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Sample records for oxygen species scavenging

  1. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone: a reactive oxygen species scavenger in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Misra, Hari S; Khairnar, Nivedita P; Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K; Mohan, Hari; Apte, Shree K

    2004-12-01

    Transgenic Escherichia coli expressing pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) synthase gene from Deinococcus radiodurans showed superior survival during Rose Bengal induced oxidative stress. Such cells showed significantly low levels of protein carbonylation as compared to non-transgenic control. In vitro, PQQ reacted with reactive oxygen species with rate constants comparable to other well known antioxidants, producing non-reactive molecular products. PQQ also protected plasmid DNA and proteins from the oxidative damage caused by gamma-irradiation in solution. The data suggest that radioprotective/oxidative stress protective ability of PQQ in bacteria may be consequent to scavenging of reactive oxygen species per se and induction of other free radical scavenging mechanism. PMID:15581610

  2. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species by silibinin dihemisuccinate.

    PubMed

    Mira, L; Silva, M; Manso, C F

    1994-08-17

    Silibinin dihemisuccinate (SDH) is a flavonoid of plant origin with hepatoprotective effects which have been partially attributed to its ability to scavenge oxygen free radicals. In the present paper the antioxidant properties of SDH were evaluated by studying the ability of this drug to react with relevant biological oxidants such as superoxide anion radical (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (HO.) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). In addition, its effect on lipid peroxidation was investigated. SDH is not a good scavenger of O2- and no reaction with H2O2 was detected within the sensitivity limit of our assay. However, it reacts rapidly with HO. radicals in free solution at approximately diffusion-controlled rate (K = (1.0-1.2) x 10(10)/M/sec) and appears to be a weak iron ion chelator. SDH at concentrations in the micromolar range protected alpha 1-antiproteinase against inactivation by HOCl, showing that it is a potent scavenger of this oxidizing species. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence induced by HOCl was also inhibited by SDH. The reaction of SDH with HOCl was monitored by the modification of the UV-visible spectrum of SDH. The studies on rat liver microsome lipid peroxidation induced by Fe(III)/ascorbate showed that SDH has an inhibitory effect, which is dependent on its concentration and the magnitude of lipid peroxidation. This work supports the reactive oxygen species scavenger action ascribed to SDH. PMID:8080448

  3. Reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Jixueteng evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and photon emission.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Toshizo; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takamichi, Maomi; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Maehata, Yojiro; Sugiyama, Shuta; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Todoki, Kazuo; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2014-12-01

    Jixueteng, the dried stem of Spatholobus suberectus Dunn (Leguminosae), is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine that is commonly classified as a herb that promotes blood circulation and can be used to treat blood stasis. The aim of this study was to examine the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity of Jixueteng and other herbal medicines. The ROS scavenging activities of the water extracts of Jixueteng, Cnidium officinale and Salvia miltiorrhiza were examined using an electron spin resonance (ESR) technique and faint luminescence measurement. The ESR signal intensities of the superoxide anion (O2·) and hydroxyl radical (HO·) were reduced more by Jixueteng than the other herbal medicines we tested. High photon emission intensity to hydrogen peroxide (H202) and HO· was observed in Jixueteng using the XYZ chemiluminescence system that was used as faint luminescence measurement and analysis. The results of the present study revealed that the ROS scavenging activity of 8% Jixueteng was the strongest among the herbal medicines we tested. It has been reported that Jixueteng includes various polyphenols. In the ROS scavenging activity by Jixueteng, it is supposed that the antioxidant activity caused by these polyphenols would contribute greatly. In conclusion, a water extract component of Jixueteng had potent free radical scavenging activity and an antioxidative effect that inhibited the oxidative actions of O2·⁻, H2O2 and HO·. Therefore, Jixueteng represents a promising therapeutic drug for reactive oxygen-associated pathologies. PMID:25632478

  4. Scavenging activity of "beta catechin" on reactive oxygen species generated by photosensitization of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Yoneda, T; Hiramatsu, M

    1996-05-01

    "beta CATECHIN", a preparation containing green tea extract, ascorbic acid, sunflower seed extract, dunaliella carotene and natural vitamin E, has been designed as a model "universal antioxidant" that offers protection via its scavenging action on a wide range of free radicals, both water-soluble and fat-soluble. Reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, are often generated in biological systems during photosensitized oxidation reactions. We report on the simultaneous effect of "beta CATECHIN" on active oxygen species generated during the photosensitized oxidation of riboflavin using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (TMPD) as a "spin-trapping" agent. The intensities of the resulting stable nitroxide radical adduct, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Results show simultaneous, nonspecific and complete scavenging action of reactive oxygen species generated in our in vitro model system by "beta CATECHIN". It is therefore suggested that "beta CATECHIN" could offer protection against free radical insult and in preventing cancer and other diseases that are mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:8739038

  5. Development of nitroxide radicals-containing polymer for scavenging reactive oxygen species from cigarette smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, Toru; Kuramochi, Kazuhiro; Binh Vong, Long; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2014-06-01

    We developed a nitroxide radicals-containing polymer (NRP), which is composed of poly(4-methylstyrene) possessing nitroxide radicals as a side chain via amine linkage, to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) from cigarette smoke. In this study, the NRP was coated onto cigarette filters and its ROS-scavenging activity from streaming cigarette smoke was evaluated. The intensity of electron spin resonance signals of the NRP in the filter decreased after exposure to cigarette smoke, indicating consumption of nitroxide radicals. To evaluate the ROS-scavenging activity of the NRP-coated filter, the amount of peroxy radicals in an extract of cigarette smoke was measured using UV-visible spectrophotometry and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The absorbance of DPPH at 517 nm decreased with exposure to cigarette smoke. When NRP-coated filters were used, the decrease in the absorbance of DPPH was prevented. In contrast, both poly[4-(cyclohexylamino)methylstyrene]- and poly(acrylic acid)-coated filters, which have no nitroxide radical, did not show any effect, indicating that the nitroxide radicals in the NRP scavenge the ROS in cigarette smoke. As a result, the extract of cigarette smoke passed through the NRP-coated filter has a lower cellular toxicity than smoke passed through poly[4-(cyclohexylamino)methylstyrene]- and poly(acrylic acid)-coated filters. Accordingly, NRP is a promising material for ROS scavenging from cigarette smoke.

  6. A novel biointerface that suppresses cell morphological changes by scavenging excess reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yutaka; Yoshinari, Tomoki; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    During cell cultivation on conventional culture dishes, various events results in strong stresses that lead to the production of bioactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. These reactive species cause variable damage to cells and stimulate cellular responses. Here, we report the design of a novel biocompatible surface that decreases stress by not only morphologically modifying the dish surface by using poly(ethylene glycol) tethered chains, but also actively scavenging oxidative stress by using our novel nitroxide radical-containing polymer. A block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl)aminomethylstyrene] (PEG-b-PMNT) was used to coat the surface of a dish. Differentiation of undifferentiated human leukemia (HL-60) cells was found to be suppressed on the polymer-coated dish. Notably, HL-60 cell cultivation caused apoptosis under high-density conditions, while spontaneous apoptosis was suppressed in cells plated on the PEG-b-PMNT-modified surface, because a healthy mitochondrial membrane potential was maintained. In contrast, low molecular weight antioxidants did not have apparent effects on the maintenance of mitochondria. We attribute this to the lack of cellular internalization of our immobilized polymer and selective scavenging of excessive ROS generated outside of cells. These results demonstrate the utility of our novel biocompatible material for actively scavenging ROS and thus maintaining cellular morphology. PMID:25691268

  7. Prussian Blue Nanoparticles as Multienzyme Mimetics and Reactive Oxygen Species Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Sunling; Yin, Jun-Jie; He, Weiwei; Lu, Wei; Ma, Ming; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-11

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important mechanism of nanomaterial toxicity. We found that Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) can effectively scavenge ROS via multienzyme-like activity including peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Instead of producing hydroxyl radicals (•OH) through the Fenton reaction, PBNPs were shown to be POD mimetics that can inhibit •OH generation. We theorized for the first time that the multienzyme-like activities of PBNPs were likely caused by the abundant redox potentials of their different forms, making them efficient electron transporters. To study the ROS scavenging ability of PBNPs, a series of in vitro ROS-generating models was established using chemicals, UV irradiation, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, high glucose contents, and oxygen glucose deprivation and reperfusion. To demonstrate the ROS scavenging ability of PBNPs, an in vivo inflammation model was established using lipoproteins in Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice. The results indicated that PBNPs hold great potential for inhibiting or relieving injury induced by ROS in these pathological processes. PMID:26918394

  8. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species as the mechanism of drug action.

    PubMed

    Robak, J; Marcinkiewicz, E

    1995-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated when oxygen is supplied in excess and/or its reduction is insufficient. The best explored ROS are superoxide anions, hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The first two are free radicals. ROS are harmful for the living cells and are implicated in a variety of pathological processes and diseases. Drugs used in the treatment of these states are either stimulators of endogenous defense mechanisms against ROS or inhibitors of ROS formation. Six groups of anti-ROS substances have been described in this paper. 1) Antioxidant substances used in substitutive therapy such as enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase), substances containing thiol groups and vitamins (A, E, P, C). 2) Chelating agents (e.g. desferoxamine), which lower the level of prooxidative transition metal ions. 3) Inhibitors of superoxide ions generation by stimulated cells or xanthine oxidase. Such mechanism of action was described for xanthine oxidase inhibitor-allopurinol. 4) Superoxide scavengers. Many known drugs were investigated for this activity, but the best documentation was presented for flavonoids. 5) Substances which eliminate hydrogen peroxide, mainly glutathione and its precursors. 6) Scavengers of hydroxyl radicals. Studies of the above activity were conducted mainly using an unspecific method--estimation of malondialdehyde generated during the action of hydroxyl radicals on lipids or on desoxyribose. Inhibition of malondialdehyde formation was described for many drugs of plant and synthetic origin. PMID:8688896

  9. Baicalin Scavenged Reactive Oxygen Species and Protected Human Keratinocytes Against UVB-induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Lin, En-Yuan; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hu, Pei-Shin; Chuang, Chin-Liang; Liao, Cheng-Hsi; Fu, Chun-Kai; Su, Chung-Hao; Gong, Chi-Li; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Bau, DA-Tian; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    Ultraviolet B (UVB), with a wavelength of 280-320 nm, represents one of the most important environmental factors for skin disorders, including sunburn, hyperpigmentation, solar keratosis, solar elastosis and skin cancer. Therefore, protection against excessive UVA-induced damage is useful for prevention of sunburn and other human diseases. Baicalin, a major component of traditional Chinese medicine Scutellaria baicalensis, has been reported to possess antioxidant and cytostatic capacities. In this study, we examined whether baicalin is also capable of protecting human keratinocytes from UVB irradiation. The results showed that baicalin effectively scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevated within 4 h after UVB radiation and reversed the UVB-suppressed cell viability and UVB-induced apoptosis after 24 h. Our results demonstrated the utility of baicalin to complement the contributions of traditional Chinese medicine in UVB-induced damage to skin and suggested their potential application as pharmaceutical agents in long-term sun-shining injury prevention. PMID:27566079

  10. Effect of lanthanum ions (La3+) on the reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes in wheat leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijing; Zeng, Fuli; Xiao, Rong

    2003-03-01

    Physiological effects of lanthanum ions on the activities of the enzymes in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging system in leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings were studied. Wheat leaves treated in Hogland solution with 0.1 mM LaCl(3) for 48 h showed increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate-specific peroxidase (AsA-POD), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR). However, a minor effect was observed on the levels of monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) and glutathione reductase (GR), which regulate the release of energy required by the ROS scavenging system. The whole system was linked up by H(+) transmission. Our results indicated that the activities of the enzymes that function directly to remove ROS were elevated by La(3+) treatment, which is consistent with the observations that La(3+)-treated plants had increased tolerance to environmental stresses. The remaining levels of MDAR and GR suggested that these two enzymes might be regulated differently from that of the other four enzymes studied. PMID:12663948

  11. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species by a glycolipid fraction of Mycobacterium avium serovar 2.

    PubMed

    Scherer, T A; Lauredo, I T; Abraham, W M

    1997-01-01

    Previous experiments indicated that MIF-A3, a peptidoglycolipid extracted from Mycobacterium avium serovar 2 (Mycobacterium paratuberculosis 18), inhibits the killing of Candida albicans by activated bovine peripheral blood-derived macrophages and murine thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Subsequent in vitro data from our laboratory indicated that this reduction in killing may be related to the ability of MIF-A3 to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study we examined this hypothesis directly by determining if MIF-A3 reduced exogenous H2O2-induced candidacidal activity. When Candida albicans was incubated with H2O2 (4 mM) alone, colony-forming units/ml x 10(4) (CFU/ml) were 0.4 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SE, n = 4) as compared to 11.3 +/- 2.0 CFU/ml in control (untreated) cultures (p < .05). The addition of catalase at concentrations > or = 6.8 U/ml, completely blocked the fungicidal effect of H2O2. However, reducing the amount of catalase from 6.8 U/ml to 3.4 U/ml resulted in a loss of scavenging activity, which was associated with a 50% increase in H2O2-mediated killing. Substituting MIF-A3 (400 micrograms/ml) for catalase, also reduced H2O2-induced fungicidal activity. In the absence of MIF-A3, H2O2 reduced Candida albicans to less than 10(3) CFU/ml. However, in the presence of MIF-A3 the CFU/ml of Candida albicans increased 7.5-fold. Based on concentration-response curves of H2O2 inhibition vs. increasing amounts of catalase we determined that the relative inhibitory capacity of the MIF-A3 (400 micrograms/ml) was approximately 1.0 U/ml "catalase equivalents." These findings provide direct evidence that MIF-A3 can scavenge H2O2, and reduce H2O2-induced killing of Candida albicans. PMID:8981049

  12. Scavenging capacity of marine carotenoids against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in a membrane-mimicking system.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eliseu; Mariutti, Lilian R B; Mercadante, Adriana Z

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoid intake has been associated with the decrease of the incidence of some chronic diseases by minimizing the in vivo oxidative damages induced by reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS). The carotenoids are well-known singlet oxygen quenchers; however, their capacity to scavenge other reactive species, such as peroxyl radical (ROO•, hydroxyl radical (HO•), hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and anion peroxynitrite (ONOO⁻), still needs to be more extensively studied, especially using membrane-mimicking systems, such as liposomes. Moreover, the identification of carotenoids possessing high antioxidant capacity can lead to new alternatives of drugs or nutritional supplements for prophylaxis or therapy of pathological conditions related to oxidative damages, such as cardiovascular diseases. The capacity to scavenge ROO•, HO•, HOCl and ONOO⁻ of seven carotenoids found in marine organisms was determined in liposomes based on the fluorescence loss of a fluorescent lipid (C₁₁-BODIPY⁵⁸¹/⁵⁹¹) due to its oxidation by these reactive species. The carotenoid-bearing hydroxyl groups were generally more potent ROS scavengers than the carotenes, whilst β-carotene was the most efficient ONOO⁻ scavenger. The role of astaxanthin as an antioxidant should be highlighted, since it was a more potent scavenger of ROO•, HOCl and ONOO⁻ than α-tocopherol. PMID:23015774

  13. Scoparone attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation through controlling reactive oxygen species production and scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2015-02-15

    Scoparone, one of the bioactive components of Artemisia capillaris Thunb, has various biological properties including immunosuppressive, hepatoprotective, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. This study aims at evaluating the anti-osteoporotic effect of scoparone and its underlying mechanism in vitro. Scoparone demonstrated potent cellular antioxidant capacity. It was also found that scoparone inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38-mediated c-Fos–nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway. During osteoclast differentiation, the production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions was dose-dependently attenuated by scoparone. In addition, scoparone diminished NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression and activation via the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–cSrc–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k) signaling pathway and prevented the disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain system. Furthermore, scoparone augmented the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT). The overall results indicate that the inhibitory effect of scoparone on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is attributed to the suppressive effect on ROS and superoxide anion production by inhibiting Nox1 expression and activation and protecting the mitochondrial electron transport chain system and the scavenging effect of ROS resulting from elevated SOD1 and CAT expression. - Highlights: • Scoparone dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. • Scoparone diminished general ROS and superoxide anions in a dose-dependent manner. • Scoparone inhibited Nox1 expression and

  14. Scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by the prodrug sulfasalazine and its metabolites 5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine.

    PubMed

    Couto, Diana; Ribeiro, Daniela; Freitas, Marisa; Gomes, Ana; Lima, José L F C; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2010-01-01

    Sulfasalazine is a prodrug composed by a molecule of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sulfapyridine (SP), linked by an azo bond, which has been shown to be effective in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as of rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The precise mechanism of action of sulfasalazine and/or its metabolites has not been completely elucidated, though its antioxidant effects are well established and are probably due to its scavenging effects against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), as well as metal chelating properties, in association to its inhibitory effects over neutrophil oxidative burst. The present work was focused on screening and comparing the potential scavenging activity for an array of ROS (O(2)(•-), H(2)O(2), (1)O(2), ROO(•) and HOCl) and RNS ((•)NO and ONOO(-)), mediated by sulfasalazine and its metabolites 5-ASA and SP, using validated in vitro screening systems. The results showed that both 5-ASA and sulfasalazine were able to scavenge all the tested ROS while SP was practically ineffective in all the assays. For HOCl, (1)O(2), and ROO(•), 5-ASA showed the best scavenging effects. A new and important finding of the present study was the strong scavenging effect of 5-ASA against (1)O(2). 5-ASA was shown to be a strong scavenger of (•)NO and ONOO(-). Sulfasalazine was also able to scavenge these RNS, although with a much lower potency than 5-ASA. SP was unable to scavenge (•)NO in the tested concentrations but was shown to scavenge ONOO(-), with a higher strength when the assay was performed in the presence of 25 mM bicarbonate, suggesting further scavenging of oxidizing carbonate radical. In conclusion, the ROS- and RNS-scavenging effects of sulfasalazine and its metabolites shown in this study may contribute to the anti-inflammatory effects mediated by sulfasalazine through the prevention of the

  15. Oxygen scavenging with enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Hitzman, D.O.

    1983-11-08

    An effective method of reducing the amount of oxygen present in an aqueous fluid is described, which protects materials otherwise susceptible to oxidative degradation in the presence of free (dissolved) oxygen. The method comprises reacting the oxygen with an alcohol selected from the group consisting of methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol, in the further presence of alcohol oxidase. An oxygen containing aqueous fluid is a fluid comprising water and free oxygen. The fluid containing free oxygen can be, for example, oil field fluids, recycle water, foodstuffs, etc. The method is applicable to oil field aqueous fluid systems in order to protect oil field equipment to avoid molecular degradation of polymeric viscosifiers used in floods, etc., and to treat foodstuffs. 17 claims.

  16. Flavonoids function as antioxidants: By scavenging reactive oxygen species or by chelating iron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuguo, Deng; Xingwang, Fang; Jilan, Wu

    1997-09-01

    Flavonoids have been reported to exhibit strong antioxidative activity. In the present work, a systematic mechanistic study has been performed on five flavonoids (baicalin, hesperidin, naringin, quercetin and rutin) selected according to their structural characteristics. The experimental results reveal that flavonoids function as antioxidant mainly by chelating iron ions and by scavenging peroxyl radicals whereas their OH radical scavenging effect is much less important.

  17. Prevention of asbestos-induced cell death in rat lung fibroblasts and alveolar macrophages by scavengers of active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Shatos, M.A.; Doherty, J.M.; Marsh, J.P.; Mossman, B.T.

    1987-10-01

    The possible modulation of asbestos-related cell death using antioxidants in both target and effector cells of asbestosis was investigated. After exposure to crocidolite asbestos at a range of concentrations (2.5-25 ..mu..gcm/sup 2/ dish), the viability of a normal rat lung fibroblast line and freshly isolated alveolar macrophages (AM) was determined. In comparison to fibroblasts, AM were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of asbestos. Cytotoxic concentrations of asbestos then were added to both cell types in combination with the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase (SOD), a scavenger of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -./), and catalase, an enzyme scavenging H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of the hydroxyl radical (OH/sup ./) and deferoxamine, an iron chelator, also were evaluated in similar studies. Results showed significant dosage-dependent reduction of asbestos-associated cell death with all agents. In contrast, asbestos-induced toxicity was not ameliorated after addition of chemically inactivated SOD and catalase or bovine serum albumin. Results above suggest asbestos-induced cell damage is mediated by active oxygen species. In this regard, the iron associated with the fiber andor its interaction with cell membranes might be critical in deriving a modified Haber-Weiss (Fenton-type) reaction resulting in production of OH/sup ./.

  18. TIGAR contributes to ischemic tolerance induced by cerebral preconditioning through scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Song, Dan-Dan; Xia, Yun-Fei; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Sheng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Previous study showed that TIGAR (TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator) protected ischemic brain injury via enhancing pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux and preserving mitochondria function. This study was aimed to study the role of TIGAR in cerebral preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and isoflurane preconditioning (ISO) models were established in primary cultured cortical neurons and in mice. Both IPC and ISO increased TIGAR expression in cortical neurons. Preconditioning might upregulate TIGAR through SP1 transcription factor. Lentivirus mediated knockdown of TIGAR significantly abolished the ischemic tolerance induced by IPC and ISO. ISO also increased TIGAR in mouse cortex and hippocampus and alleviated subsequent brain ischemia-reperfusion injury, while the ischemic tolerance induced by ISO was eliminated with TIGAR knockdown in mouse brain. ISO increased the production of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), and scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS), while TIGAR knockdown decreased GSH and NADPH production and increased the level of ROS. Supplementation of ROS scavenger NAC and PPP product NADPH effectively rescue the neuronal injury caused by TIGAR deficiency. Notably, TIGAR knockdown inhibited ISO-induced anti-apoptotic effects in cortical neurons. These results suggest that TIGAR participates in the cerebral preconditioning through reduction of ROS and subsequent cell apoptosis. PMID:27256465

  19. Novel antioxidative nanotherapeutics in a rat periodontitis model: Reactive oxygen species scavenging by redox injectable gel suppresses alveolar bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Saita, Makiko; Kaneko, Junya; Sato, Takenori; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Kawamata, Ryota; Sakurai, Takashi; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-il; Hamada, Nobushiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in a variety of disorders, but to date, ROS scavengers have not been widely used for local treatment of inflammation, because they are rapidly eliminated from the inflamed site. We have designed a novel redox injectable gel (RIG) that is formed at 37 °C after disintegration of nano-assembled flower micelles allowing nitroxide radicals to act locally as specific ROS scavengers for the treatment of periodontitis. In the present study, we have confirmed retention of the RIG in the periodontal region, along with its antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory effects, and we have subsequently evaluated the inhibitory effect of the RIG against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis)-induced alveolar bone loss attributed to ROS. Alveolar bone loss was estimated by morphometry, gingival blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry, and osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. The results show that the RIG can inhibit P. gingivalis-induced bone loss by antioxidant-related anti-inflammatory actions, and this suggests that the RIG is a promising novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis. PMID:26559357

  20. TIGAR contributes to ischemic tolerance induced by cerebral preconditioning through scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Song, Dan-Dan; Xia, Yun-Fei; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Sheng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Previous study showed that TIGAR (TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator) protected ischemic brain injury via enhancing pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux and preserving mitochondria function. This study was aimed to study the role of TIGAR in cerebral preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and isoflurane preconditioning (ISO) models were established in primary cultured cortical neurons and in mice. Both IPC and ISO increased TIGAR expression in cortical neurons. Preconditioning might upregulate TIGAR through SP1 transcription factor. Lentivirus mediated knockdown of TIGAR significantly abolished the ischemic tolerance induced by IPC and ISO. ISO also increased TIGAR in mouse cortex and hippocampus and alleviated subsequent brain ischemia-reperfusion injury, while the ischemic tolerance induced by ISO was eliminated with TIGAR knockdown in mouse brain. ISO increased the production of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), and scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS), while TIGAR knockdown decreased GSH and NADPH production and increased the level of ROS. Supplementation of ROS scavenger NAC and PPP product NADPH effectively rescue the neuronal injury caused by TIGAR deficiency. Notably, TIGAR knockdown inhibited ISO-induced anti-apoptotic effects in cortical neurons. These results suggest that TIGAR participates in the cerebral preconditioning through reduction of ROS and subsequent cell apoptosis. PMID:27256465

  1. Influence of coffee genotype on bioactive compounds and the in vitro capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Naira Poerner; Salva, Terezinha de Jesus Garcia; Bragagnolo, Neura

    2015-05-20

    The influence of green coffee genotype on the bioactive compounds and the in vitro antioxidant capacity against the principal reactive oxygen (ROO(•), H2O2, HO(•), and HOCl) and nitrogen (NO(•) and ONOO(-)) species of biological relevance was investigated. This is the first report on the capacity of green coffee to scavenge H2O2, HOCl, and NO(•). Variations in the contents of total chlorogenic acids (22.9-37.9 g/100 g), cinnamoyl-amino acid conjugates (0.03-1.12 g/100 g), trigonelline (3.1-6.7 g/100 g), and caffeine (3.9-11.8 g/100 g) were found. Hydrophilic extracts of Coffea canephora and Coffea kapakata were the most potent scavengers of ROO(•), H2O2, HO(•), NO(•), and ONOO(-) due to their chlorogenic acid contents, which were, on average, 30% higher than those found in Coffea arabica and Coffea racemosa. The results showed that genotype is a determinant characteristic in the bioactive compound contents and consequently in the antioxidant capacity of green coffee. PMID:25910038

  2. Edaravone (MCI-186) scavenges reactive oxygen species and ameliorates tissue damage in the murine spinal cord injury model.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Takeshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Seki, Toshitaka; Yano, Shunsuke; Shichinohe, Hideo; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2008-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on lesion volume and neurological dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI) in mice, and investigated its protective effects on superoxide generation. Female C57BL/6 mice were subjected to SCI using a pneumatic impact device and were treated with 3 mg/kg of edaravone or vehicle 30 minutes before the insult. Motor functions were quantitatively evaluated. Lesion volume was assessed by Dohrmann's two-cone method after one week. In situ detection of superoxide in the injured cord was carried out using the superoxide-sensitive dye dihydroethidium (DHE) staining technique. Pretreatment with edaravone significantly improved motor dysfunction and reduced the lesion volume to about 63% of the control (p < 0.05). Semi-quantitative measurements of red fluorescence emitted from DHE revealed that the superoxide concentration increased in the lesion periphery at 1 and 3 hours after the insult, and that pretreatment with edaravone significantly inhibited the increase of superoxide concentration in the lesion periphery at both time points (p < 0.0001). Double staining with DHE and monoclonal antibody against MAP2 showed that most cells positive for DHE were also positive for MAP2. These findings suggest that edaravone ameliorates tissue damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species, especially in the neurons, after SCI. PMID:19106491

  3. Response to temperature stress of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes in the cross-tolerance of barley seed germination*

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu-qin; Song, Song-quan

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have shown the existence of cross-tolerance in plants, but the physiological mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we used the germination of barley seeds as a system to investigate the cross-tolerance of low-temperature pretreatment to high-temperature stress and the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes in the cross-tolerance. After pretreatment at 0 °C for different periods of time, barley seeds were germinated at 35 °C, and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of ROS scavenging enzymes were measured by a spectrophotometer analysis. The results showed that barley seed germinated very poorly at 35 °C, and this inhibitive effect could be overcome by pretreatment at 0 °C. The MDA content varied, depending on the temperature at which seeds germinated, while barley seeds pretreated at 0 °C did not change the MDA content. Compared with seeds germinated directly at 35 °C, the seeds pretreated first at 0 °C and then germinated at 35 °C had markedly increased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR). The SOD and APX activities of seeds germinated at 35 °C after 0 °C-pretreatment were even substantially higher than those at 25 °C, and GR activity was similar to that at 25 °C, at which the highest germination performance of barley seeds was achieved. These results indicate that low-temperature pretreatment can markedly increase the tolerance of barley seed to high temperature during germination, this being related to the increase in ROS scavenging enzyme activity. This may provide a new method for increasing seed germination under stress environments, and may be an excellent model system for the study of cross-tolerance. PMID:21121076

  4. Enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging by overproduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase delays postharvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R; Zhang, Peng

    2013-03-01

    Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava (Manihot esculenta) storage roots is the result of a rapid oxidative burst, which leads to discoloration of the vascular tissues due to the oxidation of phenolic compounds. In this study, coexpression of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) in transgenic cassava was used to explore the intrinsic relationship between ROS scavenging and PPD occurrence. Transgenic cassava plants integrated with the expression cassette p54::MeCu/ZnSOD-35S::MeCAT1 were confirmed by Southern-blot analysis. The expression of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeCAT1 was verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic activity analysis both in the leaves and storage roots. Under exposure to the ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen or to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the transgenic plants showed higher enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT than the wild-type plants. Levels of malondialdehyde, chlorophyll degradation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 accumulation were dramatically reduced in the transgenic lines compared with the wild type. After harvest, the storage roots of transgenic cassava lines show a delay in their PPD response of at least 10 d, accompanied by less mitochondrial oxidation and H2O2 accumulation, compared with those of the wild type. We hypothesize that this is due to the combined ectopic expression of Cu/ZnSOD and CAT leading to an improved synergistic ROS-scavenging capacity of the roots. Our study not only sheds light on the mechanism of the PPD process but also develops an effective approach for delaying the occurrence of PPD in cassava. PMID:23344905

  5. Mechanisms of nitric oxide crosstalk with reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes during abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Arora, Dhara; Jain, Prachi; Singh, Neha; Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) acts in a concentration and redox-dependent manner to counteract oxidative stress either by directly acting as an antioxidant through scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anions (O(2)(-)*), to form peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) or by acting as a signaling molecule, thereby altering gene expression. NO can interact with different metal centres in proteins, such as heme-iron, zinc-sulfur clusters, iron-sulfur clusters, and copper, resulting in the formation of a stable metal-nitrosyl complex or production of varied biochemical signals, which ultimately leads to modification of protein structure/function. The thiols (ferrous iron-thiol complex and nitrosothiols) are also involved in the metabolism and mobilization of NO. Thiols bind to NO and transport it to the site of action whereas nitrosothiols release NO after intercellular diffusion and uptake into the target cells. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) also has the ability to transnitrosylate proteins. It is an NO˙ reservoir and a long-distance signaling molecule. Tyrosine nitration of proteins has been suggested as a biomarker of nitrosative stress as it can lead to either activation or inhibition of target proteins. The exact molecular mechanism(s) by which exogenous and endogenously generated NO (or reactive nitrogen species) modulate the induction of various genes affecting redox homeostasis, are being extensively investigated currently by various research groups. Present review provides an in-depth analysis of the mechanisms by which NO interacts with and modulates the activity of various ROS scavenging enzymes, particularly accompanying ROS generation in plants in response to varied abiotic stress. PMID:26554526

  6. Production and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Signaling during Leaf and Flower Senescence: Similar But Different.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Hilary; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the regulation of many developmental processes, including senescence, and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Several mechanisms of ROS generation and scavenging are similar, but others differ between senescing leaves and petals, despite these organs sharing a common evolutionary origin. Photosynthesis-derived ROS, nutrient remobilization, and reversibility of senescence are necessarily distinct features of the progression of senescence in the two organs. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed specific redox signaling processes that act in concert with phytohormones and transcription factors to regulate senescence-associated genes in leaves and petals. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the production and elimination of ROS in these two organs. We focus on unveiling common and differential aspects of redox signaling in leaf and petal senescence, with the aim of linking physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes. We conclude that the spatiotemporal impact of ROS in senescing tissues differs between leaves and flowers, mainly due to the specific functionalities of these organs. PMID:27208233

  7. Production and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Signaling during Leaf and Flower Senescence: Similar But Different1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the regulation of many developmental processes, including senescence, and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Several mechanisms of ROS generation and scavenging are similar, but others differ between senescing leaves and petals, despite these organs sharing a common evolutionary origin. Photosynthesis-derived ROS, nutrient remobilization, and reversibility of senescence are necessarily distinct features of the progression of senescence in the two organs. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed specific redox signaling processes that act in concert with phytohormones and transcription factors to regulate senescence-associated genes in leaves and petals. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the production and elimination of ROS in these two organs. We focus on unveiling common and differential aspects of redox signaling in leaf and petal senescence, with the aim of linking physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes. We conclude that the spatiotemporal impact of ROS in senescing tissues differs between leaves and flowers, mainly due to the specific functionalities of these organs. PMID:27208233

  8. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, James E.; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M.; Swanson, Raymond A.; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human DNA repair-deficient disease that involves transcription coupled repair (TCR), in which three gene products, Cockayne syndrome A (CSA), Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), and ultraviolet stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) cooperate in relieving RNA polymerase II arrest at damaged sites to permit repair of the template strand. Mutation of any of these three genes results in cells with increased sensitivity to UV light and defective TCR. Mutations in CSA or CSB are associated with severe neurological disease but mutations in UVSSA are for the most part only associated with increased photosensitivity. This difference raises questions about the relevance of TCR to neurological disease in CS. We find that CSB-mutated cells, but not UVSSA-deficient cells, have increased levels of intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially when mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by rotenone. Increased ROS would result in oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. CSB appears to behave as an electron scavenger in the mitochondria whose absence leads to increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial ROS, however, did not cause detectable nuclear DNA damage even when base excision repair was blocked by an inhibitor of polyADP ribose polymerase. Neurodegeneration in Cockayne syndrome may therefore be associated with ROS-induced damage in the mitochondria, independent of nuclear TCR. An implication of our present results is that mitochondrial dysfunction involving ROS has a major impact on CS-B pathology, whereas nuclear TCR may have a minimal role. PMID:25136123

  9. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, James E; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Swanson, Raymond A; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-09-16

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human DNA repair-deficient disease that involves transcription coupled repair (TCR), in which three gene products, Cockayne syndrome A (CSA), Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), and ultraviolet stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) cooperate in relieving RNA polymerase II arrest at damaged sites to permit repair of the template strand. Mutation of any of these three genes results in cells with increased sensitivity to UV light and defective TCR. Mutations in CSA or CSB are associated with severe neurological disease but mutations in UVSSA are for the most part only associated with increased photosensitivity. This difference raises questions about the relevance of TCR to neurological disease in CS. We find that CSB-mutated cells, but not UVSSA-deficient cells, have increased levels of intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially when mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by rotenone. Increased ROS would result in oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. CSB appears to behave as an electron scavenger in the mitochondria whose absence leads to increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial ROS, however, did not cause detectable nuclear DNA damage even when base excision repair was blocked by an inhibitor of polyADP ribose polymerase. Neurodegeneration in Cockayne syndrome may therefore be associated with ROS-induced damage in the mitochondria, independent of nuclear TCR. An implication of our present results is that mitochondrial dysfunction involving ROS has a major impact on CS-B pathology, whereas nuclear TCR may have a minimal role. PMID:25136123

  10. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of the oxidation of low density lipoprotein by the aqueous extraction of Anoectochilus formosanus.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Wu, Yueh-Wern; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2003-01-01

    The ability of Anoectochilus formosanus extract (AFE) to react with relevant biological oxidants was evaluated in this study. In addition, its effect on oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. AFE could scavenge reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical. The study of human LDL oxidation showed that AFE delayed oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo studies also showed that oral administration of AFE delayed the oxidation of LDL from hyperlipidemic hamsters. The ability of AFE to scavenge free radicals suggests that it may be a promising anti-atherogenic agent. PMID:12723752

  11. The scavenging of free radical and oxygen species activities and hydration capacity of collagen hydrolysates from walleye pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Yongliang; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue

    2009-06-01

    Fish skin collagen hydrolysates (FSCH) were prepared from walleye pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) using a mixture of enzymes, namely trypsin and flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis of the skin collagen was 27.3%. FSCH was mainly composed of low-molecular-weight peptides and the relative proportion of <1000Da fraction was 70.6%. Free radical and oxygen species scavenging activities of FSCH were investigated in four model systems, including diphenylpicrylhy-drazyl radical (DPPH), superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide model, and compared with that of a native antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). FSCH was also evaluated by water-absorbing and water-holding capacity. The results showed that FSCH was able to scavenge free radical and oxygen species significantly and to enhance water-absorbing and water-holding capacity remarkably. Therefore, FSCH may have potential applications in the medicine and food industries.

  12. Is alpha-lipoic acid a scavenger of reactive oxygen species in vivo? Evidence for its initiation of stress signaling pathways that promote endogenous antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Petersen Shay, Kate; Moreau, Régis F; Smith, Eric J; Hagen, Tory M

    2008-06-01

    The chemical reduction and oxidation (redox) properties of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) suggest that it may have potent antioxidant potential. A significant number of studies now show that LA and its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), directly scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) species and protect cells against a host of insults where oxidative stress is part of the underlying etiology. However, owing to its limited and transient accumulation in tissues following oral intake, the efficacy of nonprotein-bound LA to function as a physiological antioxidant has been questioned. Herein, we review the evidence that the micronutrient functions of LA may be more as an effector of important cellular stress response pathways that ultimately influence endogenous cellular antioxidant levels and reduce proinflammatory mechanisms. This would promote a sustained improvement in cellular resistance to pathologies where oxidative stress is involved, which would not be forthcoming if LA solely acted as a transient ROS scavenger. PMID:18409172

  13. Evaluation of reactive oxygen species scavenging activities and DNA damage prevention effect of Pleioblastus kongosanensis f. aureostriatus leaf extract by chemiluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qinxue; Xu, Guangzhi; Gao, Qianxin; Yang, Dongdong; Zhang, Youzuo

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species scavenging effect of Pleioblastus kongosanensis f. aureostriatus leaf extract against O2(-), OH and H2O2 were investigated by chemiluminescence methods in vitro. Bamboo grass leaves were extracted with 70% ethanol solution and sequentially partitioned with solvents in an order of increasing polarity. Among fractions of different polarity, BuOH and EtOAc fractions showed powerful scavenging activities than others, and showed better scavenging ability on OH than that of O2(-)and H2O2, with IC50 of 0.55 μg/mL and 0.60 μg/mL, respectively. Both OH-induced DNA damage model by chemiluminescence assay and plasmid pUC18 double-strand break model by agarose gel electrophoresis showed that BuOH and EtOAc fractions had remarkable concentration-dependent prevention effect on the OH-induced damage of DNA attribute to their good scavenging effects on ROS. Results from the compositional analysis of different fractions indicate that the flavonoids in the Pleioblastus kongosanensis f. aureostriatus leaf may be responsible for its ROS scavenging activity and DNA damage prevention ability. PMID:24103782

  14. Isoflavonoid-Rich Flemingia macrophylla Extract Attenuates UVB-Induced Skin Damage by Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species and Inhibiting MAP Kinase and MMP Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Liao, Sue-Tsai; Chen, Yen-Ting; Chang, Hsien-Chang; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the antioxidant activity and anti-photoaging properties of an extract of Flemingia macrophylla, a plant rich in isoflavonoid content. Pretreatment of fibroblasts with Flemingia macrophylla extract (FME) inhibited elastase activity, promoted the protein expression of type I procollagen, and attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and the protein expression of matrix-metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 1, 3, and 9. The IC50 values were 2.1 μg/mL for DPPH radical scavenging ability, 366.8 μg/mL for superoxide anion scavenging ability, 178.9 μg/mL for hydrogen peroxide scavenging ability, and 230.9 μg/mL for hydroxyl radical scavenging ability. Also, exposure of erythrocytes to various concentrations of FME (50–500 μg/mL) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of AAPH-induced hemolysis. In human fibroblasts, FME at 10 μg/mL was shown to be a potent scavenger of UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidant and anti-photoaging properties of FME make it an ideal anti-intrinsic aging and anti-photoaging agent. PMID:23935672

  15. Isoflavonoid-Rich Flemingia macrophylla Extract Attenuates UVB-Induced Skin Damage by Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species and Inhibiting MAP Kinase and MMP Expression.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Liao, Sue-Tsai; Chen, Yen-Ting; Chang, Hsien-Chang; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the antioxidant activity and anti-photoaging properties of an extract of Flemingia macrophylla, a plant rich in isoflavonoid content. Pretreatment of fibroblasts with Flemingia macrophylla extract (FME) inhibited elastase activity, promoted the protein expression of type I procollagen, and attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and the protein expression of matrix-metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 1, 3, and 9. The IC50 values were 2.1  μ g/mL for DPPH radical scavenging ability, 366.8  μ g/mL for superoxide anion scavenging ability, 178.9  μ g/mL for hydrogen peroxide scavenging ability, and 230.9  μ g/mL for hydroxyl radical scavenging ability. Also, exposure of erythrocytes to various concentrations of FME (50-500  μ g/mL) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of AAPH-induced hemolysis. In human fibroblasts, FME at 10  μ g/mL was shown to be a potent scavenger of UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidant and anti-photoaging properties of FME make it an ideal anti-intrinsic aging and anti-photoaging agent. PMID:23935672

  16. Neuronal apoptosis in rats is accompanied by rapid impairment of cellular respiration and is prevented by scavengers of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Marra, E; Calissano, P

    1998-04-10

    Apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells induced by potassium withdrawal is accompanied by a very rapid decrease in both cell and mitochondrial respiration supported by glucose and succinate, respectively. The respiratory control ratio, which is an index of oxidative phosphorylation and therefore reflects the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP, is reduced by 50% within the first 2 h after the beginning of apoptosis, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), actinomicin D or cycloheximide, previously reported to inhibit apoptosis, fully prevent the impairment of cellular respiration while scavengers of reactive oxygen species partially inhibit apoptosis and restore cellular respiration. PMID:9605472

  17. Calcitriol-copper interaction leads to non enzymatic, reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage and modulation of cellular redox scavengers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Asim; Farhan, Mohd; Naseem, Imrana; Hadi, S M

    2016-09-01

    Calcitriol is the metabolically active form of Vitamin D and is known to kill cancer cells. Using the rat model of DEN induced hepatocellular carcinoma we show that there is a marked increase in cellular levels of copper in hepatocellular carcinoma and that calcitriol-copper interaction leads to reactive oxygen species mediated DNA breakage selectively in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In vivo studies show that calcitriol selectively induces severe fluctuations in cellular enzymatic and non enzymatic scavengers of reactive oxygen species in the malignant tissue. Lipid peroxidation, a well established marker of oxidative stress, was found to increase, and substantial cellular DNA breakage was observed. We propose that calcitriol is a proxidant in the cellular milieu of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and this copper mediated prooxidant action of calcitriol causes selective DNA breakage in malignant cells, while sparing normal (non malignant) cells. PMID:27343126

  18. Molecular mechanisms for the reaction between (˙)OH radicals and proline: insights on the role as reactive oxygen species scavenger in plant stress.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Santiago; Coitiño, E Laura; Borsani, Omar; Monza, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of proline (Pro) and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by plants exposed to stress is well-documented. In vitro assays show that enzyme inactivation by hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) can be avoided in the presence of Pro, suggesting this amino acid might act as a (•)OH scavenger. Although production of hydroxyproline (Hyp) has been hypothesized in connection with such antioxidant activity, no evidence on the detailed mechanism of scavenging has been reported. To elucidate whether and how Hyp might be produced, we used density functional theory calculations coupled to a polarizable continuum model to explore 27 reaction channels including H-abstraction by (•)OH and (•)OH/H2O addition. The structure and energetics of stable species and transition states for each reaction channel were characterized at the PCM-(U)M06/6-31G(d,p) level in aqueous solution. Evidence is found for a main pathway in which Pro scavenges (•)OH by successive H-abstractions (ΔG(‡,298) = 4.1 and 7.5 kcal mol(-1)) to yield 3,4-Δ-Pro. A companion pathway with low barriers yielding Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) is also supported, linking with 5-Hyp through hydration. However, this connection remains unlikely in stressed plants because P5C would be efficiently recycled to Pro (contributing to its accumulation) by P5C reductase, hypothesis coined here as the "Pro-Pro cycle". PMID:24328335

  19. Antioxidant effects of the sarsaparilla via scavenging of reactive oxygen species and induction of antioxidant enzymes in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Tae-mi; Kim, Jeong Hee; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight causes distinct changes in collagenous skin tissues as a result of the breakdown of collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix. UV irradiation downregulates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-elimination pathways, thereby promoting the production of ROS, which are implicated in skin aging. Smilax glabra Roxb (sarsaparilla) has been used in folk medicine because of its many effects. However, no study on the protective effects of sarsaparilla root (SR) on human dermal fibroblasts has been reported previously. Here, we investigated the protective effect of SR against oxidative stress in dermal fibroblasts. SR significantly inhibited oxidative damage and skin-aging factor via mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Also, SR decreased Ca(2+) and ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, dysfunction, and increased glutathione, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase and heme oxygenase-1. These results demonstrate that SR can protect dermal fibroblasts against UVB-induced skin aging via antioxidant effects. PMID:25022355

  20. Soyasaponins prevent H₂O₂-induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by scavenging reactive oxygen species in rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiading; Sun, Suxia; Zha, Dingsheng; Wu, Jiguo; Mao, Limei; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Luo, Haiji; Zha, Longying

    2014-01-01

    It appears to be more practical and effective to prevent carcinogenesis by targeting the tumor promotion stage. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is strongly involved in carcinogenesis, especially the tumor promotion stage. Considerable interest has been focused on the chemoprevention activities of soyasaponin (SS), which are major phytochemicals found in soybeans and soy products. However, less is known about the preventive effects of SS (especially SS with different chemical structures) against tumor promoter-induced inhibition of GJIC. We investigated the protective effects of SS-A1, SS-A2, and SS-I against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced GJIC inhibition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Buffalo rat liver (BRL) cells. The present results clearly show for the first time that SS-A1, SS-A2, and SS-I prevent the H2O2-induced GJIC inhibition by scavenging ROS in BRL cells in a dose-dependent manner at the concentration range of from 25 to 100 μg/mL. Soyasaponins attenuated the H2O2-induced ROS through potentiating the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. This may be an important mechanism by which SS protects against tumor promotion. In addition, various chemical structures of SS appear to exhibit different protective abilities against GJIC inhibition. This may partly attribute to their differences in ROS-scavenging activities. PMID:25268883

  1. Ethylene Response Factor TERF1, Regulated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like Factors, Functions in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Scavenging in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Ang; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Zejun; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dingyu; Liu, Xinmin; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays a crucial role in the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants under stress conditions. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are important ethylene-signaling regulators functioning in plant defense responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the roles of ERFs during plant adapting to ROS stress have not yet been well documented. Our studies previously reported that a tomato ERF transcription factor TERF1 functions in the regulation of plant ethylene responses and stress tolerance. Here, we report our findings regarding the roles of TERF1 in ROS scavenging. In this study, we revealed that the transcription of TERF1 is regulated by upstream EIN3-like (EIN3, ethylene-insensitive 3) regulators LeEIL3 and LeEIL4 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and is also inducible by exogenous applied ROS-generating reagents. Ectopic expression of TERF1 in tobacco promoted the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses, including carbonic anhydrase functioning in hypersensitive defense, catalase and glutathione peroxidase catalyzing oxidative reactions, and GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase functioning in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, reduced the ROS content induced by ethylene treatment, and enhanced stress tolerance of tobacco seedlings to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cumulatively, these findings suggest that TERF1 is an ethylene inducible factor regulating ROS scavenging during stress responses. PMID:27435661

  2. Substance P Inhibits Hyperosmotic Stress-Induced Apoptosis in Corneal Epithelial Cells through the Mechanism of Akt Activation and Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging via the Neurokinin-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lingling; Sui, Wenjie; Li, Yunqiu; Qi, Xia; Wang, Yao; Zhou, Qingjun; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hyperosmolarity has been recognized as an important pathological factor in dry eye leading to ocular discomfort and damage. As one of the major neuropeptides of corneal innervation, substance P (SP) has been shown to possess anti-apoptotic effects in various cells. The aim of this study was to determine the capacity and mechanism of SP against hyperosmotic stress-induced apoptosis in cultured corneal epithelial cells. The cells were exposed to hyperosmotic stress by the addition of high glucose in the presence or absence of SP. The results showed that SP inhibited hyperosmotic stress-induced apoptosis of mouse corneal epithelial cells. Moreover, SP promoted the recovery of phosphorylated Akt level, mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca2+ contents, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione levels that impaired by hyperosmotic stress. However, the antiapoptotic capacity of SP was partially suppressed by Akt inhibitor or glutathione depleting agent, while the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist impaired Akt activation and ROS scavenging that promoted by SP addition. In conclusion, SP protects corneal epithelial cells from hyperosmotic stress-induced apoptosis through the mechanism of Akt activation and ROS scavenging via the NK-1 receptor. PMID:26901348

  3. Ethylene Response Factor TERF1, Regulated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like Factors, Functions in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Scavenging in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Ang; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Zejun; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dingyu; Liu, Xinmin; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays a crucial role in the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants under stress conditions. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are important ethylene-signaling regulators functioning in plant defense responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the roles of ERFs during plant adapting to ROS stress have not yet been well documented. Our studies previously reported that a tomato ERF transcription factor TERF1 functions in the regulation of plant ethylene responses and stress tolerance. Here, we report our findings regarding the roles of TERF1 in ROS scavenging. In this study, we revealed that the transcription of TERF1 is regulated by upstream EIN3-like (EIN3, ethylene-insensitive 3) regulators LeEIL3 and LeEIL4 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and is also inducible by exogenous applied ROS-generating reagents. Ectopic expression of TERF1 in tobacco promoted the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses, including carbonic anhydrase functioning in hypersensitive defense, catalase and glutathione peroxidase catalyzing oxidative reactions, and GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase functioning in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, reduced the ROS content induced by ethylene treatment, and enhanced stress tolerance of tobacco seedlings to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cumulatively, these findings suggest that TERF1 is an ethylene inducible factor regulating ROS scavenging during stress responses. PMID:27435661

  4. 6-Methyl 3-chromonyl 2,4-thiazolidinedione/2,4-imidazolidinedione/2-thioxo-imidazolidine-4-one compounds: novel scavengers of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Berczyński, Paweł; Duchnik, Ewa; Kruk, Irena; Piechowska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Bozdağ-Dündar, Oya; Ceylan-Unlusoy, Meltem

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of antioxidants on human health are usually ascribed to their potential ability to remove reactive oxygen species providing protection against oxidative stress. In this paper the free radicals scavenging activities of nine 6-methyl 3-chromonyl derivatives (CMs) were evaluated for the first time by the chemiluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance, spin trapping and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) methods. The total antioxidant capacity was also measured using a ferric-ferrozine reagent. Compounds having a hydrogen atom at the N3-position of the β-ring were effective in quenching CL resulted from the KO2 /18-crown-6-ether system (a source of superoxide anion radical, O2•¯) in a dose-dependent manner over the range of 0.05-1 mmol/L [IC50 ranged from 0.353 (0.04) to 0.668 (0.05) mmol/L]. The examined compounds exhibited a significant scavenging effect towards hydroxyl radicals (HO(•) HO(•)), produced by the Fenton reaction, and this ranged from 24.0% to 61.0%, at the concentration of 2.5 mmol/L. Furthermore, the compounds examined were also found to inhibit DPPH(•) and this ranged from 51.9% to 97.4% at the same concentration. In addition, the use of the total antioxidant capacity assay confirmed that CM compounds are able to act as reductants. According to the present study, CM compounds showed effective in vitro free radical scavenging activity and may be considered as potential therapeutics to control diseases of oxidative stress-related etiology. PMID:23843284

  5. Different Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging Properties of Flavonoids Determine Their Abilities to Extend the Shelf Life of Tomato1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; De Stefano, Rosalba; Robine, Marie; Butelli, Eugenio; Bulling, Katharina; Hill, Lionel; Rejzek, Martin; Martin, Cathie; Schoonbeek, Henk-jan

    2015-01-01

    The shelf life of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit is determined by the processes of overripening and susceptibility to pathogens. Postharvest shelf life is one of the most important traits for commercially grown tomatoes. We compared the shelf life of tomato fruit that accumulate different flavonoids and found that delayed overripening is associated with increased total antioxidant capacity caused by the accumulation of flavonoids in the fruit. However, reduced susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, a major postharvest fungal pathogen of tomato, is conferred by specific flavonoids only. We demonstrate an association between flavonoid structure, selective scavenging ability for different free radicals, and reduced susceptibility to B. cinerea. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how flavonoids influence the shelf life, information that could be used to improve the shelf life of tomato and, potentially, other soft fruit. PMID:26082399

  6. Superoxide dismutase of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 plays a role in anti-autophagic response by scavenging reactive oxygen species in infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lihua; Shen, Hongxia; Tang, Yulong; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-04-17

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) causes septic shock and meningitis. However, its pathogenesis is still not well-understood. We have recently shown that superoxide dismutase sodA of SS2 is a virulence factor probably by increasing resistance to oxidative stresses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are products of the respiratory burst of phagocytic cells and have been shown to activate autophagy. We wanted to know if and how SS2 explores its sodA to interfere with cell autophagic responses. A sodA deletion mutant (Δsod) was compared with its parent and complemented strain in autophagic response in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. We found that the Δsod mutant induced significant autophagic responses in infected cells, shown as increased LC3 lipidation (LC3-II) and EGFP-LC3 punctae, than those infected by its parent or complemented strain at 1 or 2h post-infection. Co-localization of the autophagosomal EGFP-LC3 vesicles with lysosomes was seen in cells infected with Δsod mutant and its parent strain, indicating that SS2 infection induced complete autophagic responses. Reduced autophagic responses of cells infected with the wild-type strain might be related to decreased ROS by the scavenging effect of its sodA, as shown by increased superoxide anion or ROS level in cells infected with the Δsod mutant and in the cell free xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine ROS-generating system, as compared with its parent or complemented strain. Taken together, SS2 makes use of its sodA for survival not only by scavenging ROS but also by alleviating the host autophagic responses due to ROS stimulation. PMID:25726301

  7. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species in apoplastic and symplastic areas of rolled leaves in Ctenanthe setosa under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Sağlam, Aykut; Kadioğlu, Asim

    2010-09-01

    The correspondence among apoplastic and symplastic antioxidant status, stomatal conductance and water potential was investigated during leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) under drought stress. Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate form). In the leaf symplast, the highest changes were found in catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities when compared to score 1 during leaf rolling. No significant change was observed in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities in the symplast of leaf during the rolling. The same phenomenon was also present in the symplast of petiole except APX activity. In the leaf apoplast, the highest increase occurred in APX and GPX activities, whilst a slight increase in CAT and SOD activities. In the apoplast of petiole, the highest increment was found only in GPX activity, while there were small increases in SOD, APX and CAT activities. Hydrogen peroxide content increased up to score 3 in the apoplast and symplast of leaf and petiole but then slightly decreased. Also, superoxide production increased in the leaf and petiole apoplast but its quantity in the apoplast was much more than that of the symplast. On the other hand, NAD(P)H oxidase activity increased in the leaf but no change was observed in the petiole. In conclusion, as a result of water deficit during leaf rolling antioxidant enzymes are induced to scavenging of ROS produced in symplast and apoplast. PMID:20724275

  8. Biomimetic nanomaterials: Development of protein coated nanoceria as a potential antioxidative nano-agent for the effective scavenging of reactive oxygen species in vitro and in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Nandhagopal, Soundharapandiyan; Rajesh Kannan, Rajaretinam; Gopinath, P

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced oxidative stress is one of the major factors responsible for initiation of several intracellular toxic events that leads to cell death. Antioxidant enzymes defence system of the body is responsible for maintaining the oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. Several diseases are promoted by the excessive oxidative stress caused by the impaired antioxidant defence system that leads to oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in the body. In order to restore or precise the aberrant antioxidant system, a large number of catalytic nanoparticles has been screened so far. Exceptional antioxidative activity of nanoceria made it as a potential antioxidative nano-agent for the effective scavenging of toxic ROS. In this work albumin coated nanoceria (ANC) was synthesized and further characterised by various physicochemical techniques. The antioxidant and superoxide dismutase (SOD) assay confirm that the albumin coating do not alter the antioxidant potential of ANC. The biocompatibility and protective efficacy of ANC against oxidative stress was investigated both in vitro and in vivo in human lung epithelial (L-132) cells and zebrafish embryos, respectively. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) analysis corroborates the uptake of ANC by the cells. Furthermore, the semi-quantitative gene expression studies confirmed that the ANC successfully defend the cells against oxidative stress by preserving the antioxidant system of the cells. Thus, the current work open up a new avenue for the development of improved antioxidant nano-drug therapies. PMID:27388966

  9. An Arabidopsis Zinc Finger Protein Increases Abiotic Stress Tolerance by Regulating Sodium and Potassium Homeostasis, Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Osmotic Potential.

    PubMed

    Zang, Dandan; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Hongyun; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiming; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Plant zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise a large protein family and they are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance. Although Arabidopsis RING/FYVE/PHD ZFP At5g62460 (AtRZFP) is found to bind to zinc, whether it is involved in abiotic stress tolerance is still unknown. In the present study, we characterized the roles of AtRZFP in response to abiotic stresses. The expression of AtRZFP was induced significantly by salt and osmotic stress. AtRZFP positively mediates tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. Additionally, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis plants, plants overexpressing AtRZFP showed reduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs) accumulation, enhanced superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, increased soluble sugars and proline contents, reduced K(+) loss, decreased Na(+) accumulation, stomatal aperture and the water loss rate. Conversely, AtRZFP knockout plants displayed the opposite physiological changes when exposed to salt or osmotic stress conditions. These data suggested that AtRZFP enhances salt and osmotic tolerance through a series of physiological processes, including enhanced ROSs scavenging, maintaining Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis, controlling the stomatal aperture to reduce the water loss rate, and accumulating soluble sugars and proline to adjust the osmotic potential. PMID:27605931

  10. An Arabidopsis Zinc Finger Protein Increases Abiotic Stress Tolerance by Regulating Sodium and Potassium Homeostasis, Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Osmotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Dandan; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Hongyun; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiming; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Plant zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise a large protein family and they are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance. Although Arabidopsis RING/FYVE/PHD ZFP At5g62460 (AtRZFP) is found to bind to zinc, whether it is involved in abiotic stress tolerance is still unknown. In the present study, we characterized the roles of AtRZFP in response to abiotic stresses. The expression of AtRZFP was induced significantly by salt and osmotic stress. AtRZFP positively mediates tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. Additionally, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis plants, plants overexpressing AtRZFP showed reduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs) accumulation, enhanced superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, increased soluble sugars and proline contents, reduced K+ loss, decreased Na+ accumulation, stomatal aperture and the water loss rate. Conversely, AtRZFP knockout plants displayed the opposite physiological changes when exposed to salt or osmotic stress conditions. These data suggested that AtRZFP enhances salt and osmotic tolerance through a series of physiological processes, including enhanced ROSs scavenging, maintaining Na+ and K+ homeostasis, controlling the stomatal aperture to reduce the water loss rate, and accumulating soluble sugars and proline to adjust the osmotic potential. PMID:27605931

  11. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 3. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS/RNS) Scavenging Assays, Oxidative Stress Biomarkers, and Chromatographic/Chemometric Assays.

    PubMed

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    There are many studies in which the antioxidant potential of different foods have been analyzed. However, there are still conflicting results and lack of information as a result of unstandardized assay techniques and differences between the principles of the methods applied. The measurement of antioxidant activity, especially in the case of mixtures, multifunctional or complex multiphase systems, cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using a simple antioxidant test due to the many variables influencing the results. In the literature, there are many antioxidant assays that are used to measure the total antioxidant activity/capacity of food materials. In this review, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) scavenging assays are evaluated with respect to their mechanism, advantages, disadvantages, and potential use in food systems. On the other hand, in vivo antioxidant activity (AOA) assays including oxidative stress biomarkers and cellular-based assays are covered within the scope of this review. Finally, chromatographic and chemometric assays are reviewed, focusing on their benefits especially with respect to their time saving, cost-effective, and sensitive nature. PMID:26689748

  12. Sulphur antioxidants inhibit oxidative stress induced retinal ganglion cell death by scavenging reactive oxygen species but influence nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signalling pathway differently.

    PubMed

    Majid, Aman Shah Abdul; Yin, Zheng Qin; Ji, Dan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to show if two different sulphur containing drugs sulbutiamine and acetylcysteine (NAC) could attenuate the effects of two different insults being serum deprivation and glutamate/buthionine sulfoximine (GB)-induced death to transformed retinal ganglion cell line (RGC-5) in culture. Cells were exposed to either 5 mM of GB for 24 h or serum deprivation for 48 h with inclusion of either NAC or sulbutiamine. Cell viability, microscopic evidence for apoptosis, caspase 3 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), catalase and gluthathione-S-transferase (GST) were determined. The effects of NAC and sulbutiamine on the oxidative stress related transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2) levels and its dependent phase II enzyme haemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) were carried out using Western blot and quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). NAC and sulbutiamine dose-dependently attenuated serum deprivation-induced cell death. However NAC but not sulbutiamine attenuated GB-induced cell death. NAC and sulbutiamine both independently stimulated the GSH and GST production but scavenged different types of ROS with different efficacy. Moreover only sulbutiamine stimulated catalase and significantly increased Nrf-2 and HO-1 levels. In addition, the pan caspase inhibitor, benzoylcarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone (z-VAD-fmk) attenuated the negative effect of serum deprivation while the necroptosis inhibitor (necrostatin-1) counteracted solely an insult of GB. The neuroprotective actions of NAC and sulbutiamine in GB or serum-deprivation insult are therefore different. PMID:23811559

  13. Scavenging dissolved oxygen via acoustic droplet vaporization.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Holland, Christy K; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of perfluorocarbon emulsions has been explored for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that vaporization of a liquid droplet results in a gas microbubble with a diameter 5-6 times larger than the initial droplet diameter. The expansion factor can increase to a factor of 10 in gassy fluids as a result of air diffusing from the surrounding fluid into the microbubble. This study investigates the potential of this process to serve as an ultrasound-mediated gas scavenging technology. Perfluoropentane droplets diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were insonified by a 2 MHz transducer at peak rarefactional pressures lower than and greater than the ADV pressure amplitude threshold in an in vitro flow phantom. The change in dissolved oxygen (DO) of the PBS before and after ADV was measured. A numerical model of gas scavenging, based on conservation of mass and equal partial pressures of gases at equilibrium, was developed. At insonation pressures exceeding the ADV threshold, the DO of air-saturated PBS decreased with increasing insonation pressures, dropping as low as 25% of air saturation within 20s. The decrease in DO of the PBS during ADV was dependent on the volumetric size distribution of the droplets and the fraction of droplets transitioned during ultrasound exposure. Numerically predicted changes in DO from the model agreed with the experimentally measured DO, indicating that concentration gradients can explain this phenomenon. Using computationally modified droplet size distributions that would be suitable for in vivo applications, the DO of the PBS was found to decrease with increasing concentrations. This study demonstrates that ADV can significantly decrease the DO in an aqueous fluid, which may have direct therapeutic applications and should be considered for ADV-based diagnostic or therapeutic applications. PMID:26964964

  14. A novel sulfite alternative scavenger and benefits for the use of traced oxygen scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Batton, C.B.; Riede, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Dissolved oxygen in boiler systems is known to cause corrosion. Mechanical deaeration removes the majority of the dissolved oxygen while oxygen scavengers remove the remaining trace level. Sodium sulfate is a commonly used scavenger, but has several use limitations, such as high solids contribution to boiler water and decomposition products that are corrosive gases which can cause downstream equipment problems. A novel sulfite replacement oxygen scavenger has been developed which addresses the limitations of sulfite. Identification and demonstrated performance of the new scavenger is presented using both research and field data. In addition to oxygen scavenger performance, the success of a boiler water treatment program is dependent upon the correct dosage added to the feedwater. Plant managers and operators often struggle with indirect or inaccurate methods to determine what is occurring within their system. An oxygen scavenger product containing a proprietary fluorescent tracer has been developed. This technology for boilers provides a breakthrough in measurement capability for monitoring the dynamics of a boiler system. These two oxygen scavenger developments represent the result of maintaining desirable performance characteristics and significantly improving current technology. Laboratory and field data supporting these results are presented.

  15. Responses of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes, proline and malondialdehyde to water deficits among six secondary successional seral species in Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Du, Feng; Shi, Huijun; Zhang, Xingchang; Xu, Xuexuan

    2014-01-01

    Drought can impact local vegetation dynamics in a long term. In order to predict the possible successional pathway of local community under drought, the responses of some drought resistance indices of six successional seral species in the semi-arid Loss Hilly Region of China were illustrated and compared on three levels of soil water deficits along three growing months (7, 8 and 9). The results showed that: 1) the six species had significant differences in SOD, POD activities and MDA content. The rank correlations between SOD, POD activities and the successional niche positions of the six species were positive, and the correlation between MDA content and the niche positions was negative; 2) activities of SOD, CAT and POD, and content of proline and MDA had significant differences among the three months; 3) there existed significant interactions of SOD, CAT, POD activities and MDA content between months and species. With an exception, no interaction of proline was found. Proline in leaves had a general decline in reproductive month; 4) SOD, CAT, POD activities and proline content had negative correlations with MDA content. Among which, the correlation between SOD activity and MDA content was significant. The results implied that, in arid or semiarid region, the species at later successional stage tend to have strong drought resistance than those at early stage. Anti-drought indices can partially interpret the pathway of community succession in the drought impacted area. SOD activity is more distinct and important on the scope of protecting membrane damage through the scavenging of ROS on exposure to drought. PMID:24914928

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors as oxygen free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queiroz, M J; Manso, C F

    1993-01-01

    The authors have compared the ability of two non-SH-containing angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (enalaprilat and lisinopril) with an -SH containing ACE inhibitor (captopril) to scavenge the hydroxyl radical (.OH). All three compounds were able to scavenge .OH radicals generated in free solution at approximately diffusion-controlled rates (10(10) M-1 s-1) as established by the deoxyribose assay in the presence of EDTA. The compounds also inhibited deoxyribose degradation in reaction mixtures which did not contain EDTA but not so effectively. This later findings also suggests that they have some degree of metal-binding capability. Chemiluminescence assays of oxidation of hypoxanthine by xanthine oxidase in the presence of luminol, confirm that the three ACE inhibitors are oxygen free radical scavengers. Our results indicate that the presence of a sulphydryl group in the chemical structure of ACE inhibitors is not relevant for their oxygen free radical scavenging ability. PMID:8244086

  17. Flavanoid-rich fraction from Sageretia theezans leaves scavenges reactive oxygen radical species and increases the resistance of low-density lipoprotein to oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore their bioactive fractions, S. theezans leaves were extracted 2 with 60% acetone and then fractionated sequentially with hexane, ethyl acetate, and water. ROS (HOCl, ONOO-, and O2 deg -) scavenging activity, ORAC value and total phenolic content of each fraction were investigated. The ethy...

  18. The role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in scavenging singlet oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.R.; Misra, H.P. )

    1990-02-26

    The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a highly basic 28 amino acid peptide, has a widespread distribution in the body. The functional specificity of this peptide not only includes its potent vasodilatory activity, but also its role in protecting lungs against acute injury, in preventing T-lymphocyte proliferation and in modulating immune function. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible antioxidant properties of VIP. The authors found that VIP up to 50 {mu}g/ml had no inhibitory effect on its reduction of cytochrome C by xanthine and xanthine oxidase, indicating that the peptide does not have significant O{sub 2} scavenging ability. However, VIP was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the {sup 1}O{sub 2} dependent 2, 2, 6, 6 tetramethyl piperidine oxide (TEMPO) formation. {sup 1}O{sub 2} was produced by rose benzal photosensitizing system and was detected as TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct (TEMPO) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic technique. The formation of TEMPO signal was strongly inhibited by {beta}-carotene, histidine as well as azide, but not by superoxide dismutase (48 {mu}g/ml), catalase (20 {mu}g/ml) and mannitol (6mM), indicating that TEMPO signal was a TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct. These results indicate that VIP has potent antioxidant activity and may serve as a singlet O{sub 2} scavenger, thus it may modulate the oxidative tissue injury caused by this reactive oxygen species.

  19. Winery by-products: extraction optimization, phenolic composition and cytotoxic evaluation to act as a new source of scavenging of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Melo, Priscilla Siqueira; Massarioli, Adna Prado; Denny, Carina; dos Santos, Luciana Ferracini; Franchin, Marcelo; Pereira, Giuliano Elias; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; de Alencar, Severino Matias

    2015-08-15

    Nearly 20 million tons of winery by-products, with many biological activities, are discarded each year in the world. The extraction of bioactive compounds from Chenin Blanc, Petit Verdot, and Syrah grape by-products, produced in the semi-arid region in Brazil, was optimized by a Central Composite Rotatable Design. The phenolic compounds profile, antioxidant capacity against synthetic free radicals (DPPH and ABTS), reactive oxygen species (ROS; peroxyl radical, superoxide radical, hypochlorous acid), cytotoxicity assay (MTT) and quantification of TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells were conducted. Gallic acid, syringic acid, procyanidins B1 and B2, catechin, epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, quercetin 3-β-d-glucoside, delfinidin 3-glucoside, peonidin 3-O-glucoside, and malvidin 3-glucoside were the main phenolic compounds identified. In general, rachis showed higher antioxidant capacity than pomace extract, especially for Chenin Blanc. All extracts showed low cytotoxicity against RAW 264.7 cells and Petit Verdot pomace suppressed TNF-α liberation in vitro. Therefore, these winery by-products can be considered good sources of bioactive compounds, with great potential for application in the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25794735

  20. Isofraxidin, a potent reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, protects human leukemia cells from radiation-induced apoptosis via ROS/mitochondria pathway in p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhao, Qing-Li; Wu, Li-Hua; Jawaid, Paras; Jiao, Yu-Fei; Kadowaki, Makoto; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) leads to oxidizing events such as excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the exposed cells, resulting in further oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. To screen the potential radio-protective drug, the intracellular ROS was measured in irradiated U937 cells pretreated with 80 candidate traditional herbal medicine, respectively. Isofraxidin (IF) was one possible radio-protector in these 80 drugs. This study investigated the radio-protective role of IF, a Coumarin compound, in human leukemia cell lines, for the first time. Results indicate that IF protects against IR-induced apoptosis in U937 cells in the time- and concentration- dependent manner. IF decreases IR-induced intracellular ROS generation, especially hydroxyl radicals formation, inhibits IR-induced mitochondrial membrane potential loss and reduces IR-induced high intracellular Ca(2+) levels regardless of ER stress. IF down-regulates the expression of caspase-3, phospho-JNK, phospho-p38 and activates Bax in mitochondria. IF inhibits cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol. IF also moderates IR-induced Fas externalization and caspase-8 activation. IF also exhibits significant protection against IR-induced cell death in other leukemia cell lines such as Molt-4 cells and HL60 cells regardless of p53. Taken together, the data demonstrate that IF protects leukemia cells from radiation-induced apoptosis via ROS/mitochondria pathway in a p53-independent manner. PMID:24692054

  1. Reversible oxygen scavenging at room temperature using electrochemically reduced titanium oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Thomas; Tulsyan, Gaurav; Diaz, Carlos A.; Weinstein, Steven J.; Richter, Christiaan

    2015-05-01

    A material capable of rapid, reversible molecular oxygen uptake at room temperature is desirable for gas separation and sensing, for technologies that require oxygen storage and oxygen splitting such as fuel cells (solid-oxide fuel cells in particular) and for catalytic applications that require reduced oxygen species (such as removal of organic pollutants in water and oil-spill remediation). To date, however, the lowest reported temperature for a reversible oxygen uptake material is in the range of 200-300 °C, achieved in the transition metal oxides SrCoOx (ref. 1) and LuFe2O4+x (ref. 2) via thermal cycling. Here, we report rapid and reversible oxygen scavenging by TiO2-x nanotubes at room temperature. The uptake and release of oxygen is accomplished by an electrochemical rather than a standard thermal approach. We measure an oxygen uptake rate as high as 14 mmol O2 g-1 min-1, ˜2,400 times greater than commercial, irreversible oxygen scavengers. Such a fast oxygen uptake at a remarkably low temperature suggests a non-typical mechanistic pathway for the re-oxidation of TiO2-x. Modelling the diffusion of oxygen, we show that a likely pathway involves ‘exceptionally mobile’ interstitial oxygen produced by the oxygen adsorption and decomposition dynamics, recently observed on the surface of anatase.

  2. Bacterial Fucose-Rich Polysaccharide Stabilizes MAPK-Mediated Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling by Directly Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and 1H/13C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  3. Bacterial fucose-rich polysaccharide stabilizes MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling by directly scavenging reactive oxygen species during hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼ 42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H/(13)C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  4. A STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1-Regulated Protein Phosphatase Gene Rice Protein Phosphatase18 Modulates Drought and Oxidative Stress Tolerance through Abscisic Acid-Independent Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging in Rice1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    You, Jun; Zong, Wei; Hu, Honghong; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses through a complexity of signaling pathways, and the dephosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase (PP) is an important event in this process. We identified a rice (Oryza sativa) PP2C gene, OsPP18, as a STRESS-RESPONSIVE NAC1 (SNAC1)-regulated downstream gene. The ospp18 mutant was more sensitive than wild-type plants to drought stress at both the seedling and panicle development stages. Rice plants with OsPP18 suppressed through artificial microRNA were also hypersensitive to drought stress. Microarray analysis of the mutant revealed that genes encoding reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes were down-regulated in the ospp18 mutant, and the mutant exhibited reduced activities of ROS scavenging enzymes and increased sensitivity to oxidative stresses. Overexpression of OsPP18 in rice led to enhanced osmotic and oxidative stress tolerance. The expression of OsPP18 was induced by drought stress but not induced by abscisic acid (ABA). Although OsPP18 is a typical PP2C with enzymatic activity, it did not interact with SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2 protein kinases, which function in ABA signaling. Meanwhile, the expression of ABA-responsive genes was not affected in the ospp18 mutant, and the ABA sensitivities of the ospp18 mutant and OsPP18-overexpressing plants were also not altered. Together, these findings suggest that OsPP18 is a unique PP2C gene that is regulated by SNAC1 and confers drought and oxidative stress tolerance by regulating ROS homeostasis through ABA-independent pathways. PMID:25318938

  5. Free radical scavenging (DPPH) potential in nine Mentha species.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2012-02-01

    Mentha species are used in every day life in various food items. These species produce valuable secondary metabolites that scavenge toxic free radicals. Toxic free radicals can cause different diseases in the human body. In the present study free radical scavenging potential (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity) in nine Mentha species were investigated to evaluate and explore new potential sources for natural antioxidants. The activity was performed after different time intervals with incubation period of 30 minutes. The methanolic extracts revealed that significantly higher activity (82%) was observed in Mentha suaveolens, followed by Mentha longifolia (79%), Mentha officinalis (76%) and Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Mentha royleana (75%), respectively. Significantly same activity was observed in Mentha arvensis and Mentha spicata. Lower activity was observed in Mentha citrata (64%). The present study revealed that these species can be used as natural antioxidants. PMID:21646282

  6. The effects of oxygen scavenging on jet fuel thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Heneghan, S.P.; Williams, T.F.; Whitacre, S.; Ervin, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    Preliminary tests with a proposed oxygen scavenger (triphenyl-phosphine, TPP) have been done in closed static and flowing systems to study its effects on the oxidation and the deposit formation of jet fuel. TPP was found to significantly slow the oxidation of hexadecane or jet fuel at some temperatures/concentrations and increase the oxidation rate at other conditions. The additive helped decrease the formation of deposits at higher concentrations (200 mg/l) but not at lower concentrations. No evidence of phosphorous was observed in the deposits that were formed. Gas chomatography combined with mass spectrometry and atomic emission detection showed that TPP produced the expected oxidation product (triphenylphosphineoxide) and an unexpected triphenylphosphine-sulfide. The GC/AED allowed A quantitative analysis of the conversion efficiency of TPP to TPPO upon stressing in a closed system.

  7. Cytochrome c is released from mitochondria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent fashion and can operate as a ROS scavenger and as a respiratory substrate in cerebellar neurons undergoing excitotoxic death.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Calissano, P; Bobba, A; Azzariti, A; Marra, E; Passarella, S

    2000-11-24

    In rat cerebellar granule cells both reactive oxygen species production and release of cytochrome c take place during glutamate toxicity. This investigation was aimed (i) to ascertain whether and how these two processes are related and (ii) to gain insight into the role played by the released cytochrome c in the onset of neurotoxicity. Cytochrome c release takes place owing to the generation of reactive oxygen species both in glutamate-treated cerebellar granule cells and in sister control cultures incubated in the presence of the reactive oxygen species-generating system consisting of xanthine plus xanthine oxidase. In the early phase of neurotoxicity (30-min glutamate exposure) about 40% of the maximum (as measured at 3 h of glutamate exposure) cytochrome c release was found to occur in cerebellar granule cells from mitochondria that were essentially coupled and intact and that had a negligible production of oxygen free radicals. Contrarily, mitochondria from cells treated with glutamate for 3 h were mostly uncoupled and produced reactive oxygen species at a high rate. The cytosolic fraction containing the released cytochrome c was able to transfer electrons from superoxide anion to molecular oxygen via the respiratory chain and was found to partially prevent glutamate toxicity when added externally to cerebellar neurons undergoing necrosis. In the light of these findings, we propose that in the early phase of neurotoxicity, cytochrome c release can be part of a cellular and mitochondrial defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:10980192

  8. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation. PMID:26650762

  9. Copper(II) as an efficient scavenger of singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Joshi, P C

    1998-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to play an important role in tissue injury that damages DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Increased production of ROS and/or decreased efficiency of antioxidant defense system has been shown to contribute to a number of degenerative processes including cancer and AIDS. Among the various forms of ROS, singlet oxygen (1O2), which is generated predominantly in photosensitization reactions, is of particular physiologic significance because of its selectively long life in aqueous solution, its ability to cross the cell membrane barrier and high reactivity towards biomolecules. In the present study, the 1O2 scavenging potential of Cu(II) has been evaluated by (i) generating 1O2 by photosensitization of rose bengal (RB), (ii) establishing 1O2 quenching with recognized 1O2 scavengers like sodium azide, DABCO and (iii) examining the effect of Cu(II) in scavenging of 1O2. The results revealed that Cu(II) inhibited the rate of 1O2 production by 88%, 68%, 40%, 21% and 10% at a concentration of 10(-2) M, 5 x 10(-3) M, 10(-3) M; 5 x 10(-4) M, and 10(-4) M, respectively. Under similar experimental condition, sodium azide or DABCO at 10(-2) M inhibited the 1O2 production by 86% and 88%, respectively. Other 1O2 generating photosensitizer like hematoporphyrin, riboflavin and methylene blue also produced identical results with Cu(II) but Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) or As(III) did not produce any quenching of 1O2. Presence of a copper binding peptide (Gly-Gly-His) in the reaction system reduced the 1O2 scavenging capacity of Cu(II) by 52-66% depending upon the UV dose. The 1O2 scavenging property of metal ion appears to have an advantage to reduce the oxidative damage of photodynamic reactions in order to prevent ROS-induced toxicity reactions. PMID:9854900

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species and Cellular Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Timothy P; Pan, Yi; Simon, M. Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Many organisms activate adaptive transcriptional programs to help them cope with decreased oxygen levels, or hypoxia, in their environment. These responses are triggered by various oxygen sensing systems in bacteria, yeast and metazoans. In metazoans, the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) mediate the adaptive transcriptional response to hypoxia by upregulating genes involved in maintaining bioenergetic homeostasis. The HIFs in turn are regulated by HIF-specific prolyl hydroxlase activity, which is sensitive to cellular oxygen levels and other factors such as tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Establishing a role for ROS in cellular oxygen sensing has been challenging since ROS are intrinsically unstable and difficult to measure. However, recent advances in fluorescence energy transfer resonance (FRET)-based methods for measuring ROS are alleviating some of the previous difficulties associated with dyes and luminescent chemicals. In addition, new genetic models have demonstrated that functional mitochondrial electron transport and associated ROS production during hypoxia are required for HIF stabilization in mammalian cells. Current efforts are directed at how ROS mediate prolyl hydroxylase activity and hypoxic HIF stabilization. Progress in understanding this process has been enhanced by the development of the FRET-based ROS probe, an vivo prolyl hydroxylase reporter and various genetic models harboring mutations in components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:17893032

  11. Nested species-rich networks of scavenging vertebrates support high levels of interspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Sebastián-González, Esther; Moleón, Marcos; Gibert, Jean P; Botella, Francisco; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Olea, Pedro P; Guimarães, Paulo R; Sánchez-Zapata, José A

    2016-01-01

    Disentangling the processes that shape the organization of ecological assemblages and its implications for species coexistence is one of the foremost challenges of ecology. Although insightful advances have recently related community composition and structure with species coexistence in mutualistic and antagonistic networks, little is known regarding other species assemblages, such as those of scavengers exploiting carrion. Here we studied seven assemblages of scavengers feeding on ungulate carcasses in mainland Spain. We used dynamical models to investigate if community composition, species richness and structure (nestedness) affect species coexistence at carcasses. Scavenging networks showed a nested pattern in sites where highly efficient, obligate scavengers (i.e., vultures) were present and a non-nested pattern everywhere else. Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) and certain meso-facultative mammalian scavengers (i.e., red fox, Vulpes vulpes, and stone marten, Martes foina) were the main species contributing to nestedness. Assemblages with vultures were also the richest ones in species. Nested species-rich assemblages with vulture presence were associated with high carcass consumption rates, indicating higher interspecific competition at the local scale. However, the proportion of species stopping the consumption of carrion (as derived from the competitive dynamic model) stabilized at high richness and nestedness levels. This suggests that high species richness and nestedness may characterize scavenging networks that are robust to high levels of interspecific competition for carrion. Some facilitative interactions driven by vultures and major facultative scavengers could be behind these observations. Our findings are relevant for understanding species' coexistence in highly competitive systems. PMID:27008779

  12. The use of oxygen scavengers to prevent the transient discolouration of ground beef packaged under controlled, oxygen-depleted atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; McGinnis, J C

    1995-01-01

    Rates of O(2) absorption from air were determined for a type of commercial O(2) scavenger that is formulated for rapid O(2) absorption at chiller temperatures. Rates of O(2) absorption from N(2) atmospheres containing 600 ppm O(2) were determined for trays that each contained 350 g of ground beef. Packs with controlled atmospheres of N(2) that contained ground beef and O(2) scavengers were prepared, to determine the conditions under which the scavengers could prevent the transient discolouration of the meat which arises from its reaction with the residual O(2) initially present in pack atmospheres. The rates of O(2) absorption by individual scavengers varied from the average by ±50%. The rate of O(2) absorption declined with decreasing oxygen concentration, from an average value per scavenger of about 12 ml h(-1) when O(2) concentrations were between 20 and 10%. At O(2) concentrations <1% (10,000 ppm) the rate of O(2) absorption was directly proportioned to the O(2) concentration so that the O(2) concentration in an atmosphere in a gas-impermeable pouch declined exponentially with time. The absorption of O(2) by ground beef was similarly dependent on the O(2) concentration. At 2 °C, the transient discolouration of beef in atmospheres initially containing about 50 ppm O(2) was prevented by the presence of 17.5 scavengers per l of atmosphere. At -15 °C, discolouration was prevented by 5 scavengers per l. The findings indicate that the O(2) concentration in pack atmospheres has to be reduced below 10 ppm within 30 min at 2 °C, or 2 h at -1.5 °C if ground beef is not to transiently discolour. It is unlikely that the required rates of O(2) absorption could be obtained economically with currently available, commercial O(2) scavengers. PMID:22060109

  13. Key role in ecosystem functioning of scavengers reliant on a single common species

    PubMed Central

    Inger, Richard; Per, Esra; Cox, Daniel T.C.; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of species richness in maintaining ecosystem function in the field remains unclear. Recent studies however have suggested that in some systems functionality is maintained by a few abundant species. Here we determine this relationship by quantifying the species responsible for a key ecosystem role, carcass removal by scavengers. We find that, unlike those within largely unaltered environments, the scavenger community within our highly altered system is dominated by a single species, the Carrion crow, despite the presence of a number of other scavenging species. Furthermore, we find no relationship between abundance of crows and carcass removal. However, the overall activity of crows predicts carcass biomass removal rate in an asymptotic manner, suggesting that a relatively low level of abundance and scavenging activity is required to maintain this component of ecosystem function. PMID:27404915

  14. Key role in ecosystem functioning of scavengers reliant on a single common species.

    PubMed

    Inger, Richard; Per, Esra; Cox, Daniel T C; Gaston, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The importance of species richness in maintaining ecosystem function in the field remains unclear. Recent studies however have suggested that in some systems functionality is maintained by a few abundant species. Here we determine this relationship by quantifying the species responsible for a key ecosystem role, carcass removal by scavengers. We find that, unlike those within largely unaltered environments, the scavenger community within our highly altered system is dominated by a single species, the Carrion crow, despite the presence of a number of other scavenging species. Furthermore, we find no relationship between abundance of crows and carcass removal. However, the overall activity of crows predicts carcass biomass removal rate in an asymptotic manner, suggesting that a relatively low level of abundance and scavenging activity is required to maintain this component of ecosystem function. PMID:27404915

  15. 5-AIQ inhibits H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species scavenging and Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway in H9c2 cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Seok; Kang, Jun Chul; Kang, Do-Hyun; Jang, Yong Chang; Yi, Kyu Yang; Chung, Hun-Jong; Park, Jong Seok; Kim, Bokyung; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2013-04-01

    Poly(adenosine 5′-diphosphate ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a nuclear enzyme activated by DNA strand breaks and plays an important role in the tissue injury associated with ischemia and reperfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5-AIQ), a PARP inhibitor, against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. 5-AIQ pretreatment significantly protected against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death, as determined by the XTT assay, cell counting, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, and Western blot analysis of apoptosis-related proteins such as caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2. Upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase accompanied the protective effect of 5-AIQ on H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Our data also showed that 5-AIQ pretreatment protected H9c2 cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by triggering activation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and that the protective effect of 5-AIQ was diminished by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 at a concentration that effectively abolished 5-AIQ-induced Akt and GSK-3β activation. In addition, inhibiting the Akt/GSK-3β pathway by LY294002 significantly attenuated the 5-AIQ-mediated decrease in cleaved caspase-3 and Bax activation and H9c2 cell apoptosis induction. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 5-AIQ prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells by reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species production, regulating apoptosis-related proteins, and activating the Akt/GSK-3β pathway. - Highlights: ► 5-AIQ, a PARP inhibitor, decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced H9c2 cell death and apoptosis. ► 5-AIQ upregulated antioxidant Mn-SOD and catalase, while decreasing ROS production. ► 5-AIQ decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced increase in cleaved caspase-3 and Bax and decrease in Bcl2. ► 5-AIQ activated Akt and GSK-3

  16. Reactive oxygen scavenging activity of matured whiskey and its active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Taguchi, A; Koshimizu, S; Suwa, Y; Yamada, Y; Shirasaka, N; Yoshizumi, H

    2007-04-01

    The quality of whiskey is known to improve remarkably by its storage over many years. This process is commonly termed "maturing." In this process, polyphenols derived from lignin and tannin of the barrel have an important role in not only forming the matured flavor and taste but also contributing to the advance of clustering ethanol and water in whiskey. It is also likely that polyphenols generally possess reactive oxygen (RO) scavenging activity. The present study evaluated the RO scavenging activity (free-radical scavenging activity, H(2)O(2) reduction activity under peroxidase coculture, and H(2)O(2)scavenging activity) of 24 single malt whiskeys with a maturation age of 10 to 30 y produced in Japanese, Scotch (Islay), or Scotch (Speyside and Highland) regions. Single malt whiskey not only showed RO scavenging activity but there was also a positive correlation between this activity and the maturation age of whiskey exceeding the difference resulting from the manufacturing region. A nonvolatile fraction derived from the barrel was responsible for RO scavenging activity. In particular, the contents of ellagic and gallic acids and lyoniresinol, the main polyphenolic compounds in whiskey, increased with maturation age. For the free-radical scavenging activity per molecule, each compound was 1.68 to 3.14 times that of trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E). The activities of ellagic acid, gallic acid, and lyoniresinol in the whiskey (Yamazaki 18) were equivalent to that of 80.3, 31.2, and 11.1 ppm trolox, respectively. Accordingly, the total activity of these 3 compounds accounted for about 20% of the activity of the whiskey (630.7 ppm trolox). PMID:17995817

  17. Singlet oxygen scavenging activity of tocopherol and plastochromanol in Arabidopsis thaliana: relevance to photooxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Yadav, Deepak Kumar; Szymańska, Renata; Kruk, Jerzy; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, singlet oxygen (¹O₂) scavenging activity of tocopherol and plastochromanol was examined in tocopherol cyclase-deficient mutant (vte1) of Arabidopsis thaliana lacking both tocopherol and plastochromanol. It is demonstrated here that suppression of tocopherol and plastochromanol synthesis in chloroplasts isolated from vte1 Arabidopsis plants enhanced ¹O₂ formation under high light illumination as monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy. The exposure of vte1 Arabidopsis plants to high light resulted in the formation of secondary lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde as determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Furthermore, it is shown here that the imaging of ultra-weak photon emission known to reflect oxidation of lipids was unambiguously higher in vte1 Arabidopsis plants. Our results indicate that tocopherol and plastochromanol act as efficient ¹O₂ scavengers and protect effectively lipids against photooxidative damage in Arabidopsis plants. PMID:23848570

  18. A Different Pattern of Production and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species in Halophytic Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) Plants in Comparison to Arabidopsis thaliana and Its Relation to Salt Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pilarska, Maria; Wiciarz, Monika; Jajić, Ivan; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Dobrev, Petre; Vanková, Radomíra; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Isolated thylakoids from halophytic Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) produces more H2O2 in comparison to glycophytic Arabidopsis thaliana. The first objective of this study was to verify whether this feature is relevant also to the intact chloroplasts and leaves. Enhanced H2O2 levels in chloroplasts and leaves of E. salsugineum were positively verified with several methods (electron microscopy, staining with Amplex Red and with diaminobenzidine). This effect was associated with a decreased ratio of O2•–/H2O2 in E. salsugineum in comparison to A. thaliana as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance method. As a next step, we tested how this specific ROS signature of halophytic species affects the antioxidant status and down-stream components of ROS signaling. Comparison of enzymatic antioxidants revealed a decreased activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), enhanced activity of glutathione peroxidase, and the presence of thylakoid-bound forms of iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) and APX in E. salsugineum. These cues were, however, independent from application of salt stress. The typical H2O2-dependent cellular responses, namely the levels of glucosinolates and stress-related hormones were determined. The total glucosinolate content in E. salsugineum water-treated leaves was higher than in A. thaliana and increased after salinity treatment. Treatment with salinity up-regulated all of tested stress hormones, their precursors and catabolites [abscisic acid (ABA), dihydrophaseic acid, phaseic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine] in A. thaliana, whereas in E. salsugineum only a stimulation in ethylene synthesis and ABA catabolism was noted. Obtained results suggest that constitutively enhanced H2O2 generation in chloroplasts of E. salsugineum might be a crucial component of stress-prepardeness of this halophytic species. It shapes a very efficient

  19. A Different Pattern of Production and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species in Halophytic Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) Plants in Comparison to Arabidopsis thaliana and Its Relation to Salt Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Pilarska, Maria; Wiciarz, Monika; Jajić, Ivan; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Dobrev, Petre; Vanková, Radomíra; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Isolated thylakoids from halophytic Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) produces more H2O2 in comparison to glycophytic Arabidopsis thaliana. The first objective of this study was to verify whether this feature is relevant also to the intact chloroplasts and leaves. Enhanced H2O2 levels in chloroplasts and leaves of E. salsugineum were positively verified with several methods (electron microscopy, staining with Amplex Red and with diaminobenzidine). This effect was associated with a decreased ratio of [Formula: see text]/H2O2 in E. salsugineum in comparison to A. thaliana as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance method. As a next step, we tested how this specific ROS signature of halophytic species affects the antioxidant status and down-stream components of ROS signaling. Comparison of enzymatic antioxidants revealed a decreased activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), enhanced activity of glutathione peroxidase, and the presence of thylakoid-bound forms of iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) and APX in E. salsugineum. These cues were, however, independent from application of salt stress. The typical H2O2-dependent cellular responses, namely the levels of glucosinolates and stress-related hormones were determined. The total glucosinolate content in E. salsugineum water-treated leaves was higher than in A. thaliana and increased after salinity treatment. Treatment with salinity up-regulated all of tested stress hormones, their precursors and catabolites [abscisic acid (ABA), dihydrophaseic acid, phaseic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine] in A. thaliana, whereas in E. salsugineum only a stimulation in ethylene synthesis and ABA catabolism was noted. Obtained results suggest that constitutively enhanced H2O2 generation in chloroplasts of E. salsugineum might be a crucial component of stress-prepardeness of this halophytic species. It shapes a very

  20. HBOC Vasoactivity: Interplay Between Nitric Oxide Scavenging and Capacity to Generate Bioactive Nitric Oxide Species

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite many advances in blood substitute research, the development of materials that are effective in maintaining blood volume and oxygen delivery remains a priority for emergency care and trauma. Clinical trials on hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have not provided information on the mechanism of toxicity, although all commercial formulations have safety concerns. Specifically, it is important to reconcile the different hypotheses of Hb toxicity, such as nitric oxide (NO) depletion and oxidative reactions, to provide a coherent molecular basis for designing a safe HBOC. Recent Advances: HBOCs with different sizes often exhibit differences in the degree of HBOC-induced vasoactivity. This has been attributed to differences in the degree of NO scavenging and in the extent of Hb extravasation. Additionally, it is appears that Hb can undergo reactions that compensate for NO scavenging by generating bioactive forms of NO. Critical Issues: Engineering modifications to enhance bioactive NO production can result in diminished oxygen delivery by virtue of increased oxygen affinity. This strategy can prevent the HBOC from fulfilling the intended goal on preserving oxygenation; however, the NO production effects will increase perfusion and oxygen transport. Future Directions: Hb modifications influence NO scavenging and the capacity of certain HBOCs to compensate for NO scavenging through nitrite-mediated reactions that generate bioactive NO. Based on the current understanding of these NO-related factors, possible synthetic strategies are presented that address how HBOC formulations can be prepared that: (i) effectively deliver oxygen, (ii) maintain tissue perfusion, and (iii) limit/reverse underlying inflammation within the vasculature. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2284–2297. PMID:23249305

  1. Role of reactive oxygen species in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron Chi-Hao; Huang, Ying-Ying; Arany, Praveen R.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    This review will focus on the role of reactive oxygen species in the cellular and tissue effects of low level light therapy (LLLT). Coincidentally with the increase in electron transport and in ATP, there has also been observed by intracellular fluorescent probes and electron spin resonance an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical. ROS scavengers, antioxidants and ROS quenchers block many LLLT processes. It has been proposed that light between 400-500- nm may produce ROS by a photosensitization process involving flavins, while longer wavelengths may directly produce ROS from the mitochondria. Several redox-sensitive transcription factors are known such as NF-kB and AP1, that are able to initiate transcription of genes involved in protective responses to oxidative stress. It may be the case that LLLT can be pro-oxidant in the short-term, but anti-oxidant in the long-term.

  2. Effects of Titanium Layer Oxygen Scavenging on the High-k/InGaAs Interface.

    PubMed

    Winter, Roy; Shekhter, Pini; Tang, Kechao; Floreano, Luca; Verdini, Alberto; McIntyre, Paul C; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2016-07-01

    One of the main challenges in the path to incorporating InGaAs based metal-oxide-semiconductor structures in nanoelectronics is the passivation of high-k/InGaAs interfaces. Here, the oxygen scavenging effect of thin Ti layers on high-k/InGaAs gate stacks was studied. Electrical measurements and synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, with in situ metal deposition, were used. Oxygen removal from the InGaAs native oxide surface layer remotely through interposed Al2O3 and HfO2 layers observed. Synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has revealed a decrease in the intensity of InOx features relative to In in InGaAs after Ti deposition. The signal ratio decreases further after annealing. In addition, Ti 2p spectra clearly show oxidation of the thin Ti layer in the ultrahigh vacuum XPS environment. Using capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage measurements, Pt/Ti/Al2O3/InGaAs and Pt/Al2O3/InGaAs capacitors were characterized both before and after annealing. It was found that the remote oxygen scavenging from the oxide/semiconductor interface using a thin Ti layer can influence the density of interface traps in the high-k/InGaAs interface. PMID:27282201

  3. Singlet oxygen quenching and radical scavenging capacities of structurally-related flavonoids present in Zuccagnia punctata Cav.

    PubMed

    Vieyra, Faustino E Morán; Boggetti, Héctor J; Zampini, Iris C; Ordoñez, Roxana M; Isla, María I; Alvarez, Rosa M S; De Rosso, Veridiana; Mercadante, Adriana Z; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2009-06-01

    The singlet oxygen (1O2) quenching and free radical (DPPH(*), ABTS(* +) and O2(* -)) scavenging ability of three structurally-related flavonoids (7-hydroxyflavanone HF, 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone DHC and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone DHF) present in the Argentinean native shrub Zuccagnia punctata Cav. were studied in solution by combining electrochemical and kinetic measurements, mass spectroscopy, end-point antioxidant assays and computational calculations. The results showed that the antioxidant properties of these flavonoids depend on several factors, such as their electron- and hydrogen atom donor capacity, the ionization degree of the more acidic group, solvatation effects and electrostatic interactions with the oxidant species. The theoretical calculations for both the gas and solution phases at the B3LYP level of theory for the Osanger reaction field model agreed with the experimental findings, thus supporting the characterization of the antioxidant mechanism of the Z. punctata flavonoids. PMID:19431060

  4. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Obligate and Facultative Scavenging Avian Species in California.

    PubMed

    Straub, Mary H; Kelly, Terra R; Rideout, Bruce A; Eng, Curtis; Wynne, Janna; Braun, Josephine; Johnson, Christine K

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, populations of scavenger birds are declining rapidly with some populations already on the brink of extinction. Much of the current research into the factors contributing to these declines has focused on exposure to drug residues, lead, and other toxins. Despite increased monitoring of these declining populations, little is known about infectious diseases affecting scavenger bird species. To assess potential infectious disease risks to both obligate and facultative scavenger bird species, we performed a serosurvey for eleven potential pathogens in three species of scavenging birds in California: the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). California condors were seropositive for avian adenovirus, infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, avian paramyxovirus-2, West Nile virus (WNV) and Toxoplasma gondii. Golden eagles were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Toxoplasma gondii, and turkey vultures were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci, avian paramyxovirus-1, Toxoplasma gondii and WNV. Risk factor analyses indicated that rearing site and original release location were significantly associated with a positive serologic titer to WNV among free-flying condors. This study provides preliminary baseline data on infectious disease exposure in these populations for aiding in early disease detection and provides potentially critical information for conservation of the endangered California condor as it continues to expand its range and encounter new infectious disease threats. PMID:26606755

  5. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Obligate and Facultative Scavenging Avian Species in California

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Mary H.; Kelly, Terra R.; Rideout, Bruce A.; Eng, Curtis; Wynne, Janna; Braun, Josephine; Johnson, Christine K.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, populations of scavenger birds are declining rapidly with some populations already on the brink of extinction. Much of the current research into the factors contributing to these declines has focused on exposure to drug residues, lead, and other toxins. Despite increased monitoring of these declining populations, little is known about infectious diseases affecting scavenger bird species. To assess potential infectious disease risks to both obligate and facultative scavenger bird species, we performed a serosurvey for eleven potential pathogens in three species of scavenging birds in California: the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). California condors were seropositive for avian adenovirus, infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, avian paramyxovirus-2, West Nile virus (WNV) and Toxoplasma gondii. Golden eagles were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Toxoplasma gondii, and turkey vultures were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci, avian paramyxovirus-1, Toxoplasma gondii and WNV. Risk factor analyses indicated that rearing site and original release location were significantly associated with a positive serologic titer to WNV among free-flying condors. This study provides preliminary baseline data on infectious disease exposure in these populations for aiding in early disease detection and provides potentially critical information for conservation of the endangered California condor as it continues to expand its range and encounter new infectious disease threats. PMID:26606755

  6. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  7. Oxygen-scavenging coatings and films based on lignosulfonates and laccase.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Kristin; Winestrand, Sandra; Johansson, Caisa; Järnström, Lars; Jönsson, Leif J

    2012-09-15

    Laccase and lignosulfonates were included in coating colors and embedded in latex-based or starch-based films and coatings on foil or board. After 6 days at 23 °C and 100% relative humidity, the oxygen content in airtight chambers decreased from 1.0% (synthetic gas consisting of 99% N(2) and 1% O(2)) to 0.3% in the presence of board coated with lignosulfonate and laccase, while the oxygen content remained unchanged in control experiments without enzyme. The water stability of lignosulfonate-containing latex-based coatings and starch-based films was improved after laccase-catalyzed oxidation of lignosulfonates, which indicates polymerization to products with lower solubility in water. Furthermore, the E' modulus of starch-based films increased with 30%, which indicates laccase-catalyzed polymerization of lignosulfonates resulting in increased stiffness of the film. The results suggest that laccases and lignosulfonates can be used as an oxygen-scavenging system in active packaging and that enzyme-catalyzed polymerization of lignosulfonates contributes to improved water stability and mechanical properties. PMID:22721759

  8. Singlet oxygen scavengers affect laser-dye impairment of endothelium-dependent responses of brain arterioles.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, W I; Nelson, G H

    1996-04-01

    This study investigates the possible role of singlet oxygen in accounting for the inhibitory effect of laser-dye injury on endothelium-dependent dilations. The combination of helium-neon (HeNe) laser (20-s exposure) and intravascular Evans blue impairs endothelium-dependent dilation of mouse pial arterioles by acetylcholine (ACh), bradykinin (BK), and calcium ionophore A23187. Each has a different endothelium-derived mediator (EDRFACh, EDRFBK, EDRFionophore, respectively). In this study, diameters at a craniotomy site were monitored in vivo with an image splitter-television microscope. The laser-dye injury, as usual, abolished the responses 10 and 30 min after injury, with recovery, complete or partial, at 60 min. Dilations by sodium nitroprusside, an endothelium-independent dilator, were not affected by laser-dye. When the singlet oxygen scavengers L-histidine (10(-3) M) and L-tryptophan (10(-2) M) were added to the suffusate over the site, the responses to ACh at 10 and 30 min were relatively intact, the response to BK was partly protected at 10 min only, and the response to ionophore was still totally impaired at 10 and 30 min. Lysine, a nonscavenging amino acid, had no protective effects with any dilator. We postulate that a heat-induced injury initiates a chain of events resulting in prolonged singlet oxygen generation by the endothelial cell (not by the dye). We postulate further that destruction of EDRFACh by singlet oxygen is responsible for laser-dye inhibition of ACh and that generation of the radical must continue for > or = 30 min. On the other hand, the heat injury itself is probably responsible for the elimination of the response to ionophore. Heat plus singlet oxygen generated by heat-damaged tissue may initially impair the response to BK, but by 30 min only the effects of some other factor, presumably heat injury, account for the impaired response to BK. PMID:8967364

  9. Inhibition of adriamycin cardiotoxicity by 5-fluorouracil: a potential free oxygen radical scavenger.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, G P; Malamos, N A; Dontas, I; Deliconstantinos, G; Perrea-Kotsareli, D; Karayannacos, P E

    1998-01-01

    Adriamycin (ADR), a broad spectrum anticancer agent, has a limit to total dose used, due to cumulative cardiotoxicity. This side effect has been tested in the present study in combined administration with 5-fluorouracil a cytotoxic drug that often is applied together with ADR in cancer treatment. The study was performed on Wistar rats, and the experiment consisted of weekly administration for 12 weeks of adriamycin alone, of 5-fluorouracil alone, a combination of both, and a control group (normal saline) in separate groups comprising 42 animals each. The histology of the cardiac muscle, large vessels and liver, biochemistry of serum cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL-C and oxygen free radical production were examined. It was found that addition of 5-FU to the ADR administration reduced significantly the cardiac lesions, delayed and reduced the increase of serum lipids, produced by ADR alone and oxygen free radical production was also reduced, indicating that 5-fluorouracil is acting as a scavenger of free radicals. PMID:9891497

  10. Comparison of lignin derivatives as substrates for laccase-catalyzed scavenging of oxygen in coatings and films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin derivatives are phenylpropanoid biopolymers derived from pulping and biorefinery processes. The possibility to utilize lignin derivatives from different types of processes in advanced enzyme-catalyzed oxygen-scavenging systems intended for active packaging was explored. Laccase-catalyzed oxidation of alkali lignin (LA), hydrolytic lignin (LH), organosolv lignin (LO), and lignosulfonates (LS) was compared using oxygen-scavenging coatings and films in liquid and gas phase systems. Results When coatings containing lignin derivatives and laccase were immersed in a buffered aqueous solution, the oxygen-scavenging capability increased in the order LO < LH < LA < LS. Experiments with coatings containing laccase and LO, LH or LA incubated in oxygen-containing gas in air-tight chambers and at a relative humidity (RH) of 100% showed that paperboard coated with LO and laccase reduced the oxygen content from 1.0% to 0.4% during a four-day period, which was far better than the results obtained with LA or LH. LO-containing coatings incubated at 92% RH also displayed activity, with a decrease in oxygen from 1.0% to 0.7% during a four-day period. The oxygen scavenging was not related to the content of free phenolic hydroxyl groups, which increased in the order LO < LS < LH < LA. LO and LS were selected for further studies and films containing starch, clay, glycerol, laccase and LO or LS were characterized using gel permeation chromatograpy, dynamic mechanical analysis, and wet stability. Conclusions The investigation shows that different lignin derivatives exhibit widely different properties as a part of active coatings and films. Results indicate that LS and LO were most suitable for the application studied and differences between them were attributed to a higher degree of laccase-catalyzed cross-linking of LS than of LO. Inclusion in active-packaging systems offers a new way to utilize some types of lignin derivatives from biorefining

  11. Oxygen supply and nitric oxide scavenging by myoglobin contribute to exercise endurance and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Merx, Marc W; Gödecke, Axel; Flögel, Ulrich; Schrader, Jürgen

    2005-06-01

    Recent studies of myoglobin (Mb) knockout (myo-/-) mice have extended our understanding of Mb's diverse functions and have demonstrated a complex array of compensatory mechanisms. The present study was aimed at detailed analysis of cardiac function and exercise endurance in myo-/- mice and at providing evidence for Mb's functional relevance. Myo-/- isolated working hearts display decreased contractility (dP/dtmax 3883+/-351 vs. 4618+/-268 mmHg/sec, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.005). Due to a shift in sympathetic/parasympathetic tone, heart rate is reduced in conscious myo mice-/- (615+/-33 vs. 645+/-27 bpm, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001). Oxygen consumption (VO2) under resting conditions (3082+/-413 vs. 4452+/-552 ml x kg(-1) x h(-1), myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001) and exercise endurance, as determined by spiroergometry, are decreased (466+/-113 vs. 585+/-153 m, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.01). Conscious myo-/- mice evaluated by echocardiography display lowered cardiac output (0.64+/-0.06 vs. 0.75+/-0.09 ml x min(-1) x g(-1), myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001), impaired systolic shortening (60+/-3.5 vs. 65+/-4%, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001) and fail to respond to beta1-stimulation. Strikingly, the latter cardiac effects of Mb deficiency can be partially attenuated by NOS inhibition. Loss of Mb results in a distinct phenotype, even under resting conditions, and the importance of oxygen supply and nitric oxide scavenging by Mb is clearly demonstrated at the conscious animal level. PMID:15817640

  12. Hydrogen peroxide is the most toxic oxygen species for Onchocerca cervicalis microfilariae.

    PubMed

    Callahan, H L; Crouch, R K; James, E R

    1990-06-01

    The toxicity of the active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen to microfilariae (mf) has been studied in vitro, using active oxygen-generating systems and scavengers/inhibitors. Mf viability was monitored by uptake of the radiolabel, [3H]2-deoxy-D-glucose. Hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen, but not superoxide radical or hydroxyl radical, are toxic for mf. Hydrogen peroxide was toxic for mf within 2 h at concentrations as low as 5 microM, an amount eosinophils have been shown to release in vitro (Weiss et al. 1986). Catalase and thiourea, but not inactivated catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), singlet oxygen scavengers, or hydroxyl radical scavengers, protected mf. Mf have relatively high levels of endogenous SOD but no measurable glutathione peroxidase and low levels of catalase when compared with other parasites (Callahan, Crouch & James, 1988). The low levels of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzymes correlate well with mf sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and the protective effect of exogenous catalase. PMID:2163503

  13. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro models have demonstrated the potent antioxidant effects of azelaic acid, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for its efficacy in the treatment of rosacea. PMID:20967185

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species (Ros-Induced) Ros Release

    PubMed Central

    Zorov, Dmitry B.; Filburn, Charles R.; Klotz, Lars-Oliver; Zweier, Jay L.; Sollott, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    We sought to understand the relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in cardiac myocytes based on the observation of increased ROS production at sites of spontaneously deenergized mitochondria. We devised a new model enabling incremental ROS accumulation in individual mitochondria in isolated cardiac myocytes via photoactivation of tetramethylrhodamine derivatives, which also served to report the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, ΔΨ. This ROS accumulation reproducibly triggered abrupt (and sometimes reversible) mitochondrial depolarization. This phenomenon was ascribed to MPT induction because (a) bongkrekic acid prevented it and (b) mitochondria became permeable for calcein (∼620 daltons) concurrently with depolarization. These photodynamically produced “triggering” ROS caused the MPT induction, as the ROS scavenger Trolox prevented it. The time required for triggering ROS to induce the MPT was dependent on intrinsic cellular ROS-scavenging redox mechanisms, particularly glutathione. MPT induction caused by triggering ROS coincided with a burst of mitochondrial ROS generation, as measured by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, which we have termed mitochondrial “ROS-induced ROS release” (RIRR). This MPT induction/RIRR phenomenon in cardiac myocytes often occurred synchronously and reversibly among long chains of adjacent mitochondria demonstrating apparent cooperativity. The observed link between MPT and RIRR could be a fundamental phenomenon in mitochondrial and cell biology. PMID:11015441

  15. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neonatal Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Abnormal lung development in the perinatal period can result in severe neonatal complications, including persistent pulmonary hypertension (PH) of the newborn and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a substantive role in the development of PH associated with these diseases. ROS impair the normal pulmonary artery (PA) relaxation in response to vasodilators, and ROS are also implicated in pulmonary arterial remodeling, both of which can increase the severity of PH. Recent Advances: PA ROS levels are elevated when endogenous ROS-generating enzymes are activated and/or when endogenous ROS scavengers are inactivated. Animal models have provided valuable insights into ROS generators and scavengers that are dysregulated in different forms of neonatal PH, thus identifying potential therapeutic targets. Critical Issues: General antioxidant therapy has proved ineffective in reversing PH, suggesting that it is necessary to target specific signaling pathways for successful therapy. Future Directions: Development of novel selective pharmacologic inhibitors along with nonantioxidant therapies may improve the treatment outcomes of patients with PH, while further investigation of the underlying mechanisms may enable earlier detection of the disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1926–1942. PMID:24350610

  16. Reactive oxygen species formed in organic lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Patrick; Dongmo, Saustin; Fenske, Daniela; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-04-20

    Li-oxygen batteries with organic electrolytes are of general interest because of their theoretically high gravimetric energy density. Among the great challenges for this storage technology is the generation of reactive oxygen species such as superoxides and peroxides that may react with the organic solvent molecules and other cell components. The generation of such species has been assumed to occur during the charging reaction. Here we show that superoxide is formed also during the discharge reaction in lithium ion-containing dimethyl sulfoxide electrolytes and is released into the solution. This is shown independently by fluorescence microscopy after reaction with the selective reagent 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole and by local detection using a microelectrode of a scanning electrochemcial microscope positioned in a defined distance of 10 to 90 μm above the gas diffusion electrode. PMID:26911793

  17. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  18. Changes in oxygen consumption induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide in perfused rat liver. Effect of free-radical scavengers.

    PubMed Central

    Videla, L A; Villena, M I; Donoso, G; Giulivi, C; Boveris, A

    1984-01-01

    The addition of t-butyl hydroperoxide to perfused rat liver elicited a biphasic effect on hepatic respiration. A rapid fall in liver oxygen consumption was initially observed, followed by a recovery phase leading to respiratory rates higher than the initial steady-state values of oxygen uptake. This overshoot in hepatic oxygen uptake was abolished by free-radical scavengers such as (+)-cyanidanol-3 or butylated hydroxyanisole at concentrations that did not alter mitochondrial respiration. (+)-Cyanidanol-3 was also able to facilitate the recovery of respiration, the diminution in the calculated rate of hydroperoxide utilization and the decrease in liver GSH content produced by two consecutive pulses of t-butyl hydroperoxide. It is suggested that the t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced overshoot in liver respiration is related to increased utilization of oxygen for lipid peroxidation as a consequence of free radicals produced in the scission of the hydroperoxide by cellular haemoproteins. PMID:6508746

  19. Screening of radical scavenging activity and polyphenol content of Bulgarian plant species

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Discovery of new plant species with antioxidant properties is a priority of many research teams. Most of the species included in this study are unstudied for antioxidant properties, but they are taxonomically related to reference plants with well-documented antioxidant activity. Materials and Methods: Free radical scavenging activity of plant extracts was evaluated using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. An aluminum chloride colorimetric method was used for flavonoid determination. The amount of phenolic compounds in the extracts was estimated by using the Folin–Ciocalteu reagent. Results: As a result of screening, it was found that the significant antioxidant properties possess several unstudied until now plant species (Veronica bellidioides L., V. kellereri Deg. et Urm, V. vindobonensis (M. Fisher) M. Fisher, V. beccabunga L., V. rhodopaea L., V. austriaca (Velen.) Degen., Clinopodium vulgare L., Stachysrecta L., Clematis vitalba L., and Xeranthemum annum L.). The antioxidant potential of the new species is comparable to that of reference medicinal plants. Conclusions: The existing data presented here provide new information for antioxidant potential of plant species that have not been traditionally used as medicinal plants. PMID:22224049

  20. Biochemical reactivity of melatonin with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R J; Tan, D X; Manchester, L C; Qi, W

    2001-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), an endogenously produced indole found throughout the animal kingdom, was recently reported, using a variety of techniques, to be a scavenger of a number of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species both in vitro and in vivo. Initially, melatonin was discovered to directly scavenge the high toxic hydroxyl radical (*OH). The methods used to prove the interaction of melatonin with the *OH included the generation of the radical using Fenton reagents or the ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H202) with the use of spin-trapping agents, followed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis followed by ESR, and several spectrofluorometric and chemical (salicylate trapping in vivo) methodologies. One product of the reaction of melatonin with the *OH was identified as cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin (3-OHM) using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical (HPLC-EC) detection, electron ionization mass spectrometry (EIMS), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and COSY 1H NMR. Cyclic 3-OHM appears in the urine of humans and other mammals and in rat urine its concentration increases when melatonin is given exogenously or after an imposed oxidative stress (exposure to ionizing radiation). Urinary cyclic 3-OHM levels are believed to be a biomarker (footprint molecule) of in vivo *OH production and its scavenging by melatonin. Although the data are less complete, besides the *OH, melatonin in cell-free systems has been shown to directly scavenge H2O2, singlet oxygen (1O2) and nitric oxide (NO*), with little or no ability to scavenge the superoxide anion radical (O2*-) In vitro, melatonin also directly detoxifies the peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-) and/or peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), or the activated form of this molecule, ONOOH*; the product of the latter interaction is proposed to be 6-OHM. How these in vitro findings relate to the in vivo antioxidant actions of melatonin remains to be

  1. Endophytic Bacterium-Triggered Reactive Oxygen Species Directly Increase Oxygenous Sesquiterpenoid Content and Diversity in Atractylodes lancea

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Yuan, Jie; Li, Xia; Ning, Yi-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenous terpenoids are active components of many medicinal plants. However, current studies that have focused on enzymatic oxidation reactions cannot comprehensively clarify the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis and diversity. This study shows that an endophytic bacterium can trigger the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that directly increase oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in Atractylodes lancea. A. lancea is a famous but endangered Chinese medicinal plant that contains abundant oxygenous sesquiterpenoids. Geo-authentic A. lancea produces a wider range and a greater abundance of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids than the cultivated herb. Our previous studies have shown the mechanisms behind endophytic promotion of the production of sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbon scaffolds; however, how endophytes promote the formation of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids and their diversity is unclear. After colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B, oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in A. lancea occur synchronously. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or singlet oxygen induces oxidative burst and promotes oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in planta. Conversely, pretreatment of plantlets with the ROS scavenger ascorbic acid significantly inhibits the oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation induced by P. fluorescens ALEB7B. Further in vitro oxidation experiments show that several oxygenous sesquiterpenoids can be obtained from direct oxidation caused by H2O2 or singlet oxygen. In summary, this study demonstrates that endophytic bacterium-triggered ROS can directly oxidize oxygen-free sesquiterpenoids and increase the oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in A. lancea, providing a novel explanation of the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis in planta and an essential complementarity to enzymatic oxidation reactions. PMID:26712554

  2. Endophytic Bacterium-Triggered Reactive Oxygen Species Directly Increase Oxygenous Sesquiterpenoid Content and Diversity in Atractylodes lancea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Yuan, Jie; Li, Xia; Ning, Yi-Fan; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Oxygenous terpenoids are active components of many medicinal plants. However, current studies that have focused on enzymatic oxidation reactions cannot comprehensively clarify the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis and diversity. This study shows that an endophytic bacterium can trigger the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that directly increase oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in Atractylodes lancea. A. lancea is a famous but endangered Chinese medicinal plant that contains abundant oxygenous sesquiterpenoids. Geo-authentic A. lancea produces a wider range and a greater abundance of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids than the cultivated herb. Our previous studies have shown the mechanisms behind endophytic promotion of the production of sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbon scaffolds; however, how endophytes promote the formation of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids and their diversity is unclear. After colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B, oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in A. lancea occur synchronously. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or singlet oxygen induces oxidative burst and promotes oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in planta. Conversely, pretreatment of plantlets with the ROS scavenger ascorbic acid significantly inhibits the oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation induced by P. fluorescens ALEB7B. Further in vitro oxidation experiments show that several oxygenous sesquiterpenoids can be obtained from direct oxidation caused by H2O2 or singlet oxygen. In summary, this study demonstrates that endophytic bacterium-triggered ROS can directly oxidize oxygen-free sesquiterpenoids and increase the oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in A. lancea, providing a novel explanation of the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis in planta and an essential complementarity to enzymatic oxidation reactions. PMID:26712554

  3. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species at the Heart of the Matter: New Therapeutic Approaches for Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kornfeld, Opher S.; Hwang, Sunhee; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Chen, Che-Hong; Qvit, Nir; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in a variety of age-related diseases including multiple cardiovascular disorders. However, translation of ROS scavengers (anti-oxidants) into the clinic has not been successful. These anti-oxidants grossly reduce total levels of cellular ROS including ROS that participate in physiological signaling. In this review, we challenge the traditional anti-oxidant therapeutic approach that targets ROS directly with novel approaches that improve mitochondrial functions to more effectively treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25999419

  4. Tissue injury by reactive oxygen species and the protective effects of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    de Groot, H; Rauen, U

    1998-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species contribute decisively to a great variety of diseases. Flavonoids are benzo-gamma-pyrone derivatives of plant origin found in various fruits and vegetables but also in tea and in red wine. Some of the flavonoids, such as quercetin and silibinin, can effectively protect cells and tissues against the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species. Their antioxidant activity results from scavenging of free radicals and other oxidizing intermediates, from the chelation of iron or copper ions and from inhibition of oxidases. For their free radical scavenging properties, scavenging of lipid- and protein-derived radicals is presumably of special importance. A non-radical reactive oxygen species effectively trapped by flavonoids is hypochlorous acid. In general, the antioxidative properties of flavonoids are favoured by a high degree of OH substitution. On the other hand, inhibition of enzymatic functions other than oxidases, e.g., inhibition of lipoxygenase and thus prevention of the formation of leukotrienes, may also participate in the cell and tissue protective properties of flavonoids. PMID:9646056

  5. Reactive oxygen species in chick hair cells after gentamicin exposure in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Hockenbery, D M; Rubel, E W

    1997-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been invoked as a causative agent of cell death in many different developmental and pathological states. The presence of free radicals and their importance of hair cell death due to aminoglycosides is suggested by a number of studies that have demonstrated a protective effect of antioxidants. By using dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) a fluorescent compound that is a reporter of reactive oxygen species, we have shown that free radicals are rapidly produced by avian hair cells in vitro after exposure to gentamicin. In addition, free radical scavengers, catalase and glutathione, were tested with DCFH fluorescent imaging for their ability to quench the production of reactive oxygen species in hair cells after drug exposure. Both free radical scavengers were very effective in suppressing drug-induced production of free radicals. Next, we investigated the ability of these antioxidants to preserve the structural integrity of hair cells after exposure to gentamicin. We were not able to detect any attenuation of the hair cell loss using antioxidants in conjunction with gentamicin. This result must be qualified by the fact that the antioxidants used were not effective over long-term gentamicin exposure. Therefore, methodological constraints prevented adequately testing possible protective effects of the free radical scavengers in this model system. PMID:9119753

  6. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES: IMPACT ON SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Ji, Li Li; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that contracting muscles produce both reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Although the sources of oxidant production during exercise continue to be debated, growing evidence suggests that mitochondria are not the dominant source. Regardless of the sources of oxidants in contracting muscles, intense and prolonged exercise can result in oxidative damage to both proteins and lipids in the contracting myocytes. Further, oxidants regulate numerous cell signaling pathways and modulate the expression of many genes. This oxidant-mediated change in gene expression involves changes at transcriptional, mRNA stability, and signal transduction levels. Furthermore, numerous products associated with oxidant-modulated genes have been identified and include antioxidant enzymes, stress proteins, and mitochondrial electron transport proteins. Interestingly, low and physiological levels of reactive oxygen species are required for normal force production in skeletal muscle, but high levels of reactive oxygen species result in contractile dysfunction and fatigue. Ongoing research continues to explore the redox-sensitive targets in muscle that are responsible for both redox-regulation of muscle adaptation and oxidant-mediated muscle fatigue. PMID:23737208

  7. Beneficial effect of the oxygen free radical scavenger amifostine (WR-2721) on spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chronidou, Fany; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Georgiou, Christos D; Koletsis, Efstratios N; Karanikolas, Menelaos; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Background Paraplegia is the most devastating complication of thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aortic surgery. During these operations, an ischemia-reperfusion process is inevitable and the produced radical oxygen species cause severe oxidative stress for the spinal cord. In this study we examined the influence of Amifostine, a triphosphate free oxygen scavenger, on oxidative stress of spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion in rabbits. Methods Eighteen male, New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized and spinal cord ischemia was induced by temporary occlusion of the descending thoracic aorta by a coronary artery balloon catheter, advanced through the femoral artery. The animals were randomly divided in 3 groups. Group I functioned as control. In group II the descending aorta was occluded for 30 minutes and then reperfused for 75 min. In group III, 500 mg Amifostine was infused into the distal aorta during the second half-time of ischemia period. At the end of reperfusion all animals were sacrificed and spinal cord specimens were examined for superoxide radicals by an ultra sensitive fluorescent assay. Results Superoxide radical levels ranged, in group I between 1.52 and 1.76 (1.64 ± 0.10), in group II between 1.96 and 2.50 (2.10 ± 0.23), and in group III (amifostine) between 1.21 and 1.60 (1.40 ± 0.19) (p = 0.00), showing a decrease of 43% in the Group of Amifostine. A lipid peroxidation marker measurement ranged, in group I between 0.278 and 0.305 (0.296 ± 0.013), in group II between 0.427 and 0.497 (0.463 ± 0.025), and in group III (amifostine) between 0.343 and 0.357 (0.350 ± 0.007) (p < 0.00), showing a decrease of 38% after Amifostine administration. Conclusion By direct and indirect methods of measuring the oxidative stress of spinal cord after ischemia/reperfusion, it is suggested that intra-aortic Amifostine infusion during spinal cord ischemia phase, significantly attenuated the spinal cord oxidative injury in rabbits. PMID:19758462

  8. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Bianka; Steffen-Heins, Anja; Sauter, Margret

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism, and non-enzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical, and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS. PMID:23761805

  9. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  10. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Jajic, Ivan; Sarna, Tadeusz; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2) has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment. PMID:27135335

  11. Yields of single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA irradiated in aqueous solution in the presence of oxygen and scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Udovicic, Lj.; Mark, F.; Bothe, E.

    1994-11-01

    Yields of radiation-induced single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA have been measured as a function of OH scavenger concentration in N{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}-saturated aqueous solution. The experimental data are well represented by a theoretical model based on non-homogeneous reaction kinetics, without the need to adjust any parameter. The good agreement between experimental and theoretical data is taken as evidence that, in the presence of oxygen, the main effect of added scavengers with respect to the formation of single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA is OH radical scavenging. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Vertical Transport Processes for Inert and Scavenged Species: TRACE-A Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    upper troposphere. We expect to be able to attribute this to either parameterization reasons (inadequacy of this parameterization at the large 100km scale) or other reasons. Nevertheless, the qualitative nature of deep transport by clouds shows up well in the simulations. As for scavengable species, the simulations predict tens of micrograms per standard cubic meter of smoke aerosol in the boundary layer. In a straightforward illustration of our simple bulk-mass scavenging parameterization, to one or two micrograms per standard cubic meter of smoke aerosol in the free troposphere just above the source regions: very high concentrations for the free troposphere. We expect to report on comparisons of these predictions to a variety of observations.

  13. The effect of a Ta oxygen scavenger layer on HfO2-based resistive switching behavior: thermodynamic stability, electronic structure, and low-bias transport.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Rungger, Ivan; Zapol, Peter; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-03-14

    Reversible resistive switching between high-resistance and low-resistance states in metal-oxide-metal heterostructures makes them very interesting for applications in random access memories. While recent experimental work has shown that inserting a metallic "oxygen scavenger layer" between the positive electrode and oxide improves device performance, the fundamental understanding of how the scavenger layer modifies the heterostructure properties is lacking. We use density functional theory to calculate thermodynamic properties and conductance of TiN/HfO2/TiN heterostructures with and without a Ta scavenger layer. First, we show that Ta insertion lowers the formation energy of low-resistance states. Second, while the Ta scavenger layer reduces the Schottky barrier height in the high-resistance state by modifying the interface charge at the oxide-electrode interface, the heterostructure maintains a high resistance ratio between high- and low-resistance states. Finally, we show that the low-bias conductance of device on-states becomes much less sensitive to the spatial distribution of oxygen removed from the HfO2 in the presence of the Ta layer. By providing a fundamental understanding of the observed improvements with scavenger layers, we open a path to engineer interfaces with oxygen scavenger layers to control and enhance device performance. In turn, this may enable the realization of a non-volatile low-power memory technology with concomitant reduction in energy consumption by consumer electronics and offering significant benefits to society. PMID:26902598

  14. Peat: home to novel syntrophic species that feed acetate- and hydrogen-scavenging methanogens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver; Hink, Linda; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2016-08-01

    Syntrophic bacteria drive the anaerobic degradation of certain fermentation products (e.g., butyrate, ethanol, propionate) to intermediary substrates (e.g., H2, formate, acetate) that yield methane at the ecosystem level. However, little is known about the in situ activities and identities of these syntrophs in peatlands, ecosystems that produce significant quantities of methane. The consumption of butyrate, ethanol or propionate by anoxic peat slurries at 5 and 15 °C yielded methane and CO2 as the sole accumulating products, indicating that the intermediates H2, formate and acetate were scavenged effectively by syntrophic methanogenic consortia. 16S rRNA stable isotope probing identified novel species/strains of Pelobacter and Syntrophomonas that syntrophically oxidized ethanol and butyrate, respectively. Propionate was syntrophically oxidized by novel species of Syntrophobacter and Smithella, genera that use different propionate-oxidizing pathways. Taxa not known for a syntrophic metabolism may have been involved in the oxidation of butyrate (Telmatospirillum-related) and propionate (unclassified Bacteroidetes and unclassified Fibrobacteres). Gibbs free energies (ΔGs) for syntrophic oxidations of ethanol and butyrate were more favorable than ΔGs for syntrophic oxidation of propionate. As a result of the thermodynamic constraints, acetate transiently accumulated in ethanol and butyrate treatments but not in propionate treatments. Aceticlastic methanogens (Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta) appeared to outnumber hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanocella, Methanoregula), reinforcing the likely importance of aceticlastic methanogenesis to the overall production of methane. ΔGs for acetogenesis from H2 to CO2 approximated to -20 kJ mol(-1) when acetate concentrations were low, indicating that acetogens may have contributed to the flow of carbon and reductant towards methane. PMID:26771931

  15. Reactive Nitrogen Species Scavenging Capacity of Aqueous and Ethanolic Extracts from Galinsoga parviflora and G. quadriradiata Herbs.

    PubMed

    Rogowska, Marta; Srecec, Sinisa; Bazylko, Agnieszka

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the scavenging capacity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts derived from the herb of two species of Galinsoga against NO and ONOO-. In both tests the aqueous extracts of both Galinsoga species were more active than the ethanolic extracts. The highest scavenging activity against NO, and also against ONOO- was shown by G. quadriradiata aqueous extract (SC50 ± SD = 1.54 ± 0.32, and 2.10 ± 1.98, respectively). The study showed that the activity of the extracts from both Galinsoga species is related not only to the presence of flavonoids but also to caffeic acid derivatives and caffeic acid. The results of this study partly explain the beneficial effects of Galinsoga herb extracts in the treatment of skin diseases. PMID:26749807

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species and Targeted Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally increased in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal cells. ROS plays a vital role in various cellular biological activities including proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and invasion. Besides, ROS participates in tumor microenvironment orchestration. The role of ROS is a doubled-edged sword in pancreatic cancer. The dual roles of ROS depend on the concentration. ROS facilitates carcinogenesis and cancer progression with mild-to-moderate elevated levels, while excessive ROS damages cancer cells dramatically and leads to cell death. Based on the recent knowledge, either promoting ROS generation to increase the concentration of ROS with extremely high levels or enhancing ROS scavenging ability to decrease ROS levels may benefit the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, when faced with oxidative stress, the antioxidant programs of cancer cells have been activated to help cancer cells to survive in the adverse condition. Furthermore, ROS signaling and antioxidant programs play the vital roles in the progression of pancreatic cancer and in the response to cancer treatment. Eventually, it may be the novel target for various strategies and drugs to modulate ROS levels in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26881012

  17. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-01

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  18. [The two faces of reactive oxygen species].

    PubMed

    Zabłocka, Agnieszka; Janusz, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in playing a crucial role in aging and in the pathogeneses of a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Oxidative stress occurs due to an imbalance in prooxidant and antioxidant levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly reactive and may modify and inactivate proteins, lipids, DNA, and RNA and induce cellular dysfunctions. To prevent free radical-induced cellular damage, the organism has developed a defense mechanism, the antioxidative system. This system includes antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), and glutathione reductase (GSSGR) and low-molecular antioxidants such as glutathion and plasma proteins. Glutathion plays a key role in maintaining the physiological balance between prooxidants and antioxidants. Plasma proteins can inhibit ROS generation and lipid peroxidation by chelating free transition metals. The major exogenous antioxidants are vitamins E, C, and A. PMID:18388851

  19. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Several agents used for treatment of colon and other cancers induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and this plays an important role in their anticancer activities. In addition to the well-known proapoptotic effects of ROS inducers, these compounds also decrease expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and several pro-oncogenic Spregulated genes important for cancer cell proliferation, survival and metastasis. The mechanism of these responses involve ROS-dependent downregulation of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) or miR-20a (and paralogs) and induction of two Sp-repressors, ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 respectively. This pathway significantly contributes to the anticancer activity of ROS inducers and should be considered in development of drug combinations for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25584043

  20. Reactive oxygen species in abiotic stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Pinja; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2010-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to accumulate during abiotic stresses, and different cellular compartments respond to them by distinctive profiles of ROS formation. In contrast to earlier views, it is becoming increasingly evident that even during stress, ROS production is not necessarily a symptom of cellular dysfunction but might represent a necessary signal in adjusting the cellular machinery to the altered conditions. ROS can modulate many signal transduction pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, and ultimately influence the activity of transcription factors. However, the picture of ROS-mediated signaling is still fragmentary and the issues of ROS perception as well as the signaling specificity remain open. Here, we review some of the recent advances in plant abiotic stress signaling with emphasis on processes known to be affected heavily by ROS. PMID:20028478

  1. Downregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chul-Ho; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by diverse anti-cancer drugs or phytochemicals has been closely related with the induction of apoptosis in cancers. Also, the downregulation of ROS by these chemicals has been found to block initiation of carcinogenesis. Therefore, modulation of ROS by phytochemicals emerges as a crucial mechanism to regulate apoptosis in cancer prevention or therapy. This review summarizes the current understanding of the selected chemical compounds and related cellular components that modulate ROS during apoptotic process. Metformin, quercetin, curcumin, vitamin C, and other compounds have been shown to downregulate ROS in the cellular apoptotic process, and some of them even induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The cellular components mediating the downregulation of ROS include nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 antioxidant signaling pathway, thioredoxin, catalase, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and uncoupling proteins. The present review provides information on the relationship between these compounds and the cellular components in modulating ROS in apoptotic cancer cells. PMID:27051644

  2. [Effects of exogenous silicon on active oxygen scavenging systems in chloroplasts of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings under salt stress].

    PubMed

    Qian, Qiong-Qiu; Zai, Wen-San; Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2006-02-01

    With K(2)SiO(4) (1.0 mmol/L) treatment, the effects of Si on the distribution of Na(+), K(+) to chloroplasts and antioxidant system of cucumber leaves under 50 mmol/L NaCl stress were studied. The results showed that there was a selective transport of K(+) into the chloroplasts so that Na(+) content of chloroplasts was lower under Si treatment (Table 1); H(2)O(2) and MDA contents in chloroplasts were significantly decreased (Fig.1), and the activities of SOD, APX, GR and DHAR were increased simultaneity (Fig.2), and AsA, GSH contents were also increased in chloroplasts of salt-stressed cucumber by additional Si treatment (Fig.3). It may be concluded that Si could decrease absorption of Na(+) and increase ability of active oxygen scavenging in chloroplasts, therefore the injury of chloroplast membrane under salinity stress in cucumber was alleviated. PMID:16477139

  3. Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-11-03

    Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species and Neutrophil Function.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J; Hampton, Mark B

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophils are essential for killing bacteria and other microorganisms, and they also have a significant role in regulating the inflammatory response. Stimulated neutrophils activate their NADPH oxidase (NOX2) to generate large amounts of superoxide, which acts as a precursor of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species that are generated by their heme enzyme myeloperoxidase. When neutrophils engulf bacteria they enclose them in small vesicles (phagosomes) into which superoxide is released by activated NOX2 on the internalized neutrophil membrane. The superoxide dismutates to hydrogen peroxide, which is used by myeloperoxidase to generate other oxidants, including the highly microbicidal species hypochlorous acid. NOX activation occurs at other sites in the cell, where it is considered to have a regulatory function. Neutrophils also release oxidants, which can modify extracellular targets and affect the function of neighboring cells. We discuss the identity and chemical properties of the specific oxidants produced by neutrophils in different situations, and what is known about oxidative mechanisms of microbial killing, inflammatory tissue damage, and signaling. PMID:27050287

  5. Influence of reactive oxygen species on the sterilization of microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of reactive oxygen species on living cells, including various microbes, is discussed. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores reveals that an argoneoxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby indicating that oxygen radic...

  6. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  7. Transcript levels of antioxidative genes and oxygen radical scavenging enzyme activities in chilled zucchini squash in response to superatmospheric oxygen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcript levels of antioxidative genes including Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), Cu/Zn SOD, ascorbate peroxidise (APX), and catalase (CAT) do not vary significantly during storage at 5 °C with high oxygen treatment in freshly harvested zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Elite). However, ...

  8. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pathogenesis of Radiocontrast-Induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Antonio; Faga, Teresa; Ashour, Michael; Di Nuzzi, Antonella; Mancini, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated enhanced hypoxia and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the kidney following the administration of iodinated contrast media, which play a relevant role in the development of contrast media-induced nephropathy. Many studies indeed support this possibility, suggesting a protective effect of ROS scavenging or reduced ROS formation with the administration of N-acetylcysteine and bicarbonate infusion, respectively. Furthermore, most risk factors, predisposing to contrast-induced nephropathy, are prone to enhanced renal parenchymal hypoxia and ROS formation. In this review, the association of renal hypoxia and ROS-mediated injury is outlined. Generated during contrast-induced renal parenchymal hypoxia, ROS may exert direct tubular and vascular endothelial injury and might further intensify renal parenchymal hypoxia by virtue of endothelial dysfunction and dysregulation of tubular transport. Preventive strategies conceivably should include inhibition of ROS generation or ROS scavenging. PMID:24459673

  9. Increased endogenous ascorbyl free radical formation with singlet oxygen scavengers in reperfusion injury: an EPR and functional recovery study in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Bobst, E V; Wang, Y G; Ashraf, M M; Bobst, A M

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) scavengers on functional recovery and ascorbyl free radical (AFR) formation in isolated ischemic rat hearts. Hearts were subjected to 40 min. of global ischemia followed by 30 min. of reperfusion. Hemodynamics were measured as heart rate (HR), coronary flow (CF), left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and contractility (dP/dt). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure AFR release in coronary perfusate during the first two min. of reperfusion as a function of ROS scavengers. Relative to ischemic controls the administration of the (1)O2 scavengers 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone x HCl (4-oxo-TEMP), carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) or a combination of the two significantly improved functional recovery as measured by LVDP. While no AFR signal was detected in coronary perfusate collected during preischemic perfusion with and without (1)O2 scavengers, the AFR background signal due to ischemia was significantly increased with the (1)O2 and *O2- scavengers. No such increase was observed with the hydroxyl radical (*OH) scavenger mannitol. Besides the AFR increase with the (1)O2 and *O2- scavengers the functional recovery was only significantly improved with the (1)O2 scavengers. In contrast to previous AFR studies we found with endogenous AFR that an increased AFR formation is not necessarily only reflecting increased oxidative stress but can also report improved functional recovery. Combining the hemodynamic data with increased AFR formation in the presence of several different ROS scavengers gives supportive evidence for (1)O2 also being involved in reperfusion injury. PMID:11156483

  10. Electrical Characteristics of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor with High-κ/Metal Gate Using Oxygen Scavenging Process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junil; Kim, Jang Hyun; Kwon, Dae Woong; Park, Euyhwan; Park, Taehyung; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Byung-gook

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely accepted that the mismatch of lattice constants between HfO2 and Si generates interface traps at the HfO2-Si interface, which causes the degradation of device performances. For better interface quality, very thin SiO2 film (< 2 nm) has been inserted as an interlayer (IL) between HfO2 and Si despite of the increase of EOT. In order to obtain both the better interface quality and the reduction of EOT, we used Ti metal on HfO2/IL SiO2 stack as a scavenging layer to absorb oxygens in the SiO2 and various annealing conditions were applied to optimize the thickness of the SiO2. As a result, we can effectively shrink the EOT from 3.55 nm to 1.15 nm while maintaining the same physical thickness of gate stacks. Furthermore, the diffusion of oxygen was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass Spectrometry (SIMS). PMID:27483842

  11. Reactive oxygen species and anti-proteinases.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Tooba; Zia, Mohammad Khalid; Ali, Syed Saqib; Rehman, Ahmed Abdur; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Fahim Halim

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause damage to macromolecules such as proteins, lipids and DNA and alters their structure and function. When generated outside the cell, ROS can induce damage to anti-proteinases. Anti-proteinases are proteins that are involved in the control and regulation of proteolytic enzymes. The damage caused to anti-proteinase barrier disturbs the proteinase-anti-proteinases balance and uncontrolled proteolysis at the site of injury promotes tissue damage. Studies have shown that ROS damages anti-proteinase shield of the body by inactivating key members such as alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-antitrypsin. Hypochlorous acid inactivates α-1-antitrypsin by oxidizing a critical reactive methionine residue. Superoxide and hypochlorous acid are physiological inactivators of alpha-2-macroglobulin. The damage to anti-proteinase barrier induced by ROS is a hallmark of diseases such as atherosclerosis, emphysema and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, understanding the behaviour of ROS-induced damage to anti-proteinases may helps us in development of strategies that could control these inflammatory reactions and diseases. PMID:26699123

  12. Reactive oxygen species as glomerular autacoids.

    PubMed

    Baud, L; Fouqueray, B; Philippe, C; Ardaillou, R

    1992-04-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, hypochlorous acid) are implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic, ischemic, and immunologically mediated glomerular injury. The capacity of glomerular cells, especially mesangial cells, to generate ROS in response to several stimuli suggests that these autacoids may play a role in models of glomerular injury that are independent of infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. The mechanisms whereby ROS formation results in morphologic lesions and in modifications of glomerular permeability, blood flow, and filtration rate have been inferred from in vitro studies. They involve direct and indirect injury to resident cells (mesangiolysis) and glomerular basement membrane (in concert with metalloproteases) and alteration of both the release and binding of vasoactive substances, such as bioactive lipids (e.g., prostaglandin E2, prostacyclin, thromboxane), cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha), and possibly endothelium-derived relaxing factor. The importance of such processes appears to be modulated by the intrinsic antioxidant defenses of the glomeruli. Further studies are needed to address the role of ROS in human glomerular diseases. PMID:1600128

  13. Physical exercise, reactive oxygen species and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Radak, Zsolt; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Balogh, Laszlo; Boldogh, Istvan; Koltai, Erika

    2016-09-01

    Regular exercise has systemic beneficial effects, including the promotion of brain function. The adaptive response to regular exercise involves the up-regulation of the enzymatic antioxidant system and modulation of oxidative damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important regulators of cell signaling. Exercise, via intensity-dependent modulation of metabolism and/or directly activated ROS generating enzymes, regulates the cellular redox state of the brain. ROS are also involved in the self-renewal and differentiation of neuronal stem cells and the exercise-mediated neurogenesis could be partly associated with ROS production. Exercise has strong effects on the immune system and readily alters the production of cytokines. Certain cytokines, especially IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, IL-18 and IFN gamma, are actively involved in the modulation of synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Cytokines can also contribute to ROS production. ROS-mediated alteration of lipids, protein, and DNA could directly affect brain function, while exercise modulates the accumulation of oxidative damage. Oxidative alteration of macromolecules can activate signaling processes, membrane remodeling, and gene transcription. The well known neuroprotective effects of exercise are partly due to redox-associated adaptation. PMID:26828019

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Junheng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), byproducts of aerobic metabolism, are increased in many types of cancer cells. Increased endogenous ROS lead to adaptive changes and may play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. In contrast, the ROS generated by xenobiotics disturb the redox balance and may selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Recent Advances: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are integral parts of pathophysiological mechanisms of tumor progression, metastasis, and chemo/radio resistance. Currently, intracellular ROS in CSCs is an active field of research. Critical Issues: Normal stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells reside in niches characterized by hypoxia and low ROS, both of which are critical for maintaining the potential for self-renewal and stemness. However, the roles of ROS in CSCs remain poorly understood. Future Directions: Based on the regulation of ROS levels in normal stem cells and CSCs, future research may evaluate the potential therapeutic application of ROS elevation by exogenous xenobiotics to eliminate CSCs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1215–1228. PMID:22316005

  15. Ovarian toxicity from reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when cellular mechanisms to regulate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are overwhelmed due to overproduction of ROS and/or deficiency of antioxidants. This chapter describes accumulating evidence that oxidative stress is involved in ovarian toxicity caused by diverse stimuli, including environmental toxicants. There is strong evidence that ROS are involved in initiation of apoptosis in antral follicles caused by several chemical and physical agents. Although less attention has been focused on the roles of ROS in primordial and primary follicle death, several studies have shown protective effects of antioxidants and/or evidence of oxidative damage, suggesting that ROS may play a role in these smaller follicles as well. Oxidative damage to lipids in the oocyte has been implicated as a cause of persistently poor oocyte quality after early life exposure to several toxicants. Developing germ cells in the fetal ovary have also been shown to be sensitive to toxicants and ionizing radiation, which induce oxidative stress. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which ROS mediate ovarian toxicity. PMID:24388188

  16. Reactive oxygen species in leaf abscission signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Masaru; Munemura, Ikuko; Tomita, Reiko

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in response to many environmental stresses, such as UV, chilling, salt and pathogen attack. These stresses also accompany leaf abscission in some plants, however, the relationship between these stresses and abscission is poorly understood. In our recent report, we developed an in vitro abscission system that reproduces stress-induced pepper leaf abscission in planta. Using this system, we demonstrated that continuous production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is involved in leaf abscission signaling. Continuous H2O2 production is required to induce expression of the cell wall-degrading enzyme, cellulase and functions downstream of ethylene in abscission signaling. Furthermore, enhanced production of H2O2 occurs at the execution phase of abscission, suggesting that H2O2 also plays a role in the cell-wall degradation process. These data suggest that H2O2 has several roles in leaf abscission signaling. Here, we propose a model for these roles. PMID:19704438

  17. Prooxidant action of knipholone anthrone: copper dependent reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, S; Dagne, E

    2009-07-01

    Knipholone (KP) and knipholone anthrone (KA) are natural 4-phenylanthraquinone structural analogues with established differential biological activities including in vitro antioxidant and cytotoxic properties. By using DNA damage as an experimental model, the comparative Cu(II)-dependent prooxidant action of these two compounds were studied. In the presence of Cu(II) ions, the antioxidant KA (3.1-200 microM) but not KP (6-384 microM) caused a concentration-dependent pBR322 plasmid DNA strand scission. The DNA damage induced by KA could be abolished by reactive oxygen species scavengers, glutathione and catalase as well as EDTA and a specific Cu(I) chelator bathocuproine disulfonic acid. In addition to Cu(II) chelating activity, KA readily reduces Cu(II) to Cu(I). Copper-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and the subsequent macromolecular damage may be involved in the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity of KA. PMID:19345716

  18. Fluoranthene fumigation and exogenous scavenging of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in evergreen Japanese red pine seedlings (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et. Zucc.).

    PubMed

    Oguntimehin, Ilemobayo; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) such as O(2)(-), H(2)O(2), and *OH is known to be a major mechanism of damage in biological systems. This study investigated and compared effectiveness of scavenging ROI generated in fluoranthene (FLU) pre-fumigated Japanese red pine seedlings. Three kinds of eco-physiological assessments were used to express the impact of the different fumigants used inside the green house. Gas exchange measurements showed negative changes induced by 10 microM FLU on Japanese pine seedlings during a 10 d exposure period whilst no negative change was found during a 5 d exposure period. Moreover, during a 14 d FLU exposure incorporating ROI scavengers, results revealed that chlorophyll fluorescence, needle chemical contents and needle dry mass per unit area of the seedlings were affected. The negative effects of FLU on the conifer were dependent on both the dose and period of FLU fumigation. Peroxidase (PERO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and mannitol (MANN) were all effective scavengers of ROI. MANN scavenged *OH, the most lethal of the ROI. For practicable use, MANN is more economical, and may be the best ROI scavenger among the three considered. It can be concluded that efficient scavenging of ROI in biological systems is important to mitigate the negative effects of FLU on Japanese red pine trees. PMID:18442844

  19. Clade age and diversification rate variation explain disparity in species richness among water scavenger beetle (Hydrophilidae) lineages.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Devin D; Fikáček, Martin; Short, Andrew E Z

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One explanation for heterogeneity among clade richness is that older clades are more species rich because they have had more time to accrue diversity than younger clades. Alternatively, disparity in species richness may be due to among-lineage diversification rate variation. Here we investigate diversification in water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae), which vary in species richness among major lineages by as much as 20 fold. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and comparative methods, we test for a relationship between clade age and species richness and for shifts in diversification rate in hydrophilids. We detected a single diversification rate increase in Megasternini, a relatively young and species rich clade whose diversity might be explained by the stunning diversity of ecological niches occupied by this clade. We find that Amphiopini, an old clade, is significantly more species poor than expected, possibly due to its restricted geographic range. The remaining lineages show a correlation between species richness and clade age, suggesting that both clade age and variation in diversification rates explain the disparity in species richness in hydrophilids. We find little evidence that transitions between aquatic, semiaquatic, and terrestrial habitats are linked to shifts in diversification rates. PMID:24887453

  20. Clade Age and Diversification Rate Variation Explain Disparity in Species Richness among Water Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilidae) Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Devin D.; Fikáček, Martin; Short, Andrew E. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One explanation for heterogeneity among clade richness is that older clades are more species rich because they have had more time to accrue diversity than younger clades. Alternatively, disparity in species richness may be due to among-lineage diversification rate variation. Here we investigate diversification in water scavenger beetles (Hydrophilidae), which vary in species richness among major lineages by as much as 20 fold. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and comparative methods, we test for a relationship between clade age and species richness and for shifts in diversification rate in hydrophilids. We detected a single diversification rate increase in Megasternini, a relatively young and species rich clade whose diversity might be explained by the stunning diversity of ecological niches occupied by this clade. We find that Amphiopini, an old clade, is significantly more species poor than expected, possibly due to its restricted geographic range. The remaining lineages show a correlation between species richness and clade age, suggesting that both clade age and variation in diversification rates explain the disparity in species richness in hydrophilids. We find little evidence that transitions between aquatic, semiaquatic, and terrestrial habitats are linked to shifts in diversification rates. PMID:24887453

  1. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bauerová, K; Bezek, A

    1999-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease affecting up to 3% of the population in most countries. The causes of RA have not been completely elucidated. This paper aims to review the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the etiopathogenesis of RA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid, as well as reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitric oxide and peroxynitrite, contribute significantly to tissue injury in RA. Several mechanisms are involved in the generation and action of ROS and RNS. Superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide do not directly damage the majority of biological molecules. They are however converted into the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, which reacts with almost all molecules in living cells. The resulting chronic inflammation process can be reduced with antioxidant therapy. To date, scavenging, preventive, and enzyme antioxidants are available. The most important mode is scavenging of the hydroxyl radical and of hypochlorous acid. Another important way is to inhibit production of RNS and ROS by neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. The control of inflammation in arthritic patients by natural as well as synthetic antioxidants could become a relevant component of antirheumatic prevention and therapy. PMID:10703714

  2. Skin, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mary A.; Nihal, Minakshi; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skin, a complex organ and the body's first line of defense against environmental insults, plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an organism. This balance is maintained through a complex network of cellular machinery and signaling events, including those regulating oxidative stress and circadian rhythms. These regulatory mechanisms have developed integral systems to protect skin cells and to signal to the rest of the body in the event of internal and environmental stresses. Recent Advances: Interestingly, several signaling pathways and many bioactive molecules have been found to be involved and even important in the regulation of oxidative stress and circadian rhythms, especially in the skin. It is becoming increasingly evident that these two regulatory systems may, in fact, be interconnected in the regulation of homeostasis. Important examples of molecules that connect the two systems include serotonin, melatonin, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Critical Issues: Excessive reactive oxygen species and/or dysregulation of antioxidant system and circadian rhythms can cause critical errors in maintaining proper barrier function and skin health, as well as overall homeostasis. Unfortunately, the modern lifestyle seems to contribute to increasing alterations in redox balance and circadian rhythms, thereby posing a critical problem for normal functioning of the living system. Future Directions: Since the oxidative stress and circadian rhythm systems seem to have areas of overlap, future research needs to be focused on defining the interactions between these two important systems. This may be especially important in the skin where both systems play critical roles in protecting the whole body. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2982–2996. PMID:24111846

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species in Combustion Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; See, S.

    2007-12-01

    Research on airborne particulate matter (PM) has received increased concern in recent years after it was identified as a major component of the air pollution mix that is strongly associated with premature mortality and morbidity. Particular attention has been paid to understanding the potential health impacts of fine particles (PM2.5), which primarily originate from combustion sources. One group of particulate-bound chemical components of health concern is reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ions such as hypochlorite ion (OCl-), free radicals such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and superoxide anion (·O2-) which is both an ion and a radical. However, the formation of ROS in PM is not clearly understood yet. Furthermore, the concentration of ROS in combustion particles of different origin has not been quantified. The primary objective of this work is to study the effect of transition metals on the production of ROS in PM2.5 by determining the concentrations of ROS and metals. Both soluble and total metals were measured to evaluate their respective associations with ROS. PM2.5 samples were collected from several outdoor and indoor combustion sources, including those emitted from on-road vehicles, food cooking, incense sticks, and cigarette smoke. PM2.5 samples were also collected from the background air in both the ambient outdoor and indoor environments to assess the levels of particulate-bound transition metals and ROS with no combustion activities in the vicinity of sampling locations. Results obtained from this comprehensive study on particulate-bound ROS will be presented and discussed.

  4. Reactive oxygen species and boar sperm function.

    PubMed

    Awda, Basim J; Mackenzie-Bell, Meghan; Buhr, Mary M

    2009-09-01

    Boar spermatozoa are very susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS), but ROS involvement in damage and/or capacitation is unclear. The impact of exposing fresh boar spermatozoa to an ROS-generating system (xanthine/xanthine oxidase; XA/XO) on sperm ROS content, membrane lipid peroxidation, phospholipase (PL) A activity, and motility, viability, and capacitation was contrasted to ROS content and sperm function after cryopreservation. Exposing boar sperm (n = 4-5 ejaculates) to the ROS-generating system for 30 min rapidly increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation in all sperm, increased PLA in dead sperm, and did not affect intracellular O2- (flow cytometry of sperm labeled with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorscein diacetate, BODIPY 581/591 C11, bis-BODIPY-FL C11, hydroethidine, respectively; counterstained for viability). Sperm viability remained high, but sperm became immotile. Cryopreservation decreased sperm motility, viability, and intracellular O2- significantly, but did not affect H2O2. As expected, more sperm incubated in capacitating media than Beltsville thawing solution buffer underwent acrosome reactions and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (four proteins, 58-174 kDa); which proteins were tyrosine phosphorylated was pH dependent. Pre-exposing sperm to the ROS-generating system increased the percentage of sperm that underwent acrosome reactions after incubation in capacitating conditions (P < 0.025), and decreased capacitation-dependent increases in two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins (P < or = 0.035). In summary, H2O2 is the major free radical mediating direct ROS effects, but not cryopreservation changes, on boar sperm. Boar sperm motility, acrosome integrity, and lipid peroxidation are more sensitive indicators of oxidative stress than viability and PLA activity. ROS may stimulate the acrosome reaction in boar sperm through membrane lipid peroxidation and PLA activation. PMID:19357363

  5. Inhibitory activities of soluble and bound millet seed phenolics on free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara, Anoma; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    Oxidative stress, caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), is responsible for modulating several pathological conditions and aging. Soluble and bound phenolic extracts of commonly consumed millets, namely, kodo, finger (Ravi), finger (local), foxtail, proso, little, and pearl, were investigated for their phenolic content and inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and ROS, namely, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). Inhibition of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals was detrmined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The peroxyl radical inhibitory activity was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The scavenging of H(2)O(2), HOCl, and (1)O(2) was evaluated using colorimetric methods. The results were expressed as micromoles of ferulic acid equivalents (FAE) per gram of grain on a dry weight basis. In addition, major hydroxycinnamic acids were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS). All millet varieties displayed effective radical and ROS inhibition activities, which generally positively correlated with phenolic contents, except for hydroxyl radical. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of ferulic and p-coumaric acids as major hydroxycinnamic acids in phenolic extract and responsible for the observed effects. Bound extracts of millet contributed 38-99% to ROS scavenging, depending on the variety and the test system employed. Hence, bound phenolics must be included in the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of millets and other cereals. PMID:21133411

  6. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production During Reductive Stress: The Roles of Mitochondrial Glutathione and Thioredoxin Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Korge, Paavo; Calmettes, Guillaume; Weiss, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Both extremes of redox balance are known to cause cardiac injury, with mounting evidence revealing that the injury induced by both oxidative and reductive stress is oxidative in nature. During reductive stress, when electron acceptors are expected to be mostly reduced, some redox proteins can donate electrons to O2 instead, which increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the high level of reducing equivalents also concomitantly enhances ROS scavenging systems involving redox couples such as NADPH/NADP+ and GSH/GSSG. Here our objective was to explore how reductive stress paradoxically increases net mitochondrial ROS production despite the concomitant enhancement of ROS scavenging systems. Using recombinant enzymes and isolated permeabilized cardiac mitochondria, we show that two normally antioxidant matrix NADPH reductases, glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase, generate H2O2 by leaking electrons from their reduced flavoprotein to O2 when electron flow is impaired by inhibitors or because of limited availability of their natural electron acceptors, GSSG and oxidized thioredoxin. The spillover of H2O2 under these conditions depends on H2O2 reduction by peroxiredoxin activity, which may regulate redox signaling in response to endogenous or exogenous factors. These findings may explain how ROS production during reductive stress overwhelms ROS scavenging capability, generating the net mitochondrial ROS spillover causing oxidative injury. These enzymes could potentially targeted to increase cancer cell death or modulate H2O2-induced redox signaling to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion damage. PMID:25701705

  7. Balancing the generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Rusty; Redman, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Fossil records suggest that bacteria developed the ability to photosynthesize ≈3,500 million years ago (mya), initiating a very slow accumulation of atmospheric oxygen (1). Recent geochemical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen did not accumulate to levels conducive for aerobic life until 500–1,000 mya (2, 3). The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere resulted in the emergence of aerobic organisms followed by a great diversification of biological species and the eventual evolution of humans.

  8. The oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite species and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Inigo A.; Brunner, Benjamin; Breuer, Christian; Coleman, Max; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Sulfite is an important sulfoxy intermediate in oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling in the marine and terrestrial environment. Different aqueous sulfite species exist, such as dissolved sulfur dioxide (SO2), bisulfite (HSO3-), pyrosulfite (S2O52-) and sulfite sensu stricto (SO32-), whereas their relative abundance in solution depends on the concentration and the pH. Conversion of one species into another is rapid and involves in many cases incorporation of oxygen from, or release of oxygen to, water (e.g. SO2 + H2O ↔ HSO3- + H+), resulting in rapid oxygen isotope exchange between sulfite species and water. Consequently, the oxygen isotope composition of sulfite is strongly influenced by the oxygen isotope composition of water. Since sulfate does not exchange oxygen isotopes with water under most earth surface conditions, it can preserve the sulfite oxygen isotope signature that it inherits via oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling. Therefore, interpretation of δO values strongly hinges on the oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite and water which is poorly constrained. This is in large part due to technical difficulties in extraction of sulfite from solution for oxygen isotope analysis.

  9. Reactive oxygen species produced upon photoexcitation of sunscreens containing titanium dioxide (an EPR study).

    PubMed

    Brezová, Vlasta; Gabcová, Sona; Dvoranová, Dana; Stasko, Andrej

    2005-05-13

    Commercial sunscreen products containing titanium dioxide were irradiated with lambda>300 nm and the formation of oxygen- (.OH, O2.-/.OOH) and carbon-centered radicals was monitored by EPR spectroscopy and spin trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN), alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone as spin traps, and free nitroxide radical 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxyl. The photoinduced production of singlet oxygen was shown by 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-piperidine. The generation of reactive oxygen radical species upon irradiation of sunscreens significantly depends on their composition, as the additives present (antioxidants, radical-scavengers, solvents) can transform the reactive radicals formed to less harmful products. The continuous in situ irradiation of titanium dioxide powder, recommended for cosmetic application, investigated in different solvents (water, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropyl myristate) resulted in the generation of oxygen-centered reactive radical species (superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl and alkoxyl radicals). PMID:15878117

  10. KRIT1 Regulates the Homeostasis of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Goitre, Luca; Balzac, Fiorella; Degani, Simona; Degan, Paolo; Marchi, Saverio; Pinton, Paolo; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2010-01-01

    KRIT1 is a gene responsible for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM), a major cerebrovascular disease characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Comprehensive analysis of the KRIT1 gene in CCM patients has suggested that KRIT1 functions need to be severely impaired for pathogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular functions of KRIT1 as well as CCM pathogenesis mechanisms are still research challenges. We found that KRIT1 plays an important role in molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) homeostasis to prevent oxidative cellular damage. In particular, we demonstrate that KRIT1 loss/down-regulation is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Conversely, ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are significantly and dose-dependently reduced after restoration of KRIT1 expression. Moreover, we show that the modulation of intracellular ROS levels by KRIT1 loss/restoration is strictly correlated with the modulation of the expression of the antioxidant protein SOD2 as well as of the transcriptional factor FoxO1, a master regulator of cell responses to oxidative stress and a modulator of SOD2 levels. Furthermore, we show that the KRIT1-dependent maintenance of low ROS levels facilitates the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression required for cell transition from proliferative growth to quiescence. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are associated with an increased cell susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage and a marked induction of the DNA damage sensor and repair gene Gadd45α, as well as with a decline of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Taken together, our results point to a new model where KRIT1 limits the accumulation of intracellular oxidants and prevents oxidative stress-mediated cellular dysfunction and DNA damage by enhancing the

  11. Peroxiredoxin-5 targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space attenuates hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species signalling.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Simran S; Waypa, Gregory B; Marks, Jeremy D; Schumacker, Paul T

    2013-12-15

    The ability to adapt to acute and chronic hypoxia is critical for cellular survival. Two established functional responses to hypoxia include the regulation of gene transcription by HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor), and the constriction of pulmonary arteries in response to alveolar hypoxia. The mechanism of O2 sensing in these responses is not established, but some studies implicate hypoxia-induced mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) signalling. To further test this hypothesis, we expressed PRDX5 (peroxiredoxin-5), a H2O2 scavenger, in the IMS (mitochondrial intermembrane space), reasoning that the scavenging of ROS in that compartment should abrogate cellular responses triggered by the release of mitochondrial oxidants to the cytosol. Using adenoviral expression of IMS-PRDX5 (IMS-targeted PRDX5) in PASMCs (pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells) we show that IMS-PRDX5 inhibits hypoxia-induced oxidant signalling in the IMS and cytosol. It also inhibits HIF-1α stabilization and HIF activity in a dose-dependent manner without disrupting cellular oxygen consumption. IMS-PRDX5 expression also attenuates the increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in PASMCs during hypoxia. These results extend previous work by demonstrating the importance of IMS-derived ROS signalling in both the HIF and lung vascular responses to hypoxia. PMID:24044889

  12. The effect of Ta ``oxygen scavenger layer'' on HfO2-based resistive switching behavior: termodynamic stability, electronic structure, and low-bias transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Rungger, Ivan; Zapol, Peter; Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro; Heinonen, Olle

    Metal-oxide-metal heterostructures are promising candidates for next-generation random access memories, which exhibit reversible resistive switching between high- and low-conductance states. Recent experimental work showed that inserting a metallic `oxygen scavenger layer' between TiN electrode and HfO2 significantly improves device switching performance. We show, using atomistic modeling within the GGA +U scheme of Density Functional Theory, that a Ta oxygen scavenger layer significantly enhances the thermodynamic stability of depleting oxygen from the oxide. Furthermore, the presence of a Ta layer reduces the dependence of the Schottky barrier heights on the location of the oxygen removed from the oxide matrix. Finally, the Schottky barrier height has a very small effect on the on-state low-bias conductance; this is more sensitive to the location of the depleted oxygen. We gratefully acknowledge the computing resources provided on Blues, a high-performance computing cluster operated by the Laboratory Computing Resource Center at Argonne National Laboratory. Work at Argonne was supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Selective decreased de novo synthesis of glomerular proteoglycans under the influence of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Kashihara, N; Watanabe, Y; Makino, H; Wallner, E I; Kanwar, Y S

    1992-01-01

    The effect of reactive oxygen species on de novo synthesis of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) of the renal glomerulus was investigated in an organ perfusion system. Isolated kidneys were perfused for 7 hr with a medium containing [35S]sulfate to label sulfated proteoglycans or [35S]methionine to label total glomerular glycoproteins. For the generation of reactive oxygen species, xanthine and xanthine oxidase were included in the perfusion medium, and catalase and superoxide dismutase were used as scavenging agents. Proteoglycans were characterized by Sepharose CL-6B and DEAE-Sephacel chromatographies and SDS/PAGE analysis. The labeled glycoproteins were immunoprecipitated with anti-HSPG, anti-type IV collagen, and anti-laminin, and their specific radioactivities were determined. With exposure to reactive oxygen species, a drastic dose-dependent decrease in de novo synthesis of proteoglycans was seen, and that effect was reversible by catalase treatment. No alterations in the biochemical characteristics of proteoglycans were noted. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed a 16-fold decrease in the synthesis of nascent core peptide of HSPGs, while at comparable concentrations of xanthine and xanthine oxidase, synthesis of type IV collagen and laminin slightly decreased (approximately 15%). Morphologic studies revealed a 14-fold decrease in [35S]sulfate-associated autoradiographic grains overlying the glomerular basement membrane, a critical component of the ultrafiltration apparatus. Relevance of the selective decreased de novo synthesis of HSPGs of the glomerular basement membrane is discussed in terms of increased glomerular permeability to plasma proteins. Images PMID:1631123

  14. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  15. A soil actinobacterium scavenges atmospheric H2 using two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Berney, Michael; Hards, Kiel; Cook, Gregory M; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-03-18

    In the Earth's lower atmosphere, H2 is maintained at trace concentrations (0.53 ppmv/0.40 nM) and rapidly turned over (lifetime ≤ 2.1 y(-1)). It is thought that soil microbes, likely actinomycetes, serve as the main global sink for tropospheric H2. However, no study has ever unambiguously proven that a hydrogenase can oxidize this trace gas. In this work, we demonstrate, by using genetic dissection and sensitive GC measurements, that the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 constitutively oxidizes subtropospheric concentrations of H2. We show that two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases mediate this process. Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd1) (MSMEG_2262-2263) is well-adapted to rapidly oxidize H2 at a range of concentrations [Vmax(app) = 12 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 180 nM; threshold = 130 pM in the Δhyd23 (Hyd1 only) strain], whereas Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2720) catalyzes a slower-acting, higher-affinity process [Vmax(app) = 2.5 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 50 nM; threshold = 50 pM in the Δhyd13 (Hyd2 only) strain]. These observations strongly support previous studies that have linked group 5 [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd2) to the oxidation of tropospheric H2 in soil ecosystems. We further reveal that group 2a [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd1) can contribute to this process. Hydrogenase expression and activity increases in carbon-limited cells, suggesting that scavenging of trace H2 helps to sustain dormancy. Distinct physiological roles for Hyd1 and Hyd2 during the adaptation to this condition are proposed. Soil organisms harboring high-affinity hydrogenases may be especially competitive, given that they harness a highly dependable fuel source in otherwise unstable environments. PMID:24591586

  16. Effect of PDE5 inhibition combined with free oxygen radical scavenger therapy on erectile function in a diabetic animal model.

    PubMed

    De Young, L; Yu, D; Freeman, D; Brock, G B

    2003-10-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors represent an important advance in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). In spite of widespread use and generally good efficacy, as a class they remain ineffective in 15-57% of men. Specific cohorts of patients with severe vascular or neurogenic basis to their ED, such as diabetic men or those who have undergone radical pelvic surgery, demonstrate lower response rates with PDE inhibition treatment. We believe that circulating levels of nitric oxide (NO) may be enhanced through delivery of adequate concentrations of free oxygen radical scavenger molecules such as vitamin E. Higher levels of NO, theoretically, should produce increased penile blood flow with the potential for a synergistic effect when combined with a PDE5 inhibitor. With this hypothesis in mind, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley streptozotocin-induced (60 mg/kg i.p.) diabetic rats were divided into four therapeutic groups (n=5). Group I--control animals received peanut oil, group II--vitamin E 20 IU/day, group III--sildenafil 5 mg/kg/day and group IV--vitamin E 20 IU/day plus sildenafil 5 mg/kg/day, by oral gavage daily for 3 weeks. Erectile function was assessed as a rise in intracavernous pressure following cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Penile tissue was harvested to determine the changes in tissue morphology including neuronal nitric oxide synthase, smooth muscle alpha-actin and endothelial cell integrity. PDE5 protein content and activity were measured. Significant increases in intracavernous pressure were measured in the animals receiving combined vitamin E plus sildenafil treatment. Immunohistochemical staining showed increases of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, endothelial cell and smooth muscle cell staining. Western blot analysis did not show significant differences of PDE5 protein between the groups. However, higher PDE5 activity was measured in the sildenafil group and lower activity of PDE5 was recorded in the cohort receiving vitamin E with

  17. Species delimitation in northern European water scavenger beetles of the genus Hydrobius (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae).

    PubMed

    Fossen, Erlend I; Ekrem, Torbjørn; Nilsson, Anders N; Bergsten, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The chiefly Holarctic Hydrobius species complex (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae) currently consists of Hydrobius arcticus Kuwert, 1890, and three morphological variants of Hydrobius fuscipes (Linnaeus, 1758): var. fuscipes, var. rottenbergii and var. subrotundus in northern Europe. Here molecular and morphological data are used to test the species boundaries in this species complex. Three gene segments (COI, H3 and ITS2) were sequenced and analyzed with Bayesian methods to infer phylogenetic relationships. The Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) model and two versions of the Bayesian species delimitation method BPP, with or without an a priori defined guide tree (v2.2 & v3.0), were used to evaluate species limits. External and male genital characters of primarily Fennoscandian specimens were measured and statistically analyzed to test for significant differences in quantitative morphological characters. The four morphotypes formed separate genetic clusters on gene trees and were delimited as separate species by GMYC and by both versions of BPP, despite specimens of Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes and Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus being sympatric. Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii could only be separated genetically with ITS2, and were delimited statistically with GMYC on ITS2 and with BPP on the combined data. In addition, six or seven potentially cryptic species of the Hydrobius fuscipes complex from regions outside northern Europe were delimited genetically. Although some overlap was found, the mean values of six male genital characters were significantly different between the morphotypes (p < 0.001). Morphological characters previously presumed to be diagnostic were less reliable to separate Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes from Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus, but characters in the literature for Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii were diagnostic. Overall, morphological and molecular evidence

  18. Species delimitation in northern European water scavenger beetles of the genus Hydrobius (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Fossen, Erlend I.; Ekrem, Torbjørn; Nilsson, Anders N.; Bergsten, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The chiefly Holarctic Hydrobius species complex (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae) currently consists of Hydrobius arcticus Kuwert, 1890, and three morphological variants of Hydrobius fuscipes (Linnaeus, 1758): var. fuscipes, var. rottenbergii and var. subrotundus in northern Europe. Here molecular and morphological data are used to test the species boundaries in this species complex. Three gene segments (COI, H3 and ITS2) were sequenced and analyzed with Bayesian methods to infer phylogenetic relationships. The Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) model and two versions of the Bayesian species delimitation method BPP, with or without an a priori defined guide tree (v2.2 & v3.0), were used to evaluate species limits. External and male genital characters of primarily Fennoscandian specimens were measured and statistically analyzed to test for significant differences in quantitative morphological characters. The four morphotypes formed separate genetic clusters on gene trees and were delimited as separate species by GMYC and by both versions of BPP, despite specimens of Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes and Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus being sympatric. Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii could only be separated genetically with ITS2, and were delimited statistically with GMYC on ITS2 and with BPP on the combined data. In addition, six or seven potentially cryptic species of the Hydrobius fuscipes complex from regions outside northern Europe were delimited genetically. Although some overlap was found, the mean values of six male genital characters were significantly different between the morphotypes (p < 0.001). Morphological characters previously presumed to be diagnostic were less reliable to separate Hydrobius fuscipes var. fuscipes from Hydrobius fuscipes var. subrotundus, but characters in the literature for Hydrobius arcticus and Hydrobius fuscipes var. rottenbergii were diagnostic. Overall, morphological and molecular

  19. Direct observation of both contact and remote oxygen scavenging of GeO{sub 2} in a metal-oxide-semiconductor stack

    SciTech Connect

    Fadida, S. Shekhter, P.; Eizenberg, M.; Cvetko, D.; Floreano, L.; Verdini, A.; Kymissis, I.

    2014-10-28

    In the path to incorporating Ge based metal-oxide-semiconductor into modern nano-electronics, one of the main issues is the oxide-semiconductor interface quality. Here, the reactivity of Ti on Ge stacks and the scavenging effect of Ti were studied using synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, with an in-situ metal deposition and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. Oxygen removal from the Ge surface was observed both in direct contact as well as remotely through an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The scavenging effect was studied in situ at room temperature and after annealing. We find that the reactivity of Ti can be utilized for improved scaling of Ge based devices.

  20. The French Paradox: Determining the Superoxide-Scavenging Capacity of Red Wine and Other Beverages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Barry A.; Hammond, Matthew P.; Stormo, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    Plant-derived phenolic compounds such as those found in red wine, tea, and certain fruit juices may protect against cardiovascular disease by detoxifying (scavenging) superoxide and other unstable reactive oxygen species. We present a laboratory exercise that can be used to assess the superoxide-scavenging capacity of beverages. Among the…

  1. pH dependent catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles with respect to the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and scavenging of superoxide and singlet oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Li, Meng; Yin, Jun-Jie; Nie, Zhihong

    2014-09-01

    Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions, but catalase-like activity of producing H2O and O2 under neutral and alkaline conditions. In addition, Pt NPs exhibit significant superoxide dismutase-like activity of scavenging O2&z.rad;- under neutral conditions, but not under acidic conditions. The 1O2 scavenging ability of Pt NPs increases with the increase in the pH of the environment. The study will provide useful guidance for designing Pt NPs with desired catalytic and biological properties.Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions

  2. Endothelial GRK2 regulates vascular homeostasis through the control of free radical oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarelli, Michele; Sorriento, Daniela; Franco, Antonietta; Fusco, Anna; Giudice, Carmine Del; Annunziata, Roberto; Cipolletta, Ersilia; Monti, Maria Gaia; Dorn, Gerald W; Trimarco, Bruno; Iaccarino, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Objective The role of endothelial GRK2 was investigated in mice with selective deletion of the kinase in the endothelium (Tie2-CRE/GRK2fl/fl). Approach and Results Aortas from Tie2-CRE/GRK2fl/fl presented functional and structural alterations as compared to control GRK2fl/fl mice. In particular, vasoconstriction was blunted to different agonists, and collagen and elastic rearrangement and macrophage infiltration were observed. In primary cultured endothelial cells deficient for GRK2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased, leading to expression of cytokines. Chronic treatment with a ROS scavenger in mice corrected the vascular phenotype by recovering vasoconstriction, structural abnormalities and reducing macrophage infiltration. Conclusions These results demonstrate that GRK2 removal compromises vascular phenotype and integrity by increasing endothelial ROS production. PMID:23950144

  3. The regulatory roles of ethylene and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant salt stress responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Smith, J Andrew C; Harberd, Nicholas P; Jiang, Caifu

    2016-08-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most commonly encountered environmental stresses affecting plant growth and crop productivity. Accordingly, plants have evolved a variety of morphological, physiological and biochemical strategies that enable them to adapt to saline growth conditions. For example, it has long been known that salinity-stress increases both the production of the gaseous stress hormone ethylene and the in planta accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there has been significant progress in understanding how the fine-tuning of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling transduction can promote salinity tolerance, and how salinity-induced ROS accumulation also acts as a signal in the mediation of salinity tolerance. Furthermore, recent advances have indicated that ethylene signaling modulates salinity responses largely via regulation of ROS-generating and ROS-scavenging mechanisms. This review focuses on these recent advances in understanding the linked roles of ethylene and ROS in salt tolerance. PMID:27233644

  4. Mitochondrial Respiration Deficits Driven by Reactive Oxygen Species in Experimental Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2fl/flNEXCre/Cre) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development. PMID:25600213

  5. Comparison of two strategies for detection of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weidong; Zhou, Yuanshu; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that was applied to oncology , dermatology, and ophthalmology. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a important role in the efficacy of PDT. Online monitoring of reactive oxygen species is the key to understand effect of PDT treatment. We used Fluorescence probes DPBF and luminescent probe luminal to measure the ROS in cells. And we revaluate the relationship between the amount of light and cell survival. There is strongly correlated between the amount of light and cell kill.

  6. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-11-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of dopamine linkers and Cu NPs, peroxidase activity tests, H2O2 calibration and degradation tests for resorufin, RB and MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03563h

  7. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:17386182

  8. A novel nematode effector suppresses plant immunity by activating host reactuve oxygen species-scavenging system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative burst is a hallmark event of the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity (PTI), which is the first line of plant defense mechanisms, but it remains unclear how nematodes can overcome this defense mechanism. In this study, we show that plant-parasitic nematode Meloid...

  9. Induction of benzo[a]pyrene Mono-oxygenase in liver cell culture by the photochemical generation of active oxygen species. Evidence for the involvement of singlet oxygen and the formation of a stable inducing intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Paine, A J

    1976-01-01

    1. The photochemical generation of excited states of oxygen in liver cell culture by the mild ilumination of culture medium containing riboflavin, results in stimulation of benzo[a]pyrene 3-mono-oxygenase, a cytochrome P-450-linked mono-oxygenase. 2. The same large increase in mono-oxygenase activity was found when medium containing riboflavin was illuminated in the absence of cells and then stored in the dark for 24h before contact with the cells. From this it may be inferred that stimulation is due to the formation of a stable inducer in the culture medium. Further experiments indicate that the stable inducer is due to the photo-oxidation of an amino acid. 3. Evidence that singlet oxygen is responsible for initiating the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase is based on the use of molecules that scavenge particular active oxygen species. Of all the scavengers tested, only those that scavenge single oxygen inhibited the stimulation. 4. A hypothesis is developed to relate the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase by singlet oxygen in cultured cells to the regulation of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system in vivo. It is suggested that single oxygen generation within cells may be a common factor linking the many structurally diverse inducers of the enzyme system. PMID:962887

  10. Induction of benzo[a]pyrene Mono-oxygenase in liver cell culture by the photochemical generation of active oxygen species. Evidence for the involvement of singlet oxygen and the formation of a stable inducing intermediate.

    PubMed

    Paine, A J

    1976-07-15

    1. The photochemical generation of excited states of oxygen in liver cell culture by the mild ilumination of culture medium containing riboflavin, results in stimulation of benzo[a]pyrene 3-mono-oxygenase, a cytochrome P-450-linked mono-oxygenase. 2. The same large increase in mono-oxygenase activity was found when medium containing riboflavin was illuminated in the absence of cells and then stored in the dark for 24h before contact with the cells. From this it may be inferred that stimulation is due to the formation of a stable inducer in the culture medium. Further experiments indicate that the stable inducer is due to the photo-oxidation of an amino acid. 3. Evidence that singlet oxygen is responsible for initiating the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase is based on the use of molecules that scavenge particular active oxygen species. Of all the scavengers tested, only those that scavenge single oxygen inhibited the stimulation. 4. A hypothesis is developed to relate the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase by singlet oxygen in cultured cells to the regulation of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system in vivo. It is suggested that single oxygen generation within cells may be a common factor linking the many structurally diverse inducers of the enzyme system. PMID:962887

  11. Oleoyl-Lysophosphatidylcholine Limits Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability by Induction of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kozina, Andrijana; Opresnik, Stefan; Wong, Michael Sze Ka; Hallström, Seth; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Malli, Roland; Schröder, Katrin; Schmidt, Kurt; Frank, Saša

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported modulation of endothelial prostacyclin and interleukin-8 production, cyclooxygenase-2 expression and vasorelaxation by oleoyl- lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC 18:1). In the present study, we examined the impact of this LPC on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in vascular endothelial EA.hy926 cells. Basal NO formation in these cells was decreased by LPC 18:1. This was accompanied with a partial disruption of the active endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)- dimer, leading to eNOS uncoupling and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The LPC 18:1-induced ROS formation was attenuated by the superoxide scavenger Tiron, as well as by the pharmacological inhibitors of eNOS, NADPH oxidases, flavin-containing enzymes and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Intracellular ROS-formation was most prominent in mitochondria, less pronounced in cytosol and undetectable in endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, Tiron completely prevented the LPC 18:1-induced decrease in NO bioavailability in EA.hy926 cells. The importance of the discovered findings for more in vivo like situations was analyzed by organ bath experiments in mouse aortic rings. LPC 18:1 attenuated the acetylcholine-induced, endothelium dependent vasorelaxation and massively decreased NO bioavailability. We conclude that LPC 18:1 induces eNOS uncoupling and unspecific superoxide production. This results in NO scavenging by ROS, a limited endothelial NO bioavailability and impaired vascular function. PMID:25419657

  12. Hypoxia induces adipocyte differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells by triggering reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Seok-Ho; Song, Seung Yong; Kim, Won-Serk; Song, Sun U; Yi, TacGhee; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Chung, Hyung-Min; Xia, Ying; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) induces the proliferation and migration of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). However, the functional role of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) generation in ASCs is unknown. Therefore, we have investigated whether hypoxia induces the differentiation of ASCs via ROS generation. We also have tried to identify the cellular mechanisms of ROS generation underlying adipocyte differentiation. Hypoxia (2%) and ROS generators, such as antimycin and rotenone, induced adipocyte differentiation, which was attenuated by an ROS scavenger. Although Nox4 generates ROS and regulates proliferation of ASCs, Nox4 inhibition or Nox4 silencing did not inhibit adipocyte differentiation; indeed fluorescence intensity of mito-SOX increased in hypoxia, and treatment with mito-CP, a mtROS scavenger, significantly reduced hypoxia-induced adipocyte differentiation. Phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR was induced by hypoxia, while inhibition of these molecules prevented adipocyte differentiation. Thus hypoxia induces adipocyte differentiation by mtROS generation, and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is involved. PMID:23956071

  13. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in cocaine-taking behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Su-Chan; Yeo, Mi Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Folsom, Ryan J; Schilaty, Nathan D; Kim, Kwang Joong; Yang, Chae Ha; Steffensen, Scott C; Kim, Hee Young

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of behavioral sensitization following repeated cocaine exposure. We hypothesized that increased ROS following cocaine exposure would act as signaling molecules in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which might play an important role in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cocaine enhancement of brain metabolic activity and the effects of ROS scavengers on cocaine self-administration behavior, cocaine-induced ROS production in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and cocaine enhancement of DA release in the NAc. Metabolic neural activity monitored by temperature and oxidative stress were increased in NAc following cocaine exposure. Systemic administration of the ROS scavenger N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL), either pre- or post-treatment, significantly decreased cocaine self-administration without affecting food intake. Infusion of TEMPOL into the NAc inhibited cocaine self-administration. Increased oxidative stress was found mainly on neurons, but not astrocytes, microglia or oligodendrocytes, in NAc of rats self-administering cocaine. TEMPOL significantly attenuated cocaine-induced enhancement of DA release in the NAc, compared to saline controls. TEMPOL had no effect on the enhancement of DA release produced by the DA transporter inhibitor GBR12909. Taken together, these findings suggest that enhancement of ROS production in NAc neurons contributes to the reinforcing effect of cocaine. PMID:24975938

  14. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in cocaine-taking behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Su-Chan; Yeo, Mi Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Folsom, Ryan J.; Schilaty, Nathan D.; Kim, Kwang Joong; Yang, Chae Ha; Steffensen, Scott C.; Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of behavioral sensitization following repeated cocaine exposure. We hypothesized that increased ROS following cocaine exposure would act as signaling molecules in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which might play an important role in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cocaine enhancement of brain metabolic activity and the effects of ROS scavengers on cocaine self-administration behavior, cocaine-induced ROS production in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and cocaine enhancement of DA release in the NAc. Metabolic neural activity monitored by temperature and oxidative stress were increased in NAc following cocaine exposure. Systemic administration of the ROS scavenger N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL), either pre- or post-treatment, significantly decreased cocaine self-administration without affecting food intake. Infusion of TEMPOL into the NAc inhibited cocaine self-administration. Increased oxidative stress was found mainly on neurons, but not astrocytes, microglia or oligodendrocytes, in NAc of rats self-administering cocaine. TEMPOL significantly attenuated cocaine-induced enhancement of DA release in the NAc, compared to saline controls. TEMPOL had no effect on the enhancement of DA release produced by the DA transporter inhibitor GBR12909. Taken together, these findings suggest that enhancement of ROS production in NAc neurons contributes to the reinforcing effect of cocaine. PMID:24975938

  15. Paclitaxel induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression through reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Sun; Oh, Jin Mi; Jin, Dong Hoon; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2008-01-01

    The antineoplastic drug paclitaxel is known to block cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle through stabilization of microtubules. The development of paclitaxel resistance in tumors is one of the most significant obstacles to successful therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) are important regulators of neovascularization. HIF-1 regulates VEGF expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigated whether paclitaxel treatment affects VEGF expression for the development of paclitaxel resistance. Paclitaxel treatment induced dose-dependent cell death and increased VEGF expression. Paclitaxel also induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and stabilized HIF-1alpha, which stimulated luciferase activity of HIF-1alpha response element on VEGF gene. As paclitaxel treatment produced reactive oxygen species (ROS), VEGF expression was increased by H2O2 treatment and reduced by various ROS scavengers such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and diphenylene iodonium. Paclitaxel-induced cell death was aggravated by incubation with those ROS scavengers. Collectively, this suggests that paclitaxel-induced VEGF expression could be mediated by paclitaxel-induced ROS production through nuclear factor-kappaB activation and HIF-1alpha stabilization, which could affect resistance induction to antitumor therapeutics during cancer treatment. PMID:18322419

  16. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Metabolic Changes in Barley Seed Embryo during Germination.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenguo; Marsolais, Frédéric; Bykova, Natalia V; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-01-01

    The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0-48 h post imbibition) the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione) were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS) might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy. PMID:26909088

  17. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Metabolic Changes in Barley Seed Embryo during Germination

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhenguo; Marsolais, Frédéric; Bykova, Natalia V.; Igamberdiev, Abir U.

    2016-01-01

    The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0–48 h post imbibition) the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione) were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS) might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy. PMID:26909088

  18. Reactive oxygen species at phospholipid bilayers: distribution, mobility and permeation.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rodrigo M

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in biochemical processes such as redox signaling, aging, carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Although biomembranes are targets for reactive oxygen species attack, little is known about the role of their specific interactions. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to determine the distribution, mobility and residence times of various reactive oxygen species at the membrane-water interface. Simulations showed that molecular oxygen (O2) accumulated at the membrane interior. The applicability of this result to singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was discussed. Conversely, superoxide (O2(-)) radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) remained at the aqueous phase. Both hydroxyl (HO) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals were able to penetrate deep into the lipid headgroups region. Due to membrane fluidity and disorder, these radicals had access to potential peroxidation sites along the lipid hydrocarbon chains, without having to overcome the permeation free energy barrier. Strikingly, HO2 radicals were an order of magnitude more concentrated in the headgroups region than in water, implying a large shift in the acid-base equilibrium between HO2 and O2(-). In comparison with O2, both HO and HO2 radicals had lower lateral mobility at the membrane. Simulations revealed that there were intermittent interruptions in the H-bond network around the HO radicals at the headgroups region. This effect is expected to be unfavorable for the H-transfer mechanism involved in HO diffusion. The implications for lipid peroxidation and for the effectiveness of membrane antioxidants were evaluated. PMID:24095673

  19. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Excitable Cells: Modulators of Mitochondrial and Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrion is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide (O2•−) is generated under specific bioenergetic conditions at several sites within the electron-transport system; most is converted to H2O2 inside and outside the mitochondrial matrix by superoxide dismutases. H2O2 is a major chemical messenger that, in low amounts and with its products, physiologically modulates cell function. The redox state and ROS scavengers largely control the emission (generation scavenging) of O2•−. Cell ischemia, hypoxia, or toxins can result in excess O2•− production when the redox state is altered and the ROS scavenger systems are overwhelmed. Too much H2O2 can combine with Fe2+ complexes to form reactive ferryl species (e.g., Fe(IV) = O•). In the presence of nitric oxide (NO•), O2•− forms the reactant peroxynitrite (ONOO−), and ONOOH-induced nitrosylation of proteins, DNA, and lipids can modify their structure and function. An initial increase in ROS can cause an even greater increase in ROS and allow excess mitochondrial Ca2+ entry, both of which are factors that induce cell apoptosis and necrosis. Approaches to reduce excess O2•− emission include selectively boosting the antioxidant capacity, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation to reduce generation of O2•− by inducing proton leak, and reversibly inhibiting electron transport. Mitochondrial cation channels and exchangers function to maintain matrix homeostasis and likely play a role in modulating mitochondrial function, in part by regulating O2•− generation. Cell-signaling pathways induced physiologically by ROS include effects on thiol groups and disulfide linkages to modify posttranslationally protein structure to activate/inactivate specific kinase/phosphatase pathways. Hypoxia-inducible factors that stimulate a cascade of gene transcription may be mediated physiologically by ROS. Our knowledge of the role played by ROS and their scavenging systems in

  20. Oxygen chemistry of shocked interstellar clouds. III - Sulfur and oxygen species in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leen, T. M.; Graff, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical evolution of oxygen and sulfur species in shocked dense clouds is studied. Reaction rate constants for several important neutral reactions are examined, and revised values are suggested. The one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic shock structure and postshock chemical evolution are calculated for shocks of velocity v(s) = 10 km/s through clouds of initial number density n(0) = 100,000/cu cm and of molecule/atom ratios H2/H = 10, 1000, and 100,000 with most sulfur contained initially in molecules SO2 and SO. Abundances of SO2, SO, CS, and OCS remain near their preshock values, except in clouds containing substantial amounts of atomic hydrogen, where significant destruction of sulfur-oxygen species occurs. Abundances of shock-enhanced molecules HS and H2O are sensitive to the molecule/atom ratio. Nonthermal oxygen-hydrogen chemistry has a minor effect on oxygen-sulfur molecules in the case H2/H = 10.

  1. BIOMONITORING OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with several disease processes in humans, including cancer, asthma, diabetes, and cardiac disease. We have explored whether ROS can be measured directly in human fluids, and their value as a biomarker of exposure an...

  2. Reactive oxygen species in cancer: a dance with the devil.

    PubMed

    Schumacker, Paul T

    2015-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can initiate cancer, but oxidant generation in tumors leaves them vulnerable to further stresses. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Harris and colleagues show that augmenting oxidant stress in normal cells limits tumor initiation and progression. Hence, strategic targeting of antioxidant systems may undermine survival of new tumor cells. PMID:25670075

  3. Adipose dysfunction, interaction of reactive oxygen species, and inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This American Society for Nutrition sponsored symposium summary contains information about the symposium focus and the general content of speaker presentation. The focus of the symposium was to delineate the significance of obesity-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation, and adipose ...

  4. A role for reactive oxygen species in postharvest biocontrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in plant defense responses against pathogens. There is evidence that microbial biocontrol agents also induce a transient production of ROS in a host plant which triggers local and systemic defense responses. In this study, we explored the abilit...

  5. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O3(υ) formed in O + O2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O3(υ ⩾ 2) + O2(a1Δ) → 2O2 + O is the main O2(a1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O2(a1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Copper elevated embryonic hemoglobin through reactive oxygen species during zebrafish erythrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Long; Wu, Jun-Jie; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2016-06-01

    Copper, as an essential trace mineral, can cause diseases such as childhood leukemia at excess levels, but has been applied in anemia therapy for a long time. However, few reports have studied its role during hematopoiesis at the molecular level in an animal model. In this study, by microarray, qRT-PCR, whole-mount in situ hybridization and O-dianisidine staining detections, we revealed the increased expression of hemoglobin in copper-exposed embryos. Secondly, we found that copper-exposed embryos exhibited high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and genes in oxygen binding and oxygen transporting were up-regulated in the embryos. Finally, we found that ROS scavengers NAC, GSH, and DMTU not only inhibited in vivo ROS levels induced by copper, but also significantly decreased high expression of hemoglobin back to almost normal levels in copper exposed embryos, and also helped with copper elimination from the embryos. Our data first demonstrated that ROS mediated copper induced hemoglobin expression in vertebrates, partly revealing the underlying molecular mechanism of copper therapy for anemia. Moreover, we revealed that copper homeostasis was broken by its induced ROS and ROS helped with copper overloading in the body, which could be applied as a novel therapy target for copper-caused diseases. PMID:26991749

  7. Khat (Catha edulis) generates reactive oxygen species and promotes hepatic cell apoptosis via MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Abid, Morad Dirhem Naji; Chen, Juan; Xiang, Min; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xiaoping; Gong, Feili

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have suggested an association between khat (Catha edulis) chewing and acute liver lesions or chronic liver disease. However, little is known about the effects of khat on hepatic cells. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism behind khat-induced apoptosis in the L02 human hepatic cell line. We used cell growth inhibition assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining to measure hepatocyte apoptosis induced by khat. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression levels of caspase-8 and -9, as well as those of Bax and Bcl-2. We also measured reactive oxygen species production. The results indicated that khat induced significant hepatocyte apoptosis in L02 cells. We found that khat activated caspase-8 and -9, upregulated Bax protein expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression levels, which resulted in the coordination of apoptotic signals. Khat-induced hepatocyte apoptosis is primarily regulated through the sustained activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and only partially via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Furthermore, the khat-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activation of the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), attenuated the khat-induced activation of JNK and ERK. Our results demonstrate that khat triggers the generation of intracellular ROS and sequentially induces the sustainable activation of JNK, which in turn results in a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis. PMID:23708648

  8. The formation of metal--oxygen species at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S.L.; Lin, C.L.; Chen, J.; Strongin, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The interaction of solid molecular oxygen with Li, Cs, K, La, Ag, Cu, and Ba has been studied at 35 K or below using photoemission. A feature near 535 eV in the O 1{ital s} core-level spectra was observed when Li, Cs, K, and La were deposited on solid oxygen. This feature was identified with one electron being donated to an oxygen molecule, i.e., the superoxide species, which as far as we know has not been previously reported for La and Li. A feature at about 531.5--533 eV was identified as a peroxide species where two electrons were donated to an oxygen molecule. Finally, features at about 528--530.5 eV were identified as oxide phases where the molecular oxygen was dissociated into atomic O with formal oxidation state of {minus}2. These identifications are crucial in the determinations of the exotic features in the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) O 1{ital s} spectra of the high {ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors.

  9. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} − N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  10. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N(3) - N(4), where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles. PMID:25005287

  11. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N3 - N4, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  12. Effect of electron scavengers on the formation of paramagnetic species upon radiolysis of polystyrene and its low-molecular-weight analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Zezin, A.A.; Fel`dman, V.I.; Sukhov, F.F.

    1995-05-01

    The effect of electron scavengers on the composition and the yields of paramagnetic species upon the radiolysis of polystyrene was examined. Various mechanisms of the reactions of radical cations (holes) in low-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbons and polystyrene are discussed. The dimeric radical cations were found to be trapped in polystyrene and benzene irradiated in the presence of electron scavengers at 77 K. The yield of paramagnetic species was shown to increase markedly in the presence of small amounts (<1%) of chloroform of benzyl chloride. The results obtained show that the ionic processes make a large contribution to the formation of paramagnetic species. It is concluded that the radiation resistance of polystyrene is due not only to its chemical structure, but to the association of phenyl rings in the solid polymer.

  13. Chemical pathway analysis of Titan's upper atmosphere: Oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. W.; Lara, L. M.; Lehmann, R.

    2014-04-01

    CO, CO2, and H2O are the only oxygen bearing species in Titan's atmosphere which have been clearly detected so far. Their abundances are controlled by the interaction of external and internal sources, photochemistry and condensation. In this contribution, we determine all significant chemical pathways responsible for the production and consumption of CO, CO2, and H2O. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of different oxygen sources on the efficiencies of the pathways. In order to achieve this, we apply a unique algorithm, called the Pathway Analysis Program - PAP to the results of a 1D photochemical model of Titan's atmosphere.

  14. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  15. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVIE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES. CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON , FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). R...

  16. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  17. Natural antioxidants as inhibitors of oxygen species induced mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Minnunni, M; Wolleb, U; Mueller, O; Pfeifer, A; Aeschbacher, H U

    1992-10-01

    A ternary antioxidant vitamin mix consisting of ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol and lecithin as well as a rosemary extract with carnosic acid and carnosol as the two major active ingredients were shown to exhibit strong antimutagenic effects in Ames tester strain TA102. This strain has been shown to be highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species. Mutagenicity was induced by the generation of oxygen radicals by tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (tBOOH) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); therefore, the antimutagenic property of the above substances was attributed to their antioxidant properties. In the case of the vitamin mix, ascorbic acid was held responsible for this inhibitory property, whereas for the rosemary extract carnosic acid was identified as the antimutagenic agent. Since oxygen radicals are known to be involved in the multiprocess of carcinogenicity, it is concluded that these antioxidants might exhibit anticarcinogenic properties. PMID:1383702

  18. Reactive oxygen species regulate alkaloid metabolism in undifferentiated N. tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Nita; Rogers, Dennis T; Yun, Kil-Young; Littleton, John M; Falcone, Deane L

    2010-05-01

    Plants produce an immense number of natural products and undifferentiated cells from various plant tissues have long been considered an ideal source for their synthesis. However, undifferentiated plant cells often either lose their biosynthetic capacity over time or exhibit immediate repression of the required pathways once dedifferentiated. In this study, freshly prepared callus tissue was employed to further investigate the regulation of a natural product pathway in undifferentiated tobacco cells. Putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) is a pathway-specific enzyme required in nicotinic alkaloid production in Nicotiana species. Callus derived from transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants harboring PMT promoter-GUS fusions were used to study factors that influence PMT expression. Under normal callus growth conditions in the presence of light and auxin, PMT promoter activity was strongly repressed. Conversely, dark conditions and the absence of auxin were found to upregulate PMT promoter activity, with light being dominant to the repressive effects of auxin. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known by-products of photosynthesis and have been implicated in signaling, their involvement was investigated in transgenic callus by treatment with the ROS scavenger, dimethylthiourea, or catalase. Under highly repressive conditions for alkaloid synthesis, including normal culture conditions in the light, both ROS scavengers resulted in significant induction of PMT promoter activity. Moreover, treatment of callus with catalase resulted in the upregulation of PMT promoter activity and alkaloid accumulation in this tissue. These results suggest that ROS impact the regulation of the alkaloid pathway in undifferentiated cells and have implications for regulation of the pathway in other plant tissues. PMID:20217418

  19. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant vitamins: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Frei, B

    1994-09-26

    This article is a brief overview of the mechanisms of production of reactive oxygen species in biologic systems, and the various antioxidant defense systems that provide protection against oxidative damage to biologic macromolecules. The mechanisms of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection are explained using a specific example, viz., oxidative modification of human low density lipoprotein and its prevention by vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene. PMID:8085584

  20. Reactive oxygen species: The good, the bad, and the enigma

    PubMed Central

    Ogrunc, Müge

    2014-01-01

    Work carried out primarily in the laboratory of Fabrizio d’Adda di Fagagna unveils the mitogenic properties of Ras-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their relationship with the DNA damage response. Combined data from studies of cultured cells, zebrafish models, and clinical material consistently support a role of the RAS-RAC1-NOX4 axis in ROS induction, hyperproliferation, and senescence. PMID:27308352

  1. Mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a causal role in aging-related intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Robinson, Andria R.; Ngo, Kevin; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Dong, Qing; St. Croix, Claudette; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Pola, Enrico; Robbins, Paul D.; Kang, James; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Wipf, Peter; Vo, Nam V.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative damage is a well-established driver of aging. Evidence of oxidative stress exists in aged and degenerated discs, but it is unclear how it affects disc metabolism. In this study, we first determined whether oxidative stress negatively impacts disc matrix metabolism using disc organotypic and cell cultures. Mouse disc organotypic culture grown at atmospheric oxygen (20% O2) exhibited perturbed disc matrix homeostasis, including reduced proteoglycan synthesis and enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinases, compared to discs grown at low oxygen levels (5% O2). Human disc cells grown at 20% O2 showed increased levels of mitochondrial-derived superoxide anions and perturbed matrix homeostasis. Treatment of disc cells with the mitochondria-targeted reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger XJB-5-131 blunted the adverse effects caused by 20% O2. Importantly, we demonstrated that treatment of accelerated aging Ercc1−/Δmice, previously established to be a useful in vivo model to study age-related intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), also resulted in improved disc total glycosaminoglycan content and proteoglycan synthesis. This demonstrates that mitochondrial-derived ROS contributes to age-associated IDD in Ercc1−/Δmice. Collectively, these data provide strong experimental evidence that mitochondrial-derived ROS play a causal role in driving changes linked to aging-related IDD and a potentially important role for radical scavengers in preventing IDD. PMID:23389888

  2. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species in the Pathogenesis of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Keiichi; Higaki, Takashi; Matsubara, Yuko; Nawa, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized by disturbed extravillous trophoblast migration toward uterine spiral arteries leading to increased uteroplacental vascular resistance and by vascular dysfunction resulting in reduced systemic vasodilatory properties. Its pathogenesis is mediated by an altered bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and tissue damage caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, superoxide (O2−) rapidly inactivates NO and forms peroxynitrite (ONOO−). It is known that ONOO− accumulates in the placental tissues and injures the placental function in PE. In addition, ROS could stimulate platelet adhesion and aggregation leading to intravascular coagulopathy. ROS-induced coagulopathy causes placental infarction and impairs the uteroplacental blood flow in PE. The disorders could lead to the reduction of oxygen and nutrients required for normal fetal development resulting in fetal growth restriction. On the other hand, several antioxidants scavenge ROS and protect tissues against oxidative damage. Placental antioxidants including catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protect the vasculature from ROS and maintain the vascular function. However, placental ischemia in PE decreases the antioxidant activity resulting in further elevated oxidative stress, which leads to the appearance of the pathological conditions of PE including hypertension and proteinuria. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between ROS and antioxidant activity. This review provides new insights about roles of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of PE. PMID:25739077

  3. Endogenous and endobiotic induced reactive oxygen species formation by isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Siraki, Arno G; Pourahmad, Jalal; Chan, Tom S; Khan, Sumsullah; O'Brien, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    The rat hepatocyte catalyzed oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to form the fluorescent 2,7'-dichlorofluorescein was used to measure endogenous and xenobiotic-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation by intact isolated rat hepatocytes. Various oxidase substrates and inhibitors were then used to identify the intracellular oxidases responsible. Endogenous ROS formation was markedly increased in catalase-inhibited or GSH-depleted hepatocytes, and was inhibited by ROS scavengers or desferoxamine. Endogenous ROS formation was also inhibited by cytochrome P450 inhibitors, but was not affected by oxypurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, or phenelzine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. Mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors or hypoxia, on the other hand, markedly increased ROS formation before cytotoxicity ensued. Furthermore, uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation inhibited endogenous ROS formation. This suggests endogenous ROS formation can largely be attributed to oxygen reduction by reduced mitochondrial electron transport components and reduced cytochrome P450 isozymes. Addition of monoamine oxidase substrates increased antimycin A-resistant respiration and ROS formation before cytotoxicity ensued. Addition of peroxisomal substrates also increased antimycin A-resistant respiration but they were less effective at inducing ROS formation and were not cytotoxic. However, peroxisomal substrates readily induced ROS formation and were cytotoxic towards catalase-inhibited hepatocytes, which suggests that peroxisomal catalase removes endogenous H(2)O(2) formed in the peroxisomes. Hepatocyte catalyzed dichlorofluorescin oxidation induced by oxidase substrates, e.g., benzylamine, was correlated with the cytotoxicity induced in catalase-inhibited hepatocytes. PMID:11755311

  4. Action of reactive oxygen species in the antifungal mechanism of gemini-pyridinium salts against yeast.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Ueta, Shouko; Maseda, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki; Omasa, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    We previously found that the gemini quaternary salt (gemini-QUAT) containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 3,3'- (2,7-dioxaoctane) bis (1-decylpyridinium bromide) (3DOBP-4,10) , exerted fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and caused respiration inhibition and the cytoplasmic leakage of ATP, magnesium, and potassium ions. Here, we investigated how the gemini-QUAT, 3DOBP-4,10, exerts more powerful antimicrobial activity than the mono-QUAT N-cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and examined the association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antimicrobial mechanism. Antifungal assays showed that the activity of 3DOBP-4,10 against two yeasts, S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans, was significantly elevated under aerobic conditions, and largely reduced under anaerobic conditions (nitrogen atmosphere) . Adding radical scavengers such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and potassium iodide (KI) also decreased the fungicidal activity of 3DOBP-4,10 but negligibly affected that of CPC. We measured survival under static conditions and found that the rapid fungicidal profile of 3DOBP-4,10 was lost, whereas that of CPC was slightly affected in the presence of KI. Our results suggest that 3DOBP-4,10 exerts powerful antimicrobial activity by penetrating the cell wall and membrane, which then allows oxygen to enter the cells, where it participates in the generation of intracellular ROS. The activity could thus be attributable to a synergic antimicrobial combination of the disruption of organelle membranes by the QUAT and oxidative stress imposed by ROS. PMID:22790843

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species and Induction of Lignin Peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Belinky, Paula A.; Flikshtein, Nufar; Lechenko, Sergey; Gepstein, Shimon; Dosoretz, Carlos G.

    2003-01-01

    We studied oxidative stress in lignin peroxidase (LIP)-producing cultures (cultures flushed with pure O2) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium by comparing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cumulative oxidative damage, and antioxidant enzymes with those found in non-LIP-producing cultures (cultures grown with free exchange of atmospheric air [control cultures]). A significant increase in the intracellular peroxide concentration and the degree of oxidative damage to macromolecules, e.g., DNA, lipids, and proteins, was observed when the fungus was exposed to pure O2 gas. The specific activities of manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase and the consumption of glutathione were all higher in cultures exposed to pure O2 (oxygenated cultures) than in cultures grown with atmospheric air. Significantly higher gene expression of the LIP-H2 isozyme occurred in the oxygenated cultures. A hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (50 mM), added to the culture every 12 h, completely abolished LIP expression at the mRNA and protein levels. This effect was confirmed by in situ generation of hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction, which significantly enhanced LIP expression. The level of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) was correlated with the starvation conditions regardless of the oxygenation regimen applied, and similar cAMP levels were obtained at high O2 concentrations and in cultures grown with atmospheric air. These results suggest that even though cAMP is a prerequisite for LIP expression, high levels of ROS, preferentially hydroxyl radicals, are required to trigger LIP synthesis. Thus, the induction of LIP expression by O2 is at least partially mediated by the intracellular ROS. PMID:14602606

  6. Cytotoxic responses to 405nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells: Involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G; Grant, M Helen

    2016-06-01

    Light at wavelength 405 nm is an effective bactericide. Previous studies showed that exposing mammalian cells to 405 nm light at 36 J/cm(2) (a bactericidal dose) had no significant effect on normal cell function, although at higher doses (54 J/cm(2)), mammalian cell death became evident. This research demonstrates that mammalian and bacterial cell toxicity induced by 405 nm light exposure is accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, as detected by generation of fluorescence from 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. As indicators of the resulting oxidative stress in mammalian cells, a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione content and a corresponding increase in the efflux of oxidised glutathione were observed from 405 nm light treated cells. The mammalian cells were significantly protected from dying at 54 J/cm(2) in the presence of catalase, which detoxifies H2O2. Bacterial cells were significantly protected by sodium pyruvate (H2O2 scavenger) and by a combination of free radical scavengers (sodium pyruvate, dimethyl thiourea (OH scavenger) and catalase) at 162 and 324 J/cm(2). Results therefore suggested that the cytotoxic mechanism of 405 nm light in mammalian cells and bacteria could be oxidative stress involving predominantly H2O2 generation, with other ROS contributing to the damage. PMID:26916085

  7. Carotenoid intake does not mediate a relationship between reactive oxygen species and bright colouration: experimental test in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mats; Wilson, Mark; Isaksson, Caroline; Uller, Tobias; Mott, Beth

    2008-04-01

    We performed experiments on male Australian painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus) to test the hypothesis that carotenoids can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), protecting the organism from oxidative stress, and that this capacity is reflected in skin colours involved in signalling. Subsequent to 4 weeks of carotenoid treatment we used flow cytometry to analyse unspecified ROS (H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, superoxide and peroxynitrite level), hereafter termed ROS, and baseline superoxide specifically (bSO in peripheral blood cells). Mean background levels of ROS and bSO did not differ between carotenoid-treated and control males. bSO, which represents the superoxide level in un-manipulated blood, was negatively correlated with colour development in all males, regardless of carotenoid treatment. Thus, carotenoid intake does not reduce circulating levels of ROS or bSO, suggesting that carotenoids are inefficient antioxidants in vivo and, therefore, are unlikely to provide a direct link between oxidative stress and colouration. PMID:18375850

  8. Spreading the news: subcellular and organellar reactive oxygen species production and signalling.

    PubMed

    Mignolet-Spruyt, Lorin; Xu, Enjun; Idänheimo, Niina; Hoeberichts, Frank A; Mühlenbock, Per; Brosché, Mikael; Van Breusegem, Frank; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2016-06-01

    As plants are sessile organisms that have to attune their physiology and morphology continuously to varying environmental challenges in order to survive and reproduce, they have evolved complex and integrated environment-cell, cell-cell, and cell-organelle signalling circuits that regulate and trigger the required adjustments (such as alteration of gene expression). Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential components of this network, their pathways are not yet completely unravelled. In addition to the intrinsic chemical properties that define the array of interaction partners, mobility, and stability, ROS signalling specificity is obtained via the spatiotemporal control of production and scavenging at different organellar and subcellular locations (e.g. chloroplasts, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and apoplast). Furthermore, these cellular compartments may crosstalk to relay and further fine-tune the ROS message. Hence, plant cells might locally and systemically react upon environmental or developmental challenges by generating spatiotemporally controlled dosages of certain ROS types, each with specific chemical properties and interaction targets, that are influenced by interorganellar communication and by the subcellular location and distribution of the involved organelles, to trigger the suitable acclimation responses in association with other well-established cellular signalling components (e.g. reactive nitrogen species, phytohormones, and calcium ions). Further characterization of this comprehensive ROS signalling matrix may result in the identification of new targets and key regulators of ROS signalling, which might be excellent candidates for engineering or breeding stress-tolerant plants. PMID:26976816

  9. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine accumulation by beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide elicitors in potato tuber tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, F; Miyagawa, H; Ueno, T

    2001-01-01

    Treatment of potato tuber tissues with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide induces accumulation of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine (p-CO). We examined the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the signal transduction leading to p-CO accumulation. Induction was suppressed by an NADPH-oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium chloride, and oxygen radical scavengers. H2O2 was generated in the tuber tissue within a few minutes of treatment with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide. On the other hand, treatment with NO specific scavenger, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and serine protease inhibitor did not inhibit p-CO induction. Our findings suggest that ROS generated by the action of NADPH-oxidase play an important role in this system, while NO and serine protease are unlikely to be involved in this process. PMID:11371013

  10. Reactive oxygen species and energy machinery: an integrated dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Korla, Kalyani

    2016-08-01

    The role of several important reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the Krebs cycle, the electron transport chain (ETC) and the two important shuttles has been modelled. Major part of the ROS is produced during oxygen reduction in the ETC, which has been kinetically simulated, and the changes in the final concentrations of several important metabolites were found. The simulation is based on chemical kinetics equation, and the associated set of differential equations was solved by the ordinary differential equation package in Octave. The validity of the model is checked by comparing the experimental results available in the literature with the simulations when a part of the ETC is blocked (80%) in the script. The present approach is versatile and flexible and has potential applications in various simulations. It is easy to study the change in concentrations of various metabolites when a particular enzyme or pathway is blocked (say by a drug). The Octave script is presented in the text. PMID:26309069

  11. [Reactive oxygen species and fibrosis in tissues and organs - review].

    PubMed

    Meng, Juan-Xia; Zhao, Ming-Feng

    2012-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a kind of molecules derived by oxygen in the metabolic process of aerobic cells, which mainly includes superoxide, hydroxyl radicals, alkoxyl, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, ozone, etc. They can destroy the structure and function of cells through the damage of biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins and the lipid peroxidation. ROS also can regulate the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cells through several signaling pathways and participate in fibrogenesis of many organs including hepatic and pulmonary fibrosis. Recent study shows that ROS might have an important effect on the forming of myelofibrosis. Consequently, ROS plays a significant role in the fibrogenesis of tissues and organs. In this review, the relevance between ROS and common tissues and organs fibrosis is summarized. PMID:23114165

  12. Methylmercury-induced reactive oxygen species formation in neonatal cerebral astrocytic cultures is attenuated by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Gouri; Aschner, Michael

    2003-01-31

    Excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been suggested as a causal factor in various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease [Brain Res. 830 (1999) 10-15; Biochem. J. 310 (1995) 83-90; Free Radic. Biol. Med. 27 (1999) 612-616]. The present work examined the role of ROS in the neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg). ROS formation in primary astrocytic cultures of neonatal rat cerebral cortex was monitored by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA) fluorescence. MeHg, at 10 and 20 microM caused a significant increase in ROS formation (10 microM, P<0.01; 20 microM, P<0.001). Additional studies established the effectiveness of antioxidants/free radical scavengers in attenuating the MeHg-stimulated ROS formation in the following rank-order: (1) Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a non-thiol containing antioxidant, (2) n-propyl gallate (PG), a free radical scavenger, (3) superoxide dismutase (SOD), an antioxidant enzyme that dismutates superoxide anion radical, (4) alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), a lipophilic hydroxyl radical spin trapping agent. A significant inhibition of MeHg-induced ROS generation was also noted in astrocytes preincubated (3 h) with arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF(3,) 20 microM, P<0.05), a specific inhibitor of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Conversely, pretreatment (24 h) with 100 microM buthionine-L-sulfoxamine [BSO, a glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor], significantly increased (P<0.05) ROS formation in MeHg treated astrocytes compared to controls. Combined, these studies invoke ROS as potent mediators of MeHg cytotoxicity and support the hypothesis that excessive ROS generation, at least in part, plays an important role in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:12573536

  13. Global inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibits paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fidanboylu, Mehmet; Griffiths, Lisa A; Flatters, Sarah J L

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that has a major dose limiting side-effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. Currently there is no effective therapy for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathies. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction during paclitaxel-induced pain was previously indicated with the presence of swollen and vacuolated neuronal mitochondria. As mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the aim of this study was to examine whether pharmacological inhibition of ROS could reverse established paclitaxel-induced pain or prevent the development of paclitaxel-induced pain. Using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced pain (intraperitoneal 2 mg/kg paclitaxel on days 0, 2, 4 & 6), the effects of a non-specific ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and a superoxide selective scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) were compared. Systemic 100 mg/kg PBN administration markedly inhibited established paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g and 15 g stimulation and cold hypersensitivity to plantar acetone application. Daily systemic administration of 50 mg/kg PBN (days -1 to 13) completely prevented mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 4 g and 8 g stimulation and significantly attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 15 g. Systemic 100 mg/kg TEMPOL had no effect on established paclitaxel-induced mechanical or cold hypersensitivity. High dose (250 mg/kg) systemic TEMPOL significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g & 15 g, but to a lesser extent than PBN. Daily systemic administration of 100 mg/kg TEMPOL (day -1 to 12) did not affect the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These data suggest that ROS play a causal role in the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced pain, but such effects cannot be attributed to superoxide radicals alone. PMID

  14. Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Rachel; Kalghatgi, Sameer; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Fridman, Gregory; Shereshevsky, Alexey; Torabi, Behzad; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Podolsky, Erica; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane; Brooks, Ari D.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat malignancies via induction of apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were exposed to plasma at doses that did not induce necrosis, and cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated by Trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining, caspase-3 cleavage, and TUNEL® analysis. Trypan blue staining revealed that non-thermal plasma treatment significantly decreased the viability of cells in a dose-dependent manner 3 and 24 h after plasma treatment. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001). Caspase-3 cleavage was observed 48 h post-plasma treatment at a dose of 15 J/cm2. TUNEL® analysis of plasma-treated cells demonstrated an increase in apoptosis at 48 and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001) at a dose of 15 J/cm2. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, significantly decreased apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 5 and 15 J/cm2. Plasma treatment induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through a pathway that appears to be dependent on production of intracellular ROS. DBD plasma production of intracellular ROS leads to dose-dependent DNA damage in melanoma cells, detected by γ-H2AX, which was completely abrogated by pre-treating cells with ROS scavenger, NAC. Plasma-induced DNA damage in turn may lead to the observed plasma-induced apoptosis. Since plasma is non-thermal, it may be used to selectively treat malignancies. PMID:21046465

  15. Potential molecular mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species

    PubMed Central

    Debold, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Intense contractile activity causes a dramatic decline in the force and velocity generating capacity of skeletal muscle within a few minutes, a phenomenon that characterizes fatigue. Much of the research effort has focused on how elevated levels of the metabolites of ATP hydrolysis might inhibit the function of the contractile proteins. However, there is now growing evidence that elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), which also accumulate in the myoplasm during fatigue, also play a causative role in this type of fatigue. The most compelling evidence comes from observations demonstrating that pre-treatment of intact muscle with a ROS scavenger can significantly attenuate the development of fatigue. A clear advantage of this line of inquiry is that the molecular targets and protein modifications of some of the ROS scavengers are well-characterized enabling researchers to begin to identify potential regions and even specific amino acid residues modified during fatigue. Combining this knowledge with assessments of contractile properties from the whole muscle level down to the dynamic motions within specific contractile proteins enable the linking of the structural modifications to the functional impacts, using advanced chemical and biophysical techniques. Based on this approach at least two areas are beginning emerge as potentially important sites, the regulatory protein troponin and the actin binding region of myosin. This review highlights some of these recent efforts which have the potential to offer uniquely precise information on the underlying molecular basis of fatigue. This work may also have implications beyond muscle fatigue as ROS/RNS mediated protein modifications are also thought to play a role in the loss of muscle function with aging and in some acute pathologies like cardiac arrest and ischemia. PMID:26388779

  16. Global Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Inhibits Paclitaxel-Induced Painful Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fidanboylu, Mehmet; Griffiths, Lisa A.; Flatters, Sarah J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that has a major dose limiting side-effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. Currently there is no effective therapy for the prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathies. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction during paclitaxel-induced pain was previously indicated with the presence of swollen and vacuolated neuronal mitochondria. As mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the aim of this study was to examine whether pharmacological inhibition of ROS could reverse established paclitaxel-induced pain or prevent the development of paclitaxel-induced pain. Using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced pain (intraperitoneal 2 mg/kg paclitaxel on days 0, 2, 4 & 6), the effects of a non-specific ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and a superoxide selective scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) were compared. Systemic 100 mg/kg PBN administration markedly inhibited established paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g and 15 g stimulation and cold hypersensitivity to plantar acetone application. Daily systemic administration of 50 mg/kg PBN (days −1 to 13) completely prevented mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 4 g and 8 g stimulation and significantly attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 15 g. Systemic 100 mg/kg TEMPOL had no effect on established paclitaxel-induced mechanical or cold hypersensitivity. High dose (250 mg/kg) systemic TEMPOL significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity to von Frey 8 g & 15 g, but to a lesser extent than PBN. Daily systemic administration of 100 mg/kg TEMPOL (day −1 to 12) did not affect the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These data suggest that ROS play a causal role in the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced pain, but such effects cannot be attributed to superoxide radicals alone. PMID

  17. Reactive oxygen species regulate Smac mimetic/TNFα-induced necroptotic signaling and cell death.

    PubMed

    Schenk, B; Fulda, S

    2015-11-19

    Necroptosis represents a key programmed cell death pathway involved in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in necroptotic signaling has remained unclear. In the present study, we identify ROS as critical regulators of BV6/tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced necroptotic signaling and cell death. We show that BV6/TNFα-induced cell death depends on ROS production, as several ROS scavengers such as butylated hydroxyanisole, N-acetylcysteine, α-tocopherol and ethyl pyruvate significantly rescue cell death. Before cell death, BV6/TNFα-stimulated ROS generation promotes stabilization of the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1)/RIP3 necrosome complex via a potential positive feedback loop, as on the one hand radical scavengers attenuate RIP1/RIP3 necrosome assembly and phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain like (MLKL), but on the other hand silencing of RIP1 or RIP3 reduces ROS production. Although MLKL knockdown effectively decreases BV6/TNFα-induced cell death, it does not affect RIP1/RIP3 interaction and only partly reduces ROS generation. Moreover, the deubiquitinase cylindromatosis (CYLD) promotes BV6/TNFα-induced ROS generation and necrosome assembly even in the presence of BV6, as CYLD silencing attenuates these events. Genetic silencing of phosphoglycerate mutase 5 or dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) fails to protect against BV6/TNFα-induced cell death. By demonstrating that ROS are involved in regulating BV6/TNFα-induced necroptotic signaling, our study provides new insights into redox regulation of necroptosis. PMID:25867066

  18. Effect of high oxygen atmosphere storage on quality, antioxidant enzymes, and DPPH-radical scavenging activity of Chinese bayberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Yonghua; Cao, Shifeng

    2009-01-14

    The influence of high O(2) atmosphere on postharvest decay, quality, total phenolic, total anthocyanin contents, antioxidant enzymes activity, and antioxidant activity of Chinese bayberry fruit was investigated. Freshly harvested Chinese bayberry fruits were placed in jars and ventilated continuously with air or with 80 and 100% O(2) for up to 12 days. Samples were randomly selected initially and at 3-days interval during storage. The fruit exposed to high O(2) was resistant to decay, had high levels of total soluble solids, titratable acidity and ascorbic acid contents, and also reduced the increment of pH value. High O(2) treatment was less stressful as reflected by having the significantly lower malonaldehyde contents and higher catalase, ascorbic acid peroxidase, and peroxidase activities during storage. Both 80% and 100% O(2) treaments had also retained the bioactive contents and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity during storage. These results indicate that elevated O(2) levels may improve the ability of the antioxidative defense mechanism in Chinese bayberry and result in a better control of fruit decay. PMID:19093866

  19. Implications for reactive oxygen species in schizophrenia pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Koga, Minori; Serritella, Anthony V; Sawa, Akira; Sedlak, Thomas W

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-recognized participant in the pathophysiology of multiple brain disorders, particularly neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. While not a dementia, a wide body of evidence has also been accumulating for aberrant reactive oxygen species and inflammation in schizophrenia. Here we highlight roles for oxidative stress as a common mechanism by which varied genetic and epidemiologic risk factors impact upon neurodevelopmental processes that underlie the schizophrenia syndrome. While there is longstanding evidence that schizophrenia may not have a single causative lesion, a common pathway involving oxidative stress opens the possibility for intervention at susceptible phases. PMID:26589391

  20. Redox Processes in Neurodegenerative Disease Involving Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2012-01-01

    Much attention has been devoted to neurodegenerative diseases involving redox processes. This review comprises an update involving redox processes reported in the considerable literature in recent years. The mechanism involves reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, usually in the brain. There are many examples including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, prions, Down’s syndrome, ataxia, multiple sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and Tardive Dyskinesia. Evidence indicates a protective role for antioxidants, which may have clinical implications. A multifaceted approach to mode of action appears reasonable. PMID:23730253

  1. Cellular reactive oxygen species inhibit MPYS induction of IFNβ.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Lenz, Laurel L; Cambier, John C

    2010-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases, as well as infections, are accompanied by elevation in cellular levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Here we report that MPYS, a.k.a. STING, which was recently shown to mediate activation of IFNβ expression during infection, is a ROS sensor. ROS induce intermolecular disulfide bonds formation in MPYS homodimer and inhibit MPYS IFNβ stimulatory activity. Cys-64, -148, -292, -309 and the potential C₈₈xxC₉₁ redox motif in MPYS are indispensable for IFNβ stimulation and IRF3 activation. Thus, our results identify a novel mechanism for ROS regulation of IFNβ stimulation. PMID:21170271

  2. Effects of oxygen on fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.L.; Shuchart, C.E.; Yaritz, J.G.; Norman, L.R.

    1995-11-01

    The stability of polysaccharide gels at high temperature is limited by such factors as pH, mechanical degradation, and oxidants. Oxygen is unavoidably placed in fracturing fluids through dissolution of air. To prevent premature degradation of the fracturing fluid by this oxidant, oxygen scavengers are commonly used. In this paper, the effects of oxygen and various oxygen scavengers on gel stability will be presented. Mechanical removal of oxygen resulted in surprisingly stable fracturing gels at 275 F. However, chemical removal of oxygen gave mixed results. Test data from sodium thiosulfate, sodium sulfite, and sodium erythorbate used as oxygen scavengers/gel stabilizers showed that the efficiency of oxygen removal from gels did not directly coincide with the viscosity retention of the gel, and large excesses of additives were necessary to provide optimum gel stabilization. The inability of some oxygen scavengers to stabilize the gel was the result of products created from the interaction of oxygen with the oxygen scavenger, which in turn, produced species that degraded the gel. The ideal oxygen scavenger should provide superior gel stabilization without creating detrimental side reaction products. Of the materials tested, sodium thiosulfate appeared to be the most beneficial.

  3. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  4. Singlet Oxygen Is the Major Reactive Oxygen Species Involved in Photooxidative Damage to Plants1[W

    PubMed Central

    Triantaphylidès, Christian; Krischke, Markus; Hoeberichts, Frank Alfons; Ksas, Brigitte; Gresser, Gabriele; Havaux, Michel; Van Breusegem, Frank; Mueller, Martin Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species act as signaling molecules but can also directly provoke cellular damage by rapidly oxidizing cellular components, including lipids. We developed a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry-based quantitative method that allowed us to discriminate between free radical (type I)- and singlet oxygen (1O2; type II)-mediated lipid peroxidation (LPO) signatures by using hydroxy fatty acids as specific reporters. Using this method, we observed that in nonphotosynthesizing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) tissues, nonenzymatic LPO was almost exclusively catalyzed by free radicals both under normal and oxidative stress conditions. However, in leaf tissues under optimal growth conditions, 1O2 was responsible for more than 80% of the nonenzymatic LPO. In Arabidopsis mutants favoring 1O2 production, photooxidative stress led to a dramatic increase of 1O2 (type II) LPO that preceded cell death. Furthermore, under all conditions and in mutants that favor the production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (two sources for type I LPO reactions), plant cell death was nevertheless always preceded by an increase in 1O2-dependent (type II) LPO. Thus, besides triggering a genetic cell death program, as demonstrated previously with the Arabidopsis fluorescent mutant, 1O2 plays a major destructive role during the execution of reactive oxygen species-induced cell death in leaf tissues. PMID:18676660

  5. Catalytic reduction of NO by CO over rhodium catalysts. 2. Effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondarides, D.I.; Chafik, T.; Verykios, X.E.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed during reduction of NO by CO over Rh/TiO{sub 2} catalysts has been examined employing FTIR and transient MS techniques. It has been found that the activity of Rh is hindered by accumulation of surface oxygen originating from NO decomposition and gas-phase oxygen in the feed. Adsorbed CO and reduced TiO{sub 2{minus}x} species in the vicinity of Rh particles act as oxygen atom scavengers and, under fuel-rich conditions, remove atomic oxygen from the surface and restore the catalytic properties. Results of the present study provide additional evidence that production of N{sub 2} is related to dissociation of adsorbed Rh-NO{sup {minus}} while production of N{sub 2}O is related to the presence of Rh(NO){sub 2}. The presence of reduced RH{sup 0} sites is necessary for the formation of both reduction products. In the absence of oxygen in the feed, surface isocyanate species are also observed under reaction conditions. Their formation requires the presence of adjacent Rh{sup 0}-CO and reduced Rh{sup 0} sites. Although these species are favored under conditions in which NO conversion to reduction products is observed, there is no evidence that they are catalytically active species.

  6. Effect of Cu(2+)-complexation on the scavenging ability of chrysin towards photogenerated singlet molecular oxygen (O2((1)Δg)). Possible biological implications.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Vanesa A; Ferrari, Gabriela V; Montaña, M Paulina; Miskoski, Sandra; García, Norman A

    2016-09-01

    Visible-light irradiation of aqueous-ethanolic solutions of Riboflavin (Rf) in the individual presence of the flavone chrysin (Chr) and its complex with Cu(2+) ([Chr2Cu]; 2:1 L:M) generates singlet molecular oxygen O2((1)Δg), that concomitantly interact with both flavone derivatives. Overall (kt) and reactive (kr) rate constants in the order of 10(7)M(-1)s(-1) were determined for the process. Metal chelation greatly enhances the scavenging ability of [Chr2Cu] towards O2((1)Δg) through a mechanism dominated, in >80%, by the physical component. In this way, practically all O2((1)Δg) is deactivated by the complex without significant loss of the quencher. The isolated flavone quenches O2((1)Δg) in a prevailing reactive fashion. The very low value exhibited by [Chr2Cu] for the kr/kt ratio constitutes a positive quality for antioxidative protectors in biological media, where elevated local concentration and high reactivity of significant molecules make them initial targets for O2((1)Δg) aggression. Finally, two interesting properties in the field of free radicals scavenging by [Chr2Cu] must be mentioned. In first place metal chelation itself, in the obvious sense of free metal ion withdrawal from the oxidizable medium, prevents the initiation of a free radical-mediated oxidation processes through mechanisms of Fenton or lipid peroxidation. In addition, the incorporation of Cu adds to [Chr2Cu] the ability of a free radical scavenger, already described for similar Cu-chelate compounds. This collection of beneficial properties positions the complex as a remarkably promising bioprotector towards ROS-mediated oxidation. A quantification of the efficiency on the initial anti-oxidative effect exerted by Chr and [Chr2Cu] towards tryptophan was carried out. The amino acid is an archetypal molecular model, commonly employed to monitor oxidative degradation of proteinaceous media. It was efficiently photoprotected against O2((1)Δg)-mediated photooxidation by [Chr2Cu]. PMID

  7. Reactive nitrogen species scavenging, rather than nitric oxide inhibition, protects from articular cartilage damage in rat zymosan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Brain, Susan D; Greenacre, Stan; Jerônimo, Selma Maria Bezerra; de Melo, Liana Batista; Keeble, Julie; da Rocha, Francisco Airton Castro

    2003-01-01

    The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (PN) to inflammation in a zymosan-induced (1 mg, intra-articular, i.art.) rat model of arthritis was assessed by histopathology and by measuring the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the articular cartilage. Progression of the chronic synovitis in zymosan-induced arthritis (ZYA) was associated with increased nitrite and nitrotyrosine (3-NT) levels in the joint exudates that paralleled a progressive loss of the GAG content. An increase in 3-NT was also observed after i.art. PN. The nonselective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (25–75 mg kg−1day−1) or the selective inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (50–100 mg kg−1day−1) given 1 h before (prophylactic) or 3 days after (therapeutic) injection of the zymosan ameliorated the synovitis, but worsened the GAG loss, as measured at the end of the experiment (day 7). The PN scavenger uric acid (100–250 mg kg−1 i.p. four times daily) given prophylactically until the end of the experiment (day 14), in a dose compatible with its PN scavenging activity, significantly decreased both the synovitis and the GAG loss. In conclusion, PN formation is associated with cartilage damage in addition to proinflammatory activity in ZYA. NOS inhibitors and a PN scavenger were able to reduce the cellular infiltration, while displaying opposite effects on cartilage homeostasis either by enhancing or ameliorating the damage, respectively. PMID:14662723

  8. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qing; Qin, Da-Nian; Wang, Fu-Xin; Ren, Jun; Li, Hong-Bao; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Qing; Miao, Yu-Wang; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jie; Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Aims: To explore whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger (tempol) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and proinflammatory cytokines (PICs), and decreases the blood pressure and sympathetic activity in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Methods and results: Male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused intravenously with ANG II (10 ng/kg per min) or normal saline (NS) for 4 weeks. These rats were treated with bilateral PVN infusion of oxygen free radical scavenger tempol (TEMP, 20 μg/h) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid, aCSF) for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). These ANG II-infused rats also had higher levels of gp91{sup phox} (a subunit of NAD(P)H oxidase), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the PVN than the control animals. Treatment with PVN infusion of TEMP attenuated the overexpression of gp91{sup phox}, ACE and IL-1β within the PVN, and decreased sympathetic activity and MAP in ANG II-infused rats. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces elevated PICs and oxidative stress in the PVN, which contribute to the sympathoexcitation in hypertension. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates the renin–angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in ANG II-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • The effect of chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide on hypertension was investigated. • ANG II infusion induced increased proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in PVN. • ANG II infusion resulted in oxidative stress, sympathoexcitation and hypertension. • Chronic inhibiting PVN superoxide attenuates RAS and cytokines in hypertension.

  9. Decreases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species initiate GABAA receptor-mediated electrical suppression in anoxia-tolerant turtle neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, David W; Pamenter, Matthew E; Dukoff, David J; Buck, Leslie T

    2015-01-01

    Key points Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) enhanced GABA transmission prevents injury. The mechanism responsible for increased GABA transmission is unknown; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria may play a role because this is an oxygen-sensitive process. In this study, we show that inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production is sufficient to initiate a redox-sensitive GABA signalling cascade that suppresses pyramidal neuron action potential frequency. These results further our understanding of the turtle's unique strategy for reducing ATP consumption during anoxia and highlights a natural mechanism in which to explore therapies to protect mammalian brain from low-oxygen insults (e.g. cerebral stroke). Abstract Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the anoxia-tolerant western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) neuronal electrical activity is suppressed (i.e. spike arrest), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption is reduced, and cell death does not occur. Electrical suppression is primarily the result of enhanced γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for initiating oxygen-sensitive GABAergic spike arrest is unknown. In turtle cortical pyramidal neurons there are three types of GABAA receptor-mediated currents: spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), giant IPSCs and tonic currents. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging on these three currents since ROS levels naturally decrease with anoxia and may serve as a redox signal to initiate spike arrest. We found that anoxia, pharmacological ROS scavenging, or inhibition of mitochondrial ROS generation enhanced all three types of GABA currents, with tonic currents comprising ∼50% of the total current. Application of hydrogen peroxide inhibited

  10. Reactivity of pyruvic acid and its derivatives towards reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Piechowska, Teresa; Kruk, Irena; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-11-01

    Pyruvic acid and its derivatives occurring in most biological systems are known to exhibit several pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective or anticancer, many of which are suggested to originate from their antioxidant and free radical scavenger activity. The therapeutic potential of these compounds is a matter of particular interest, due to their mechanisms of action, particularly their possible antioxidant behaviour. Here, we report the results of a study of the effect of pyruvic acid (PA), ethyl pyruvate (EP) and sodium pyruvate (SP) on reactions generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion radicals, hydroxyl radicals and singlet oxygen, and their total antioxidant capacity. Chemiluminescence (CL) and spectrophotometry techniques were employed. The pyruvate analogues studied were found to inhibit the CL signal arising from superoxide anion radicals in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 = 0.0197 ± 0.002 mM for EP and IC50 = 69.2 ± 5.2 mM for PA. These compounds exhibited a dose-dependent decrease in the CL signal of the luminol + H2O2 system over the range 0.5-10 mM with IC50 values of 1.71 ± 0.12 mM for PA, 3.85 ± 0.21 mM for EP and 22.91 ± 1.21 mM for SP. Furthermore, these compounds also inhibited hydroxyl radical-dependent deoxyribose degradation in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.5-200 mM, with IC50 values of 33.2 ± 0.3 mM for SP, 116.1 ± 6.2 mM for EP and 168.2 ± 6.2 mM for PA. All the examined compounds also showed antioxidant capacity when estimated using the ferric-ferrozine assay. The results suggest that the antioxidant activities of pyruvate derivatives may reflect a direct effect on scavenging ROS and, in part, be responsible for their pharmacological actions. PMID:25754627

  11. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Seo, Hyun Wook; Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. PMID:25576869

  12. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2012-08-24

    Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, γH2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-β-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-β-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. PMID:22877754

  13. Negative Regulation of Autophagy by Sulfide Is Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence in mammalian, and recently plant, systems has led to a change in our understanding of the role played by hydrogen sulfide in life processes. In plants, hydrogen sulfide mitigates stress and regulates important plant processes such as photosynthesis, stomatal movement, and autophagy, although the underlying mechanism is not well known. In this study, we provide new experimental evidence that, together with our previous findings, demonstrates the role of hydrogen sulfide in regulating autophagy. We used green fluorescent protein fluorescence associated with autophagic bodies and immunoblot analysis of the ATG8 protein to show that sulfide (and no other molecules such as sulfur-containing molecules or ammonium) was able to inhibit the autophagy induced in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots under nitrogen deprivation. Our results showed that sulfide was unable to scavenge reactive oxygen species generated by nitrogen limitation, in contrast to well-established reducers. In addition, reducers were unable to inhibit the accumulation of autophagic bodies and ATG8 protein forms to the same extent as sulfide. Therefore, we conclude that sulfide represses autophagy via a mechanism that is independent of redox conditions. PMID:27208225

  14. Photoreactivity of Metal-Organic Frameworks in Aqueous Solutions: Metal Dependence of Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Gao, Yanxin; Liu, Jing; Wen, Yifan; Zhao, Yingcan; Zhang, Kunyang; Yu, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Promising applications of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in various fields have raised concern over their environmental fate and safety upon inevitable discharge into aqueous environments. Currently, no information regarding the transformation processes of MOFs is available. Due to the presence of repetitive π-bond structure and semiconductive property, photochemical transformations are an important fate process that affects the performance of MOFs in practical applications. In the current study, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isoreticular MIL-53s was studied. Scavengers were employed to probe the production of (1)O2, O2(•-), and •OH, respectively. In general, MIL-53(Cr) and MIL-53(Fe) are dominated by type I and II photosensitization reactions, respectively, and MIL-53(Al) appears to be less photoreactive. The generation of ROS in MIL-53(Fe) may be underestimated due to dismutation. Further investigation of MIL-53(Fe) encapsulated diclofenac transformation revealed that diclofenac can be easily transformed by MIL-53(Fe) generated ROS. However, the cytotoxicity results implied that the ROS generated from MIL-53s have little effect on the viability of the human hepatocyte (HepG2) cell line. These results suggest that the photogeneration of ROS by MOFs may be metal-node dependent, and the application of MIL-53s as drug carriers needs to be carefully considered due to their high photoreactivity. PMID:26942867

  15. Ligation of Glycophorin A Generates Reactive Oxygen Species Leading to Decreased Red Blood Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Khoory, Joseph; Estanislau, Jessica; Elkhal, Abdallah; Lazaar, Asmae; Melhorn, Mark I.; Brodsky, Abigail; Illigens, Ben; Hamachi, Itaru; Kurishita, Yasutaka; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Ghiran, Ionita C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute, inflammatory conditions associated with dysregulated complement activation are characterized by significant increases in blood concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ATP. The mechanisms by which these molecules arise are not fully understood. In this study, using luminometric- and fluorescence-based methods, we show that ligation of glycophorin A (GPA) on human red blood cells (RBCs) results in a 2.1-fold, NADPH-oxidase-dependent increase in intracellular ROS that, in turn, trigger multiple downstream cascades leading to caspase-3 activation, ATP release, and increased band 3 phosphorylation. Functionally, using 2D microchannels to assess membrane deformability, GPS-ligated RBCs travel 33% slower than control RBCs, and lipid mobility was hindered by 10% using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). These outcomes were preventable by pretreating RBCs with cell-permeable ROS scavenger glutathione monoethyl ester (GSH-ME). Our results obtained in vitro using anti-GPA antibodies were validated using complement-altered RBCs isolated from control and septic patients. Our results suggest that during inflammatory conditions, circulating RBCs significantly contribute to capillary flow dysfunctions, and constitute an important but overlooked source of intravascular ROS and ATP, both critical mediators responsible for endothelial cell activation, microcirculation impairment, platelet activation, as well as long-term dysregulated adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:26784696

  16. Nutritional countermeasures targeting reactive oxygen species in cancer: from mechanisms to biomarkers and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Samoylenko, Anatoly; Hossain, Jubayer Al; Mennerich, Daniela; Kellokumpu, Sakari; Hiltunen, Jukka Kalervo; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) exert various biological effects and contribute to signaling events during physiological and pathological processes. Enhanced levels of ROS are highly associated with different tumors, a Western lifestyle, and a nutritional regime. The supplementation of food with traditional antioxidants was shown to be protective against cancer in a number of studies both in vitro and in vivo. However, recent large-scale human trials in well-nourished populations did not confirm the beneficial role of antioxidants in cancer, whereas there is a well-established connection between longevity of several human populations and increased amount of antioxidants in their diets. Although our knowledge about ROS generators, ROS scavengers, and ROS signaling has improved, the knowledge about the direct link between nutrition, ROS levels, and cancer is limited. These limitations are partly due to lack of standardized reliable ROS measurement methods, easily usable biomarkers, knowledge of ROS action in cellular compartments, and individual genetic predispositions. The current review summarizes ROS formation due to nutrition with respect to macronutrients and antioxidant micronutrients in the context of cancer and discusses signaling mechanisms, used biomarkers, and its limitations along with large-scale human trials. PMID:23458328

  17. C-phycocyanin protects against low fertility by inhibiting reactive oxygen species in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Jiao; Han, Zhe; Ge, Lei; Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Zhao, Yue-Fang; Wang, Dong-Hui; Ren, Jing; Niu, Xin-Xin; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Women over 35 have higher rates of infertility, largely due to deterioration of oocyte quality characterized by fragmentation, abnormal meiotic spindle-chromosome complexes, and oxidative stress. C-phycocyanin (PC) is a biliprotein enriched in Spirulina platensis that is known to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and radical-scavenging properties. D-galactose-induced aging acceleration in mice has been extensively used to study aging mechanisms and for pharmaceutical screening. In this study, adult female B6D2F/1 mice injected with D-galactose were used as a model to test the age-reversing effects of PC on degenerated reproductive ability. Our results show that PC can prevent oocyte fragmentation and aneuploidy by maintaining cytoskeletal integrity. Moreover, PC can reverse the expression of antioxidant genes, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and decrease methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content, and normalize mitochondria distribution. PC exerts its benefit by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which decreases apoptosis. Finally, we observe a significant increase in litter size after PC administration to D-galactose-induced aging mice. Our study demonstrates for the first time that D-galactose-induced impaired female reproductive capability can be partially rescued by the antioxidant effects of PC. PMID:27008700

  18. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs’ treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs’ treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS. PMID:26730190

  19. The role of reactive oxygen species and autophagy in safingol-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ling, L-U; Tan, K-B; Lin, H; Chiu, G N C

    2011-01-01

    Safingol is a sphingolipid with promising anticancer potential, which is currently in phase I clinical trial. Yet, the underlying mechanisms of its action remain largely unknown. We reported here that safingol-induced primarily accidental necrotic cell death in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells, as shown by the increase in the percentage of cells stained positive for 7-aminoactinomycin , collapse of mitochondria membrane potential and depletion of intracellular ATP. Importantly, safingol treatment produced time- and concentration-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Autophagy was triggered following safingol treatment, as reflected by the formation of autophagosomes, acidic vacuoles, increased light chain 3-II and Atg biomarkers expression. Interestingly, scavenging ROS with N-acetyl--cysteine could prevent the autophagic features and reverse safingol-induced necrosis. Our data also suggested that autophagy was a cell repair mechanism, as suppression of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1 significantly augmented cell death on 2-5 μ safingol treatment. In addition, Bcl-xL and Bax might be involved in the regulation of safingol-induced autophagy. Finally, glucose uptake was shown to be inhibited by safingol treatment, which was associated with an increase in p-AMPK expression. Taken together, our data suggested that ROS was the mediator of safingol-induced cancer cell death, and autophagy is likely to be a mechanism triggered to repair damages from ROS generation on safingol treatment. PMID:21390063

  20. Reactive oxygen species metabolism during the cadmium hyperaccumulation of a new hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-chun; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance, a newly discovered hyperaccumulator, could serve as a good material for phytoremediation of Cd polluted sites. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidases (catalase (CAT); superoxide dismutase (SOD); peroxidase (POD)) in the leaf were determined when S. alfredii was treated for 15 d with various CdCl2 concentrations ranging from 0 to 800 micromol/L. The results showed that the production rate of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), which is an indicator of ROS level, reached up to the maximum at 400 micromol/L CdCl2 and then declined with the increase of CdCl2 concentration, while MDA accumulation tended to increase. CAT activity was significantly inhibited at all tested CdCl2 concentrations and SOD activity was sharply suppressed at 800 micromol/L CdCl2. However, the enhancement of POD activity was observed when CdCl2 concentration was higher than 400 micromol/L. In addition, its activity increased when treated with 600 micromol/L CdCl2 for more than 5 d. When sodium benzoate, a free radical scavenger, was added, S. alfredii was a little more sensitive to Cd toxicity than that exposed to Cd alone, and the Cd accumulation tended to decline with the increase of sodium benzoate concentration. It came to the conclusions that POD played an important role during Cd hyperaccumulation, and the accumulation of ROS induced by Cd treatment might be involved in Cd hyperaccumulation. PMID:18232224

  1. Autophagy induction upon reactive oxygen species in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, WeiNa; Chen, WenLi

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy is a protein degradation process in which cells recycle cytoplasmic contents when subjected to environmental stress conditions or during certain stages of development. Upon the induction of autophagy, a double membrane autophagosome forms around cytoplasmic components and delivers them to the vacuole for degradation. In plants, autophagy has been shown previously to be induced during abiotic stresses including oxidative stress. Cd, as a toxicity heavy metal, resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, we demonstrated that ROS contributed to the induction of autophagy in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana. However, pre-incubation with ascorbic acid (AsA, antioxidant molecule) and catalase (CAT, a H2O2-specific scavenger) decreased the ROS production and the number of autolysosomal-like structures. Together our results indicated that the oxidative condition was essential for autophagy, as treatment with AsA and CAT abolished the formation of autophagosomes, and ROS may function as signal molecules to induce autophagy in abiotic stress.

  2. Mitochondrial uncoupling does not decrease reactive oxygen species production after ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Quarrie, Ricardo; Lee, Daniel S; Reyes, Levy; Erdahl, Warren; Pfeiffer, Douglas R; Zweier, Jay L; Crestanello, Juan A

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR) leads to myocardial dysfunction by increasing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial H(+) leak decreases ROS formation; it has been postulated that increasing H(+) leak may be a mechanism of decreasing ROS production after IR. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) decreases ROS formation after IR, but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesize that pharmacologically increasing mitochondrial H(+) leak would decrease ROS production after IR. We further hypothesize that IPC would be associated with an increase in the rate of H(+) leak. Isolated male Sprague-Dawley rat hearts were subjected to either control or IPC. Mitochondria were isolated at end equilibration, end ischemia, and end reperfusion. Mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔΨ) was measured using a tetraphenylphosphonium electrode. Mitochondrial uncoupling was achieved by adding increasing concentrations of FCCP. Mitochondrial ROS production was measured by fluorometry using Amplex-Red. Pyridine dinucleotide levels were measured using HPLC. Before IR, increasing H(+) leak decreased mitochondrial ROS production. After IR, ROS production was not affected by increasing H(+) leak. H(+) leak increased at end ischemia in control mitochondria. IPC mitochondria showed no change in the rate of H(+) leak throughout IR. NADPH levels decreased after IR in both IPC and control mitochondria while NADH increased. Pharmacologically, increasing H(+) leak is not a method of decreasing ROS production after IR. Replenishing the NADPH pool may be a means of scavenging the excess ROS thereby attenuating oxidative damage after IR. PMID:25085966

  3. Glucocorticoids: Dose-related effects on osteoclast formation and function via reactive oxygen species and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Wang, Long; Zhang, Hongyang; Jie, Qiang; Li, Xiaojie; Shi, Qiyue; Huang, Qiang; Gao, Bo; Han, Yuehu; Guo, Kai; Liu, Jian; Yang, Liu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-10-01

    Whether glucocorticoids directly enhance or interrupt osteoclastogenesis is still a controversial subject. In this study, we ascertained the dose-dependent positive effects of glucocorticoids on osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro as well as investigated the mechanism in vitro. As the dose of glucocorticoids increased, osteoclastogenesis was stimulated at 0.1 μM, a peak was achieved at 1 μM and a corresponding decrease occurred at 10 μM. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a crucial role in osteoclastogenesis, and autophagy flux activity, a cellular recycling process, were consistently up-regulated along with the dose-dependent effects of the glucocorticoids on osteoclast formation and function. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, abrogated the effects of the glucocorticoids on autophagy and osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an autophagy inhibitor, interrupted osteoclastogenesis stimulation by the glucocorticoids. These results implied that with glucocorticoid administration, ROS and autophagy, as a downstream factor of ROS, played vital roles in osteoclast formation and function. 3-MA administration did not enhance ROS accumulation, so that autophagy had no effect on ROS induced by glucocorticoids. Our investigation demonstrated that glucocorticoids had dose-dependent positive effects on osteoclast formation and function via ROS and autophagy. These results provide support for ROS and autophagy as therapeutic targets in glucocorticoid-related bone loss diseases such as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. PMID:26115910

  4. Nutritional Countermeasures Targeting Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer: From Mechanisms to Biomarkers and Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Samoylenko, Anatoly; Hossain, Jubayer Al; Mennerich, Daniela; Kellokumpu, Sakari; Hiltunen, Jukka Kalervo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) exert various biological effects and contribute to signaling events during physiological and pathological processes. Enhanced levels of ROS are highly associated with different tumors, a Western lifestyle, and a nutritional regime. The supplementation of food with traditional antioxidants was shown to be protective against cancer in a number of studies both in vitro and in vivo. However, recent large-scale human trials in well-nourished populations did not confirm the beneficial role of antioxidants in cancer, whereas there is a well-established connection between longevity of several human populations and increased amount of antioxidants in their diets. Although our knowledge about ROS generators, ROS scavengers, and ROS signaling has improved, the knowledge about the direct link between nutrition, ROS levels, and cancer is limited. These limitations are partly due to lack of standardized reliable ROS measurement methods, easily usable biomarkers, knowledge of ROS action in cellular compartments, and individual genetic predispositions. The current review summarizes ROS formation due to nutrition with respect to macronutrients and antioxidant micronutrients in the context of cancer and discusses signaling mechanisms, used biomarkers, and its limitations along with large-scale human trials. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2157–2196. PMID:23458328

  5. Respiratory long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia requires reactive oxygen species formation

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, PM; Mitchell, GS

    2008-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) elicits a form of respiratory plasticity known as long-term facilitation (LTF). LTF is a progressive and sustained increase in respiratory motor output as expressed in phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in several forms of neuroplasticity, and ROS production is increased by intermittent hypoxia, we tested the hypothesis that ROS are necessary for phrenic and hypoglossal LTF following AIH. Urethane anesthetized, paralyzed, vagotomized and pump ventilated Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to AIH (11% O2, 3, 5 min episodes, 5 min intervals), and both phrenic and XII nerve activity were monitored for 60 min post-AIH. Although phrenic and XII LTF were observed in control rats, intravenous Manganese (III) tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin pentachloride (MnTMPyP), a superoxide anion scavenger, attenuated both phrenic and XII LTF in a dose dependent manner. Localized application of MnTMPyP (5.5mM; 10µl) to the intrathecal space of the cervical spinal cord (C4) abolished phrenic, but not XII LTF. Thus, ROS are necessary for AIH-induced respiratory LTF, and the relevant ROS appear to be localized near respiratory motor nuclei since cervical MnTMPyP injections impaired phrenic (and not XII) LTF. Phrenic LTF is a novel form of ROS-dependent neuroplasticity since its ROS-dependence resides in the spinal cord. PMID:18207649

  6. Targeting mitochondrial reactive oxygen species as novel therapy for inflammatory diseases and cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There are multiple sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell. As a major site of ROS production, mitochondria have drawn considerable interest because it was recently discovered that mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) directly stimulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines and pathological conditions as diverse as malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and cardiovascular diseases all share common phenotype of increased mtROS production above basal levels. Several excellent reviews on this topic have been published, but ever-changing new discoveries mandated a more up-to-date and comprehensive review on this topic. Therefore, we update recent understanding of how mitochondria generate and regulate the production of mtROS and the function of mtROS both in physiological and pathological conditions. In addition, we describe newly developed methods to probe or scavenge mtROS and compare these methods in detail. Thorough understanding of this topic and the application of mtROS-targeting drugs in the research is significant towards development of better therapies to combat inflammatory diseases and inflammatory malignancies. PMID:23442817

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinfeng; Song, Mengjia; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism play an important role as signaling messengers in immune system. ROS elevated in the tumor microenvironment are associated with tumor-induced immunosuppression. T cell-based therapy has been recently approved to be effective for cancer treatment. However, T cells often become dysfunctional after reaching the tumor site. It has been reported that ROS participate extensively in T cells activation, apoptosis, and hyporesponsiveness. The sensitivity of T cells to ROS varies among different subsets. ROS can be regulated by cytokines, amino acid metabolism, and enzymatic activity. Immunosuppressive cells accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and induce apoptosis and functional suppression of T cells by producing ROS. Thus, modulating the level of ROS may be important to prolong survival of T cells and enhance their antitumor function. Combining T cell-based therapy with antioxidant treatment such as administration of ROS scavenger should be considered as a promising strategy in cancer treatment, aiming to improve antitumor T cells immunity. PMID:27547291

  8. Antioxidant effects of antioxidant biofactor on reactive oxygen species in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of antioxidant biofactor (AOB) on reactive oxygen species (ROS). Generation of superoxide radical (O2•−) and hydroxyl radical (•OH) was determined using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method. AOB was added at different concentrations to these free radical generating systems. The generation of both O2•− and •OH was scavenged by the addition of AOB in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that AOB has strong antioxidant properties against these radicals. We further investigated the anti-oxidative effect of AOB on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). HGFs were treated for 3 h with α-MEM containing a combination of AOB and H2O2 (AOB + H2O2 group), containing H2O2 (H2O2 group), or containing AOB alone (AOB group). Non-stimulated HGFs were used as a control group. The number of surviving cells was in the order of the AOB group > control group > AOB + H2O2 group > H2O2 group. The level of expression of type I collagen mRNA and production of collagen were also in the order of the AOB group > control group > AOB + H2O2 group > H2O2 group. In conclusion, our results suggest that AOB may protect HGFs against oxidative stress by reducing stress-induced ROS. PMID:21562640

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinfeng; Song, Mengjia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism play an important role as signaling messengers in immune system. ROS elevated in the tumor microenvironment are associated with tumor-induced immunosuppression. T cell-based therapy has been recently approved to be effective for cancer treatment. However, T cells often become dysfunctional after reaching the tumor site. It has been reported that ROS participate extensively in T cells activation, apoptosis, and hyporesponsiveness. The sensitivity of T cells to ROS varies among different subsets. ROS can be regulated by cytokines, amino acid metabolism, and enzymatic activity. Immunosuppressive cells accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and induce apoptosis and functional suppression of T cells by producing ROS. Thus, modulating the level of ROS may be important to prolong survival of T cells and enhance their antitumor function. Combining T cell-based therapy with antioxidant treatment such as administration of ROS scavenger should be considered as a promising strategy in cancer treatment, aiming to improve antitumor T cells immunity. PMID:27547291

  10. C-phycocyanin protects against low fertility by inhibiting reactive oxygen species in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Jiao; Han, Zhe; Ge, Lei; Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Zhao, Yue-Fang; Wang, Dong-Hui; Ren, Jing; Niu, Xin-Xin; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Women over 35 have higher rates of infertility, largely due to deterioration of oocyte quality characterized by fragmentation, abnormal meiotic spindle-chromosome complexes, and oxidative stress. C-phycocyanin (PC) is a biliprotein enriched in Spirulina platensis that is known to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and radical-scavenging properties. D-galactose-induced aging acceleration in mice has been extensively used to study aging mechanisms and for pharmaceutical screening. In this study, adult female B6D2F/1 mice injected with D-galactose were used as a model to test the age-reversing effects of PC on degenerated reproductive ability. Our results show that PC can prevent oocyte fragmentation and aneuploidy by maintaining cytoskeletal integrity. Moreover, PC can reverse the expression of antioxidant genes, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and decrease methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content, and normalize mitochondria distribution. PC exerts its benefit by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which decreases apoptosis. Finally, we observe a significant increase in litter size after PC administration to D-galactose-induced aging mice. Our study demonstrates for the first time that D-galactose-induced impaired female reproductive capability can be partially rescued by the antioxidant effects of PC. PMID:27008700