Science.gov

Sample records for oxygen enriched combustion

  1. REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSION FROM COAL COMBUSTION THROUGH OXYGEN ENRICHMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Western Research Institute

    2006-07-01

    BOC Process Gas Solutions and Western Research Institute (WRI) conducted a pilot-scale test program to evaluate the impact of oxygen enrichment on the emissions characteristics of pulverized coal. The combustion test facility (CTF) at WRI was used to assess the viability of the technique and determine the quantities of oxygen required for NOx reduction from coal fired boiler. In addition to the experimental work, a series of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were made of the CTF under comparable conditions. A series of oxygen enrichment test was performed using the CTF. In these tests, oxygen was injected into one of the following streams: (1) the primary air (PA), (2) the secondary air (SA), and (3) the combined primary and secondary air. Emission data were collected from all tests, and compared with the corresponding data from the baseline cases. A key test parameter was the burner stoichiometry ratio. A series of CFD simulation models were devised to mimic the initial experiments in which secondary air was enriched with oxygen. The results from these models were compared against the experimental data. Experimental evidence indicated that oxygen enrichment does appear to be able to reduce NOx levels from coal combustion, especially when operated at low over fire air (OFA) levels. The reductions observed however are significantly smaller than that reported by others (7-8% vs. 25-50%), questioning the economic viability of the technique. This technique may find favor with fuels that are difficult to burn or stabilize at high OFA and produce excessive LOI. While CFD simulation appears to predict NO amounts in the correct order of magnitude and the correct trend with staging, it is sensitive to thermal conditions and an accurate thermal prediction is essential. Furthermore, without development, Fluent's fuel-NO model cannot account for a solution sensitive fuel-N distribution between volatiles and char and thus cannot predict the trends seen in the

  2. Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

  3. Simulation and experiment for oxygen-enriched combustion engine using liquid oxygen to solidify CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Jia, Xiaoshe; Pei, Pucheng; Lu, Yong; Yi, Li; Shi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    For capturing and recycling of CO2 in the internal combustion engine, Rankle cycle engine can reduce the exhaust pollutants effectively under the condition of ensuring the engine thermal efficiency by using the techniques of spraying water in the cylinder and optimizing the ignition advance angle. However, due to the water spray nozzle need to be installed on the cylinder, which increases the cylinder head design difficulty and makes the combustion conditions become more complicated. In this paper, a new method is presented to carry out the closing inlet and exhaust system for internal combustion engines. The proposed new method uses liquid oxygen to solidify part of cooled CO2 from exhaust system into dry ice and the liquid oxygen turns into gas oxygen which is sent to inlet system. The other part of CO2 is sent to inlet system and mixed with oxygen, which can reduce the oxygen-enriched combustion detonation tendency and make combustion stable. Computing grid of the IP52FMI single-cylinder four-stroke gasoline-engine is established according to the actual shape of the combustion chamber using KIVA-3V program. The effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate are analyzed on the temperatures, the pressures and the instantaneous heat release rates when the EGR rate is more than 8%. The possibility of enclosing intake and exhaust system for engine is verified. The carbon dioxide trapping device is designed and the IP52FMI engine is transformed and the CO2 capture experiment is carried out. The experimental results show that when the EGR rate is 36% for the optimum EGR rate. When the liquid oxygen of 35.80-437.40 g is imported into the device and last 1-20 min, respectively, 21.50-701.30 g dry ice is obtained. This research proposes a new design method which can capture CO2 for vehicular internal combustion engine.

  4. Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Cole, Roger L.

    1997-01-01

    An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

  5. Experimental study on improving cement quality with oxygen- enriched combustion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Q.; Zhang, A. M.; Qing, S.; Li, F. S.; Yang, S. P.; Yang, Z. F.

    2015-12-01

    With the intensification of the global energy crisis, the production cost of enterprises is continuously increasing because of the rising fuel prices and high requirements for environmental protection. As result, energy savings and environmental protection are vital considerations for a variety of enterprises. As a practical energy-saving technology, oxygen- enriched combustion has played a major role in energy saving and emissions reduction as its application in industrial furnaces has been popularized in recent years. This experiment was conducted in a cement rotary kiln with a capacity of 4000 t/d in a factory in China. Based on measured data in the oxygen-enriched combustion experiment, we determined the patterns of variation in the main parameters of the cement rotary kiln under oxygen-enriched production conditions. The results provide important theoretical and practical base for the cement building materials industry in energy saving and emissions reduction.

  6. Combustion Of Porous Graphite Particles In Oxygen Enriched Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delisle, Andrew J.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Chelliah, Harsha K.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion of solid fuel particles has many important applications, including power generation and space propulsion systems. The current models available for describing the combustion process of these particles, especially porous solid particles, include various simplifying approximations. One of the most limiting approximations is the lumping of the physical properties of the porous fuel with the heterogeneous chemical reaction rate constants [1]. The primary objective of the present work is to develop a rigorous modeling approach that could decouple such physical and chemical effects from the global heterogeneous reaction rates. For the purpose of validating this model, experiments with porous graphite particles of varying sizes and porosity are being performed under normal and micro gravity.

  7. Experimental and kinetic modeling of oxygen-enriched air combustion of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo Hui; Ma, Xiao Qian; Yu, Zhaosheng

    2009-02-01

    The characteristics of oxygen-enriched air combustion of raw municipal solid waste (MSW) were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Experiments on oxidative pyrolysis of MSW were carried out under different atmospheres (N(2), N(2):O(2)=7:3, N(2):O(2)=5:5, N(2):O(2)=4:6, and N(2):O(2)=2:8) at 30 degrees C/min. Two distinct peaks of weight loss were obtained according to the derivative thermogravimetric curves; one of them is centered on 305 degrees C with about 40% weight loss, and the second is centered on 420 degrees C with about 20% weight loss. Effects of oxygen concentration on the decomposition process and char combustion were analyzed, and then the process of oxygen-enriched air combustion of MSW was divided into four steps. Kinetic parameters were observed by direct non-linear regressions. According to the obtained data, the apparent activation energy and reaction order decreases along with the combustion process, while that of char combustion increases as oxygen concentration increases. PMID:18691862

  8. Application of oxygen-enriched combustion for locomotive diesel engines. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Assanis, D.N.

    1996-09-01

    A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the oxygen-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, the gross and net power outputs of an engine operating under different levels of oxygen enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in an increase in net engine power of approximately 13% when intake air with an oxygen content of 28% by volume is used and fuel injection timing is retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure improves power by only 4%. If part of the significantly higher exhaust enthalpies available as a result of oxygen enrichment are recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met, resulting in substantial net power improvements. Oxygen enrichment reduces particulate and visible smoke emissions but increases NO emissions. However, a combination of retarded fuel injection timing and post-treatment of exhaust gases may be adequate to meet the locomotive diesel engine NO{sub x} standards. Exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required to realize the full potential of oxygen enrichment. Economic analysis shows that oxygen-enrichment technology is economically feasible and provides high returns on investment. The study also indicates the strong influence of membrane parasitic requirements and exhaust energy recovery on economic benefits. To obtain an economic advantage while using a membrane with higher parasitic power requirements, it is necessary to recover a part of the exhaust energy.

  9. Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.; Assanis, D.N.; Cataldi, G.R.

    1996-10-01

    A thermodynamic simulation is used to study effects of O2-enriched intake air on performance and NO emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. Parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the O2-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, gross and net power output of an engine operating under different levels of O2 enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in 13% increase in net engine power when intake air with 28 vol% O2 is used and fuel injection timing retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in only 4% improvement in power. If part of the higher exhaust enthalpies from the O2 enrichment is recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met. O2 enrichment with its higher combustion temperatures reduces emissions of particulates and visible smoke but increases NO emissions (by up to 3 times at 26% O2 content). Therefore, exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required if the full potential of O2 enrichment for improving the performance of locomotive diesel engines is to be realized.

  10. Carbon dioxide remediation via oxygen-enriched combustion using dense ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Bose, Arun C.; McIlvried, Howard G.

    2001-01-01

    A method of combusting pulverized coal by mixing the pulverized coal and an oxidant gas to provide a pulverized coal-oxidant gas mixture and contacting the pulverized coal-oxidant gas mixture with a flame sufficiently hot to combust the mixture. An oxygen-containing gas is passed in contact with a dense ceramic membrane of metal oxide material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity that is gas-impervious until the oxygen concentration on one side of the membrane is not less than about 30% by volume. An oxidant gas with an oxygen concentration of not less than about 30% by volume and a CO.sub.2 concentration of not less than about 30% by volume and pulverized coal is contacted with a flame sufficiently hot to combust the mixture to produce heat and a flue gas. One dense ceramic membrane disclosed is selected from the group consisting of materials having formulae SrCo.sub.0.8 Fe.sub.0.2 O.sub.x, SrCo.sub.0.5 FeO.sub.x and La.sub.0.2 Sr.sub.0.8 Co.sub.0.4 Fe.sub.0.6 O.sub.x.

  11. Development of Nanofiller-Modulated Polymeric Oxygen Enrichment Membranes for Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Jianzhong Lou; Shamsuddin Ilias

    2010-12-31

    North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina, has undertaken this project to develop the knowledge and the material to improve the oxygen-enrichment polymer membrane, in order to provide high-grade oxygen-enriched streams for coal combustion and gasification applications. Both experimental and theoretical approaches were used in this project. The membranes evaluated thus far include single-walled carbon nano-tube, nano-fumed silica polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and zeolite-modulated polyimide membranes. To document the nanofiller-modulated polymer, molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to calculate the theoretical oxygen molecular diffusion coefficient and nitrogen molecular coefficient inside single-walled carbon nano-tube PDMS membranes, in order to predict the effect of the nano-tubes on the gas-separation permeability. The team has performed permeation and diffusion experiments using polymers with nano-silica particles, nano-tubes, and zeolites as fillers; studied the influence of nano-fillers on the self diffusion, free volume, glass transition, oxygen diffusion and solubility, and perm-selectivity of oxygen in polymer membranes; developed molecular models of single-walled carbon nano-tube and nano-fumed silica PDMS membranes, and zeolites-modulated polyimide membranes. This project partially supported three graduate students (two finished degrees and one transferred to other institution). This project has resulted in two journal publications and additional publications will be prepared in the near future.

  12. Characterization of single coal particle combustion within oxygen-enriched environments using high-speed OH-PLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köser, J.; Becker, L. G.; Vorobiev, N.; Schiemann, M.; Scherer, V.; Böhm, B.; Dreizler, A.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents first-of-its-kind high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the hydroxyl radical in the boundary layer of single coal particles. Experiments were performed in a laminar flow reactor providing an oxygen-enriched exhaust gas environment at elevated temperatures. Single coal particles in a sieve fraction of 90-125 µm and a significant amount of volatiles (36 wt%) were injected along the burner's centerline. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy measurements were taken to characterize the gas-phase temperature. Time-resolved imaging of the OH distribution at 10 kHz allowed identifying reaction and post-flame zones and gave access to the temporal evolution of burning coal particles. During volatile combustion, a symmetric diffusion flame was observed around the particle starting from a distance of ~150 µm from the particle surface. For subsequent char combustion, this distance decreased and the highest OH signals appeared close to the particle surface.

  13. Final report on the project entitled: Highly Preheated Combustion Air System with/without Oxygen Enrichment for Metal Processing Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Arvind Atreya

    2007-02-16

    This work develops and demonstrates a laboratory-scale high temperature natural gas furnace that can operate with/without oxygen enrichment to significantly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. The laboratory-scale is 5ft in diameter & 8ft tall. This furnace was constructed and tested. This report demonstrates the efficiency and pollutant prevention capabilities of this test furnace. The project also developed optical detection technology to control the furnace output.

  14. MHD performance calculations with oxygen enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, C. C. P.; Staiger, P. J.; Seikel, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of oxygen enrichment of the combustion air on the generator and overall plant performance was studied for the ECAS-scale MHD/steam plants. A channel optimization technique is described and the results of generator performance calculations using this technique are presented. Performance maps were generated to assess the impact of various generator parameters. Directly and separately preheated plant performance with varying O2 enrichment was calculated. The optimal level of enrichment was a function of plant type and preheat temperature. The sensitivity of overall plant performance to critical channel assumptions and oxygen plant performance characteristics was also examined.

  15. Test Would Quantify Combustion Oxygen From Different Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed isotope-enrichment scheme enables determination of contributions of dual sources of oxygen for combustion. Liquid oxygen or other artificial stream enriched with O(18) to about 1 percent by weight. Combustion products analyzed by mass spectrometer to measure relative abundances of H2O(18) and H2O(16). From relative abundances of water products measured, one computes relative contribution of oxygen extracted from stream compared to other source of oxygen in combustion process. Used to determine contributions of natural oxygen in air and liquid oxygen supplied in separate stream mixed with air or sent directly into combustion chamber.

  16. Low NOx combustion using cogenerated oxygen and nitrogen streams

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, Lawrence E.; Snyder, William J.

    2009-02-03

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuel is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding the fuel into a slightly oxygen-enriched atmosphere, and separating air into oxygen-rich and nitrogen-rich streams which are fed separately into the combustion device.

  17. Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Haiqing

    2011-11-15

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a

  18. Efficiency evaluation of oxygen enrichment in energy conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bomelburg, H.J.

    1983-12-01

    The extent to which energy conversion efficiencies can be increased by using oxygen or oxygen-enriched air for combustion was studied. Combustion of most fuels with oxygen instead of air was found to have five advantages: increases combustion temperature and efficiency, improves heat transfer at high temperatures, reduces nitrous oxide emissions, permits a high ration of exhaust gas recirculation and allows combustion of certain materials not combustible in air. The same advantages, although to a lesser degree, are apparent with oxygen-enriched air. The cost-effectiveness of the process must necessarily be improved by about 10% when using oxygen instead of air before such use could become justifiable on purely economic terms. Although such a modest increase appears to be attainable in real situations, this study ascertained that it is not possible to generally assess the economic gains. Rather, each case requires its own evaluation. For certain processes industry has already proven that the use of oxygen leads to more efficient plant operation. Several ideas for essentially new applications are described. Specifically, when oxygen is used with exhaust gas recirculation in external or internal combustion engines. It appears also that the advantages of pulse combustion can be amplified further if oxygen is used. When burning wet fuels with oxygen, direct steam generation becomes possible. Oxygen combustion could also improve processes for in situ gasification of coals, oil shales, peats, and other wet fuels. Enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding methods might also become more effective if oxygen is used. The cold energy contained in liquid oxygen can be substantially recovered in the low end of certain thermodynamic cycles. Further efforts to develop certain schemes for using oxygen for combustion appear to be justified from both the technical and economic viewpoints.

  19. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen; David R. Thompson

    2000-07-01

    Increased environmental regulations will require utility boilers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu in the near term. Conventional technologies such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) are unable to achieve these lowered emission levels without substantially higher costs and major operating problems. Oxygen enhanced combustion is a novel technology that allows utilities to meet the NO{sub x} emission requirements without the operational problems that occur with SCR and SNCR. Furthermore, oxygen enhanced combustion can achieve these NO{sub x} limits at costs lower than conventional technologies. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the use of oxygen enhanced combustion as a technical and economical method of meeting the EPA State Implementation Plan for NO{sub x} reduction to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu for a wide range of boilers and coal. The oxygen enhanced coal combustion program (Task 1) focused this quarter on the specific objective of exploration of the impact of oxygen enrichment on NO{sub x} formation utilizing small-scale combustors for parametric testing. Research efforts toward understanding any limitations to the applicability of the technology to different burners and fuels such as different types of coal are underway. The objective of the oxygen transport membrane (OTM) materials development program (Task 2.1) is to ascertain a suitable material composition that can be fabricated into dense tubes capable of producing the target oxygen flux under the operating conditions. This requires that the material have sufficient oxygen permeation resulting from high oxygen ion conductivity, high electronic conductivity and high oxygen surface exchange rate. The OTM element development program (Task 2.2) objective is to develop, fabricate and characterize OTM elements for laboratory and pilot reactors utilizing quality control parameters to ensure reproducibility and superior performance

  20. Diesel cogeneration plant using oxygen enriched air and emulsified fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, T.J.; Cole, R.L.; Sekar, R.R.; Stodolsky, F. ); Eustis, J.N. )

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen-enriched combustion of alternative fuels in diesel engines at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is based on information gathered from two previous Department of Energy programs. The first was the slow-speed diesel engine program which used fuels such as coal-water slurry and coal derived liquid fuels in a slow speed diesel engine. The second was the development of membrane oxygen separation equipment. The results of these programs indicated that using the new membrane oxygen enrichment technology with medium- and high-speed diesel engines would do two things. First, oxygen enrichment could reduce some emissions from stationary diesel engines, particularly smoke, particulates and hydrocarbons while significantly increasing power output. The second, was that it might be possible to use less expensive liquid fuels such as No. 4, No. 6 and residual oil emulsified with water in medium- to high-speed diesel engines. The water would (1) help to eliminate the undesirable increase in nitrogen oxide production when enriched oxygen is used, and (2) by reducing the viscosity of the heavier liquid fuels, make them easier to use in smaller industrial cogeneration applications. This program consists of four steps: preliminary feasibility study, exploratory experiments, system development, and demonstration and commercialization of an industrial cogeneration system. 3 refs., 13 figs.

  1. Utilization of oxygen-enriched air in diesel engines: Fundamental considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, D.; Mehta, P.S.; Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.

    1997-09-01

    Utilization of oxygen-enriched air in diesel engines holds potential for low exhaust smoke and particulate emissions. The majority of the oxygen-enriched-air combustion-related studies so far are experimental in nature, where the observed results are understood on an overall basis. This paper deals with the fundamental considerations associated with the oxygen-enriched air-fuel combustion process to enhance understanding of the concept. The increase in adiabatic flame temperature, the composition of exhaust gases at equilibrium, and also the changes in thermodynamic and transport properties due to oxygen-enrichment of standard intake air are computed. The effects of oxygen-enrichment on fuel evaporation rate, ignition delay, and premixed burnt fraction are also evaluated. Appropriate changes in the ignition delay correlation to reflect the effects of oxygen-enrichment are proposed. The notion of oxygen-enrichment of standard intake air as being akin to leaning of the fuel-air mixture is refuted on the basis of the fundamentally different requirements for the oxygen-enriched combustion process.

  2. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  3. Fire extinguishment in oxygen enriched atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, A. F.; Rappaport, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art of fire suppression and extinguishment techniques in oxygen enriched atmosphere is reviewed. Four classes of extinguishment action are considered: cooling, separation of reactants, dilution or removal of fuel, and use of chemically reactive agents. Current practice seems to show preference for very fast acting water spray applications to all interior surfaces of earth-based chambers. In space, reliance has been placed on fire prevention methods through the removal of ignition sources and use of nonflammable materials. Recommendations are made for further work related to fire suppression and extinguishment in oxygen enriched atmospheres, and an extensive bibliography is appended.

  4. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2004-04-01

    Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this

  5. Oxygen Compatibility Screening Tests in Oxygen-Rich Combustion Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Anerew J.

    1997-01-01

    The identification and characterization of oxygen-rich compatible materials enables full-flow, staged combustion designs. Although these oxygen-rich designs offer significant cost, performance, and reliability benefits over existing systems, they have never been used operationally by the United States. If these systems are to be realized, it is critical to understand the long-term oxidative stability in high-temperature, high-pressure, oxygen-rich combustion environments. A unique facility has been constructed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to conduct tests of small-scale rocket engine materials and subcomponents in an oxygen-rich combustion environment that closely approximates a full-scale rocket engine. Thus, a broad range of advanced materials and concepts can be screened in a timely manner and at a relatively low cost.

  6. Test Operation of Oxygen-Enriched Incinerator for Wastes From Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.-G.; Yang, H.cC.; Park, G.-I.; Kim, I.-T.; Kim, J.-K.

    2002-02-26

    The oxygen-enriched combustion concept, which can minimize off-gas production, has been applied to the incineration of combustible uranium-containing wastes from a nuclear fuel fabrication facility. A simulation for oxygen combustion shows the off-gas production can be reduced by a factor of 6.7 theoretically, compared with conventional air combustion. The laboratory-scale oxygen enriched incineration (OEI) process with a thermal capacity of 350 MJ/h is composed of an oxygen feeding and control system, a combustion chamber, a quencher, a ceramic filter, an induced draft fan, a condenser, a stack, an off-gas recycle path, and a measurement and control system. Test burning with cleaning paper and office paper in this OEI process shows that the thermal capacity is about 320 MJ/h, 90 % of design value and the off-gas reduces by a factor of 3.5, compared with air combustion. The CO concentration for oxygen combustion is lower than that of air combustion, while the O2 concentration in off-gas is kept above 25 vol % for a simple incineration process without any grate. The NOx concentration in an off-gas stream does not reduce significantly due to air incoming by leakage, and the volume and weight reduction factors are not changed significantly, which suggests a need for an improvement in sealing.

  7. Dissolution of oxygen-enriched Zircaloy-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskarsson, M.; Ahlberg, E.; Pettersson, K.

    2001-10-01

    When metal is removed from oxidised Zircaloy specimens in order to study the morphology of the oxide at the metal-oxide interface needle-like features are frequently observed. Since similar features are not observed in cross-section TEM examinations it has been questioned whether or not the needles are a result of the dissolution process. In particular it has been proposed that reprecipitation of oxide may take place when the metal is enriched with oxygen. In the present work oxygen-enriched Zircaloy has been dissolved and the resulting structures examined. The results indicate that the needles are in fact artefacts of the specimen preparation procedure. However, there are no significant differences between oxygen-enriched and normal Zircaloy below an oxide layer grown in steam at about 400 °C. In view of the differences between the needle structure observed after metal removal with bromine or by electropolishing and removal by HF-HNO 3 pickling solution it is speculated that the needles consist of a hydrous zirconium oxide which is unstable in the pickling solution.

  8. Hydrogen-oxygen powered internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, H.; Morgan, N.

    1970-01-01

    Hydrogen at 300 psi and oxygen at 800 psi are injected sequentially into the combustion chamber to form hydrogen-rich mixture. This mode of injection eliminates difficulties of preignition, detonation, etc., encountered with carburated, spark-ignited, hydrogen-air mixtures. Ignition at startup is by means of a palladium catalyst.

  9. Combustion of bulk titanium in oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, A. F.; Moulder, J. C.; Runyan, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    The combustion of bulk titanium in one atmosphere oxygen is studied using laser ignition and several analytical techniques. These were high-speed color cinematography, time and space resolved spectra in the visible region, metallography (including SEM) of specimens quenched in argon gas, X-ray and chemical product analyses, and a new optical technique, the Hilbert transform method. The cinematographic application of this technique for visualizing phase objects in the combustion zone is described. The results indicate an initial vapor phase reaction immediately adjacent to the molten surface but as the oxygen uptake progresses the evaporation approaches the point of congruency and a much reduced evaporation rate. This and the accumulation of the various soluble oxides soon drive the reaction zone below the surface where gas formation causes boiling and ejection of particles. The buildup of rutile cuts off the oxygen supply and the reaction ceases.

  10. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2002-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for the Program through the ninth quarter April-June 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1--Oxygen Enhanced Combustion, Task 2--Oxygen Transport Membranes, Task 3--Economic Evaluation and Task 4--Program Management. The program is proceeding in accordance with the objectives for the third year. Full-scale testing using the Industrial Boiler Simulation Facility (ISBF) at Alstom Power was completed. The pilot scale experiments to evaluate the effect of air preheat and transport air stoichiometric ratio (SR) on NOx emissions were conducted at the University of Utah. Combustion modeling activities continued with full-scale combustion test furnace simulations. An OTM element was tested in Praxair's single tube high-pressure test facility and two thermal cycles were completed. PSO1d elements of new dimension were tested resulting in a lower flux than previous PSO1d elements of different dimensions, however, no element deformation was observed. Economic evaluation has confirmed the advantage of oxygen-enhanced combustion. Two potential host beta sites have been identified and proposals submitted.

  11. Taguchi methods applied to oxygen-enriched diesel engine experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, W.W.; Sekar, R.R.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Longman, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a test series conducted on a six-cylinder diesel engine to study the impacts of controlled factors (i.e., oxygen content of the combustion air, water content of the fuel, fuel rate, and fuel-injection timing) on engine emissions using Taguchi methods. Three levels of each factor were used in the tests. Only the main effects of the factors were examined; no attempt was made to analyze the interactions among the factors. It was found that, as in the case of the single-cylinder engine tests, oxygen in the combustion air was very effective in reducing particulate and smoke emissions. Increases in NO[sub x] due to the oxygen enrichment observed in the single-cylinder tests also occurred in the present six-cylinder tests. Water in the emulsified fuel was found to be much less effective in decreasing NO[sub x] emissions for the six-cylinder engine than it was for the single-cylinder engine.

  12. Taguchi methods applied to oxygen-enriched diesel engine experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, W.W.; Sekar, R.R.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.; Longman, D.E.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a test series conducted on a six-cylinder diesel engine to study the impacts of controlled factors (i.e., oxygen content of the combustion air, water content of the fuel, fuel rate, and fuel-injection timing) on engine emissions using Taguchi methods. Three levels of each factor were used in the tests. Only the main effects of the factors were examined; no attempt was made to analyze the interactions among the factors. It was found that, as in the case of the single-cylinder engine tests, oxygen in the combustion air was very effective in reducing particulate and smoke emissions. Increases in NO{sub x} due to the oxygen enrichment observed in the single-cylinder tests also occurred in the present six-cylinder tests. Water in the emulsified fuel was found to be much less effective in decreasing NO{sub x} emissions for the six-cylinder engine than it was for the single-cylinder engine.

  13. Quantitative measurement of oxygen in microgravity combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.

    1995-01-01

    This research combines two innovations in an experimental system which should result in a new capability for quantitative, nonintrusive measurement of major combustion species. Using a newly available vertical cavity surface-emitting diode laser (VCSEL) and an improved spatial scanning method, we plan to measure the temporal and spatial profiles of the concentrations and temperatures of molecular oxygen in a candle flame and in a solid fuel (cellulose sheet) system. The required sensitivity for detecting oxygen is achieved by the use of high frequency wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). Measurements will be performed in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second Drop Tower Facility. The objective of this research is twofold. First, we want to develop a better understanding of the relative roles of diffusion and reaction of oxygen in microgravity combustion. As the primary oxidizer species, oxygen plays a major role in controlling the observed properties of flames, including flame front speed (in solid or liquid flames), extinguishment characteristics, flame size, and flame temperature. The second objective is to develop better diagnostics based on diode laser absorption which can be of real value in microgravity combustion research. We will also demonstrate diode lasers' potential usefulness for compact, intrinsically-safe monitoring sensors aboard spacecraft. Such sensors could be used to monitor any of the major cabin gases as well as important pollutants.

  14. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  15. Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Michael F.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  16. Enhancing SNCR-aided combustion with oxygen addition

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Wu, Kuang Tsai; Bool, III, Lawrence E.

    2004-03-09

    NOx emissions from combustion are reduced, NOx reduction efficiency by SNCR is improved, and other efficiencies are realized, by injecting oxygen into a fuel-rich combustion zone under controlled conditions.

  17. Oxygen enhanced switching to combustion of lower rank fuels

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.; Wu, Kuang Tsai

    2004-03-02

    A furnace that combusts fuel, such as coal, of a given minimum energy content to obtain a stated minimum amount of energy per unit of time is enabled to combust fuel having a lower energy content, while still obtaining at least the stated minimum energy generation rate, by replacing a small amount of the combustion air fed to the furnace by oxygen. The replacement of oxygen for combustion air also provides reduction in the generation of NOx.

  18. An oxygen enrichment attachment for use with humidified air

    PubMed Central

    Jebson, P.; Dewar, J.; White, J.

    1974-01-01

    Jebson, P., Dewar, J., and White, J. (1974).Thorax, 29, 371-376. An oxygen enrichment attachment for use with humidified air. An oxygen enrichment attachment is described which fulfils the basic requirements for intubated patients. Using values for tidal volume and inspiratory time found in the type of patients for whom the attachment is intended, a range of mean inspired oxygen concentration has been given for 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 1/min oxygen flow. Images PMID:4850557

  19. Identification of oxygenated compounds in combustion systems.

    PubMed

    De Joannon, M; Ragucci, R; Cavaliere, A; Ciajolo, A

    2001-01-01

    An attempt for the spectroscopic identification of oxygenated compounds produced in combustion processes under different environmental conditions is reported in this paper. A deeper knowledge about presence and evolution of such species in dependence of the operating conditions of practical burner represents a fundamental hint to the objective of an advancement of the control of combustion process and reduction of pollutant emissions. This paper mainly focuses on species characterized by the presence of carbonyl functionality since aldehydes, ketones and diketones are among the principal intermediate species and products of hydrocarbon oxidation. They are by themselves to be considered atmospheric pollutants and are also indicators of actual pathways followed during the chemical reactions occurring in the combustion process. For these reasons they are most suitable for the exploitation of the above indicated objectives. In this paper, a classification of spectroscopic features and markers of these classes of carbonyl compounds is presented on the basis of both literature and spectra collected from sample species. This interpretative scheme is then used for the attribution of fluorescence signals collected from a tetradecane spray in different environmental conditions. PMID:11219711

  20. Quantitative Measurement of Oxygen in Microgravity Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment, in space or in ground-based facilities such as drop towers, provides a unique setting for studying combustion mechanisms. Understanding the physical phenomena controlling the ignition and spread of flames in microgravity has importance for space safety as well as for better characterization of dynamical and chemical combustion processes which are normally masked by buoyancy and other gravity-related effects. Due to restrictions associated with performing measurements in reduced gravity, diagnostic methods which have been applied to microgravity combustion studies have generally been limited to capture of flame emissions on film or video, laser Schlieren imaging and (intrusive) temperature measurements using thermocouples. Given the development of detailed theoretical models, more sophisticated diagnostic methods are needed to provide the kind of quantitative data necessary to characterize the properties of microgravity combustion processes as well as provide accurate feedback to improve the predictive capabilities of the models. When the demands of space flight are considered, the need for improved diagnostic systems which are rugged, compact, reliable, and operate at low power becomes apparent. The objective of this research is twofold. First, we want to develop a better understanding of the relative roles of diffusion and reaction of oxygen in microgravity combustion. As the primary oxidizer species, oxygen plays a major role in controlling the observed properties of flames, including flame front speed (in solid or liquid flames), extinguishment characteristics, flame size and flame temperature. The second objective is to develop better diagnostics based on diode laser absorption which can be of real value in both microgravity combustion research and as a sensor on-board Spacelab as either an air quality monitor or as part of a fire detection system. In our prior microgravity work, an eight line-of-sight fiber optic system measured

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species in Combustion Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; See, S.

    2007-12-01

    Research on airborne particulate matter (PM) has received increased concern in recent years after it was identified as a major component of the air pollution mix that is strongly associated with premature mortality and morbidity. Particular attention has been paid to understanding the potential health impacts of fine particles (PM2.5), which primarily originate from combustion sources. One group of particulate-bound chemical components of health concern is reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ions such as hypochlorite ion (OCl-), free radicals such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and superoxide anion (·O2-) which is both an ion and a radical. However, the formation of ROS in PM is not clearly understood yet. Furthermore, the concentration of ROS in combustion particles of different origin has not been quantified. The primary objective of this work is to study the effect of transition metals on the production of ROS in PM2.5 by determining the concentrations of ROS and metals. Both soluble and total metals were measured to evaluate their respective associations with ROS. PM2.5 samples were collected from several outdoor and indoor combustion sources, including those emitted from on-road vehicles, food cooking, incense sticks, and cigarette smoke. PM2.5 samples were also collected from the background air in both the ambient outdoor and indoor environments to assess the levels of particulate-bound transition metals and ROS with no combustion activities in the vicinity of sampling locations. Results obtained from this comprehensive study on particulate-bound ROS will be presented and discussed.

  2. An oxygen enrichment device for lowlanders ascending to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When ascending to the high altitude, people living in low altitude areas will suffer from acute mountain sickness. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that whether an oxygen concentration membrane can be made and used to construct a new portable oxygen enrichment device for individuals in acute exposure to the high altitude. Methods The membrane was fabricated using vinylsiloxane rubber, polyphenylene oxide hydrogen silicone polymers, chloroplatinic acid and isopropyl alcohol. The membrane was assembled in a frame and the performance was tested in terms of concentration of oxygen, flow rate of oxygen enriched air, pressure ratio across the membrane and ambient temperature. Furthermore, the oxygen concentration device was constructed using the membrane, a DC fan, vacuum pump and gas buffer. A nonrandomized preliminary field test was conducted, in which eight healthy male subjects were flown to Tibet (Lhasa, 3,700 m). First, subjects wore the oxygen enrichment device and performed an incremental exercise on cycle ergometer. The test included heart rate (HR), saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2) and physical work capacity (PWC). Then, after a rest period of 4 hours, the experimental protocol was repeated without oxygen enrichment device. Results The testing showed that the membrane could increase the oxygen concentration by up to 30%. Simulation test indicated that although the performance of the oxygen enrichment device decreased with altitudes, the oxygen concentration could still maintain 28% with flow rate of enriched air 110 cm3/s at 5000 m. The field test showed that higher SpO2, lower HR, and better PWC (measured by the PWC-170) were observed from all the subjects using oxygen enrichment device compared with non-using (P < 0.01). Conclusions We concluded that the new portable oxygen enrichment device would be effective in improving exercise performance when ascending to the high altitude. PMID:24103365

  3. Flammability and sensitivity of materials in oxygen-enriched atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus, J.M.; Benz, F.J.; Stradling, J.S. )

    1989-01-01

    This book presents five papers on development and evaluation of test methods. It addresses the ignition and combustion of nonmetallic and metallic materials. Analysis and testing of oxygen systems are included.

  4. Oxygen-enriched air for MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, R. W., Jr.; Cutting, J. C.; Burkhart, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Cryogenic air-separation process cycle variations and compression schemes are examined. They are designed to minimize net system power required to supply pressurized, oxygen-enriched air to the combustor of an MHD power plant with a coal input of 2000 MWt. Power requirements and capital costs for oxygen production and enriched air compression for enrichment levels from 13 to 50% are determined. The results are presented as curves from which total compression power requirements can be estimated for any desired enrichment level at any delivery pressure. It is found that oxygen enrichment and recuperative heating of MHD combustor air to 1400 F yields near-term power plant efficiencies in excess of 45%. A minimum power compression system requires 167 MW to supply 330 lb of oxygen per second and costs roughly 100 million dollars. Preliminary studies show MHD/steam power plants to be competitive with plants using high-temperature air preheaters burning gas.

  5. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1997-10-31

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions

  6. Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric

  7. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    2005-09-30

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions

  8. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.F.

    2003-04-30

    Novel furnace designs based on Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) technology were developed under subcontract by Techint Technologies, Coraopolis, PA, to fully exploit the energy and environmental capabilities of DOC technology and to provide a competitive offering for new furnace construction opportunities. Capital cost, fuel, oxygen and utility costs, NOx emissions, oxide scaling performance, and maintenance requirements were compared for five DOC-based designs and three conventional air5-fired designs using a 10-year net present value calculation. A furnace direct completely with DOC burners offers low capital cost, low fuel rate, and minimal NOx emissions. However, these benefits do not offset the cost of oxygen and a full DOC-fired furnace is projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is roughly $6/lb NOx, compared with an estimated $3/lb. NOx for equ8pping a conventional furnace with selective catalytic reduction (SCCR) technology. A furnace fired with DOC burners in the heating zone and ambient temperature (cold) air-fired burners in the soak zone offers low capital cost with less oxygen consumption. However, the improvement in fuel rate is not as great as the full DOC-fired design, and the DOC-cold soak design is also projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The NOx improvement with the DOC-cold soak design is also not as great as the full DOC fired design, and the incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is nearly $9/lb NOx. These results indicate that a DOC-based furnace design will not be generally competitive with conventional technology for new furnace construction under current market conditions. Fuel prices of $7/MMBtu or oxygen prices of $23/ton are needed to make the DOC furnace economics favorable. Niche applications may exist, particularly where access to capital is limited or floor space limitations

  9. Oxygen-enriched diesel engine performance: A comparison of analytical and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Assanis, D.N. ); Schaus, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Use of oxygen-enriched combustion air in diesel engines can lead to significant improvements in power density, as well as reductions in particulate emissions, but at the expense of higher NO{sub x} emissions. Oxygen enrichment would also lead to lower ignition delays and the opportunity to burn lower grade fuels. Analytical and experimental studies are being conducted in parallel to establish the optimal combination of oxygen level and diesel fuel properties. In this paper, cylinder pressure data acquired on a single-cylinder engine are used to generate heat release rates for operation under various oxygen contents. These derived heat release rates are in turn used to improve the combustion correlation -- and thus the prediction capability -- of the simulation code. It is shown that simulated and measured cylinder pressures and other performance parameters are in good agreement. The improved simulation can provide sufficiently accurate predictions of trends and magnitudes to be useful in parametric studies assessing the effects of oxygen enrichment and water injection on diesel engine performance. Measured ignition delays, NO{sub x} emissions, and particulate emissions are also compared with previously published data. The measured ignition delays are slightly lower than previously reported. Particulate emissions measured in this series of tests are significantly lower than previously reported. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Sooting Limits Of Diffusion Flames With Oxygen-Enriched Air And Diluted Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen-enhanced combustion permits certain benefits and flexibility that are not otherwise available in the design of practical combustors, as discussed by Baukal. The cost of pure and enriched oxygen has declined to the point that oxygen-enhanced combustion is preferable to combustion in air for many applications. Carbon sequestration is greatly facilitated by oxygen enrichment because nitrogen can be eliminated from the product stream. For example, when natural gas (or natural gas diluted with CO2) is burned in pure oxygen, the only significant products are water and CO2. Oxygen-enhanced combustion also has important implications for soot formation, as explored in this work. We propose that soot inception in nonpremixed flames requires a region where C/O ratio, temperature, and residence time are above certain critical values. Soot does not form at low temperatures, with the threshold in nonpremixed flames ranging from about 1250-1650 K, a temperature referred to here as the critical temperature for soot inception, Tc. Soot inception also can be suppressed when residence time is short (equivalently, when the strain rate in counterflow flames is high). Soot induction times of 0.8-15 ms were reported by Tesner and Shurupov for acetylene/nitrogen mixtures at 1473 K. Burner stabilized spherical microgravity flames are employed in this work for two main reasons. First, this configuration offers unrestricted control over convection direction. Second, in steady state these flames are strain-free and thus can yield intrinsic sooting limits in diffusion flames, similar to the way past work in premixed flames has provided intrinsic values of C/O ratio associated with soot inception limits.

  11. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: THE PYRETRON OXYGEN BURNER, AMERICAN COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pyretron is a burner which is designed to allow for the injection of oxygen into the combustion air stream for the purpose of increasing the efficiency of a hazardous waste incinerator. The SITE demonstration of the Pyretron took place at the U.S. EPA's Combustion Re...

  12. Improving oxygenation at high altitude: acclimatization and O2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2003-01-01

    When lowlanders go to high altitude, the resulting oxygen deprivation impairs mental and physical performance, quality of sleep, and general well-being. This paper compares the effects of ventilatory acclimatization and oxygen enrichment of room air on the improvement of oxygenation as judged by the increase in the alveolar P(O2) and the reduction in equivalent altitude. The results show that, on the average, complete ventilatory acclimatization at an altitude of 5000 m increases the alveolar P(O2) by nearly 8 torr, which corresponds to a reduction in equivalent altitude of about 1000 m, although there is considerable individual variability. By comparison, oxygen enrichment to 27% at 5000 m can easily reduce the equivalent altitude to 3200 m, which is generally well tolerated. Because full ventilatory acclimatization at altitudes up to about 3600 m reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3000 m, oxygen enrichment is not justified for well-acclimatized persons. At an altitude of 4200 m, where several telescopes are located on the summit of Mauna Kea, full acclimatization reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3400 m, but the pattern of commuting probably would not allow this. Therefore, at this altitude, oxygen enrichment would be beneficial but is not essential. At higher altitudes such as 5050 m, where other telescopes are located or planned, the gain in oxygenation from acclimatization is insufficient to produce an adequate mental or physical performance for most work, and oxygen enrichment is highly desirable. Full ventilatory acclimatization requires at least a week of continuous exposure, although much of the improvement is seen in the first 2 days. PMID:14561244

  13. Diesel engine experiments with oxygen enrichment, water addition and lower-grade fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Schaus, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The concept of oxygen enriched air applied to reciprocating engines is getting renewed attention in the context of the progress made in the enrichment methods and the tougher emissions regulations imposed on diesel and gasoline engines. An experimental project was completed in which a direct injection diesel engine was tested with intake oxygen levels of 21% -- 35%. Since an earlier study indicated that it is necessary to use a cheaper fuel to make the concept economically attractive, a less refined fuel was included in the test series. Since a major objection to the use of oxygen enriched combustion air had been the increase in NO{sub x} emissions, a method must be found to reduce NO{sub x}. Introduction of water into the engine combustion process was included in the tests for this purpose. Fuel emulsification with water was the means used here even though other methods could also be used. The teat data indicated a large increase in engine power density, slight improvement in thermal efficiency, significant reductions in smoke and particulate emissions and NO{sub x} emissions controllable with the addition of water. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Waste to energy operability enhancement under waste uncertainty via oxygen enrichment.

    PubMed

    Tsiliyannis, Christos Aristeides

    2014-08-19

    Waste to energy (WTE) performance is evaluated by maximization of electrical energy production and throughput, while maintaining low operational costs and complying with emission limits. Uncertainty in the quantities, composition and heating values of received wastes, pose severe operability problems and impair performance and emissions. The present work demonstrates and quantifies the possibility of improving WTE efficiency under feedstock uncertainty via oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Acting essentially as a nitrogen depletion mechanism, oxygen enrichment has reverse effects compared to excess air (EA); synergistic use provides extended capabilities for performance improvement, without impairing final emissions, while satisfying capacity constraints. Increased oxygen enrichment is required at higher EA to maintain temperature. Lower charging rates of rich wastes (plastics, paper, etc.) or diminishing heating values, require higher oxygen enrichment or lower EA. The opposite holds for lower charging rates of poor wastes (biodegradables, biosludge, inerts, etc.) or rising heating values. The results establish the possibility of nominal designs to respond to feedstock variations and may be useful for low range excess air operation (low cost) or adiabatic operation (high EA, combustor temperature controlled by large fluegas volumes). The vector formulation facilitates digital coding for applications featuring multiple waste mixture variability. A 700000 tpa WTE facility in Athens, now under public-private-partnership contract tender is investigated. PMID:25036380

  15. Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions

    DOEpatents

    Biruduganti, Munidhar S.; Gupta, Sreenath Borra; Sekar, R. Raj; McConnell, Steven S.

    2008-11-25

    A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

  16. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, M.; Werner, R. A.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Jansen, H. G.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Neubert, R. E. M.

    2011-02-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio-chemical compounds to

  17. Promoted Combustion of Metals in a High-Pressure, Flowing Oxygen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, M. J.; Stoltzfus, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Traditional promoted combustion testing has used 0.125 inch diameter samples that are ignited in a pressurized, oxygen-enriched environment. Many years of testing this sample size have yielded useful data regarding threshold pressure, or the minimum oxygen pressure required to support self-sustained combustion. However, when a material is tested in a flowing system, the threshold pressure changes. White Sands Test Facility has developed a test system to burn samples in flowing gaseous oxygen. Current sample configurations are 0.5 inch diameter rods and 1.25 inch diameter pipes with pressures ranging up to 2000 psi and gas velocities reaching 200 ft/s. This paper describes the test apparatus, modifications made as the result of a fire, and a description of the tests currently being performed.

  18. Development of materials screening tests for oxygen-enriched environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. L.; Pippen, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    The criteria governing materials to be used in an oxygen enriched atmosphere and tests to determine suitability for fireproof considerations in spacecraft design are discussed. The nine tests applied to materials before acceptance in spacecraft construction are presented. The application of the standard tests to determine ranking of materials is included.

  19. Evaluation of oxygen-enrichment system for alternative fuel vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Ng, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents results on the reduction in exhaust emissions achieved by using oxygen-enriched intake air on a flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) that used Indolene and M85 as test fuels. The standard federal test procedure (FTP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) off-cycle (REP05) test were followed. The report also provides a review of literature on the oxygen membrane device and design considerations. It presents information on the sources and contributions of cold-phase emissions to the overall exhaust emissions from light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and on the various emission standards and present-day control technologies under consideration. The effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on FTP and off-cycle emissions are discussed on the basis of test results. Conclusions are drawn from the results and discussion, and different approaches for the practical application of this technology in LDVs are recommended.

  20. Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-08-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, M.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Jansen, H. G.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Werner, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects in the order of about 26‰ became obvious, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original 18O signature of the material appeared to have little or no influence.

  2. Effects of dust enrichment on oxygen fugacity of cosmic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedkin, Alexei V.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    The degree to which dust enrichment enhances the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of a system otherwise solar in composition depends on the dust composition. Equilibrium calculations were performed at 10-3 bar in systems enriched by a factor of 104 in two fundamentally different types of dust to investigate the iron oxidation state in both cases. One type of dust, called SC for solar condensate, stopped equilibrating with solar gas at too high a temperature for FeO or condensed water to be stabilized in any form, and thus has the composition expected of a nebular condensate. The other has CI chondrite composition, appropriate for a parent body that accreted from SC dust and low-temperature ice. Upon total vaporization at 2300 K, both systems have high fO2, >IW. In the SC dust-enriched system, FeO of the bulk silicate reaches ~10 wt% at 1970 K but decreases to <1 wt% below 1500 K. The FeO undergoes reduction because consumption of gaseous oxygen by silicate recondensation causes a precipitous drop in fO2. Thus, enrichment in dust having the composition of likely nebular condensates cannot yield a sufficiently oxidizing environment to account for the FeO contents of chondrules. The fO2 of the system enriched in water-rich, CI dust, however, remains high throughout condensation, as gaseous water remains uncondensed until very low temperatures. This allows silicate condensates to achieve and maintain FeO contents of 27-35 wt%. Water-rich parent bodies are thus excellent candidate sources of chondrule precursors. Impacts on such bodies may have created the combination of high dust enrichment, total pressure, and fO2 necessary for chondrule formation.

  3. Praxair's dilute oxygen combustion technology for pyrometallurgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, M. F.; Kobayashi, H.; Deneys, A. C.

    2001-05-01

    Dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) technology uses separate high-velocity fuel and oxygen jets to generate strong in-furnace gas recirculation, producing combustion between the fuel and a highly diluted oxygen and furnace-gas mixture. These very low NOx oxy-fuel burners have been developed and commercially demonstrated in steel reheating furnaces. The burner design meets industry needs for increased productivity and lower operating costs with minimal capital expense and low maintenance. The performance of DOC technology has been measured under laboratory and industrial conditions encompassing both natural gas and coke oven gas firing, and a wide range of furnace temperatures and nitrogen levels that simulate air infiltration. This paper describes the results of the tests using natural gas as the fuel and lists potential applications for DOC technology in the non-ferrous metals industry.

  4. Method and apparatus for reducing cold-phase emissions by utilizing oxygen-enriched intake air

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Stork, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    An oxygen-enriched air intake control system for an internal combustion engine includes air directing apparatus to control the air flow into the intake of the engine. During normal operation of the engine, ambient air flowing from an air filter of the engine flows through the air directing apparatus into the intake of the engine. In order to decrease the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions that tend to be produced by the engine during a short period of time after the engine is started, the air directing apparatus diverts for a short period of time following the start up of the engine at least a portion of the ambient air from the air filter through a secondary path. The secondary path includes a selectively permeable membrane through which the diverted portion of the ambient air flows. The selectively permeable membrane separates nitrogen and oxygen from the diverted air so that oxygen enriched air containing from about 23% to 25% oxygen by volume is supplied to the intake of the engine.

  5. Bimetallic Fe-Ni Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, Saurabh; Veser, Goetz

    2013-11-06

    The relative abundance, low cost, and low toxicity of iron make Fe-based oxygen carriers of great interest for chemical looping combustion (CLC), an emerging technology for clean and efficient combustion of fossil and renewable fuels. However, Fe also shows much lower reactivity than other metals (such as Ni and Cu). Here, we demonstrate strong improvement of Fe-based carriers by alloying the metal phase with Ni. Through a combination of carrier synthesis and characterization with thermogravimetric and fixed-bed reactor studies, we demonstrate that the addition of Ni results in a significant enhancement in activity as well as an increase in selectivity for total oxidation. Furthermore, comparing alumina and ceria as support materials highlights the fact that reducible supports can result in a strong increase in oxygen carrier utilization.

  6. Powdered aluminum and oxygen rocket propellants: Subscale combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Mike L.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum combined with oxygen has been proposed as a potential lunar in situ propellant for ascent/descent and return missions for future lunar exploration. Engine concepts proposed to use this propellant have not previously been demonstrated, and the impact on performance from combustion and two-phase flow losses could only be estimated. Therefore, combustion tests were performed for aluminum and aluminum/magnesium alloy powders with oxygen in subscale heat-sink rocket engine hardware. The metal powder was pneumatically injected, with a small amount of nitrogen, through the center orifice of a single element O-F-O triplet injector. Gaseous oxygen impinged on the fuel stream. Hot-fire tests of aluminum/oxygen were performed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 3.0, and at a chamber pressure of approximately 480 kPa (70 psia). The theoretical performance of the propellants was analyzed over a mixture ratio range of 0.5 to 5.0. In the theoretical predictions the ideal one-dimensional equilibrium rocket performance was reduced by loss mechanisms including finite rate kinetics, two-dimensional divergence losses, and boundary layer losses. Lower than predicted characteristic velocity and specific impulse performance efficiencies were achieved in the hot-fire tests, and this was attributed to poor mixing of the propellants and two-phase flow effects. Several tests with aluminum/9.8 percent magnesium alloy powder did not indicate any advantage over the pure aluminum fuel.

  7. Flammability and sensitivity of materials in oxygen-enriched atmospheres; Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium, Las Cruces, NM, Apr. 11-13, 1989. Volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M. (Editor); Benz, Frank J. (Editor); Stradling, Jack S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present volume discusses the ignition of nonmetallic materials by the impact of high-pressure oxygen, the promoted combustion of nine structural metals in high-pressure gaseous oxygen, the oxygen sensitivity/compatibility ranking of several materials by different test methods, the ignition behavior of silicon greases in oxygen atmospheres, fire spread rates along cylindrical metal rods in high-pressure oxygen, and the design of an ignition-resistant, high pressure/temperature oxygen valve. Also discussed are the promoted ignition of oxygen regulators, the ignition of PTFE-lined flexible hoses by rapid pressurization with oxygen, evolving nonswelling elastomers for high-pressure oxygen environments, the evaluation of systems for oxygen service through the use of the quantitative fault-tree analysis, and oxygen-enriched fires during surgery of the head and neck.

  8. Evidence for Significantly Enriched Heavy Oxygen in Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, Timothy A.; Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Smith, R. L.; Sonnabend, G.; Sornig, M.; Stangier, T.

    2012-10-01

    The loss of primordial atmosphere from Mars should have resulted in significant enrichment of heavy isotopes in Mars carbon dioxide, which has not previously been observed. Atmospheric isotope ratios provide important context in which to interpret the geochemistry of Mars meteorites and future returned samples. Biotic and abiotic isotope-fractionation occur relative to the available chemical reservoirs, enabling a tool to interpret chemical fossils for Mars astrobiology. We report on high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of Mars obtained in October 2007 from the NASA IRTF, targeting the sub-solar latitude in late southern summer. The measured spectra include fully-resolved pressure-broadened absorption features due to cool tropospheric carbon dioxide above the warm surface and an absorption feature that is definitively due to the isotopologue that is singly-substituted with oxygen-18. The ratio of oxygen-18 to the normal isotope can be recovered from fitting the whole spectrum in absorption against the warm surface. The mean value of the retrieved oxygen-18 fraction differs insignificantly from the terrestrial VSMOW standard, consistent with prior in situ and remote-spectroscopy efforts, which found only modest differences from VSMOW. Comparison between the retrieved isotope ratio and the surface temperature reveals that the concentration of isotopically heavy carbon dioxide is correlated with the local surface temperature, suggesting that the heavy gas is preferentially adsorbed by the regolith at low night temperatures and released in warm day temperatures. The minimum retrieved isotope fraction is consistent with the solar wind ratio measured by the Genesis mission, indicating that any accuracy error in the spectroscopic parameters used for the retrieval must have resulted in underestimating heavy-isotope enrichment. The maximum retrieved isotope ratio is significantly enhanced relative to VSMOW and relative to prior retrievals on Mars. We provide additional

  9. The balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The study of turnover of carbon and oxygen is an important line of scientific investigation. This line takes on special significance in conditions of soil degradation, which leads to the excess content of carbon dioxide and, as result, decrease of oxygen in the atmosphere. The aim of this article is a statement the balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air (ratio O/C) depending on consumption and assimilation by plants of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh). Basis of model was the following: green vascular plants are facultative heterotrophic organisms with symbiotic digestion and nutrition. According to the trophology viewpoint, the plant consumption of organic compounds broadens greatly a notion about the plant nutrition and ways of its regulation. In particular, beside the main known cycle of carbon: plant - litter - humus - carbon dioxide - plant, there is the second carbon cycle (turnover of organic compounds): plant - litter - humus - DOM - plant. The biogeochemical meaning of consumption of organic compounds by plants is that plants build the structural and functional blocks of biological macromolecules in their bodies. It provides receiving of a certain "energy payoff" by plants, which leads to increase of plant biomass by both an inclusion of allochthonous organic molecules in plant tissues, and positive effect of organic compounds on plant metabolic processes. One more of powerful ecological consequence of a heterotrophic nutrition of green plants is oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air. As the organic molecules in the second biological cycle of carbon are built in plants without considerable chemical change, the atmospheric air is enriched on that amount of oxygen, which would be required on oxidation of the organic molecules absorbed by plants, in result. It was accepted that: plant-soil system was climax, the plant community was grassy, initial contents of carbon in phytomass was accepted

  10. Polymer-Oxygen Compatibility Testing: Effect of Oxygen Aging on Ignition and Combustion Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Haas, Jon P.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The oxygen compatibility of six polymers used in oxygen service was evaluated after exposure for 48 hours to oxygen pressures ranging from 350 to 6200 kPa (50 to 900 psia), and temperatures ranging from 50 to 250 C (122 to 302 F). Three elastomers were tested: CR rubber (C873-70), FKM fluorocarbon rubber (Viton A), and MPQ silicone rubber (MIL-ZZ-765, Class 2); and three thermoplastics were tested: polyhexamethylene adipamide (Zytel 42), polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon TFE), and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (Neoflon CTFE M400H). Post-aging changes in mass, dimensions, tensile strength, elongation at break, and durometer hardness were determined. Also, the compression set was determined for the three elastomers. Results show that the properties under investigation were more sensitive to oxygen pressure at low to moderate temperatures, and more sensitive to temperature at low to moderate oxygen pressures. Inspection of the results also suggested that both chain scissioning and cross-linking processes were operative, consistent with heterogeneous oxidation. Attempts are underway to verify conclusively the occurrence of heterogeneous oxidation using a simple modulus profiling technique. Finally, the effect of aging at 620 kpa (90 psia) and 121 C (250 F) on ignition and combustion resistance was determined. As expected, aged polymers were less ignitable and combustible (had higher AlTs and lower heats of combustion). Special attention was given to Neoflon CTFE. More specifically, the effect of process history (compression versus extrusion molding) and percent crystallinity (quick- versus slow-quenched) on the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity of Neoflon CTFE was investigated. Results show the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity to be essentially independent of Neoflon CTFE process history and structure.

  11. Observation of spontaneous combustion of hydrogen and oxygen in microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, A. V.; Uvarov, I. V.; Prokaznikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental evidence is presented that combustion can ignite at room temperature spontaneously inside microbubbles filled with mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. We perform water electrolysis in a closed microchamber by voltage pulses of alternating polarity at repetition frequencies ≥100 kHz to pump the gases rapidly into the electrolyte and produce extreme supersaturation with both gases. After a delay of 300 -600 μs , we observe stroboscopically microbubbles of 5 -20 μm in diameter that appear in between the electrodes for several microseconds. Each event is accompanied by a pressure jump of 0.1 -1 bar that is measured interferometrically. The pressure jumps are attributed to combustion of the gases in the microbubbles.

  12. Bus application of oxygen-enrichment technology and diesel-electric hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.

    1993-10-01

    The amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) mandate very strict limits on particulate, smoke, and other emissions from city buses. The use of alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) or methanol, can help transit operators, such as the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), meet the mandated limits. However, the capital investment needed to convert the fueling infrastructure and buses is large, as is the expense of training personnel. If a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus can be implemented with the help of oxygen-enrichment technology or a diesel-electric hybrid system, this large investment could be postponed for many years. The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) initiated this project to evaluate the possibility of applying these technologies to CTA buses. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a limited number of engine tests and computer analyses and concluded that both concepts are practical and will help in a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus that can meet the mandated limits of the CAA amendments. The oxygen enrichment of combustion air depends on the availability of a compact and economical membrane separator. Because the technology for this critical component is still under development, it is recommended that an actual bus demonstration be delayed until prototype membranes are available. The hybrid propulsion system is ready for the demonstration phase, and it is recommended that the CTA and RTA commence planning for a bus demonstration.

  13. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Diesel Combustion with Oxygenated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H J; Fisher, E M; Glaude, P-A; Marinov, N M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Flynn, P F; Durrett, R P; zur Loye, A O; Akinyemi, O C; Dryer, F L

    2000-01-11

    Emission standards for diesel engines in vehicles have been steadily reduced in recent years, and a great deal of research and development effort has been focused on reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. One promising approach to reducing emissions involves the addition of oxygen to the fuel, generally by adding an oxygenated compound to the normal diesel fuel. Miyamoto et al. [1] showed experimentally that particulate levels can be significantly reduced by adding oxygenated species to the fuel. They found the Bosch smoke number (a measure of the particulate or soot levels in diesel exhaust) falls from about 55% for conventional diesel fuel to less than 1% when the oxygen content of the fuel is above about 25% by mass, as shown in Figure 1. It has been well established that addition of oxygenates to automotive fuel, including both diesel fuel as well as gasoline, reduces NOx and CO emissions by reducing flame temperatures. This is the basis for addition of oxygenates to produce reformulated gasoline in selected portions of the country. Of course, this is also accompanied by a slight reduction in fuel economy. A new overall picture of diesel combustion has been developed by Dec [2], in which laser diagnostic studies identified stages in diesel combustion that had not previously been recognized. These stages are summarized in Figure 2. The evolution of the diesel spray is shown, starting as a liquid jet that vaporizes and entrains hot air from the combustion chamber. This relatively steady process continues as long as fuel is being injected. In particular, Dec showed that the fuel spray vaporizes and mixes with air and products of earlier combustion to provide a region in which a gas phase, premixed fuel-rich ignition and burn occurs. The products of this ignition are then observed experimentally to lead rapidly to formation of soot particles, which subsequently are consumed in a diffusion flame. Recently, Flynn et al. [3] used a chemical kinetic and

  14. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  15. Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

  16. Atmospheric pressure fluctuations and oxygen enrichment in waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.; Weber, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    During In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing radiolytic decomposition of tetraphenylborate and water can produce benzene and hydrogen, which, given sufficiently high oxygen concentrations, can deflagrate. To prevent accumulations of benzene and hydrogen and avoid deflagration, continuous nitrogen purging is maintained. If the nitrogen purging is interrupted by, for example, a power failure, outside air will begin to seep into the tank through vent holes and cracks. Eventually a flammable mixture of benzene, hydrogen, and oxygen will occur (deflagration). However, this process is slow under steady-state conditions (constant pressure) and mechanisms to increase the exchange rate with the outside atmosphere must be considered. The most important mechanism of this kind is from atmospheric pressure fluctuations in which an increase in atmospheric pressure forces air into the tank which then mixes with the hydrogen-benzene mixture. The subsequent decrease in atmospheric pressure causes venting from the tank of the mixture -- the net effect being an increase in the tank`s oxygen concentration. Thus, enrichment occurs when the atmospheric pressure increases but not when the pressure decreases. Moreover, this natural atmospheric {open_quotes}pumping{close_quotes} is only important if the pressure fluctuations take place on a time scale longer than the characteristic mixing time scale (CMT) of the tank. If pressure fluctuations have a significantly higher frequency than the CMT, outside air will be forced into the tank and then out again before any significant mixing can occur. The CMT is not known for certain, but is estimated to be between 8 and 24 hours. The purpose of this report is to analyze yearly pressure fluctuations for a five year period to determine their statistical properties over 8 and 24-hour periods. The analysis also includes a special breakdown into summer and winter seasons and an analysis of 15-minute data from the SRTC Climatology Site.

  17. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Combustion of Oxygenated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-01-11

    Thermodynamic properties and detailed chemical kinetic models have been developed for the combustion of two oxygenates: methyl butanoate, a model compound for biodiesel fuels, and methyl formate, a related simpler molecule. Bond additivity methods and rules for estimating kinetic parameters were adopted from hydrocarbon combustion and extended. The resulting mechanisms have been tested against the limited combustion data available in the literature, which was obtained at low temperature, subatmospheric conditions in closed vessels, using pressure measurements as the main diagnostic. Some qualitative agreement was obtained, but the experimental data consistently indicated lower overall reactivities than the model, differing by factors of 10 to 50. This discrepancy, which occurs for species with well-established kinetic mechanisms as well as for methyl esters, is tentatively ascribed to the presence of wall reactions in the experiments. The model predicts a region of weak or negative dependence of overall reaction rate on temperature for each methyl ester. Examination of the reaction fluxes provides an explanation of this behavior, involving a temperature-dependent competition between chain-propagating unimolecular decomposition processes and chain-branching processes, similar to that accepted for hydrocarbons. There is an urgent need to obtain more complete experimental data under well-characterized conditions for thorough testing of the model.

  18. Thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of gaseous products resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Results of calculations to determine thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of combustion product gases are presented. The product gases are those resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. The oxygen content of products resulting from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures was similiar to that of air; however, the oxygen contained in products of methane-oxygen combustion ranged from 20 percent by volume to zero for stoichiometric combustion. Calculations were made for products of reactant mixtures with fuel percentages, by mass, of 7.5 to 20. Results are presented for specific mixtures for a range of pressures varying from 0.0001 to 1,000 atm and for temperatures ranging from 200 to 3,800 K.

  19. The oxygen isotope enrichment of leaf-exported assimilates – does it always reflect lamina leaf water enrichment?

    PubMed Central

    Gessler, Arthur; Brandes, Elke; Keitel, Claudia; Boda, Sonja; Kayler, Zachary E; Granier, André; Barbour, Margaret; Farquhar, Graham D; Treydte, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The oxygen stable isotope composition of plant organic matter (OM) (particularly of wood and cellulose in the tree ring archive) is valuable in studies of plant–climate interaction, but there is a lack of information on the transfer of the isotope signal from the leaf to heterotrophic tissues. We studied the oxygen isotopic composition and its enrichment above source water of leaf water over diel courses in five tree species covering a broad range of life forms. We tracked the transfer of the isotopic signal to leaf water-soluble OM and further to phloem-transported OM. Observed leaf water evaporative enrichment was consistent with values predicted from mechanistic models taking into account nonsteady-state conditions. While leaf water-soluble OM showed the expected 18O enrichment in all species, phloem sugars were less enriched than expected from leaf water enrichment in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), European larch (Larix decidua) and Alpine ash (Eucalyptus delegatensis). Oxygen atom exchange with nonenriched water during phloem loading and transport, as well as a significant contribution of assimilates from bark photosynthesis, can explain these phloem 18O enrichment patterns. Our results indicate species-specific uncoupling between the leaf water and the OM oxygen isotope signal, which is important for the interpretation of tree ring data. PMID:23763637

  20. Combustion of hydrogen-oxygen mixture in electrochemically generated nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Svetovoy, Vitaly B; Sanders, Remko G P; Lammerink, Theo S J; Elwenspoek, Miko C

    2011-09-01

    Ignition of exothermic chemical reactions in small volumes is considered as difficult or impossible due to the large surface-to-volume ratio. Here observation of the spontaneous reaction is reported between hydrogen and oxygen in bubbles whose diameter is smaller than a threshold value around 150 nm. The effect is attributed to high Laplace pressure and to fast dynamics in nanobubbles and is the first indication on combustion in the nanoscale. In this study the bubbles were produced by water electrolysis using successive generation of H(2) and O(2) above the same electrode with short voltage pulses in the microsecond range. The process was observed in a microsystem at current densities >1000 A/cm(2) and relative supersaturations >1000. PMID:22060445

  1. Combustion of hydrogen-oxygen mixture in electrochemically generated nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Sanders, Remko G. P.; Lammerink, Theo S. J.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2011-09-01

    Ignition of exothermic chemical reactions in small volumes is considered as difficult or impossible due to the large surface-to-volume ratio. Here observation of the spontaneous reaction is reported between hydrogen and oxygen in bubbles whose diameter is smaller than a threshold value around 150 nm. The effect is attributed to high Laplace pressure and to fast dynamics in nanobubbles and is the first indication on combustion in the nanoscale. In this study the bubbles were produced by water electrolysis using successive generation of H2 and O2 above the same electrode with short voltage pulses in the microsecond range. The process was observed in a microsystem at current densities >1000 A/cm2 and relative supersaturations >1000.

  2. Low temperature combustion using nitrogen enrichment to mitigate NOx from large bore natural gas fueled engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Biruduganti, M.; Gupta, S.; Sekar, R.; Energy Systems

    2010-01-01

    Low temperature combustion is identified as one of the pathways to meet the mandatory ultra low NO{sub x} emissions levels set by the regulatory agencies. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a well known technique to realize low NO{sub x} emissions. However, EGR has many built-in adverse ramifications that negate its advantages in the long term. This paper discusses nitrogen enrichment of intake air using air separation membranes as a better alternative to the mature EGR technique. This investigation was undertaken to determine the maximum acceptable level of nitrogen enrichment of air for a single-cylinder spark-ignited natural gas engine. NO{sub x} reduction as high as 70% was realized with a modest 2% nitrogen enrichment while maintaining power density and simultaneously improving fuel conversion efficiency (FCE). Any enrichment beyond this level degraded engine performance in terms of power density, FCE, and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The effect of ignition timing was also studied with and without N{sub 2} enrichment. Finally, lean burn versus stoichiometric operation utilizing nitrogen enrichment was compared. Analysis showed that lean burn operation along with nitrogen enrichment is one of the effective pathways for realizing better FCE and lower NO{sub x} emissions.

  3. Investigation of the Process of Methane-Oxygen Combustion in Steam Under the Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Bogomolov, A. R.; Azikhanov, S. S.; Shevyrev, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the article presented results of combustion methane-oxygen mixtures in the slightly superheated water steam under the atmospheric pressure. It is shown that exist dependence of flow rate combustible mixture and steam ratio (Gg.s./Gs) on the composition of the reacting mixture at the outlet of combustion chamber. There is a trend of increasing CO2 concentration in the reacting mixture at the outlet of combustion chamber with increase of Gg.s./Gs.

  4. Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions of carbon and oxygen during combustion of porous carbon particles in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Gremyachkin, V.M.

    2006-05-15

    A model of combustion of a high-porosity carbon particle in oxygen is considered, which takes into account heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions inside the particles and radiative heat transfer. The boundaries of the domain where the burning rate depends on the particle temperature are determined. The possibility of two combustion regimes is demonstrated: regime with a high burning rate, where the carbon-oxygen reaction proceeds in a layer adjacent to the particle surface, and regime with a low burning rate, where the reaction proceeds in the entire particle volume. In the regime with a high burning rate, the main product of the reaction between carbon and oxygen is carbon monoxide, whereas both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide can be formed in the regime with a low burning rate. The kinetic equations of heterogeneous reactions C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2} and 2C + O{sub 2} = 2CO are determined, which reveal the retarding effect of carbon monoxide and dioxide on the rates of these reactions.

  5. Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

    1991-11-01

    The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

  6. Attrition Rate of Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilen, Harry Martin

    This project developed an evaluation methodology for determining, accurately and rapidly, the attrition resistance of oxygen carrier materials used in chemical looping technologies. Existing test protocols, to evaluate attrition resistance of granular materials, are conducted under non-reactive and ambient temperature conditions. They do not accurately reflect the actual behavior under the unique process conditions of chemical looping, including high temperatures and cyclic operation between oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. This project developed a test method and equipment that represented a significant improvement over existing protocols. Experimental results obtained from this project have shown that hematite exhibits different modes of attrition, including both due to mechanical stresses and due to structural changes in the particles due to chemical reaction at high temperature. The test methodology has also proven effective in providing reactivity changes of the material with continued use, a property, which in addition to attrition, determines material life. Consumption/replacement cost due to attrition or loss of reactivity is a critical factor in the economic application of the chemical looping technology. This test method will allow rapid evaluation of a wide range of materials that are best suited for this technology. The most important anticipated public benefit of this project is the acceleration of the development of chemical looping technology for lowering greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion.

  7. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational consequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. The report is in two volumes, of which this is Volume 1 covering the main body of the report plus Appendixes A through D.

  8. Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at chamber pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational concequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. This is Volume 2 of the report, which contains data plots of all the test programs.

  9. The influence of thermal annealing on oxygen uptake and combustion rates of a bituminous coal char

    SciTech Connect

    Osvalda Senneca; Piero Salatino; Daniela Menghini

    2007-07-01

    The effect of thermal annealing on the combustion reactivity of a bituminous coal char has been investigated with a focus on the role of the formation of surface oxides by oxygen chemisorption. The combined use of thermogravimetric analysis and of analysis of the off-gas during isothermal combustion of char samples enabled the determination of the rate and extent of oxygen uptake along burn-off. Combustion was carried out at temperatures between 350 and 510{sup o}C. Char samples were prepared by controlled isothermal heat treatment of coal for different times (in the range between 1 s and 30 min) at different temperatures (in the range 900-2000{sup o}C). Results indicate that oxygen uptake is extensive along burn-off of chars prepared under mild heat treatment conditions. The maximum oxygen uptake is barely affected by the combustion temperature within the range of combustion conditions investigated. The severity of heat treatment has a pronounced effect on char combustion rate as well as on the extent and rate at which surface oxides are built up by oxygen chemisorption. Chars prepared under severe heat treatment conditions show negligible oxygen uptake and strongly reduced combustion rates. Altogether it appears that a close correlation can be established between the extent and the accessibility of active sites on the carbon surface and the combustion rate. Despite the investigation has been carried out at temperatures well below those of practical interest, results provide useful insight into the relationship existing between thermal annealing, formation of surface oxide and combustion reactivity which is relevant to the proper formulation of detailed kinetic models of char combustion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. THE SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE AMERICAN COMBUSTION PYRETRON OXYGEN-ENHANCED BURNER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the American Combustion PyretronTM oxygen-enhanced burner ws conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The Demonstration was conducted at the U.S. EPA's Combustion Research Facility (CRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas....

  11. SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE AMERICAN COMBUSTION PYRETRON OXYGEN-ENHANCED BURNER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the American Combustion Pyretron TM oxygen-enhanced burner was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. he Demonstration was conducted at the U.S. EPA's Combustion Research Facility (CRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. n eight wee...

  12. Mathematical simulation of hydrogen-oxygen combustion in rocket engines using LOGOS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betelin, V. B.; Shagaliev, R. M.; Aksenov, S. V.; Belyakov, I. M.; Deryuguin, Yu. N.; Korchazhkin, D. A.; Kozelkov, A. S.; Nikitin, V. F.; Sarazov, A. V.; Zelenskiy, D. K.

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen fuels are very attractive now for rocket engines designers, because this pair is ecology friendly. Computer aided design of new effective and clean hydrogen engines needs mathematical tools for supercomputer modeling of hydrogen-oxygen components mixing and combustion in rocket engines. The paper presents the results of developing, verification and validation of mathematical model making it possible to simulate unsteady processes of ignition and combustion in rocket engines.

  13. Application of Oxygen-Enriched Aeration in the Production of Bacitracin by Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Flickinger, M. C.; Perlman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The physiological effects of controlling the dissolved oxygen tension at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.05 atm by the use of oxygen-enriched aeration were investigated during growth and bacitracin production by Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 10716. Up to a 2.35-fold increase in the final antibiotic yield and a 4-fold increase in the rate of bacitracin synthesis were observed in response to O2-enriched aeration. The increase in antibiotic production was accompanied by increased respiratory activity and an increase in the specific productivity of the culture from 1.3 to 3.6 g of antibiotic per g of cell mass produced. Oxygen enrichment of the aeration decreased medium carbohydrate uptake and the maximum specific growth rate of B. licheniformis from 0.6 h−1 to as low as 0.15 h−1, depending upon the level of enrichment and the conditions of oxygen transfer rate (impeller speed). The response of this culture to O2 enrichment suggests that this method of controlling the dissolved oxygen tension for antibiotic-producing cultures may simulate conditions that would occur if the carbon source were fed slowly, as is often employed to optimize antibiotic production. Analysis of the biologically active bacitracins produced by B. licheniformis ATCC 10716 suggested that the ratio of biologically active peptides was not changed by O2 enrichment, nor were any new biologically active compounds formed. Images PMID:34361

  14. Nano-Enriched and Autonomous Sensing Framework for Dissolved Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Nader; Azab, Mohammed; Kandas, Ishac; Meehan, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a nano-enhanced wireless sensing framework for dissolved oxygen (DO). The system integrates a nanosensor that employs cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles to monitor the concentration of DO in aqueous media via optical fluorescence quenching. We propose a comprehensive sensing framework with the nanosensor equipped with a digital interface where the sensor output is digitized and dispatched wirelessly to a trustworthy data collection and analysis framework for consolidation and information extraction. The proposed system collects and processes the sensor readings to provide clear indications about the current or the anticipated dissolved oxygen levels in the aqueous media. PMID:26287211

  15. Experimental investigation on combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Fedorov, V. A.; Alekseev, M. V.; Bogomolov, A. R.; Sorokin, A. L.; Azikhanov, S. S.; Shevyrev, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental data are represented on the investigation of combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated (initial temperature of approximately 150°C) steam at atmospheric pressure. The influence of the ratio of mass flows of the combustible mixture and steam on the qualitative composition of combustion products and the temperature of produced steam is revealed. Main laws for combustion of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, which affect the completeness of mixture combustion, are determined. Experimental data on the influence of concentrations of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the flow of the steam and the combustible mixture upon the completeness of combustion are given. It is found that, when burning the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow with a temperature of 1000-1200°C, it is possible using a variation of the combustible mixture flow. At the same time, the volume fraction of noncondensable gases in the produced steam is no more than 2%. It is revealed that there are several combustion modes of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, in which, in one case, the steam always suppresses combustion and, in another one, detonation of the combustible mixture combustible mixture occurs. It is found that with the excess air factor close to unit, the combustion of the methane-oxygen mixture within steam and the vapor conversion of methane, which result in the appearance of free hydrogen in the produced high-temperature steam, are possible. The description and the principle of the operation of the experimental bench for investigation of combustion of methane-oxygen and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in the medium of steam are given. Results of experimental investigations of burning fuel and oxygen in the medium of steam are used in the development of a steam superheater for a hightemperature steam turbine.

  16. Combustion of 316 stainless steel in high-pressure gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Frank; Steinberg, Theodore A.; Janoff, Dwight

    1989-01-01

    Upward combustion of 316 stainless steel (SS) rods is discussed and a combustion model is presented. The effects of varying oxygen pressure and rod diameter on the rate limiting processes for combustion of 316 SS are evaluated. The rate-limiting steps for combustion up 316 SS rods are shown to be dependent on the incorporation and mass transport of oxygen in the molten mass, and heat transfer between the molten mass and rod. Both these rate-limiting steps are shown to be dependent on rod diameter. Small (d/r/ = 0.051 cm) 316 SS rods are shown to be dependent on convective heat transfer, and larger rods (d/r/ not less than 0.32 cm) are shown to be dependent on oxygen incorporation and mass transport in the molten mass.

  17. Reproductive adaptation in Drosophila exposed to oxygen-enriched atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloek, G.; Winkle, L.

    1979-01-01

    Ten successive generations of a Drosophila melanogaster population were exposed to an atmospheric mix of 50% oxygen/50% nitrogen at standard pressure. This atmospheric mix has been shown to be toxic to this species and causes significantly shortened life span. By the fifth generation, survivorship and life span for the first 25-30 days were identical to control populations and total life span was shorter by only a few days. Egg-laying rates were stable in the experimental populations but below those of the controls. Hatching success was identical between experimental and control populations. Even though the egg-laying rates were lower in 50% oxygen, it was concluded that the population had adapted and could maintain a stable population in these conditions. The near-normal life spans, normal hatching rates, and overall population stability, exhibited following five generations of adaptation, were considered sufficient to allow continued reproduction in spite of a reduced egg-laying rate.

  18. Economic Evaluations of Energy Recovery options for oxygen- and enriched air-blown Texaco GCC power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, R.F.; Coleman, B.S.; Dawkins, R.P.; Rao, A.D.; Ravikumar, R.H.; Smelser, S.C.; Stock, R.M.

    1980-11-01

    This report presents the results of preliminary process design and economic screening studies of seven integrated Texaco-based coal gasification/combined-cycle power plant systems. Previous reports have indicated that the oxidant feed and hot gasifier effluent cooling units are the most costly items in the gasification system and, thus, hold the greatest possibility of being reduced. Therefore, the systems examined reflect combinations of two types of coal oxidant (98 percent oxygen and enriched air containing 35 percent oxygen) and four gas cooling options. Also presented is an eighth process design (without economics) of the most efficient of the seven systems under the more favorable ISO ambient conditions, rather than summer conditions. Except for the gasifiers and associated high-temperature heat recovery equipment, all of the combined-cycle designs in this report use commercially available components, including the gas turbines. The gasifier performances are based on extrapolations of the pilot plant gasifiers from mid- to the late 1980s. The high-temperature heat recovery equipment designs have not been demonstrated as full-sized equipment. The first and major objective was to determine whether or not oxygen-blown Texaco-based gasification combined-cycle power plants employing current technology combustion turbine (2000/sup 0/F), could produce electricity at a competitive cost to that produced in a conventional coal-fired steam plant using limestone scrubbers for SO/sub 2/ removal. When all the cases are compared and referred to earlier studies, it is concluded that oxygen-blown Texaco GCC plants employing current technology (2000/sup 0/F) combustion turbines produce electricity that is cost competitive with electricity produced by a conventional coal-fired steam plant with stack gas scrubbers designed to meet 1978 New Source Performance Standards.

  19. Health safe alarm evaluation. Final report. [Combustible gas/oxygen deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M.A.; Bishop, E.C.

    1981-12-01

    The USAF Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory (USAF OEHL) conducted an evaluation of the National Mine Service Company, Model MX 241, Combination Combustible Gas/Oxygen Deficiency Alarm. The evaluation included determination of linearity of response to a calibration gas (hexane) and the instrument's ability to set the %LEL alarm at or below 5% LEL and oxygen alarm at or below 19.5% oxygen. Recommendation of the MX 241 for specific application was made based upon the evaluation results.

  20. Test methods for determining the suitability of metal alloys for use in oxygen-enriched environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gunaji, Mohan V.

    1991-01-01

    Materials are more flammable in oxygen rich environments than in air. When the structural elements of a system containing oxygen ignite and burn, the results are often catastrophic, causing loss of equipment and perhaps even human lives. Therefore, selection of the proper metallic and non-metallic materials for use in oxygen systems is extremely important. While test methods for the selection of non-metallic materials have been available for years, test methods for the selection of alloys have not been available until recently. Presented here are several test methods that were developed recently at NASA's White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to study the ignition and combustion of alloys, including the supersonic and subsonic speed particle impact tests, the frictional heating and coefficient of friction tests, and the promoted combustion test. These test methods are available for commercial use.

  1. An Elementary Overview of the Selection of Materials for Service in Oxygen-Enriched Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Samuel Eddie

    2012-01-01

    The process for selecting materials for use in oxygen or oxygen-enriched environments is one that continues to be investigated by many industries due to the importance to those industries of oxygen systems. There are several excellent resources available to assist oxygen systems design engineers and end-users, with the most comprehensive being ASTM MNL-36, Safe Use of Oxygen and Oxygen Systems: Handbook for Design, Operation and Maintenance, 2nd Edition. ASTM also makes available several standards for oxygen systems. However, the ASTM publications are extremely detailed, and typically designed for professionals who already possess a working knowledge of oxygen systems. No notable resource exists, whether an ASTM or other organizational publication, which can be used to educate engineers or technicians who have no prior knowledge of the nuances of oxygen system design and safety. This paper will fill the void for information needed by organizations that design or operate oxygen systems. The information in this paper is not new information, but is a concise and easily understood summary of selecting materials for oxygen systems. This paper will serve well as an employee s first introduction to oxygen system materials selection, and probably the employee s first introduction to ASTM.

  2. Combustion in a multiburner furnace with selective flow of oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Bool, III, Lawrence E.; Kobayashi, Hisashi

    2004-03-02

    Improved operational characteristics such as improved fuel efficiency, reduction of NOx formation, reduction of the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, and lessened tendency to corrosion at the tube wall, in a multi-burner furnace are obtained by reducing the flow rate of combustion air to the burners and selectively individually feeding oxidant to only some of the burners.

  3. NOx reduction in combustion with concentrated coal streams and oxygen injection

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.; Snyder, William J.

    2004-03-02

    NOx formation in the combustion of solid hydrocarbonaceous fuel such as coal is reduced by obtaining, from the incoming feed stream of fuel solids and air, a stream having a ratio of fuel solids to air that is higher than that of the feed steam, and injecting the thus obtained stream and a small amount of oxygen to a burner where the fuel solids are combusted.

  4. Mult-Pollutant Control Through Novel Approaches to Oxygen Enhanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Axelbaum; Pratim Biswas

    2009-02-28

    Growing concerns about global climate change have focused effortss on identifying approaches to stabilizing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. One approach utilizes oxy-fuel combustion to produce a concentrated flue gas that will enable economical CO{sub 2} capture by direct methods. Oxy-fuel combustion rewuires an Air Separation Unit (ASU) to provide a high-purity stream of oxygen as well as a Compression and Purification Unit (CPU) to clean and compress the CO{sub 2} for long term storage. Overall plant efficiency will suffer from the parasitic load of both the ASU and CPU and researchers are investigating techniques to enhance other aspects of the combustion and gas cleanup proceses to improve the benefit-to-cost ratio. This work examines the influence of oxy-fuel combustion and non-carbon based sorbents on the formation and fate of multiple combustion pollutants both numerically and experimentally.

  5. An experimental study on high temperature and low oxygen air combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. B.; Chung, D. H.; Yang, J. B.; Noh, D. S.

    2000-06-01

    High temperature preheated and diluted air combustion has been confirmed as the technology, mainly applied to industrial furnaces and kilns, to realize higher thermal efficiency and lower emissions. The purpose of this study was to investigate fundamental aspects of the above-mentioned combustion experimentally and to compare with those in ordinary hydrocarbon combustion with room temperature air. The test items were exhaust gas components of CO, NOx, flame shape and radical components of CH, OH and C2, which were measured with gas analyser, camera and ICCD(Intensified Charged - Coupled Device) camera. Many phenomena as results appeared in combustion with the oxidizer, low oxygen concentration and extremely high temperature air, such as expansion of the flammable limits, increased flame propagation speed, it looked so strange as compared with those in existing combustion technology. We confirmed that such extraordinary phenomena were believable through the hot-test experiment.

  6. The effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on FFV exhaust emissions using M85

    SciTech Connect

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.; Ng, H.K.; Baudino, J.H.; Colucci, C.P.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents results of emission tests of a flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) powered by an SI engine, fueled by M85 (methanol), and supplied with oxygen-enriched intake air containing 21, 23, and 25 vol% O2. Engine-out total hydrocarbons (THCs) and unburned methanol were considerably reduced in the entire FTP cycle when the O2 content of the intake air was either 23 or 25%. However, CO emissions did not vary much, and NOx emissions were higher. HCHO emissions were reduced by 53% in bag 1, 84% in bag 2, and 59% in bag 3 of the FTP cycle with 25% oxygen-enriched intake air. During cold-phase FTP,reductions of 42% in THCs, 40% in unburned methanol, 60% in nonmethane hydrocarbons, and 45% in nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs) were observed with 25% enriched air; NO{sub x} emissions increased by 78%. Converter-out emissions were also reduced with enriched air but to a lesser degree. FFVs operating on M85 that use 25% enriched air during only the initial 127 s of cold-phase FTP or that use 23 or 25% enriched air during only cold-phase FTP can meet the reactivity-adjusted NMOG, CO, NO{sub x}, and HCHO emission standards of the transitional low-emission vehicle.

  7. The effect of intraoral suction on oxygen-enriched surgical environments: a mechanism for reducing the risk of surgical fires.

    PubMed

    VanCleave, Andrea M; Jones, James E; McGlothlin, James D; Saxen, Mark A; Sanders, Brian J; Vinson, LaQuia A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mechanical model was applied in order to replicate potential surgical fire conditions in an oxygen-enriched environment with and without high-volume suction typical for dental surgical applications. During 41 trials, 3 combustion events were measured: an audible pop, a visible flash of light, and full ignition. In at least 11 of 21 trials without suction, all 3 conditions were observed, sometimes with an extent of fire that required early termination of the experimental trial. By contrast, in 18 of 20 with-suction trials, ignition did not occur at all, and in the 2 cases where ignition did occur, the fire was qualitatively a much smaller, candle-like flame. Statistically comparing these 3 combustion events in the no-suction versus with-suction trials, ignition (P = .0005), audible pop (P = .0211), and flash (P = .0092) were all significantly more likely in the no-suction condition. These results suggest a possible significant and new element to be added to existing surgical fire safety protocols toward making surgical fires the "never-events" they should be. PMID:25517551

  8. Oxygen index: An approximate value for the evaluation of combustion characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zartmann, I.; Reinwardt, D.; Franke, A.

    1986-01-01

    The oxygen index has gained international recognition for the determination of combustion characteristics of plastic material. The amounts of oxygen and nitrogen were more accurately determined for existing test equipment in order to specify the oxygen index as precisely and as reproducible as possible. Parameters are outlined such as the size of the ignition flame, ignition of test pieces, test piece sizes and test temperature. The minimum oxygen index was determined by the dimension and duration of the fire. The results are sufficiently accurate for factory operating conditions and are also reproducible.

  9. Combustion and Performance Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper summarizes the analyses of combustion and performance as a follow-up to a paper published in the 2008 JANNAF/LPS meeting. Combustion stability analyses are presented in a separate paper. The current paper includes test and analysis results of coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane or gaseous methane propellants. Several thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element swirl coax element injectors tested at the NASA MSFC, and a uni-element chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods

  10. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  11. Injection Principles from Combustion Studies in a 200-Pound-Thrust Rocket Engine Using Liquid Oxygen and Heptane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, M. F.; Auble, C. M.

    1955-01-01

    The importance of atomizing and mixing liquid oxygen and heptane was studied in a 200-pound-thrust rocket engine. Ten injector elements were used with both steel and transparent chambers. Characteristic velocity was measured over a range of mixture ratios. Combustion gas-flow and luminosity patterns within the chamber were obtained by photographic methods. The results show that, for efficient combustion, the propellants should be both atomized and mixed. Heptane atomization controlled the combustion rate to a much larger extent than oxygen atomization. Induced mixing, however, was required to complete combustion in the smallest volume. For stable, high-efficiency combustion and smooth engine starts, mixing after atomization was most promising.

  12. PROGRESS IN DETAILED KINETIC MODELING OF THE COMBUSTION OF OXYGENATED COMPONENTS OF BIOFUELS

    PubMed Central

    Sy Tran, Luc; Sirjean, Baptiste; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Due to growing environmental concerns and diminishing petroleum reserves, a wide range of oxygenated species has been proposed as possible substitutes to fossil fuels: alcohols, methyl esters, acyclic and cyclic ethers. After a short review the major detailed kinetic models already proposed in the literature for the combustion of these molecules, the specific classes of reactions considered for modeling the oxidation of acyclic and cyclic oxygenated molecules respectively, are detailed. PMID:23700355

  13. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE LINDE OXYGEN COMBUSTION SYSTEM ON THE EPA MOBILE INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes the various system performance tests and the long-term operating experience of the LINDE(r) Oxygen Combustion System (OCS) installed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Mobile Incineration System (MIS) when it was in operation at the Denney F...

  14. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE LINDE OXYGEN COMBUSTION SYSTEM ON THE EPA MOBILE INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes the various system performance tests and the long-term operating experience of the LINDE Oxygen Combustion System installed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mobile Incineration System (MIS) when it was in operation at the Denney Farm site in sou...

  15. CO{sub 2} emission abatement in IGCC power plants by semiclosed cycles: Part A -- With oxygen-blown combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Chiesa, P.; Lozza, G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper analyzes the fundamentals of IGCC power plants where carbon dioxide produced by syngas combustion can be removed, liquefied and eventually disposed, to limit the environmental problems due to the greenhouse effect. To achieve this goal, a semiclosed-loop gas turbine cycle using an highly-enriched CO{sub 2} mixture as working fluid was adopted. As the oxidizer, the syngas combustion utilizes oxygen produced by an air separation unit. Combustion gases mainly consist of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O: after expansion, heat recovery and water condensation, a part of the exhausts, highly concentrated in CO{sub 2}, can be easily extracted, compressed and liquefied for storage or disposal. A detailed discussion about the configuration and the thermodynamic performance of these plants is the aim of the paper. Proper attention was paid to: (i) the modelization of the gasification section and of its integration with the power cycle, (ii) the optimization of pressure ratio due the change of the cycle working fluid, (iii) the calculation of the power consumption of the auxiliary equipment, including the compression train of the separated CO{sub 2} and the air separation unit. The resulting overall efficiency is in the 38--39% range, with status-of-the-art gas turbine technology, but resorting to a substantially higher pressure ratio. The extent of modifications to the gas turbine engine, with respect to commercial units, was therefore discussed. Relevant modifications are needed, but not involving changes in the technology. A second plant scheme will be considered in the second part of the paper, using air for syngas combustion and a physical absorption process to separate CO{sub 2} from nitrogen-rich exhausts. A comparison between the two options will be addressed there.

  16. Interaction of the burning spherical droplets in oxygen-enriched turbulent environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Chong Pyo; Kim, Ho Young; Yoon, Sam S.

    2009-01-15

    Three-dimensional numerical studies on the interaction of vaporizing and burning droplets were conducted to understand the burning characteristics of multiple droplets in a turbulent environment. The burning droplets characteristics, such as lifetime, surface temperature, vaporization, reaction, and burning rate were examined for various oxygen mole-fractions and geometrical arrangements of droplets. Results from a single droplet combustion test were first verified and validated against existing experimental data. Results indicate that turbulent intensity has a moderate effect on droplet burning rate, but not as prominent an effect as the oxygen mole-fraction. At high oxygen mole-fractions, droplet lifetime was short due to enhanced burning. It is shown that evaporation processes of multiple droplets are notably affected by the inter-space distance between droplets both in streamwise and spanwise directions. The burning rate as a function of oxygen mole-fraction and inter-space distance is determined and can be used as a guideline for future studies on spray combustion. (author)

  17. Low Temperature Combustion using nitrogen enrichment to mitigate nox from large bore natural gas-filled engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Biruduganti, M. S.; Gupta, S. B.; Sekar, R. R.

    2008-01-01

    Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) is identified as one of the pathways to meet the mandatory ultra low NOx emissions levels set by regulatory agencies. This phenomenon can be realized by utilizing various advanced combustion control strategies. The present work discusses nitrogen enrichment using an Air Separation Membrane (ASM) as a better alternative to the mature Exhaust Gas Re-circulation (EGR) technique currently in use. A 70% NOx reduction was realized with a moderate 2% nitrogen enrichment while maintaining power density and simultaneously improving Fuel Conversion Efficiency (FCE). The maximum acceptable Nitrogen Enriched Air (NEA) in a single cylinder spark ignited natural gas engine was investigated in this paper. Any enrichment beyond this level degraded engine performance both in terms of power density and FCE, and unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions. The effect of ignition timing was also studied with and without N2 enrichment. Finally, lean burn versus stoichiometric operation utilizing NEA was compared. Analysis showed that lean burn operation along with NEA is one of the effective pathways for realizing better FCE and lower NOx emissions.

  18. Burning of CP Titanium (Grade 2) in Oxygen-Enriched Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Jeffers, Nathan; Gallus, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The flammability in oxygen-enriched atmospheres of commercially pure (CP) titanium rods as a function of diameter and test gas pressure was determined. Test samples of varying diameters were ignited at the bottom and burned upward in 70% O2/balance N2 and in 99.5+% O2 at various pressures. The burning rate of each ignited sample was determined by observing the apparent regression rate of the melting interface (RRMI) of the burning samples. The burning rate or RRMI increased with decreasing test sample diameter and with increasing test gas pressure and oxygen concentration

  19. The Research of Membrane-sorption System with Increased Pressure Stream for Enriching Air with Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, M. V.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Kurchatov, I. M.

    Numerical study of single-hybrid membrane-sorption air separation system for enriching the air with oxygen were conducted. The effectiveness of such a system was analyzed, depending on selective sorbents and membranes under specified pressure ratio. A comparison of various modes membrane sorption system was done. The conclusion regarding the choice of the membrane and a sorbent for the system with a pressurized product stream was drawn.

  20. Oxygen enrichment and its application to life support systems for workers in high-altitude areas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongling; Liu, Yingshu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workers coming from lowland regions are at risk of developing acute mountain sickness (AMS) when working in low oxygen high-altitude areas. Objectives: The aim of this study was to improve the conditions that lead to hypoxia and ensure the safety of the high-altitude workers. We analyzed the influence of low atmospheric pressure on the oxygen enrichment process in high-altitude areas using an engineering method called low-pressure swing adsorption (LPSA). Methods: Fourteen male subjects were screened and divided into three groups by type of oxygen supply system used: (1) oxygen cylinder group; (2) LPSA oxygen dispersal group; and (3) control group. These tests included arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), pulse rate (PR), breaths per minute (BPM), and blood pressure (BP). Results: The results showed that after supplying oxygen using the LPSA method at the tunnel face, the SaO2 of workers increased; the incidence of acute mountain sickness, PR, and BPM significantly decreased. Conclusions: The LPSA life support system was found to be a simple, convenient, efficient, reliable, and applicable approach to ensure proper working conditions at construction sites in high-altitude areas. PMID:25000108

  1. Effects of argon enriched low-oxygen atmospheres and of high-oxygen atmospheres on the kinetics of polyphenoloxidase (PPO).

    PubMed

    O'Beirne, David; Murphy, Eileen; Ni Eidhin, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    The reported benefits of enrichment of air atmospheres with argon or oxygen for control of enzymatic browning were investigated by determining the effects of these atmospheres on PPO kinetics. Kinetics of purified apple PPO and a commercially available mushroom PPO were studied in an in vitro model system. Enrichment with argon produced greater inhibitory effects than the current industry practice of enrichment with nitrogen. Km(app) values (mM) for apple PPO in 3%O(2)/97%Ar, 3%O(2)/97%N(2), and air, were 133, 87, and 48, respectively. The data indicate that inhibition by both gases is competitive, and also support the hypothesis that the greater inhibitory effect of argon was proportional to the size of the Van der Waals radius of argon against nitrogen (1.91 Å against 1.54 Å). Much smaller inhibitory effects were observed in the presence of 80% O(2) (Km(app) 57 mM), and the nature of this inhibition was less clear. The results suggest that the benefits of argon enrichment may be relatively small, and may require critical enzyme, substrate, and gas levels to be successful. However, these benefits may be exploitable commercially in some fresh-cut products, and may allow less anoxic atmospheres to be used. Practical Application: Control of enzymatic browning without sulfites continues to be a challenge in some fresh-cut products. While sporadic benefits of these atmospheres in control of enzymatic browning have been reported, results have been inconsistent in commercial practice. The results suggest that the benefits of argon enrichment may be relatively small, and may require critical enzyme, substrate, and gas levels to be successful. However, these benefits may be exploitable commercially in some fresh-cut products, and allow less anoxic atmospheres to be used. PMID:21535678

  2. Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine. Volume 1, Concept evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

    1991-11-01

    The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

  3. A System for Controlling the Oxygen Content of a Gas Produced by Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Puster, R. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A mixture of air, CH4 and OH(2) is burned in a combustion chamber to produce a product gas in the test section. The OH(2) content of the product gas is compared with the OH(2) content of reference air in an OH(2) sensor. If there is a difference an error signal is produced at the output of a control circuit which by the means of a solenoid valve, regulates the flow of OH(2) into the combustion chamber to make the error signal zero. The product gas in the test section has the same oxygen content as air.

  4. CONTROL OF TRANSIENT INCINERATOR EMISSIONS WITH AN OXYGEN BASED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subject of this paper is the experience with a novel and field-proven method for the enhanced control of transient emissions from rotary kiln incinerators using oxygen enrichment. hen high-BTU content wastes are fed into rotary kiln incinerators in an intermittent mode (typic...

  5. Synthesis of silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) composite membranes for oxygen enrichment from air

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) [PFA] composite membranes were prepared by solution casting of silicalite-furfuryl alcohol [FA] suspension on a porous polysulfone substrate and subsequent in situ polymerization of FA. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize silicalite nanocrystals and silicalite-PFA composite membranes. The silicalite-PFA composite membrane with 20 wt.% silicalite loading exhibits good oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (4.15) and high oxygen permeability (1,132.6 Barrers) at 50°C. Silicalite-PFA composite membranes are promising for the production of oxygen-enriched air for various applications. PMID:22209012

  6. Gas-potentiometric method with solid electrolyte oxygen sensors for the investigation of combustion.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, H; Tittmann, K; Sitzki, L; Trippler, S; Rau, H

    1996-09-01

    Gas-potentiometric analysis using oxide-ion-conducting solid electrolytes as stabilized zirconia is a worthwhile method for the investigation of combustion processes. In the case of gas and oil flames specific parameters like the flame contour, the degree of burn-out and mixing can be determined and information about flame turbulence and reaction density can be gained from the temporal resolution of the sensor signal. Measurements carried out with solid electrolyte oxygen sensors in a fluidized bed show that combustion processes of solid fuels are also analyzable. This analysis results in fuel specific burn-out curves finally leading to burn-out times and to parameters of a macrokinetics of the combustion process as well as to ideas about the burn-out mechanism. From the resulting constants of the effective reaction rate a reactivity relative to bituminous coal coke can be given for any solid fuel. PMID:15048356

  7. Investigation of spontaneous combustion of hydrogen-oxygen mixture using DSMC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Sun, Quanhua

    2014-12-09

    Combustion has been widely studied in the literature, but very little work was focused on the microscopic level. In this paper, the DSMC method is applied to simulate the microscopic behavior of the spontaneous combustion of hydrogen oxygen mixture. It is found that the ignition delay time of the mixture depends on many factors, such as the physical size, temperature, pressure, and dilution. Comparison between DSMC and CFD results shows that more atomic hydrogen is consumed through reaction HO{sub 2}+H→H{sub 2}+O{sub 2} at temperature close to the extended second explosion limit due to localized distribution of reactants, which may indicate the importance of microscopic behavior on low temperature combustion.

  8. A Preliminary Study on the Toxic Combustion Products Testing of Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

    2004-01-01

    One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative _ pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper reports the preliminary results of toxic combustion product testing of selected polymers in a pneumatic-impact test system. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Nylon 6/6, polychlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), fluoroelastomer (Viton(TradeMark) A), and nitrile rubber (Buna N), were tested in a pneumatic-impact test system at 2500- or 3500-psia oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned, then combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed by GC/MS/IRD, GC/FID, and GC/Methanizer/FID. The results of adiabatic-compression tests show that combustion of hydrocarbon polymers, nitrogen-containing polymers, and halogenated polymers in high-pressure oxygen systems are relatively complete. Toxicity of the combustion product gas is presumably much lower than the combustion product gas generated from ambient-pressure oxygen (or air) environments. The NASA-Lewis equilibrium code was used to determine the composition of combustion product gas generated from a simulated, adiabatic-compression test of nine polymers. The results are presented and discussed.

  9. Injector characterization for a gaseous oxygen-methane single element combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celano, M. P.; Silvestri, S.; Schlieben, G.; Kirchberger, C.; Haidn, O. J.; Knab, O.

    2016-07-01

    The results from an experimental investigation on an oxygen-methane single-injector combustion chamber are presented. They provide detailed information about the thermal loads at the hot inner walls of the combustion chamber at representative rocket engine conditions and pressures up to 20 bar. The present study aims to contribute to the understanding of the thermal transfer processes and to validate the in-house design tool Thermtest and a base for an attempt to simulate the flame behavior with large-eddy simulation (LES). Due to the complex flow phenomena linked to the use of cryogenic propellants, like extreme variation of flow properties and steep temperature gradients, in combination with intensive chemical reactions, the problem has been partially simplified by injecting gaseous oxygen (GOx) and gaseous methane (GCH4).

  10. HIGH ARSENIC CONCENTRATIONS AND ENRICHED SULFUR AND OXYGEN ISOTOPES IN A FRACTURED-BEDROCK GROUND-WATER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated arsenic concentrations are coincident with enriched sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate in bedrock ground water within Kelly's Cove watershed, Northport, Maine, USA. Interpretation of the data is complicated by the lack of correlations between sulfate concentrations an...

  11. New type of microengine using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Sanders, Remco G. P.; Ma, Kechun; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2014-01-01

    Microsystems become part of everyday life but their application is restricted by lack of strong and fast motors (actuators) converting energy into motion. For example, widespread internal combustion engines cannot be scaled down because combustion reactions are quenched in a small space. Here we present an actuator with the dimensions 100 × 100 × 5 μm3 that is using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen as part of its working cycle. Water electrolysis driven by short voltage pulses creates an extra pressure of 0.5–4 bar for a time of 100–400 μs in a chamber closed by a flexible membrane. When the pulses are switched off this pressure is released even faster allowing production of mechanical work in short cycles. We provide arguments that this unexpectedly fast pressure decrease is due to spontaneous combustion of the gases in the chamber. This actuator is the first step to truly microscopic combustion engines. PMID:24599052

  12. New type of microengine using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Svetovoy, Vitaly B; Sanders, Remco G P; Ma, Kechun; Elwenspoek, Miko C

    2014-01-01

    Microsystems become part of everyday life but their application is restricted by lack of strong and fast motors (actuators) converting energy into motion. For example, widespread internal combustion engines cannot be scaled down because combustion reactions are quenched in a small space. Here we present an actuator with the dimensions 100 × 100 × 5 μm(3) that is using internal combustion of hydrogen and oxygen as part of its working cycle. Water electrolysis driven by short voltage pulses creates an extra pressure of 0.5-4 bar for a time of 100-400 μs in a chamber closed by a flexible membrane. When the pulses are switched off this pressure is released even faster allowing production of mechanical work in short cycles. We provide arguments that this unexpectedly fast pressure decrease is due to spontaneous combustion of the gases in the chamber. This actuator is the first step to truly microscopic combustion engines. PMID:24599052

  13. Investigation into Oxygen-Enriched Bottom-Blown Stibnite and Direct Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Luo, Honglin; Qing, Wenqing; Zheng, Yongxing; Yang, Kang; Han, Junwei

    2014-08-01

    The direct oxidation of stibnite (Sb2S3) using a gas mixture of nitrogen-oxygen was investigated in a pilot plant. Steady-state pilot operation of 5 and 10 t/d was normally observed during the pilot test of 100 days, and a cleaning experiment of high-antimony molten slag from oxygen-enriched bottom-blown was tested by direct reduction in a laboratory-scale electric furnace. Autogenous smelting was achieved without adding any other fuel, which guaranteed the feasibility and advantage of oxygen-enriched bottom-blown stibnite. Through analysis and calculation, the sulfur dioxide concentration in offgas was more than 8 pct, which meets the requirement for the preparation of sulfuric acid. In the reduction experiment, the effects of added CaO, the ratio of coal ( ω = actual weight of coal/theoretical weight of coal), and the slag type on the reduction procedure were considered. The residual slag obtained after reduction averaged less than 1 g/ton Au and less than 1 wt pct Sb. The metal phase contained iron less than 3 wt pct, and the recoveries of Au in the metal phase were more than 98 pct. This process shows significant environmental and economic benefits compared with previous processes.

  14. Oxygen enrichment of room air to improve well-being and productivity at high altitude.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    1999-01-01

    Increasingly, commercial activities, such as mines, and scientific facilities, such as telescopes, are being placed at very high altitudes, up to 5,000 m. Frequently workers commute to these locations from much lower altitudes, or even from sea level. In addition, large numbers of people permanently live and work at high altitudes. The hypoxia of high altitude impairs sleep quality, mental performance, productivity, and general well-being. Recently it has become feasible to raise the oxygen concentration of room air by injecting oxygen into the air conditioning. This is remarkably effective at reducing the equivalent altitude. For example, increasing the oxygen concentration by 1% (e.g., from 21% to 22%) reduces the equivalent altitude by about 300 m. In other words, a room at an altitude of 4,500 m containing 26% oxygen is effectively at an altitude of 3,000 m. Oxygen enrichment has now been tested in several studies and shown to improve sleep quality and cognitive function. The fire hazard is less than in air at sea level. This innovative technique promises to improve productivity and well-being at high altitude. PMID:10441257

  15. Evidence for chain molecules enriched in carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Carlson, C. W.; Curtis, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    In situ measurements of the composition and spatial distribution of heavy thermal positive ions in the coma of comet Halley were made with the heavy-ion analyzer RPA2-PICCA aboard the Giotto spacecraft. Above 50 atomic mass units an ordered series of mass peaks centered at 61, 75, 91, and 105 atomic mass units were observed. Each peak appears to be composed of three or more closely spaced masses. The abundances decrease and the dissociation rates increase smoothly with increasing mass. These observations suggest the presence of chain molecules that are enriched in carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen, such as polyoxymethylene (polymerized formaldehyde), in comet Halley.

  16. Development of fire resistant electronic configurations for use in oxygen enriched environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    Design concepts for electronic black boxes and modules were tested in oxygen enriched atmospheres, and it was found that various types of sealed configurations would generally eliminate any flammability hazard. The type of configuration and its construction was found to be of more importance in the elimination of flammability hazards in electronic configurations than the types of materials utilized in them. The design concepts developed for fire hazard free electronic configurations for use in manned space programs are applicable for the design of electronic hardware for any use or environment.

  17. Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway Glass Containers. Technical progress report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.; Abbasi, H.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the program is to demonstrate the use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO, emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. This technology, known as oxygen-enriched air staging (OEAS), has been demonstrated, and is now being commercialized, for endport container glass furnaces. A 17-month development program has been established with specific objectives to: (1) acquire baseline operating data on the host sideport furnace in Vernon, California, (2) evaluate secondary oxidant injection strategies based on earlier endport furnace results and through modeling of a single port pair, (3) retrofit and test one port pair (the test furnace has six port pairs) with a flexible OEAS system, and select the optimal system configuration, (4) use the results from tests with one port pair to design, retrofit, and test OEAS on the entire furnace (six port pairs), and (5) analyze test results, prepare report, and finalize the business plan to commercialize OEAS for sideport furnaces. The host furnace for testing in this program is an Owens-Brockway 6-port pair sideport furnace in Vernon, California producing 325-ton/d of amber container glass. The baseline NO{sub x} level of this optimized furnace is about 4.0 lb/ton of glass. An anticipated NO{sub x}, reduction of 50% will lower the NO{sub x} production level to below 2 lb/ton. Secondary oxidant staging techniques being considered include oxygen-enriched ambient air staging (OEAS) and oxygen staging (OS).

  18. Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway glass containers. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1996--January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.; Abbasi, H.

    1997-03-01

    The objective of the program is to demonstrate the use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO, emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. This technology, known as oxygen-enriched air staging (OEAS), has been demonstrated, and is now being commercialized, for endport container glass furnaces. A 17-month development program has been established with specific objectives to: (1) acquire baseline operating data on the host sideport furnace in Vernon, California, (2) evaluate secondary oxidant injection strategies based on earlier endport furnace results and through modeling of a single port pair, (3) retrofit and test one port pair (the test furnace has six port pairs) with a flexible OEAS system, and select the optimal system configuration, (4) use the results from tests with one port pair to design, retrofit, and test OEAS on the entire furnace (six port pairs), and (5) analyze test results, prepare report, and finalize the business plan to commercialize OEAS for sideport furnaces. The host furnace for testing in this program is an Owens-Brockway 6-port pair sideport furnace in Vernon, California producing 325-ton/d of amber container glass. The baseline NO{sub x} level of this optimized furnace is about 4.0 lb/ton of glass. An anticipated NO{sub x}, reduction of 50% will lower the NO{sub x} production level to below 2 lb/ton. Secondary oxidant staging techniques being considered include oxygen-enriched ambient air staging (OEAS) and oxygen staging (OS).

  19. High performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Clement, Jason T.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-10-01

    The roundtrip electrochemical energy efficiency is improved from 63% to 76% at a current density of 200 mA cm-2 in an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) by utilizing modified carbon paper electrodes in the high-performance no-gap design. Heat treatment of the carbon paper electrodes in a 42% oxygen/58% nitrogen atmosphere increases the electrochemically wetted surface area from 0.24 to 51.22 m2 g-1, resulting in a 100-140 mV decrease in activation overpotential at operationally relevant current densities. An enriched oxygen environment decreases the amount of treatment time required to achieve high surface area. The increased efficiency and greater depth of discharge doubles the total usable energy stored in a fixed amount of electrolyte during operation at 200 mA cm-2.

  20. Emission of Oxygenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Indoor Solid Fuel Combustion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guofeng; Tao, Shu; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yifeng; Ding, Junnan; Xue, Miao; Min, Yujia; Zhu, Chen; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Xilong; Russell, Armistead G.

    2011-01-01

    Indoor solid fuel combustion is a dominant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) and the latter are believed to be more toxic than the former. However, there is limited quantitative information on the emissions of OPAHs from solid fuel combustion. In this study, emission factors of OPAHs (EFOPAH) for nine commonly used crop residues and five coals burnt in typical residential stoves widely used in rural China were measured under simulated kitchen conditions. The total EFOPAH ranged from 2.8±0.2 to 8.1±2.2 mg/kg for tested crop residues and from 0.043 to 71 mg/kg for various coals and 9-fluorenone was the most abundant specie. The EFOPAH for indoor crop residue burning were 1~2 orders of magnitude higher than those from open burning, and they were affected by fuel properties and combustion conditions, like moisture and combustion efficiency. For both crop residues and coals, significantly positive correlations were found between EFs for the individual OPAHs and the parent PAHs. An oxygenation rate, Ro, was defined as the ratio of the EFs between the oxygenated and parent PAH species to describe the formation potential of OPAHs. For the studied OPAH/PAH pairs, mean Ro values were 0.16 ~ 0.89 for crop residues and 0.03 ~ 0.25 for coals. Ro for crop residues burned in the cooking stove were much higher than those for open burning and much lower than those in ambient air, indicating the influence of secondary formation of OPAH and loss of PAHs. In comparison with parent PAHs, OPAHs showed a higher tendency to be associated with particulate matter (PM), especially fine PM, and the dominate size ranges were 0.7 ~ 2.1 µm for crop residues and high caking coals and < 0.7 µm for the tested low caking briquettes. PMID:21375317

  1. Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-06-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized Cu–Fe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the

  2. Optimization of Microwave Roasting for Dechlorination of CuCl Residue under Oxygen-Enriched Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhanyong, Guo; Shaohua, Ju; Jinhui, Peng; Libo, Zhang; Ting, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The clean utilization of the residue containing chloride, such as zinc oxide dust and CuCl residue, produced from zinc hydrometallurgy is very important for the recycle of valuable metals. In this paper, a new technology for dechlorination of the CuCl residue through thermal treatment with application of microwave and oxygen-enriched air roasting is brought out. And the response surface methodology (RSM) based on five-level, three-variable and central composite design (CCD) was used to optimize the operation parameters for increasing the dechlorination efficiency. The effects of temperature, roasting time and oxygen consumption on the dechlorination efficiency were studied and the optimal process conditions were identified. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the dechlorination process under the optimum condition. The results showed that the experimental data were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation. The optimized process conditions are identified to be a roasting temperature of 451°, heating duration of 114 min and oxygen consumption of 2.4 times the theoretical oxygen demand. A dechlorination efficiency of 96.4% could be achieved at the optimal process conditions.

  3. Combustion Stability Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper presents test data and analyses of combustion stability from the recent PCAD-funded test programs at the NASA MSFC. These test programs used swirl coaxial element injectors with liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants. Oxygen was injected conventionally in the center of the coaxial element, and swirl was provided by tangential entry slots. Injectors with 28-element and 40-element patterns were tested with several configurations of combustion chambers, including ablative and calorimeter spool sections, and several configurations of fuel injection design. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred with both injectors, and high-frequency combustion instability occurred at the first tangential (1T) transverse mode with the 40-element injector. In most tests, a transition between high-amplitude chug with gaseous methane flow and low-amplitude chug with liquid methane flow was readily observed. Chug analyses of both conditions were conducted using techniques from Wenzel and Szuch and from the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code. The 1T mode instability occurred in several tests and was apparent by high-frequency pressure measurements as well as dramatic increases in calorimeter-measured heat flux

  4. High-Efficiency, High-Capacity, Low-NOx Aluminum Melting Using Oxygen-Enhanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    D'Agostini, M.D.

    2000-06-02

    This report describes the development and application of a novel oxygen enhanced combustion system with an integrated vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) oxygen supply providing efficient, low NOx melting in secondary aluminum furnaces. The mainstay of the combustion system is a novel air-oxy-natural gas burner that achieves high productivity and energy efficiency with low NOx emissions through advanced mixing concepts and the use of separate high- and low-purity oxidizer streams. The technology was installed on a reverberatory, secondary aluminum melting plant at the Wabash Aluminum Alloy's Syracuse, N.Y. plant, where it is currently in operation. Field testing gave evidence that the new burner technology meets the stringent NOx emissions target of 0.323 lb NO2/ton aluminum, thus complying with regulations promulgated by Southern California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). Test results also indicated that the burner technology exceeded fuel efficiency and melting capacity goals. Economic modeling showed that the novel air-oxy-fuel (ADF) combustion technology provides a substantial increase in furnace profitability relative to air-fuel operation. Model results also suggest favorable economics for the air-oxy-fuel technology relative to a full oxy-fuel conversion of the furnace.

  5. Ultrathin Icosahedral Pt-Enriched Nanocage with Excellent Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity.

    PubMed

    He, Dong Sheng; He, Daping; Wang, Jing; Lin, Yue; Yin, Peiqun; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2016-02-10

    Cost-efficient utilization of Pt in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance for the potential industrial scale demand of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. Designing a hollow structure of a Pt catalyst offers a great opportunity to enhance the electrocatalytic performance and maximize the use of precious Pt. Herein we report a routine to synthesize ultrathin icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocages. In detail, the Pt atoms were conformally deposited on the surface of Pd icosahedral seeds, followed by selective removal of the Pd core by a concentrated HNO3 solution. The icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocage that is a few atomic layers thick includes the merits of abundant twin defects, an ultrahigh surface/volume ratio, and an ORR-favored Pt{111} facet, all of which have been demonstrated to be promoting factors for ORR. With a 10 times higher specific activity and 7 times higher mass activity, this catalyst shows more extraordinary ORR activity than the commercial Pt/C. The ORR activity of icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocages outperforms the cubic and octahedral nanocages reported in the literature, demonstrating the superiority of the icosahedral nanocage structure. PMID:26808073

  6. Oxygen bomb combustion of biological samples for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Gilberto B.; Carrilho, Elma Neide V. M.; Oliveira, Camila V.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2002-12-01

    A rapid sample preparation method is proposed for decomposition of milk powder, corn bran, bovine and fish tissues, containing certified contents of the analytes. The procedure involves sample combustion in a commercial stainless steel oxygen bomb operating at 25 bar. Most of the samples were decomposed within 5 min. Diluted nitric acid or water-soluble tertiary amines 10% v/v were used as absorption solutions. Calcium, Cu, K, Mg, Na, P, S and Zn were recovered with the bomb washings and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Ethanol mixed with paraffin was used as a combustion aid to allow complete combustion. A cooling step prior releasing of the bomb valve was employed to increase the efficiency of sample combustion. Iodine was also determined in milk samples spiked with potassium iodide to evaluate the volatilization and collection of iodine in amine CFA-C medium and the feasibility of its determination by ICP-OES with axial view configuration. Most of the element recoveries in the samples were between 91 and 105% and the certified and found contents exhibited a fair agreement at a 95% confidence level.

  7. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs

    PubMed Central

    Charton, Antoine; Péronnet, François; Doutreleau, Stephane; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Klein, Alexis; Jimenez, Liliana; Geny, Bernard; Diemunsch, Pierre; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2) supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Methods Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach). Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2), skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2) were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Results Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in the three groups, but when compared to the control group, the values remained significantly higher in animals that received the water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. Conclusions In this protocol, water enriched in O2 by electrolysis lessened the decline of peripheral tissue oxygenation. This observation is compatible with the claim that the electrolytic process generates water clathrates which trap O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along pressure gradients. Potential applications of O2-enriched water include an alternate method of oxygen supply. PMID:25210438

  8. A Brief Study on Toxic Combustion Products of the Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

    2005-01-01

    One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is the adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the NASA pneumatic-impact system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and determines the toxic combustion products produced from the burning of five selected polymers. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Zytel(Registered TradeMark) 42 (Nylon 6/6), Buna N (nitrile rubber), Witon(Registered TradeMark) A (copolymer of vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropylene), Neoflon(Registered TradeMark) (polychlorotrifluoroethylene), and Teflon(Registered TradeMark) (polytetrafluoroethylene), were tested in the NASA pneumatic-impact test system at 17.2-MPa oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned; combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed using various methods. The results show that the NASA pneumatic-impact system is an appropriate test system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and to collect combustion products for further chemical analysis. The composition of the combustion product gas generated from burning the five selected polymers are presented and discussed.

  9. Astronomical Oxygen Isotopic Evidence for Supernova Enrichment of the Solar System Birth Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Edward; Gounelle, M.; Smith, R. L.; Morris, M. R.; Pontoppidan, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    Ratios among [C16O], [C17O] and [C18O] from young stellar objects (YSOs) obtained by high-resolution infrared spectroscopy (CRIRES, NIRSPEC) suggest that the solar system is indeed unusual in its 18O/17O compared with the present-day Galaxy at a variety of scales of observation. Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models suggest that 18O/17O is independent of time. A nearly constant Galactic 18O/17O with time is indicated by existing data showing a systematic variation in oxygen isotopologue ratios with distance from the Galactic center. In this context, we show that the disparity between present-day Galactic and solar 18O/17O is explained if the solar system was born in an environment enriched by type II supernovae from low-mass progenitors. Enrichment by ejecta from exploding B stars (not O stars) on the order of 1 % by mass can account for the enhancement in 18O/17O of the birth environment of the solar system compared with normal Galactic values. Analysis of the stochastic nature of star formation utilizing a well-known mass generation function shows that the parental molecular cloud complex that produced the solar system was proximal to a cluster composed of order 500 stars. Larger clusters produce SNe II with oxygen isotope ratios that are inconsistent with enhancement in 18O/17O. This cluster predated the solar system by approximately 10 to 30 Myrs. Enrichment by B star ejecta explains not only the anomalous 18O/17O of the solar system but also its anomalous Si isotopic composition and the former presence of extinct 60Fe.

  10. Photographic Study of Combustion in a Rocket Engine I : Variation in Combustion of Liquid Oxygen and Gasoline with Seven Methods of Propellant Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellman, Donald R; Humphrey, Jack C

    1948-01-01

    Motion pictures at camera speeds up to 3000 frames per second were taken of the combustion of liquid oxygen and gasoline in a 100-pound-thrust rocket engine. The engine consisted of thin contour and injection plates clamped between two clear plastic sheets forming a two-dimensional engine with a view of the entire combustion chamber and nozzle. A photographic investigation was made of the effect of seven methods of propellant injection on the uniformity of combustion. From the photographs, it was found that the flame front extended almost to the faces of the injectors with most of the injection methods, all the injection systems resulted in a considerable nonuniformity of combustion, and luminosity rapidly decreased in the divergent part of the nozzle. Pressure vibration records indicated combustion vibrations that approximately corresponded to the resonant frequencies of the length and the thickness of the chamber. The combustion temperature divided by the molecular weight of the combustion gases as determined from the combustion photographs was about 50 to 70 percent of the theoretical value.

  11. Chemical-looping combustion of coal with metal oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjani Siriwardane; Hanjing Tian; George Richards; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston

    2009-08-15

    The combustion and reoxidation properties of direct coal chemical-looping combustion (CLC) over CuO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CO{sub 3}O{sub 4}, NiO, and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor studies. When coal is heated in either nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), 50% of weight loss was observed because of partial pyrolysis, consistent with the proximate analysis. Among various metal oxides evaluated, CuO showed the best reaction properties: CuO can initiate the reduction reaction as low as 500{sup o}C and complete the full combustion at 700{sup o}C. In addition, the reduced copper can be fully reoxidized by air at 700{sup o}C. The combustion products formed during the CLC reaction of the coal/metal oxide mixture are CO{sub 2} and water, while no carbon monoxide was observed. Multicycle TGA tests and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor tests strongly supported the feasibility of CLC of coal by using CuO as an oxygen carrier. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of solid reaction products indicated some changes in the surface morphology of a CuO-coal sample after reduction/oxidation reactions at 800 {sup o}C. However, significant surface sintering was not observed. The interactions of fly ash with metal oxides were investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermodynamic analysis. Overall, the results indicated that it is feasible to develop CLC with coal by metal oxides as oxygen carriers. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Heavy metal enrichment characteristics in ash of municipal solid waste combustion in CO2/O2 atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tang, YuTing; Ma, XiaoQian; Yu, QuanHeng; Zhang, Can; Lai, Zhiyi; Zhang, Xiaoshen

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigated the behavior of six heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr, Ni and Zn) in the bottom ashes of recycled polyvinyl chloride pellets (PVC), wood sawdust (WS) and paper mixture (PM), representing the common components of municipal solid waste (MSW), obtained during combustion in CO2/O2 atmosphere in a lab-scale electrically heated tube furnace. Replacement of N2 by CO2 did not obviously change the shape of relative enrichment factor (RE) curves and subsequent order of heavy metals, but increased enrichment of these heavy metals in bottom ashes of WS, PM and PVC. The increment of O2 concentration in CO2/O2 atmosphere further increased RE values. It was only when the temperature was higher than or equal to 700°C that the increment of the combustion temperature reduced the RE values of heavy metals. The effect of temperature on heavy metals evaporation was the most pronounced for the medium volatile metal Pb, and the least for the low volatiles Cr and Ni. The effect of temperature was more pronounced for PVC ash than for WS and PM ashes. This paper contributes to the control of heavy metals during MSW incineration and management of MSW oxy-fuel residues. PMID:26130169

  13. A study of combustion of hydrogen-enriched gasoline in a spark ignition engine

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolescu, N.; Chiriac, R.

    1996-09-01

    An investigation has been done on the influence of small amounts of hydrogen added to hydrocarbons-air mixtures on combustion characteristics. The effect of hydrogen addition to a hydrocarbon-air mixture was firstly approached in an experimental bomb, to measure the laminar burning velocity and the shift of lean flammability limit. Experiments carried out with a single-cylinder four stroke SI engine confirmed the possibility of expanding the combustion stability limit, which correlates well with the general trend of enhancing the rate of combustion. An increase of brake thermal efficiency has been obtained with a reduction of HC emissions; the NO{sub x} emissions were higher, except for very lean mixtures.

  14. Effect of CO/sub 2/ enrichment on growth and reproduction of wheat grown under low oxygen. [Triticum aestivum

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, M.E.; Scheld, H.W.; Strain, B.R.

    1987-04-01

    Two cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cvs Sonoita and Yecoro Rojo) were grown to maturity in a Phytotron B chamber within four sub-chambers which imposed two CO/sub 2/ levels (350 or 1000 ppm) at either ambient (21%) or low oxygen (5%). Techniques of growth analysis were used to characterize changes in plant carbon budgets imposed by the gas regimes. Large increases in leaf area were seen in the low oxygen treatments, due primarily to a stimulation of tillering. No necrosis was observed in roots developing at 5% oxygen but rather root development increased dramatically. Flowering was much delayed in the low oxygen, 350 ppm carbon dioxide regime and the spikes which did develop did not mature. While one cultivar (Sonoita) did not respond to CO/sub 2/ enrichment (1000 ppm) at ambient oxygen in terms of increases in leaf area and head number, carbon dioxide enrichment overcame the low oxygen effect on flowering in both cultivars. The results demonstrate a previously unknown interaction between carbon dioxide enrichment and low oxygen as they affect reproduction and may help elucidate the nature of low-oxygen-induced infertility.

  15. Corrosion prevention in copper combustion chamber liners of liquid oxygen/methane booster engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Gage, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a protective gold coating for preventing the corrosion of copper combustion chamber liners in liquid oxygen/methane booster engines is discussed with reference to experimental results. Gold-plated and unplated copper alloy specimens were tested in a carbothermal test facility providing realistic simulations of booster engine cooling channel conditions, such as temperature, pressure, flow velocity, and heat flux. Metallographic examinations of the unplated specimens showed severe corrosion as a result of the reaction with the sulfur-containing contaminant in the fuel. In contrast, gold-plated specimens showed no corrosion under similar operating conditions.

  16. Oxy Coal Combustion at the US EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygen enriched coal (oxy-coal) combustion is a developing, and potentially a strategically key technology intended to accommodate direct CO2 recovery and sequestration. Oxy-coal combustion is also intended for retrofit application to existing power plants. During oxy-coal comb...

  17. Importance of atomic oxygen in preheating zone in plasma-assisted combustion of a steady-state premixed burner flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaima, K.; Akashi, H.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-09-01

    It is widely believed that electron impact processes play essential roles in plasma-assisted combustion. However, the concrete roles of high-energy electrons have not been fully understood yet. In this work, we examined the density of atomic oxygen in a premixed burner flame with the superposition of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The density of atomic oxygen in the reaction zone was not affected by the superposition of DBD, indicating that the amount of atomic oxygen produced by combustion reactions was much larger than that produced by electron impact processes. On the other hand, in the preheating zone, we observed high-frequency oscillation of the density of atomic oxygen at the timings of the pulsed current of DBD. The oscillation suggests the rapid consumption of additional atomic oxygen by combustion reactions. A numerical simulation using Chemkin indicates the shortened ignition delay time when adding additional atomic oxygen in the period of low-temperature oxidation. The present results reveals the importance of atomic oxygen, which is produced by the effect of high-energy electrons, in the preheating zone in plasma-assisted combustion of the steady-state premixed burner flame.

  18. Carbon monoxide and oxygen combustion experiments: A demonstration of Mars in situ propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using carbon monoxide and oxygen as rocket propellants was examined both experimentally and theoretically. The steady-state combustion of carbon monoxide and oxygen was demonstrated for the first time in a subscale rocket engine. Measurements of experimental characteristic velocity, vacuum specific impulse, and thrust coefficient efficiency were obtained over a mixture ratio range of 0.30 to 2.0 and a chamber pressures of 1070 and 530 kPa. The theoretical performance of the propellant combination was studied parametrically over the same mixture ratio range. In addition to one dimensional ideal performance predictions, various performance reduction mechanisms were also modeled, including finite-rate kinetic reactions, two-dimensional divergence effects and viscous boundary layer effects.

  19. Carbon monoxide and oxygen combustion experiments - A demonstration of Mars in situ propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using carbon monoxide and oxygen as rocket propellants was examined both experimentally and theoretically. The steady-state combustion of carbon monoxide and oxygen was demonstrated for the first time in a subscale rocket engine. Measurements of experimental characteristic velocity, vacuum specific impulse, and thrust coefficient efficiency were obtained over a mixture ratio range of 0.30 to 2.0 and a chamber pressures of 1070 and 530 kPa. The theoretical performance of the propellant combination was studied parametrically over the same mixture ratio range. In addition to one dimensional ideal performance predictions, various performance reduction mechanisms were also modeled, including finite-rate kinetic reactions, two-dimensional divergence effects and viscous boundary layer effects.

  20. Combustion synthesis of Ni Zn ferrite powder—influence of oxygen balance value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chyi-Ching; Tsai, Jih-Sheng; Huang, Ting-Han; Peng, Cheng-Hsiung; Chen, San-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    In this study, Ni 0.5Zn 0.5Fe 2O 4 powder was synthesized via an exothermic reaction between nitrates [Ni(NO 3) 2·6H 2O, Zn(NO 3) 2·6H 2O, Fe(NO 3) 3·9H 2O, and NH 4NO 3] and glycine [NH 2CH 2COOH]. By adjusting the glycine-to-nitrates ratio, the oxygen balance (OB) values of the reactant mixtures can be varied in which the combustion phenomena is altered and thereby the as-synthesized products with different characteristics are obtained. An interpretation based on the measurement of maximum combustion temperature ( Tc) and the amounts of gas evolved during reaction for various OB values has been proposed regarding the nature of combustion and its correlation with the characteristics of as-synthesized products. After instrumental analyses, it is shown that the as-synthesized powders are nanoscale crystallites with a large specific surface area and they inherit a superparamagnetic behavior.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for measurement of fuel/oxygen mixing in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dackman, Matthew; Lewis, J. W. L.; Chen, Ying-Ling; Shi, Lei

    2007-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied for measurement of C-O equivalence ratios and mixing in a methane/oxygen flame. A nominal 10-nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to effect a cascade-type optical breakdown in the flame, which is projected above a pre-mixed McKenna burner. Atomic and ionic carbon and oxygen spectra are used to verify the combustion equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5 to 2.0. Emission spectra are obtained separately from the near ultraviolet (vicinity of 250nm) and from the visible (vicinity of 430nm) using gated array detectors. Emission data are obtained over a range of sub-microsecond delay times following the laser pulse. The ultraviolet lines exhibit significantly larger signal-to-noise/background ratios, but the visible lines possess greater relative intensity. Implications of these results are discussed for local measurements of fuel-oxidizer ratios for both atmospheric pressure and high pressure combustion.

  2. Ignition and devolatilization of pulverized bituminous coal particles during oxygen/carbon dioxide coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandro Molina; Christopher R. Shaddix

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen/carbon dioxide recycle coal combustion is actively being investigated because of its potential to facilitate CO{sub 2} sequestration and to achieve emission reductions. In the work reported here, the effect of enhanced oxygen levels and CO{sub 2} bath gas is independently analyzed for their influence on single-particle pulverized coal ignition of a U.S. eastern bituminous coal. The experiments show that the presence of CO{sub 2} and a lower O{sub 2} concentration increase the ignition delay time but have no measurable effect on the time required to complete volatile combustion, once initiated. For the ignition process observed in the experiments, the CO{sub 2} results are explained by its higher molar specific heat and the O{sub 2} results are explained by the effect of O{sub 2} concentration on the local mixture reactivity. Particle ignition and devolatilization properties in a mixture of 30% O{sub 2} in CO{sub 2} are very similar to those in air. 23 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The sulfur poisoning of the nickel/oxygen-enriched yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxing; Wan, Zhengyang; Yang, Zongxian

    2015-10-01

    The sulfur poisoning properties of the nickel/oxygen-enriched yttria-stabilized zirconia (denoted as Ni/YSZ + O) with or without interface O vacancy are studied using the first-principles method based on density functional theory. The effects of the extra O atom at the subsurface vacancy of Ni/YSZ are focused. It is found that S at the Ni/YSZ + O can diffuse easily away from the interface oxygen to the top Ni layer sites. With the formation of O vacancy at the Ni/YSZ + O interface (denoted as Ni/(YSZ + O)-Ov), the adsorbed S prefers to diffuse back to the Ni/YSZ interface O vacancy. Compared with Ni/YSZ-Ov, the Ni/(YSZ + O)-Ov can effectively not only weaken the S adsorption at the interface O vacancy site, but also improve the diffusion of S out of the interface O vacancy. Therefore, the Ni/YSZ + O can help to alleviate the sulfur poisoning at the interface O vacancy site as compared with the Ni/YSZ.

  4. Fluorination of an antiepileptic drug: A self supporting transporter by oxygen enrichment mechanism.

    PubMed

    Natchimuthu, V; Amoros, J; Ravi, S

    2016-03-01

    Drug therapy of seizures involves producing high levels of antiepileptic drugs in the blood. Drug must enter the brain by crossing from the blood into the brain tissue, called a transvascular route (TVR). Even before the drug can reach the brain tissue, factors such as systemic toxicity, macrophage phagocytises and reduction in oxygen content limit the success of this TVR. Encapsulating the drug within a nano scale delivering system, synthesising drugs with low molecular weight are the best mechanisms to deliver the drug to the brain. But through this article, we have explored a possibility of attaching a molecule 4-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid (TFMBA), that possess more number of fluorine atom, to benzodiazepine (BDZ) resulting in an ionic salt (S)-(+)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine5,11(10H,11aH)-dione with 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoic acid. By this way, reducing the toxicity of BDZ than the conventional anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), increasing the solubility, reducing the melting point, enriching the TVR with excess oxygen content with the support of fluorine. With all these important prerequisites fulfilled, the drug along with the attached molecule is expected to travel more comfortably through the TVR without any external support than any other conventional AEDs. FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HRMS spectroscopy, HRTEM and In vitro cytotoxicity analysis supports this study. PMID:26708322

  5. Numerical Investigation of Combustion and Flow Dynamics in a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Yu, Zhiyi

    2016-02-01

    The combustion and flow behavior within a high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun is very complex and involves multiphase flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and supersonic/subsonic transitions. Additionally, this behavior has a significant effect on the formation of a coating. Non-premixed combustion models have been developed and are able to provide insight into the underlying physics of the process. Therefore, this investigation employs a non-premixed combustion model and the SST k - ω turbulence model to simulate the flow field of the JP5000 (Praxair-TAFA, US) HVOF thermal spray gun. The predicted temperature and velocity have a high level of agreement with experimental data when using the non-premixed combustion model. The results are focused on the fuel combustion, the subsequent gas dynamics within the HVOF gun, and the development of a supersonic free jet outside the gun. Furthermore, the oxygen/fuel inlet turbulence intensity, the fuel droplet size, and the oxygen/fuel ratio are investigated to determine their effect on the supersonic flow characteristics of the combustion gas.

  6. Diurnal variation of oxygen isotopic enrichment in asymmetric-18 ozone from the middle stratosphere to lower mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomohiro; Kasai, Yasuko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen isotopic signature is a powerful tracer of chemical and physical processes in the earth's atmosphere. Ozone has the largest oxygen isotopic enrichment in other oxygen-included species and is a source of oxygen isotopic enrichment. The vertical profile of ozone isotopic enrichment has been measured; however its variation over time remains uninvestigated. As ozone isotopic enrichment is generated by the ozone formation reaction and ozone photolysis, ozone isotopic enrichment is expected to vary over the course of a day. In this paper, the diurnal variation in oxygen isotopic enrichment of asymmetric 18 heavy ozone (δ^{18}OOO) was reported from the middle stratosphere to the lower mesosphere for the first time. We used the Level 2 vertical profile data derived from the atmospheric limb emission spectra acquired by the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) with the optimized retrieval algorithm for ozone isotopic ratio by SMILES (TOROROS). In the middle stratosphere, δ^{18}OOO increased during the day with amplitudes of approximately 3.5 % and 2.2 % at 32 and 37 km, respectively. No significant variation was observed in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere, although δ^{18}OOO tended to decrease during the day with increasing altitude. This trend is opposite to that observed in the stratosphere. We estimated the diurnal variation in δ^{18}OOO with isotopic fractionation of ozone photolysis calculated by the photolysis rates of major and minor ozones. The estimation reproduced the daytime increase in the stratosphere and daytime decrease in the mesosphere. The contributions of ozone photolysis to the daytime increase were approximately 70 % and 80 % at 32 and 37 km, respectively. The daytime increase at an altitude of 32 km was underestimated, which indicates possible contributions from other chemical reactions such as collision with NO_x species. We concluded that ozone photolysis plays a key role in determining the diurnal

  7. Ozonolysis of nonmethane hydrocarbons as a source of the observed mass independent oxygen isotope enrichment in tropospheric CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RöCkmann, Thomas; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Neeb, Peter; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1998-01-01

    Combined 17O and 18O measurements of tropospheric CO from two northern hemisphere (NH) sites reveal systematically enhanced 17O levels, confirming the existence of significant mass independent oxygen isotope enrichment in this important trace gas. When CO levels increase in the NH winter, the mass independent enrichment decreases proportionally. A possible source of this rare isotope effect in CO is transfer of the mass independent enrichment from O3 to the CO pool via ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons such as isoprene and terpenes. Laboratory ozonolysis experiments indeed confirm that this process is a potentially important source of mass independently enriched CO. The extra 17O enrichment found in ozonolysis-derived CO is similar to the mass independent fractionation measured on ozone. If ozonolysis is the only source of mass independent enrichment in CO, it is estimated that about 10% of all CO in middle to high latitude winter, at ground level, originates from the ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons. While the laboratory experiments prove that ozonolysis is a source of mass independent enrichment in CO, a further problem unfolds. Because tropospheric O3 is strongly enriched in 18O as well, this enrichment is also transferred to the CO inventory. When 10% of the CO inventory has the strong 18O enrichment, the measured low 18O abundance of atmospheric CO requires for compensation the existence of a strongly 18O depleted CO source, or a selective isotopic modification due to isotope fractionation. No such source has been identified to date, and thus ozonolysis may not be the only source of mass independent fractionation in atmospheric CO. Because the mass independent isotopic enrichment is by its nature indestructible by common (i.e., mass dependent) fractionation processes, it is an ideal tracer.

  8. Emissions of Parent, Nitro, and Oxygenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Residential Wood Combustion in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, Guofeng; TAO, Shu; WEI, Siye; ZHANG, Yanyan; WANG, Rong; WANG, Bin; LI, Wei; SHEN, Huizhong; HUANG, Ye; CHEN, Yuanchen; CHEN, Han; YANG, Yifeng; WANG, Wei; WANG, Xilong; LIU, Wenxin; SIMONICH, Staci L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Residential wood combustion is one of the important sources of air pollution in developing countries. Among the pollutants emitted, parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAHs) and their derivatives, including nitrated and oxygenated PAHs (nPAHs and oPAHs), are of concern because of their mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. In order to evaluate their impacts on regional air quality and human health, emission inventories, based on realistic emission factors (EFs), are needed. In this study, the EFs of 28 pPAHs (EFPAH28), 9 nPAHs (EFPAHn9) and 4 oPAHs (EFPAHo4) were measured for residential combustion of 27 wood fuels in rural China. The measured EFPAH28, EFPAHn9, and EFPAHo4 for brushwood were 86.7±67.6, 3.22±1.95×10−2, and 5.56±4.32 mg/kg, which were significantly higher than 12.7±7.0, 8.27±5.51×10−3, and 1.19±1.87 mg/kg for fuel wood combustion (p < 0.05). Sixteen U.S. EPA priority pPAHs contributed approximately 95% of the total of the 28 pPAHs measured. EFs of pPAHs, nPAHs, and oPAHs were positively correlated with one another. Measured EFs varied obviously depending on fuel properties and combustion conditions. The EFs of pPAHs, nPAHs, and oPAHs were significantly correlated with modified combustion efficiency and fuel moisture. Nitro-naphthalene and 9-fluorenone were the most abundant nPAHs and oPAHs identified. Both nPAHs and oPAHs showed relatively high tendencies to be present in the particulate phase than pPAHs due to their lower vapor pressures. The gas-particle partitioning of freshly emitted pPAHs, nPAHs and oPAHs was primarily controlled by organic carbon absorption. PMID:22765266

  9. Pressurized chemical-looping combustion of coal with an iron ore-based oxygen carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Rui; Song, Min; Zhang, Shuai; Shen, Laihong; Song, Qilei; Lu, Zuoji

    2010-06-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a new combustion technology with inherent separation of CO{sub 2}. Most of the previous investigations on CLC of solid fuels were conducted under atmospheric pressure. A pressurized CLC combined cycle (PCLC-CC) system is proposed as a promising coal combustion technology with potential higher system efficiency, higher fuel conversion, and lower cost for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In this study pressurized CLC of coal with Companhia Valedo Rio Doce (CVRD) iron ore was investigated in a laboratory fixed bed reactor. CVRD iron ore particles were exposed alternately to reduction by 0.4 g of Chinese Xuzhou bituminous coal gasified with 87.2% steam/N{sub 2} mixture and oxidation with 5% O{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at 970 C. The operating pressure was varied between 0.1 MPa and 0.6 MPa. First, control experiments of steam coal gasification over quartz sand were performed. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are the major components of the gasification products, and the operating pressure influences the gas composition. Higher concentrations of CO{sub 2} and lower fractions of CO, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} during the reduction process with CVRD iron ore was achieved under higher pressures. The effects of pressure on the coal gasification rate in the presence of the oxygen carrier were different for pyrolysis and char gasification. The pressurized condition suppresses the initial coal pyrolysis process while it also enhances coal char gasification and reduction with iron ore in steam, and thus improves the overall reaction rate of CLC. The oxidation rates and variation of oxygen carrier conversion are higher at elevated pressures reflecting higher reduction level in the previous reduction period. Scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses show that particles become porous after experiments but maintain structure and size after several cycles. Agglomeration was not observed in this study. An EDX analysis demonstrates

  10. Gut microbiota associated with HIV infection is significantly enriched in bacteria tolerant to oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dubourg, Grégory; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Hüe, Sophie; Surenaud, Mathieu; Bachar, Dipankar; Robert, Catherine; Michelle, Caroline; Ravaux, Isabelle; Mokhtari, Saadia; Million, Matthieu; Stein, Andreas; Brouqui, Philippe; Levy, Yves; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gut microbiota modifications occurring during HIV infection have recently been associated with inflammation and microbial translocation. However, discrepancies between studies justified a comprehensive analysis performed on a large sample size. Design and methods In a case–control study, next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was applied to the faecal microbiota of 31 HIV-infected patients, of whom 18 were treated with antiretroviral treatment (ART), compared with 27 healthy controls. 21 sera samples from HIV-infected patients and 7 sera samples from control participants were used to test the presence of 25 markers of inflammation and/or immune activation. Results Diversity was significantly reduced in HIV individuals when compared with controls and was not restored in the ART group. The relative abundance of several members of Ruminococcaceae such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was critically less abundant in the HIV-infected group and inversely correlated with inflammation/immune activation markers. Members of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae were found to be enriched and positively correlated with these markers. There were significantly more aerotolerant species enriched in HIV samples (42/52 species, 80.8%) when compared with the control group (14/87 species, 16.1%; χ2 test, p<10−5, conditional maximum-likelihood estimate (CMLE) OR=21.9). Conclusions Imbalance between aerobic and anaerobic flora observed in HIV faecal microbiota could be a consequence of the gut impairment classically observed in HIV infection via the production of oxygen. Overgrowth of proinflammatory aerobic species during HIV infection raises the question of antioxidant supplementation, such as vitamin C, E or N-acetylcysteine. PMID:27547442

  11. Low Reynolds Number Droplet Combustion In CO2 Enriched Atmospheres In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, M. C.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of radiative feedback from the gas phase in micro-gravity combustion processes has been of increasing concern because of the implications in the selection and evaluation of appropriate fire suppressants. The use of CO2, an optically thick gas in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, has garnered widespread acceptance as an effective fire suppressant for most ground based applications. Since buoyant forces often dominate the flow field in 1-g environments the temperature field between the flame front and the fuel surface is not significantly affected by gas phase radiative absorption and re-emission as these hot gases are quickly swept downstream. However, in reduced gravity environments where buoyant-driven convective flows are negligible and where low-speed forced convective flows may be present at levels where gas phase radiation becomes important, then changes in environment that enhance gas phase radiative effects need to be better understood. This is particularly true in assessments of flammability limits and selection of appropriate fire suppressants for future space applications. In recognition of this, a ground-based investigation has been established that uses a droplet combustion configuration to systematically study the effects of enhanced gas phase radiation on droplet burn rates, flame structure, and radiative output from the flame zone.

  12. Oxygen-Rich Combustion Experiments in LOX/GH2 Uni-Element Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, S. A.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Research efforts are directed towards understanding specific technical issues that must be resolved to minimize the risk and cost associated with developing oxygen-rich rocket preburners. The experiments concentrate on hot-fire uni-element tests to demonstrate concepts which can be incorporated into hardware design and development. Two concepts under consideration are direct injection of propellants at high O/F (oxidizer/fuel ratio), and stoichiometric injection followed by downstream injection of LOX to achieve the high O/F. The specific results given here address the performance, ignition, combustion stability, and wall heat transfer aspects of a direct-injection swirl coaxial element design operating at high O/F.

  13. Kinetic mechanism for low-pressure oxygen/methane ignition and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavinskaya, N. A.; Wiegand, M.; Starcke, J. H.; Riedel, U.; Haidn, O. J.; Suslov, D.

    2013-03-01

    It is known that during a launch of a rocket, the interaction of the exhaust gases of rocket engines with the atmosphere causes a local depletion of the ozone layer. In order to study these chemical processes in detail, a chemical reaction mechanism of the methane oxidation appropriate for high- and low-pressure conditions and a chemical reactor network to reproduce operating conditions in rocket engines and in the environment have been developed. An earlier developed detailed chemical kinetic model for the high-pressure CH4/O2 combustion has been improved for the low pressure and low temperature methane combustion and augmented with a submodel for NOx formation. The main model improvements are related to the pressure depending reactions. The model has been validated for operating conditions of 0.02 < p < 100 atm, 300 < T < 1800 K and 0.5 < Φ < 3.0. The network of chemical reactors available in CHEMICAL WORKBENCH software has been successfully developed to simulate chemical processes in the convergent divergent rocket nozzle and in the exhaust-jet. Simulations performed have shown that the exhaust gases of a methane/oxygen propelled liquid rocket engine contain high amounts of active radicals, which can influence the formation of nitrogen compounds and consume ozone in the atmosphere.

  14. Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Enriched 3D Porous Carbon for Supercapacitors of High Volumetric Capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Liu, Kang; Gao, Xiang; Yao, Bin; Huo, Kaifu; Cheng, Yongliang; Cheng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Dongchang; Wang, Bo; Sun, Wanmei; Ding, Dong; Liu, Meilin; Huang, Liang

    2015-11-11

    Efficient utilization and broader commercialization of alternative energies (e.g., solar, wind, and geothermal) hinges on the performance and cost of energy storage and conversion systems. For now and in the foreseeable future, the combination of rechargeable batteries and electrochemical capacitors remains the most promising option for many energy storage applications. Porous carbonaceous materials have been widely used as an electrode for batteries and supercapacitors. To date, however, the highest specific capacitance of an electrochemical double layer capacitor is only ∼200 F/g, although a wide variety of synthetic approaches have been explored in creating optimized porous structures. Here, we report our findings in the synthesis of porous carbon through a simple, one-step process: direct carbonization of kelp in an NH3 atmosphere at 700 °C. The resulting oxygen- and nitrogen-enriched carbon has a three-dimensional structure with specific surface area greater than 1000 m(2)/g. When evaluated as an electrode for electrochemical double layer capacitors, the porous carbon structure demonstrated excellent volumetric capacitance (>360 F/cm(3)) with excellent cycling stability. This simple approach to low-cost carbonaceous materials with unique architecture and functionality could be a promising alternative to fabrication of porous carbon structures for many practical applications, including batteries and fuel cells. PMID:26477268

  15. Experiments on chemical looping combustion of coal with a NiO based oxygen carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Laihong; Wu, Jiahua; Xiao, Jun

    2009-03-15

    A chemical looping combustion process for coal using interconnected fluidized beds with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} is proposed in this paper. The configuration comprises a high velocity fluidized bed as an air reactor, a cyclone, and a spout-fluid bed as a fuel reactor. The high velocity fluidized bed is directly connected to the spout-fluid bed through the cyclone. Gas composition of both fuel reactor and air reactor, carbon content of fly ash in the fuel reactor, carbon conversion efficiency and CO{sub 2} capture efficiency were investigated experimentally. The results showed that coal gasification was the main factor which controlled the contents of CO and CH{sub 4} concentrations in the flue gas of the fuel reactor, carbon conversion efficiency in the process of chemical looping combustion of coal with NiO-based oxygen carrier in the interconnected fluidized beds. Carbon conversion efficiency reached only 92.8% even when the fuel reactor temperature was high up to 970 C. There was an inherent carbon loss in the process of chemical looping combustion of coal in the interconnected fluidized beds. The inherent carbon loss was due to an easy elutriation of fine char particles from the freeboard of the spout-fluid bed, which was inevitable in this kind of fluidized bed reactor. Further improvement of carbon conversion efficiency could be achieved by means of a circulation of fine particles elutriation into the spout-fluid bed or the high velocity fluidized bed. CO{sub 2} capture efficiency reached to its equilibrium of 80% at the fuel reactor temperature of 960 C. The inherent loss of CO{sub 2} capture efficiency was due to bypassing of gases from the fuel reactor to the air reactor, and the product of residual char burnt with air in the air reactor. Further experiments should be performed for a relatively long-time period to investigate the effects of ash and sulfur in coal on the reactivity of nickel-based oxygen carrier in the continuous CLC reactor

  16. Microgravity Droplet Combustion in CO2 Enriched Environments at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Nayagam, V.; Williams, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Microgravity droplet combustion experiments were performed in elevated concentrations of CO2 at pressures of 1.0 atm, 3.0 atm, and 5.0 atm to examine the effects of a radiatively participating suppression agent in space applications. Methanol and n-heptane droplets, with an initial diameter of 2.0 mm supported on a quartz fiber, were used in these experiments. The ambient O2 concentration was held constant at 21% and the CO2 concentrations ranged from 0% to a maximum of 70%, by volume with the balance consisting of N2 . Results from the methanol tests showed slight decreases in burning rates with increased CO2 concentrations at all ambient pressures. The n-heptane tests show slight increases in burning rates with increasing CO2 concentrations at each pressure level. Instantaneous radiative heat flux was also measured using both a broadband radiometer (i.e., wavelengths from 0.6 microns to 40.0 microns) and a narrowband radiometer (i.e., centered at 5.6 microns with a filter width at half maximum of 1.5 microns). Radiative exchanges between the droplet and surrounding gases as well as the soot field produce departures from the classical quasisteady theory which would predict a decrease in burning rates with increasing CO2 concentrations in microgravity.

  17. Combustion, Respiration and Intermittent Exercise: A Theoretical Perspective on Oxygen Uptake and Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first “modern” investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier’s work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2) uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ) and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ). When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result. PMID:24833508

  18. Combustion, respiration and intermittent exercise: a theoretical perspective on oxygen uptake and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Scott, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first "modern" investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier's work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2) uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ) and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ). When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result. PMID:24833508

  19. Partitioning of metal species during an enriched fuel combustion experiment. speciation in the gaseous and particulate phases.

    PubMed

    Pavageau, Marie-Pierre; Morin, Anne; Seby, Fabienne; Guimon, Claude; Krupp, Eva; Pécheyran, Christophe; Poulleau, Jean; Donard, Olivier F X

    2004-04-01

    Combustion processes are the most important source of metal in the atmosphere and need to be better understood to improve flue gas treatment and health impact studies. This combustion experiment was designed to study metal partitioning and metal speciation in the gaseous and particulate phases. A light fuel oil was enriched with 15 organometallic compounds of the following elements: Pb, Hg, As, Cu, Zn, Cd, Se, Sn, Mn, V, Tl, Ni, Co, Cr, and Sb. The resulting mixture was burnt in a pilot-scale fuel combustion boiler under controlled conditions. After filtration of the particles, the gaseous species were sampled in the stack through a heated sampling tube simultaneously by standardized washing bottles-based sampling techniques and cryogenically. The cryogenic samples were collected at -80 degrees C for further speciation analysis by LT/GC-ICPMS. Three species of selenium and two of mercury were evidenced as volatile species in the flue gas. Thermodynamic predictions and experiments suggest the following volatile metal species to be present in the flue gas: H2Se, CSSe, CSe2, SeCl2, Hg(0), and HgCl2. Quantification of volatile metal species in comparison between cryogenic techniques and the washing bottles-based sampling method is also discussed. Concerning metal partitioning, the results indicated that under these conditions, at least 60% (by weight) of the elements Pb, Sn, Cu, Co, Tl, Mn, V, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Sb mixed to the fuel were found in the particulate matter. For As and Se, 37 and 17%, respectively, were detected in the particles, and no particulate mercury was found. Direct metal speciation in particles was performed by XPS allowing the determination of the oxidation state of the following elements: Sb(V), Tl(III), Mn(IV), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cr(III), Ni(II), Co(II), V(V), and Cu(II). Water soluble species of inorganic Cr, As, and Se in particulate matter were determined by HPLC/ICP-MS and identified in the oxidation state Cr(III), As(V), and Se(IV). PMID

  20. Combustion of solid fuel slabs with gaseous oxygen in a hybrid motor analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene) fuel cross-linked with diisocyanate was burned with gaseous oxygen (GOX) under various operating conditions. Large-amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed-line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from plus or minus 20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of plus or minus 1.5%. Embedded fine--wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations are thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real-time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thicknesses and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented. Several tests were conducted using, simultaneously, one translucent fuel slab and one fuel slab processed with carbon black powder. The addition of carbon black did not affect the measured regression rates or

  1. Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project is presented. The overview includes project metrics, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on some of the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Objective: Development of comprehensive detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms of jet fuels for chemically-reacting flow modeling. Scientific Challenges: 1) Developing experimental facilities capable of handling higher hydrocarbons and providing benchmark combustion data. 2) Determining and understanding ignition and combustion characteristics, such as laminar flame speeds, extinction stretch rates, and autoignition delays, of jet fuels and hydrocarbons relevant to jet surrogates. 3) Developing comprehensive kinetic models for jet fuels.

  2. Absorption spectroscopy of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water species for applications in combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Anhua

    Laser absorption spectroscopy has been a useful tool applied in combustion diagnostics because of its capability to measure the species' concentration, particularly to measure concentration, temperature, and pressure simultaneously. These measurements provide the necessary information for dynamic combustion control. Due to its advantages such as fast response, non-intrusive nature and applicability under harsh environment like high temperature and high pressure, absorption laser spectroscopy makes it possible to monitor combustion system on-line and in situ. Since its development for more than thirty years, laser spectroscopy has matured, and the novel and advanced laser sensors have pushed it to be applied fast. On the other hand, industry still needs cheaper and more operable spectroscopy, which becomes an important consideration in the development and application of modern laser spectroscopy. This study presents an instrumental structure including the algorithm of the spectrum computation and the hardware configuration. The algorithm applied the central maximum value of the spectrum to simplify the computation. The whole calculation was done extensively using Beer-Lambert theory and HITRAN database which makes it efficient and applicable. This research conducted the simulations of high temperature species, such as CO2, H2O to carry out the algorithm, which were compared with published data. Also, this research designed and performed the experiments of measuring oxygen and its mixture with Helium by using a 760 nm diode laser and a 655 nm Helium/Neon laser sensor with fixed wavelength structures. The results of this research also conclude the following: (1) extensive literature survey, field research and laboratory work; (2) studying the significant theories and experimental methods of the laser spectroscopy; (3) developing efficient and simplified algorithm for spectrum calculation; (4) simulating high temperature species H2O and CO2; (5) designing and building

  3. Proliferation of Rous sarcoma virus-infected, but not of normal, chicken fibroblasts in oxygen-enriched environment: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R S; Elgas, R J; Balk, S D

    1976-04-01

    Both normal and Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken fibroblasts proliferate in an incubator containing 95% air, 5% CO2. In an incubator atmosphere enriched with oxygen, however, the normal fibroblasts are maintained without proliferation, while the Rous sarcoma virus-infected fibroblasts continue to proliferate. This suggests that a respiratory function may be involved in the regulation of proliferation of normal cells, and that neoplastic cells may proliferate autonomously because of a deficiency in this regulatory function. PMID:177983

  4. Are oxygen and neon enriched in PNe and is the current solar Ne/O abundance ratio underestimated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Liu, X.-W.

    2008-09-01

    A thorough critical literature survey has been carried out for reliable measurements of oxygen and neon abundances of planetary nebulae (PNe) and HII regions. By contrasting the results of PNe and of HII regions, we aim to address the issues of the evolution of oxygen and neon in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in the late evolutionary phases of low- and intermediate-mass stars (LIMS), as well as the currently hotly disputed solar Ne/O abundance ratio. Through the comparisons, we find that neon abundance and Ne/O ratio increase with increasing oxygen abundance in both types of nebulae, with positive correlation coefficients larger than 0.75. The correlations suggest different enrichment mechanisms for oxygen and neon in the ISM, in the sense that the growth of neon is delayed compared to oxygen. The differences of abundances between PNe and HII regions are mainly attributed to the results of nucleosynthesis and dredge-up processes that occurred in the progenitor stars of PNe. We find that both these α-elements are significantly enriched at low metallicity (initial oxygen abundance <~8.0) but not at metallicity higher than the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The fact that Ne/O ratios measured in PNe are almost the same as those in HII regions, regardless of the metallicity, suggest a very similar production mechanism of neon and oxygen in intermediate-mass stars (IMS) of low initial metallicities and in more massive stars, a conjecture that requires verification by further theoretical studies. This result also strongly suggests that both the solar neon abundance and the Ne/O ratio should be revised upwards by ~0.22dex from the Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval values or by ~0.14dex from the Grevesse & Sauval values.

  5. Solid waste management of a chemical-looping combustion plant using Cu-based oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    García-Labiano, Francisco; Gayán, Pilar; Adánez, Juan; De Diego, Luis F; Forero, Carmen R

    2007-08-15

    Waste management generated from a Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) plant using copper-based materials is analyzed by two ways: the recovery and recycling of the used material and the disposal of the waste. A copper recovery process coupled to the CLC plant is proposed to avoid the loss of active material generated by elutriation from the system. Solid residues obtained from a 10 kWth CLC prototype operated during 100 h with a CuO-Al2O3 oxygen carrier prepared by impregnation were used as raw material in the recovery process. Recovering efficiencies of approximately 80% were obtained in the process, where the final products were an eluate of Cu(NO3)2 and a solid. The eluate was used for preparation of new oxygen carriers by impregnation, which exhibited high reactivity for reduction and oxidation reactions as well as adequate physical and chemical properties to be used in a CLC plant. The proposed recovery process largely decreases the amount of natural resources (Cu and Al203) employed in a CLC power plant as well as the waste generated in the process. To determine the stability of the different solid streams during deposition in a landfill, these were characterized with respect to their leaching behavior according to the European Union normative. The solid residue finally obtained in the CLC plant coupled to the recovery process (composed by Al2O3 and CuAl2O4) can be classified as a stable nonreactive hazardous waste acceptable at landfills for nonhazardous wastes. PMID:17874801

  6. Reference concepts for a space-based hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator, burst power system

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes reference concepts for a hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator power system that supplies power during battle engagement to a space-based, ballistic missile defense platform. All of the concepts are open''; that is, they exhaust hydrogen or a mixture of hydrogen and water vapor into space. We considered the situation where hydrogen is presumed to be free to the power system because it is also needed to cool the platform's weapon and the situation where hydrogen is not free and its mass must be added to that of the power system. We also considered the situation where water vapor is an acceptable exhaust and the situation where it is not. The combination of these two sets of situations required four different power generation systems, and this report describes each, suggests parameter values, and estimates masses for each of the four. These reference concepts are expected to serve as a baseline'' to which other types of power systems can be compared, and they are expected to help guide technology development efforts in that they suggest parameter value ranges that will lead to optimum system designs. 7 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Apparent Km of mitochondria for oxygen computed from Vmax measured in permeabilized muscle fibers is lower in water enriched in oxygen by electrolysis than injection

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Joffrey; Bouitbir, Jamal; Sirvent, Pascal; Klein, Alexis; Charton, Antoine; Jimenez, Liliana; Péronnet, François R; Geny, Bernard; Richard, Ruddy

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that oxygen (O2) diffusion could be favored in water enriched in O2 by a new electrolytic process because of O2 trapping in water superstructures (clathrates), which could reduce the local pressure/content relationships for O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along PO2 gradients. Materials and methods Mitochondrial respiration was compared in situ in saponin-skinned fibers isolated from the soleus muscles of Wistar rats, in solution enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process 1) at an O2 concentration decreasing from 240 µmol/L to 10 µmol/L (132 mmHg to 5 mmHg), with glutamate–malate or N, N, N′, N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD)–ascorbate (with antimycin A) as substrates; and 2) at increasing adenosine diphosphate (ADP) concentration with glutamate–malate as substrate. Results As expected, maximal respiration decreased with O2 concentration and, when compared to glutamate–malate, the apparent Km O2 of mitochondria for O2 was significantly lower with TMPD–ascorbate with both waters. However, when compared to the water enriched in O2 by injection, the Km O2 was significantly lower with both electron donors in water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. This was not associated with any increase in the sensitivity of mitochondria to ADP; no significant difference was observed for the Km ADP between the two waters. Conclusion In this experiment, a higher affinity of the mitochondria for O2 was observed in water enriched in O2 by electrolysis than by injection. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that O2 diffusion can be facilitated in water enriched in O2 by the electrolytic process. PMID:26203225

  8. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Heat Transfer and Combustion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lb/f thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-percentage by weight loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Three different injectors were used during the testing: one for the baseline O(2)/RP-1 tests and two for the gelled and metallized gelled fuel firings. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each chamber used a water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples and flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations. The rocket engine Cstar efficiency for the RP-1 fuel was in the 65-69 percent range, while the gelled 0 percent by weight RP-1 and the 5-percent by weight RP-1 exhibited a Cstar efficiency range of 60 to 62% and 65 to 67%, respectively. The 55-percent by weight RP-1 fuel delivered a 42-47% Cstar efficiency. Comparisons of the heat flux and temperature profiles of the RP-1 and the metallized gelled RP-1/A1 fuels show that the peak nozzle heat fluxes with the metallized gelled O2/RP-1/A1 propellants are substantially higher than the baseline O2/RP-1: up to double the flux for the 55 percent by weight RP-1/A1 over the RP-1 fuel. Analyses showed that the heat transfer to the wall was significantly different for the RP-1/A1 at 55-percent by weight versus the RP-1 fuel. Also, a gellant and an aluminum combustion delay was inferred in the 0 percent and 5-percent by weight RP-1/A1 cases from the decrease in heat flux in the first part of the chamber. A large decrease in heat flux in the last half of the chamber was caused by fuel deposition in the chamber and nozzle. The engine combustion occurred well downstream of the injector face

  9. Development of modified poly(perfluoropropyleneoxide) urethane systems for use in liquid oxygen and in enriched 100 percent oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. S.

    1973-01-01

    This program consisted of two separate though related phases. The initial phase was directed toward improving the mechanical and adhesive properties of the very highly fluorinated-polyurethane resin system derived from the hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropylene oxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate. Various new curing agents for this system were investigated, with the goal of providing a more thermally stable crosslink (cure) mechanism to provide wider applicability and fuller utilization of the outstanding oxygen resistance of the PFPO system. Complete resistance to liquid- and gaseous-oxygen impact at presures as high as 1035 N/sq cm were attained with the use of the PFPO resin castings. The second corollary phase was directed toward investigating the feasibility and optimization of the allophanate cured, urethane extended polymer derived from hydroxyl-terminated polyperfluoropropyleneoxide and 6-chloro-2,4,5-trifluoro-m-phenylene diisocyanate, as the adhesive system for use in a weld-bond configuration for liquid oxygen tankage. The synthesis and application procedures of the adhesive system to insure liquid oxygen compatibility (under 10 kg-m loading), and the development of procedures and techniques to provide high quality weld-bonded joint configurations were studied.

  10. Guide for Oxygen Hazards Analyses on Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Dees, Jesse; Poe, Robert F.

    1996-01-01

    Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite at lower temperatures in an oxygen-enriched environment than in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Many metals burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment when ignited. Lubricants, tapes, gaskets, fuels, and solvents can increase the possibility of ignition in oxygen systems. However, these hazards do not preclude the use of oxygen. Oxygen may be safely used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. These ignition and combustion hazards necessitate a proper oxygen hazards analysis before introducing a material or component into oxygen service. The objective of this test plan is to describe the White Sands Test Facility oxygen hazards analysis to be performed on components and systems before oxygen is introduced and is recommended before implementing the oxygen component qualification procedure. The plan describes the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility method consistent with the ASTM documents for analyzing the hazards of components and systems exposed to an oxygen-enriched environment. The oxygen hazards analysis is a useful tool for oxygen-system designers, system engineers, and facility managers. Problem areas can be pinpointed before oxygen is introduced into the system, preventing damage to hardware and possible injury or loss of life.

  11. Demonstration of cost-effective NO{sub x} reduction on a regenerative sideport glass furnace using oxygen-enriched air staging

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.; Neff, D.; Rue, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCal) have joined with the development team of the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), Combustion Tec, Inc. (CTI), and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and provided support for extension of the oxygen-enriched air staging (OEAS) NO{sub x} control technology to natural gas-fired sideport regenerative glass melters. In previous demonstrations, the OEAS technology has successfully reduced NO{sub x} emissions by more than 50% on natural gas-fired endport regenerative glass melters without any adverse impacts on furnace performance or glass quality. In the current program, Owens-Brockway (OB) provided operations expertise and a 6 port pair, sideport furnace for field evaluation tests of OEAS. Background and initial test results for a single port pair and the complete furnace are presented along with CFD modeling results for OEAS on a single port pair of the sideport furnace. Modeling results confirm the capacity of OEAS to provide significant NO{sub x} reduction and CO burnout while maintaining or increasing thermal efficiency and furnace production rate.

  12. USE OF REDOX-SENSITIVE METALS ENRICHMENT FACTORS AS INDICATORS OF LOW DESSOLVED OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is one adverse response to excessive eutrophication in U. S. coastal waters. For dissolved oxygen criteria to be effective, it is necessary to measure DO levels and impacts over large spatial scales. However, biological responses to low DO are often dep...

  13. A simplified method for determining heat of combustion of natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Chegini, Hoshang; Mall, Gerald H.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified technique for determination of the heat of combustion of natural gas has been developed. It is a variation of the previously developed technique wherein the carrier air, in which the test sample was burnt, was oxygen enriched to adjust the mole fraction of oxygen in the combustion product gases up to that in the carrier air. The new technique eliminates the need for oxygen enrichment of the experimental mixtures and natural gas samples and has been found to predict their heats of combustion to an uncertainty of the order of 1 percent.

  14. Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanjing Tian; Karuna Chaudhari; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston; Tengfei Liu; Tom Sanders; Goetz Veser; Ranjani Siriwardane

    2008-11-15

    CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900{degree}C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO{sub 2} from fuel gas at 800 and 900{degree}C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700{degree}C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900{degree}C. 48 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) main engine is a Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. The engine met or exceeded all performance requirements without experiencing any in- ight failures, but the engine exhibited acoustic-coupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing. First tangential (1T), rst radial (1R), 1T1R, and higher order modes were triggered by conditions during the Morpheus vehicle derived low chamber pressure startup sequence. The instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. Ground-interaction acoustics aggravated the instability in vehicle tests. Analysis of more than 200 hot re tests on the Morpheus vehicle and Stennis Space Center (SSC) test stand showed a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure. The instability had the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop at low chamber pressure during the start sequence. Data analysis suggests that the two-phase density during engine start results in a high injection velocity, possibly triggering the instabilities predicted by the Hewitt stability curves. Engine ignition instability was successfully mitigated via a higher-chamber pressure start sequence (e.g., 50% power level vs 30%) and operational propellant start temperature limits that maintained \\cold LOX" and \\warm methane" at the engine inlet. The main engine successfully demonstrated 4:1 throttling without chugging during mainstage, but chug instabilities were observed during some engine shutdown sequences at low injector pressure drop, especially during vehicle landing.

  16. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/aluminum Rocket Combustion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1995-01-01

    A series of combustion experiments were conducted to measure the specific impulse, Cstar-, and specific-impulse efficiencies of a rocket engine using metallized gelled liquid propellants. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-1bf (89- to 178-N) thrust, modular engine consisting of an injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-wt% loadings of aluminum and gaseous oxygen was the oxidizer. Ten different injectors were used during the testing: 6 for the baseline 02/RP-1 tests and 4 for the gelled fuel tests which covered a wide range of mixture ratios. At the peak of the Isp versus oxidizer-to-fuel ratio (O/F) data, a range of 93 to 99% Cstar efficiency was reached with ungelled 02/RP-1. A Cstar efficiency range of 75 to 99% was obtained with gelled RP-l (0-wt% RP-1/Al) while the metallized 5-wt% RP-1/Al delivered a Cstar efficiency of 94 to 99% at the peak Isp in the O/F range tested. An 88 to 99% Cstar efficiency was obtained at the peak Isp of the gelled RP1/Al with 55-wt% Al. Specific impulse efficiencies for the 55-wt% RP-1/Al of 67%-83% were obtained at a 2.4:1 expansion ratio. Injector erosion was evident with the 55-wt% testing, while there was little or no erosion seen with the gelled RP-1 with 0- and 5-wt% Al. A protective layer of gelled fuel formed in the firings that minimized the damage to the rocket injector face. This effect may provide a useful technique for engine cooling. These experiments represent a first step in characterizing the performance of and operational issues with gelled RP-1 fuels.

  17. SAFETY ASPECTS OF OXYGEN AERATION ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was carried out to assess the impact of the use of oxygen and oxygen-enriched air for aeration of activated sludge systems on the safety of municipal waste-water treatment plants and their personnel. The tasks included (1) determination of oxygen combustion hazards f...

  18. Highly Efficient Oxygen-Storage Material with Intrinsic Coke Resistance for Chemical Looping Combustion-Based CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Qasim; Kurlov, Alexey; Rupp, Jennifer Lilia Marguerite; Müller, Christoph Rüdiger

    2015-06-22

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) are emerging thermochemical CO2 capture cycles that allow the capture of CO2 with a small energy penalty. Here, the development of suitable oxygen carrier materials is a key aspect to transfer these promising concepts to practical installations. CuO is an attractive material for CLC and CLOU because of its high oxygen-storage capacity (20 wt %), fast reaction kinetics, and high equilibrium partial pressure of oxygen at typical operating temperatures (850-1000 °C). However, despite its promising characteristics, its low Tammann temperature requires the development of new strategies to phase-stabilize CuO-based oxygen carriers. In this work, we report a strategy based on stabilization by co-precipitated ceria (CeO2-x ), which allowed us to increase the oxygen capacity, coke resistance, and redox stability of CuO-based oxygen carriers substantially. The performance of the new oxygen carriers was evaluated in detail and compared to the current state-of-the-art materials, that is, Al2 O3 -stabilized CuO with similar CuO loadings. We also demonstrate that the higher intrinsic oxygen uptake, release, and mobility in CeO2-x -stabilized CuO leads to a three times higher carbon deposition resistance compared to that of Al2 O3 -stabilized CuO. Moreover, we report a high cyclic stability without phase intermixing for CeO2-x -supported CuO. This was accompanied by a lower reduction temperature compared to state-of-the-art Al2 O3 -supported CuO. As a result of its high resistance towards carbon deposition and fast oxygen uncoupling kinetics, CeO2-x -stabilized CuO is identified as a very promising material for CLC- and CLOU-based CO2 capture architectures. PMID:25916240

  19. Enriched-air and oxygen gasification of Illinois No. 6 coal in a Texaco coal-gasification unit

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, W.B.; Richter, G.N.; Dillingham, E.W.

    1982-02-01

    Four runs were made with Illinois No. 6 coal, from Peabody Coal Company River King Mine at Freeburg, Illinois, to demonstrate technology to integrate the Texaco Coal Gasification Process in an environmentally acceptable manner with gas turbines for combined cycle electric power generation. Operability and response of the gasifier and a Selexol acid gas removal unit were demonstrated during load changes utilizing both oxygen and enriched air as oxidants (transient runs). Steady state performance data on the gasifier, Selexol unit and gas turbine combustor were obtained at a variety of oxygen to coal ratios at different production rates utilizing each oxidant (steady state runs). Essentially no effect of charge rate on the syngas quality was noted. Environmental base line data were gathered for both oxidants. Results of the environmental tests and the turbine combustor tests are reported separately.

  20. Isolation of photosystem II-enriched membranes and the oxygen-evolving complex subunit proteins from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Leng, Jing; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods to isolate highly active oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes and core complexes from higher plants, and to purify subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The membrane samples used as the material for various in vitro studies of PSII are prepared by solubilizing thylakoid membranes with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, and the core complexes are prepared by further solubilization of the PSII membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DDM). The OEC subunit proteins are dissociated from the PSII-enriched membranes by alkaline or salt treatment, and are then purified by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated high performance liquid chromatography system. PMID:20960116

  1. High cell density cultivation of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 using glucose without the need for oxygen enriched air supply.

    PubMed

    Davis, Reeta; Duane, Gearoid; Kenny, Shane T; Cerrone, Federico; Guzik, Maciej W; Babu, Ramesh P; Casey, Eoin; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2015-04-01

    High Cell Density (HCD) cultivation of bacteria is essential for the majority of industrial processes to achieve high volumetric productivity (g L(-1) h(-1) ) of a bioproduct of interest. This study developed a fed batch bioprocess using glucose as sole carbon and energy source for the HCD of the well described biocatalyst Pseudomonas putida KT2440 without the supply of oxygen enriched air. Growth kinetics data from batch fermentations were used for building a bioprocess model and designing feeding strategies. An exponential followed by linearly increasing feeding strategy of glucose was found to be effective in maintaining biomass productivity while also delaying the onset of dissolved oxygen (supplied via compressed air) limitation. A final cell dry weight (CDW) of 102 g L(-1) was achieved in 33 h with a biomass productivity of 3.1 g L(-1) h(-1) which are the highest ever reported values for P. putida strains using glucose without the supply of pure oxygen or oxygen enriched air. The usefulness of the biomass as a biocatalyst was demonstrated through the production of the biodegradable polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). When nonanoic acid (NA) was supplied to the glucose grown cells of P. putida KT2440, it accumulated 32% of CDW as PHA in 11 h (2.85 g L(-1) h(-1) ) resulting in a total of 0.56 kg of PHA in 18 L with a yield of 0.56 g PHA g NA(-1) . PMID:25311981

  2. Analytical chemical kinetic investigation of the effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on hydrogen-air combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative values were computed which show the effects of the presence of small amounts of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on the finite-rate chemical kinetics of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures undergoing isobaric autoignition and combustion. The free radicals were considered to be initially present in hydrogen-air mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.2, 0.6, 1.0, and 1.2. Initial mixture temperatures were 1100 K, 1200 K, and 1500 K, and pressures were 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 atm. Of the radicals investigated, atomic oxygen was found to be the most effective for reducing induction time, defined as the time to 5 percent of the total combustion temperature rise. The reaction time, the time between 5 percent and 95 percent of the temperature rise, is not decreased by the presence of free radicals in the initial hydrogen-air mixture. Fuel additives which yield free radicals might be used to effect a compact supersonic combustor design for efficient operation in an otherwise reaction-limited combustion regime.

  3. Liquid oxygen/hydrogen testing of a single swirl coaxial injector element in a windowed combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Makel, D.

    1993-06-01

    A modular, high pressure, liquid rocket single element combustion chamber was developed at Aerojet for use with nonintrusive combustion diagnostics. The hardware is able to accommodate full-size injection elements and includes a recessed annular injector around the single element to provide a source for hot gas background flow, which reduces recirculation in the chamber and provides additional injection mass to elevate chamber pressure. Experiments are being conducted to develop the diagnostics required to characterize a single-element combustion spray field for combustion modeling, benchmark data for CFD model validation, and development of the transfer functions between single element cold flow and multielement hot fire. The latter task is being pursued using an injector element identical to elements that had been previously cold-flow tested in single element tests to ambient backpressure and hot fire tested in a multielement injector. Preliminary tests conducted to date without hydrogen flowing through the annular coaxial orifice of the single element show the general flow characteristics of a reacting, unconfined, liquid oxygen hollow cone swirl spray.

  4. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The Project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines demonstrated acousticcoupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Stennis Space Center (SSC). High-amplitude, 1T, 1R, 1T1R (and higher order) modes appear to be triggered by injector conditions. The instability occurred during the Morpheus-specific engine ignition/start sequence, and did demonstrate the capability to propagate into mainstage. However, the instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. The Morpheus main engine is a JSC-designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. Two different engine designs, named HD4 and HD5, and two different builds of the HD4 engine all demonstrated similar instability characteristics. Through the analysis of more than 200 hot fire tests on the Morpheus vehicle and SSC test stand, a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure was developed. The instability has the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop (dP) at low chamber pressure (Pc); i.e., instabilities initiated at high dP/Pc at low Pc during the start sequence. The high dP/Pc during start results during the injector /chamber chill-in, and is enhanced by hydraulic flip in the injector orifice elements. Because of the fixed mixture ratio of the existing engine design (the main valves share a common actuator), it is not currently possible to determine if LOX or methane injector dP/Pc were individual contributors (i.e., LOX and methane dP/Pc typically trend in the same direction within a given test). The instability demonstrated initiation characteristic of starting at or shortly after methane injector chillin. Colder methane (e.g., sub-cooled) at the injector inlet prior to engine start was much more likely to result in an instability. A secondary effect of LOX

  5. Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

  6. Oxygen abundances in the Galactic bulge: evidence for fast chemical enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, M.; Lecureur, A.; Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Renzini, A.; Minniti, D.; Momany, Y.; Gómez, A.; Ortolani, S.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.We spectroscopically characterize the Galactic Bulge to infer its star formation timescale, compared to the other Galactic components, through the chemical signature on its individual stars. Methods: .We derived iron and oxygen abundances for 50 K giants in four fields towards the Galactic bulge. High resolution (R=45 000) spectra for the target stars were collected with FLAMES-UVES at the VLT. Results: .Oxygen, as measured from the forbidden line at 6300 Å, shows a well-defined trend with [Fe/H], with [O/Fe] higher in bulge stars than in thick disk ones, which were known to be more oxygen enhanced than thin disk stars. Conclusions: .These results support a scenario in which the bulge formed before and more rapidly than the disk, and therefore the MW bulge can be regarded as a prototypical old spheroid, with a formation history similar to that of early-type (elliptical) galaxies.

  7. Reaction behavior of trace oxygen during combustion of falling FeSi75 powder in a nitrogen flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Chen, Jun-hong; Jiang, Peng; Yan, Ming-wei; Sun, Jia-lin; Li, Yong

    2016-08-01

    To explore the reaction behavior of trace oxygen during the flash combustion process of falling FeSi75 powder in a nitrogen flow, a flash-combustion-synthesized Fe-Si3N4 sample was heat-treated to remove SiO2. The samples before and after the treatment were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, and the formation mechanism of SiO2 was investigated. The results show that SiO2 in the Fe-Si3N4 is mainly located on the surface or around the Si3N4 particles in dense areas, existing in both crystalline and amorphous states; when the FeSi75 particles, which are less than 0.074 mm in size, fell in up-flowing hot N2 stream, trace oxygen in the N2 stream did not significantly hinder the nitridation of FeSi75 particles as it was consumed by the surface oxidation of the generated Si3N4 particles to form SiO2. At the reaction zone, the oxidation of Si3N4 particles decreased the oxygen partial pressure in the N2 stream and greatly reduced the opportunity for FeSi75 particles to be oxidized into SiO2; by virtue of the SiO2 film developed on the surface, the Si3N4 particles adhered to each other and formed dense areas in the material.

  8. A 400 kyr record of combustion oxygen demand in the western equatorial Pacific: Evidence for a precessionally forced climate response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Helen M.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    1998-02-01

    We have developed a combustion analysis technique for sediments which measures the amount of O2 consumed by the reduced species. We have measured this quantity, which we call "combustion oxygen demand (COD)," on a carbonate-rich sediment core from the Ontong-Java Plateau in the western equatorial Pacific back to marine oxygen isotope stage 11. The precision of the COD technique is ±6.3 µmol O2 g-1, which corresponds to ˜±0.0076% wt Corg, assuming oxidation of organic carbon dominates the signal. The COD time series is characterized by values which are about twice as high during glacials as during interglacials, the largest shift occurring from 401 µmol O2 g-1 in midstage 6 to 144 µmol O2 g-1 at 5e, and is coherent with the oxygen isotope curve of Globigerinoides sacculifer in the same core at the Milankovitch frequencies of 100 and 41 kyr. Pronounced variations in the 19-23 kyr band suggest that the climate of the western equatorial Pacific is sensitive to precessional forcing, a response not apparent from other records obtained in this region.

  9. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-03-17

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. PMID:25733906

  10. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. PMID:25733906

  11. High sensitivity of Lobelia dortmanna to sediment oxygen depletion following organic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Møller, Claus Lindskov; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2011-04-01

    • Lobelia dortmanna thrives in oligotrophic, softwater lakes thanks to O(2) and CO(2) exchange across roots and uptake of sediment nutrients. We hypothesize that low gas permeability of leaves constrains Lobelia to pristine habitats because plants go anoxic in the dark if O(2) vanishes from sediments. • We added organic matter to sediments and followed O(2) dynamics in plants and sediments using microelectrodes. To investigate plant stress, nutrient content and photosynthetic capacity of leaves were measured. • Small additions of organic matter triggered O(2) depletion and accumulation of NH(4)(+), Fe(2+) and CO(2) in sediments. O(2) in leaf lacunae fluctuated from above air saturation in the light to anoxia late in the dark in natural sediments, but organic enrichment prolonged anoxia because of higher O(2) consumption and restricted uptake from the water. Leaf N and P dropped below minimum thresholds for cell function in enriched sediments and was accompanied by critically low chlorophyll and photosynthesis. • We propose that anoxic stress restricts ATP formation and constrains transfer of nutrients to leaves. Brief anoxia in sediments and leaf lacunae late at night is a recurring summer phenomenon in Lobelia populations, but increased input of organic matter prolongs anoxia and reduces survival. PMID:21175638

  12. Thermochemical conversion of biomass in smouldering combustion across scales: The roles of heterogeneous kinetics, oxygen and transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyan; Rein, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass in smouldering combustion is investigated here by combining experiments and modeling at two scales: matter (1mg) and bench (100g) scales. Emphasis is put on the effect of oxygen (0-33vol.%) and oxidation reactions because these are poorly studied in the literature in comparison to pyrolysis. The results are obtained for peat as a representative biomass for which there is high-quality experimental data published previously. Three kinetic schemes are explored, including various steps of drying, pyrolysis and oxidation. The kinetic parameters are found using the Kissinger-Genetic Algorithm method, and then implemented in a one-dimensional model of heat and mass transfer. The predictions are validated with thermogravimetric and bench-scale experiments and then analyzed to unravel the role of heterogeneous reaction. This is the first time that the influence of oxygen on biomass smouldering is explained in terms of both chemistry and transport phenomena across scales. PMID:26901090

  13. High-pressure calorimeter chamber tests for liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Philip A.; Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Price, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the rocket combustion and heat transfer characteristics of liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) mixtures at high chamber pressures. Two water-cooled calorimeter chambers of different combustion lengths were tested using 37- and 61-element oxidizer-fuel-oxidizer triplet injectors. The tests were conducted at nominal chamber pressures of 4.1, 8.3, and 13.8 MPa abs (600, 1200, and 2000 psia). Heat flux Q/A data were obtained for the entire calorimeter length for oxygen/fuel mixture ratios of 1.8 to 3.3. Test data at 4.1 MPa abs compared favorably with previous test data from another source. Using an injector with a fuel-rich outer zone reduced the throat heat flux by 47 percent with only a 4.5 percent reduction in the characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency C* sub eff. The throat heat transfer coefficient was reduced approximately 40 percent because of carbon deposits on the chamber wall.

  14. Off-design study of an open cycle MHD power plant with oxygen enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, H. K.; Berry, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the more important aspects of off-design operation for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power plant are discussed. It is noted that the plant must be designed to meet part-load and overload conditions and that the optimal design should be subject to a specified load demand curve. An analysis is made for off-design regimes to determine the compatible joint operating conditions for an MHD topping cycle, a steam bottoming plant, a turbine train, a compressor, and an oxygen separation plant. The analysis is subject to such constraints as metal temperatures, second law violations, component performance requirements, and environmental considerations.

  15. Method for operating a production well in an oxygen driven in-situ combustion oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.G.

    1986-07-08

    A method is described for recovering viscous oil from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation penetrated by at least one injection well and one production well and having fluid communication therebetween comprising: a. establishing an in-situ combustion operation in the formation by injecting substantially pure oxygen into the formation via the injection well and recovering fluids including oil and an effluent gas from the formation via the production well; b. continuously injecting nitrogen at a predetermined low injection rate into the lower portion of the production well; c. continuously analyzing the effluent gas for oxygen concentration and monitoring the bottomhole temperature of the production well; d. increasing the injection rate of the nitrogen gas to a maximum rate in the event the oxygen concentration of the effluent gas increases to a predetermined concentration or the bottomhole temperature increases to a predetermined temperature indicating a hazardous condition; and e. continuing injection of the nitrogen at a maximum rate until the oxygen concentration of the effluent gas and the bottomhole temperature are reduced to a safe level.

  16. Oxygen Pumping. II. Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High-Frequency CMB Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Haiman, Zoltán; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2008-01-01

    At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 μm fine-structure line of O I is pumped by the ~1300 Å soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen in which metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and the cosmic epoch when the O I pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak [(δy)rms <~ 10-7 roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of ~1 nK], it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able to set useful constraints on the heavy-element enrichment history of the IGM.

  17. Promoted Combustion Test Data Re-Examined

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michelle; Jeffers, Nathan; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Promoted combustion testing of metallic materials has been performed by NASA since the mid-1980s to determine the burn resistance of materials in oxygen-enriched environments. As the technolo gy has advanced, the method of interpreting, presenting, and applying the promoted combustion data has advanced as well. Recently NASA changed the bum criterion from 15 cm (6 in.) to 3 cm (1.2 in.). This new burn criterion was adopted for ASTM G 124, Standard Test Method for Determining the Combustion Behavior- of Metallic Materials in Oxygen-Enriched Atmospheres. Its effect on the test data and the latest method to display the test data will be discussed. Two specific examples that illustrate how this new criterion affects the burn/no-bum thresholds of metal alloys will also be presented.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY-ENRICHED COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES FROM ELECTRIC UTILITIES USING ENHANCED SORBENTS FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching of mercury and other constituents of potential concern during land disposal or beneficial use of coal combustion residues (CCRs) is the environmental impact pathway evaluated in this report. The specific objectives of the research was to: (1) evaluate mercury, arsenic an...

  19. A Novel Layered Sedimentary Rocks Structure of the Oxygen-Enriched Carbon for Ultrahigh-Rate-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Li, Huan-Huan; Shi, Yan-Hong; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wu, Xing-Long; Wang, Hai-Feng; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-02-17

    In this paper, gelatin as a natural biomass was selected to successfully prepare an oxygen-enriched carbon with layered sedimentary rocks structure, which exhibited ultrahigh-rate performance and excellent cycling stability as supercapacitors. The specific capacitance reached 272.6 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and still retained 197.0 F g(-1) even at 100 A g(-1) (with high capacitance retention of 72.3%). The outstanding electrochemical performance resulted from the special layered structure with large surface area (827.8 m(2) g(-1)) and high content of oxygen (16.215 wt %), which effectively realized the synergistic effects of the electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. Moreover, it delivered an energy density of 25.3 Wh kg(-1) even with a high power density of 34.7 kW kg(-1) and ultralong cycling stability (with no capacitance decay even over 10,000 cycles at 2 A g(-1)) in a symmetric supercapacitor, which are highly desirable for their practical application in energy storage devices and conversion. PMID:26815316

  20. Leaner Lifted-Flame Combustion Enabled by the Use of an Oxygenated Fuel in an Optical CI Engine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gehmlich, Ryan K.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Wang, Yefu; Mueller, Charles J.

    2016-04-05

    Leaner lifted-flame combustion (LLFC) is a mixing-controlled combustion strategy for compression-ignition engines that does not produce soot because the equivalence ratio at the lift-off length, Φ(H), is less than or equal to approximately two. In addition to preventing soot formation, LLFC can simultaneously control emissions of nitrogen oxides because it is tolerant to the use of exhaust-gas recirculation for lowering in-cylinder temperatures. LLFC can be achieved through the use of oxygenated fuels and enhanced fuel/charge-gas mixing upstream of the lift-off length. Enhanced mixing can be obtained via higher injection pressures, smaller injector orifice diameters, lower intake-manifold and coolant temperatures, and/ormore » more retarded injection timings. This study focuses on the effects of an oxygenated fuel blend (T50) made up of 50% by volume tri-propylene glycol mono-methyl ether with a #2 ULSD emissions-certification fuel (CFA), compared against baseline testing of the CFA fuel without the oxygenate. Experimental measurements include crank-angle resolved natural luminosity (NL) and chemiluminescence (CL) imaging diagnostics. EGR is simulated by adding nitrogen and carbon dioxide to the intake charge to produce a 16% intake-oxygen mole fraction (XO2), and results are compared against cases with no charge dilution (i.e., 21% XO2). Initial experiments with a two-hole tip achieved soot-free LLFC at low loads with the T50 fuel, 240 MPa injection pressure, 50 °C intake-manifold temperature (IMT), 95 °C coolant temperature, and -5 crank-angle degree (CAD) after top-dead-center (ATDC) start of combustion (SOC) timing. The strategy was extended to more moderate loads by employing a 6-hole injector tip, where lowering the IMT to 30 °C, reducing the coolant temperature to 85 °C, and retarding the SOC timing to +5 CAD ATDC resulted in sustained LLFC at both 21% and 16% XO2 at up to 6.2 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (gIMEP) with T50. The

  1. Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

    2011-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting

  2. Effect of Ozone Addition on Combustion Efficiency of Hydrogen: Liquid-Oxygen Propellant in Small Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Riley O.; Brown, Dwight D.

    1959-01-01

    An experimental study shows that 2 percent by weight ozone in oxygen has little effect on overall reactivity for a range of oxidant-fuel weight ratios from 1 to 6. This conclusion is based on characteristic-velocity measurements in 200-pound-thrust chambers at a pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute with low-efficiency injectors. The presence of 9 percent ozone in oxygen also did not affect performance in an efficient chamber. Explosions were encountered when equipment or procedure permitted ozone to concentrate locally. These experiments indicate that even small amounts of ozone in oxygen can cause operational problems.

  3. The influence of oxygen concentration on the combustion of a fuel/oxidizer mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Biteau, H.; Fuentes, A.; Marlair, G.; Torero, J.L.

    2010-04-15

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of the O{sub 2} concentration on the combustion behaviour of a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The material tested is a ternary mixture of lactose, starch, and potassium nitrate, which has already been used in an attempt to estimate heat release rate using the FM-Global Fire Propagation Apparatus. It provides a well-controlled combustion chamber to study the evolution of the combustion products when varying the O{sub 2} concentration, between air and low oxidizer conditions. Different chemical behaviours have been exhibited. When the O{sub 2} concentration was reduced beyond 18%, large variations were observed in the CO{sub 2} and CO concentrations. This critical O{sub 2} concentration seems to be the limit before which the material only uses its own oxidizer to react. On the other hand, mass loss did not highlight this change in chemical reactions and remained similar whatever the test conditions. This presumes that the oxidation of CO into CO{sub 2} are due to reactions occurring in the gas phase especially for large O{sub 2} concentrations. This actual behaviour can be verified using a simplified flammability limit model adapted for the current work. Finally, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out to underline the influence of CO concentration in the evaluation of heat release rate using typical calorimetric methods. The results of this study provide a critical basis for the investigation of the combustion of a fuel/oxidizer mixture and for the validation of future numerical models. (author)

  4. The Seebeck Coefficient in Oxygen Enriched La2NiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Paul; Leboran, Victor; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    Oxide-based devices show promise for themoelectric applications due to their chemical stability and straightforward fabrication. The La2NiO4+δ system has been predicted to show an increased thermopower coupled with an increased electrical conductivity around δ = 0 . 05 [Pardo et al. PRB 86, 165114 (2012)] that could lead to a large thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT). We investigate the suitability of lanthanum nickelate as a candidate material for high-ZT devices through a systematic study of oxygenated thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. We report the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and structural morphology of La2NiO4 grown in a range of oxidizing atmospheres and discuss their implications for controlled engineering of thermoelectric properties. We have explored the possibility of gate-tuning these systems in order to fabricate single-oxide based devices. This work was supported by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (Spain), grant MAT2010-16157, and the European Research Council, grant ERC-2010-StG 259082 2D THERMS.

  5. Fuel-rich catalytic combustion: A soot-free technique for in situ hydrogen-like enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Olson, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental program on the catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrated the feasibility of the two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With a fuel-rich (phi = 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic combustion preburner as the first stage the combustion process was soot free at reactor outlet temperatures of 1200 K or less. Although soot was not measured directly, its absence was indicated. Reaction products collected at two positions downstream of the catalyst bed were analyzed on a gas chromatograph. Comparison of these products indicated that pyrolysis of the larger molecules continued along the drift tube and that benzene formation was a gas-phase reaction. The effective hydrogen-carbon ratio calculated from the reaction products increased by 20 to 68 percent over the range of equivalence ratios tested. The catalytic partial oxidation process also yielded a large number of smaller-containing molecules. The fraction of fuel carbon in compounds having two or fewer carbon atoms ranged from 30 percent at 1100 K to 80 percent at 1200 K.

  6. The effect of dissolved oxygen on N2O production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Erler, Dirk; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is commonly recognized as an important factor influencing nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, it has been difficult to separate the true effect of DO from that of nitrite, as DO variation often affects nitrite accumulation. The effect of DO on N2O production by an enriched nitrifying sludge, consisting of both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), was investigated in this study. Nitrite accumulation was minimised by augmenting nitrite oxidation through the addition of an enriched NOB sludge. It was demonstrated that the specific N2O production rate increased from 0 to 1.9 ± 0.09 (n = 3) mg N2O-N/hr/g VSS with an increase of DO concentration from 0 to 3.0 mg O2/L, whereas N2O emission factor (the ratio between N2O nitrogen emitted and the ammonium nitrogen converted) decreased from 10.6 ± 1.7% (n = 3) at DO = 0.2 mg O2/L to 2.4 ± 0.1% (n = 3) at DO = 3.0 mg O2/L. The site preference measurements indicated that both the AOB denitrification and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidation pathways contributed to N2O production, and DO had an important effect on the relative contributions of the two pathways. This finding is supported by analysis of the process data using an N2O model describing both pathways. As DO increased from 0.2 to 3.0 mg O2/L, the contribution of AOB denitrification decreased from 92% - 95%-66% - 73%, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the contribution by the NH2OH oxidation pathway. PMID:25179869

  7. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion. Task 6: Data analysis and formulation of an empirical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makel, Darby B.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1990-01-01

    The formation and deposition of carbon (soot) was studied in the Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion Program. An empirical, 1-D model for predicting soot formation and deposition in LO2/hydrocarbon gas generators/preburners was derived. The experimental data required to anchor the model were identified and a test program to obtain the data was defined. In support of the model development, cold flow mixing experiments using a high injection density injector were performed. The purpose of this investigation was to advance the state-of-the-art in LO2/hydrocarbon gas generator design by developing a reliable engineering model of gas generator operation. The model was formulated to account for the influences of fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, and gas generator hardware design on soot formation and deposition.

  8. Determination of Local Experimental Heat-Transfer Coefficients on Combustion Side of an Ammonia-Oxygen Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Ehlers, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    Local experimental heat-transfer coefficients were measured in the chamber and throat of a 2400-pound-thrust ammonia-oxygen rocket engine with a nominal chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute. Three injector configurations were used. The rocket engine was run over a range of oxidant-fuel ratio and chamber pressure. The injector that achieved the best performance also produced the highest rates of heat flux at design conditions. The heat-transfer data from the best-performing injector agreed well with the simplified equation developed by Bartz at the throat region. A large spread of data was observed for the chamber. This spread was attributed generally to the variations of combustion processes. The spread was least evident, however, with the best-performing injector.

  9. Performance and Stability Characteristics of a Uni-Element Swirl Injector for Oxygen-Rich Stage Combustion Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, S.; Kalitan, D.; Woodward, R. D.; Santoro, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    A uni-element liquid propellant combustion performance and instability study for liquid RP-1 and hot oxygen-rich pre-burner products was conducted, at a chamber pressure of about 1000 psi. using flush and recessed swirl injectors. High-frequency pressure transducer measurements were analyzed to yield the characteristic frequencies which were compared to expected frequencies of the chamber. Modes, which were discovered to be present within the main chamber included, the first longitudinal, detected at approximately 1950 Hz, and the second longitudinal mode at approximately 3800 Hz. An additional first longitudinal quarter wave mode was measured at a frequency of approximately 23000 Hz for the recessed swirl injector configuration. The characteristic instabilities resulting from these experiments were relatively weak averaging 0.2% to 0.3% of the chamber pressure.

  10. Regenerable MgO promoted metal oxide oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Miller, Duane D.

    2014-08-19

    The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier comprised of a plurality of metal oxide particles in contact with a plurality of MgO promoter particles. The MgO promoter particles increase the reaction rate and oxygen utilization of the metal oxide when contacting with a gaseous hydrocarbon at a temperature greater than about 725.degree. C. The promoted oxide solid is generally comprised of less than about 25 wt. % MgO, and may be prepared by physical mixing, incipient wetness impregnation, or other methods known in the art. The oxygen carrier exhibits a crystalline structure of the metal oxide and a crystalline structure of MgO under XRD crystallography, and retains these crystalline structures over subsequent redox cycles. In an embodiment, the metal oxide is Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and the gaseous hydrocarbon is comprised of methane.

  11. Effect of pressure on the behavior of copper-, iron-, and nickel-based oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Juan Adanez; Luis F. de Diego; Pilar Gayan; Alberto Abad

    2006-02-01

    This work analyzes the main characteristics related to the chemical looping combustion (CLC) process necessary to use the syngas obtained in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. The kinetics of reduction with H{sub 2} and CO and oxidation with O{sub 2} of three high-reactivity oxygen carriers used in the CLC system have been determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer at atmospheric pressure. The iron- and nickel-based oxygen carriers were prepared by freeze-granulation, and the copper-based oxygen carrier was prepared by impregnation. The changing grain size model (CGSM) was used for the kinetic determination, assuming spherical grains for the freeze-granulated particles containing iron and nickel and a platelike geometry for the reacting surface of the copper-based impregnated particles. The dependence of the reaction rates on temperature was low, with the activation energy values varying from 14 to 33 kJ mol{sup -1} for the reduction and 7 to 15 kJ mol{sup -1} for the oxidation. The reaction order depended on the reacting gas and oxygen carrier, with values ranging from 0.25 to 1. However, an increase in the operating pressure for the IGCC + CLC system increases the thermal efficiency of the process, and the CO{sub 2} is recovered as a high pressure gas, decreasing the energy demand for further compression. The effect of pressure on the behavior of the oxygen carriers has been analyzed in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer at 1073 K and pressures up to 30 atm. It has been found that an increase in total pressure has a negative effect on the reaction rates of all the oxygen carriers. Moreover, the use of the CGSM with the kinetic parameters obtained at atmospheric pressure predicted higher reaction rates than those experimentally obtained at higher pressures, and therefore, the kinetic parameters necessary to design pressurized CLC plants must be determined at the operating pressure. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Ab initio atomistic thermodynamics study on the sulfur tolerance mechanism of the oxygen-enriched yttria-stabilized zirconia surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xingli; Zhang, Yanxing; Li, Shasha; Yang, Zongxian

    2014-04-01

    The first-principles method based on density functional theory (DFT) is used to investigate the reaction mechanism for the adsorption of H2S on the oxygen-enriched yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ + O) (111) surface. It is found that the H2S dissociation processes have low energy barriers (< 0.5 eV) and high exothermicities (2.5 eV), and the dissociative S atoms may result in the poisoning of the YSZ + O surface by forming the SO and the hyposulfite (SO22 -) species with very strong bonds to the surface. In addition, using the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics method, the surface regeneration or de-sulfurization process of a sulfur-poisoned (i.e. sulfur-covered) YSZ + O(111) surface is studied. According to the phase diagram, the adsorbed atomic sulfur can be oxidized to SO2 and removed from the YSZ + O surface by introducing oxidizing reagents, e.g. O2 and H2O.

  13. The effect of protein oxidation on hydration and water-binding in pork packaged in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Delles, Rebecca M; Xiong, Youling L

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the in situ oxidative process of myofibrillar proteins in boneless pork loin chops (Longissimus lumborum) packaged in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2), an air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) overwrap, or a partial vacuum (VP) throughout display at 2°C for up to 14, 7, and 21days, respectively. Samples stored in HiOx were susceptible to lipid (TBARS) and protein (carbonyls, sulfhydryls, and aggregation) oxidation, while samples in PVC and VP showed lesser oxidative changes. Water-holding capacity of raw muscle decreased (P<0.05) when stored in HiOx but not in PVC and VP. Upon salt and phosphate brine marination, HiOx and PVC muscle samples had improved hydration capacity during display compared with non-stored control, but display generally decreased hydration of VP samples. The result was in agreement with myofibril structural changes. Despite the enhanced hydration, HiOx muscle was least capable of withholding moisture upon cooking. PMID:24583326

  14. Comparison of iridium- and ruthenium-based, Pt-surface-enriched, nanosize catalysts for the oxygen-reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D.; Goor, M.; Alon, M.; Tsizin, S.; Burstein, L.; Rosenberg, Y.; Popov, I.; Peled, E.

    2016-02-01

    Pt-surface-enriched nanosize catalysts (Pt-SENS catalysts) with ruthenium and iridium cores, supported on XC72, were synthesized and characterized. The structure and composition of the catalysts are determined by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical characterization tests, including oxygen-reduction-catalysis activity and durability studies of catalysts are performed with the use of cyclic-voltammetry and rotating-disk-electrode (RDE) techniques at room temperature. The ORR activity of the homemade catalysts is also compared to ORR activity of commercial 50%Pt/C catalyst. It is determined that the Ir-based catalyst (Pt/Ir/XC72) shows higher ORR activity in terms of A g-1 of Pt (at 0.85 V vs. RHE) than the Ru-based catalyst (Pt/Ru/XC72) and the commercial 50%Pt/C. The Ru-based catalyst shows similar ORR activity in terms of A g-1 of Pt, to that of the commercial 50%Pt/C, but with much lower durability.

  15. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO from flue gas using 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Sun, X.J.; Fang, H.; Liu, F.

    2007-04-15

    Fly ash, industry-grade lime, and an additive, MnO{sub 2} (M), were used to prepare an 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent. Experiments of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors were also investigated on the removal efficiencies of desulfurization and denitrification. Removal efficiencies of 95.5% for SO{sub 2} and 64.8% for NO were obtained respectively under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen species appeared in the spent absorbent except sulfur species. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, oxidizing highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  16. Emissions of parent, nitrated, and oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from indoor corn straw burning in normal and controlled combustion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guofeng; Xue, Miao; Wei, Siye; Chen, Yuanchen; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Lv, Yan; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yanyan; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Wei, Wen; Zhao, Qiuyue; Li, Bin; Wu, Haisuo; Tao, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Emission factors (EFs) of parent polycyclic aromatic (pPAHs), nitrated PAHs (nPAHs), and oxygenated PAHs (oPAHs) were measured for indoor corn straw burned in a cooking brick stove in both normal and controlled burning conditions. EFs of total 28 pPAHs, 6 nPAHs and 4 oPAHs were 7.9±3.4, 6.5±1.6×10-3, and 6.1±1.4×10-1 mg/kg, respectively. By controlling the burning conditions, it was found that the influence of fuel charge size on EFs of the pPAHs and derivatives was insignificant. Measured EFs increased significantly in a fast burning mainly because of the oxygen deficient atmosphere formed in the stove chamber with a small volume. In both restricted and enhance air supply conditions, EFs of pPAHs, nPAHs and oPAHs were significantly higher than those measured in normal burning conditions. Though EFs varied in different burning conditions, the composition profiles and calculated isomer ratios were similar without significant differences. The results from the stepwise regression model showed that fuel burning rate, air supply amount, and modified combustion efficiency were three most significant influencing factors, explaining 72-85% of the total variations. PMID:24494494

  17. Combustion of solid fuel slabs with gaseous oxygen in a hybrid motor analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated- Polybutadiene) fuel cross linked with diisocyanate was burned with GOX under various operating conditions. Large amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from +/- 20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of +/- 1.5%. Embedded fine-wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading-edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations arc thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thicknesses and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented. Several tests were conducted using, simultaneously, one translucent fuel slab and one fuel slab processed with carbon black powder. The addition of carbon black did not affect the measured regression rates or surface temperatures in comparison

  18. Reduction kinetics of iron-based oxygen carriers using methane for chemical-looping combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Longfei; Lv, Mingming

    2014-12-01

    The performance of three iron-based oxygen carriers (pure Fe2O3, synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 and iron ore) in reduction process using methane as fuel is investigated in thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The reaction rate and mechanism between three oxygen carriers and methane are investigated. On the basis of reactivity in reduction process, it may be concluded that Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 has the best reactivity with methane. The reaction rate constant is found to be in the following order: Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 > pure Fe2O3 > iron ore and the activation energy varies between 49 and 184 kJ mol-1. Reduction reactions for the pure Fe2O3 and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 are well represented by the reaction controlling mechanism, and for the iron ore the phase-boundary controlled (contracting cylinder) model dominates. The particles of iron ore and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 have better stability than that of pure Fe2O3 when the reaction temperature is limited to lower than 1223 K. These preliminary results suggest that iron-based mixed oxygen carrier particles are potential to be used in methane chemical looping process, but the reactivity of the iron ore needs to be increased.

  19. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  20. Sulfur evolution in chemical looping combustion of coal with MnFe2O4 oxygen carrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baowen; Gao, Chuchang; Wang, Weishu; Zhao, Haibo; Zheng, Chuguang

    2014-05-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of coal has gained increasing attention as a novel combustion technology for its advantages in CO2 capture. Sulfur evolution from coal causes great harm from either the CLC operational or environmental perspective. In this research, a combined MnFe2O4 oxygen carrier (OC) was synthesized and its reaction with a typical Chinese high sulfur coal, Liuzhi (LZ) bituminous coal, was performed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA)-Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Evolution of sulfur species during reaction of LZ coal with MnFe2O4 OC was systematically investigated through experimental means combined with thermodynamic simulation. TGA-FTIR analysis of the LZ reaction with MnFe2O4 indicated MnFe2O4 exhibited the desired superior reactivity compared to the single reference oxides Mn3O4 or Fe2O3, and SO2 produced was mainly related to oxidization of H2S by MnFe2O4. Experimental analysis of the LZ coal reaction with MnFe2O4, including X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, verified that the main reduced counterparts of MnFe2O4 were Fe3O4 and MnO, in good agreement with the related thermodynamic simulation. The obtained MnO was beneficial to stabilize the reduced MnFe2O4 and avoid serious sintering, although the oxygen in MnO was not fully utilized. Meanwhile, most sulfur present in LZ coal was converted to solid MnS during LZ reaction with MnFe2O4, which was further oxidized to MnSO4. Finally, the formation of both MnS and such manganese silicates as Mn2SiO4 and MnSiO3 should be addressed to ensure the full regeneration of the reduced MnFe2O4. PMID:25079636

  1. A laboratory model of a hydrogen/oxygen engine for combustion and nozzle studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, Sybil H.; Myers, Roger M.; Benko, Stephen E.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Reed, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    A small laboratory diagnostic thruster was developed in order to evaluate approaches for the use of temperature and pressure sensors for the investigation of low thrust rocket flowfields. Tests were performed at chamber pressures of about 255 kPa, 370 kPa, and 500 kPa with oxidizer/fuel mixture ratios between 4.0 and 8.0. Two gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen injector designs were tested with 60 and 75 fuel film cooling. The results of hot-wire tests showed the thruster and instrumentation designs to be effective. Azimuthal temperature distributions were found to be a function of operating conditions and hardware configuration. Results indicated that small differences in injector design can result in dramatically different thruster performance and wall temperature behavior. However, the importance of these injector effects may be decreased by operating at a high fuel film cooling rate.

  2. Experimental study of O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} production for the oxyfuel combustion using a Co-based oxygen carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.S.; Zhang, T.; Cai, N.S.

    2008-10-01

    Production of O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixed gases for the oxyfuel combustion using a Co-based oxygen carrier packed in a fixed bed reactor was investigated. The reaction kinetics of CoO with O{sub 2} and the decomposition kinetics of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in CO{sub 2} atmosphere at different temperatures were studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Both desorption and sorption processes exhibit a high reaction rate. Multiple sorption and desorption cycles indicated that Co-based oxygen carrier has high reactivity and cyclic stability. The results of X-ray diffraction indicated that Co-based oxygen carrier does not react with CO{sub 2} during the desorption stage, and this is especially important for oxyfuel combustion. The high temperature sorption process for production of O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} gas mixtures in a fixed bed reactor packed with Co-based oxygen carrier particles through air separation with carbon dioxide as the purge gas is investigated. Oxygen is absorbed, and heat is stored by the Co-based oxygen carrier particles with air being fed. An O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained when the fixed bed is regenerated with carbon dioxide as the desorption gas. O{sub 2} fraction in the O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} gas mixtures can be controlled by adjusting the flow rate of CO{sub 2} regeneration gas. This Co-based oxygen carrier offers potential for further study in the O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} production for the oxyfuel coal combustion process.

  3. A Laboratory Model of a Hydrogen/Oxygen Engine for Combustion and Nozzle Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, Sybil Huang; Myers, Roger M.; Benko, Stephen E.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Reed, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    A small laboratory diagnostic thruster was developed to augment present low thrust chemical rocket optical and heat flux diagnostics at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The objective of this work was to evaluate approaches for the use of temperature and pressure sensors for the investigation of low thrust rocket flow fields. The nominal engine thrust was 110 N. Tests were performed at chamber pressures of about 255 kPa, 370 kPa, and 500 kPa with oxidizer to fuel mixture ratios between 4.0 and 8.0. Two gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen injector designs were tested with 60 percent and 75 percent fuel film cooling. The thruster and instrumentation designs were proven to be effective via hot fire testing. The thruster diagnostics provided inner wall temperature and static pressure measurements which were compared to the thruster global performance data. For several operating conditions, the performance data exhibited unexpected trends which were correlated with changes in the axial wall temperature distribution. Azimuthal temperature distributions were found to be a function of operating conditions and hardware configuration. The static pressure profiles showed that no severe pressure gradients were present in the rocket. The results indicated that small differences in injector design can result in dramatically different thruster performance and wall temperature behavior, but that these injector effects may be overshadowed by operating at a high fuel film cooling rate.

  4. Thermofluid analysis of the SSME preburner using a gas-gas diffusion model for oxygen and hydrogen combustion at supercritical pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, C.; Singhal, A. K.; Shafer, C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the thermofluid analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuelside preburner. The governing equations have been solved numerically to predict flow, heat transfer, mixing, and combustion. A two-fluid approach is adopted in which oxygen is regarded as one fluid and hydrogen is regarded as the other fluid. The chemical kinetics is assumed to be very fast so that combustion is primarily controlled by the rate of mixing between oxygen and hydrogen. The preburner pressure is much greater than the critical pressures of oxygen and hydrogen; hence, a gas-gas diffusion model (rather than an evaporation model) has been developed to compute the rate of interphase mixing. Empirical correlations have been incorporated to account for the effect of slip on the interphase exchange. A sensitivity study has been performed with various model parameters. It is observed that the model can predict possibility of incomplete combustion and local regions of high temperatures under steady operating conditions. Some of these anomalies have been observed in actual tests, and the numerical model is useful for understanding possible causes and remedies. At least some measurements are needed for quantitative verification of the model.

  5. Anomalous oxygen isotope enrichment in CO{sub 2} produced from O+CO: Estimates based on experimental results and model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Antra; Bhattacharya, S.K.

    2006-06-21

    The oxygen isotope fractionation associated with O+CO{yields}CO{sub 2} reaction was investigated experimentally where the oxygen atom was derived from ozone or oxygen photolysis. The isotopic composition of the product CO{sub 2} was analyzed by mass spectrometry. A kinetic model was used to calculate the expected CO{sub 2} composition based on available reaction rates and their modifications for isotopic variants of the participating molecules. A comparison of the two (experimental data and model predictions) shows that the product CO{sub 2} is endowed with an anomalous enrichment of heavy oxygen isotopes. The enrichment is similar to that observed earlier in case of O{sub 3} produced by O+O{sub 2} reaction and varies from 70 per mille to 136 per mille for {sup 18}O and 41 per mille to 83 per mille for {sup 17}O. Cross plot of {delta} {sup 17}O and {delta} {sup 18}O of CO{sub 2} shows a linear relation with slope of {approx}0.90 for different experimental configurations. The enrichment observed in CO{sub 2} does not depend on the isotopic composition of the O atom or the sources from which it is produced. A plot of {delta}({delta} {sup 17}O) versus {delta}({delta} {sup 18}O) (two enrichments) shows linear correlation with the best fit line having a slope of {approx}0.8. As in case of ozone, this anomalous enrichment can be explained by invoking the concept of differential randomization/stabilization time scale for two types of intermediate transition complex which forms symmetric ({sup 16}O{sup 12}C{sup 16}O) molecule in one case and asymmetric ({sup 16}O{sup 12}C{sup 18}O and {sup 16}O{sup 12}C{sup 17}O) molecules in the other. The {delta} {sup 13}C value of CO{sub 2} is also found to be different from that of the initial CO due to the mass dependent fractionation processes that occur in the O+CO{yields}CO{sub 2} reaction. Negative values of {delta}({delta} {sup 13}C) ({approx}12.1 per mille ) occur due to the preference of {sup 12}C in CO{sub 2}{sup *} formation

  6. Is the scatter in nitrogen/oxygen of metal-poor systems real? Do H II regions become significantly self-enriched in oxygen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Aida Hortensia

    In this dissertation, I addressed two independent problems. Problem 1 was to determine the extent of intrinsic scatter in the log(N/O) versus 12+log(O/H) diagram of dwarf emission-line galaxies with 12+log(O/H) <= 8.1 (hereafter, metal-poor systems), where O/H (oxygen to hydrogen) and N/O (nitrogen to oxygen) are number density ratios derived from the global HII region-like spectra of these systems. In order to assess the extent of intrinsic scatter among these systems, I computed 24 single-star HII region (H IIR) simulations with CLOUDY, using input stellar spectra modeled by D. Casebeer and D. Jevremovic with PHOENIX. The advantages of these simulations are: use of state- of-the-art stellar spectra, log(N/O) and log(C/O) fixed at -1.46 and -0.7 (which are published means of these systems, respectively), self-consistent stellar and nebular chemical compositions, and O/H as low as solar/50, i.e. , lower than any past work. The analysis of the 24 models shows that: (a) the uncertainties in the log(O/H) and log(N/O) derived from collisionally excited forbidden lines are reduced if the temperatures T e (N + ) and T e (O + ), used for deriving N + /H + and O + /H + respectively, are independent parameterizations of T e (O +2 ) [in general, T e (N + ) = T e (O + ) is assumed, but I show that T e (N + ) and T e (O + ) significantly diverge at low metallicity]; and (b) that the ionization correction factor (ICF) for obtaining N/O from N + /O + , is [left angle bracket]ICF[right angle bracket] = 1.08 ± 0.09 (in general, N/O=N + /O + is assumed). Adopting T e (N + ) != T e (O + ), the above ICF, and published de-reddened emission-line strengths, I re-derived the O/H and N/O ratios for a carefully selected sample of 68 metal-poor systems. For these systems: (1) the largest group of objects forms the well- known N/O plateau, with a value for the mean (and its statistical error) of - 1.43 (+.0084/-.0085); (2) the objects are distributed within a range in log(N/ O) of -1.54 to

  7. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part B--Nitrogen-, Sulfur-, and Oxygen-Containing Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-07-01

    Present study focused on the biodegradation of various heterocyclic nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen (NSO) compounds using naphthalene-enriched culture. Target compounds in the study were pyridine, quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran. Screening studies were carried out using different microbial consortia enriched with specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and NSO compounds. Among different microbial consortia, naphthalene-enriched culture was the most efficient consortium based on high substrate degradation rate. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order pyridine > quinoline > benzofuran > benzothiophene. Benzothiophene and benzofuran were found to be highly recalcitrant pollutants. Benzothiophene could not be biodegraded when concentration was above 50 mg/l. It was observed that 2-(1H)-quinolinone, benzothiophene-2-one, and benzofuran-2,3-dione were formed as metabolic intermediates during biodegradation of quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran, respectively. Quinoline-N and pyridine-N were transformed into free ammonium ions during the biodegradation process. Biodegradation pathways for various NSO compounds are proposed. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate single substrate biodegradation kinetics satisfactorily. Benzothiophene and benzofuran biodegradation kinetics, in presence of acetone, was simulated using a generalized multi-substrate model. PMID:26054616

  8. Deuterium enrichment by selective photoinduced dissociation of a multihalogenated organic compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.; Herman, Irving P.

    1981-01-01

    A method for deuterium enrichment by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the deuterium source a multihalogenated organic compound selected from the group consisting of a dihalomethane, a trihalomethane, a 1,2-dihaloethene, a trihaloethene, a tetrahaloethane and a pentahaloethane. The multihalogenated organic compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of substantially only those molecules containing deuterium to provide a deuterium enriched dissociation product. The deuterium enriched product may be combusted with oxygen to provide deuterium enriched water. The deuterium depleted undissociated molecules may be redeuterated by treatment with a deuterium source such as water.

  9. Higher borides and oxygen-enriched Mg-B-O inclusions as possible pinning centers in nanostructural magnesium diboride and the influence of additives on their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhna, Tatiana; Gawalek, Wolfgang; Savchuk, Yaroslav; Tkach, Vasiliy; Danilenko, Nikolay; Wendt, Michael; Dellith, Jan; Weber, Harold; Eisterer, Michael; Moshchil, Viktor; Sergienko, Nina; Kozyrev, Artem; Nagorny, Peter; Shapovalov, Andrey; Melnikov, Vladimir; Dub, Sergey; Litzkendorf, Doris; Habisreuther, Tobias; Schmidt, Christa; Mamalis, Athanasios; Sokolovsky, Vladimir; Sverdun, Vladimir; Karau, Fridrich; Starostina, Alexandra

    2010-10-01

    The study of high pressure (2 GPa) synthesized MgB 2-based materials allows us to conclude that higher borides (with near MgB 12 stoichiometry) and oxygen-enriched Mg-B-O inclusions can be pinning centers in nanostructural magnesium diboride matrix (with average grain sizes of 15-37 nm). It has been established that additions of Ti or SiC as well as manufacturing temperature can affect the size, amount and distribution of these inclusions in the material structure and thus, influence critical current density. The superconducting behavior of materials with near MgB 12 stoichiometry of matrix is discussed.

  10. Unravelling the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species formation in nanohybrid systems of porphyrins and enriched (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes for photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Camila S; Ferreira, Daniele C; Sáfar, Gustavo A M; Gontijo, Rafael N; Fantini, Cristiano; Martins, Dayse C S; Idemori, Ynara M; Pinheiro, Maurício V B; Krambrock, Klaus

    2016-07-27

    Nanohybrids of enriched (6,5) single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes (E-SWCNTs) and porphyrin can be used synergistically as photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents. The efficiency of different porphyrins within the nanohybrids was investigated and compared with results obtained from porphyrins in previous studies. Reactive oxygen species singlet oxygen (1)O2 and for the first time hydroxyl radical ˙OH generation by the nanohybrids under illumination were detected by electron paramagnetic resonance using spin trapping molecules TEMP and PBN. Based on the analysis, we improve the modelling of charge transport within the nanohybrids, which is also detected by Raman scattering. It is shown that the 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)porphyrin [H2TTMAPP(OTs)4] and E-SWCNT form very efficient nanohybrids for PDT applications in the visible spectral range. PMID:27402463