Science.gov

Sample records for oxygen transport membranes

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-04-01

    This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  5. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-12-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  6. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report

  7. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  10. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2014-08-05

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  13. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  14. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  16. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; W.B. Yelon; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and initial studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. In addition, studies were also begun to obtain reliable estimates of fracture toughness and stable crack growth in specific environments. Newer composition of Ti doped LSF membranes were characterized by neutron diffraction analysis. Quench studies indicated an apparent correlation between the unit cell volume and oxygen occupancy. The studies however, indicated an anomaly of increasing Fe/Ti ratio with change in heat treatment. Ti doped LSF was also characterized for stoichiometry as a function of temp and pO{sub 2}. The non stoichiometry parameter {delta} was observed to increase almost linearly on lowering pO{sub 2} until a ideal stoichiometric composition of {delta} = 0.175 was approached.

  17. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2006-05-01

    In this quarter a systematic analysis on the decomposition behavior of the OTM membranes at air and nitrogen were initiated to understand the structural and stoichiometric changes associated with elevated temperatures. Evaluation of the flexural strengths using 4-point bend test was also started for the dual phase membranes. Initial results on the synthesis of dual phase composite materials have been obtained. The measurements have focused on the compatibility of mixed conductors with the pure ionic conductors yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinium doped ceria (GDC). The initial results obtained for three different mixed conductors suggest that (GDC) is the better choice. A new membrane permeation system has been designed and tested and sintering studies of biphasic systems are in progress.

  18. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  19. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped Ti-substituted perovskites, La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3}, with 0 {le} x {le} 0.20, were investigated by neutron diffraction, magnetization, electric resistivity, and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. All samples show a rhombohedral structure (space group R3C) from 10 K to room temperature. At room temperature, the cell parameters a, c and the unit cell volume increase with increasing Ti content. However, at 10 K, the cell parameter a has a maximum value for x = 0.10, and decreases for x > 0.10, while the unit cell volume remains nearly constant for x > 0.10. The average (Mn,Ti)-O bond length increases up to x = 0.15, and the (Mn,Ti)-O-(Mn,Ti) bond angle decreases with increasing Ti content to its minimum value at x = 0.15 at room temperature. Below the Curie temperature TC, the resistance exhibits metallic behavior for the x {le} 0.05 samples. A metal (semiconductor) to insulator transition is observed for the x {ge} 0.10 samples. A peak in resistivity appears below TC for all samples, and shifts to a lower temperature as x increases. The substitution of Mn by Ti decreases the 2p-3d hybridization between O and Mn ions, reduces the bandwidth W, and increases the electron-phonon coupling. Therefore, the TC shifts to a lower temperature and the resistivity increases with increasing Ti content. A field-induced shift of the resistivity maximum occurs at x {le} 0.10 compounds. The maximum MR effect is about 70% for La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}. The separation of TC and the resistivity maximum temperature T{sub {rho},max} enhances the MR effect in these compounds due to the weak coupling between the magnetic ordering and the resistivity as compared with La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}. The bulk densities of the membranes were determined using the

  20. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals.

  2. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  3. Transportation of Critically Ill Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Broman, L. Mikael; Frenckner, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may be a life-saving procedure for patients with severe reversible pulmonary or cardiac failure or for patients in need for a bridge to transplantation. ECMO is provided by specialized centers, but patients in need of ECMO are frequently taken care of at other centers. Conventional transports to an ECMO center can be hazardous and deaths have been described. For this reason, many ECMO centers have developed transport programs with mobile ECMO. After request, the mobile team including all necessary equipment to initiate ECMO is sent to the referring hospital, where the patient is cannulated and ECMO commenced. The patient is then transported on ECMO to the ECMO facility by road, helicopter, or fixed-wing aircraft depending on distance, weather conditions, etc. Eight publications have reported series of more than 50 transports on ECMO of which the largest included over 700. Together, these papers report on more than 1400 patient transports on ECMO. Two deaths during transport have occurred. A number of other adverse events are described, but without effect on patient outcome. Survival of patients transported on ECMO is equivalent to that of non-transported ECMO patients. It is concluded that long-, short-distance interhospital transports on ECMO can be performed safely. The staff should be experienced and highly competent in intensive care, ECMO cannulation, ECMO treatment, intensive care transport, and air transport medicine. PMID:27379221

  4. Transportation of Critically Ill Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Broman, L Mikael; Frenckner, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may be a life-saving procedure for patients with severe reversible pulmonary or cardiac failure or for patients in need for a bridge to transplantation. ECMO is provided by specialized centers, but patients in need of ECMO are frequently taken care of at other centers. Conventional transports to an ECMO center can be hazardous and deaths have been described. For this reason, many ECMO centers have developed transport programs with mobile ECMO. After request, the mobile team including all necessary equipment to initiate ECMO is sent to the referring hospital, where the patient is cannulated and ECMO commenced. The patient is then transported on ECMO to the ECMO facility by road, helicopter, or fixed-wing aircraft depending on distance, weather conditions, etc. Eight publications have reported series of more than 50 transports on ECMO of which the largest included over 700. Together, these papers report on more than 1400 patient transports on ECMO. Two deaths during transport have occurred. A number of other adverse events are described, but without effect on patient outcome. Survival of patients transported on ECMO is equivalent to that of non-transported ECMO patients. It is concluded that long-, short-distance interhospital transports on ECMO can be performed safely. The staff should be experienced and highly competent in intensive care, ECMO cannulation, ECMO treatment, intensive care transport, and air transport medicine. PMID:27379221

  5. Oxygen transport by oxygen potential gradient in dense ceramic oxide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in recent years on the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas: CO + H{sub 2}) with air as the oxidant. In partial oxidation, a mixed-oxide ceramic membrane selectively transports oxygen from the air; this transport is driven by the oxygen potential gradient. Of the several ceramic materials the authors have tested, a mixed oxide based on the Sr-Fe-Co-O system has been found to be very attractive. Extensive oxygen permeability data have been obtained for this material in methane conversion experiments carried out in a reactor. The data have been analyzed by a transport equation based on the phenomenological theory of diffusion under oxygen potential gradients. Thermodynamic calculations were used to estimate the driving force for the transport of oxygen ions. The results show that the transport equation deduced from the literature describes the permeability data reasonably well and can be used to determine the diffusion coefficients and the associated activation energy of oxygen ions in the ceramic membrane material.

  6. Oxygen Transport Across Space-Filling Biological Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chen

    2005-03-01

    Space-filling fractal surfaces play a fundamental role in how organisms function and in how structure determines function at various levels. In this project we developed an efficient and powerful algorithm, rope-walk algorithm, for solving diffusion equations of transport of species across the space-filling fractal surface. We performed analytic computations of the oxygen current across the alveolar membranes in the lung, as a function of diffusion coefficient and membrane permeability, using the rope-walk algorithm, without adjustable parameters. The analytic calculation identifies the four cases as sharply delineated screening regimes and finds that the lung operates in the partial-screening regime, close to the transition to no screening, and in the no-screening regime, for respiration at rest and in exercise respectively. The gas exchange satisfies six criteria of optimal design: maximum current; minimum waste of surface area; minimum permeability; maximum fault tolerance; minimum waiting time and maximum current increase when going from rest to exercise. This extraordinary, multiply optimized performance is a direct consequence of the space-filling membrane architecture.

  7. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  8. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  9. Membrane Transport of Singlet Oxygen Monitored by Dipole Potential Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Valerij S.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The efficiency of photodynamic reactions depends on 1), the penetration depth of the photosensitizer into the membrane and 2), the sidedness of the target. Molecules which are susceptible to singlet oxygen (1O2) experience less damage when separated from the photosensitizer by the membrane. Since 1O2 lifetime in the membrane environment is orders of magnitude longer than the time required for nonexcited oxygen (O2) to cross the membrane, this observation suggests that differences between the permeabilities or membrane partition of 1O2 and O2 exist. We investigated this hypothesis by releasing 1O2 at one side of a planar membrane while monitoring the kinetics of target damage at the opposite side of the same membrane. Damage to the target, represented by dipole-modifying molecules (phloretin or phlorizin), was indicated by changes in the interleaflet dipole potential difference Δϕb. A simple analytical model allowed estimation of the 1O2 interleaflet concentration difference from the rate at which Δϕb changed. It confirmed that the lower limit of 1O2 permeability is ∼2 cm/s; i.e., it roughly matches O2 permeability as predicted by Overton's rule. Consequently, the membrane cannot act as a barrier to 1O2 diffusion. Differences in the reaction rates at the cytoplasmic and extracellular membrane leaflets may be attributed only to 1O2 quenchers inside the membrane. PMID:18931253

  10. Impact of microstructure on oxygen semi-permeation performance of perovskite membranes: Understanding of oxygen transport mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmann, M.; Geffroy, P.-M.; Richet, N.; Chartier, T.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of dense membrane microstructures on semi permeation performance is still not well understood, and no consensus or explanation can be established from the literature. The apparent discrepancy is likely due to a poor understanding of the oxygen transport mechanisms through the membrane and, specifically, to the impact of the microstructure on the oxygen surface exchange kinetics. The aim of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the impact of microstructures on oxygen transport mechanisms through the membrane. Two reference materials, Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe0.7Co0.3O3 (BSFCo) and La0.5Sr0.5Fe0.7Ga0.3O3 (LSFG) perovskites, are considered to explain the discrepancies observed in the literature.

  11. Enhancing oxygen transport through Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony S.

    Ceramic membranes based on Mixed-Ionic-and-Electronic-Conducting (MIEC) oxides are capable of separating oxygen from air in the presence of an oxygen partial-pressure gradient. These MIEC membranes show great promise for oxygen consuming industrial processes, such as the production of syngas from steam reforming of natural gas (SRM), as well as for electricity generation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). For both applications, the overall performance is dictated by the rate of oxygen transport across the membrane. Oxygen transport across MIEC membranes is composed of a bulk oxygen-ion diffusion process and surface processes, such as surface reactions and adsorption/desorption of gaseous reactants/products. The main goal of this thesis was to determine which process is rate-limiting in order to significantly enhance the overall rate of oxygen transport in MIEC membrane systems. The rate-limiting step was determined by evaluating the total resistance to oxygen transfer, Rtot. Rtot is the sum of a bulk diffusion resistance in the membrane itself, Rb, and interfacial loss components, Rs. Rb is a function of the membrane's ionic conductivity and thickness, while Rs arises primarily from slow surface-exchange kinetics that cause the P(O2) at the surfaces of the membrane to differ from the P(O 2) in the adjacent gas phases. Rtot can be calculated from the Nernst potential across the membrane and the measured oxygen flux. The rate-limiting process can be determined by evaluating the relative contributions of the various losses, Rs and Rb, to Rtot. Using this method, this thesis demonstrates that for most membrane systems, Rs is the dominating factor. In the development of membrane systems with high oxygen transport rates, thin membranes with high ionic conductivities are required to achieve fast bulk oxygen-ion diffusion. However, as membrane thickness is decreased, surface reaction kinetics become more important in determining the overall transport rate. The two

  12. The effect of mechanical twisting on oxygen ionic transport in solid-state energy conversion membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanuo; Bork, Alexander Hansen; Schweiger, Sebastian; Rupp, Jennifer Lilia Marguerite

    2015-07-01

    Understanding `electro-chemo-mechanics’ in oxygen ion conducting membranes represents a foundational step towards new energy devices such as micro fuel cells and oxygen or fuel separation membranes. For ionic transport in macro crystalline electrolytes, doping is conventionally used to affect oxygen ionic association/migration energies. Recently, tuning ionic transport in films through lattice strain conveyed by substrates or heterostructures has generated much interest. However, reliable manipulation of strain states to twist the ionic conduction in real micro energy devices remains intractable. Here, we demonstrate that the oxygen ionic conductivity clearly correlates with the compressive strain energy acting on the near order of the electrolyte lattices by comparing thin-film ceria-based membrane devices against substrate-supported flat structures. It is possible to capitalize on this phenomenon with a smart choice of strain patterns achieved through microelectrode design. We highlight the importance of electro-chemo-mechanics in the electrolyte material for the next generation of solid-state energy conversion microdevices.

  13. Unprecedented Perovskite Oxyfluoride Membranes with High-Efficiency Oxygen Ion Transport Paths for Low-Temperature Oxygen Permeation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiawei; Liu, Gongping; Liu, Zhengkun; Chu, Zhenyu; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping

    2016-05-01

    Unprecedented perovskite oxyfluoride membranes, a new generation of mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes, feature extraordinary performance for low-temperature oxygen permeation, which transcend the performance of state-of-the-art MIEC membranes and fulfil commercial requirements. These results provide important progress for MIEC membranes and will potentially open the door to exploring high-performance MIEC compounds. PMID:26970399

  14. Membrane transporters mediating root signalling and adaptive responses to oxygen deprivation and soil flooding.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Sergey; Shabala, Lana; Barcelo, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    This review provides a comprehensive assessment of a previously unexplored topic: elucidating the role that plasma- and organelle-based membrane transporters play in plant-adaptive responses to flooding. We show that energy availability and metabolic shifts under hypoxia and anoxia are critical in regulating membrane-transport activity. We illustrate the high tissue and time dependence of this regulation, reveal the molecular identity of transporters involved and discuss the modes of their regulation. We show that both reduced oxygen availability and accumulation of transition metals in flooded roots result in a reduction in the cytosolic K(+) pool, ultimately determining the cell's fate and transition to programmed cell death (PCD). This process can be strongly affected by hypoxia-induced changes in the amino acid pool profile and, specifically, ϒ-amino butyric acid (GABA) accumulation. It is suggested that GABA plays an important regulatory role, allowing plants to proceed with H2 O2 signalling to activate a cascade of genes that mediate plant adaptation to flooding while at the same time, preventing the cell from entering a 'suicide program'. We conclude that progress in crop breeding for flooding tolerance can only be achieved by pyramiding the numerous physiological traits that confer efficient energy maintenance, cytosolic ion homeostasis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) control and detoxification. PMID:24689809

  15. Pediatric Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Transport by EC-145 With a Custom-Built Sled.

    PubMed

    Holt, Philip L; Hodge, Ashley B; Ratliff, Todd; Frazier, W Joshua; Ohnesorge, David; Gee, Samantha W

    2016-01-01

    Indications for the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in pediatrics has expanded beyond the initial historic treatment of neonates with respiratory failure. Patients with severe refractory cardiopulmonary failure may benefit from ECMO support until the primary insult has subsided or been treated. More recently, ECMO has been used by some centers as a bridge to transplant for irreversible organ failure. Nationwide Children's Hospital is a referral center that supports the use of ECMO as a bridge to transplant and is able to provide transport services for ECMO patients referred for transplant evaluation. In this report, we describe our design of a unique, custom-built sled designed specifically for the EC-145 helicopter to transport pediatric ECMO patients to our institution. This report is the first, to our knowledge, to describe the safe and successful transport of a pediatric ECMO patient in an EC-145 helicopter. PMID:27255881

  16. Influence of temperature on oxygen permeation through ion transport membrane to feed a biomass gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, T.; Foscolo, P. U.; Gallucci, K.; Stendardo, S.

    2015-11-01

    Oxygen-permeable perovskite membranes with mixed ionic-electronic conducting properties can play an important role in the high temperature separation of oxygen from air. A detailed design of a membrane test module is presented, useful to test mechanical resistance and structural stability of Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) capillary membrane in the reactor environment. Preliminary experimental results of membrane permeation tests highlight the positive effect of temperature on perovskite materials. This behaviour is also confirmed by a computational model of char combustion with oxygen permeated through the membrane module, when it is placed inside a gasifier reactor to provide the necessary input of heat to the gasification endothermic process. The results show that the temperature affects the oxygen permeation of the BSCF membrane remarkably.

  17. ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

    2003-06-10

    Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

  18. On the effect of serum on the transport of reactive oxygen species across phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Szili, Endre J; Hong, Sung-Ha; Short, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The transport of plasma generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) across a simple phospholipid membrane mimic of a (real) cell was investigated. Experiments were performed in cell culture media (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, DMEM), with and without 10% serum. A (broad spectrum) ROS reporter dye, 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH), was used to detect the generation of ROS by a helium (He) plasma jet in DMEM using free DCFH and with DCFH encapsulated inside phospholipid membrane vesicles dispersed in DMEM. The authors focus on the concentration and on the relative rates (arbitrary units) for oxidation of DCFH [or the appearance of the oxidized product 2,7-dichlorofluorescein (DCF)] both in solution and within vesicles. In the first 1 h following plasma exposure, the concentration of free DCF in DMEM was ~15× greater in the presence of serum (cf. to the serum-free DMEM control). The DCF in vesicles was ~2× greater in DMEM containing serum compared to the serum-free DMEM control. These data show that serum enhances plasma ROS generation in DMEM. As expected, the role of the phospholipid membrane was to reduce the rate of oxidation of the encapsulated DCFH (with and without serum). And the efficiency of ROS transport into vesicles was lower in DMEM containing serum (at 4% efficiency) when compared to serum-free DMEM (at 32% efficiency). After 1 h, the rate of DCFH oxidation was found to have significantly reduced. Based upon a synthesis of these data with results from the open literature, the authors speculate on how the components of biological fluid and cellular membranes might affect the kinetics of consumption of plasma generated ROS. PMID:25910641

  19. Deposition of Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (LSCF) Using Suspension Plasma Spraying for Oxygen Transport Membrane Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, E. S. C.; Kesler, O.

    2015-08-01

    Suspension plasma spray deposition was utilized to fabricate dense lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) on porous metal substrates for mechanical support. The as-sprayed membranes had negligible and/or reversible material decomposition. At the longer stand-off distance (80 mm), smooth and dense membranes could be manufactured using a plasma with power below approximately 81 kW. Moreover, a membrane of 55 μm was observed to have very low gas leakage rates desirable for OSM applications. This thickness could potentially be decreased further to improve oxygen diffusion by using metal substrates with finer surface pores.

  20. First experience with the ultra compact mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system Cardiohelp in interhospital transport.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Alois; Arlt, Matthias; Amann, Matthias; Lunz, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Graf, Bernhard; Schmid, Christof

    2011-06-01

    In patients with severe cardiopulmonary failure extracorporeal assist devices are to support patients during resuscitation, for transportation, until organ recovery, and as bridge to further therapeutic modalities. We report on our first experience with the new Cardiohelp system for interhospital transfer of cardiopulmonarily compromised patients. The Cardiohelp system was used for transportation and in-house treatment in six male patients with a mean age of 41±17 years. Five patients suffered respiratory failure; one patient with acute myocardial infarction was in profound cardiogenic shock. Accordingly, the Cardiohelp system was implanted as a venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in five patients and as a venoarterial system in one patient. The preECMO ventilation time was 0.5-4 days. The patients were transported to our institution by car (n=1) or helicopter (n=5) over a distance of 80-5850 km. The subsequent in-house ECMO support was continued with the Cardiohelp and lasted for 5-13 days. PostECMO ventilation was one to 25 days. A 100% survival was achieved. The portable Cardiohelp system allows location-independent stabilization of cardiopulmonary compromised patients with consecutive interhospital transfer and in-house treatment. The integrated sensors, which register arterial and venous line pressure, blood temperature, hemoglobin as well as SvO(2), greatly alleviate its management and considerably increase safety. PMID:21388980

  1. Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E.; Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M.

    2001-11-06

    Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can

  2. A potentiostatic study of oxygen transport through poly(2-ethoxyethyl methacrylate-co-2,3-dihydroxypropylmethacrylate) hydrogel membranes.

    PubMed

    Compañ, Vicente; Tiemblo, Pilar; García, F; García, J M; Guzmán, Julio; Riande, Evaristo

    2005-06-01

    The oxygen permeability and diffusion coefficients of hydrogel membranes prepared with copolymers of 2-ethoxyethyl methacrylate (EEMA)/2,3-dihydroxypropylmethacrylate (MAG) with mole fraction of the second monomer in the range between 0 and 0.75 are described. Values of the permeability and diffusion coefficients of oxygen are determined by using electrochemical procedures involving the measurement of the steady-state current in membranes prepared by radical polymerization of the monomers. The results obtained for the transport properties were analyzed taking into account the fractional free volumes, the cohesive energy densities and the glass transition temperatures of the hydrogels. PMID:15626426

  3. Scaling laws for oxygen transport across the space-filling system of respiratory membranes in the human lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chen

    Space-filling fractal surfaces play a fundamental role in how organisms function at various levels and in how structure determines function at different levels. In this thesis, we develop a quantitative theory of oxygen transport to and across the surface of the highly branched, space-filling system of alveoli, the fundamental gas exchange unit (acinar airways), in the human lung. Oxygen transport in the acinar airways is by diffusion, and we treat the two steps---diffusion through the branched airways, and transfer across the alveolar membranes---as a stationary diffusion-reaction problem, taking into account that there may be steep concentration gradients between the entrance and remote alveoli (screening). We develop a renormalization treatment of this screening effect and derive an analytic formula for the oxygen current across the cumulative alveolar membrane surface, modeled as a fractal, space-filling surface. The formula predicts the current from a minimum of morphological data of the acinus and appropriate values of the transport parameters, through a number of power laws (scaling laws). We find that the lung at rest operates near the borderline between partial screening and no screening; that it switches to no screening under exercise; and that the computed currents agree with measured values within experimental uncertainties. From an analysis of the computed current as a function of membrane permeability, we find that the space-filling structure of the gas exchanger is simultaneously optimal with respect to five criteria. The exchanger (i) generates a maximum oxygen current at minimum permeability; (ii) 'wastes' a minimum of surface area; (iii) maintains a minimum residence time of oxygen in the acinar airways; (iv) has a maximum fault tolerance to loss of permeability; and (v) generates a maximum current increase when switching from rest to exercise.

  4. Dual-Phase Oxygen Transport Membranes for Stable Operation in Environments Containing Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fayos, Julio; Balaguer, María; Serra, José M

    2015-12-21

    Dual-phase membranes are appealing candidates for oxygen transport membranes owing to their unique combination of ambipolar electron-ion transport and endurance. However, O2 separation in industrial environments demands very high stability and effectiveness in the presence of CO2- and SO2-bearing process gases. Here, the composition of dual-phase membranes based on NiFe2O4-Ce(0.8) Tb(0.2)O(2-δ) (NFO-CTO) was optimized and the effective performance of catalytically-activated membranes was assessed in presence of CO2 and SO2. Further insight into the limiting mechanisms in the permeation was gained through electrical conductivity studies, permeation testing in several conditions and impedance spectroscopy analysis. The dual-phase membranes were prepared by one-pot sol-gel method and their permeability increases with increasing fluorite content. An O2 flux of 0.25 (ml min(-1)  cm(-2)) mm at 1000 °C was obtained for a thick self-standing membrane with 40:60 NFO/CTO composition. An in-depth study mimicking typical harsh conditions encountered in oxyfuel flue gases was performed on a 50:50 NFO/CTO membrane. CO2 content as well as SO2 presence in the sweep gas stream were evaluated in terms of O2 permeation. O2 fluxes of 0.13 and 0.09 mL min(-1)  cm(-2) at 850 °C were obtained for a 0.59 mm thick membrane under CO2 and 250 ppm SO2 in CO2 sweep conditions, respectively. Extended periods at work under CO2- and SO2-containing atmospheres revealed good permeation stability over time. Additionally, XRD, backscattered electrons detector (BSD)-SEM, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the spent membrane confirmed material stability upon prolonged exposure to SO2. PMID:26586419

  5. Membrane Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective movement and redistribution of ions and small organic molecules is essential for plant growth and cellular homeostasis. Because of this, plants have evolved numerous proteins that facilitate the transport of minerals, sugars, metabolites, and other compounds through the limiting membra...

  6. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  7. Oxygen dynamics in photosynthetic membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Kihara, Shigeharu

    2008-03-01

    Production of oxygen by oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is expected to raise oxygen concentration within their photosynthetic membranes above normal aerobic values. These raised levels of oxygen may affect function of many proteins within photosynthetic cells. However, experiments on proteins in vitro are usually performed in aerobic (or anaerobic) conditions since the oxygen content of a membrane is not known. Using theory of diffusion and measured oxygen production rates we estimated the excess levels of oxygen in functioning photosynthetic cells. We show that for an individual photosynthetic cell suspended in water oxygen level is essentially the same as that for a non-photosynthetic sell. These data suggest that oxygen protection mechanisms may have evolved after the development of oxygenic photosynthesis in primitive bacteria and was driven by the overall rise of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere. Substantially higher levels of oxygen are estimated to occur in closely packed colonies of photosynthetic bacteria and in green leafs.

  8. The Role of Oxygen Partial Pressure in Controlling the Phase Composition of La1- x Sr x Co y Fe1- y O3- δ Oxygen Transport Membranes Manufactured by Means of Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcano, D.; Mauer, G.; Sohn, Y. J.; Vaßen, R.; Garcia-Fayos, J.; Serra, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    La0.58Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 - δ (LSCF) deposited on a metallic porous support by plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a promising candidate for oxygen-permeation membranes. Ionic transport properties are regarded to depend on the fraction of perovskite phase present in the membrane. However, during processing, the LSCF powder decomposes into perovskite and secondary phases. In order to improve the ionic transport properties of the membranes, spraying was carried out at different oxygen partial pressures p(O2). It was found that coatings deposited at lower and higher oxygen partial pressures consist of 70% cubic/26% rhombohedral and 61% cubic/35% rhombohedral perovskite phases, respectively. During annealing, the formation of non-perovskite phases is driven by oxygen non-stoichiometry. The amount of oxygen added during spraying can be used to increase the perovskite phase fraction and suppress the formation of non-perovskite phases.

  9. Atomic transport of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Tomlins, G.W.

    1994-06-15

    Atomic transport of oxygen in nonstoichiometric oxides is an extremely important topic which overlaps science and technology. In many cases the diffusion of oxygen controls sintering, grain growth, and creep. High oxygen diffusivity is critical for efficient operation of many fuel cells. Additionally, oxygen diffusivities are an essential ingredient in any point defect model. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the most accurate modern technique to measure oxygen tracer diffusion. This paper briefly reviews the principles and applications of SIMS for the measurement of oxygen transport. Case studies are taken from recent work on ZnO and some high-temperature superconductors.

  10. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Stephen B.; McMullan, D. Michael; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit is made of a number of components that have been customized to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery in patients with severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure for a prolonged period of time (days to weeks). A standard ECMO circuit consists of a mechanical blood pump, gas exchange device, and a heat exchanger all connected together with circuit tubing. ECMO circuits can vary from simple to complex and may include a variety of blood flow and pressure monitors, continuous oxyhemoglobin saturation monitors, circuit access sites and a bridge connecting the venous access and arterial infusion limbs of the circuit. Significant technical advancements have been made in the equipment available for short and long term ECMO applications. Contemporary ECMO circuits have greater biocompatibility and allow for more prolonged cardiopulmonary support time, while minimizing the procedure-related complications of bleeding, thrombosis and other physiologic derangements that were so common with the early application of ECMO. Modern era ECMO circuitry and components are simpler, safer, more compact and can be used across a wide variety of patient sizes from neonates to adults. PMID:23735989

  11. A Highly Efficient Sandwich-Like Symmetrical Dual-Phase Oxygen-Transporting Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production by Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Steinbach, Frank; Cao, Zhongwei; Zhu, Xuefeng; Feldhoff, Armin

    2016-07-18

    Water splitting coupled with partial oxidation of methane (POM) using an oxygen-transporting membrane (OTM) would be a potentially ideal way to produce high-purity hydrogen as well as syngas. Over the past decades, substantial efforts have been devoted to the development of supported membranes with appropriate configurations to achieve considerable performance improvements. Herein, we describe the design of a novel symmetrical membrane reactor with a sandwich-like structure, whereby a largescale production (>10 mL min(-1)  cm(-2) ) of hydrogen and syngas can be obtained simultaneously on opposite sides of the OTM. Furthermore, this special membrane reactor could regenerate the coke-deactivated catalyst in situ by water steam in a single unit. These results represent an important first step in the development of membrane separation technologies for the integration of multiple chemical processes. PMID:27244216

  12. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  13. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  14. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  17. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  18. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  19. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  20. Decoupling of the processes of molecular oxygen synthesis and electron transport in Ca2+-depleted PSII membranes.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B; Seibert, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Extraction of Ca(2+) from the O(2)-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) membranes with 2 M NaCl in the light (PSII(-Ca/NaCl)) results in 90% inhibition of the O(2)-evolution reaction. However, electron transfer from the donor to acceptor side of PSII, measured as the reduction of the exogenous acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP) under continuous light, is inhibited by only 30%. Thus, calcium extraction from the OEC inhibits the synthesis of molecular O(2) but not the oxidation of a substrate we term X, the source of electrons for DCIP reduction. The presence of electron transfer across PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was demonstrated using fluorescence induction kinetics, a method that does not require an artificial acceptor. The calcium chelator, EGTA (5 mM), when added to PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes, does not affect the inhibition of O(2) evolution by NaCl but does inhibit DCIP reduction up to 92% (the reason why electron transport in Ca(2+)-depleted materials has not been noticed before). Another chelator, sodium citrate (citrate/low pH method of calcium extraction), also inhibits both O(2) evolution and DCIP reduction. The role of all buffer components (including bicarbonate and sucrose) as possible sources of electrons for PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was investigated, but only the absence of chloride anions strongly inhibited the rate of DCIP reduction. Substitution of other anions for chloride indicates that Cl(-) serves its well-known role as an OEC cofactor, but it is not substrate X. Multiple turnover flash experiments have shown a period of four oscillations of the fluorescence yield (both the maximum level, F(max), and the fluorescence level measured 50 s after an actinic flash in the presence of DCMU) in native PSII membranes, reflecting the normal function of the OEC, but the absence of oscillations in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples. Thus, PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples do not evolve O(2) but do transfer electrons from the donor to acceptor sides and exhibit a

  1. Decoupling of the Processes of Molecular Oxygen Synthesis and Electron Transport in Ca2+-Depleted PSII Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Davletshina, L. N.; Ivanov, I. I.; Rubin, A. B.; Seibert, M.

    2008-10-01

    Extraction of Ca{sup 2+} from the O{sub 2}-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) membranes with 2 M NaCl in the light (PSII(-Ca/NaCl)) results in 90% inhibition of the O{sub 2}-evolution reaction. However, electron transfer from the donor to acceptor side of PSII, measured as the reduction of the exogenous acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP) under continuous light, is inhibited by only 30%. Thus, calcium extraction from the OEC inhibits the synthesis of molecular O{sub 2} but not the oxidation of a substrate we term X, the source of electrons for DCIP reduction. The presence of electron transfer across PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was demonstrated using fluorescence induction kinetics, a method that does not require an artificial acceptor. The calcium chelator, EGTA (5 mM), when added to PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes, does not affect the inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution by NaCl but does inhibit DCIP reduction up to 92% (the reason why electron transport in Ca{sup 2+}-depleted materials has not been noticed before). Another chelator, sodium citrate (citrate/low pH method of calcium extraction), also inhibits both O{sub 2} evolution and DCIP reduction. The role of all buffer components (including bicarbonate and sucrose) as possible sources of electrons for PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes was investigated, but only the absence of chloride anions strongly inhibited the rate of DCIP reduction. Substitution of other anions for chloride indicates that Cl{sup -} serves its well-known role as an OEC cofactor, but it is not substrate X. Multiple turnover flash experiments have shown a period of four oscillations of the fluorescence yield (both the maximum level, F{sub max}, and the fluorescence level measured 50 s after an actinic flash in the presence of DCMU) in native PSII membranes, reflecting the normal function of the OEC, but the absence of oscillations in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples. Thus, PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples do not evolve O{sub 2} but do transfer electrons from

  2. Oxygen transport resistance at gas diffusion layer - Air channel interface with film flow of water in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Mustafa; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2016-01-01

    Water present as films on the gas diffusion layer-air channel interface in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) alters the oxygen transport resistance, which is expressed through Sherwood number (Sh). The effect of multiple films along the flow length on Sh is investigated through 3D and stationary simulations. The effects of air Péclet number, non-dimensional film width, length, and spacing are studied. Using the simulation results, non-dimensional correlations are developed for local Sh within a mean absolute percentage error of 9%. These correlations can be used for simulating PEMFC performance over temperature and relative humidity ranges of 20-80 °C and 0-100%, respectively. Sh on the film side can be up to 31% lower than that for a dry channel, while a film may reduce the interfacial width by up to 39%. The corresponding increase in transport resistance results in lowering the voltage by 5 and 8 mV respectively at a current density of 1.5 A cm-2. However, their combined effect leads to a voltage loss of 20 mV due to this additional mass transport resistance. It is therefore important to incorporate the additional resistance introduced by the films while modeling fuel cell performance.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF REACTION-DRIVEN IONIC TRANSPORT MEMBRANES (ITMs) TECHNOLOGY: PHASE IV/BUDGET PERIOD 6 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems”

    SciTech Connect

    David, Studer

    2012-03-01

    Air Products and Chemicals, along with development participants and in association with the U.S. Department of Energy, has made substantial progress in developing a novel air separation technology. Unlike conventional cryogenic processes, this method uses high-temperature ceramic membranes to produce high-purity oxygen. The membranes selectively transport oxygen ions with high flux and infinite theoretical selectivity. Reaction-driven ceramic membranes are fabricated from non-porous, multi-component metallic oxides, operate at temperatures typically over 700°C, and have exceptionally high oxygen flux and selectivity. Oxygen from low-pressure air permeates as oxygen ions through the ceramic membrane and is consumed through chemical reactions, thus creating a chemical driving force that pulls oxygen ions across the membrane at high rates. The oxygen reacts with a hydrocarbon fuel in a partial oxidation process to produce a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture – synthesis gas. This project expands the partial-oxidation scope of ITM technology beyond natural gas feed and investigates the potential for ITM reaction-driven technology to be used in conjunction with gasification and pyrolysis technologies to provide more economical routes for producing hydrogen and synthesis gas. This report presents an overview of the ITM reaction-driven development effort, including ceramic materials development, fabrication and testing of small-scale ceramic modules, ceramic modeling, and the investigation of gasifier integration schemes

  4. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The activities during the fourth semi-annual period of the MTP project have involved the completion of the Science Concept Review (SCR) presentation and peer review, continuation of analyses for the mass transfer coefficients measured from MTA experiment data, and development of the second generation (MTP-II) instrument. The SCR panel members were generated several recommendations for the MTP project recommendations are : Table 1 Summary of Primary SCR Panel Recommendations (1) Continue and refine development of mass transfer coefficient analyses (2) Refine and upgrade analytical modeling associated with the MTP experiment. (3) Increase resolution of measurements in proximity of the membrane interface. (4) Shift emphasis to measurement of coupled transport effects (i.e., development of MTP phase II experiment concept).

  5. Dense ceramic membranes for partial oxygenation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Sweeney, S.M.; Mieville, R.L.; Maiya, P.S.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Pei, S.; Kobylinski, T.P.; Bose, A.C.

    1994-05-01

    The most significant cost associated with partial oxidation of methane to syngas is that of the oxygen plant. In this paper, the authors offer a technology that is based on dense ceramic membranes and that uses air as the oxidant for methane-conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required and if the driving potential of transport is sufficient, the partial oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen anions, not oxygen molecules. In principle, the dense ceramic materials can be shaped into a hollow-tube reactor, with air passed over the outside of the membrane and methane through the inside. The membrane is permeable to oxygen at high temperatures, but not to nitrogen or any other gas. Long tubes of La-Sr-Fe-Co-O (SFC) membrane were fabricated by plastic extrusion, and thermal stability of the tubes was studied as a function of oxygen partial pressure by high-temperature XRD. Mechanical properties were measured and found to be acceptable for a reactor material. Fracture of certain SFC tubes was the consequence of an oxygen gradient that introduced a volumetric lattice difference between the inner and outer walls. However, tubes made with a particular stoichiometry (SFC-2) provided methane conversion efficiencies of >99% in a reactor. Some of the reactor tubes have operated for up to {approx} 1,000 h.

  6. Oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Picciolo, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    Mixed-conducting oxides have a wide range of applications, including fuel cells, gas separation systems, sensors, and electrocatalytic equipment. Dense ceramic membranes made of mixed-conducting oxides are particularly attractive for gas separation and methane conversion processes. Membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, i.e., CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have fabricated tubular Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes and tested them (some for more than 1,000 h) in a methane conversion reactor that was operating at 850--950 C. An oxygen permeation flux of {approx} 10 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained at 900 C in a tubular membrane with a wall thickness of 0.75 mm. Using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors have also measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of flat Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure(pO{sub 2}). Steady-state oxygen permeability increases with increasing temperature and with the difference in pO{sub 2} on the two sides of the membrane. At 900 C, an oxygen permeability of {approx} 2.5 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained in a 2.9-mm-thick membrane. This value agrees with that obtained in methane conversion reactor experiments. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics determined in the gas-tight cell indicate that bulk effect, rather than surface exchange effect, is the main limiting factor for oxygen permeation of {approx} 1-mm-thick Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes at elevated temperatures (> 650 C).

  7. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  8. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1996-01-01

    The development of the seal between the membrane and the Fluid Optical Cells (FOC) has been a high priority activity. This seal occurs at an interface in the instrument where three key functions must be realized: (1) physical membrane support, (2) fluid sealing, and (3) unobscured optical transmission.

  9. [Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for critically ill adults].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Kunihiko; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy (ECMO) is an artificial life support for severe respiratory and/or cardiac failure, and refractory cardiac arrest. It consists of a hollow-fiber membrane that oxygenates the blood and removes carbon dioxide and a centrifugal pump that drain blood from central venous circulation, pump through membrane, and return to the patients. Veno-venous ECMO provides gas change in hemodynamically stable patients with respiratory failure. Veno-arterial ECMO offers hemodynamic support in addition to gas change for cardiac failure or refractory cardiac arrest. We describe the physiological principles and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECMO in critically ill adult patients. PMID:26915254

  10. Membrane transport of antineoplastic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, I.D. )

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Methods for Quantifying the Transport of Drugs Across Brain Barrier Systems; Liposomes as Drug Carriers in Cancer Chemotherapy; Genetic and Bioochemical Characterization of Multidrug Resistance; Membrane Transport of Anthracyclines; and The Cellular Pharmacology of Methotrexate.

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for hydrocarbon aspiration.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, A J; Weber, T R; Jaeger, R W; Connors, R H; Thompson, M W

    1990-08-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is a pulmonary bypass procedure that has been employed in adults to provide temporary treatment for reversible acute pulmonary and cardiac insufficiency. The technology of membrane oxygenation has been used since 1977 in neonates with predictably fatal pulmonary failure due to respiratory distress syndrome, persistent fetal circulation or persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, meconium aspiration syndrome, and congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in older children with other pulmonary disorders has been limited. We report two cases of hydrocarbon aspiration involving petroleum-based products, both successfully treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A 15-month-old male infant who aspirated baby oil (light mineral oil) is particularly unusual owing to the generally expected low risk of aspiration with a hydrocarbon of such viscosity (greater than 60 Saybolt Universal Seconds). The second patient is a 16-month-old male infant who aspirated furniture polish (mineral seal oil). In both children severe intractable hypoxemia developed despite intensive ventilatory support, and they became candidates for alternative therapy. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation provides a potentially life-saving option when a patient fails to respond to conventional therapy for hydrocarbon aspiration. PMID:2378332

  12. Circuit oxygenator contributes to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Duane C; Turi, Jennifer L; Hornik, Christoph P; Bonadonna, Desiree K; Williford, Walter L; Walczak, Richard J; Watt, Kevin M; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2015-01-01

    Hemolysis can occur as a consequence of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Shear stress generated by flow through the circuit and oxygenator is believed to cause ECMO-induced hemolysis. We hypothesize that either a smaller dimension oxygenator or an in-line hemofilter will increase ECMO-associated hemolysis. Circuits were configured with a Quadrox-D Adult oxygenator (surface area 1.8 m), Quadrox-iD Pediatric oxygenator (surface area 0.8 m), or Quadrox-D Adult oxygenator with an in-line hemofilter (N = 4) and ran for 6 hours. Samples were collected hourly from the ECMO circuit and a time-based hemolysis control. Plasma hemoglobin levels were assayed. Circuit-induced hemolysis at each time point was defined as the change in plasma hemoglobin standardized to the time-based hemolysis control. Plasma hemoglobin increased with the use of the smaller dimension pediatric oxygenator as compared with the adult oxygenator when controlling for ECMO run time (p = 0.02). Furthermore, there was a greater pressure gradient with the smaller dimension pediatric oxygenator (p < 0.05). Plasma hemoglobin did not change with the addition of the in-line hemofilter. The use of a smaller dimension pediatric oxygenator resulted in greater hemolysis and a higher pressure gradient. This may indicate that the increased shear forces augment ECMO-induced hemolysis. PMID:25419829

  13. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Besecker, Charles J.; Chen, Hancun; Robinson, Earil T.

    2007-06-12

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  14. Neurodevelopmental outcome after neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, C M; Finer, N N; Sauve, R S; Whitfield, M F; Belgaumkar, T K; Synnes, A R; Grace, M G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the neurodevelopmental outcome of neonates who underwent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO group) and similarly critically ill newborns with a lower Oxygenation Index who underwent conventional treatment (comparison group), and to determine whether factors such as the underlying diagnosis and the distance transported from outlying areas affect outcome. DESIGN: Multicentre prospective longitudinal comparative outcome study. SETTING: An ECMO centre providing services to all of western Canada and four tertiary care neonatal follow-up clinics. SUBJECTS: All neonates who received treatment between February 1989 and January 1992 at the Western Canadian Regional ECMO Center and who were alive at 2 years of age; 38 (95%) of the 40 surviving ECMO-treated subjects and 26 (87%) of the 30 surviving comparison subjects were available for follow-up. INTERVENTIONS: ECMO or conventional therapy for respiratory failure. OUTCOME MEASURES: Neurodevelopmental disability (one or more of cerebral palsy, visual or hearing loss, seizures, severe cognitive disability), and mental and performance developmental indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. RESULTS: Six (16%) of the ECMO-treated children had neurodevelopmental disabilities at 2 years of age, as compared with 1 (4%) of the comparison subjects; the difference was not statistically significant. The mean mental developmental index (91.8 [standard deviation (SD) 19.5] v. 100.5 [SD 25.4]) and the mean performance developmental index (87.2 [SD 20.0] v. 96.4 [SD 20.9]) did not differ significantly between the ECMO group and the comparison group respectively. Among the ECMO-treated subjects those whose underlying diagnosis was sepsis had the lowest Bayley indexes, significantly lower than those whose underlying diagnosis was meconium aspiration syndrome. The distance transported did not affect outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Neurodevelopmental disability and delay occurred in both groups. The underlying

  15. Membranes, mechanics, and intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Cellular membranes are remarkable materials -- self-assembled, flexible, two-dimensional fluids. Understanding how proteins manipulate membrane curvature is crucial to understanding the transport of cargo in cells, yet the mechanical activities of trafficking proteins remain poorly understood. Using an optical-trap based assay involving dynamic deformation of biomimetic membranes, we have examined the behavior of Sar1, a key component of the COPII family of transport proteins. We find that Sar1 from yeast (S. cerevisiae) lowers membrane rigidity by up to 100% as a function of its concentration, thereby lowering the energetic cost of membrane deformation. Human Sar1 proteins can also lower the mechanical rigidity of the membranes to which they bind. However, unlike the yeast proteins, the rigidity is not a monotonically decreasing function of concentration but rather shows increased rigidity and decreased mobility at high concentrations that implies interactions between proteins. In addition to describing this study of membrane mechanics, I'll also discuss some topics relevant to a range of biophysical investigations, such as the insights provided by imaging methods and open questions in the dynamics of multicellular systems.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Transport through Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Missner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Sommer, Klaus; Mathai, John C.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Pohl, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Several membrane channels, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and the RhAG protein of the rhesus complex, were hypothesized to be of physiological relevance for CO2 transport. However, the underlying assumption that the lipid matrix imposes a significant barrier to CO2 diffusion was never confirmed experimentally. Here we have monitored transmembrane CO2 flux (JCO2) by imposing a CO2 concentration gradient across planar lipid bilayers and detecting the resulting small pH shift in the immediate membrane vicinity. An analytical model, which accounts for the presence of both carbonic anhydrase and buffer molecules, was fitted to the experimental pH profiles using inverse problems techniques. At pH 7.4, the model revealed that JCO2 was entirely rate-limited by near-membrane unstirred layers (USL), which act as diffusional barriers in series with the membrane. Membrane tightening by sphingomyelin and cholesterol did not alter JCO2 confirming that membrane resistance was comparatively small. In contrast, a pH-induced shift of the CO2 hydration-dehydration equilibrium resulted in a relative membrane contribution of about 15% to the total resistance (pH 9.6). Under these conditions, a membrane CO2 permeability (3.2 ± 1.6 cm/s) was estimated. It indicates that cellular CO2 uptake (pH 7.4) is always USL-limited, because the USL size always exceeds 1 μm. Consequently, facilitation of CO2 transport by AQP1, RhAG, or any other protein is highly unlikely. The conclusion was confirmed by the observation that CO2 permeability of epithelial cell monolayers was always the same whether AQP1 was overexpressed in both the apical and basolateral membranes or not. PMID:18617525

  17. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2000-06-30

    Mixed-conducting membranes have the ability to conduct oxygen with perfect selectivity at elevated temperatures, which makes them an extremely attractive alternative for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. The ability to reliably fabricate these membranes in thin or thick films would enable solid-state divisional limitations to be minimized, thus providing higher oxygen flux. Based on that motivation, the overall objective for this project is to develop and demonstrate a strategy for the fabrication of supported Wick film ceramic mixed conducting membranes, and improve the understanding of the fundamental issues associated with reliable fabrication of these membranes. The project has focused on the mixed-conducting ceramic composition SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} because of its superior permeability and stability in reducing atmospheres. The fabrication strategy employed involves the deposition of SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} thick films onto porous supports of the same composition. In the second year of this project, we completed characterization of the sintering and phase behavior of the porous SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} supports, leading to a standard support fabrication methodology. Using a doctor blade method, pastes made from aerosol-derived SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} powder dispersed with polyethylene glycol were applied to the supports, and the sintering behavior of the thick film membranes was examined in air and nitrogen atmospheres. It has been demonstrated that the desired crystalline phase content can be produced in the membranes, and that the material in the membrane layer can be highly densified without densifying the underlying support. However, considerable cracking and opening of the film occurred when films densified to a high extent. The addition of MgO into the SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} supports was shown to inhibit support sintering so that temperatures up to 1300 C, where significant liquid formation occurs, could be used for film sintering

  18. Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Haiqing

    2011-11-15

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a

  19. Method and apparatus for producing oxygen and nitrogen and membrane therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

    1985-09-17

    Process and apparatus for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen as well as a novel membrane useful therein are disclosed. The process utilizes novel facilitated transport membranes to selectively transport oxygen from one gaseous stream to another, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the method, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a polar organic membrane which separates a gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. In an alternate mode of operation, the feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane and the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. Under such conditions, the carrier acts as a shuttle, picking up oxygen at the feed side of the membrane, diffusing across the membrane as the oxygenated complex, releasing oxygen to the product stream, and then diffusing back to the feed side to repeat the process. Exceptionally and unexpectedly high O[sub 2]/N[sub 2] selectivity, on the order of 10 to 30, is obtained, as well as exceptionally high oxygen permeability, on the order of 6 to 15 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] cm[sup 3]-cm/cm[sup 2]-sec-cmHg, as well as a long membrane life of in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 2 figs.

  20. Method and apparatus for producing oxygen and nitrogen and membrane therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C.; Baker, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    Process and apparatus for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen as well as a novel membrane useful therein are disclosed. The process utilizes novel facilitated transport membranes to selectively transport oxygen from one gaseous stream to another, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the method, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a polar organic membrane which separates a gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. In an alternate mode of operation, the feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form at the interface of the feed stream with the membrane and the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form at the interface of the product stream with the membrane. Under such conditions, the carrier acts as a shuttle, picking up oxygen at the feed side of the membrane, diffusing across the membrane as the oxygenated complex, releasing oxygen to the product stream, and then diffusing back to the feed side to repeat the process. Exceptionally and unexpectedly high O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 selectivity, on the order of 10 to 30, is obtained, as well as exceptionally high oxygen permeability, on the order of 6 to 15.times.10.sup.-8 cm.sup.3 -cm/cm.sup.2 -sec-cmHg, as well as a long membrane life of in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  1. Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition of La1- x Sr x Co y Fe1- y O3-δ Thin-Film Oxygen Transport Membrane on Porous Metallic Supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarligo, Maria Ophelia; Mauer, Georg; Bram, Martin; Baumann, Stefan; Vaßen, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Plasma spray physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a very promising route to manufacture ceramic coatings, combining the efficiency of thermal spray processes and characteristic features of thin PVD coatings. Recently, this technique has been investigated to effectively deposit dense thin films of perovskites particularly with the composition of La0.58Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) for application in gas separation membranes. Furthermore, asymmetric type of membranes with porous metallic supports has also attracted research attention due to the advantage of good mechanical properties suitable for use at high temperatures and high permeation rates. In this work, both approaches are combined to manufacture oxygen transport membranes made of gastight LSCF thin film by PS-PVD on porous NiCoCrAlY metallic supports. The deposition of homogenous dense thin film is challenged by the tendency of LSCF to decompose during thermal spray processes, irregular surface profile of the porous metallic substrate and crack and pore-formation in typical ceramic thermal spray coatings. Microstructure formation and coating build-up during PS-PVD as well as the annealing behavior at different temperatures of LSCF thin films were investigated. Finally, measurements of leak rates and oxygen permeation rates at elevated temperatures show promising results for the optimized membranes.

  2. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2002-07-01

    Mixed-conducting ceramics have the ability to conduct oxygen with perfect selectivity at elevated temperatures, making them extremely attractive as membrane materials for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. While the conductivity of these materials can be quite high at elevated temperatures (typically 800-1000 C), much higher oxygen fluxes, or, alternatively, equivalent fluxes at lower temperatures, could be provided by supported thin or thick film membrane layers. Based on that motivation, the objective of this project was to explore the use of ultrafine aerosol-derived powder of a mixed-conducting ceramic material for fabrication of supported thick-film dense membranes. The project focused on the mixed-conducting ceramic composition SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) because of the desirable permeability and stability of that material, as reported in the literature. Appropriate conditions to produce the submicron SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} powder using aerosol pyrolysis were determined. Porous supports of the same composition were produced by partial sintering of a commercially obtained powder that possessed significantly larger particle size than the aerosol-derived powder. The effects of sintering conditions (temperature, atmosphere) on the porosity and microstructure of the porous discs were studied, and a standard support fabrication procedure was adopted. Subsequently, a variety of paste and slurry formulations were explored utilizing the aerosol-derived SCFO powder. These formulations were applied to the porous SCFO support by a doctor blade or spin coating procedure. Sintering of the supported membrane layer was then conducted, and additional layers were deposited and sintered in some cases. The primary characterization methods were X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and room-temperature nitrogen permeation was used to assess defect status of the membranes.We found that non-aqueous paste/slurry formulations incorporating

  3. Novel Molten Oxide Membrane for Ultrahigh Purity Oxygen Separation from Air.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Valery V; Kulbakin, Igor V; Fedorov, Sergey V; Klimashin, Anton A

    2016-08-31

    We present a novel solid/liquid Co3O4-36 wt % Bi2O3 composite that can be used as molten oxide membrane, MOM ( Belousov, V. V. Electrical and Mass Transport Processes in Molten Oxide Membranes. Ionics 22 , 2016 , 451 - 469 ), for ultrahigh purity oxygen separation from air. This membrane material consists of Co3O4 solid grains and intergranular liquid channels (mainly molten Bi2O3). The solid grains conduct electrons, and the intergranular liquid channels predominantly conduct oxygen ions. The liquid channels also provide the membrane material gas tightness and ductility. This last property allows us to deal successfully with the problem of thermal incompatibility. Oxygen and nitrogen permeation fluxes, oxygen ion transport number, and conductivity of the composite were measured by the gas flow, volumetric measurements of the faradaic efficiency, and four-probe dc techniques, accordingly. The membrane material showed the highest oxygen selectivity jO2/jN2 > 10(5) and sufficient oxygen permeability 2.5 × 10(-8) mol cm(-1) s(-1) at 850 °C. In the range of membrane thicknesses 1.5-3.3 mm, the oxygen permeation rate was controlled by chemical diffusion. The ease of the MOM fabrication, combined with superior oxygen selectivity and competitive oxygen permeability, shows the promise of the membrane material for ultrahigh purity oxygen separation from air. PMID:27482771

  4. Oxygen permeability of the lipid bilayer membrane made of calf lens lipids

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen permeability coefficient across the membrane made of the total lipid extract from the plasma membrane of calf lens was estimated from the profile of the oxygen transport parameter (local oxygen diffusion-concentration product) and compared with those estimated for membranes made of an equimolar 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (POPC/Chol) mixture and of pure POPC. Profiles of the oxygen transport parameter were obtained by observing the collision of molecular oxygen with nitroxide radical spin labels placed at different depths in the membrane using the saturation-recovery EPR technique and were published by us earlier (J. Widomska, M. Raguz, J. Dillon, E. R. Gaillard, W. K. Subczynski, Biochim. Biophys. Acta. Epub 2007 March 20). At 35°C, the estimated oxygen permeability coefficients were 51.3, 49.7, and 157.4 cm/s for lens lipid, POPC/Chol, and POPC membranes, respectively (compared with 53.3 cm/s for a water layer with the same thickness as a membrane). Membrane permeability significantly decreases at lower temperatures. In the lens lipid membrane, resistance to the oxygen transport is located in and near the polar headgroup region of the membrane to the depth of the ninth carbon, which is approximately where the steroid-ring structure of cholesterol reaches into the membrane. In the central region of the membrane, oxygen transport is enhanced, significantly exceeding that in bulk water. It is concluded that the high level of cholesterol in lens lipids is responsible for these unique membrane properties. PMID:17662231

  5. Insight into the Nanoscale Mechanism of Rapid H2O Transport within a Graphene Oxide Membrane: Impact of Oxygen Functional Group Clustering.

    PubMed

    Ban, Shuai; Xie, Jing; Wang, Yajun; Jing, Bo; Liu, Bei; Zhou, Hongjun

    2016-01-13

    Realistic models of graphene oxide membranes were developed and validated to interpret the exceptional water permeation in association with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analysis, and dynamic vapor sorption measurements. With respect to the GO oxidization level, surface distributions of functionalized domains were analyzed in line with TEM observations, and 3 types of interlayer domains in slit pores of GO membranes were identified. The hydrophilicity degrees of as-defined domains strongly influence their H2O uptake capacities. Calculated sorption enthalpies and isotherms are in good agreement with experimental data, and the results indicate the dominant role of dipole interactions. GO expansion shows a transition from the interstratification of an H2O monolayer to the accumulation of H2O multilayers at an interlayer distance of 0.8 nm. The evolution of both hydrogen bonds and H2O diffusivities suggests the existence of three types of H2O species with different binding states and molecular mobilities. The computed H2O permeability on the basis of sorption-diffusion theory supports the exceptional H2O transport capacity in GO membranes. PMID:26653332

  6. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2003-03-01

    This project addresses the need for reliable fabrication methods of supported thin/thick dense ceramic membranes for oxygen separation. Some ceramic materials that possess mixed conductivity (electronic and ionic) at high temperature have the potential to permeate oxygen with perfect selectivity, making them very attractive for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. In order to maximize permeation rates at the lowest possible temperatures, it is desirable to minimize diffusional limitations within the ceramic by reducing the thickness of the ceramic membrane, preferably to thicknesses of 10 {micro}m or thinner. It has proven to be very challenging to reliably fabricate dense, defect-free ceramic membrane layers of such thickness. In this project we are investigating the use of ultrafine SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) powders produced by aerosol pyrolysis to fabricate such supported membranes. SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} is a ceramic composition that has been shown to have desirable oxygen permeability, as well as good chemical stability in the reducing environments that are encountered in some important applications. Our approach is to use a doctor blade procedure to deposit pastes prepared from the aerosol-derived SCFO powders onto porous SCFO supports. We have previously shown that membrane layers deposited from the aerosol powders can be sintered to high density without densification of the underlying support. However, these membrane layers contained large-scale cracks and open areas, making them unacceptable for membrane purposes. In the past year, we have refined the paste formulations based on guidance from the ceramic tape casting literature. We have identified a multicomponent organic formulation utilizing castor oil as dispersant in a solvent of mineral spirits and isopropanol. Other additives were polyvinylbutyral as binder and dibutylphthalate as plasticizer. The nonaqueous formulation has superior wetting properties with the powder, and

  7. Ethanol reforming using Ba0.5Sr0.5Cu0.2Fe0.8O3-δ/Ag composites as oxygen transport membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. Y.; Lee, T. H.; Dorris, S. E.; Park, J.-H.; Balachandran, U.

    2012-09-01

    Cobalt-free oxygen transport membranes (OTMs), Ba0.5Sr0.5Cu0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (BSCF) and its composites, Ba0.5Sr0.5Cu0.2Fe0.8O3-δ/Ag (BSCF/Ag), were fabricated by conventional solid state synthesis, and their oxygen transport properties were evaluated. The metal (Ag) content in the composite was 10-40 vol.%. Based on oxygen-permeation results, BSCF/40 vol.% Ag with Rh catalyst was selected for testing its ability to supply high-purity oxygen (from air) for ethanol reforming. It was found that the composite played an important role in producing hydrogen from ethanol reforming at 600 °C. The composite with catalyst shifted ethanol conversion toward production of hydrogen and away from production of other products, i.e., using a catalyst increased the selectivity for hydrogen in the reformate. The crystal structure, thermal expansion, coke formation, and the microstructural behavior of the OTMs are discussed.

  8. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  9. Membrane transporters in drug development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters can be major determinants of the pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy profiles of drugs. This presents several key questions for drug development, including which transporters are clinically important in drug absorption and disposition, and which in vitro methods are suitable for studying drug interactions with these transporters. In addition, what criteria should trigger follow-up clinical studies, and which clinical studies should be conducted if needed. In this article, we provide the recommendations of the International Transporter Consortium on these issues, and present decision trees that are intended to help guide clinical studies on the currently recognized most important drug transporter interactions. The recommendations are generally intended to support clinical development and filing of a new drug application. Overall, it is advised that the timing of transporter investigations should be driven by efficacy, safety and clinical trial enrolment questions (for example, exclusion and inclusion criteria), as well as a need for further understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of the drug molecule, and information required for drug labeling. PMID:20190787

  10. Cost-effective usage of membrane oxygenators in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in infants.

    PubMed

    Özyüksel, A; Ersoy, C; Akçevin, A; Türkoğlu, H; Çiçek, A E; Kahraman, A; Kayhan, B; Cantürk, E

    2015-04-01

    Although the poly-methylpentene (PMP) oxygenators have significant advantages in ECMO implementation, their usage may be limited in some situations, which may be related to economic constraints. In this report, we aimed to emphasize our cost-effective usage of a membrane oxygenator at the ECMO setup. We implemented ECMO with eight Capiox® FX05 or Baby RX05 hollow-fiber membrane oxygenators in five neonatal patients. The average ECMO duration was 121 hours (ranging from 41 to 272 hours). Following the termination of the ECMO, the system was broken down into its components for macroscopic analysis. Neither gross blood clots nor plasma leakage were observed in any of the components. The integration of a centrifugal pump and a separate hollow-fiber oxygenator may provide a cost-effective ECMO implementation setup with no adverse effects which may be an encouraging alternative for the low cost usage of ECMO in neonates. PMID:24965913

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation 2016: an update

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Warwick; MacLaren, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an important issue for intensivists, critical care nurses, surgeons, cardiologists, and many others. There has been a continued increase in the number of centres performing ECMO. This review examines novel applications and recent trends in the use of ECMO over the last 2 years. These include ECMO to facilitate the safe use of other treatments, changing the timing of initiation, newer equipment and better biocompatibility, and the ability of ECMO programs to essentially choose which cluster of potential complications they are prepared to accept. ECMO continues to evolve, diversify in its applications, and improve in safety. PMID:27158464

  12. Improved cannulation method for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Read, R; St Cyr, J; Tornabene, S; Whitman, G

    1990-10-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been shown to be useful for patients in reversible cardiogenic shock. Effective arterial cannulation techniques for infants have been developed that are simple to use and require minimal subsequent vascular repair or reconstruction after removal. Groin cannulation in adults frequently requires bidirectional arterial cannulation to ensure adequate distal perfusion as well as frequent complex arterial repairs after discontinuation. We describe a simple arterial cannulation technique using a single right-angle, high-flow arterial cannula. With this technique adequate bidirectional arterial perfusion is maintained with a single arterial cannula while the need for vascular repairs or reconstruction is minimized. PMID:2222065

  13. Computation of the unsteady facilitated transport of oxygen in hemoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1990-01-01

    The transport of a reacting permeant diffusing through a thin membrane is extended to more realistic dissociation models. A new nonlinear analysis of the reaction-diffusion equations, using implicit finite-difference methods and direct block solvers, is used to study the limits of linearized and equilibrium theories. Computed curves of molecular oxygen permeating through hemoglobin solution are used to illustrate higher-order reaction models, the effect of concentration boundary layers at the membrane interfaces, and the transient buildup of oxygen flux.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennie

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) remains a promising treatment for pediatric patients in cardiac arrest unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With venoarterial extracorporeal support, blood is drained from the right atrium, oxygenated through the extracorporeal circuit, and transfused back to the body, bypassing the heart and lungs. The use of artificial oxygenation and perfusion thus provides the body a period of hemodynamic stability, while allowing resolution of underlying disease processes. Survival rates for ECPR patients are higher than those for traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), although neurological outcomes require further investigation. The impact of duration of CPR and length of treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation vary in published reports. Furthermore, current guidelines for the initiation and use of ECPR are limited and may lead to confusion about appropriate use of this support. Many ethical concerns arise with this advanced form of life support. More often than not, the dilemma is not whether to withhold ECPR, but rather when to withdraw it. Although clinicians must decide if ECPR is appropriate and when further intervention is futile, the ultimate burden of choice is left to the patient's caregivers. Offering support and guidance to the patient's family as well as the patient is essential. PMID:25639578

  15. Nod Factor Effects on Root Hair-Specific Transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: Focus on Plasma Membrane Transport Systems and Reactive Oxygen Species Networks.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Isabelle; Drain, Alice; Guichard, Marjorie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Boscari, Alexandre; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Brunaud, Véronique; Cottaz, Sylvain; Rancurel, Corinne; Da Rocha, Martine; Fizames, Cécile; Fort, Sébastien; Gaillard, Isabelle; Maillol, Vincent; Danchin, Etienne G J; Rouached, Hatem; Samain, Eric; Su, Yan-Hua; Thouin, Julien; Touraine, Bruno; Puppo, Alain; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Pauly, Nicolas; Sentenac, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF) for 4 or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF, and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters, or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10% of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1176 genes that could be considered as "papilionoid legume-specific" were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an ortholog in every of the six legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions specific to legumes. This

  16. Nod Factor Effects on Root Hair-Specific Transcriptome of Medicago truncatula: Focus on Plasma Membrane Transport Systems and Reactive Oxygen Species Networks

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Isabelle; Drain, Alice; Guichard, Marjorie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Boscari, Alexandre; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Brunaud, Véronique; Cottaz, Sylvain; Rancurel, Corinne; Da Rocha, Martine; Fizames, Cécile; Fort, Sébastien; Gaillard, Isabelle; Maillol, Vincent; Danchin, Etienne G. J.; Rouached, Hatem; Samain, Eric; Su, Yan-Hua; Thouin, Julien; Touraine, Bruno; Puppo, Alain; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Pauly, Nicolas; Sentenac, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Root hairs are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and thereby in plant autotrophy. In legumes, they also play a crucial role in establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. To obtain a holistic view of Medicago truncatula genes expressed in root hairs and of their regulation during the first hours of the engagement in rhizobial symbiotic interaction, a high throughput RNA sequencing on isolated root hairs from roots challenged or not with lipochitooligosaccharides Nod factors (NF) for 4 or 20 h was carried out. This provided a repertoire of genes displaying expression in root hairs, responding or not to NF, and specific or not to legumes. In analyzing the transcriptome dataset, special attention was paid to pumps, transporters, or channels active at the plasma membrane, to other proteins likely to play a role in nutrient ion uptake, NF electrical and calcium signaling, control of the redox status or the dynamic reprogramming of root hair transcriptome induced by NF treatment, and to the identification of papilionoid legume-specific genes expressed in root hairs. About 10% of the root hair expressed genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by NF treatment, suggesting their involvement in remodeling plant functions to allow establishment of the symbiotic relationship. For instance, NF-induced changes in expression of genes encoding plasma membrane transport systems or disease response proteins indicate that root hairs reduce their involvement in nutrient ion absorption and adapt their immune system in order to engage in the symbiotic interaction. It also appears that the redox status of root hair cells is tuned in response to NF perception. In addition, 1176 genes that could be considered as “papilionoid legume-specific” were identified in the M. truncatula root hair transcriptome, from which 141 were found to possess an ortholog in every of the six legume genomes that we considered, suggesting their involvement in essential functions specific to legumes. This

  17. [Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation : Principles and medical indications].

    PubMed

    David, S; Napp, L C; Kühn, C; Hoeper, M M

    2016-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a special form of a miniaturized heart-lung machine with the ultimate goal to stabilize critically ill patients. Dependent on the cannulation strategy ECMO can support or replace heart and/or lung function. Medical indications and contraindications have to be evaluated thoroughly before cannulation. Moreover, before ECMO initiation a solid treatment aim has to be defined: bridge to recovery, bridge to decision, bridge to transplantation, and bridge to destination (i. e. implantation of a permanent assist device). Regarding invasiveness of the system, potential life-threatening complications, requirement of standardized monitoring of the patient and the device as well as tertiary care infrastructure, ECMO should exclusively be used in highly experienced tertiary centers. PMID:27411792

  18. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Gianluca; Katz, Nevin; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an effective therapy for patients with reversible cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI) often occurs in patients supported with ECMO; it frequently evolves into chronic kidney damage or end-stage renal disease and is associated with a reported 4-fold increase in mortality rate. Although AKI is generally due to the hemodynamic alterations associated with the baseline disease, ECMO itself may contribute to maintaining kidney dysfunction through several mechanisms. Summary AKI may be related to conditions derived from or associated with extracorporeal therapy, leading to a reduction in renal oxygen delivery and/or to inflammatory damage. In particular, during pathological conditions requiring ECMO, the biological defense mechanisms maintaining central perfusion by a reduction of perfusion to peripheral organs (such as the kidney) have been identified as pretreatment and patient-related risk factors for AKI. Hormonal pathways are also impaired in patients supported with ECMO, leading to failures in mechanisms of renal homeostasis and worsening fluid overload. Finally, inflammatory damage, due to the primary disease, heart and lung crosstalk with the kidney or associated with extracorporeal therapy itself, may further increase the susceptibility to AKI. Renal replacement therapy can be integrated into the main extracorporeal circuit during ECMO to provide for optimal fluid management and removal of inflammatory mediators. Key Messages AKI is frequently observed in patients supported with ECMO. The pathophysiology of the associated AKI is chiefly related to a reduction in renal oxygen delivery and/or to inflammatory damage. Risk factors for AKI are associated with a patient's underlying disease and ECMO-related conditions. PMID:27194996

  19. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  20. Oxygen transport and exchange in oxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, B. C. H.

    1994-04-01

    Oxygen transport in most oxide ceramics incorporated in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) involves the movement of oxygen ion vacancies. It is the relative magnitude of oxygen ion vacancy and electronic charge carrier concentrations and mobilities which determines whether oxide materials can function as effective electrolyte or electrode components. Examination of relevant data suggests that zirconia- and ceria-based electrolytes are unlikely to be replaced in SOFC systems operating in the temperature range 450-950 C. Oxygen ion vacancies are also involved in the cathodic reduction of oxygen and influence the magnitude of the associated exchange current density which can be measured by isotopic oxygen exchange measurements. Oxygen vacancy concentrations are also implicated in thermal expansion coefficient values and chemical stability considerations. It follows that optimisation of the cathode composition requires many conflicting requirements to be satisfied. However for operation at 800 C, electrolyte, electrode and bipolar plate materials are available to ensure power densities approaching 0.5 W sq cm. In contrast, direct methanol SOFC systems operating at 500 C necessitate the development of alternative electrode materials. The successful exploitation of our knowledge about oxygen ion vacancy transport in ceramic oxides has now stimulated research into the role of protons in oxide lattices, and it is postulated that protonic/hydroxyl ion transport could be important in the development of alternative anode components.

  1. Oxygen separation from air using zirconia solid electrolyte membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suitor, J. W.; Marner, W. J.; Schroeder, J. E.; Losey, R. W.; Ferrall, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Air separation using a zirconia solid electrolyte membrane is a possible alternative source of oxygen. The process of zirconia oxygen separation is reviewed, and an oxygen plant concept using such separation is described. Potential cell designs, stack designs, and testing procedures are examined. Fabrication of the materials used in a zirconia module as well as distribution plate design and fabrication are examined.

  2. Spallation performance of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation tubing.

    PubMed

    Peek, G J; Thompson, A; Killer, H M; Firmin, R K

    2000-09-01

    During the prolonged roller pump use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), tubing wear generates spallation. The spallation performance of Tygon S-65-HL was measured and compared with a potential new ECMO tubing, LVA (Portex 800-500-575). Spallation was measured by on-line laser diode particle counting (HIAC) during simulated ECMO. The effects of differing levels of occlusion and pump speed were examined, as was the effect of spallation over time. The spallation produced by Tygon S-65-HL was less than that seen with LVA during 24 h of simulated ECMO (p < 0.001), and after 72 h had fallen almost to zero. Spallation with Tygon tubing increases with increasing pump speed and decreases over time. There appears to be only a weak correlation with occlusion, which is surprising. The spallation performance of Tygon S-65-HL was variable and under some conditions exceeded that of LVA. Overall, however, Tygon S-65-HL produced less spallation than LVA. Therefore, LVA cannot be recommended for clinical ECMO use. PMID:11001170

  3. Year in Review 2015: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Raman, Lakshmi; Dalton, Heidi J

    2016-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified form of cardiopulmonary bypass. Although early trials were plagued by severe bleeding and high rates of death, subsequent experience with neonates found good survival, and ECMO became an important tool in the care of critically ill infants with respiratory failure. Since the 1980s, expansion to other groups (children, patients with cardiac disease, etc) followed as experience was obtained. Today, there is a rapid growth of ECMO, especially in the adult population. To date, >73,000 patients receiving ECMO have been reported to the international Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry. This rapid growth in the usage of ECMO has made it possible for it to be included in the management algorithm of certain disease processes, such as ARDS, cardiopulmonary arrest, and septic shock. Significant advances in technology have made it possible to support patients on ECMO for weeks or months with success. Reduction in sedative use and experience with "awake" patients has led to ambulatory and mobile ECMO. Changes in ventilator support while on ECMO, even to the point of extubation, are also occurring. This article will review briefly some of the literature related to criteria for severity of illness before ECMO and related to ECMO care and practice. Issues relating to the use of ECMO as a resuscitative tool in cardiac arrest as well as the controversial topic of volume and outcome will also be presented. PMID:27381702

  4. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammels, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to gas-impermeable, solid state materials fabricated into membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors. This invention particularly relates to solid state oxygen anion- and electron-mediating membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors for promoting partial or full oxidation of different chemical species, for decomposition of oxygen-containing species, and for separation of oxygen from other gases. Solid state materials for use in the membranes of this invention include mixed metal oxide compounds having the brownmillerite crystal structure.

  5. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2005-09-27

    This invention relates to gas-impermeable, solid state materials fabricated into membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors. This invention particularly relates to solid state oxygen anion- and electron-mediating membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors for promoting partial or full oxidation of different chemical species, for decomposition of oxygen-containing species, and for separation of oxygen from other gases. Solid state materials for use in the membranes of this invention include mixed metal oxide compounds having the brownmillerite crystal structure.

  6. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  7. Simulation training for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Roberta; Rajani, Ronak; Gelandt, Elton; Morgan, Lisa; Raguseelan, Nira; Butt, Salman; Nelmes, David; Auzinger, Georg; Broughton, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a complex treatment. Despite this, there are a lack of training programs designed to develop relevant clinical and nonclinical skills required for ECMO specialists. The aim of the current study was to describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a 1-day simulation course for delivering training in ECMO. Methods: A 1-day simulation course was developed with educational and intensive care experts. First, the delegates received a lecture on the principles of simulation training and the importance of human factors. This was, followed by a practical demonstration and discussion of the ECMO circuit, console components, circuit interactions effects and potential complications. There were then five ECMO simulation scenarios with debriefing that covered technical and nontechnical issues. The course culminated in a knowledge-based assessment. Course outcomes were assessed using purpose-designed questionnaires. Results: We held 3 courses with a total of 14 delegates (9 intensive care nurses, 3 adult intensive care consultants and 2 ECMO technicians). Following the course, 8 (57%) gained familiarity in troubleshooting an ECMO circuit, 6 (43%) increased their familiarity with the ECMO pump and circuit, 8 (57%) perceived an improvement in their communication skills and 7 (50%) perceived an improvement in their leadership skills. At the end of the course, 13 (93%) delegates agreed that they felt more confident in dealing with ECMO. Conclusions: Simulation-training courses may increase knowledge and confidence in dealing with ECMO emergencies. Further studies are indicated to determine whether simulation training improves clinical outcomes and translates to reduced complication rates in patients receiving ECMO. PMID:25849687

  8. Solute transporters in plant thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schoefs, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Plants utilize sunlight to drive photosynthetic energy conversion in the chloroplast thylakoid membrane. Here are located four major photosynthetic complexes, about which we have great knowledge in terms of structure and function. However, much less we know about auxiliary proteins, such as transporters, ensuring an optimum function and turnover of these complexes. The most prominent thylakoid transporter is the proton-translocating ATP-synthase. Recently, four additional transporters have been identified in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana, namely one copper-transporting P-ATPase, one chloride channel, one phosphate transporter, and one ATP/ADP carrier. Here, we review the current knowledge on the function and physiological role of these transporters during photosynthesis and light stress in plants. Subsequently, we make a survey on the outlook of thylakoid activities awaiting identification of responsible proteins. Such knowledge is necessary to understand the thylakoid network of transporters, and to design strategies for bioengineering crop plants in the future. PMID:20585503

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neonatal Encephalopathy and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, An; Rais-Bahrami, Khodayar; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; Short, Billie Lou; Baumgart, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This case series describes clinical management of five infants who received whole-body cooling during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We maintained systemic hypothermia during ECMO with acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:20472254

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after living-related liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Ender; Çelik, Muhammet Reha; Otan, Emrah; Dişli, Olcay Murat; Erdil, Nevzat; Bayındır, Yaşar; Kutlu, Ramazan; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-04-01

    Various types of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation methods have been used in liver transplant operations. The main indications are portopulmonary or hepatopulmonary syndromes and other cardiorespiratory failure syndromes that are refractory to conventional therapy. There is little literature available about extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, especially after liver transplant. We describe our experience with 2 patients who had living-related liver transplant. A 69-year-old woman had refractory aspergillosis pneumonia and underwent pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy 4 weeks after liver transplant. An 8-month-old boy with biliary atresia underwent urgent liver transplant; he received venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy on postoperative day 1. Despite our unsuccessful experience with 2 patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy for liver transplant patients may improve prognosis in selected cases. PMID:25894176

  11. Modeling Oxygen Transport in the Human Placenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Alexander; Filoche, Marcel; Salafia, Carolyn; Grebenkov, Denis

    Efficient functioning of the human placenta is crucial for the favorable pregnancy outcome. We construct a 3D model of oxygen transport in the placenta based on its histological cross-sections. The model accounts for both diffusion and convention of oxygen in the intervillous space and allows one to estimate oxygen uptake of a placentone. We demonstrate the existence of an optimal villi density maximizing the uptake and explain it as a trade-off between the incoming oxygen flow and the absorbing villous surface. Calculations performed for arbitrary shapes of fetal villi show that only two geometrical characteristics - villi density and the effective villi radius - are required to predict fetal oxygen uptake. Two combinations of physiological parameters that determine oxygen uptake are also identified: maximal oxygen inflow of a placentone and the Damköhler number. An automatic image analysis method is developed and applied to 22 healthy placental cross-sections demonstrating that villi density of a healthy human placenta lies within 10% of the optimal value, while overall geometry efficiency is rather low (around 30-40%). In a perspective, the model can constitute the base of a reliable tool of post partum oxygen exchange efficiency assessment in the human placenta. Also affiliated with Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

  12. Prism-patterned Nafion membrane for enhanced water transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Kang, Yun Sik; Ahn, Chiyeong; Jang, Segeun; Kim, Minhyoung; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoo, Sung Jong; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a simple and effective strategy to enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by imprinting prism-patterned arrays onto the Nafion membrane, which provides three combined effects directly related to the device performance. First, a locally thinned membrane via imprinted micro prism-structures lead to reduced membrane resistance, which is confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Second, increments of the geometrical surface area of the prism-patterned Nafion membrane compared to a flat membrane result in the increase in the electrochemical active surface area. Third, the vertically asymmetric geometry of prism structures in the cathode catalyst layer lead to enhanced water transport, which is confirmed by oxygen gain calculation. To explain the enhanced water transport, we propose a simple theoretical model on removal of water droplets existing in the asymmetric catalyst layer. These three combined effects achieved via incorporating prism patterned arrays into the Nafion membrane effectively enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  13. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  14. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  15. Polyene antibiotic that inhibits membrane transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; de Kruijff, Ben; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-01-01

    The limited therapeutic arsenal and the increase in reports of fungal resistance to multiple antifungal agents have made fungal infections a major therapeutic challenge. The polyene antibiotics are the only group of antifungal antibiotics that directly target the plasma membrane via a specific interaction with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, often resulting in membrane permeabilization. In contrast to other polyene antibiotics that form pores in the membrane, the mode of action of natamycin has remained obscure but is not related to membrane permeabilization. Here, we demonstrate that natamycin inhibits growth of yeasts and fungi via the immediate inhibition of amino acid and glucose transport across the plasma membrane. This is attributable to ergosterol-specific and reversible inhibition of membrane transport proteins. It is proposed that ergosterol-dependent inhibition of membrane proteins is a general mode of action of all the polyene antibiotics, of which some have been shown additionally to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Our results imply that sterol-protein interactions are fundamentally important for protein function even for those proteins that are not known to reside in sterol-rich domains. PMID:22733749

  16. Polyene antibiotic that inhibits membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; de Kruijff, Ben; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-07-10

    The limited therapeutic arsenal and the increase in reports of fungal resistance to multiple antifungal agents have made fungal infections a major therapeutic challenge. The polyene antibiotics are the only group of antifungal antibiotics that directly target the plasma membrane via a specific interaction with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, often resulting in membrane permeabilization. In contrast to other polyene antibiotics that form pores in the membrane, the mode of action of natamycin has remained obscure but is not related to membrane permeabilization. Here, we demonstrate that natamycin inhibits growth of yeasts and fungi via the immediate inhibition of amino acid and glucose transport across the plasma membrane. This is attributable to ergosterol-specific and reversible inhibition of membrane transport proteins. It is proposed that ergosterol-dependent inhibition of membrane proteins is a general mode of action of all the polyene antibiotics, of which some have been shown additionally to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Our results imply that sterol-protein interactions are fundamentally important for protein function even for those proteins that are not known to reside in sterol-rich domains. PMID:22733749

  17. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with right axillary artery perfusion.

    PubMed

    Navia, José L; Atik, Fernando A; Beyer, Erik A; Ruda Vega, Pablo

    2005-06-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can be instituted through various cannulation sites. This paper describes a technique for axillary artery cannulation for inflow perfusion in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and discusses both potential advantages and limitations. Exposure of the artery was achieved through the deltoid-pectoral approach. Both direct cannulation and interposition graft cannulation are possible, but the latter is preferred. Advantages of axillary artery cannulation are related mainly to the establishment of "central" support with antegrade flow and excellent upper body oxygenation. It also affords chest closure after postcardiotomy shock, and easy control of any mediastinal bleeding. These cannulation sites may be options for the institution of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, especially in postcardiotomy and respiratory failure patients and in patients with significant peripheral vascular disease. PMID:15919341

  18. Monitoring Transport Across Modified Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Penumetcha, Sai S.; Kona, Ravikanth; Hardin, Jonathan L.; Molder, Andrew L.; Steinle, Erich D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of several characterization methods to examine alumina nanotubule membranes that have been modified with specific silanes. The function of these silanes is to alter the transport properties through the membrane by changing the local environment inside the alumina nanotube. The presence of alkyl groups, either long (C18) or short and branched (isopropyl) hydrocarbon chains, on these silanes significantly decreases the rate of transport of permeant molecules through membranes containing alumina nanotubes as monitored via absorbance spectroscopy. The presence of an ionic surfactant can alter the polarity of these modified nanotubes, which correlates to an increased transport of ions. Fluorescent spectroscopy is also utilized to enhance the sensitivity of detecting these permeant molecules. Confirmation of the alkylsilane attachment to the alumina membrane is achieved with traditional infrared spectroscopy, which can also examine the lifetime of the modified membrane. The physical parameters of these silane-modified porous alumina membranes are studied via scanning electron microscopy. The alumina nanotubes are not physically closed off or capped by the silanes that are attached to the alumina surfaces.

  19. Actinide transport across cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Bulman, R A; Griffin, R J

    1980-01-01

    Protactinium uptake into the normal liver does not exceed 3%, but when the phospholipid levels in the liver are elevated by administration of thioacetamide this uptake increases to 31%. Phosphatidic acid, which is absent from the normal liver, has been shown to extract protactinium into organic solvents. However, phosphatidylserine, a component of normal liver cell membranes, does not extract protactinium. It might be conjectured that this is why so little protactinium is taken up by the normal liver. The hypothesis is advanced that phosphatidylserine, which is known to complex plutonium, americium and curium, may regulate the uptake of these elements by liver. PMID:7373293

  20. Proton switch for modulating oxygen reduction by a copper electrocatalyst embedded in a hybrid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, Christopher J.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Li, Ying; Sobyra, Thomas B.; Zimmerman, Steven C.; Hosseini, Ali; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular switches gate many fundamental processes in natural and artificial systems. Here, we report the development of an electrochemical platform in which a proton carrier switches the activity of a catalyst. By incorporating an alkyl phosphate in the lipid layer of a hybrid bilayer membrane, we regulate proton transport to a Cu-based molecular oxygen reduction reaction catalyst. To construct this hybrid bilayer membrane system, we prepare an example of a synthetic Cu oxygen reduction reaction catalyst that forms a self-assembled monolayer on Au surfaces. We then embed this Cu catalyst inside a hybrid bilayer membrane by depositing a monolayer of lipid on the self-assembled monolayer. We envisage that this electrochemical system can give a unique mechanistic insight not only into the oxygen reduction reaction, but into proton-coupled electron transfer in general.

  1. Hydrogen transport in composite inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model simulating hydrogen transport through composite inorganic membranes is proposed. This model simulates operation of membranes made of three or more porous or metallic layers. Transport through Pd-alloy metallic layers is simulated using a comprehensive model proposed by Ward and Dao. The model accounts for external mass transfer, surface adsorption and desorption, transport to and from the bulk metal, and diffusion within the metal. Transport through porous ceramic layers is simulated following Burggraaf, who proposed an expression that combines viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, and transition flow through porous media of complex geometrical structure. The model can also use experimentally determined permeance data when available. The theoretical model has been computationally implemented. Computations show very good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. The proposed model predicts hydrogen fluxes through composite membranes of several layers for standard operating conditions. The model can also predict which of the several layers used in manufacturing the membrane is controlling the total hydrogen flux. This information can be used to determine optimal thickness values for metallic and porous layers.

  2. Cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2014-01-28

    Novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials are disclosed that operate at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes based on oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  3. Transport processes of the legume symbiosome membrane

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosome membrane (SM) is a physical barrier between the host plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the legume:rhizobia symbiosis, and represents a regulated interface for the movement of solutes between the symbionts that is under plant control. The primary nutrient exchange across the SM is the transport of a carbon energy source from plant to bacteroid in exchange for fixed nitrogen. At a biochemical level two channels have been implicated in movement of fixed nitrogen across the SM and a uniporter that transports monovalent dicarboxylate ions has been characterized that would transport fixed carbon. The aquaporin NOD26 may provide a channel for ammonia, but the genes encoding the other transporters have not been identified. Transport of several other solutes, including calcium and potassium, have been demonstrated in isolated symbiosomes, and genes encoding transport systems for the movement of iron, nitrate, sulfate, and zinc in nodules have been identified. However, definitively matching transport activities with these genes has proved difficult and many further transport processes are expected on the SM to facilitate the movement of nutrients between the symbionts. Recently, work detailing the SM proteome in soybean has been completed, contributing significantly to the database of known SM proteins. This represents a valuable resource for the identification of transporter protein candidates, some of which may correspond to transport processes previously described, or to novel transport systems in the symbiosis. Putative transporters identified from the proteome include homologs of transporters of sulfate, calcium, peptides, and various metal ions. Here we review current knowledge of transport processes of the SM and discuss the requirements for additional transport routes of other nutrients exchanged in the symbiosis, with a focus on transport systems identified through the soybean SM proteome. PMID:25566274

  4. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membrane for Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Porter, Jason; Patki, Neil; Kelley, Madison; Stanislowski, Josh; Tolbert, Scott; Way, J. Douglas; Makuch, David

    2015-12-23

    A pilot-scale hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) separator was built that incorporated 98 membranes that were each 24 inches long. This separator used an advanced design to minimize the impact of concentration polarization and separated over 1000 scfh of hydrogen from a hydrogen-nitrogen feed of 5000 scfh that contained 30% hydrogen. This mixture was chosen because it was representative of the hydrogen concentration expected in coal gasification. When tested with an operating gasifier, the hydrogen concentration was lower and contaminants in the syngas adversely impacted membrane performance. All 98 membranes survived the test, but flux was lower than expected. Improved ceramic substrates were produced that have small surface pores to enable membrane production and large pores in the bulk of the substrate to allow high flux. Pd-Au was chosen as the membrane alloy because of its resistance to sulfur contamination and good flux. Processes were developed to produce a large quantity of long membranes for use in the demonstration test.

  5. Recent Advances in Synthetic Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    McNALLY, BETH A.; LEEVY, W. MATTHEW; SMITH, BRADLEY D.

    2010-01-01

    It is 25 years since the first report of a synthetic ion channel transporter. Today, dozens of molecular and supramolecular designs have been developed to facilitate ion and small molecule transport across a bilayer membrane. Presented here is a concise summary of the advances made over the past four years. The transporters are grouped into three mechanistic classes: mobile carrier, monomeric channel, and self-assembled pore. Common building blocks are crown ethers, steroids, cyclodextrins, peptides, curcubiturils, and calixarenes. The eventual goal is to produce functional supramolecular devices such as sensors, enzyme assays, and lead candidates for pharmaceutical development. PMID:20376284

  6. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  7. Oxygen nonstoichiometry and transport properties of strontium substituted lanthanum ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sogaard, Martin Vang Hendriksen, Peter; Mogensen, Mogens

    2007-04-15

    This study presents an investigation of the properties of (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.99}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF40) covering thermomechanical properties, oxygen nonstoichiometry and electronic and ionic conductivity. Finally, oxygen permeation experiments have been carried out and the oxygen flux has been determined as a function of temperature and driving force. The electrical conductivity was measured using a 4 probe method. It is shown that the electrical conductivity is a function of the charge carrier concentration only. The electron hole mobility is found to decrease with increasing charge carrier concentration in agreement with recent literature. Values of the chemical diffusion coefficient, D{sub Chem}, and the surface exchange coefficient, k{sub Ex}, have been determined using electrical conductivity relaxation. At 800 deg. CD{sub Chem} is determined to be 6.2x10{sup -6}cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} with an activation energy of 137kJmol{sup -1}. The surface exchange coefficient is found to decrease with decreasing oxygen partial pressure. Oxygen permeation experiments were carried out. The flux through a membrane placed between air and wet hydrogen/nitrogen was J{sub O{sub 2}}{approx}1.8x10{sup -6}molcm{sup -2}s{sup -1} (corresponding to an equivalent electrical current density of 670mAcm{sup -2}). The oxygen permeation measurements are successfully interpreted based on the oxygen nonstoichiometry data and the determined transport parameters.

  8. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 μm Teflon sheet with a 120 μm aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  9. Plasma Membrane Transporters in Modern Liver Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Jose J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The liver plays a crucial role in the detoxification of drugs used in the treatment of many diseases. The liver itself is the target for drugs aimed to modify its function or to treat infections and tumours affecting this organ. Both detoxification and pharmacological processes occurring in the liver require the uptake of the drug by hepatic cells and, in some cases, the elimination into bile. These steps have been classified as detoxification phase 0 and phase III, respectively. Since most drugs cannot cross the plasma membrane by simple diffusion, the involvement of transporters is mandatory. Several members of the superfamilies of solute carriers (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, with a minor participation of other families of transporters, account for the uptake and efflux, respectively, of endobiotic and xenobiotic compounds across the basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. These transporters are also involved in the sensitivity and refractoriness to the pharmacological treatment of liver tumours. An additional interesting aspect of the role of plasma membrane transporters in liver pharmacology regards the promiscuity of many of these carriers, which accounts for a variety of drug-drug, endogenous substances-drug and food components-drug interactions with clinical relevance. PMID:24278693

  10. Use of inside-out chloroplast thylakoid membrane vesicles for studying electron transport and membrane structure

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Asafo-Adjei, E.

    1987-01-01

    Inside-out and right-side-out thylakoid vesicles were isolated from spinach chloroplasts by aqueous-polymer two-phase partitioning following mechanical fragmentation of thylakoid membranes by Yeda press treatment. Externally added plastocyanin stimulated the whole-chain and PSI electron transport rates in the inside-out thylakoid vesicles by about 500 and 350%, respectively, compared to about 50% stimulation for both assays in the fraction enriched in right-side-out vesicles. The electron transport between PSII and PSI in inside-out thylakoid vesicles appears to be interrupted due to plastocyanin release from the thylakoids by the Yeda press treatment, but it was restored by externally added plastocyanin. Acetic anhydride chemical modification and uncoupler-induced proton release from dark-adapted membranes are probes for detecting the sequested proton domains in thylakoid membranes. Both assays were used to find out if inside-out membranes retain metastable, localized proton binding domains. Treatment of dark-maintained inside-out thylakoid membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H)acetic anhydride showed no uncoupler-induced increase in acetylation of the 33, 24, and 18 kDa polypeptides of the oxygen-evolving-complex, indicating complete loss of the implicated proton domains in these polypeptides. The various steps in the inside-out preparation were studied to discern which steps(s) leads to the loss of the metastable domain proton pool.

  11. Total Artificial Heart, Augmented by Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lick, Scott D; Tran, Phat L; Kazui, Toshinobu; Smith, Richard G; Khalpey, Zain I

    2016-01-01

    Shortly after SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) implant, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) via a 31 Fr Avalon cannula was used for profound hypoxic lung dysfunction. Immediately after starting ECMO, TAH flow increased by 1.5-2.0 L/min, presumably because of augmented TAH filling by the ECMO jet. PMID:26771394

  12. Hydrogen production from methane using oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Sedigheh

    Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest in membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons to higher value products like hydrogen. However, hydrogen generation by this method has not yet been commercialized and suffers from low membrane stability, low membrane oxygen flux, high membrane fabrication costs, and high reaction temperature requirements. In this dissertation, hydrogen production from methane on two different types of ceramic membranes (dense SFC and BSCF) has been investigated. The focus of this research was on the effects of different parameters to improve hydrogen production in a membrane reactor. These parameters included operating temperature, type of catalyst, membrane material, membrane thickness, membrane preparation pH, and feed ratio. The role of the membrane in the conversion of methane and the interaction with a Pt/CeZrO2 catalyst has been studied. Pulse studies of reactants and products over physical mixtures of crushed membrane material and catalyst have clearly demonstrated that a synergy exists between the membrane and the catalyst under reaction conditions. The degree of catalyst/membrane interaction strongly impacts the conversion of methane and the catalyst performance. During thermogravimetric analysis, the onset temperature of oxygen release for BSCF was observed to be lower than that for SFC while the amount of oxygen release was significantly greater. Pulse injections of CO2 over crushed membranes at 800°C have shown more CO2 dissociation on the BSCF membrane than the SFC membrane, resulting in higher CO formation on the BSCF membrane. Similar to the CO2 pulses, when CO was injected on the samples at 800°C, CO2 production was higher on BSCF than SFC. It was found that hydrogen consumption on BSCF particles is 24 times higher than that on SFC particles. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption studies of

  13. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:26597501

  14. Membrane Transport in Yeast, An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Kschischo, Maik; Ramos, José; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Research on membrane transport has made continuous progress in the last decades and remains an active field of scientific investigation. In the case of yeast, most of the research has been conducted for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but also the so-called non-conventional yeasts are being studied, especially because of their peculiarities and, in some cases, specific transport systems. This book is based on the experience of several experts summarizing the current knowledge about important substrate transport processes in yeast. Each chapter provides both a general overview of the main transport characteristics of a specific substrate or group of substrates and the unique details that only an expert working in the field is able to transmit to the reader. PMID:26721268

  15. Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air

    DOEpatents

    Staiger, Chad L.; Vaughn, Mark R.; Miller, A. Keith; Cornelius, Christopher J.

    2011-01-25

    A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

  16. Oxygen-Permeable, Hydrophobic Membranes of Silanized alpha-Al2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Membranes made of silanized alumina have been prepared and tested as prototypes of derivatized ceramic membranes that are both highly permeable to oxygen and hydrophobic. Improved oxygen-permeable, hydrophobic membranes would be attractive for use in several technological disciplines, including supporting high-temperature aqueousphase oxidation in industrial production of chemicals, oxygenation of aqueous streams for bioreactors, and oxygenation of blood during open-heart surgery and in cases of extreme pulmonary dysfunction. In comparison with organic polymeric oxygen-permeable membranes now commercially available, the derivatized ceramic membranes are more chemically robust, are capable of withstanding higher temperatures, and exhibit higher oxygen-diffusion coefficients.

  17. Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) review of a lifesaving technology

    PubMed Central

    Makdisi, George

    2015-01-01

    Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) indications and usage has strikingly progressed over the last 20 years; it has become essential tool in the care of adults and children with severe cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction refractory to conventional management. In this article we will provide a review of ECMO development, clinical indications, patients’ management, options and cannulations techniques, complications, outcomes, and the appropriate strategy of organ management while on ECMO. PMID:26380745

  18. Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) review of a lifesaving technology.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, George; Wang, I-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) indications and usage has strikingly progressed over the last 20 years; it has become essential tool in the care of adults and children with severe cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction refractory to conventional management. In this article we will provide a review of ECMO development, clinical indications, patients' management, options and cannulations techniques, complications, outcomes, and the appropriate strategy of organ management while on ECMO. PMID:26380745

  19. Morphology and transport in ionic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disabb-Miller, Melanie Lisa

    Ion-containing polymers for fuel cell membranes have been studied to determine the chemical structure and ion content relationship to membrane water uptake, conductivity, and morphology. Random and block copolymer proton exchange membranes (PEMs) and anion exchange membranes (AEMs) with unique properties, such as diblock and triblock copolymers, superacidic moieties, and charge-delocalized polymer-tethered Ru-complex based cations, were investigated, and new metrics were developed to analyze fundamental ion transport behavior in these polymers. The morphology of the polymer systems was examined using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By studying a number of different ion-conducting systems using multiple techniques and deep analysis of structure-property relationships, a more complete picture of the property landscape of these materials was developed. Model diblock and unique triblock copolymer systems with center-functionalized blocks based on poly(styrene), PS, and poly(hexyl methacrylate), PHMA, were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PS block was functionalized for backbone-independent comparisons of PEM and AEM water uptake and conductivity to provide insight in how the properties of PEMs and AEMs compare and aid in further AEM development. The ratio of the mobile ion diffusion coefficients and dilute solution ion diffusivity (D/D0) was developed as a new metric, allowing for accurate comparison of polymer systems with different ion moieties and contents. Subsequently, it was determined that block copolymer PEMs and AEMs demonstrate the same barriers to ion transport if the mobility of the charge carrier is considered.

  20. Proton transport via the membrane surface.

    PubMed Central

    Georgievskii, Yuri; Medvedev, Emile S; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2002-01-01

    Some proton pumps, such as cytochrome c oxidase (C(c)O), translocate protons across biological membranes at a rate that considerably exceeds the rate of proton transport to the entrance of the proton-conducting channel via bulk diffusion. This effect is usually ascribed to a proton-collecting antenna surrounding the channel entrance. In this paper, we consider a realistic phenomenological model of such an antenna. In our model, a homogeneous membrane surface, which can mediate proton diffusion toward the channel entrance, is populated with protolytic groups that are in dynamic equilibrium with the solution. Equations that describe coupled surface-bulk proton diffusion are derived and analyzed. A general expression for the rate constant of proton transport via such a coupled surface-bulk diffusion mechanism is obtained. A rigorous criterion is formulated of when proton diffusion along the surface enhances the transport. The enhancement factor is found to depend on the ratio of the surface and bulk diffusional constants, pK(a) values of surface protolytic groups, and their concentration. A capture radius for a proton on the surface and an effective size of the antenna are found. The theory also predicts the effective distance that a proton can migrate on the membrane surface between a source (such as CcO) and a sink (such as ATP synthase) without fully equilibrating with the bulk. In pure aqueous solutions, protons can travel over long distances (microns). In buffered solutions, the travel distance is much shorter (nanometers); still the enhancement effect of the surface diffusion on the proton flow to a target on the surface can be tens to hundreds at physiological buffer concentrations. These results are discussed in a general context of chemiosmotic theory. PMID:12023208

  1. Safety Standard for Oxygen and Oxygen Systems: Guidelines for Oxygen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage, and Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's standard for oxygen system design, materials selection, operation, and transportation is presented. Minimum guidelines applicable to NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Installations are contained.

  2. Shared Molecular Mechanisms of Membrane Transporters.

    PubMed

    Drew, David; Boudker, Olga

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the crystal structures of small-molecule transporters has shed light on the conformational changes that take place during structural isomerization from outward- to inward-facing states. Rather than using a simple rocking movement of two bundles around a central substrate-binding site, it has become clear that even the most simplistic transporters utilize rearrangements of nonrigid bodies. In the most dramatic cases, one bundle is fixed while the other, structurally divergent, bundle carries the substrate some 18 Å across the membrane, which in this review is termed an elevator alternating-access mechanism. Here, we compare and contrast rocker-switch, rocking-bundle, and elevator alternating-access mechanisms to highlight shared features and novel refinements to the basic alternating-access model. PMID:27023848

  3. Osmotic water transport through carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amrit; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study osmotically driven transport of water molecules through hexagonally packed carbon nanotube membranes. Our simulation setup comprises two such semipermeable membranes separating compartments of pure water and salt solution. The osmotic force drives water flow from the pure-water to the salt-solution compartment. Monitoring the flow at molecular resolution reveals several distinct features of nanoscale flows. In particular, thermal fluctuations become significant at the nanoscopic length scales, and as a result, the flow is stochastic in nature. Further, the flow appears frictionless and is limited primarily by the barriers at the entry and exit of the nanotube pore. The observed flow rates are high (5.8 water molecules per nanosecond and nanotube), comparable to those through the transmembrane protein aquaporin-1, and are practically independent of the length of the nanotube, in contrast to predictions of macroscopic hydrodynamics. All of these distinct characteristics of nanoscopic water flow can be modeled quantitatively by a 1D continuous-time random walk. At long times, the pure-water compartment is drained, and the net flow of water is interrupted by the formation of structured solvation layers of water sandwiched between two nanotube membranes. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of confined water monolayers are studied. PMID:12878724

  4. Case-Based Learning of Blood Oxygen Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, William H.

    2006-01-01

    A case study about carbon monoxide poisoning was used help students gain a greater understanding of the physiology of oxygen transport by the blood. A review of student answers to the case questions showed that students can use the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve to make meaningful determinations of oxygen uptake and delivery. However, the…

  5. First steps in membrane oxygenation and prolonged extracorporeal perfusion in Duesseldorf using the Bramson membrane lung.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Hagen D

    2003-05-01

    After a shortened history of conventional closed and open heart surgery, including hypothermia by surface cooling and extracorporeal circulation, the first application of a new membrane oxygenator developed by ML Bramson with an integrated temperature exchange system and a heart-lung machine (HLM) was reported in 1972. The aim was to have an efficient oxygenating and gas exchange artificial lung that allowed prolonged perfusions in patients with cardiogenic shock or acute respiratory insufficiency. After in vitro closed recirculation studies comparing different bubble, vertical screen, and the new membrane oxygenators, the Bramson HLM was used in dog experiments before starting clinical cardiac surgery with routine interventions (closure of an atrial septal defect). The first clinically prolonged support for more than three hours after a double valve replacement in a NYHA class IV patient failed. A partial venoarterial prolonged perfusion for 42 hours and 43 minutes in a 10-year-old girl after surgical correction of a partial av canal defect and postoperative development of consistent lung edema caused by myocardial failure after an ischemic time of 43 minutes was the first successful long-term perfusion case in Europe. These first experiences with the Bramson membrane lung formed the basis, in our group, for further investigations of different perfusion routes and cannulations in animal experiments. Also, scanning electron microscopy studies could be performed with experimentally and clinically used membranes. The development of disposable membrane lung devices, for instance, Lande-Edwards, Kolobow Scimed, and General Electric Peirce membrane lungs, ameliorated and improved the use of these devices considerably. Also, BRAMSON had developed a disposable membrane lung device that had proved to be very effective in animal experiments by 1972, but, unfortunately, this device did not become commercially available. PMID:12952126

  6. Mixed-conducting ceramic membranes for partial oxygenation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Maiya, P.S.; Mieville, R.L.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A.; Bose, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    The most significant cost associated with the conventional partial oxidation of methane is that of an oxygen plant. Our new technology offers a way to lower this cost, and in this paper we explore the technology that is based on dense ceramic membranes and that uses air as the oxidant for methane-conversion reactions. Mixed-conducting ceramic materials have been produced from mixed-oxide systems of the La-Sr-Fe-Co-O (SFC) type, in the form of tubes and bars. Thermodynamic stability of the tubes was studied as a function of oxygen partial pressure by high-temperature XRD. Mechanical properties were measured and found to be adequate for a reactor in the case of SFC-2: Electronic and ionic conductivities were measured; SFC-2 is unique in the sense that the ratio of ionic to electronic conductance is close to unity. Performance of the membrane tubes was good only with SFC-2. Fracture of other SFC tubes was the consequence of an oxygen gradient that introduced a volumetric lattice difference between the inner and outer walls. SFC-2 tubes provided methane conversion efficiencies of >99% in a reactor. These tubes have operated for >1000 h.

  7. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  8. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: current clinical practice, coding, and reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Kolovos, Nikoleta S; Boyd, Kayla V; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2008-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a technique for providing life support for patients experiencing both pulmonary and cardiac failure by maintaining oxygenation and perfusion until native organ function is restored. ECMO is used routinely at many specialized hospitals for infants and less commonly for children with respiratory or cardiac failure from a variety of causes. Its usage is more controversial in adults, but select medical centers have reported favorable findings in patients with ARDS and other causes of severe pulmonary failure. ECMO is also rarely used as a rescue therapy in a small subset of adult patients with cardiac failure. This article will review the current uses and techniques of ECMO in the critical care setting as well as the evidence supporting its usage. In addition, current practice management related to coding and reimbursement for this intensive therapy will be discussed. PMID:18628221

  9. Oxygen Selective Membranes for Li-Air (O2) Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Owen; Salomon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) batteries have a much higher theoretical energy density than conventional lithium batteries and other metal air batteries, so they are being developed for applications that require long life. Water vapor from air must be prevented from corroding the lithium (Li) metal negative electrode during discharge under ambient conditions, i.e., in humid air. One method of protecting the Li metal from corrosion is to use an oxygen selective membrane (OSM) that allows oxygen into the cell while stopping or slowing the ingress of water vapor. The desired properties and some potential materials for OSMs for Li-air batteries are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:24958173

  10. Oxygen selective membranes for li-air (o2) batteries.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Owen; Salomon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) batteries have a much higher theoretical energy density than conventional lithium batteries and other metal air batteries, so they are being developed for applications that require long life. Water vapor from air must be prevented from corroding the lithium (Li) metal negative electrode during discharge under ambient conditions, i.e., in humid air. One method of protecting the Li metal from corrosion is to use an oxygen selective membrane (OSM) that allows oxygen into the cell while stopping or slowing the ingress of water vapor. The desired properties and some potential materials for OSMs for Li-air batteries are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:24958173

  11. Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adults With Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Schoenfeld, Elinor; Parnia, Sam; Singer, Adam J; Edelman, Norman

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), rates of return of spontaneous circulation and survival with minimal neurologic impairment remain low. Utilization of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for CA in adults is steadily increasing. Propensity-matched cohort studies have reported outcomes associated with ECMO use to be superior to that of conventional CPR alone in in-hospital patients with CA. In this review, we discuss the mechanism, indications, complications, and evidence for ECMO in CA in adults. PMID:25922385

  12. Novel Uses of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adults.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Darryl; Brodie, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been available for decades, with its use steadily expanding in the setting of advances in technology. The most common indications for venovenous and venoarterial ECMO remain severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock, respectively. Refinements in extracorporeal circuitry and cannulation strategies have led to novel indications for ECMO in cardiopulmonary failure, including pulmonary hypertension, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and less severe forms of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is hope for the development of destination device therapy, which could have significant implications for acute and chronic management of severe respiratory and cardiac disease. PMID:26304275

  13. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults: A practical guide for internists.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Sharma, Nirmal S; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adults has rapidly increased as the technology has evolved, although there is little definitive evidence that it is beneficial in this group. ECMO is now being used in acute respiratory distress syndrome (and was used extensively for this indication during the influenza H1N1 pandemic), as a bridge to lung or heart transplant, and in postcardiac arrest patients. We review the current evidence and indications for ECMO, focusing on its principles and practical aspects in adult patients with respiratory or cardiac failure. PMID:27168514

  14. Left ventricular thrombus associated with arteriovenous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Makdisi, George; Hashmi, Zubair A.; Wozniak, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has remarkably progressed over the recent years. It has become an invaluable tool in the care of adults and pediatric patients with severe cardiogenic shock. At the initiation of ECMO support, the left ventricular contractility is profoundly impaired. Inadequate right ventricular drainage and bronchial circulation can lead to left ventricular distension, with potential deleterious consequences, ranging from inadequate myocardial rest, pulmonary edema, or intracardiac clot formation. Therefore, it is of extreme importance to ensure an adequate left ventricular drainage. Here we present a case of LV thrombus developed while the patient is on central venoarterial (VA) ECMO. PMID:26716054

  15. Left ventricular thrombus associated with arteriovenous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, George; Hashmi, Zubair A; Wozniak, Thomas C; Wang, I-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has remarkably progressed over the recent years. It has become an invaluable tool in the care of adults and pediatric patients with severe cardiogenic shock. At the initiation of ECMO support, the left ventricular contractility is profoundly impaired. Inadequate right ventricular drainage and bronchial circulation can lead to left ventricular distension, with potential deleterious consequences, ranging from inadequate myocardial rest, pulmonary edema, or intracardiac clot formation. Therefore, it is of extreme importance to ensure an adequate left ventricular drainage. Here we present a case of LV thrombus developed while the patient is on central venoarterial (VA) ECMO. PMID:26716054

  16. Urea transport through composite polyallylamine membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Kubo, L. Y.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Clark, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Polyallylamine composite reverse osmosis membranes were prepared by plasma polymerization and deposition onto small-pored cellulose acetate/cellulose nitrate films. The polyallylamine coated the porous substrate with a thin uniform polymer film which exhibited water permeability and urea rejection, of interest because of the potential application of reverse osmosis to urine purification in closed environmental systems. The flux of C-14 labeled urea was studied under the influence of osmotic gradients provided by sodium chloride solutions. The urea flux was found to be enhanced by an osmotic pressure gradient in the same direction and diminished, but not prevented, by an opposing osmotic pressure gradient. Consideration is given to the mechanism of the urea transport, as well as to the influence of concentration polarization on the experimental results. The minimization of coupled flow in pores of a critical size range is apparently necessary to improve urea rejection.

  17. The Pathway for Oxygen: Tutorial Modelling on Oxygen Transport from Air to Mitochondrion: The Pathway for Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Bassingthwaighte, James B; Raymond, Gary M; Dash, Ranjan K; Beard, Daniel A; Nolan, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The 'Pathway for Oxygen' is captured in a set of models describing quantitative relationships between fluxes and driving forces for the flux of oxygen from the external air source to the mitochondrial sink at cytochrome oxidase. The intervening processes involve convection, membrane permeation, diffusion of free and heme-bound O2 and enzymatic reactions. While this system's basic elements are simple: ventilation, alveolar gas exchange with blood, circulation of the blood, perfusion of an organ, uptake by tissue, and consumption by chemical reaction, integration of these pieces quickly becomes complex. This complexity led us to construct a tutorial on the ideas and principles; these first PathwayO2 models are simple but quantitative and cover: (1) a 'one-alveolus lung' with airway resistance, lung volume compliance, (2) bidirectional transport of solute gasses like O2 and CO2, (3) gas exchange between alveolar air and lung capillary blood, (4) gas solubility in blood, and circulation of blood through the capillary syncytium and back to the lung, and (5) blood-tissue gas exchange in capillaries. These open-source models are at Physiome.org and provide background for the many respiratory models there. PMID:26782201

  18. Freestanding eggshell membrane-based electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors and oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jing; Wu, Hao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M.; Elzatahry, Ahmed A.; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-08-01

    A type of freestanding, light-weight eggshell membrane-based electrode is demonstrated for supercapacitors and for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysis. As a widely available daily waste, eggshell membranes have unique porous three-dimensional grid-like fibrous structures with relatively high surface area and abundant macropores, allowing for effective conjugation of carbon nanotubes and growth of NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays, an effective supercapacitor material and OER catalyst. The three-dimensional fibrous eggshell membrane frameworks with carbon nanotubes offer efficient pathways for charge transport, and the macropores between adjacent fibers are fully accessible for electrolytes and bubble evolution. As a supercapacitor, the eggshell membrane/carbon nanotube/NiCo2O4 electrode shows high specific capacitances at current densities from 1 to 20 A g-1, with excellent capacitance retention (>90%) at 10 A g-1 for over 10 000 cycles. When employed as an OER catalyst, this eggshell membrane-based electrode exhibits an OER onset potential of 1.53 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), and a stable catalytic current density of 20 mA cm-2 at 1.65 V vs. the RHE.A type of freestanding, light-weight eggshell membrane-based electrode is demonstrated for supercapacitors and for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysis. As a widely available daily waste, eggshell membranes have unique porous three-dimensional grid-like fibrous structures with relatively high surface area and abundant macropores, allowing for effective conjugation of carbon nanotubes and growth of NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays, an effective supercapacitor material and OER catalyst. The three-dimensional fibrous eggshell membrane frameworks with carbon nanotubes offer efficient pathways for charge transport, and the macropores between adjacent fibers are fully accessible for electrolytes and bubble evolution. As a supercapacitor, the eggshell membrane/carbon nanotube/NiCo2O4 electrode shows high specific

  19. Pressure dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction at the platinum microelectrode/nafion interface - Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.; Martin, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen reduction kinetics at the platinum/Nafion interface is of great importance in the advancement of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel-cell technology. This study focuses on the dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics on oxygen pressure. Conventional Tafel analysis of the data shows that the reaction order with respect to oxygen is unity at both high and low current densities. Chronoamperometric measurements of the transport parameters for oxygen in Nafion show that oxygen dissolution follows Henry's isotherm. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen is invariant with pressure; however, the diffusion coefficient for oxygen is lower when air is used as the equilibrating gas as compared to when oxygen is used for equilibration. These results are of value in understanding the influence of O2 partial pressure on the performance of PEM fuel cells and also in elucidating the mechanism of oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface.

  20. Medication Adsorption into Contemporary Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenator Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Klayton W.; Heger, Margaret L.; Fortuna, Randall S.; Mays, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to evaluate the amount of medication adsorbed into extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuits with a polymethylpentane membrane oxygenator and heparin-coated polyvinyl chloride tubing. METHODS: An ECMO circuit with the aforementioned components was set up ex vivo and primed with expired blood. Midazolam, lorazepam, morphine, and fentanyl were administered to the circuit. Fifteen minutes after medication administration, 60 mL of blood were removed and stored in a 60-mL syringe to serve as a control. Medication levels were drawn from the ECMO circuit (test) and control syringe (control) 15 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours after the medications were administered. ECMO circuit medication levels were compared to their corresponding syringe control medication levels. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the percentage of medication remaining in the blood and compare it to the control value. RESULTS: Except for morphine, there was a large decline in medication levels over the 48-hour period. Compared to control values, 17.2% of midazolam, 41.3% of lorazepam, 32.6% of fentanyl, and 102% of morphine remained in the ECMO circuit. CONCLUSION: Despite the use of newer components in ECMO circuits, a large quantity of medication is adsorbed into the ECMO circuit. Midazolam, lorazepam, and fentanyl all showed reductions in medication levels greater than 50%. Morphine may have advantages for patients on ECMO, as its concentration does not appear to be affected. PMID:25762874

  1. Analytical Applications of Transport Through Bulk Liquid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Ioana; Ruse, Elena; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Bunaciu, Andrei A

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the results of research in the use of bulk liquid membranes in separation processes and preconcentration for analytical purposes. It includes some theoretical aspects, definitions, types of liquid membranes, and transport mechanism, as well as advantages of using liquid membranes in laboratory studies. These concepts are necessary to understand fundamental principles of liquid membrane transport. Due to the multiple advantages of liquid membranes several studies present analytical applications of the transport through liquid membranes in separation or preconcentration processes of metallic cations and some organic compounds, such as phenol and phenolic derivatives, organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, and drugs. This review presents coupled techniques such as separation through the liquid membrane coupled with flow injection analysis. PMID:26185963

  2. Surface monofunctionalized polymethyl pentene hollow fiber membranes by plasma treatment and hemocompatibility modification for membrane oxygenators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Weiping; Zheng, Zhi; Fan, Wenling; Mao, Chun; Shi, Jialiang; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The hemocompatibility of polymethyl pentene (PMP) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) was improved through surface modification for membrane oxygenator applications. The modification was performed stepwise with the following: (1) oxygen plasma treatment, (2) functionalization of monosort hydroxyl groups through NaBH4 reduction, and (3) grafting 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) or heparin. SEM, ATR-FTIR, and XPS analyses were conducted to confirm successful grafting during the modification. The hemocompatibility of PMP HFMs was analyzed and compared through protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and coagulation tests. Pure CO2 and O2 permeation rates, as well as in vitro gas exchange rates, were determined to evaluate the mass transfer properties of PMP HFMs. SEM results showed that different nanofibril topographies were introduced on the HFM surface. ATR-FTIR and XPS spectra indicated the presence of functionalization of monosort hydroxyl group and the grafting of MPC and heparin. Hemocompatibility evaluation results showed that the modified PMP HFMs presented optimal hemocompatibility compared with pristine HFMs. Gas permeation results revealed that gas permeation flux increased in the modified HFMs because of dense surface etching during the plasma treatment. The results of in vitro gas exchange rates showed that all modified PMP HFMs presented decreased gas exchange rates because of potential surface fluid wetting. The proposed strategy exhibits a potential for fabricating membrane oxygenators for biomedical applications to prevent coagulation formation and alter plasma-induced surface topology and composition.

  3. Methods for using novel cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J.; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2016-01-12

    Methods using novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials operating at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes include oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  4. Proline transport across the intestinal microvillus membrane may be regulated by membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, D C; Gibbs, D J; Meddings, J B

    1992-03-23

    There is now abundant evidence that integral membrane protein function may be modulated by the physical properties of membrane lipids. The intestinal brush border membrane represents a membrane system highly specialized for nutrient absorption and, thus, provides an opportunity to study the interaction between integral membrane transport proteins and their lipid environment. We have previously demonstrated that alterations in this environment may modulate the function of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter in terms of its affinity for glucose. In this communication we report that membrane lipid-protein interactions are distinctly different for the proline transport proteins. Maximal transport rates for L-proline by either the neutral brush border or imino transport systems are reduced 10-fold when the surrounding membrane environment is made more fluid over the physiological range that exists along the crypt-villus axis. Furthermore, in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from enterocytes isolated from along the crypt-villus axis a similar gradient exists in the functional activity of these transport systems. This would imply that either the functional activity of these transporters are regulated by membrane physical properties or that the synthesis and insertion of these proteins is coordinated in concert with membrane physical properties as the enterocyte migrates up the crypt-villus axis. PMID:1567897

  5. Nanostructured silicon membranes for control of molecular transport.

    PubMed

    Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Retterer, Scott T; Fowlkes, Jason D; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-11-01

    A membrane that allows selective transport of molecular species requires precise engineering on the nanoscale. Membrane permeability can be tuned by controlling the physical structure and surface chemistry of the pores. Here, a combination of electron beam and optical lithography, along with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching, has been used to fabricate silicon membranes that are physically robust, have uniform pore sizes, and are directly integrated into a microfluidic network. Additional reductions in pore size were achieved using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide to coat membrane surfaces. Cross sectioning of the membranes using focused ion beam milling was used to determine the physical shape of the membrane pores before and after coating. Functional characterization of the membranes was performed by using quantitative fluorescence microscopy to document the transport of molecular species across the membrane. PMID:24932436

  6. Angiogenesis and hyperbaric oxygen in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Montecorboli, Umberto; Annese, Tiziana; Marinaccio, Christian; Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is increasingly applied in different areas of medical practice. The oxy-hyperbarism effects are not well understood in cancer malignancy. One unique feature of cancer is the presence of hypoxic regions that are insensitive to conventional therapies. It is possible to alter the hypoxic state and produce reactive oxygen species for better treatment outcome by HBOT. In the present study, we determined the effects of HBOT on angiogenesis, a signature of cancer progression, by using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in vivo assay. CAMs were exposed to 2.0 ATA (atmospheres absolute) for 30 min of hyperbaric oxygen on the 6(th) and 7(th) days of incubation (ED6, ED7). On the 10-11(th) day of incubation, CAMs were excised from eggs, fixed and analysed using APERIO ImageScope software. HBOT outcomes were evaluated quantifying the volumetric area occupied by blood vessels and calculating the number of blood vessel ramifications. Results indicated that CAMs treated at ED6 and ED7 had a significantly higher CAM vascularization and an increased number of blood vessel ramifications (+82% higher for ED6) compared to untreated CAMs (ED6=63.3±2.5 and ED7=57.7±5.5 vs. CTRL=34.7±2.5). Thus, HBOT induces an angiogenic response in treated CAMs through a classic sprouting mechanism. PMID:26864486

  7. Advanced oxygen-separation membranes. Topical report, April 1989-September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.D.; Copeland, R.J.

    1990-09-01

    The value of oxygen in improving the economics of high-temperature, natural-gas-fired processes is calculated, and the size and characteristics of the markets where oxygen-enhanced combustion could improve natural gas utilization are analyzed. Next, the cost of existing oxygen-separation processes is surveyed. Together, these define an economic target which any new production technology must meet if it is to be accepted. The bulk of the report analyzes three membrane based processes for oxygen production: polymeric membranes, porous ceramic membranes, and oxygen ion conducting membranes. Polymeric membranes are a commercially available technology limited to the production of oxygen-enriched air (OEA). Porous ceramic membranes have higher fluxes, higher costs, and are also limited to the production of OEA. Solid electrolyte, oxygen ion conductors produce pure oxygen, are applicable at both the very small and very large scales, and can potentially be less expensive than current technologies. In order to achieve this, better oxygen ion conductors and/or thinner membranes are required and membrane costs must be reduced. Improved conductors and thinner membranes are a target for fundamental research, while reduced costs will come both from improved materials and the general growth of the high-performance ceramics industry.

  8. Freestanding eggshell membrane-based electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors and oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jing; Wu, Hao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-09-14

    A type of freestanding, light-weight eggshell membrane-based electrode is demonstrated for supercapacitors and for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysis. As a widely available daily waste, eggshell membranes have unique porous three-dimensional grid-like fibrous structures with relatively high surface area and abundant macropores, allowing for effective conjugation of carbon nanotubes and growth of NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays, an effective supercapacitor material and OER catalyst. The three-dimensional fibrous eggshell membrane frameworks with carbon nanotubes offer efficient pathways for charge transport, and the macropores between adjacent fibers are fully accessible for electrolytes and bubble evolution. As a supercapacitor, the eggshell membrane/carbon nanotube/NiCo2O4 electrode shows high specific capacitances at current densities from 1 to 20 A g(-1), with excellent capacitance retention (>90%) at 10 A g(-1) for over 10,000 cycles. When employed as an OER catalyst, this eggshell membrane-based electrode exhibits an OER onset potential of 1.53 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), and a stable catalytic current density of 20 mA cm(-2) at 1.65 V vs. the RHE. PMID:26247312

  9. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Holt, Jason; Noy, Aleksandr; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  10. Structure and transport properties of ethylcellulose membranes with different types and granulation of magnetic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasowska, Monika; Strzelewicz, Anna; Rybak, Aleksandra; Dudek, Gabriela; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-06-01

    Structure and transport properties of ethylcellulose membranes with dispersed magnetic powder were investigated. The study mainly focused on diffusion, which is one of the transport mechanisms. The transport properties depend on many parameters like: polymeric matrix used, type of powder, its amount and granulation. The structure of the pattern formed by magnetic particles in the membrane matrix was studied. Description of the system was based on the phenomenological and molecular (random walk on a fractal lattice) approaches. Two parameters were calculated: the fractal dimension of random walk dw, and the fractal dimension of membrane structure df. The knowledge of both parameters made it possible to use the generalized equation of diffusion on the fractal structure obtained by Metzler et al. The research was carried out to determine the influence of magnetic powder granulation on the transport properties. The results showed that the random walk within the membranes of the smallest magnetic powder granulation was of the most subdiffusive character. Detailed investigation and quantitative description of gas transport through the membranes enables designing the membranes to be used in air oxygen enrichment.

  11. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation-What the Nephrologist Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Razo-Vazquez, Andres Oswaldo; Thornton, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use in adults is rapidly increasing in its use for both cardiac and respiratory failure. ECMO exists in 2 primary configurations: veno-venous ECMO, used in the setting of isolated respiratory failure, and veno-arterial ECMO, which can be used in respiratory failure but is mandatory in the setting of cardiac failure. Acute kidney injury occurs frequently in patients on ECMO, and renal replacement therapy is often required. Continuous forms of renal replacement therapy predominate, but there is a high degree of variation in clinical practice among ECMO centers internationally. No consensus exists regarding the optimal technique, but the use of continuous renal replacement machines has been shown to be safe and effective in patients on ECMO. An understanding of the basic principles and functionality of ECMO is important for both acid-base and fluid management in the intensive care unit. PMID:27113690

  12. Concepts from paediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for adult intensivists.

    PubMed

    Butt, Warwick; MacLaren, Graeme

    2016-12-01

    Over the last 5 years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adult patients with severe respiratory or cardiac failure. This contrasts to the use of the technology in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units, where it has been regarded as a standard of care for a number of conditions for over 25 years. Many innovations in ECMO circuitry or clinical management evolve first in one particular discipline and it may be helpful for individual clinicians to keep abreast of developments in ECMO across the entire age range, from neonatology to older adults. This review addresses nine concepts in ECMO that are better studied or established in paediatric medicine and considers their application in adult patients. PMID:26940318

  13. In vitro clearance of intravenous acetaminophen in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gillogly, A; Kilbourn, C; Waldvogel, J; Martin, J; Annich, G; Wagner, D

    2013-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used as a bridge to transplantation in critically ill patients who suffer from acute respiratory or cardiac failure with resultant hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. This is not amendable to conventional support intervention. Previous studies have shown significant drug losses in the components of an ECMO circuit, leading to decreased plasma drug levels. An in vitro study was conducted to determine: (1) changes in intravenous acetaminophen levels over time and (2) changes in concentration observed between different sites of the ECMO circuit. A single bolus dose of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen was injected into a standard blood-primed ECMO circuit. Plasma drug concentrations in the circuit were then measured at specific time points at three different locations to determine concentrations of the drug at time 0, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 360 minutes. The three samples were drawn pre- and post-membrane oxygenator and the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing. A second bolus dose was administered 24 hours after the first in order to compare "new" and "old" circuits. This entire process was repeated a total of three times. The results show that acetaminophen concentrations do not change significantly over time, with consistent levels seen in both new and old circuits (N=9). Average old circuit concentrations were approximately two times greater than the average new circuit concentrations after the circuit was re-dosed at 24 hours. Drug sequestration in the circuit was not significant in any of the three sites measured. It appears that, while acetaminophen levels remain relatively constant over a six hour period, dosing adjustments may be required for use in a circuit beyond the initial 24 hour period, depending on physiologic clearance of the drug. Assuming a six-hour dosing interval, levels should remain constant. PMID:23201817

  14. Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Tuberculosis Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Meenal; Via, Laura E.; Chen, Wei; Baish, James W.; Xu, Lei; Barry, Clifton E.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary granulomas—the hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection—are dense cellular lesions that often feature regions of hypoxia and necrosis, partially due to limited transport of oxygen. Low oxygen in granulomas can impair the host immune response, while MTB are able to adapt and persist in hypoxic environments. Here, we used a physiologically based mathematical model of oxygen diffusion and consumption to calculate oxygen profiles within the granuloma, assuming Michaelis–Menten kinetics. An approximate analytical solution—using a priori and newly estimated parameters from experimental data in a rabbit model of tuberculosis—was able to predict the size of hypoxic and necrotic regions in agreement with experimental results from the animal model. Such quantitative understanding of transport limitations can inform future tuberculosis therapeutic strategies that may include adjunct host-directed therapies that facilitate oxygen and drug delivery for more effective treatment. PMID:26253038

  15. Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Tuberculosis Granulomas.

    PubMed

    Datta, Meenal; Via, Laura E; Chen, Wei; Baish, James W; Xu, Lei; Barry, Clifton E; Jain, Rakesh K

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary granulomas-the hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection-are dense cellular lesions that often feature regions of hypoxia and necrosis, partially due to limited transport of oxygen. Low oxygen in granulomas can impair the host immune response, while MTB are able to adapt and persist in hypoxic environments. Here, we used a physiologically based mathematical model of oxygen diffusion and consumption to calculate oxygen profiles within the granuloma, assuming Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An approximate analytical solution-using a priori and newly estimated parameters from experimental data in a rabbit model of tuberculosis-was able to predict the size of hypoxic and necrotic regions in agreement with experimental results from the animal model. Such quantitative understanding of transport limitations can inform future tuberculosis therapeutic strategies that may include adjunct host-directed therapies that facilitate oxygen and drug delivery for more effective treatment. PMID:26253038

  16. Residues in the pathway through a membrane transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, R T; Maloney, P C

    1995-01-01

    The structure of solute transporters is understood largely from analysis of their amino acid sequences, and more direct information is greatly needed. Here we report work that applies cysteine scanning mutagenesis to describe structure-function relations in UhpT, a bacterial membrane transporter. By using an impermeant SH-reactive agent to probe single-cysteine variants, we show that UhpT transmembrane segment 7 spans the membrane as an alpha-helix and that the central portion of this helix is exposed to both membrane surfaces, forming part of the translocation pathway through this transporter. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597063

  17. Electrophoretic Transport of Biomolecules through Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghua; Su, Xin; Wu, Ji; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophoretic transport of proteins across electrochemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes has been investigated. Small charged protein, lysozyme, was successfully pumped across MWCNT membranes by electric field while rejecting larger bovine serum albumin (BSA). Transport of the lysozome was reduced by a factor of about 30 in comparison to bulk mobility and consistent with prediction for hindered transport. Mobilities between 0.33-1.4×10-9 m2/V-s were observed and are approximately 10 fold faster than comparable ordered nanoporous membranes and are consistent with continuum models. For mixtures of BSA and lysozyme, complete rejection of BSA is seen with electrophoretic separations PMID:21338104

  18. Distribution and dynamics of electron transport complexes in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-03-01

    The cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane represents a system that can carry out both oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration simultaneously. The organization, interactions and mobility of components of these two electron transport pathways are indispensable to the biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane modules and the optimization of bioenergetic electron flow in response to environmental changes. These are of fundamental importance to the metabolic robustness and plasticity of cyanobacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the distribution and dynamics of electron transport components in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes. Global understanding of the principles that govern the dynamic regulation of electron transport pathways in nature will provide a framework for the design and synthetic engineering of new bioenergetic machinery to improve photosynthesis and biofuel production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26619924

  19. Thermodynamics of Ionic Transport through Functionalized Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathee, Vikramjit; Qu, Siyi; Dilenschneider, Theodore; Phillip, William A.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    Through microphase separation of block copolymers, highly porous solid membranes may be assembled. Further functionalization with amine and sulfonic acid groups has demonstrated promise in exquisitely controlling the flux of charged species, and in particular multivalent ions. Using coarse-grained molecular simulations, we explore the essential thermodynamics underlying salt rejection in charge-functionalized membranes, and develop a model capable of linking the performance of these membranes to their molecular character through free energy calculations.

  20. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  1. The Pathway for Oxygen: Tutorial Modelling on Oxygen Transport from Air to Mitochondrion

    PubMed Central

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Raymond, Gary M.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Beard, Daniel A.; Nolan, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The ‘Pathway for Oxygen’ is captured in a set of models describing quantitative relationships between fluxes and driving forces for the flux of oxygen from the external air source to the mitochondrial sink at cytochrome oxidase. The intervening processes involve convection, membrane permeation, diffusion of free and heme-bound O2 and enzymatic reactions. While this system’s basic elements are simple: ventilation, alveolar gas exchange with blood, circulation of the blood, perfusion of an organ, uptake by tissue, and consumption by chemical reaction, integration of these pieces quickly becomes complex. This complexity led us to construct a tutorial on the ideas and principles; these first PathwayO2 models are simple but quantitative and cover: 1) a ‘one-alveolus lung’ with airway resistance, lung volume compliance, 2) bidirectional transport of solute gasses like O2 and CO2, 3) gas exchange between alveolar air and lung capillary blood, 4) gas solubility in blood, and circulation of blood through the capillary syncytium and back to the lung, and 5) blood-tissue gas exchange in capillaries. These open-source models are at Physiome.org and provide background for the many respiratory models there. PMID:26782201

  2. Surface modification of PTMSP membranes by plasma treatment: Asymmetry of transport in organic solvent nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Tsarkov, S E; Gilman, A B; Khotimsky, V S; Roldughin, V I; Volkov, V V

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the effect of asymmetry of the membrane transport was studied for organic solvents and solutes upon their nanofiltration through the plasma-modified membranes based on poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP). Plasma treatment is shown to provide a marked hydrophilization of the hydrophobic PTMSP surface (the contact angle of water decreases from 88 down to 20°) and leads to the development of a negative charge of -5.2 nC/cm(2). The XPS measurements prove the formation of the oxygen-containing groups (Si-O and C-O) due to the surface modification. The AFM images show that the small-scale surface roughness of the plasma-treated PTMSP sample is reduced but the large-scale surface heterogeneities become more pronounced. The modified membranes retain their hydrophilic surface properties even after the nanofiltration tests and 30-day storage under ambient conditions. The results of the filtration tests show that when the membrane is oriented so that its modified layer contacts the feed solution, the membrane permeability for linear alcohols (methanol-propanol) and acetone decreases nearly two times. When the modified membrane surface faces the permeate, the membrane is seen to regain its transport characteristics: the flux becomes equal to that of the unmodified PTMSP. The well-pronounced effect of the transport asymmetry is observed for the solution of the neutral dye Solvent Blue 35 in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. For example, the initial membrane shows the negative retention for the Solvent Blue 35 dye (-16%) upon its filtration from the ethanol solution whereas, for the modified PTMSP membrane, the retention increases up to 17%. Various effects contributing to the asymmetry of the membrane transport characteristics are discussed. PMID:25482845

  3. Membrane Transporters as Mediators of Cisplatin Effects and Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Transporters are important mediators of specific cellular uptake and thus, not only for effects, but also for side effects, metabolism, and excretion of many drugs such as cisplatin. Cisplatin is a potent cytostatic drug, whose use is limited by its severe acute and chronic nephro-, oto-, and peripheral neurotoxicity. For this reason, other platinum derivatives, such as carboplatin and oxaliplatin, with less toxicity but still with antitumoral action have been developed. Several transporters, which are expressed on the cell membranes, have been associated with cisplatin transport across the plasma membrane and across the cell: the copper transporter 1 (Ctr1), the copper transporter 2 (Ctr2), the P-type copper-transporting ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B, the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), and the multidrug extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1). Some of these transporters are also able to accept other platinum derivatives as substrate. Since membrane transporters display a specific tissue distribution, they can be important molecules that mediate the entry of platinum derivatives in target and also nontarget cells possibly mediating specific effects and side effects of the chemotherapeutic drug. This paper summarizes the literature on toxicities of cisplatin compared to that of carboplatin and oxaliplatin and the interaction of these platinum derivatives with membrane transporters. PMID:24278698

  4. Enhanced ionic oxygen flow through mixed ionic-electronic conducting membranes: Directional dependence, composite construction and the partial oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, Kirk R.

    Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conducting (MIEC) membranes transport ions and electrons in a crystalline matrix. Ionic transport occurs through MIEC materials in the presence of an applied ionic potential gradient. MIEC membranes form a special class of ionic conductors with primary applications as membrane separators, sensors, and components in solid oxide fuel cells. Current efforts focus on separation of oxygen from air for supply to high temperature reactions. One such reaction is the methane partial oxidation to synthesis gas (CO and H2). Certain MIEC membrane characteristics are required for a methane partial oxidation reactor: (1) the cost of the material must be economical on a tube cost per mol oxygen transported basis; (2) the membrane must be stable in steep oxygen partial pressure gradients and in the presence of reducing gases; (3) the membrane must be stable at temperatures exceeding 800°C without fracturing due to thermal stress. Two mechanisms govern the transport of oxygen through MIEC membranes: surface exchange at the MIEC/gas surface and ionic transport through the MIEC bulk. Most MIEC membranes conduct oxygen with a mixed transport mechanism, i.e., both surface exchange and bulk diffusion affect the total transport. We investigate the relative importance of bulk diffusion versus surface exchange in MIEC tubular and disk membranes made of La0.5Sr0.5Fe 0.8Ga0.2O3-delta. We propose a proof based on the currently accepted transport model for the directional dependence of ionic flow through a tubular MIEC. We qualitatively confirm directional dependence using a novel experimental system. Further, we propose a model for ionic flow in a composite membrane system consisting of a dense, tubular LSFG substrate with a thin, dense layer of SrCox Fe1-xO3-delta applied to the surface(s). Comparisons are made between the performance of the monolithic membrane tube and the layered composite membrane tube. A layered composite tubular membrane is constructed and tested

  5. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  6. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  7. Current status of ceramic-based membranes for oxygen separation from air.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Salwa Meredith; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Subhash

    2010-10-15

    There has been tremendous progress in membrane technology for gas separation, in particular oxygen separation from air in the last 20 years. It provides an alternative route to the existing conventional separation processes such as cryogenic distillation and pressure swing adsorption as well as cheaper production of oxygen with high purity. This review presents the recent advances of ceramic membranes for the separation of oxygen from air at high temperature. It covers the issues and problems with respect to the selectivity and separation performance. The paper also presents different approaches applied to overcome these challenges. The future directions of ceramic-based membranes for oxygen separation from air are also presented. PMID:20813344

  8. Intramyocardial oxygen transport by quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in calves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbergh, Tobias; Larsson, Marcus; Szabó, Zoltán; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Intramyocardial oxygen transport was assessed during open-chest surgery in calves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using a small intramuscular fiber-optic probe. The sum of hemo- and myoglobin tissue fraction and oxygen saturation, the tissue fraction and oxidation of cytochrome aa3, and the tissue fraction of methemoglobin were estimated using a calibrated empirical light transport model. Increasing the oxygen content in the inhaled gas, 21%-50%-100%, in five calves (group A) gave an increasing oxygen saturation of 19+/-4%, 24+/-5%, and 28+/-8% (p<0.001, ANOVA repeated measures design) and mean tissue fractions of 1.6% (cytochrome aa3) and 1.1% (hemo- and myoglobin). Cardiac arrest in two calves gave an oxygen saturation lower than 5%. In two calves (group B), a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD pump) was implanted. Oxygen saturation in group B animals increased with LVAD pump speed (p<0.001, ANOVA) and with oxygen content in inhaled gas (p<0.001, ANOVA). The cytochrome aa3 oxidation level was above 96% in both group A and group B calves, including the two cases involving cardiac arrest. In conclusion, the estimated tissue fractions and oxygenation/oxidation levels of the myocardial chromophores during respiratory and hemodynamic provocations were in agreement with previously presented results, demonstrating the potential of the method.

  9. Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger failure detected by unique blood gas findings.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Justin L

    2014-03-01

    Failure of components integrated into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, although rare, can bring about catastrophic results. One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane. These areas are glued or welded to keep the two compartments separate, maintaining sterility of the blood. Although quality control testing is performed by the manufacturer at the factory level, transport presents the real possibility for damage. Because of this, each manufacturer has included in the instructions for use a testing procedure for testing the integrity of the heat exchanger component. Water is circulated through the heat exchanger before priming and a visible check is made of the oxygenator bundle to check for leaks. If none are apparent, then priming of the oxygenator is performed. In this particular case, this procedure was not useful in detecting communication between the water and blood chambers of the oxygenator. PMID:24779125

  10. O2 and CO2 glow-discharge-assisted oxygen transport through Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outlaw, R. A.

    1990-08-01

    The permeation of oxygen through Ag normally occurs by a sequence of steps which include the initial dissociative adsorption of molecular oxygen at the upstream surface, the dissolution of the atoms into the bulk, and the subsequent migration of the atoms between octahedral sites of the lattice until they arrive at the vacuum interface downstream. The dissociative adsorption step, however, proceeds slowly, as indicated by the low sticking coefficient of O2 on Ag(10-6-10-3). The application of a dc field in 0.5 Torr of O2 (E/n˜10-14 V cm2) on the upstream side of a Ag membrane generated gas phase atomic oxygen that substantially enhanced the transport. The transport flux was observed to increase from a value of 4.4×1013 cm-2 s-1 to a glow discharge value of 2.83×1014 cm-2 s-1 at a membrane temperature of 650 °C. This suggests that the dissociative adsorption step limits the supply of oxygen atoms to the upstream side of the membrane. When the upstream O2 was replaced by an equal pressure of CO2, only a small permeation signal was observed, but the application of the glow discharge substantially increased the transport flux from 3.25×1012 cm-2 s-1 to 1.74×1014 cm-2 s-1. This method of separating O2 from a CO2 environment may be a possible mechanism for providing a supply of oxygen for astronauts in a manned mission to Mars.

  11. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks. PMID:25398979

  12. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: use in meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Short, B L

    2008-12-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been successful as a rescue therapy for infants with respiratory failure with some diagnoses such as meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) having a survival rate of more than 94%. New therapies have allowed many infants who would have required ECMO to be kept off ECMO, but at what cost. The survival rate for the neonatal ECMO patient has dropped over the years, whereas the time of ECMO has increased, indicating that the new therapies are keeping the less ill infants off ECMO. The major cause of non-survival in this population remains intraventricular hemorrhage. The primary risk factors related to this are thought to be pre-ECMO events, such as hypoxia and/or ischemia either prenatally or post-delivery. ECMO events that may complicate this are heparinization that is required while on ECMO and concern for the effect of shear stress and blood flow pattern changes created by the ECMO pump with venoarterial ECMO, although these changes are not seen in venovenous ECMO, the more common form of ECMO. Newer low-resistant microporous artificial lungs and miniaturized pumping systems may allow ECMO to be performed using less blood and safer equipment. The smaller low-resistant artificial lungs provide the ability to consider giving extracorporeal life support using only this membrane with flow provided by an arterial-venous shunt, thus eliminating the pumping system all together. Trials are ongoing in adults and, if effective, may direct further research into using this technique in newborns where the umbilical artery and vein could be used as the arterial-venous shunt. PMID:19057615

  13. Ionic transport properties of template-synthesized gold nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng

    Ionic transport in nanotubes exhibits unique properties due to the strong interactions between ions and the nanotube surface. The main objective of my research is to explore and regulate the ionic transport in gold nanotube membranes. Chapter 1 overviews a versatile method of fabricating nanostructured materials, called the template synthesis. Important parameters of the template synthesis are introduced such as templates and deposition methods. The template synthesis method is used to prepare membranes used in this dissertation. Chapter 2 describes a method to increase the ionic conductivity in membranes containing gold nanotubes with small diameter (4 nm). The gold nanotube membrane is prepared by the electroless plating of gold in a commercially available polycarbonate membrane. Voltages are applied to the gold nanotube membrane and fixed charges are injected on the gold nanotube walls. We show that ionic conductivity of the gold nanotube membrane can be enhanced in aqueous potassium chloride (KCl) solution at negative applied voltages. When the most negative voltage (-0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied to the membrane, the ionic conductivity of the solution inside the gold nanotube (94 mS.cm-1) is comparable to that of 1 M aqueous KCl, over two orders of magnitude higher than that of the 0.01 M KCl contacting the membrane. Chapter 3 explores another important transport property of the gold nanotube membrane -- ion permselectivity. When the permselective membrane separates two electrolyte solutions at different concentrations, a membrane potential is developed and measured by the potentiometric method. Surface charge density and the ion mobilities are estimated by fitting the experimental data with a pre-existing model. The surface charge density of the gold nanotube membrane in this research is estimated to be 2 muC/cm2. Chapter 4 describes voltage-controlled ionic transport in a gold/polypyrrole membrane doped with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Polypyrrole

  14. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  15. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  16. Role of plasma membrane transporters in muscle metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, A; Fandos, C; Palacín, M

    2000-01-01

    Muscle plays a major role in metabolism. Thus it is a major glucose-utilizing tissue in the absorptive state, and changes in muscle insulin-stimulated glucose uptake alter whole-body glucose disposal. In some conditions, muscle preferentially uses lipid substrates, such as fatty acids or ketone bodies. Furthermore, muscle is the main reservoir of amino acids and protein. The activity of many different plasma membrane transporters, such as glucose carriers and transporters of carnitine, creatine and amino acids, play a crucial role in muscle metabolism by catalysing the influx or the efflux of substrates across the cell surface. In some cases, the membrane transport process is subjected to intense regulatory control and may become a potential pharmacological target, as is the case with the glucose transporter GLUT4. The goal of this review is the molecular characterization of muscle membrane transporter proteins, as well as the analysis of their possible regulatory role. PMID:10903126

  17. Oxygen Transport in Melts Based on V2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimashin, Anton; Belousov, Valery

    2016-02-01

    An oxygen ion transport model was developed for oxide melts based on V2O5. Within the framework of this model, the values of the parabolic rate constant of catastrophic oxidation of V2O5-deposited copper and the oxygen flux through the slags based on molten V2O5 were calculated and compared with experimental data. The calculated and experimental values are of the same order of magnitude which shows an adequacy of the model.

  18. Oxygen radicals diminish dopamine transporter function in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, A E; Metzger, R R; Beyeler, M L; Gibb, J W; Hanson, G R

    1997-09-01

    Incubation of striatal synaptosomes with the oxygen radical generating enzyme, xanthine oxidase, decreased [3H]dopamine uptake: an effect attributable to a decreased Vmax. Concurrent incubation with the superoxide radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase, abolished the xanthine oxidase-induced decrease. These results indicate that, like methamphetamine administration in vivo, reactive oxygen species diminish dopamine transporter function in vitro. The significance of these findings to mechanisms responsible for effects of methamphetamine is discussed. PMID:9346337

  19. Hydrogen-oxygen proton-exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, R.; Pham, M.; Leonida, A.; Mcelroy, J.; Nalette, T.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen SPE fuel cells and SPE electrolyzers (products of Hamilton Standard) both use a Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) as the sole electrolyte. The SPE cells have demonstrated a ten year life capability under load conditions. Ultimate life of PEM fuel cells and electrolyzers is primarily related to the chemical stability of the membrane. For perfluorocarbon proton-exchange membranes an accurate measure of the membrane stability is the fluoride loss rate. Millions of cell hours have contributed to establishing a relationship between fluroride loss rates and average expected ultimate cell life. Several features were introduced into SPE fuel cells and SPE electrolyzers such that applications requiring greater than or equal to 100,000 hours of life can be considered. Equally important as the ultimate life is the voltage stability of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells and electrolyzers. Here again the features of SPE fuel cells and SPE electrolyzers have shown a cell voltage stability in the order of 1 microvolt per hour. That level of stability were demonstrated for tens of thousands of hours in SPE fuel cells at up to 500 amps per square foot (ASF) current density. The SPE electrolyzers have demonstrated the same at 1000 ASF. Many future extraterrestrial applications for fuel cells require that they be self recharged. To translate the proven SPE cell life and stability into a highly reliable extraterrestrial electrical energy storage system, a simplification of supporting equipment is required. Static phase separation, static fluid transport and static thermal control will be most useful in producting required system reliability. Although some 200,000 SPE fuel cell hours were recorded in earth orbit with static fluid phase separation, no SPE electrolyzer has, as yet, operated in space.

  20. Method measuring oxygen tension and transport within subcutaneous devices

    PubMed Central

    Weidling, John; Sameni, Sara; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Botvinick, Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cellular therapies hold promise to replace the implantation of whole organs in the treatment of disease. For most cell types, in vivo viability depends on oxygen delivery to avoid the toxic effects of hypoxia. A promising approach is the in situ vascularization of implantable devices which can mediate hypoxia and improve both the lifetime and utility of implanted cells and tissues. Although mathematical models and bulk measurements of oxygenation in surrounding tissue have been used to estimate oxygenation within devices, such estimates are insufficient in determining if supplied oxygen is sufficient for the entire thickness of the implanted cells and tissues. We have developed a technique in which oxygen-sensitive microparticles (OSMs) are incorporated into the volume of subcutaneously implantable devices. Oxygen partial pressure within these devices can be measured directly in vivo by an optical probe placed on the skin surface. As validation, OSMs have been incorporated into alginate beads, commonly used as immunoisolation devices to encapsulate pancreatic islet cells. Alginate beads were implanted into the subcutaneous space of Sprague–Dawley rats. Oxygen transport through beads was characterized from dynamic OSM signals in response to changes in inhaled oxygen. Changes in oxygen dynamics over days demonstrate the utility of our technology. PMID:25162910

  1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in neonates with septic shock.

    PubMed

    McCune, S; Short, B L; Miller, M K; Lotze, A; Anderson, K D

    1990-05-01

    Neonatal septic shock has significant morbidity and mortality with current therapeutic measures. At Children's National Medical Center, from June 1984 to October 1986, 10 of 100 patients treated with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) had a documented diagnosis of septic shock. All of these infants fulfilled criteria consistent with 80% mortality using conventional intensive medical management. However, the survival rate for the septic neonates in this study was 100%. Compared with other groups of infants treated with ECMO, these septic neonates required significantly more ventilatory support after ECMO and had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease (30% v 12%). The septic neonates were also at higher risk for intracranial hemorrhage than the other infants treated with ECMO (40% v 26%). The necessity for prolonged intubation after ECMO for patients with septic shock suggests that this condition may be associated with additional structural damage not seen with meconium aspiration syndrome or respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, for neonatal patients with septic shock unresponsive to conventional medical management, ECMO must be considered a viable alternative treatment. PMID:2352078

  2. Twelve Hours In Vitro Biocompatibility Testing of Membrane Oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Bleilevens, Christian; Grottke, Oliver; Tillmann, Sabine; Honickel, Markus; Kopp, Rüedger; Arens, Jutta; Rossaint, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    In vitro test systems for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (mock loop) represent an interesting alternative to complex and expensive in vivo test systems to analyze the pathomechanisms leading to insufficient biocompatibility. Data on mock loop systems are limited, and operation times are constricted to a maximum duration of 6 hr. This study aims at a 12 hr operation time and frequent monitoring of markers for insufficient biocompatibility in two experimental settings. Porcine blood circulated in a mock loop without any modifications, or the circuit was operated with a CO2-enhanced gas (5% CO2/21% O2/74% N2) in combination with a nutrient solution (phosphate-adenine-glucose-guanosine-saline-mannitol). Coagulation parameters changed over time without differences between the two groups. In the unmodified test setting, a pH increase was detected after 1 hr, followed by significantly increased levels of free hemoglobin as a marker for hemolysis and elevated numbers of activated platelets, which correlate with detected von Willebrand factor, microparticles, and interleukin-β. Proinflammatory cytokine levels were significantly increased after 12 hr. In contrast, these parameters remained constant in the modified test setting providing proof of a stable operating in vitro mock loop system with an extended/prolonged operation time. PMID:26273935

  3. Successful Treatment of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Zamani, Nasim; Rahimi, Mitra; Hajesmaeili, Mohammadreza; Taherkhani, Maryam; Sadeghi, Roxana

    2016-03-01

    Aluminium phosphide (ALP) is one of the most commonly used pesticides worldwide with high mortality rates. Cellular damage and cardiorespiratory failure are the most common causes of mortality and morbidity after poisoning. It is supposed that giving enough time to the patient to survive, the most critical hours after exposure may help the cardiovascular system to recover itself and save the patient's life. During a training workshop for medical extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a 28-year-old ALP-poisoned male was referred to us. Fifty minutes after admission, he developed hypotension and bradycardia and was transferred to ICU. On the second venous blood gas, he had severe metabolic acidosis. After starting the patient on the routine treatment of ALP poisoning, he was a candidate for veno-arterial (VA) ECMO. After three days, lactate level decreased and his general condition improved. On day four, the patient was completely separated from the ECMO machine with acceptable echocardiography and ejection fraction of 40%. One day later, he was extubated, sent to the ward and subsequently discharged in good condition. We suggest this method of treatment for severe ALP poisoning as well as any other poisoning that causes cell toxicity and abrupt cardiovascular or respiratory failure. PMID:26335576

  4. Clinical and billing review of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Blum, James M; Lynch, William R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2015-06-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a temporary technique for providing life support for cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary dysfunction, or both. The two forms of ECMO, veno-arterial (VA) and veno-venous (VV), are used to support cardiopulmonary and pulmonary dysfunction, respectively. Historically, ECMO was predominantly used in the neonatal and pediatric populations, as early adult studies failed to improve outcomes. ECMO has become far more common in the adult population because of positive results in published case series and clinical trials during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in 2009 to 2010. Advances in technology that make the technique much easier to implement likely fueled the renewed interest. Although exact criteria for ECMO are not available, patients who are good candidates are generally considered to be relatively young and suffering from acute illness that is believed to be reversible or organ dysfunction that is otherwise treatable. With the increase in the use in the adult population, a number of different codes have been generated to better identify the method of support with distinctly different relative value units assigned to each code from a very simple prior coding scheme. To effectively be reimbursed for use of the technique, it is imperative that the clinician understands the new coding scheme and works with payers to determine what is incorporated into each specific code. PMID:25789816

  5. Highlighting Indication of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in endocrine emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Anne; Wang, Chih-Hsien; You, Hao-Chun; Chou, Nai-Kwoun; Yu, Hsi-Yu; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Huang, Shu-Chien; Wu, I-Hui; Tseng, Li-Jung; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been repeatedly used to rescue patients with cardiopulmonary arrest. However, its clinical utility in endocrine emergencies remains unclear. Herein, we describe a case series of 12 patients presenting with refractory shock secondary to endocrine emergencies who were rescued by ECMO support. Patients were identified between 2005 and 2012 from our ECMO registry. The diagnostic distribution was as follows: pheochromocytoma crisis (n = 4), thyroid storm (n = 5), and diabetic ketoacidosis (n = 3). The initial presentation of pheochromocytoma crisis was indistinguishable from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and frequently accompanied by paroxysmal hypertension and limb ischemia. Thyroid storm was characterized by hyperbilirubinemia and severe gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas neurological symptoms were common in diabetic ketoacidosis. The clinical outcomes of patients with endocrine emergencies were compared with those of 80 cases with AMI who received ECMO because of cardiogenic shock. The cardiac function and the general conditions showed a significantly faster recovery in patients with endocrine emergencies than in those with AMI. We conclude that ECMO support can be clinically useful in endocrine emergencies. The screening of endocrine diseases should be considered during the resuscitation of patients with refractory circulatory shock. PMID:26299943

  6. [Individualised care plan during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Call Mañosa, S; Pujol Garcia, A; Chacón Jordan, E; Martí Hereu, L; Pérez Tejero, G; Gómez Simón, V; Estruga Asbert, A; Gallardo Herrera, L; Vaquer Araujo, S; de Haro López, C

    2016-01-01

    An individualised care plan is described for a woman diagnosed with pneumonia, intubated, and on invasive mechanical ventilation, who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A nursing care plan was designed based on Marjory Gordon functional patterns. The most important nursing diagnoses were prioritised, using a model of clinical reasoning model (Analysis of the current status) and NANDA taxonomy. A description is presented on, death anxiety, impaired gas exchange, decreased cardiac output, dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility, risk for disuse syndrome, infection risk, and bleeding risk. The principal objectives were: to reduce the fear of the family, achieve optimal respiratory and cardiovascular status, to maintain gastrointestinal function, to avoid immobility complications, and to reduce the risk of infection and bleeding. As regards activities performed: we gave family support; correct management of the mechanical ventilation airway, cardio-respiratory monitoring, skin and nutritional status; control of possible infections and bleeding (management of therapies, care of catheters…). A Likert's scale was used to evaluate the results, accomplishing all key performance indicators which were propose at the beginning. Individualised care plans with NNN taxonomy using the veno-venous ECMO have not been described. Other ECMO care plans have not used the same analysis model. This case can help nurses to take care of patients subjected to veno-venous ECMO treatment, although more cases are needed to standardise nursing care using NANDA taxonomy. PMID:27137415

  7. Uncoupling protein-2 accumulates rapidly in the inner mitochondrial membrane during mitochondrial reactive oxygen stress in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Giardina, Tindaro M; Steer, James H; Lo, Susan Z Y; Joyce, David A

    2008-02-01

    Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) is a member of the inner mitochondrial membrane anion-carrier superfamily. Although mRNA for UCP2 is widely expressed, protein expression is detected in only a few cell types, including macrophages. UCP2 functions by an incompletely defined mechanism, to reduce reactive oxygen species production during mitochondrial electron transport. We observed that the abundance of UCP2 in macrophages increased rapidly in response to treatments (rotenone, antimycin A and diethyldithiocarbamate) that increased mitochondrial superoxide production, but not in response to superoxide produced outside the mitochondria or in response to H2O2. Increased UCP2 protein was not accompanied by increases in ucp2 gene expression or mRNA abundance, but was due to enhanced translational efficiency and possibly stabilization of UCP2 protein in the inner mitochondrial membrane. This was not dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings extend our understanding of the homeostatic function of UCP2 in regulating mitochondrial reactive oxygen production by identifying a feedback loop that senses mitochondrial reactive oxygen production and increases inner mitochondrial membrane UCP2 abundance and activity. Reactive oxygen species-induction of UCP2 may facilitate survival of macrophages and retention of function in widely variable tissue environments. PMID:18082129

  8. Water and Molecular Transport across Nanopores in Monolayer Graphene Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Doojoon; O'Hern, Sean; Kidambi, Piran; Boutilier, Michael; Song, Yi; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Kong, Jing; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    Graphene's atomic thickness and high tensile strength allow it to outstand as backbone material for next-generation high flux separation membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations predicted that a single-layer graphene membrane could exhibit high permeability and selectivity for water over ions/molecules, qualifying as novel water desalination membranes. However, experimental investigation of water and molecular transport across graphene nanopores had remained barely explored due to the presence of intrinsic defects and tears in graphene. We introduce two-step methods to seal leakage across centimeter scale single-layer graphene membranes create sub-nanometer pores using ion irradiation and oxidative etching. Pore creation parameters were varied to explore the effects of created pore structures on water and molecular transport driven by forward osmosis. The results demonstrate the potential of nanoporous graphene as a reliable platform for high flux nanofiltration membranes.

  9. Simulating and Modeling Transport Through Atomically Thin Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Joseph; Eaves, Joel

    2014-03-01

    The world is running out of clean portable water. The efficacy of water desalination technologies using porous materials is a balance between membrane selectivity and solute throughput. These properties are just starting to be understood on the nanoscale, but in the limit of atomically thin membranes it is unclear whether one can apply typical continuous time random walk models. Depending on the size of the pore and thickness of the membrane, mass transport can range from single stochastic passage events to continuous flow describable by the usual hydrodynamic equations. We present a study of mass transport through membranes of various pore geometries using reverse nonequilibrium simulations, and analyze transport rates using stochastic master equations.

  10. Hydroxide Solvation and Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-01-27

    Understanding hydroxide solvation and transport in anion exchange membranes (AEMs) can provide important insight into the design principles of these new membranes. To accurately model hydroxide solvation and transport, we developed a new multiscale reactive molecular dynamics model for hydroxide in aqueous solution, which was then subsequently modified for an AEM material. With this model, we investigated the hydroxide solvation structure and transport mechanism in the membrane. We found that a relatively even separation of the rigid side chains produces a continuous overlapping region for hydroxide transport that is made up of the first hydration shell of the tethered cationic groups. Our results show that hydroxide has a significant preference for this overlapping region, transporting through it and between the AEM side chains with substantial contributions from both vehicular (standard diffusion) and Grotthuss (proton hopping) mechanisms. Comparison of the AEM with common proton exchange membranes (PEMs) showed that the excess charge is less delocalized in the AEM than the PEMs, which is correlated with a higher free energy barrier for proton transfer reactions. The vehicular mechanism also contributes considerably more than the Grotthuss mechanism for hydroxide transport in the AEM, while our previous studies of PEM systems showed a larger contribution from the Grotthuss mechanism than the vehicular mechanism for proton transport. The activation energy barrier for hydroxide diffusion in the AEM is greater than that for proton diffusion in PEMs, implying a more significant enhancement of ion transport in the AEM at elevated temperatures. PMID:26716727

  11. Transport in Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes I. Physical Model

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2003-06-02

    In this paper, a physical model is developed that is semiphenomenological and takes into account Schroeder's paradox. Using the wealth of knowledge contained in the literature regarding polymer-electrolyte membranes as a basis, a novel approach is taken in tying together all of the data into a single coherent theory. This approach involves describing the structural changes of the membrane due to water content, and casting this in terms of capillary phenomena. By treating the membrane in this fashion, Schroeder's paradox can be elucidated. Along with the structural changes, two different transport mechanisms are presented and discussed. These mechanisms, along with the membrane's structural changes, comprise the complete physical model of the membrane. The model is shown to agree qualitatively with different membranes and different membrane forms, and is applicable to modeling perfluorinated sulfonic acid and similar membranes. It is also the first physically based comprehensive model of transport in a membrane that includes a physical description of Schroeder's paradox, and it bridges the gap between the two types of macroscopic models currently in the literature.

  12. Influence of the interfacial phase on the structural integrity and oxygen permeability of a dual-phase membrane.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Chen, Xinwei; Hong, Liang

    2013-09-25

    Compositing fluorite Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ (CGO) oxide with perovskite La0.4Ba0.6Fe0.8Zn0.2O3-δ (LBFZ) oxide leads to the formation of a minor interfacial BaCeO3 phase upon sintering at 1400 °C. This interfacial composition assures a gastight ceramic membrane with fine grain-boundary structure, in which the LBFZ phase exhibits an improved oxygen permeability over the pristine LBFZ membrane on the same volumetric basis. The presence of the BaCeO3 phase effectively preserves the structural integrity of the composition by limiting the interfacial diffusion of barium ions between LBFZ and CGO. In comparison, replacing CGO with Y0.08Zr0.92O2-δ in the system results in a substantially low oxygen flux due to an overwhelming interfacial diffusion and, consequently, a heavy degradation of LBFZ. Besides structural reinforcement, the high interface between LBFZ and CGO benefits oxygen transport, as is proven through variation of the oxygen partial pressure on the feed side of the membrane and operation temperature. Furthermore, the trade-off between LBFZ loading and interfacial diffusion yields an optimal CGO loading at 40 wt %, which exhibits an oxygen flux of 0.84 cm(3)/cm(2)·min at 950 °C. In summary, the minor interfacial binding between CGO and LBFZ grains is constructive in easing oxygen crossover in the phase boundary with the exception of maintaining membrane structural stability under oxygen permeation conditions. PMID:23977996

  13. Too Little Oxygen: Ventilation, Prone Positioning, and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Severe Hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Pauline K

    2016-02-01

    Severe hypoxemia is associated with untoward outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. Nevertheless, in and of itself, correction of hypoxemia is not an adequate surrogate outcome for mortality and clear evidence-based targets for correction of hypoxemia remain to be determined. At present, clinical management is directed toward achieving sufficient oxygenation while minimizing toxicity of ventilator-induced lung injury. The gold standard remains lung-protective mechanical ventilation, using lower-tidal volumes and pressure-limited ventilator titration. Notable progress in care includes further refinements in mechanical ventilation, consideration of salutatory effects of early prone positioning and neuromuscular blockade, and exploration of adjunctive extrapulmonary support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This review focuses on three specific aspects: the evolving trend toward open lung ventilation, tempered by the recent cautionary experience with high-frequency oscillation ventilation; the evolution of prone positioning as a treatment for the most hypoxemic patients; and the continued future promise of extracorporeal support as a true rescue therapy. PMID:26820269

  14. The Research of Membrane-sorption System with Increased Pressure Stream for Enriching Air with Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, M. V.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Kurchatov, I. M.

    Numerical study of single-hybrid membrane-sorption air separation system for enriching the air with oxygen were conducted. The effectiveness of such a system was analyzed, depending on selective sorbents and membranes under specified pressure ratio. A comparison of various modes membrane sorption system was done. The conclusion regarding the choice of the membrane and a sorbent for the system with a pressurized product stream was drawn.

  15. Cholesterol transport through lysosome-peroxisome membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bei-Bei; Liao, Ya-Cheng; Qi, Wei; Xie, Chang; Du, Ximing; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Hongyuan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is dynamically transported among organelles, which is essential for multiple cellular functions. However, the mechanism underlying intracellular cholesterol transport has remained largely unknown. We established an amphotericin B-based assay enabling a genome-wide shRNA screen for delayed LDL-cholesterol transport and identified 341 hits with particular enrichment of peroxisome genes, suggesting a previously unappreciated pathway for cholesterol transport. We show dynamic membrane contacts between peroxisome and lysosome, which are mediated by lysosomal Synaptotagmin VII binding to the lipid PI(4,5)P2 on peroxisomal membrane. LDL-cholesterol enhances such contacts, and cholesterol is transported from lysosome to peroxisome. Disruption of critical peroxisome genes leads to cholesterol accumulation in lysosome. Together, these findings reveal an unexpected role of peroxisome in intracellular cholesterol transport. We further demonstrate massive cholesterol accumulation in human patient cells and mouse model of peroxisomal disorders, suggesting a contribution of abnormal cholesterol accumulation to these diseases. PMID:25860611

  16. A validated CFD model to predict O₂ and CO₂ transfer within hollow fiber membrane oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Hormes, Marcus; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Rode, Thomas Schmitz; Behr, Marek; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Hollow fiber oxygenators provide gas exchange to and from the blood during heart surgery or lung recovery. Minimal fiber surface area and optimal gas exchange rate may be achieved by optimization of hollow fiber shape and orientation (1). In this study, a modified CFD model is developed and validated with a specially developed micro membrane oxygenator (MicroMox). The MicroMox was designed in such a way that fiber arrangement and bundle geometry are highly reproducible and potential flow channeling is avoided, which is important for the validation. Its small size (V(Fluid)=0.04 mL) allows the simulation of the entire bundle of 120 fibers. A non-Newtonian blood model was used as simulation fluid. Physical solubility and chemical bond of O₂ and CO₂ in blood was represented by the numerical model. Constant oxygen partial pressure at the pores of the fibers and a steady state flow field was used to calculate the mass transport. In order to resolve the entire MicroMox fiber bundle, the mass transport was simulated for symmetric geometry sections in flow direction. In vitro validation was achieved by measurements of the gas transfer rates of the MicroMox. All measurements were performed according to DIN EN 12022 (2) using porcine blood. The numerical simulation of the mass transfer showed good agreement with the experimental data for different mass flows and constant inlet partial pressures. Good agreement could be achieved for two different fiber configurations. Thus, it was possible to establish a validated model for the prediction of gas exchange in hollow fiber oxygenators. PMID:21462147

  17. Biocompatibility of standard and silica-free silicone rubber membrane oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Fountain, S W; Duffin, J; Ward, C A; Osada, H; Martin, B A; Cooper, J D

    1979-02-01

    Spiral coil membrane oxygenators made from either standard silicone rubber or silica-free silicone rubber were compared using three priming techniques. Standard priming, carbon dioxide priming, and denucleation priming were employed with each type of device. Four-hour venovenous membrane oxygenator perfusions were carried out on awake sheep anticoagulated with heparin. Virtually no differences were observed in any parameters measured between standard silicone rubber and filler-free silicone rubber membranes. Significantly greater platelet losses occurred during the first hour of perfusion with standard priming and with carbon dioxide priming than with denucleation priming, using either type of membrane. These experiments demonstrate that denucleation priming reduces platelet losses during extracorporeal membrane oxygenator perfusion, but that the use of filler-free silicone rubber does not improve the biocompatibility of the membrane. PMID:420320

  18. Current topics in membranes and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinzeller, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Expression of the Oxytocin and Vasopressin Genes; Steroid Effects on Excitable Membranes: The Secretory Vesicle in Processing and Secretion of Neuropeptides: and Steroid Hormone Influences on Cyclic AMP-Generating Systems.

  19. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  20. Oxygen transport as a structure probe for amorphous polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Richard Yufeng

    Although permeability of small molecules is often measured as an important performance property, deeper analysis of the transport characteristics provides insight into polymer structure, especially if used in combination with other characterization techniques. Transport of small gas molecules "senses" the permeable amorphous structure and probes the nature of free volume. This work focuses on oxygen transport, supplemented with other methods of physical analysis, as a probe for: (1) the nature of free volume in the oriented glassy state, (2) the role of amorphous phase orientation and strain-induced crystallization on oxygen barrier properties of polyester blends, and (3) the nature of interphase between immiscible amorphous polymers in forced-assemblies. In the first part, the mechanism of oxygen transport in oriented glassy polyesters is examined. PET, PETBB55, and PEN were oriented by cold-drawing. Densification of the glassy state correlates with conformational transformation of glycol linkages from gauche to trans. Orientation is seen as a process of decreasing the amount of excess-hole free volume and bringing the nonequilibrium polymer glass closer to the equilibrium condition. Further insights into the free volume structure are obtained by exploring the relationships between free volume structure and oxygen transport property using a simple lattice-hole model. In the second part, oxygen transport through polyester blends is investigated. It is found that cold-drawing the blocky PET/PETBB55 produces highly oriented PETBB55 frustrated LCP microfibrils, which prevent relaxation of the continuous PET phase. On the other hand, careful examination of oxygen barrier for the PET/PEI blends leads to a two-phase model from which the amount of crystallinity and the amorphous phase density are determined. In the third part, oxygen permeability is utilized as a powerful probe for interphase thickness between immiscible polymers, which is as thin as a few nanometers. We

  1. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Assisted Segmentectomy for Metachronous Lung Cancer After Pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Heward, Elliot; Hayes, Tim; Evison, Matthew; Booton, Richard; Barnard, James; Shah, Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    Advances in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation have enabled the facilitation of surgical intervention in patients who may otherwise be considered inoperable using conventional ventilation-for example, the resection of an early stage metachronous lung cancer in a patient who has previously undergone a pneumonectomy for a prior lung cancer. We present one such case: a 52-year-old man who underwent right lower lobe segmentectomy for a second primary lung cancer, 3 years after left pneumonectomy, using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports describing the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in resection of metachronous lung cancer after pneumonectomy. PMID:27549537

  2. Structure and Water Transport in Nafion Nanocomposite Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Eric; Page, Kirt

    2014-03-01

    Perfluorinated ionomers, specifically Nafion, are the most widely used ion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications, where an understanding of the relationship between membrane structure and transport of water/ions is critical to battery performance. In this study, the structure of Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes, synthesized using sol-gel chemistry, as well as cast directly from Nafion/SiO2 nanoparticle dispersions, was measured using both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS). Through contrast match studies of the SiO2 nanoparticles, direct information on the change in the structure of the Nafion membranes and the ion-transport channels within was obtained, where differences in membrane structure was observed between the solution-cast membranes and the membranes synthesized using sol-gel chemistry. Additionally, water sorption and diffusion in these Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes were measured using in situ time-resolved Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS).

  3. The plasma membrane of erythrocytes plays a fundamental role in the transport of oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide and in the maintenance of the reduced state of the heme iron.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Galtieri, Antonio; Scatena, Roberto; Giardina, Bruno

    2007-08-15

    Here we review new insights into the role of the erythrocyte membrane and the implications of its architecture on the several functions accomplished by the red blood cells. The picture which emerges highlights the capability of Hb and band 3 to modulate erythrocyte metabolism and to meet the needs of the cell. PMID:17573207

  4. Oxygen dynamics and transport in the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Friederike; Røy, Hans; Bayer, Kristina; Hentschel, Ute; Pfannkuchen, Martin; Brümmer, Franz; de Beer, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    The Mediterranean sponge Aplysina aerophoba kept in aquaria or cultivation tanks can stop pumping for several hours or even days. To investigate changes in the chemical microenvironments, we measured oxygen profiles over the surface and into the tissue of pumping and non-pumping A. aerophoba specimens with Clark-type oxygen microelectrodes (tip diameters 18-30 μm). Total oxygen consumption rates of whole sponges were measured in closed chambers. These rates were used to back-calculate the oxygen distribution in a finite-element model. Combining direct measurements with calculations of diffusive flux and modeling revealed that the tissue of non-pumping sponges turns anoxic within 15 min, with the exception of a 1 mm surface layer where oxygen intrudes due to molecular diffusion over the sponge surface. Molecular diffusion is the only transport mechanism for oxygen into non-pumping sponges, which allows total oxygen consumption rates of 6-12 μmol cm(-3) sponge day(-1). Sponges of different sizes had similar diffusional uptake rates, which is explained by their similar surface/volume ratios. In pumping sponges, oxygen consumption rates were between 22 and 37 μmol cm(-3) sponge day(-1), and the entire tissue was oxygenated. Combining different approaches of direct oxygen measurement in living sponges with a dynamic model, we can show that tissue anoxia is a direct function of the pumping behavior. The sponge-microbe system of A. aerophoba thus has the possibility to switch actively between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism by stopping the water flow for more than 15 min. These periods of anoxia will greatly influence physiological variety and activity of the sponge microbes. Detailed knowledge about the varying chemical microenvironments in sponges will help to develop protocols to cultivate sponge-associated microbial lineages and improve our understanding of the sponge-microbe-system. PMID:24391232

  5. Hydrogen transport membranes for dehydrogenation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran; Uthamalingam

    2008-02-12

    A method of converting C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes to olefins by contacting a feedstock containing C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes with a first surface of a metal composite membrane of a sintered homogenous mixture of an Al oxide or stabilized or partially stabilized Zr oxide ceramic powder and a metal powder of one or more of Pd, Nb, V, Zr, Ta and/or alloys or mixtures thereof. The alkanes dehydrogenate to olefins by contact with the first surface with substantially only atomic hydrogen from the dehydrogenation of the alkanes passing through the metal composite membrane. Apparatus for effecting the conversion and separation is also disclosed.

  6. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA weremore » more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.« less

  7. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA were more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.

  8. Natural polyphenols: Influence on membrane transporters

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Saad Abdulrahman; Sulaiman, Amal Ajaweed; Alhaddad, Hasan; Alhadidi, Qasim

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has focused on the use of natural polyphenolic compounds as nutraceuticals since they showed a wide range of bioactivities and exhibited protection against variety of age-related disorders. Polyphenols have variable potencies to interact, and hence alter the activities of various transporter proteins, many of them classified as anion transporting polypeptide-binding cassette transporters like multidrug resistance protein and p-glycoprotein. Some of the efflux transporters are, generally, linked with anticancer and antiviral drug resistance; in this context, polyphenols may be beneficial in modulating drug resistance by increasing the efficacy of anticancer and antiviral drugs. In addition, these effects were implicated to explain the influence of dietary polyphenols on drug efficacy as result of food-drug interactions. However, limited data are available about the influence of these components on uptake transporters. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review the potential efficacies of polyphenols in modulating the functional integrity of uptake transporter proteins, including those terminated the effect of neurotransmitters, and their possible influence in neuropharmacology. PMID:27069731

  9. Natural polyphenols: Influence on membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saad Abdulrahman; Sulaiman, Amal Ajaweed; Alhaddad, Hasan; Alhadidi, Qasim

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has focused on the use of natural polyphenolic compounds as nutraceuticals since they showed a wide range of bioactivities and exhibited protection against variety of age-related disorders. Polyphenols have variable potencies to interact, and hence alter the activities of various transporter proteins, many of them classified as anion transporting polypeptide-binding cassette transporters like multidrug resistance protein and p-glycoprotein. Some of the efflux transporters are, generally, linked with anticancer and antiviral drug resistance; in this context, polyphenols may be beneficial in modulating drug resistance by increasing the efficacy of anticancer and antiviral drugs. In addition, these effects were implicated to explain the influence of dietary polyphenols on drug efficacy as result of food-drug interactions. However, limited data are available about the influence of these components on uptake transporters. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review the potential efficacies of polyphenols in modulating the functional integrity of uptake transporter proteins, including those terminated the effect of neurotransmitters, and their possible influence in neuropharmacology. PMID:27069731

  10. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  11. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  12. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  13. Electroosmosis in Membranes: Effects of Unstirred Layers and Transport Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P. H.; Hope, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    When a current is passed through a membrane system, differences in transport numbers between the membrane and the adjacent solutions will, in general, result in depletion and enhancement of concentrations at the membrane-solution interfaces. This will be balanced by diffusion back into the bulk solution, diffusion of solute back across the membrane itself, and osmosis resulting from these local concentration gradients. The two main results of such a phenomenon are (1) that there is a current-induced volume flow, which may be mistaken for electroosmosis, and (2) that there will generally develop transient changes in potential difference (PD) across membranes during and after the passage of current through them. PMID:5786317

  14. Controlled Transport of Functionalized Nanochannel though Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics approach, we study the directed transport of a transmembrane nanochannel to a desired location within a lipid bilayer. Each nanochannel encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) with two hydrophilic ends (A). One of the ends of the nanochannel is functionalized with hydrophilic functional groups, or hairs. The hydrophilic hairs serve a dual role: (a) control transport across the membrane barrier, and (b) enable the channel relocation to a specific membrane site. Our system comprises a lipid membrane with an embedded transmembrane nanochannel with the hairs extending into solution. First, we hold a suitably functionalized pipette above the membrane while the nanochannel freely diffuses within the membrane. For an optimal range of parameters, we demonstrate that the hairs find the pipette and spontaneously anchor onto it. We then show that by moving the pipette for a range of velocities, we can effectively transport the channel to any location within the membrane. This prototype assembly can provide guidelines for designing a number of systems for biomimetic applications.

  15. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  16. Method of making a hydrogen transport membrane, and article

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Joseph M.; Corpus, Joseph M.; Lim, Hankwon

    2015-07-21

    The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing a hydrogen transport membrane and the composite article itself. More specifically, the invention relates to producing a membrane substrate, wherein the ceramic substrate is coated with a metal oxide slurry, thereby eliminating the need for an activation step prior to plating the ceramic membrane through an electroless plating process. The invention also relates to modifying the pore size and porosity of the substrate by oxidation or reduction of the particles deposited by the metal oxide slurry.

  17. Comparative genomic analysis of integral membrane transport proteins in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ujjwal; Saier, Milton H

    2015-01-01

    Integral membrane transport proteins homologous to those found in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; www.tcdb.org) were identified and bioinformatically characterized by transporter class, family, and substrate specificity in three ciliates, Paramecium tetraurelia (Para), Tetrahymena thermophila (Tetra), and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich). In these three organisms, 1,326 of 39,600 proteins (3.4%), 1,017 of 24,800 proteins (4.2%), and 504 out of 8,100 proteins (6.2%) integral membrane transport proteins were identified, respectively. Thus, an inverse relationship was observed between the % transporters identified and the number of total proteins per genome reported. This surprising observation provides insight into the evolutionary process, giving rise to genome reduction following whole genome duplication (as in the case of Para) or during pathogenic association with a host organism (Ich). Of these transport proteins in Para and Tetra, about 41% were channels (more than any other type of organism studied), 31% were secondary carriers (fewer than most eukaryotes) and 26% were primary active transporters, mostly ATP-hydrolysis driven (more than most other eukaryotes). In Ich, the number of channels was selectively reduced by 66%, relative to Para and Tetra. Para has four times more inorganic anion transporters than Tetra, and Ich has nonselectively lost most of these. Tetra and Ich preferentially transport sugars and monocarboxylates while Para prefers di- and tricarboxylates. These observations serve to characterize the transport proteins of these related ciliates, providing insight into their nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25099884

  18. Effects of prolonged recombinant human erythropoietin administration on muscle membrane transport systems and metabolic marker enzymes.

    PubMed

    Juel, C; Thomsen, J J; Rentsch, R L; Lundby, C

    2007-12-01

    Adaptations to chronic hypoxia involve changes in membrane transport proteins. The underlying mechanism of this response may be related to concomitant occurring changes in erythropoietin (Epo) levels. We therefore tested the direct effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) treatment on the expression of muscle membrane transport proteins. Likewise, improvements in performance may involve upregulation of metabolic enzymes. Since Epo is known to augment performance we tested the effect of rHuEpo on some marker enzymes that are related to aerobic capacity. For these purposes eight subjects received 5,000 IU rHuEpo every second day for 14 days, and subsequently a single dose of 5,000 IU weekly for 12 weeks. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after 14 weeks of rHuEpo treatment. The treatment increased hematocrit (from 44.7 to 48.8%), maximal oxygen uptake by 8.1%, and submaximal performance by approximately 54%. Membrane transport systems and carbonic anhydrases involved in pH regulation remained unchanged. Of the Na(+), K(+)-pump isoforms only the density of the alpha2 subunit was decreased (by 22%) after treatment. The marker enzymes cytochrom c and hexokinase remained unchanged with the treatment. In conclusion, changes in muscle membrane transport proteins and selected muscle enzymes do not contribute to the Epo-induced improvement in performance. PMID:17882450

  19. Does hindered transport theory apply to desalination membranes?

    PubMed

    Dražević, Emil; Košutić, Krešimir; Kolev, Vesselin; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2014-10-01

    As reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration polyamide membranes become increasingly used for water purification, prediction of pollutant transport is required for membrane development and process engineering. Many popular models use hindered transport theory (HTT), which considers a spherical solute moving through an array of fluid-filled rigid cylindrical pores. Experiments and molecular dynamic simulations, however, reveal that polyamide membranes have a distinctly different structure of a "molecular sponge", a network of randomly connected voids widely distributed in size. In view of this disagreement, this study critically examined the validity of HTT by directly measuring diffusivities of several alcohols within a polyamide film of commercial RO membrane using attenuated total reflection-FTIR. It is found that measured diffusivities deviate from HTT predictions by as much as 2-3 orders of magnitude. This result indicates that HTT does not adequately describe solute transport in desalination membranes. As a more adequate alternative, the concept of random resistor networks is suggested, with resistances described by models of activated transport in "soft" polymers without a sharp size cutoff and with a proper address of solute partitioning. PMID:25137614

  20. Transport in nanoporous carbon membranes: Experiments and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, M.; Foley, H.C.

    2000-05-01

    Single-component permeances of six gases were measured on three different supported nanoporous carbon membranes prepared by spray coating and pyrolysis of poly(furfuryl alcohol) on porous stainless-steel disks. Global activation energies were regressed from data collected as a function of temperature. Permeances and global activation energies were correlated to molecular size, assuming that entropic affects dominated the transport. The permeance was best correlated to the minimum projected area of the molecule computed from first principles. The free-energy barriers to transport within the membranes were derived from the temperature dependence of the permeance data, after accounting for porosity differences between the membranes and differences in molecular adsorption. Using transition-state theory and an entropic model derived, the free energy, enthalpy, and entropic barriers to transport within the membrane were examined as a function of molecular size. Computed on the basis of size, the entropic component of this barrier did not account for the large differences in the transition-state free energies. However, when these entropic barrier values were used to compute the enthalpic portion of the barrier free energies, the minimum projected area of each molecule correlated strongly. Furthermore, these enthalpic components of the barriers were fitted nicely by the Everett-Powl mean field potential, using only the pore size as the adjustable parameter. These results shed light on the underlying mechanism by which shape-selective transport takes place in the NPC membranes and small molecules are separated.

  1. Development of an intravenous membrane oxygenator: a new concept in mechanical support for the failing lung.

    PubMed

    Hattler, B G; Reeder, G D; Sawzik, P J; Walters, F R; Pham, S M; Kormos, R L; Keenan, R J; Griffith, B P; Armitage, J M; Hardesty, R L

    1994-01-01

    An intravenous membrane oxygenator is being developed to supplement oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange in patients with temporary and potentially reversible lung failure in either a lung transplantation setting or in cases of acute respiratory distress from multiple causes. Our device incorporates a pulsatile balloon that is centrally located and around which are mounted microporous hollow fibers. Oxygen is vaccuumed through the fibers with resultant gas exchange. The rhythmic pulsations of the balloon enhance cross-flow and three-dimensional convective mixing at the blood-fiber interface and thus promote more efficient oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange. Seven intravenous membrane oxygenator prototypes have been designed and fabricated. Modifications in design have led to a progressive improvement in gas flux. Gas exchange performance measured in vitro and with both saline solution and fresh ox blood have shown gas exchange as high as 203 ml/min/m2 for oxygen and 182 ml/min/m2 for carbon dioxide. In vivo dog experiments with the device positioned in the inferior vena cava and right atrium have shown over a 50% increase in oxygen flux with balloon activation versus the static situation without changes in hemodynamics. The size of the prototype tested in animals can be scaled up fivefold for anticipated human trials. Our results indicate that our intravenous membrane oxygenator prototypes now under development may be an alternative to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the treatment of temporary respiratory failure. PMID:7865505

  2. Characterization of Nanostructured Silicon Membranes for Control of Molecular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srijanto, Bernadeta; Retterer, Scott; Fowlkes, Jason; Doktycz, Mitchel

    2011-03-01

    Fabrication of nanoporous membranes for selective transport of molecular species requires precise engineering at the nanoscale. The membrane permeability can be tuned by controlling the physical structure and the surface chemistry of the pores. We use a combination of electron-beam and optical lithography, along with cryogenic deep reactive ion etching, to fabricate silicon membranes that are physically robust and have uniform pore sizes. Pore sizes are further reduced using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide onto the membrane surfaces. Integrating nanoporous membranes within a microfluidic network provides a platform for tailoring molecular exchange between microchannels, independent of hydrodynamic effects. In enzymatic reactions, for example, tuning the pores size will allow smaller enzymatic substrates to traverse the membrane at controlled rates while larger enzymes remain spatially separated. Our results from membrane cross-sectioning using focused ion beam milling show that pore sizes can be controlled at dimensions below 10nm. Functional characterization was performed by quantitative fluorescence microscopy to observe the selective transport of molecular species of different sizes.

  3. Membrane transporter proteins: a challenge for CNS drug development

    PubMed Central

    Girardin, François

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins present in various tissues such as the lymphocytes, intestine, liver, kidney, testis, placenta, and central nervous system. These transporters play a significant role in drug absorption and distribution to organic systems, particularly if the organs are protected by blood-organ barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier or the maternal-fetal barrier. In contrast to neurotransmitters and receptor-coupled transporters or other modes of interneuronal transmission, drug transporters are not directly involved in specific neuronal functions, but provide global protection to the central nervous system. The lack of capillary fenestration, the low pinocytic activity, and the tight junctions between brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells represent further gatekeepers limiting the entrance of endogenous and exogenous compounds into the central nervous system. Drug transport is a result of the concerted action of efflux and influx pumps (transporters) located both in the basolateral and apical membranes of brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells. By regulating efflux and influx of endogenous or exogenous substances, the blood-brain barrier and, to a lesser extent, the blood-cerebrospinal barrier in the ventricles, represents the main interface between the central nervous system and the blood, ie, the rest of the body. As drug distribution to organs is dependent on the affinity of a substrate for a specific transport system, membrane transporter proteins are increasingly recognized as a key determinant of drug disposition. Many drug transporters are members of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily or the solute-linked carrier (SLC) class. The multidrug resistance protein MDR1 (ABCB1), also called P-glycoprotein, the multidrug resistance-associated proteins MRP1 (ABCC1) and MRP2 (ABCC2), and the breast cancer-resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2) are ATP-dependent efflux

  4. Computer Simulations of Ion Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes.

    PubMed

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Borodin, Oleg; Ganesan, Venkat

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and optimizing ion transport in polymer membranes have been the subject of active research for more than three decades. We present an overview of the progress and challenges involved with the modeling and simulation aspects of the ion transport properties of polymer membranes. We are concerned mainly with atomistic and coarser level simulation studies and discuss some salient work in the context of pure binary and single ion conducting polymer electrolytes, polymer nanocomposites, block copolymers, and ionic liquid-based hybrid electrolytes. We conclude with an outlook highlighting future directions. PMID:27070764

  5. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  6. Nonisothermal water transport through hydrophobic membranes in a stirred cell

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Gonzalez, M.I.; Martinez, L.

    1994-10-01

    This paper studies the transport of pure water through microporous hydrophobic membranes in a stirred cell when bathed by two phases at different temperatures. The dependence of the phenomena on the stirring rate and on the average temperature has been investigated. The influence of these operating conditions on the mass transfer rate is discussed while keeping in mind the theories of mass and heat transfer within the membrane and adjoining liquids. The concept of temperature polarization is introduced in the transport equations, and it is shown to be important in the interpretation of our experimental results.

  7. Oxygen transport as a structure probe for heterogeneous polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yushan

    Although permeability of small molecules is often measured as an important performance property, deeper analysis of the transport characteristics provides insight into polymer structure, especially if used in combination with other characterization techniques. Transport of small gas molecules senses the permeable amorphous structure and probes the nature of free volume. This work focuses on oxygen transport, supplemented with other methods of physical analysis, as a probe for: (1) the nature of free volume and crystalline morphology in the crystallized glassy state, (2) the nature of free volume and hierarchical structure in liquid crystalline polymers, and (3) the role of dispersed polyamide phase geometry on oxygen barrier properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/polyamide blends. In the first part, the improvement in oxygen-barrier properties of glassy polyesters by crystallization was examined. Examples included poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN), and a copolymer based on PET in which 55 mol% terephthalate was replaced with 4,4'-bibenzoate. Explanation of the unexpectedly high solubility of crystallized PEN required a two-phase transport model consisting of an impermeable crystalline phase of constant density and a permeable amorphous phase of variable density. The resulting relationship between oxygen solubility and amorphous phase density was consistent with free volume concepts of gas sorption. In the second part, oxygen barrier properties of liquid crystalline (LC) polyesters based on poly(diethylene glycol 4,4'-bibenzoate) (PDEGBB) were studied. This study extended the 2-phase transport model for oxygen transport of non-LC crystalline polymers to a smectic LCP. It was possible to systematically vary the solid state structure of (PDEGBB) from LC glass to crystallized LC glass. The results were consistent with a liquid crystalline state intermediate between the permeable amorphous glass and the impermeable 3-dimensional crystal. In this interpretation

  8. Pressure pyrolysed non-precious oxygen reduction catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallathambi, Vijayadurga

    2011-12-01

    and increased the porosity, particularly micro and mesopores of the catalysts that led to increased active site density and reduced oxygen transport hindrances respectively. Collaborative efforts with the University of New Mexico facilitated XPS characterization of MNC catalysts. XPS analyses indicated that pyridinic nitrogen sites, present in the edge plane of the catalysts and pyridinic nitrogen coordinated to transition metals correlated to oxygen reduction activity. Further insight into the role of transition metal and the structure of active site was gained through EXAFS measurements, carried out in collaboration with Northeastern University. Electrochemical studies performed in the presence of poisoning anions such as cyanide in alkaline environment indicated a 25% decrease in oxygen reduction activity, suggesting that the metal is part of the active sites and participates in oxygen reduction. In-situ EXAFS analysis of the catalysts indicated the active reaction site for oxygen reduction to be Fe metal coordinated to 4 nitrogen atoms. These low cost MNC catalysts find direct application in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel cells for transportation applications, where there is a huge drive to improve the economy of the fuel cell by reducing the costs associated with state-of the art platinum-based catalysts.

  9. No facilitator required for membrane transport of hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, John C.; Missner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Lee, John K.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as a new and important member in the group of gaseous signaling molecules. However, the molecular transport mechanism has not yet been identified. Because of structural similarities with H2O, it was hypothesized that aquaporins may facilitate H2S transport across cell membranes. We tested this hypothesis by reconstituting the archeal aquaporin AfAQP from sulfide reducing bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus into planar membranes and by monitoring the resulting facilitation of osmotic water flow and H2S flux. To measure H2O and H2S fluxes, respectively, sodium ion dilution and buffer acidification by proton release (H2S ⇆ H+ + HS−) were recorded in the immediate membrane vicinity. Both sodium ion concentration and pH were measured by scanning ion-selective microelectrodes. A lower limit of lipid bilayer permeability to H2S, PM,H2S ≥ 0.5 ± 0.4 cm/s was calculated by numerically solving the complete system of differential reaction diffusion equations and fitting the theoretical pH distribution to experimental pH profiles. Even though reconstitution of AfAQP significantly increased water permeability through planar lipid bilayers, PM,H2S remained unchanged. These results indicate that lipid membranes may well act as a barrier to water transport although they do not oppose a significant resistance to H2S diffusion. The fact that cholesterol and sphingomyelin reconstitution did not turn these membranes into an H2S barrier indicates that H2S transport through epithelial barriers, endothelial barriers, and membrane rafts also occurs by simple diffusion and does not require facilitation by membrane channels. PMID:19805349

  10. Limits for oxygen and substrate transport in mammals.

    PubMed

    Hoppeler, H; Weibel, E R

    1998-04-01

    Environmental oxygen is transported by the respiratory cascade to the site of oxidation in active tissues. Under conditions of heavy exercise, it is ultimately the working skeletal muscle cells that set the aerobic demand because over 90 % of energy is spent in muscle cells. The pathways for oxygen and substrates converge in muscle mitochondria. In mammals, a structural limitation of carbohydrate and lipid transfer from the microvascular system to the muscle cells is reached at a moderate work intensity (i.e. at 40-50 % of VO2max). At higher work rates, intracellular substrate stores must be used for oxidation. Because of the importance of these intracellular stores for aerobic work, we find larger intramyocellular substrate stores in 'athletic' species as well as in endurance-trained human athletes. The transfer limitations for carbohydrates and lipids at the level of the sarcolemma imply that the design of the respiratory cascade from lungs to muscle mitochondria reflects primarily oxygen demand. Comparative studies indicate that the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle tissue, and hence maximal oxygen demand, is adjusted by varying mitochondrial content. At the level of microcirculatory oxygen supply, it is found that muscle tissue capillarity is adjusted to muscle oxygen demand but that the capillary erythrocyte volume also plays a role. Oxygen delivery by the heart has long been recognized to be a key link in the oxygen transport chain. In allometric variation it is heart rate and in adaptive variation it is essentially stroke volume, and hence heart size, that determines maximal cardiac output. Again, haematocrit is an important variable that allows the heart of athletic species to generate higher flux rates for oxygen. The pulmonary gas exchanger offers only a negligible resistance to oxygen flux to the periphery. However, in contrast to all other steps in the respiratory cascade, the lungs have only a minimal phenotypical plasticity and appear, therefore

  11. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  12. Taurine transport in renal brush-border-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, R; Tenenhouse, H S; Scriver, C R

    1979-01-01

    Taurine transport in isolated brush-border-membrane vesicles from rat kidney is concentrative and it is driven by the Na+ gradient and transmembrane potential difference; binding is not a significant component of net uptake. The Na+-dependent component of net uptake is saturable with an apparent Km of 17 microM. The taurine-transport mechanism is selective for beta-amino compounds. PMID:486101

  13. Electrochemical control of ion transport through a mesoporous carbon membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Chai, Songhai; Choi, Jai-Pil; Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Jeseung; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The transport of fluids through nanometer scale channels typically on the order of 1 -100 nm often exhibit unique properties compared to the bulk fluid. These phenomena occur because the channel dimensions and molecular size become comparable to the range of several important forces including electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Small changes in properties such as the electric double layer or surface charge can significantly affect molecular transport through the channels. Based on these emerging properties, a variety of nanofluidic devices such as nanofluidic transistors, nanofluidic diodes or lab-on-a-chip devices have been developed3-7 with a diverse range of applications including water purification, biomolecular sensing, DNA separation, and rectified ion transport. Nanofluidic devices are typically fabricated using expensive lithography techniques or sacrificial templates. Here we report a carbon-based, three-dimensional nanofluidic transport membrane that enables gated, or on/off, control of the transport of organic molecular species and metal ions using an applied electrical potential. In the absence of an applied potential, both cationic and anionic molecules freely diffuse across the membrane via a concentration gradient. However, when an electrochemical potential is applied, the transport of ions through the membrane is inhibited.

  14. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  15. Lateral transport of Smoothened from the plasma membrane to the membrane of the cilium

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    The function of primary cilia depends critically on the localization of specific proteins in the ciliary membrane. A major challenge in the field is to understand protein trafficking to cilia. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway protein Smoothened (Smo), a 7-pass transmembrane protein, moves to cilia when a ligand is received. Using microscopy-based pulse-chase analysis, we find that Smo moves through a lateral transport pathway from the plasma membrane to the ciliary membrane. Lateral movement, either via diffusion or active transport, is quite distinct from currently studied pathways of ciliary protein transport in mammals, which emphasize directed trafficking of Golgi-derived vesicles to the base of the cilium. We anticipate that this alternative route will be used by other signaling proteins that function at cilia. The path taken by Smo may allow novel strategies for modulation of Hh signaling in cancer and regeneration. PMID:19948480

  16. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  17. Understanding the transport processes in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheah, May Jean

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are energy conversion devices suitable for automotive, stationary and portable applications. An engineering challenge that is hindering the widespread use of PEM fuel cells is the water management issue, where either a lack of water (resulting in membrane dehydration) or an excess accumulation of liquid water (resulting in fuel cell flooding) critically reduces the PEM fuel cell performance. The water management issue is addressed by this dissertation through the study of three transport processes occurring in PEM fuel cells. Water transport within the membrane is a combination of water diffusion down the water activity gradient and the dragging of water molecules by protons when there is a proton current, in a phenomenon termed electro-osmotic drag, EOD. The impact of water diffusion and EOD on the water flux across the membrane is reduced due to water transport resistance at the vapor/membrane interface. The redistribution of water inside the membrane by EOD causes an overall increase in the membrane resistance that regulates the current and thus EOD, thereby preventing membrane dehydration. Liquid water transport in the PEM fuel cell flow channel was examined at different gas flow regimes. At low gas Reynolds numbers, drops transitioned into slugs that are subsequently pushed out of the flow channel by the gas flow. The slug volume is dependent on the geometric shape, the surface wettability and the orientation (with respect to gravity) of the flow channel. The differential pressure required for slug motion primarily depends on the interfacial forces acting along the contact lines at the front and the back of the slug. At high gas Reynolds number, water is removed as a film or as drops depending on the flow channel surface wettability. The shape of growing drops at low and high Reynolds number can be described by a simple interfacial energy minimization model. Under flooding conditions, the fuel cell local current

  18. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  19. [Current views on oxygen transport from blood to tissues].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2001-01-01

    During the recent 25-30 years, sophisticated experiments and mathematical simulation significantly changed the generally accepted theory of oxygen transport in tissue, which was based on two major postulates, namely: 1) Blood flows in capillaries continuously at uniform velocity, 2) Gas circulation between blood and tissue takes place exclusively in capillaries. As was shown by modern research techniques, blood flow in microvessels has irregular sharp velocity fluctuations in very short time intervals (seconds). In addition, mean velocity of blood flow in microvessels of the same caliber and the same micro-region of tissue may differ several times. Therefore, efficiency of microcirculation reactions may be assessed exclusively witH mean blood velocity in capillaries of the whole micro-region, and with complicated changes of the histogram of mean velocity distribution in capillaries. It was shown that arteriolas and venulas of inactive muscles and brain account for 30 to 50% of gas circulation between blood and tissue. This resulted in fundamental change of the previous postulates in the area of tissue gas circulation physiology, and, in effect, in replacement of oxygen transport paradigm created by A. Krog. This study is an attempt to present a new modern concept of oxygen transport in tissue, to show its research significance, and possible applications. PMID:11764645

  20. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25% by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental well-being. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be utilized to enhance yields of staple crops, incre...

  1. Linking oxygen availability with membrane potential maintenance and K+ retention of barley roots: implications for waterlogging stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanrong; Konnerup, Dennis; Shabala, Lana; Zhou, Meixue; Colmer, Timothy David; Zhang, Guoping; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-10-01

    Oxygen deprivation is a key determinant of root growth and functioning under waterlogging. In this work, changes in net K(+) flux and membrane potential (MP) of root cells were measured from elongation and mature zones of two barley varieties under hypoxia and anoxia conditions in the medium, and as influenced by ability to transport O2 from the shoot. We show that O2 deprivation results in an immediate K(+) loss from roots, in a tissue- and time-specific manner, affecting root K(+) homeostasis. Both anoxia and hypoxia induced transient membrane depolarization; the extent of this depolarization varied depending on severity of O2 stress and was less pronounced in a waterlogging-tolerant variety. Intact roots of barley were capable of maintaining H(+) -pumping activity under hypoxic conditions while disrupting O2 transport from shoot to root resulted in more pronounced membrane depolarization under O2 -limited conditions and in anoxia a rapid loss of the cell viability. It is concluded that the ability of root cells to maintain MP and cytosolic K(+) homeostasis is central to plant performance under waterlogging, and efficient O2 transport from the shoot may enable operation of the plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase in roots even under conditions of severe O2 limitation in the soil solution. PMID:25132404

  2. Synthesis of silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) composite membranes for oxygen enrichment from air

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Silicalite-poly(furfuryl alcohol) [PFA] composite membranes were prepared by solution casting of silicalite-furfuryl alcohol [FA] suspension on a porous polysulfone substrate and subsequent in situ polymerization of FA. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize silicalite nanocrystals and silicalite-PFA composite membranes. The silicalite-PFA composite membrane with 20 wt.% silicalite loading exhibits good oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (4.15) and high oxygen permeability (1,132.6 Barrers) at 50°C. Silicalite-PFA composite membranes are promising for the production of oxygen-enriched air for various applications. PMID:22209012

  3. Carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Laprade, R; Grenier, F; Pagé-Dansereau, M; Dansereau, J

    1984-08-01

    The electrical properties predicted by a widely accepted model for carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayers are described. The different steps leading to ion transport and their associated rate constants are reaction at the interface between an ion in the aqueous phase and a carrier in the membrane (kRi), followed by translocation of the ion-carrier complex across the membrane interior (kis) and its dissociation at the other interface (kDi) after which the free carrier crosses back the membrane interior (ks). Results on glyceryl monooleate (GMO) membranes for a family of homologue carriers, the macrotetralide actin antibiotics (nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin) and a variety of ions (Na+, Cs+, Rb+, K+, NH4+, and Tl+) are presented. Internally consistent data obtained from steady-state electrical measurements (zero-current potential and conductance, current-voltage relationship) allow us to obtain the equilibrium permeability ratios for the different ions and show that for a given carrier kRi is relatively invariant from one ion to the other, except for Tl+ (larger), which implies that the ionic selectivity is controlled by the dissociation of the complex. The values of the individual rate constants obtained from current relaxation experiments are also presented and confirm the findings from steady-state measurements, as well as the isostericity concept for complexes of different ions with the same carrier (kis invariant). These also allow us to determine the aqueous phase membrane and torus membrane partition coefficients. Finally, the observed increase in kis from nonactin to tetranactin and, for all homologues, from GMO-decane to solvent-free GMO membranes, together with the concomitant decrease in kDi, can be explained in terms of modifications of electrostatic energy profiles induced by variations in carrier size and membrane thickness. PMID:6498590

  4. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein in membrane domains transport and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Molino, Diana; Nola, Sébastien; Lam, Sin Man; Verraes, Agathe; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Boncompain, Gaëlle; Perez, Franck; Wenk, Markus; Shui, Guanghou; Danglot, Lydia; Galli, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes in eukaryotes contain a large variety of proteins and lipids often distributed in domains in plasma membrane and endomembranes. Molecular mechanisms responsible for the transport and the organization of these membrane domains along the secretory pathway still remain elusive. Here we show that vesicular SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 plays a major role in membrane domains composition and transport. We found that the transport of exogenous and endogenous GPI-anchored proteins was altered in fibroblasts isolated from VAMP7-knockout mice. Furthermore, disassembly and reformation of the Golgi apparatus induced by Brefeldin A treatment and washout were impaired in VAMP7-depleted cells, suggesting that loss of VAMP7 expression alters biochemical properties and dynamics of the Golgi apparatus. In addition, lipid profiles from these knockout cells indicated a defect in glycosphingolipids homeostasis. We conclude that VAMP7 is required for effective transport of GPI–anchored proteins to cell surface and that VAMP7-dependent transport contributes to both sphingolipids and Golgi homeostasis. PMID:26196023

  5. Membrane transport of andrographolide in artificial membrane and rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Daodee, Supawadee; Wangboonskul, Jinda; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn; Murakami, Teruo

    2007-06-15

    In the present study, the possible drug interactions of andrographolide with co-administering drugs such as acetaminophen, amoxycillin, aspirin, chlorpheniramine and norfloxacin to treat various infectious and inflammatory diseases that may be induced during absorption process were examined using artificial lipophilic membrane and everted rat intestine. The membrane transport of andrographolide across the artificial membrane was not affected by different pH of the medium (simulated gastric and intestinal fluids), different concentrations of andrographolide and co-administered drugs examined. In everted rat intestine, above co-administered drugs examined showed no significant effect on andrographolide membrane transport. The participation of efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and MRP2 in andrographolide transport was then examined, since andrographolide is a diterpene compound and some diterpene compounds are known as P-glycoprotein substrates. Cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein/MRP2 inhibitor, significantly suppressed the efflux transport of andrographolide in distal region of intestine, whereas probenecid, an MRP inhibitor, showed no significant effect in both proximal and distal regions of intestine. These results suggest that P-glycoprotein, but not MRP, is participated in the intestinal absorption of andrographolide and P-glycoprotein-mediated drug interactions occur depending on the co-administered drugs and its concentrations. PMID:19093450

  6. Membrane-associated DNA Transport Machines

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Briana; Dubnau, David

    2010-01-01

    DNA pumps play important roles in bacteria during cell division and during the transfer of genetic material by conjugation and transformation. The FtsK/SpoIIIE proteins carry out the translocation of double-stranded DNA to ensure complete chromosome segregation during cell division. In contrast, the complex molecular machines that mediate conjugation and genetic transformation drive the transport of single stranded DNA. The transformation machine also processes this internalized DNA and mediates its recombination with the resident chromosome during and after uptake, whereas the conjugation apparatus processes DNA before transfer. This article reviews these three types of DNA pumps, with attention to what is understood of their molecular mechanisms, their energetics and their cellular localizations. PMID:20573715

  7. Use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in fulminant chagasic myocarditis as a bridge to heart transplant

    PubMed Central

    Durães, André Rodrigues; Figueira, Fernando Augusto Marinho dos Santos; Lafayette, André Rabelo; Martins, Juliana de Castro Solano; Juliano Cavalcante de, Sá

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old Brazilian male presented with progressive dyspnea for 15 days, worsening in the last 24 hours, and was admitted in respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock, with multiple organ dysfunctions. Echocardiography showed a left ventricle ejection fraction of 11%, severe diffuse hypokinesia, and a systolic pulmonary artery pressure of 50mmHg, resulting in the need for hemodynamic support with dobutamine (20mcg/kg/min) and noradrenaline (1.7mcg/kg/min). After 48 hours with no clinical or hemodynamic improvement, an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was implanted. The patient presented with hemodynamic, systemic perfusion and renal and liver function improvements; however, his cardiac function did not recover after 72 hours, and he was transfer to another hospital. Air transport was conducted from Salvador to Recife in Brazil. A heart transplant was performed with rapid recovery of both liver and kidney functions, as well as good graft function. Histopathology of the explanted heart showed chronic active myocarditis and amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. The estimated global prevalence of T. cruzi infections declined from 18 million in 1991, when the first regional control initiative began, to 5.7 million in 2010. Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease due to infectious or non-infectious conditions. Clinical manifestation is variable, ranging from subclinical presentation to refractory heart failure and cardiogenic shock. Several reports suggest that the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients presenting with severe refractory myocarditis is a potential bridging therapy to heart transplant when there is no spontaneous recovery of ventricular function. In a 6-month follow-up outpatient consult, the patient presented well and was asymptomatic. PMID:26761479

  8. Multicomponent Transport through Realistic Zeolite Membranes: Characterization & Transport in Nanoporous Networks

    SciTech Connect

    William C. Conner

    2007-08-02

    These research studies focused on the characterization and transport for porous solids which comprise both microporosity and mesoporosity. Such materials represent membranes made from zeolites as well as for many new nanoporous solids. Several analytical sorption techniques were developed and evaluated by which these multi-dimensional porous solids could be quantitatively characterized. Notably an approach by which intact membranes could be studied was developed and applied to plate-like and tubular supported zeolitic membranes. Transport processes were studied experimentally and theoretically based on the characterization studies.

  9. Microelectrode investigation of oxygen permeation in perfluorinated proton exchange membranes with different equivalent weights

    SciTech Connect

    Buechi, F.N.; Wakizoe, Masanobu; Srinivasan, S.

    1996-03-01

    Oxygen concentrations (C{sub b}) and diffusion coefficients (D) in various proton exchange membranes were measured using chronoamperometry at microelectrodes. These measurements were made under conditions similar to those prevailing in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells. Knowledge of the D and C{sub b} parameters is essential for the determination of oxygen permeation in the catalytic layers of gas diffusion electrodes, which could be rate limiting in these low-temperature fuel cells. Furthermore, the D and C{sub b} values also provide the permeation rates of oxygen through the bulk of the proton conducting membrane. it was found that the concentration of oxygen increased and the diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing equivalent weight of the membranes. These results were interpreted using a model based on the microstructure of the swollen membranes separated into two phases, one hydrophobic and the other hydrophilic, with distinctly different O{sub 2}-permeation properties. According to this model the relative amounts of the two phases in the membranes, caused by the different water contents, determine the O{sub 2} solubility and diffusion coefficient in the different membrane materials.

  10. Oxygen permeation through Nafion 117 membrane and its impact on efficiency of polymer membrane ethanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Andrzej; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Lewera, Adam

    2011-05-01

    We investigate oxygen permeation through Nafion 117 membrane in a direct ethanol fuel cell and elucidate how it affects the fuel cell efficiency. An obvious symptom of oxygen permeation is the presence of significant amounts of acetaldehyde and acetic acid in the mixture leaving anode when no current was drawn from the fuel cell (i.e. under the open circuit conditions). This parasitic process severely lowers efficiency of the fuel cell because ethanol is found to be directly oxidized on the surface of catalyst by oxygen coming through membrane from cathode in the absence of electric current flowing in the external circuit. Three commonly used carbon-supported anode catalysts are investigated, Pt, Pt/Ru and Pt/Sn. Products of ethanol oxidation are determined qualitatively and quantitatively at open circuit as a function of temperature and pressure, and we aim at determining whether the oxygen permeation or the catalyst's activity limits the parasitic ethanol oxidation. Our results strongly imply the need to develop more selective membranes that would be less oxygen permeable.

  11. Influence of water and membrane microstructure on the transport properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Ana Rosa

    Proton transport in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) depends on interaction between water and acid groups covalently bound to the polymer. Although the presence of water is important in maintaining the PEM's functions, a thorough understanding of this topic is still lacking. The objective of this work is to provide a better understanding of how the nature water, confined to ionic domains of the polymer, influences the membrane's ability to transport protons, methanol and water. Understanding this topic will facilitate development of new materials with favorable transport properties for fuel cells use. Five classes of polymer membranes were used in this work: polyacrylonitrile-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PAN-g-macPSSA); poly(vinylidene difluoride) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PVDF-g-PSSA); poly(ethylenetetrafluoroethylene) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (ETFE-gPSSA); PVDF-g-PSSA with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA); and perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion). The nature of water within the polymers (freezable versus non-freezable states) was measured by systematically freezing samples, and observing the temperature at which water freezes and the amount of heat released in the process. Freezing water-swollen membranes resulted in a 4-fold decrease in the proton conductivity of the PEM. Activation energies of proton transport before and after freezing were ˜ 0.15 eV and 0.5 eV, consistent with proton transport through liquid water and bound water, respectively. Reducing the content of water in membrane samples decreased the amount of freezable and non-freezable water. Calorimetric measurements of membranes in various degrees of hydration showed that water molecules became non-freezable when lambda, (water molecules per sulfonic acid group) was less than ˜14. Proton conduction through membranes containing only non-freezable water was demonstrated to be feasible. Diffusion experiments showed that the permeability of methanol

  12. Oxygen transport properties estimation by DSMC-CT simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2014-12-09

    Coupling DSMC simulations with classical trajectories calculations is emerging as a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational rarefied gas dynamics. The considerable increase of computational effort outlined in the early application of the method (Koura,1997) can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, GPU acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time (Ferrigni,2012; Norman et al.,2013) of DSMC-CT simulations. The aim of the present work is to study rarefied Oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions through an accurate potential energy surface, obtained by molecular beams scattering (Aquilanti, et al.,1999). The accuracy of the method is assessed by calculating molecular Oxygen shear viscosity and heat conductivity following three different DSMC-CT simulation methods. In the first one, transport properties are obtained from DSMC-CT simulations of spontaneous fluctuation of an equilibrium state (Bruno et al, Phys. Fluids, 23, 093104, 2011). In the second method, the collision trajectory calculation is incorporated in a Monte Carlo integration procedure to evaluate the Taxman’s expressions for the transport properties of polyatomic gases (Taxman,1959). In the third, non-equilibrium zero and one-dimensional rarefied gas dynamic simulations are adopted and the transport properties are computed from the non-equilibrium fluxes of momentum and energy. The three methods provide close values of the transport properties, their estimated statistical error not exceeding 3%. The experimental values are slightly underestimated, the percentage deviation being, again, few percent.

  13. Fabrication of SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} oxygen separation membranes on porous supports

    SciTech Connect

    Man Fai Ng; Riechert, T.L.; Schwartz, R.W.; Collins, J.P.

    1996-09-01

    SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCF) is an attractive material for oxygen separation membranes and for use in catalytic membrane reactors. While tubes of this material have been prepared by extrusion, further improvements in oxygen transport performance may be gained by preparing thinner membranes on porous supports. In this paper, we will discuss the deposition of thick films by spray deposition and centrifugal casting, and thin films by pyrolysis of chemical precursors. For the chemically derived thin films, porous MgO supports were used as membrane supports. Three types of precursor solutions were employed for dipcoating: a Pechini type solution, a nitrate-based solution, and a citrate-based solution. To prevent the infiltration of the precursor into the support, the support was backfilled with a material that decomposed at higher temperatures than the precursors. Cracking due to the volume changes during drying and pyrolysis of the precursors is discussed. Thick films were prepared by spray coating and centrifugal casting. Spray deposition of thick film membranes was accomplished by air brushing SCF from a water-based suspension onto the surface of a porous MgO support. Films on the interior surface of the supports were prepared by centrifugal casting using a xylene/butanol-based SCF suspension. Unlike extruded tubes, thick films undergo constrained sintering due to the presence of the support, which greatly reduces the densification rate. For membranes prepared by both approaches, we will discuss the effects of heating schedules on membrane microstructure, densification behavior, and cracking.

  14. Structure and Function of Thyroid Hormone Plasma Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model. PMID:25538896

  15. Can an oxygenator design potentially contribute to air embolism in cardiopulmonary bypass? A novel method for the determination of the air removal capabilities of neonatal membrane oxygenators.

    PubMed

    De Somer, F; Dierickx, P; Dujardin, D; Verdonck, P; Van Nooten, G

    1998-05-01

    At present, air handling of a membrane oxygenator is generally studied by using an ultrasonic sound bubble counter. However, this is not a quantitative method and it does not give any information on where air was entrapped in the oxygenator and if it eventually was removed through the membrane for gas exchange. The study presented here gives a novel technique for the determination of the air-handling characteristics of a membrane oxygenator. The study aimed at defining not only the amount of air released by the oxygenator, but also the amount of air trapped within the oxygenator and/or removed through the gas exchange membrane. Two neonatal membrane oxygenators without the use of an arterial filter were investigated: the Polystan Microsafe and the Dideco Lilliput. Although the air trap function of both oxygenators when challenged with a bolus of air was similar, the Microsafe obtained this effect mainly by capturing the air in the heat exchanger compartment while the Lilliput did remove a large amount of air through the membrane. In conclusion, the difference in trap function was most striking during continuous infusion of air. Immediate contact with a microporous membrane, avoidance of high velocities within the oxygenator, pressure drop, transit time and construction of the fibre mat all contribute to the air-handling characteristics of a membrane oxygenator. PMID:9638712

  16. Ultra-thin Oxide Membranes: Synthesis and Carrier Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jai Sung

    focused ion beam milling, thin membranes of Ti xOy of 100-300 nm thickness have been created. TEM studies indicated polycrystallinity and presence of twins in the FIB-milled nanowalls. Compositional analysis in the transmission electron microscope also showed reduced content of oxygen, confirming non-stoichiometry. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of the nanowall showed semiconducting behavior with an activation energy different from that of TiO2 single crystals and was attributed to formation of TinO2n-1 phases after FIB processing. The CeO2 study involved high temperature conductivity studies on substrate-free self-supported nano-crystalline ceria membranes up to 800 K. Increasing conductivity with oxygen partial pressure directly opposing the behavior of thin film devices 'clamped' by substrate has been observed. This illustrate that the relaxed nature of free standing membranes, and increased surface to volume ratio enables more sensitive electrical response to oxygen adsorption which could have implications for their use in oxygen storage devices, solid oxide fuel cells, and chemical sensors. The work in this thesis advances the understanding of materials in freestanding membrane form and advances fabrication techniques that have not been explored before, having implications for sensors, actuators, SOFC, memristors, and physics of quasi-2D materials.

  17. Membrane alternatives in worlds without oxygen: Creation of an azotosome

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, James; Lunine, Jonathan; Clancy, Paulette

    2015-01-01

    The lipid bilayer membrane, which is the foundation of life on Earth, is not viable outside of biology based on liquid water. This fact has caused astronomers who seek conditions suitable for life to search for exoplanets within the “habitable zone,” the narrow band in which liquid water can exist. However, can cell membranes be created and function at temperatures far below those at which water is a liquid? We take a step toward answering this question by proposing a new type of membrane, composed of small organic nitrogen compounds, that is capable of forming and functioning in liquid methane at cryogenic temperatures. Using molecular simulations, we demonstrate that these membranes in cryogenic solvent have an elasticity equal to that of lipid bilayers in water at room temperature. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate that stable cryogenic membranes could arise from compounds observed in the atmosphere of Saturn’s moon, Titan, known for the existence of seas of liquid methane on its surface. PMID:26601130

  18. Membrane alternatives in worlds without oxygen: Creation of an azotosome.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, James; Lunine, Jonathan; Clancy, Paulette

    2015-02-01

    The lipid bilayer membrane, which is the foundation of life on Earth, is not viable outside of biology based on liquid water. This fact has caused astronomers who seek conditions suitable for life to search for exoplanets within the "habitable zone," the narrow band in which liquid water can exist. However, can cell membranes be created and function at temperatures far below those at which water is a liquid? We take a step toward answering this question by proposing a new type of membrane, composed of small organic nitrogen compounds, that is capable of forming and functioning in liquid methane at cryogenic temperatures. Using molecular simulations, we demonstrate that these membranes in cryogenic solvent have an elasticity equal to that of lipid bilayers in water at room temperature. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate that stable cryogenic membranes could arise from compounds observed in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon, Titan, known for the existence of seas of liquid methane on its surface. PMID:26601130

  19. A membrane transporter for tryptophan composed of RNA

    PubMed Central

    JANAS, TERESA; JANAS, TADEUSZ; YARUS, MICHAEL

    2004-01-01

    We have incorporated an RNA binding site for the biological amino acid tryptophan within an RNA complex with affinity for phospholipid bilayer membranes. The resulting RNA (9:10Trp) creates a selective route through the bilayer for the amino acid. Binding and enhanced tryptophan permeability are nonlinear in RNA concentration, suggesting that RNA aggregation is required for both. Tryptophan permeability saturates with increased concentration, though at ~1000-fold greater level than when binding a free aptamer. The RNA (9:10Trp) complex, bound at a mean of two per liposome, halves the activation energy for tryptophan transport (to 46 kJ/mole), specifically increasing tryptophan entry to a maximal velocity of 0.5 sec-1 per liposome with little or no accompanying increase in general permeability. Individual RNAs turn over tens of thousands of times at high tryptophan concentration. Thus, a specific passive membrane transporter whose properties overlap those of single-molecule transporter proteins, can be made of RNA alone. Permeability changes probably rely on disturbances in lipid conformation as well as on an advantageous low free energy position for tryptophan at the membrane. Other RNA activities may yield other RNA-membrane nanosystems via this route. PMID:15383677

  20. The effects of oxygen on the evolution of microbial membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    One prokaryote, Methylococcus capsulatus, synthesizes both hopanoids and sterols and, thus, provides a unique opportunity to study the evolution of membrane function. When M. capsulatus was grown at different temperatures, lipid analysis of the whole cells showed that both sterol and unsaturated fatty acid levels decreased at higher growth temperatures; sterol concentrations were 0.116 micro mole/micro mole phospholipid at 30 C and 0.025 micro mole/mirco mole phospholipid at 45 C, while the saturated to unsaturated fatty acid ratio increased from 0.397 to 1.475. Hopane polyol levels were constant over this range; however, methylation of the A-ring decreased markedly in cells grown at 30 C. These results imply that sterol and hopane molecules are required for enhancement of some specific membrane function, potentially by modulating membrane fluidity.

  1. Oxygen transport in ceria: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergei, Simak

    2012-02-01

    Ceria (CeO2) is an important material for environmentally benign applications, ranging from solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to oxygen storage [1-2]. The key characteristic needed to be improved is the mobility of oxygen ions. Optimization of ionic transport in ceria has been the topic of many studies. In particular, it has been discovered how the ionic conductivity in ceria might be improved by choosing the proper kind and concentration of dopants [3]. In this presentation we will approach the problem from a different direction by adjusting structural parameters of ceria via the change of external conditions. A systematic first-principles study of the energy landscape and kinetics of reduced ceria as a function of external parameters reveals a physically transparent way to improve oxygen transport in ceria. [4pt] [1] N. Skorodumova, S. Simak, B. Lundqvist, I. Abrikosov, and B. Johansson, Physical Review Letters 89, 14 (2002). [0pt] [2] A. Trovarelli, in Catalysis by Ceria and related materials (Imperial College Press, London, 2002). [0pt] [3] D. A. Andersson, S. I. Simak, N. V. Skorodumova, I. A.Abrikosov, and B. Johansson, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103, 3518 (2006).

  2. Mechanism of electrodialytic ion transport through solvent extraction membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Moskvin, L.N.; Shmatko, A.G.; Krasnoperov, V.M.

    1987-02-01

    The authors construct a mathematical model for electrodialysis and solvent extraction via an ion-selective ion exchange membrane and accounts for the electrochemical, ion exchange, and diffusional behavior of the processes including their dependence on component concentration and current and voltage. The model is tested against experimental data for the electrodialytic transport of anionic platinum complexes of chlorides from hydrochloric acid solution through tributylphosphate membranes. The platinum concentration in the aqueous solution was determined by gamma spectroscopy obtained via platinum 191 as a radiotracer.

  3. Study of the oxygen transport through Ag (110), Ag (poly), and Ag 2.0 Zr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Wu, D.; Davidson, M. R.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of oxygen through high-purity membranes of Ag (110), Ag (poly), Ag (nano), and Ag 2.0 Zr has been studied by an ultrahigh vacuum permeation method over the temperature range of 400-800 C. The data show that there are substantial deviations from ordinary diffusion-controlled transport. A surface limitation has been confirmed by glow-discharge studies where the upstream O2 supply has been partially converted to atoms, which, for the same temperature and pressure, gave rise to over an order of magnitude increase in transport flux. Further, the addition of 2.0 wt percent Zr to the Ag has provided increased dissociative adsorption rates, which, in turn, increased the transport flux by a factor of 2. It was also observed that below a temperature of 630 C, the diffusivity exhibits an increase in activation energy of over 4 kcal/mol, which has been attributed to trapping of the atomic oxygen and/or kinetic barriers at the surface and subsurface of the vacuum interface. Above 630 C, the activation barrier decreases to the accepted value of about 11 kcal/mol for Ag (poly), consistent with zero concentration at the vacuum interface.

  4. Accelerated interleaflet transport of phosphatidylcholine molecules in membranes under deformation.

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, R M; Waugh, R E

    1996-01-01

    Biological membranes are lamellar structures composed of two leaflets capable of supporting different mechanical stresses. Stress differences between leaflets were generated during micromechanical experiments in which long thin tubes of lipid (tethers) were formed from the surfaces of giant phospholipid vesicles. A recent dynamic analysis of this experiment predicts the relaxation of local differences in leaflet stress by lateral slip between the leaflets. Differential stress may also relax by interleaflet transport of lipid molecules ("flip-flop"). In this report, we extend the former analysis to include interleaflet lipid transport. We show that transmembrane lipid flux will evidence itself as a linear increase in tether length with time after a step reduction in membrane tension. Multiple measurements were performed on 24 different vesicles composed of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine plus 3% dinitrophenol-linked di-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine. These tethers all exhibited a linear phase of growth with a mean value of the rate of interlayer permeation, cp = 0.009 s-1. This corresponds to a half-time of approximately 8 min for mechanically driven interleaflet transport. This value is found to be consistent with longer times obtained for chemically driven transport if the lipids cross the membrane via transient, localized defects in the bilayer. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 7 PMID:8874013

  5. Membrane transporters in self resistance of Cercospora nicotianae to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Herrero, Sonia; Thomas, Elizabeth; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize membrane transporter genes in Cercospora fungi required for autoresistance to the photoactivated, active-oxygen-generating toxin cercosporin they produce for infection of host plants. Previous studies implicated a role for diverse membrane transporters in cercosporin resistance. In this study, transporters identified in a subtractive cDNA library between a Cercospora nicotianae wild type and a cercosporin-sensitive mutant were characterized, including two ABC transporters (CnATR2, CnATR3), an MFS transporter (CnMFS2), a uracil transporter, and a zinc transport protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only CnATR3 clustered with transporters previously characterized to be involved in cercosporin resistance. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, however, showed that only CnATR2 was upregulated, thus this gene was selected for further characterization. Transformation and expression of CnATR2 in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa significantly increased cercosporin resistance. Targeted gene disruption of CnATR2 in the wild type C. nicotianae, however, did not decrease resistance. Expression analysis of other transporters in the cnatr2 mutant under conditions of cercosporin toxicity showed significant upregulation of the cercosporin facilitator protein gene (CFP), encoding an MFS transporter previously characterized as playing an important role in cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora species. We conclude that cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora is mediated by multiple genes, and that the fungus compensates for mutations by up-regulation of other resistance genes. CnATR2 may be a useful gene, alone or in addition to other known resistance genes, for engineering Cercospora resistance in crop plants. PMID:25862648

  6. Micro-scale Modeling of Flow and Oxygen Transfer in Hollow Fiber Membrane Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Taskin, M. Ertan; Fraser, Katharine H.; Zhang, Tao; Griffith, Bartley P.; Wu, Zhongjun J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a modeling approach to solve the flow and oxygen transfer when the blood passes through the hollow-fiber membrane bundle. For this purpose, a “two-region” modeling approach was developed regarding the hollow fiber and blood regions. The oxygen transfer in these regions was defined with separate diffusion processes. Two dimensional single and multi-fiber geometries were created and flow solutions were obtained for a non-Newtonian fluid. The convection-diffusion-reaction equation was solved to produce the oxygen partial pressure distributions. As a benefit of coupling the interstitial flow field into the oxygen transfer through the hollow-fiber membrane bundle, the membrane resistance was taken into consideration. Thus, varying oxygen partial pressures were observed on the outer fiber surface, which is contrary to the common simplifying assumptions of negligible membrane resistance and uniform oxygen content on the fiber surface (Traditional approach). It was illustrated that, the current approach can be utilized to predict the mass transfer efficiencies without overestimating as compared to the predictions obtained with the traditional approach. Utilization of the current approach was found to be beneficial for the geometries with lower packing density which allows significant PO2 variations on the fiber surfaces. For the geometries with dense packings, the above simplifying assumptions could be applicable. The model predictions were validated with the experimental measurements taken from a benchmark device. PMID:20802783

  7. Successful 2,000-Kilometer International Transfer of an Infant Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Severe Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kilian; Dunne, Ben; Festa, Marino; La Hei, Erik; Karpelowsky, Jonathan; Dando, Hayden; Orr, Yishay

    2016-08-01

    There is minimal reported experience with long-range retrieval of pediatric patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. We report the case of a 10-month old boy with necrotizing staphylococcal pneumonia complicated by a bronchopleural fistula, who was successfully retrieved and transported while receiving ECMO to our unit in Sydney, Australia, from a referring hospital 2,000 kilometers away in the Pacific Islands. He was successfully weaned from ECMO to receive single-lung ventilation after 13 days, and he underwent surgical repair of his bronchopleural fistula through a thoracotomy 3 days after decannulation. He has made a full recovery. PMID:27449448

  8. A model for oxygen transport and consumption in the unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, J. C.; Christensen, T. H.; Ammentorp, H. C.

    1991-12-01

    An oxygen transport and consumption model has been developed as a submodel to a general numerical model for solute transport in the unsaturated zone. The model comprises diffusive and convective transport of oxygen in soil air, convective transport and oxygen consumption in free water, and diffusive transport and a constant-rate oxygen consumption in the water-saturated soil crumbs. The model also estimates the anaerobic fraction of the water-saturated crumbs where no oxygen consumption takes place. The model dynamics and applicability are illustrated using the examples of the operation of a waste water infiltration plant and of anaerobic zones in the soil of importance for modelling denitrification.

  9. Two-phase flow and transport in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,Z.H.; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-03-20

    Two-phase flow and transport of reactants and products in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is studied analytically and numerically. Four regimes of water distribution and transport are classified by defining three threshold current densities and a maximum current density. They correspond to first appearance of liquid water at the membrane/cathode interface, extension of the gas-liquid two-phase zone to the cathode/channel interface, saturated moist air exiting the gas channel, and complete consumption of oxygen by the electrochemical reaction. When the cell operates above the first threshold current density, liquid water appears and a two-phase zone forms within the porous cathode. A two-phase, multi-component mixture model in conjunction with a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is applied to simulate the cathode operation in this regime. The model is able to handle the situation where a single-phase region co-exists with a two-phase zone in the air cathode. For the first time, the polarization curve as well as water and oxygen concentration distributions encompassing both single- and two-phase regimes of the air cathode are presented. Capillary action is found to be the dominant mechanism for water transport inside the two-phase zone. The liquid water saturation within the cathode is predicted to reach 6.3% at 1.4 A/cm{sup 2}.

  10. Active membrane transport and receptor proteins from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, M; Bettaney, K E; Szakonyi, G; Psakis, G; Shibayama, K; Suzuki, S; Clough, J L; Blessie, V; Abu-Bakr, A; Baumberg, S; Meuller, J; Hoyle, C K; Palmer, S L; Butaye, P; Walravens, K; Patching, S G; O'reilly, J; Rutherford, N G; Bill, R M; Roper, D I; Phillips-Jones, M K; Henderson, P J F

    2005-08-01

    A general strategy for the expression of bacterial membrane transport and receptor genes in Escherichia coli is described. Expression is amplified so that the encoded proteins comprise 5-35% of E. coli inner membrane protein. Depending upon their topology, proteins are produced with RGSH6 or a Strep tag at the C-terminus. These enable purification in mg quantities for crystallization and NMR studies. Examples of one nutrient uptake and one multidrug extrusion protein from Helicobacter pylori are described. This strategy is successful for membrane proteins from H. pylori, E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Microbacterium liquefaciens, Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Campylobacter jejuni, Neisseria meningitides, Streptomyces coelicolor and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. PMID:16042616

  11. Statistical-mechanical theory of passive transport through semipermeable membranes.

    PubMed

    del Castillo, L F; Mason, E A; Revercomb, H E

    1979-09-01

    The first general multicomponent equations for transport through semipermeable membranes are derived from basic statistical-mechanical principles. The procedure follows that used earlier for open membranes, but semipermeability is modelled mathematically by the introduction of external forces on the impermeant species. Gases are treated first in order to clarify the problems involved, but the final results apply to general nonideal solutions of any concentration. The mixed-solvent effect is treated rigorously, and a mixed-solvent osmotic pressure is defined. A useful specific identification of so-called osmotic flow is given, along with a demonstration that such an identification cannot be unique. Results are obtained both for discontinuous membrane models, and for a continuous model. PMID:486702

  12. Oxygen transport in the Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 3{minus}x}Co{sub x}O{sub y} system.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, B.

    1999-01-04

    The mixed-conducting Sr-Fe-Co oxide has potential use as a gas separation membrane. Its superior oxygen transport reveals the feasibility of using oxide membranes in large-scale oxygen separation. Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 3{minus}x}Co{sub x}O{sub y} (with x = 0.0, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0) samples were made by solid state reaction. To understand the oxygen transport mechanism in this system, conductivity and thermogravimetry experiments were conducted at high temperature in various oxygen partial pressure environments. The oxygen diffusion coefficient was determined from the time relaxation transient behavior of the specimen after switching the surrounding atmosphere. Mobility of the charge carrier was derived from relative conductivity and weight changes. X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out on these samples to determine their crystal structures.

  13. Involvement of molecular oxygen in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes.

    PubMed

    Khorobrykh, A A; Klimov, V V

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown by Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry (Moscow) 67:683-688, 2002); Yanykin et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1797:516-523, 2010); Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry 50:10658-10665, 2011) that Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membrane fragments are characterized by an enhanced oxygen photoconsumption on the donor side of PSII which is accompanied with hydroperoxide formation and it was suggested that the events are related to the oxidative photoinhibition of PSII. Experimental confirmation of this suggestion is presented in this work. The degree of photoinhibition was determined by the loss of the capability of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+) or sodium ascorbate) to the reactivation of electron transport [measured by the light-induced changes of chlorophyll fluorescence yield (∆F)] in Mn-depleted PSII membranes. The transition from anaerobic conditions to aerobic ones significantly activated photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes both in the absence and in the presence of exogenous electron acceptor, ferricyanide. The photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes was suppressed upon the addition of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+), diphenylcarbazide, and ferrocyanide). The addition of superoxide dismutase did not affect the photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. It is concluded that the interaction of molecular oxygen (rather than superoxide anion radical formed on the acceptor side of PSII) with the oxidized components of the donor side of PSII reflects the involvement of O2 in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. PMID:25862644

  14. Control of Plasma Membrane Permeability by ABC Transporters.

    PubMed

    Khakhina, Svetlana; Johnson, Soraya S; Manoharlal, Raman; Russo, Sarah B; Blugeon, Corinne; Lemoine, Sophie; Sunshine, Anna B; Dunham, Maitreya J; Cowart, L Ashley; Devaux, Frédéric; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2015-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters Pdr5 and Yor1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae control the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the plasma membrane as well as serving as ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps. Mutant strains lacking these transporter proteins were found to exhibit very different resistance phenotypes to two inhibitors of sphingolipid biosynthesis that act either late (aureobasidin A [AbA]) or early (myriocin [Myr]) in the pathway leading to production of these important plasma membrane lipids. These pdr5Δ yor1 strains were highly AbA resistant but extremely sensitive to Myr. We provide evidence that these phenotypic changes are likely due to modulation of the plasma membrane flippase complexes, Dnf1/Lem3 and Dnf2/Lem3. Flippases act to move phospholipids from the outer to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Genetic analyses indicate that lem3Δ mutant strains are highly AbA sensitive and Myr resistant. These phenotypes are fully epistatic to those seen in pdr5Δ yor1 strains. Direct analysis of AbA-induced signaling demonstrated that loss of Pdr5 and Yor1 inhibited the AbA-triggered phosphorylation of the AGC kinase Ypk1 and its substrate Orm1. Microarray experiments found that a pdr5Δ yor1 strain induced a Pdr1-dependent induction of the entire Pdr regulon. Our data support the view that Pdr5/Yor1 negatively regulate flippase function and activity of the nuclear Pdr1 transcription factor. Together, these data argue that the interaction of the ABC transporters Pdr5 and Yor1 with the Lem3-dependent flippases regulates permeability of AbA via control of plasma membrane protein function as seen for the high-affinity tryptophan permease Tat2. PMID:25724885

  15. OCTN3 is a mammalian peroxisomal membrane carnitine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Tilups, Aina; Edwards, Vernon D.; Wanders, Ronald J.; Tein, Ingrid . E-mail: ingrid.tein@sickkids.ca

    2005-12-30

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the {beta}-oxidation of fatty acids. The role of the carnitine system is to maintain homeostasis in the acyl-CoA pools of the cell, keeping the acyl-CoA/CoA pool constant even under conditions of very high acyl-CoA turnover, thereby providing cells with a critical source of free CoA. Carnitine derivatives can be moved across intracellular barriers providing a shuttle mechanism between mitochondria, peroxisomes, and microsomes. We now demonstrate expression and colocalization of mOctn3, the intermediate-affinity carnitine transporter (K {sub m} 20 {mu}M), and catalase in murine liver peroxisomes by TEM using immunogold labelled anti-mOctn3 and anti-catalase antibodies. We further demonstrate expression of hOCTN3 in control human cultured skin fibroblasts both by Western blotting and immunostaining analysis using our specific anti-mOctn3 antibody. In contrast with two peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, we show reduced expression of hOCTN3 in human PEX 1 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes is impaired but the biosynthesis of peroxisomal membrane proteins is normal, versus a complete absence of hOCTN3 in human PEX 19 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which both the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes as well as peroxisomal membranes are deficient. This supports the localization of hOCTN3 to the peroxisomal membrane. Given the impermeability of the peroxisomal membrane and the key role of carnitine in the transport of different chain-shortened products out of peroxisomes, there appears to be a critical need for the intermediate-affinity carnitine/organic cation transporter, OCTN3, on peroxisomal membranes now shown to be expressed in both human and murine peroxisomes. This Octn3 localization is in keeping with the essential role of carnitine in peroxisomal lipid metabolism.

  16. Isothermal titration calorimetry of ion-coupled membrane transporters

    PubMed Central

    SeCheol, Oh

    2015-01-01

    Binding of ligands, ranging from proteins to ions, to membrane proteins is associated with absorption or release of heat that can be detected by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Such measurements not only provide binding affinities but also afford direct access to thermodynamic parameters of binding - enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity. These parameters can be interpreted in a structural context, allow discrimination between different binding mechanisms and guide drug design. In this review, we introduce advantages and limitations of ITC as a methodology to study molecular interactions of membrane proteins. We further describe case studies where ITC was used to analyze thermodynamic linkage between ions and substrates in ion-coupled transporters. Similar type of linkage analysis will likely be applicable to a wide range of transporters, channels, and receptors. PMID:25676707

  17. A simple numerical model for membrane oxygenation of an artificial lung machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subraveti, Sai Nikhil; Sai, P. S. T.; Viswanathan Pillai, Vinod Kumar; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Optimal design of membrane oxygenators will have far reaching ramification in the development of artificial heart-lung systems. In the present CFD study, we simulate the gas exchange between the venous blood and air that passes through the hollow fiber membranes on a benchmark device. The gas exchange between the tube side fluid and the shell side venous liquid is modeled by solving mass, momentum conservation equations. The fiber bundle was modelled as a porous block with a bundle porosity of 0.6. The resistance offered by the fiber bundle was estimated by the standard Ergun correlation. The present numerical simulations are validated against available benchmark data. The effect of bundle porosity, bundle size, Reynolds number, non-Newtonian constitutive relation, upstream velocity distribution etc. on the pressure drop, oxygen saturation levels etc. are investigated. To emulate the features of gas transfer past the alveoli, the effect of pulsatility on the membrane oxygenation is also investigated.

  18. Membrane transporters and drought resistance - a complex issue.

    PubMed

    Jarzyniak, Karolina M; Jasiński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular, and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted. PMID:25538721

  19. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  20. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    PubMed Central

    Jarzyniak, Karolina M.; Jasiński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular, and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted. PMID:25538721

  1. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions. PMID:26721276

  2. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V.; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-01-01

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land. PMID:23636397

  3. Prevention of hyaline membrane disease in premature lambs by apneic oxygenation and extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, A; Kolobow, T; Buckhold, D K; Pierce, J E; Huang, H; Chen, V

    1982-01-01

    Hyaline membrane disease is found only in lungs where pulmonary ventilation has been established, i.e. after birth. We delivered eleven fetal lambs of a gestational age of 128-130 days but instead kept their lungs in total apnea and inflated to constant pressure, while removing all metabolically produced carbon dioxide with an extracorporeal membrane lung. Oxygen was provided by the membrane lung, and by apneic oxygenation through the natural lungs. Hence, arterial blood gases remained always normal, without any pulmonary ventilation. After 6-66 h the lungs had sufficiently cleared to allow normal mechanical pulmonary ventilation in 10 our of 11 lambs so treated. In a control group treated with mechanical ventilation alone, five of seven lambs died within the first 24 h of severe hyaline membrane disease. PMID:6799556

  4. Surface Modification of Polypropylene Membrane by RF Methane/Oxygen Mixture Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ching-Yuan; Juang, Ruey-Shin; Huang, Chun

    2011-08-01

    The hydrophilic surface modification of micro-porous polypropylene (PP) membranes is achieved by low-pressure 13.56 MHz RF methane (CH4)/oxygen (O2) gas mixture plasma treatment. The changes in surface wettability and surface free energy were examined by static contact angle analysis. The static water contact angle of the plasma modified membrane notably decreased with increases in treatment time and plasma power. The obvious increase in the surface energy of polypropylene membranes due to CH4/O2 mixture gas plasma treatments was also observed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to analyze the chemical species of CH4/O2 mixture gas plasma treatment. The variations in the surface morphology and chemical structure of the micro-porous PP membranes were confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. XPS analysis showed significantly higher surface concentrations of oxygen functional groups for CH4/O2 mixture gas plasma-modified polypropylene membrane surfaces than for the originally unmodified polypropylene membrane surface. The experimental results show the important role of chemical species in the interaction between a CH4/O2 mixture gas plasma and a membrane surface, which can be controlled by surface modification to tailor the hydrophilicity of the membrane to the requirements of various applications.

  5. Sum frequency generation studies of membrane transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Shreve, A.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to study the transport of protons and ions across biological membranes, one of the most fundamental processes in living organisms, critical for energy transduction in respiration and photosynthesis and for a wide variety of cellular signal transduction events. Membrane protein structure and function, in particular proton and ion pumping are poorly understood. The authors have developed sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy for the study of membrane phenomena, a nonlinear spectroscopic technique that is uniquely sensitive to interfaces and with demonstrated structural specificity. They have used SFG and conventional vibrational spectroscopic approaches to study proton transport processes in cytochrome c oxidase. A key finding has been the identification of vibrational modes associated with proton labile groups, including a glutamic acid near the redox active binuclear center and structural waters. These groups are sensitive to the ligation and redox states of the metal centers and hence are ideal candidates for coupling redox energy to proton transport processes.

  6. [Advances in the application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the treatment of severe burn].

    PubMed

    Lyu, Lin; Gao, Guodong; Long, Cun

    2015-12-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a kind of technique that uses extracorporeal circulation system to draw patients' blood into the circuit, and then oxygenate the blood when it passes along the membrane, followed by returning the blood into patients. At present, ECMO is mainly used in treating patients with respiratory failure and circulatory failure, for whom the conventional treatment such as mechanical ventilation and vasoactive drugs are invalid. ECMO can provide cardiopulmonary support for burn patients with respiratory failure or circulatory failure, and put the heart and lung at rest. The purpose of this paper is to review the application of ECMO in the treatment of severe burn. PMID:26837253

  7. Platelet-derived microparticles generated by neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation systems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Andrew D; Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Wiles, Andrew A; Freishtat, Robert J; Rais-Bahrami, Khoydar

    2015-01-01

    Current anticoagulation strategies do not eliminate thromboembolic stroke or limb loss during neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a form of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In adults, CPB surgery generates prothrombotic platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs), submicron membrane vesicles released from activated platelets. However, information on PMP generation in neonatal ECMO systems is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare PMP generation in five different neonatal ECMO systems, using a simulated circuit with swine blood at 300 ml/min for 4 hours. Systems were composed of both newer components (centrifugal pump and hollow-fiber oxygenator) and traditional components (roller-head pump and silicone membrane oxygenator). Free plasma hemoglobin levels were measured as an indicator of hemolysis and flow cytometry-measured PMP. Hemolysis generated in all ECMO systems was similar to that observed in noncirculated static blood (p = 0.48). There was no difference in net PMP levels between different oxygenators with a given pump. In contrast, net PMP generation in ECMO systems with a centrifugal pump was at least 2.5 times greater than in roller-head pump systems. This was significant when using either a hollow-fiber (p < 0.005) or a silicone membrane (p < 0.05) oxygenator. Future studies are needed to define the relationship between pump-generated PMP and thrombosis. PMID:25303795

  8. Reaction mechanism between cell membranes of P. digitatum spores and oxygen radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masafumi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru

    2013-09-01

    P. digitatum spores were exposed to oxygen radicals 10 and 20 mm downstream from our developed atmospheric-pressure oxygen-radical source. Treated spores were stained by 1,1' -dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3' -tetramethyl indocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), which has been used for investigation for functions of cell membranes. For control spores, DiI is not permeable into cells because cell membranes have selective permeability. Stained spores were observed by confocal laser microscopy. At 10 mm distance, 84% of total spores were intracellularly stained with 1.5-minute oxygen radical treatment. On the other hand, at 20 mm distance, about 80% of the total spores were intracellularly stained at least with 3-minute oxygen radical treatment. Based on the results of inactivation rates of P. digitatum spores and oxygen-radical densities, the results indicated that the increase of ratio of the number of intracellularly stained spores was correlated with the density of O(3Pj) rather than O2(1Δg) . These results and SEM observations suggest that O(3Pj) plays an important role as an inactivation factor by disturbing the normal function of cell membranes and influencing intracellular organelles without major deformation of the membranes.

  9. Multicomponent transport in membranes for redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) incorporate separator membranes, which ideally prevent mixing of electrochemically active species while permitting crossover of inactive supporting ions. Understanding crossover and membrane selectivity may require multicomponent transport models that account for solute/solute interactions within the membrane, as well as solute/membrane interactions. Application of the Onsager-Stefan-Maxwell formalism allows one to account for all the dissipative phenomena that may accompany component fluxes through RFB membranes. The magnitudes of dissipative interactions (diffusional drag forces) are quantified by matching experimentally established concentration transients with theory. Such transients can be measured non-invasively using DC conductometry, but the accuracy of this method requires precise characterization of the bulk RFB electrolytes. Aqueous solutions containing both vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) are relevant to RFB technology. One of the first precise characterizations of aqueous vanadyl sulfate has been implemented and will be reported. To assess the viability of a separator for vanadium RFB applications with cell-level simulations, it is critical to understand the tendencies of various classes of membranes to absorb (uptake) active species, and to know the relative rates of active-species and supporting-electrolyte diffusion. It is also of practical interest to investigate the simultaneous diffusion of active species and supports, because interactions between solutes may ultimately affect the charge efficiency and power efficiency of the RFB system as a whole. A novel implementation of Barnes's classical model of dialysis-cell diffusion [Physics 5:1 (1934) 4-8] is developed to measure the binary diffusion coefficients and sorption equilibria for single solutes (VOSO4 or H2SO4) in porous membranes and cation-exchange membranes. With the binary diffusion and uptake measurement in hand, a computer simulation that

  10. Oxygen transport is not compromised at high temperature in pythons.

    PubMed

    Fobian, Dannie; Overgaard, Johannes; Wang, Tobias

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate whether the 'oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance' model (OCLTT) applies to an air-breathing ectothermic vertebrate, we measured oxygen uptake (V̇(O₂)), cardiac performance and arterial blood gases during a progressive rise of temperature from 30 to 40°C in the snake Python regius. V̇(O₂) of fasting snakes increased exponentially with temperature whereas V̇(O₂) of digesting snakes at high temperatures plateaued at a level 3- to 4-fold above fasting. The high and sustained aerobic metabolism over the entire temperature range was supported by pronounced tachycardia at all temperatures, and both fasting and digesting snakes maintained a normal acid-base balance without any indication of anaerobic metabolism. All snakes also maintained high arterial PO2, even at temperatures close to the upper lethal temperature. Thus, there is no evidence of a reduced capacity for oxygen transport at high temperatures in either fasting or digesting snakes, suggesting that the upper thermal tolerance of this species is limited by other factors. PMID:25267848

  11. Tubular dense perovskite type membranes. Preparation, sealing, and oxygen permeation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Qi, H.; Xu, N.; Shi, J.

    1999-12-01

    Tubular dense perovskite type membranes were prepared by isostatic pressing and plastic extrusion. The resulting tubular La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}} perovskite type membrane prepared by plastic extrusion (designated as PE-LSCF) has a lower density and oxygen permeation flux compared with that prepared by isostatic pressing (designated as IP-LSCF). A ceramic binder developed by the research center provided reliable sealing for the tubular dense membrane at high temperature. The oxygen permeation flux increases with increasing temperature, and the value is about 0.13 cm{sup 3}/cm{sup 2} min (STP) at 1,123 K. The activation energy for oxygen permeation is 168 kJ/mol at the temperature range of 1,073--1,173. X-ray diffraction analysis for the membranes over 110 h of operation indicated that SrSO{sub 4}, CoSO{sub 4}, SrO, Co{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were formed on the surfaces of the tubular membrane, especially for the tubular PE-LSCF membrane, because of interaction with trace SO{sub 2} in the air and the helium and segregation of surface elements.

  12. YTPdb: a wiki database of yeast membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Barriot, Roland; Moreau, Yves; André, Bruno

    2010-10-01

    Membrane transporters constitute one of the largest functional categories of proteins in all organisms. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this represents about 300 proteins ( approximately 5% of the proteome). We here present the Yeast Transport Protein database (YTPdb), a user-friendly collaborative resource dedicated to the precise classification and annotation of yeast transporters. YTPdb exploits an evolution of the MediaWiki web engine used for popular collaborative databases like Wikipedia, allowing every registered user to edit the data in a user-friendly manner. Proteins in YTPdb are classified on the basis of functional criteria such as subcellular location or their substrate compounds. These classifications are hierarchical, allowing queries to be performed at various levels, from highly specific (e.g. ammonium as a substrate or the vacuole as a location) to broader (e.g. cation as a substrate or inner membranes as location). Other resources accessible for each transporter via YTPdb include post-translational modifications, K(m) values, a permanently updated bibliography, and a hierarchical classification into families. The YTPdb concept can be extrapolated to other organisms and could even be applied for other functional categories of proteins. YTPdb is accessible at http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/ytpdb/. PMID:20599686

  13. Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with atrial septal defects.

    PubMed

    Julliard, W; Niles, S D; Maloney, J D

    2015-07-01

    Two patients presented in profound respiratory distress unresponsive to maximal support and were placed on venovenous ECMO. Subsequently, both were found to have a patent foramen ovale and high pulmonary artery pressures, resulting in a right to left shunt. Both patients had a better than expected response to ECMO, likely related to their shunts allowing oxygenated blood to bypass the high pulmonary artery pressures and go directly to the left heart. Both patients were successfully weaned from ECMO and discharged to home in good condition. PMID:25249517

  14. [Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Indications, limitations and practical implementation].

    PubMed

    Lunz, D; Philipp, A; Dolch, M; Born, F; Zausig, Y A

    2014-09-01

    Due to the technical advances in pumps, oxygenators and cannulas, veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (va-ECMO) or extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has been widely used in emergency medicine and intensive care medicine for several years. An accepted indication is peri-interventional cardiac failure in cardiac surgery (postcardiotomy low cardiac output syndrome). Furthermore, especially the use of va-ECMO for other indications in critical care medicine, such as in patients with severe sepsis with septic cardiomyopathy or in cardiopulmonary resuscitation has tremendously increased. The basic indications for va-ECMO are therapy refractory cardiac or cardiopulmonary failure. The fundamental purpose of va-ECMO is bridging the function of the lungs and/or the heart. Consequently, this support system does not represent a causal therapy by itself; however, it provides enough time for the affected organ to recover (bridge to recovery) or for the decision for a long-lasting organ substitution by a ventricular assist device or by transplantation (bridge to decision). Although the outcome for bridged patients seems to be favorable, it should not be forgotten that the support system represents an invasive procedure with potentially far-reaching complications. Therefore, the initiation of these systems needs a professional and experienced (interdisciplinary) team, sufficient resources and an individual approach balancing the risks and benefits. This review gives an overview of the indications, complications and contraindications for va-ECMO. It discusses its advantages in organ transplantation and transport of critically ill patients. The reader will learn the differences between peripheral and central cannulation and how to monitor and manage va-ECMO. PMID:25074647

  15. TransportTP: A two-phase classification approach for membrane transporter prediction and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Membrane transporters play crucial roles in living cells. Experimental characterization of transporters is costly and time-consuming. Current computational methods for transporter characterization still require extensive curation efforts, especially for eukaryotic organisms. We developed a novel genome-scale transporter prediction and characterization system called TransportTP that combined homology-based and machine learning methods in a two-phase classification approach. First, traditional homology methods were employed to predict novel transporters based on sequence similarity to known classified proteins in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB). Second, machine learning methods were used to integrate a variety of features to refine the initial predictions. A set of rules based on transporter features was developed by machine learning using well-curated proteomes as guides. Results In a cross-validation using the yeast proteome for training and the proteomes of ten other organisms for testing, TransportTP achieved an equivalent recall and precision of 81.8%, based on TransportDB, a manually annotated transporter database. In an independent test using the Arabidopsis proteome for training and four recently sequenced plant proteomes for testing, it achieved a recall of 74.6% and a precision of 73.4%, according to our manual curation. Conclusions TransportTP is the most effective tool for eukaryotic transporter characterization up to date. PMID:20003433

  16. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; M.K. Ferber; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2002-07-30

    Eltron Research Inc. and their team members are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, new cermet compositions were tested that demonstrated similar performance to previous materials. A 0.5-mm thick membrane achieved at H{sub 2} transport rate of 0.2 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C, which corresponded to an ambipolar conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Although these results were equivalent to those for other cermet compositions, this new composition might be useful if it demonstrates improved chemical or mechanical stability. Ceramic/ceramic composite membranes also were fabricated and tested; however, some reaction did occur between the proton- and electron-conducting phases, which likely compromised conductivity. This sample only achieved a H{sub 2} transport rate of {approx} 0.006 mL/min/cm{sup 2} and an ambipolar conductivity of {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm. Chemical stability tests were continued, and candidate ceramic membranes were found to react slightly with carbon monoxide under extreme testing conditions. A cermet

  17. Expressing and purifying membrane transport proteins in high yield.

    PubMed

    Hale, Calvin C; Hill, Chananada K; Price, Elmer M; Bossuyt, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Structural analysis of native or recombinant membrane transport proteins has been hampered by the lack of effective methodologies to purify sufficient quantities of active protein. We addressed this problem by expressing a polyhistidine tagged construct of the cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX1) in Trichoplusia ni larvae (caterpillars) from which membrane vesicles were prepared. Larvae vesicles containing recombinant NCX1-his protein supported NCX1 transport activity that was mechanistically not different from activity in native cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles although the specific activity was reduced. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of both the 120 and 70 kDa forms of the NCX1 protein. Larvae vesicle proteins were solubilized in sodium cholate detergent and fractionated on a chelated Ni(2+) affinity chromatography column. After extensive washing, eluted fractions were mixed with soybean phospholipids and reconstituted. The resulting proteoliposomes contained NCX1 activity suggesting the protein retained native conformation. SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at 120 and 70 kDa. Purification of large amounts of active NCX1 via this methodology should facilitate biophysical analysis of the protein. The larva expression system has broad-based application for membrane proteins where expression and purification of quantities required for physical analyses is problematic. PMID:11741710

  18. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes. PMID:26361975

  19. The ABCC4 membrane transporter modulates platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cheepala, Satish B; Pitre, Aaron; Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yao; Frase, Sharon; Pestina, Tamara; Gartner, T Kent; Jackson, Carl; Schuetz, John D

    2015-11-12

    Controlling the activation of platelets is a key strategy to mitigate cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have suggested that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCC4, functions in platelet-dense granules. Using plasma membrane biotinylation and super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that ABCC4 is primarily expressed on the plasma membrane of both mouse and human platelets. Platelets lacking ABCC4 have unchanged dense-granule function, number, and volume, but harbor a selective impairment in collagen-induced aggregation. Accordingly, Abcc4 knockout (KO) platelet attachment to a collagen substratum was also faulty and associated with elevated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) and reduced plasma membrane localization of the major collagen receptor, GPVI. In the ferric-chloride vasculature injury model, Abcc4 KO mice exhibited markedly impaired thrombus formation. The attenuation of platelet aggregation by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor EHNA (a non-ABCC4 substrate), when combined with Abcc4 deficiency, illustrated a crucial functional interaction between phosphodiesterases and ABCC4. This was extended in vivo where EHNA dramatically prolonged the bleeding time, but only in Abcc4 KO mice. Further, we demonstrated in human platelets that ABCC4 inhibition, when coupled with phosphodiesterase inhibition, strongly impaired platelet aggregation. These findings have important clinical implications because they directly highlight an important relationship between ABCC4 transporter function and phosphodiesterases in accounting for the cAMP-directed activity of antithrombotic agents. PMID:26405223

  20. Energy-coupled outer membrane transport proteins and regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Braun, Volkmar; Endriss, Franziska

    2007-06-01

    FhuA and FecA are two examples of energy-coupled outer membrane import proteins of gram-negative bacteria. FhuA transports iron complexed by the siderophore ferrichrome and serves as a receptor for phages, a toxic bacterial peptide, and a toxic protein. FecA transports diferric dicitrate and regulates transcription of an operon encoding five ferric citrate (Fec) transport genes. Properties of FhuA mutants selected according to the FhuA crystal structure are described. FhuA mutants in the TonB box, the hatch, and the beta-barrel are rather robust. TonB box mutants in FhuA FecA, FepA, Cir, and BtuB are compared; some mutations are suppressed by mutations in TonB. Mutant studies have not revealed a ferrichrome diffusion pathway, and tolerance to mutations in the region linking the TonB box to the hatch does not disclose a mechanism for how energy transfer from the cytoplasmic membrane to FhuA changes the conformation of FhuA such that bound substrates are released, the pore is opened, and substrates enter the periplasm, or how surface loops change their conformation such that TonB-dependent phages bind irreversibly and release their DNA into the cells. The FhuA and FecA crystal structures do not disclose the mechanism of these proteins, but they provide important information for specific functional studies. FecA is also a regulatory protein that transduces a signal from the cell surface into the cytoplasm. The interacting subdomains of the proteins in the FecA --> FecR --> FecI --> RNA polymerase signal transduction pathway resulting in fecABCDE transcription have been determined. Energy-coupled transporters transport not only iron and vitamin B12, but also other substrates of very low abundance such as sugars across the outer membrane; transcription regulation of the transport genes may occur similarly to that of the Fec transport genes. PMID:17370038

  1. New horizons of non-emergent use of extracorporeal membranous oxygenator support.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Peter B; Wang, I-Wen

    2016-02-01

    The expansion of the extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use and its indication is strikingly increased in the past few years. ECMO use expanded to lung transplantation, difficult general thoracic resections, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and LVAD implantation. Here we will discuss the indications and the outcomes of non-emergent use of ECMO. PMID:27004223

  2. Salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prior to "Bridge" Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Fearon, William F; Raleigh, Lindsay A; Burdon, Grayson; Rao, Vidya; Boyd, Jack H; Yeung, Alan C; Miller, David Craig; Fischbein, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    We describe a patient who presented in profound cardiogenic shock due to bioprosthetic aortic valve stenosis requiring salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation followed by a "bridge" valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12750 (J Card Surg 2016;31:403-405). PMID:27109017

  3. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO): A Treatment for Neonates in Respiratory Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Donna S.; Gonzalez, Lori S.; Stewart, Sharon R.; Sampers, Jackie

    2000-01-01

    A brief history is provided of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a treatment option for infants that provides prolonged circulation and reoxgenation of blood outside the body to temporarily support a failing heart or lungs. The University of Kentucky ECMO program is described, along with the positive outcomes of 19 infants. (Contains…

  4. Triiodothyronine facilitates weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation by improved mitochondrial substrate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Files, Matthew D.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Des Rosiers, Christine; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-03-20

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a bridge to recovery after myocardial injury in infants and children, yet morbidity and mortality remain high. Weaning from the circuit requires adequate cardiac contractile function, which can be impaired by metabolic disturbances induced either by ischemia-reperfusion and / or by ECMO.

  5. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation. PMID:27236238

  6. Enhanced CO2 Resistance for Robust Oxygen Separation Through Tantalum-doped Perovskite Membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Tian, Hao; Yang, Dong; Sunarso, Jaka; Liu, Jian; Liu, Shaomin

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen selective membranes with enhanced oxygen permeability and CO2 resistance are highly required in sustainable clean energy generation technologies. Here, we present novel, cobalt-free, SrFe1-x Tax O3-δ (x=0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) perovskite membranes. Ta-doping induced lattice structure progression from orthorhombic (x=0) to cubic (x=0.05). SrFe0.95 Ta0.05 O3-δ (SFT0.05) showed the highest oxygen flux rates reaching 0.85 mL min(-1) cm(-2) at 950 °C on a 1.0 mm-thick membrane. Surface decoration can increase the permeation rate further. Ta inclusion within the perovskite lattice of SrFeO3-δ (SF) enhanced the CO2 resistance of the membranes significantly as evidenced by the absence of the carbonate functional groups on the FTIR spectrum when exposed to CO2 atmosphere at 850 °C. The CO2 resistance of Ta-doped SF compounds correlates with the lower basicity and the higher binding energy for the lattice oxygen. SFT0.05 demonstrated high stability during long-term permeation tests under 10% CO2 atmosphere. PMID:26813048

  7. Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation With Atrial Septostomy as a Bridge to Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kon, Zachary N; Pasrija, Chetan; Shah, Aakash; Griffith, Bartley P; Garcia, Jose P

    2016-03-01

    We report the first successful bridge to lung transplantation using venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with an atrial septostomy for both pulmonary and right ventricular support. This strategy may provide an alternative to other forms of ECMO support as a bridge to lung transplantation, and potentially allow for ambulation and rehabilitation. PMID:26897198

  8. New horizons of non-emergent use of extracorporeal membranous oxygenator support

    PubMed Central

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of the extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use and its indication is strikingly increased in the past few years. ECMO use expanded to lung transplantation, difficult general thoracic resections, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and LVAD implantation. Here we will discuss the indications and the outcomes of non-emergent use of ECMO. PMID:27004223

  9. PET measurement of glucose membrane transport using labeled analogs: Distinction of transport from metabolic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.E.; Koeppe, R.A.; Gatley, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    Carrier mediated glucose transport rates across brain capillary and myocardial cell membranes are many times higher than those expected for simple diffusion, and transport regulation can be an important determinant of tissue metabolic status. The authors have investigated the use of glucose analogs and dynamic positron tomography for the non-invasive measurement of unidirectional membrane transport rates. If analog extraction is sufficiently low, transport rates can be inferred directly from fitted kinetic rate constants. Fitting calculations were seen to be sensitive to the difficult to measure rapid components of the arterial input curves, to contributions from blood-borne label in the early data points, and to interference from other chemical forms in cases of significant phosphorylation. This last uncertainty was studied using serial scans of normal brain after venous injection of the well-transported but poorly phosphorylated analog 3-deoxy-3-fluoroglucose. Transport rate constants derived from 4-parameter fits of three hours of data were compared to those derived from 2-parameter fits of the first 12-20 minutes of data. Errors due to trapped label were absorbed primarily into the apparent distribution volume, allowing accurate estimation of transport rate constants from a brief data acquisition period. The study of the distinction of transport from phosphorylation also bears on the important question of the significance of the individual rate constants in the four-parameter fitting of brief dynamic scan sequences in studies of metabolic rate using 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglucose.

  10. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δmore » > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.« less

  11. Quantized Water Transport: Ideal Desalination through Graphyne-4 Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E. G.; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that γ-graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13 L/cm2/day/MPa, 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore size. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membranes. PMID:24196437

  12. Quantized water transport: ideal desalination through graphyne-4 membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E G; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that γ-graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13 L/cm(2)/day/MPa, 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore size. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membranes. PMID:24196437

  13. Study of transport through an electro responsive polymer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Datta, A.; Contractor, A. Q.

    2015-02-01

    Conducting polymers have been used widely for development of several electronic, sensing devices because of its electro active nature. In the present work porous polycarbonate (PC) support was coated with a thin gold layer. An electrochemically synthesized polyaniline (PANI) film was deposited on gold coated PC and characterisation was done by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For measuring the concentration of potassium ion (K+) inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used. Potassium ion transport across PANI membrane at various potential showed the gradual opening of the coiled PANI. In this work an effort has been given to picture the situation in the membrane electrolyte junction on application of potential.

  14. Glia plasma membrane transporters: Key players in glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Flores-Méndez, Marco; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the central nervous system, elicits its functions through the activation of specific membrane receptors that are expressed in neurons and glial cells. The re-cycling of this amino acid is carried out mostly through a continuous interplay between neurons and glia cells, given the fact that the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft depends mainly on glial glutamate transporters. Therefore, a functional and physical interaction between membrane transporters links glutamate uptake, transformation to glutamine and its release to the extra-synaptic space and its uptake to the pre-synaptic terminal. This sequence of events, best known as the glutamate/glutamine shuttle is central to glutamatergic transmission. In this sense, the uptake process triggers a complex series of biochemical cascades that modify the physiology of glial cells in the immediate, short and long term so as to be capable to take up, transform and release these amino acids in a regulated amount and in an appropriate time frame to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission. Among the signaling cascades activated in glial cells by glutamate transporters, a sustained Na(+) and Ca(2+) influx, protein posttranslational modifications and gene expression regulation at the transcriptional and translational levels are present. Therefore, it is clear that the pivotal role of glial cells in the context of excitatory transmission has been constantly underestimated. PMID:27083407

  15. Free Energy Wells and Barriers to Ion Transport Across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Susan

    2014-03-01

    The flow of ions across cellular membranes is essential to many biological processes. Ion transport is also important in synthetic materials used as battery electrolytes. Transport often involves specific ions and fast conduction. To achieve those properties, ion conduction pathways must solvate specific ions by just the ``right amount.'' The right amount of solvation avoids ion traps due to deep free energy wells, and avoids ion block due to high free energy barriers. Ion channel proteins in cellular membranes demonstrate this subtle balance in solvation of specific ions. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between binding site structure and ion solvation free energies in biological ion binding sites. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites for fast transport of specific ions. We acknowledge support from Sandia's LDRD program. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Scott R. Morrison; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephen; Frank E. Anderson; Shandra Ratnasamy; Jon P. Wagner; Clive Brereton

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites with hydrogen permeable alloys. The primary technical challenge in achieving the goals of this project will be to optimize membrane composition to enable practical hydrogen separation rates and chemical stability. Other key aspects of this developing technology include catalysis, ceramic processing methods, and separation unit design operating under high pressure. To achieve these technical goals, Eltron Research Inc. has organized a consortium consisting of CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Inc. (SCI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and NORAM. Hydrogen permeation rates in excess of 50 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} at {approx}440 C were routinely achieved under less than optimal experimental conditions using a range of membrane compositions. Factors that limit the maximum permeation attainable were determined to be mass transport resistance of H{sub 2} to and from the membrane surface, as well as surface contamination. Mass transport resistance was partially overcome by increasing the feed and sweep gas flow rates to greater than five liters per minute. Under these experimental conditions, H2 permeation rates in excess of 350 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} at {approx}440 C were attained. These results are presented in this report, in addition to progress with cermets, thin film fabrication, catalyst development, and H{sub 2} separation unit scale up.

  17. A mesoporous catalytic membrane architecture for lithium-oxygen battery systems.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Schwab, Mark; Goh, Tenghooi; Taylor, André D

    2015-01-14

    Controlling the mesoscale geometric configuration of catalysts on the oxygen electrode is an effective strategy to achieve high reversibility and efficiency in Li-O2 batteries. Here we introduce a new Li-O2 cell architecture that employs a catalytic polymer-based membrane between the oxygen electrode and the separator. The catalytic membrane was prepared by immobilization of Pd nanoparticles on a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber membrane and is adjacent to a carbon nanotube electrode loaded with Ru nanoparticles. During oxide product formation, the insulating PAN polymer scaffold restricts direct electron transfer to the Pd catalyst particles and prevents the direct blockage of Pd catalytic sites. The modified Li-O2 battery with a catalytic membrane showed a stable cyclability for 60 cycles with a capacity of 1000 mAh/g and a reduced degree of polarization (∼ 0.3 V) compared to cells without a catalytic membrane. We demonstrate the effects of a catalytic membrane on the reaction characteristics associated with morphological and structural features of the discharge products via detailed ex situ characterization. PMID:25546408

  18. Global simulation of coupled carbon and oxygen transport in a Czochralski furnace for silicon crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B.; Kakimoto, K.

    2010-10-01

    For accurate prediction of carbon and oxygen impurities in a single crystal produced by the Czochralski method, global simulation of coupled oxygen and carbon transport in the whole furnace was implemented. Both gas-phase transportation and liquid-phase transportation of oxygen and carbon were considered. With five chemical reactions considered, SiO and CO concentrations in gas and C and O atom concentrations in silicon melt were solved simultaneously. The simulation results show good agreement with experimental data.

  19. A comparative study of water uptake by and transport through ionomeric fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A.Jr.; Springer, T.E.; Davey, J.; Jestel, R.; Lopez, C.; Valerio, J.; Gottesfeld, S. . Electronics Materials and Device Research)

    1993-07-01

    Water uptake and transport parameters measured at 30 C for several available perfluorosulfonic acid membranes are compared. The water sorption characteristics, diffusion coefficient of water, electroosmotic drag, and protonic conductivity were determined for Nafion 117, Membrane C, and Dow XUS 13204.10 developmental fuel cell membrane. The diffusion coefficient and conductivity of each of these membranes were determined as functions of membrane water content. Experimental determination of transport parameters, enables one to compare membranes without the skewing effects of extensive features such as membrane thickness which contributes in a nonlinear fashion to performance in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

  20. Slow DNA Transport through Nanopores in Hafnium Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2–7 nm thick) free-standing hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with <2 nm diameter pores that last several hours, in which we observe >50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore. PMID:24083444

  1. A kinetic study of mercury(II) transport through a membrane assisted by new transport reagent

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A new organodithiophosphorus derivative, namely O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl)-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate, was synthesized and then the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. Results The compound 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The transport of mercury(II) ion by a zwitterionic dithiophosphonate 1 in the liquid membrane was studied and the kinetic behavior of the transport process as a function of concentration, temperature, stirring rate and solvents was investigated. The compound 1 is expected to serve as a model liquid membrane transport with mercury(II) ions. Conclusion A kinetic study of mercury(II) transport through a membrane assisted by O-(1,3-Bispiperidino-2-propyl)-4-methoxy phenyldithiophosphonate was performed. It can be concluded that the compound 1 can be provided a general and straightforward route to remove toxic metals ions such as mercury(II) ion from water or other solution. PMID:21762513

  2. Novel Approach for Developing Dual-Phase Ceramic Membranes for Oxygen Separation through Beneficial Phase Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbao; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Yubo; Chen, Dengjie; Chen, Jiawei; Liu, Shaomin; Jin, Wanqin; Shao, Zongping

    2015-10-21

    A novel method based on beneficial phase reaction for developing composite membranes with high oxygen permeation flux and favorable stability was proposed in this work. Various Ce0.8Sm0.2O2-δ (SDC) + SrCO3+Co3O4 powders with different SDC contents were successfully fabricated into membranes through high temperature phase reaction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements suggest that the solid-state reaction between the SDC, SrCO3 and Co3O4 oxides occurred at the temperature for membrane sintering, leading to the formation of a highly conductive tetragonal perovskite phase SmxSr1-xCoO3-δ. The morphology and elemental distribution of the dual-phase membranes were characterized using back scattered scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (BSEM-EDX). The oxygen bulk diffusivity and surface exchange properties of the materials were investigated via the electrical conductivity relaxation technique, which supported the formation of conductive phases. The SDC+20 wt % SrCO3+10.89 wt % Co3O4 membrane exhibited the highest permeation flux among the others, reaching 0.93 mL cm(-2) min(-1) [STP = standard temperature and pressure] under an air/helium gradient at 900 °C for a membrane with a thickness of 0.5 mm. In addition, the oxygen permeation flux remained stable during the long-time test. The results demonstrate the beneficial phase reaction as a practical method for the development of high-performance dual-phase ceramic membranes. PMID:26419767

  3. A miniaturized extracorporeal membrane oxygenator with integrated rotary blood pump: preclinical in vivo testing.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ruedger; Bensberg, Ralf; Arens, Jutta; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Rossaint, Rolf; Henzler, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can achieve sufficient gas exchange in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. A highly integrated extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (HEXMO) was developed to reduce filling volume and simplify management. Six female pigs were connected to venovenous HEXMO with a total priming volume of 125 ml for 4 hours during hypoxemia induced by a hypoxic inspired gas mixture. Animals were anticoagulated with intravenous heparin. Gas exchange, hemodynamics, hemolysis, and coagulation activation were examined. One device failed at the magnetic motor coupling of the integrated diagonal pump. In the remaining five experiments, the oxygenation increased significantly (arterial oxygen saturation [SaO2] from 79 ± 5% before HEXMO to 92% ± 11% after 4 hours) facilitated by a mean oxygen transfer of 66 ± 29 ml/dl through the oxygenator. The CO2 elimination by the HEXMO reduced arterial PaCO2 only marginal. Extracorporeal blood flow was maintained at 32% ± 6% of cardiac output. Hemodynamic instability or hemolysis was not observed. The plasmatic coagulation was only mildly activated without significant platelet consumption. The HEXMO prototype provided sufficient gas exchange to prevent hypoxemia. This proof of concept study supports further development and design modifications to increase performance and to reduce coagulation activation for potential long-term application. PMID:21317635

  4. The role of multi-species transport in proton-conducting perovskite permeation membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Michael Dale

    Proton conducting ceramics have been of great scientific interest since their initial development over 30 years ago. In that time, the ABO3 perovskite family of materials has shown particularly significant promise, with doped barium zirconates arguably being the subject of the most intense research. One of the most interesting and yet also scientifically underappreciated abilities of many of these ceramics is they can exhibit multi-species conduction behavior --- specifically they can exhibit simultaneous protonic and oxygen vacancy conduction in addition to electronic (electron or hole) conductivity. This allows for uses that do not require electrodes or a driving force other than chemical potential gradients, such as gas permeation and reactor membranes. The studies in this dissertation probe and clarify the implications arising from multi-species transport in these materials. Importantly, this dissertation also underscores the difficulties associated with assessing multi-species transport using standard electrochemical measurement techniques such as conductivity. To combat this difficulty, the modeling and experimental studies presented in this dissertation make use of permeation conditions to probe multi-species transport in greater detail and clarity than is possible using conductivity studies. This research explicitly examines the multi-species transport behavior, not only when two charge-carrying defects are major contributors, but also when at least a third defect has a significant contribution. This addition of a third carrier introduces behaviors that are not present in either single or two carrier systems, such as "uphill" transport. This uphill transport, the diffusion of a species up its chemical potential gradient, can occur for individual defects, the gas components on either side of the membrane, or both. A numerical model was developed to assist in the investigation of membrane performance under a wide range of possible experimental conditions

  5. Simulation of oxygen carrier mediated oxygen transport to C3A hepatoma cells housed within a hollow fiber bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jesse P; Gordon, Jason E; Palmer, Andre F

    2006-02-01

    A priori knowledge of the dissolved oxygen (O2) concentration profile within a hepatic hollow fiber (HF) bioreactor is important in developing an effective bioartificial liver assist device (BLAD). O2 provision is limiting within HF bioreactors and we hypothesize that supplementing a hepatic HF bioreactor's circulating media with bovine red blood cells (bRBCs), which function as an O2 carrier, will improve oxygenation. The dissolved O2 concentration profile within a single HF (lumen, membrane, and representative extra capillary space (ECS)) was modeled with the finite element method, and compared to experimentally measured data obtained on an actual HF bioreactor with the same dimensions housing C3A hepatoma cells. Our results (experimental and modeling) indicate bRBC supplementation of the circulating media leads to an increase in O2 consumed by C3A cells. Under certain experimental conditions (pO2,IN) = 95 mmHg, Q = 8.30 mL/min), the addition of bRBCs at 5% of the average in vivo human red blood cell concentration (% hRBC) results in approximately 50% increase in the O2 consumption rate (OCR). By simply adjusting the operating conditions (pO2,IN) = 25 mmHg, Q = 1.77 mL/min) and increasing bRBC concentration to 25% hRBC the OCR increase is approximately 10-fold. However, the improved O2 concentration profile experienced by the C3A cells could not duplicate the full range of in vivo O2 tensions (25-70 mmHg) typically experienced within the liver sinusoid with this particular HF bioreactor. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the O2 transport model accurately predicts O2 consumption within a HF bioreactor, thus setting up the modeling framework for improving the design of future hepatic HF bioreactors. PMID:16161160

  6. Automated Rotational Percussion Bed and Bronchoscopy Improves Respiratory Mechanics and Oxygenation in ARDS Patients Supported with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nirmal S; Wille, Keith M; Bellot, S Christopher; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used to provide "lung rest" through the use of low tidal volume (6 ml/kg) and ultralow tidal volume (<6 ml/kg) ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Low and ultralow tidal volume ventilation can result in low dynamic respiratory compliance and potentially increased retention of airway secretions. We present our experience using automated rotational percussion beds (ARPBs) and bronchoscopy in four ARDS patients to manage increased pulmonary secretions. These beds performed automated side-to-side tilt maneuver and intermittent chest wall percussion. Their use resulted in substantial reduction in peak and plateau pressures in two patients on volume control ventilation, while the driving pressures (inspiratory pressure) to attain the desired tidal volumes in patients on pressure control ventilation also decreased. In addition, mean partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio (109 pre-ARPB vs. 157 post-ARPB), positive end-expiratory pressure (10 cm H2O vs. 8 cm H2O), and FiO2 (0.88 vs. 0.52) improved after initiation of ARPB. The improvements in the respiratory mechanics and oxygenation helped us to initiate early ECMO weaning. Based on our experience, the use of chest physiotherapy, frequent body repositioning, and bronchoscopy may be helpful in the management of pulmonary secretions in patients supported with ECMO. PMID:26771392

  7. CESAR: conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Giles J; Clemens, Felicity; Elbourne, Diana; Firmin, Richard; Hardy, Pollyanna; Hibbert, Clare; Killer, Hilliary; Mugford, Miranda; Thalanany, Mariamma; Tiruvoipati, Ravin; Truesdale, Ann; Wilson, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Background An estimated 350 adults develop severe, but potentially reversible respiratory failure in the UK annually. Current management uses intermittent positive pressure ventilation, but barotrauma, volutrauma and oxygen toxicity can prevent lung recovery. An alternative treatment, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, uses cardio-pulmonary bypass technology to temporarily provide gas exchange, allowing ventilator settings to be reduced. While extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is proven to result in improved outcome when compared to conventional ventilation in neonates with severe respiratory failure, there is currently no good evidence from randomised controlled trials to compare these managements for important clinical outcomes in adults, although evidence from case series is promising. Methods/Design The aim of the randomised controlled trial of Conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure (CESAR) is to assess whether, for patients with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation will increase the rate of survival without severe disability ('confined to bed' and 'unable to wash or dress') by six months post-randomisation, and be cost effective from the viewpoints of the NHS and society, compared to conventional ventilatory support. Following assent from a relative, adults (18–65 years) with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure (Murray score ≥ 3.0 or hypercapnea with pH < 7.2) will be randomised for consideration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation at Glenfield Hospital, Leicester or continuing conventional care in a centre providing a high standard of conventional treatment. The central randomisation service will minimise by type of conventional treatment centre, age, duration of high pressure ventilation, hypoxia/hypercapnea, diagnosis and number of organs failed, to ensure balance in key prognostic variables

  8. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  9. Electrical resistance and transport numbers of ion-exchange membranes used in electrodialytic soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, H.K.; Ottosen, L.M.; Villumsen, A.

    1999-08-01

    Electrodialytic soil remediation is a recently developed method to decontaminate heavy metal polluted soil using ion-exchange membranes. In this method one side of the ion-exchange membrane is in direct contact with the polluted soil. It is of great importance to known if this contact with the soil causes damage to the membrane. This work presents the result of transport number and electrical resistance measurements done on four sets of ion-exchange membranes (Ionics, Inc CR67 HMR412 cation-exchange membranes and Ionics, Inc AR204 SXZR anion-exchange membranes), which have been used in four different electrodialytic soil remediation experiments. The experiments showed that after the use in electrodialytic soil remediation, the ion-exchange membranes had transport numbers in the same magnitude as new membranes. The electrical resistance for six membranes did not differ from that of new membranes, whereas two membranes showed a slightly increased resistance.

  10. Polymer electrolyte membranes from fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene: Membrane structure and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sodeye, Akinbode; Huang, Tianzi; Gido, Samuel; Mays, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    With a view to optimizing morphology and ultimately properties, membranes have been cast from relatively inexpensive block copolymer ionomers of fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene (FISS) with various sulfonation levels, in both the acid form and the cesium neutralized form. The morphology of these membranes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, as well as water uptake, proton conductivity and methanol permeability within the temperature range from 20 to 60 C. Random phase separated morphologies were obtained for all samples except the cesium sample with 50 mol% sulfonation. The transport properties increased with increasing degree of sulfonation and temperature for all samples. The acid form samples absorbed more water than the cesium samples with a maximum swelling of 595% recorded at 60 C for the acid sample having 50 mol% sulfonation. Methanol permeability for the latter sample was more than an order of magnitude less than for Nafion 112 but so was the proton conductivity within the plane of the membrane at 20 C. Across the plane of the membrane this sample had half the conductivity of Nafion 112 at 60 C.

  11. From The Cover: Osmotic water transport through carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Amrit; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2003-09-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study osmotically driven transport of water molecules through hexagonally packed carbon nanotube membranes. Our simulation setup comprises two such semipermeable membranes separating compartments of pure water and salt solution. The osmotic force drives water flow from the pure-water to the salt-solution compartment. Monitoring the flow at molecular resolution reveals several distinct features of nanoscale flows. In particular, thermal fluctuations become significant at the nanoscopic length scales, and as a result, the flow is stochastic in nature. Further, the flow appears frictionless and is limited primarily by the barriers at the entry and exit of the nanotube pore. The observed flow rates are high (5.8 water molecules per nanosecond and nanotube), comparable to those through the transmembrane protein aquaporin-1, and are practically independent of the length of the nanotube, in contrast to predictions of macroscopic hydrodynamics. All of these distinct characteristics of nanoscopic water flow can be modeled quantitatively by a 1D continuous-time random walk. At long times, the pure-water compartment is drained, and the net flow of water is interrupted by the formation of structured solvation layers of water sandwiched between two nanotube membranes. Structural and thermodynamic aspects of confined water monolayers are studied.

  12. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum–nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum–nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum–nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum–nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon. PMID:27503412

  13. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-08-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon.

  14. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon. PMID:27503412

  15. Carbon dioxide remediation via oxygen-enriched combustion using dense ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Bose, Arun C.; McIlvried, Howard G.

    2001-01-01

    A method of combusting pulverized coal by mixing the pulverized coal and an oxidant gas to provide a pulverized coal-oxidant gas mixture and contacting the pulverized coal-oxidant gas mixture with a flame sufficiently hot to combust the mixture. An oxygen-containing gas is passed in contact with a dense ceramic membrane of metal oxide material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity that is gas-impervious until the oxygen concentration on one side of the membrane is not less than about 30% by volume. An oxidant gas with an oxygen concentration of not less than about 30% by volume and a CO.sub.2 concentration of not less than about 30% by volume and pulverized coal is contacted with a flame sufficiently hot to combust the mixture to produce heat and a flue gas. One dense ceramic membrane disclosed is selected from the group consisting of materials having formulae SrCo.sub.0.8 Fe.sub.0.2 O.sub.x, SrCo.sub.0.5 FeO.sub.x and La.sub.0.2 Sr.sub.0.8 Co.sub.0.4 Fe.sub.0.6 O.sub.x.

  16. Nanopore formation process in artificial cell membrane induced by plasma-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated morphological change of an artificial lipid bilayer membrane induced by oxygen radicals which were generated by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. Neutral oxygen species, O((3)Pj) and O2((1)Δg), were irradiated of a supported lipid bilayer existing under a buffer solution at various conditions of dose time and distances, at which the dose amounts of the oxygen species were calculated quantitatively. Observation using an atomic force microscope and a fluorescence microscope revealed that dose of the neutral oxygen species generated nanopores with the diameter of 10-50 nm in a phospholipid bilayer, and finally destructed the bilayer structure. We found that protrusions appeared on the lipid bilayer surface prior to the formation of nanopores, and we attributed the protrusions to the precursor of the nanopores. We propose a mechanism of the pore formation induced by lipid oxidation on the basis of previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:27216034

  17. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  18. Towards Co-evolution of Membrane Transport and Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Protocellular boundaries were inextricably connected to the metabolism they encapsulated: to be inheritable, early metabolism must have led to an increased rate of growth and division of vesicles and, similarly, transport through vesicle boundaries must have supported the evolution of metabolism. Even though explaining how this coupling emerged and evolved in the absence of the complex machinery of modern cells is one of the key issues in studies on the origin of life, little is known about the biochemical and biophysical processes that might have been involved. This gap in our knowledge is a major impediment in efforts to construct scenarios for the origin of life and laboratory models of protocells. A combination of experimental and computational studies carried out by us and our collaborators is aimed at helping to close this gap. Properties of membranes might have contributed to the selection of RNA as an early biopolymer. A kinetic mechanism was proposed (Sacerdote & Szostak, 2005) in which ribose was supplied more quickly than other aldopentoses to primordial cells for preferential incorporation of ribonucleotides into nucleic acids. This proposal is based on a finding that ribose permeates membranes an order of magnitude faster than its diastereomers, arabinose and xylose. Our computer simulations, which yield permeation rates in excellent agreement with experiment, and kinetic modeling explain this phenomenon in terms of inter- and intramolecular interactions involving exocyclic hydroxyl groups attached to carbon atoms of the pyranose ring (Wei and Pohorille, 2009). They also constrain scenarios for the formation of the earliest nucleic acids (Wei and Pohorille, 2013). In one scenario, sugars permeate protocellular walls and subsequently are used to synthesize nucleic acids inside protocells. As long as this process proceeds at the rate faster than 6x10(exp -3)/s, ribose derivatives will be available for synthesis easier than their diastereomers. If

  19. Reactive oxygen product formation by human neutrophils as an early marker for biocompatibility of dialysis membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, A R; Templ, E; Traindl, O; Heinzl, H; Zlabinger, G J

    1994-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by neutrophils (PMN) in vivo was examined by a whole blood assay using dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) in 10 patients each dialysed consecutively with two different dialyser membranes. Haemodialysis (HD) with cuprophan membrane (CM) led to a significantly (P < 0.001) more pronounced ROI production by PMN (2.4 +/- 0.5-fold increase in intracellular oxidation of DCFH-DA) compared with HD with polysulfone membranes (PM; 1.5 +/- 0.2-fold). HD with CM induced a decrease in PMN count by about 90%, whereas PM induced a decrease by only 25% (P < 0.001). In CM patients maximal ROI production coincided with the nadir in PMN count. All patients dialysed with CM showed a clear increase in serum levels of Bb fragments, whereas PM-dialysed patients did not. In this respect, however, no clear time relationship was seen to the kinetics of ROI production, nor to the disappearance of neutrophils from the circulation. Evaluating a direct effect of the dialysis membranes on PMN demonstrated that incubation of neutrophils with hollow fibres of the CM but not of the PM in the absence of plasma induces significant ROI production by PMN. Our study thus indicates that ROI production by PMN during HD correlates to membrane biocompatibility. Furthermore, one might speculate that also independently from but perhaps in addition to complement activation, reactive oxygen products are critically involved in the generation of haemodialysis-associated neutrophil emigration. PMID:7955536

  20. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Adam Calihman; Andy Girard; Pamela M. Van Calcar; Richard Mackay; Tom Barton; Sara Rolfe

    2001-01-30

    membranes of this thickness. The sintered membranes were greater than 95% dense, but the phase purity decreased with increasing dopant concentration. The quantity of dopant incorporated into the perovskite phase was roughly constant, with excess dopant forming an additional phase. Composite materials with distinct ceramic and metallic phases, and thin film perovskites (100 {micro}m) also were successfully prepared, but have not yet been tested for hydrogen transport. Finally, porous platinum was identified as a excellent catalyst for evaluation of membrane materials, however, lower cost nickel catalyst systems are being developed.

  1. Enhanced oxygen separation through robust freeze-cast bilayered dual-phase membranes.

    PubMed

    Gaudillere, Cyril; Garcia-Fayos, Julio; Balaguer, María; Serra, José M

    2014-09-01

    Dual-phase oxygen-permeable asymmetric membranes with enhanced oxygen permeation were prepared by combining freeze-casting, screen-printing, and constraint-sintering techniques. The membranes were evaluated under oxyfuel operating conditions. The prepared membranes are composed of an original ice-templated La(0.6)Sr(0.4)Co(0.2)Fe(0.8)O(3-δ) support with hierarchically oriented porosity and a top fully densified bilayered coating comprising a 10 μm-thick La(0.6)Sr(0.4)Co(0.2)Fe(0.8)O(3-δ) layer and a top protective 8 μm-thick layer made of an optimized NiFe2O4/Ce(0.8)Tb(0.2)O(2-δ) composite synthesized by the one-pot Pechini method. Preliminary analysis confirmed the thermochemical compatibility of the three involved phases at high temperature without any additional phase detected. This membrane exhibited a promising oxygen permeation value of 4.8 mL min(-1)  cm(-2) at 1000 °C upon using Ar and air as the sweep and feed gases, respectively. Mimicking oxyfuel operating conditions by switching argon to pure CO2 as a sweep gas at 1000 °C and air as feed enabled an oxygen flux value of 5.6 mL min(-1)  cm(-2) to be reached. Finally, under the same conditions and increasing the oxygen partial pressure to 0.1 MPa in the feed, the oxygen permeation reached 12 mL min(-1)  cm(-2). The influence of CO2 content in the sweep gas was studied and its reversible and positive effect over oxygen permeation at temperatures equal to or above 950 °C was revealed. Finally, the membrane stability over a period of 150 h under CO2-rich sweep gas showed a low degradation rate of 2.4×10(-2)  mL min(-1)  cm(-2) per day. PMID:25070608

  2. An Arabidopsis peptide transporter is a member of a new class of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, H Y; Song, W; Zhang, L; Naider, F; Becker, J M; Stacey, G

    1994-01-01

    An Arabidopsis peptide transport gene was cloned from an Arabidopsis cDNA library by functionally complementing a yeast peptide transport mutant. The Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter (AtPTR2) allowed growth of yeast cells on dipeptides and tripeptides but not peptides four residues and higher. The plant peptide transporter also conferred sensitivity to a number of ethionine-containing, toxic peptides of chain length three or less and restored the ability to take up radiolabeled dileucine at levels similar to that of the wild type. Dileucine uptake was reduced by the addition of a variety of growth-promoting peptides. The sequence of a cDNA insert of 2.8 kb indicated an open reading frame encoding a 610-amino acid polypeptide (67.5 kD). Hydropathy analysis predicted a highly hydrophobic protein with a number of potential transmembrane segments. At the amino acid level, the Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter shows 24.6, 28.5, and 45.2% identity to the Arabidopsis nitrate-inducible nitrate transporter (CHL1), the rabbit small intestine oligopeptide transporter (PepT1), and the yeast peptide transporter (Ptr2p), respectively, but little identity to other proteins known to be involved in peptide transport. Root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to ethionine-containing toxic peptides was inhibited, and growth was restored by the addition of certain peptides shown to compete with dileucine uptake in yeast expressing the Arabidopsis transport gene. Consistent with the observed inhibition of root growth by toxic peptides, the peptide transporter is expressed in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings. This study represents the characterization of a plant peptide transporter that is a member of a new class of related membrane transport proteins. PMID:7919993

  3. Contributions of advective and diffusive oxygen transport through multilayer composite caps over mine waste.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Benson, Craig H

    2004-07-01

    The relative contributions of four mechanisms of oxygen transport in multilayer composite (MLC) caps placed over oxygen-consuming mine waste were evaluated using numerical and analytical methods. MLC caps are defined here as caps consisting of earthen and geosynthetic (polymeric) components where a composite barrier layer consisting of a geomembrane (1-2 mm thick polymeric sheet) overlying a clay layer is the primary barrier to transport. The transport mechanisms that were considered are gas-phase advective transport, gas-phase diffusive transport, liquid-phase advective transport via infiltrating precipitation and liquid-phase diffusive transport. A numerical model was developed to simulate gas-phase advective-diffusive transport of oxygen through a multilayer cap containing seven layers. This model was also used to simulate oxygen diffusion in the liquid phase. An approximate analytical method was used to compute the advective flux of oxygen in the liquid phase. The numerical model was verified for limiting cases using an analytical solution. Comparisons were also made between model predictions and field data for earthen caps reported by others. Results of the analysis show that the dominant mechanism for oxygen transport through MLC caps is gas-phase diffusion. For the cases that were considered, the gas-phase diffusive flux typically comprises at least 99% of the total oxygen flux. Thus, designers of MLC caps should focus on design elements and features that will limit diffusion of gas-phase oxygen. PMID:15145567

  4. Unsaturated lipids protect the integral membrane peptide gramicidin A from singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Kotova, Elena A; Agapov, Igor I; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2014-05-01

    In contrast to expectations that unsaturated fatty acids contribute to oxidative stress by providing a source of lipid peroxides, we demonstrated the protective effect of double bonds in lipids on oxidative damage to membrane proteins. Photodynamic inactivation of gramicidin channels was decreased in unsaturated lipid compared to saturated lipid bilayers. By estimating photosensitizer (boronated chlorine e6 amide) binding to the membrane with the current relaxation technique, the decrease in gramicidin photoinactivation was attributed to singlet oxygen scavenging by double bonds in lipids rather than to the reduction in photosensitizer binding. Gramicidin protection by unsaturated lipids was also observed upon induction of oxidative stress with tert-butyl hydroperoxide. PMID:24613917

  5. Toward enhanced hydrogen generation from water using oxygen permeating LCF membranes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yu; Chang, Le; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F

    2015-04-21

    Hydrogen production from water thermolysis can be enhanced by the use of perovskite-type mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes, through which oxygen permeation is driven by a chemical potential gradient. In this work, water thermolysis experiments were performed using 0.9 mm thick La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF-91) perovskite membranes at 990 °C in a lab-scale button-cell reactor. We examined the effects of the operating conditions such as the gas species concentrations and flow rates on the feed and sweep sides on the water thermolysis rate and oxygen flux. A single step reaction mechanism is proposed for surface reactions, and three-resistance permeation models are derived. Results show that water thermolysis is facilitated by the LCF-91 membrane especially when a fuel is added to the sweep gas. Increasing the gas flow rate and water concentration on the feed side or the hydrogen concentration on the sweep side enhances the hydrogen production rate. In this work, hydrogen is used as the fuel by construction, so that a single-step surface reaction mechanism can be developed and water thermolysis rate parameters can be derived. Both surface reaction rate parameters for oxygen incorporation/dissociation and hydrogen-oxygen reactions are fitted at 990 °C. We compare the oxygen fluxes in water thermolysis and air separation experiments, and identify different limiting steps in the processes involving various oxygen sources and sweep gases for this 0.9 mm thick LCF-91 membrane. In the air feed-inert sweep case, the bulk diffusion and sweep side surface reaction are the two limiting steps. In the water feed-inert sweep case, surface reaction on the feed side dominates the oxygen permeation process. Yet in the water feed-fuel sweep case, surface reactions on both the feed and sweep sides are rate determining when hydrogen concentration in the sweep side is in the range of 1-5 vol%. Furthermore, long term studies show that the surface morphology changes and

  6. Oxygen transport in off-stoichiometric uranium dioxide mediated by defect clustering dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jianguo Bai, Xian-Ming; El-Azab, Anter; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-07

    Oxygen transport is central to many properties of oxides such as stoichiometric changes, phase transformation, and ionic conductivity. In this paper, we report a mechanism for oxygen transport in uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) in which the kinetics is mediated by defect clustering dynamics. In particular, the kinetic Monte Carlo method has been used to investigate the kinetics of oxygen transport in UO{sub 2} under the condition of creation and annihilation of oxygen vacancies and interstitials as well as oxygen interstitial clustering, with variable off-stoichiometry and temperature conditions. It is found that in hypo-stoichiometric UO{sub 2−x}, oxygen transport is well described by the vacancy diffusion mechanism while in hyper-stoichiometric UO{sub 2+x}, oxygen interstitial cluster diffusion contributes significantly to oxygen transport kinetics, particularly at high temperatures and high off-stoichiometry levels. It is also found that di-interstitial clusters and single interstitials play dominant roles in oxygen diffusion while other larger clusters have negligible contributions. However, the formation, coalescence, and dissociation of these larger clusters indirectly affects the overall oxygen diffusion due to their interactions with mono and di-interstitials, thus providing an explanation of the experimental observation of saturation or even drop of oxygen diffusivity at high off-stoichiometry.

  7. Oxygen transport in off-stoichiometric uranium dioxide mediated by defect clustering dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianguo; Bai, Xian-Ming; El-Azab, Anter; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-01

    Oxygen transport is central to many properties of oxides such as stoichiometric changes, phase transformation, and ionic conductivity. In this paper, we report a mechanism for oxygen transport in uranium dioxide (UO2) in which the kinetics is mediated by defect clustering dynamics. In particular, the kinetic Monte Carlo method has been used to investigate the kinetics of oxygen transport in UO2 under the condition of creation and annihilation of oxygen vacancies and interstitials as well as oxygen interstitial clustering, with variable off-stoichiometry and temperature conditions. It is found that in hypo-stoichiometric UO2-x, oxygen transport is well described by the vacancy diffusion mechanism while in hyper-stoichiometric UO2+x, oxygen interstitial cluster diffusion contributes significantly to oxygen transport kinetics, particularly at high temperatures and high off-stoichiometry levels. It is also found that di-interstitial clusters and single interstitials play dominant roles in oxygen diffusion while other larger clusters have negligible contributions. However, the formation, coalescence, and dissociation of these larger clusters indirectly affects the overall oxygen diffusion due to their interactions with mono and di-interstitials, thus providing an explanation of the experimental observation of saturation or even drop of oxygen diffusivity at high off-stoichiometry.

  8. Oxygen transport in off-stoichiometric uranium dioxide mediated by defect clustering dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianguo; Bai, Xian-Ming; El-Azab, Anter; Allen, Todd R

    2015-03-01

    Oxygen transport is central to many properties of oxides such as stoichiometric changes, phase transformation, and ionic conductivity. In this paper, we report a mechanism for oxygen transport in uranium dioxide (UO2) in which the kinetics is mediated by defect clustering dynamics. In particular, the kinetic Monte Carlo method has been used to investigate the kinetics of oxygen transport in UO2 under the condition of creation and annihilation of oxygen vacancies and interstitials as well as oxygen interstitial clustering, with variable off-stoichiometry and temperature conditions. It is found that in hypo-stoichiometric UO(2-x), oxygen transport is well described by the vacancy diffusion mechanism while in hyper-stoichiometric UO(2+x), oxygen interstitial cluster diffusion contributes significantly to oxygen transport kinetics, particularly at high temperatures and high off-stoichiometry levels. It is also found that di-interstitial clusters and single interstitials play dominant roles in oxygen diffusion while other larger clusters have negligible contributions. However, the formation, coalescence, and dissociation of these larger clusters indirectly affects the overall oxygen diffusion due to their interactions with mono and di-interstitials, thus providing an explanation of the experimental observation of saturation or even drop of oxygen diffusivity at high off-stoichiometry. PMID:25747097

  9. Oxygen transport in off-stoichiometric uranium dioxide mediated by defect clustering dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Jianguo; Bai, Xian -Ming; El-Azab, Anter; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-05

    In this study, oxygen transport is central to many properties of oxides such as stoichiometric changes, phase transformation and ionic conductivity. In this paper, we report a mechanism for oxygen transport in uranium dioxide (UO2) in which the kinetics is mediated by defect clustering dynamics. In particular, the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been used to investigate the kinetics of oxygen transport in UO2 under the condition of creation and annihilation of oxygen vacancies and interstitials as well as oxygen interstitial clustering, with variable offstoichiometry and temperature conditions. It is found that in hypo-stoichiometric UO2-x, oxygen transport is wellmore » described by the vacancy diffusion mechanism while in hyper-stoichiometric UO2+x, oxygen interstitial cluster diffusion contributes significantly to oxygen transport kinetics, particularly at high temperatures and high off-stoichiometry levels. It is also found that diinterstitial clusters and single interstitials play dominant roles in oxygen diffusion while other larger clusters have negligible contributions. However, the formation, coalescence and dissociation of these larger clusters indirectly affects the overall oxygen diffusion due to their interactions with mono and di-interstitials, thus providing a explanation of the experimental observation of saturation or even drop of oxygen diffusivity at high off-stoichiometry.« less

  10. Oxygen transport in off-stoichiometric uranium dioxide mediated by defect clustering dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jianguo; Bai, Xian -Ming; El-Azab, Anter; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-05

    In this study, oxygen transport is central to many properties of oxides such as stoichiometric changes, phase transformation and ionic conductivity. In this paper, we report a mechanism for oxygen transport in uranium dioxide (UO2) in which the kinetics is mediated by defect clustering dynamics. In particular, the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been used to investigate the kinetics of oxygen transport in UO2 under the condition of creation and annihilation of oxygen vacancies and interstitials as well as oxygen interstitial clustering, with variable offstoichiometry and temperature conditions. It is found that in hypo-stoichiometric UO2-x, oxygen transport is well described by the vacancy diffusion mechanism while in hyper-stoichiometric UO2+x, oxygen interstitial cluster diffusion contributes significantly to oxygen transport kinetics, particularly at high temperatures and high off-stoichiometry levels. It is also found that diinterstitial clusters and single interstitials play dominant roles in oxygen diffusion while other larger clusters have negligible contributions. However, the formation, coalescence and dissociation of these larger clusters indirectly affects the overall oxygen diffusion due to their interactions with mono and di-interstitials, thus providing a explanation of the experimental observation of saturation or even drop of oxygen diffusivity at high off-stoichiometry.

  11. Haemodynamic and oxygen transport response during exchange transfusion for severe falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Joynt, G M; Lipman, J

    1994-11-01

    We describe the haemodynamic and oxygen transport response in a patient undergoing exchange transfusion for severe falciparum malaria. We found that exchange transfusion produced a significant increase in left ventricular stroke work index, systemic oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. This potentially beneficial effect of exchange transfusion has not been reported previously. PMID:7824413

  12. A case of successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for right ventricular failure following pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Karthigesu, A; Hamdan, L; Arif, M; Haslan, G

    2015-12-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a useful but less commonly used technique in right ventricular failure post cardiac surgery in our region. We report a case of successful use of ECMO for right ventricular failure post cardiac surgery. Our patient is a 27-year-old male presented with constrictive pericarditis post completion of treatment for disseminated Tuberculosis. He underwent pericardiectomy that was complicated with acute right ventricular failure. He was placed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after few hours post op that lasted for five days. The patient survived to hospital discharge and remained well on follow-up. From our experience, this aggressive management approach is beneficial in right ventricular failure and can be safely utilised in all cardiothoracic centres. PMID:26988215

  13. [Current state of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in Colombia: description of the first cases].

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Socarrás, Jorge Luis; Gómez, Carolina; Gómez, Andrea; Cruz, Mónica; Díaz-Silva, Gustavo Adolfo; Niño, María Azucena

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is considered a rescue therapy and complex vital support with benefits in cardiorespiratory diseases during neonatal period that fulfil the characteristics of being reversible in neonates older than 34 weeks. The criteria for patient selection and its prompt use are critical for the final result. Even though new alternatives for management of hypoxemic respiratory failure in full term and almost full term neonates have decreased its use, congenital diaphragmatic hernia continues being a complex disease where it can have some applicability. Even though our experience is beginning, constant training will make of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation an option for complex patients in whom maximum therapy fails. This is a report of the first neonatal cases of hypoxemic respiratory failure managed at Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia. PMID:24794914

  14. Transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport in free-standing nanometer-sized polymer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Susanne; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2015-11-01

    The transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport of ions through thin polymer membranes has been investigated by recording single transport events via time-correlated single-particle detection. At the highest kinetic energies investigated, ballistic transport of potassium ions is observed with no discernible energy loss to the membrane. At the lowest kinetic energies investigated (several 100 eV) ions are demonstrated to lose the entire kinetic energy to the membrane. Transport there occurs by electrodiffusion. A transition regime is observed. The transition energy is shown to depend on the thickness of the membrane.

  15. Left Atrial Decompression by Percutaneous Left Atrial Venting Cannula Insertion during Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Eun; Jung, Jo Won; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Park, Young Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Patients with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) frequently suffer from pulmonary edema due to left ventricular dysfunction that accompanies left heart dilatation, which is caused by left atrial hypertension. The problem can be resolved by left atrium (LA) decompression. We performed a successful percutaneous LA decompression with an atrial septostomy and placement of an LA venting cannula in a 38-month-old child treated with venoarterial ECMO for acute myocarditis. PMID:27298800

  16. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation bridging to pharmacotherapy in pulmonary arterial hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mukta C; Ramani, Gautam V; Garcia, Jose P; Griffith, Bartley P; Uber, Patricia A; Park, Myung H

    2010-07-01

    We report the case of a treatment-naive patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension who presented with decompensated right ventricular failure and cardiogenic shock. Unstable hemodynamics, hypoxia and end-organ hypoperfusion limited up-titration of pharmacotherapy. Mechanical circulatory support with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) was initiated to permit dose titration of pulmonary vasodilator therapy. VV-ECMO was weaned after 10 days of support, with successful transition to intravenous epoprostenol and oral sildenafil. PMID:20417127

  17. Severe H1N1 virus in pregnancy requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    McNamee, K; Dawood, F

    2010-01-01

    Prompt diagnosis and treatment of H1N1 is crucial during pregnancy to prevent major morbidity and mortality as the virus poses an increased risk of severe illness in pregnant women. Currently, there is limited obstetric literature concerning pregnancy and the pandemic swine flu outbreak in the UK. Although there was a concerted effort to stockpile the HIN1 virus vaccinations, critical care adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is only available in one centre in the UK.

  18. Life-threatening flecainide overdose treated with intralipid and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Brumfield, Emily; Bernard, Kenneth R L; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Flecainide is a Class Ic antiarrythmic agent associated with adverse events due to its pro-arrythmic effects. We report the case of a 33-year-old female presenting in cardiac arrest after a flecainide overdose treated with intravenous fat emulsion (IFE), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). This case reviews the pathophysiology and management of flecainide toxicity including novel strategies of IFE and ECMO. PMID:25921969

  19. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge through Chemotherapy in B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Worku, Berhane; DeBois, William; Sobol, Irina; Gulkarov, Iosif; Horn, Evelyn M; Salemi, Arash

    2015-03-01

    A 41-year-old female presented with a large anterior mediastinal mass adjacent to the heart. Biopsy demonstrated lymphoma. Upon administration of chemotherapy, she developed cardiogenic shock requiring a 5-day course of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge through her treatment. After one cycle of chemotherapy, ECMO was discontinued and the patient completed her course of chemotherapy and recovered to hospital discharge. PMID:26390681

  20. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge through Chemotherapy in B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Worku, Berhane; DeBois, William; Sobol, Irina; Gulkarov, Iosif; Horn, Evelyn M.; Salemi, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: A 41-year-old female presented with a large anterior mediastinal mass adjacent to the heart. Biopsy demonstrated lymphoma. Upon administration of chemotherapy, she developed cardiogenic shock requiring a 5-day course of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge through her treatment. After one cycle of chemotherapy, ECMO was discontinued and the patient completed her course of chemotherapy and recovered to hospital discharge. PMID:26390681

  1. Transport phenomena in membranes for PEMFC applications: an analytical approach to the calculation of membrane resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Francesco, M.; Arato, E.; Costa, P.

    The transport phenomena of mass and electrical charges play an important role in the proton exchange membrane utilised in fuel cell applications. The calculation of the membrane ion and water transfer is usually determined in two ways: one is a semi-empirical mode that can be experimentally set for any application and cannot be used in the prediction of the characteristics of new cells, and the other is a very complex mathematical approach that needs very long calculation times. In fact, the membrane mass transfer model can cause problems in the management of PEM stack models, by increasing calculation times and, above all, convergence problems. This work attempts to overcome this bottleneck using a novel approach. The validation of the new approach has been made by applying the model results to a PEM fuel cell model and by comparing the overall results to those in the literature. The resulting calculation time warranted the application of this model to a very complex stack simulation, resulting in good fit and reasonable computing times.

  2. Manipulating Cofactor Binding Thermodynamics in an Artificial Oxygen Transport Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Ross Anderson, J. L.; Ahmed, Ismail; Norman, Jessica A.; Negron, Christopher; Mutter, Andrew C.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Koder, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the mutational analysis of an artificial oxygen transport protein, HP-7, which operates via a mechanism akin to human neuroglobin and cytoglobin. This protein destabilizes one of two heme-ligating histidine residues by coupling histidine side chain ligation with the burial of three charged glutamate residues on the same helix. Replacement of these glutamate residues with alanine, which is uncharged, increases the affinity of the distal histidine ligand by a factor of thirteen. Paradoxically, it also decreases heme binding affinity by a factor of five in the reduced state and sixty in the oxidized state. Application of a three-state binding model, in which an initial pentacoordinate binding event is followed by a protein conformational change to hexacoordinate, provides insight into the mechanism of this seemingly counterintuitive result: the initial pentacoordinate encounter complex is significantly destabilized by the loss of the glutamate side chains, and the increased affinity for the distal histidine only partially compensates. These results point to the importance of considering each oxidation and conformational state in the design of functional artificial proteins. PMID:22004125

  3. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Procedural Rescue Strategy for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Cardiac Complications.

    PubMed

    Banjac, Igor; Petrovic, Marija; Akay, Mehmet H; Janowiak, Lisa M; Radovancevic, Rajko; Nathan, Sriram; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor D

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications during or after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are associated with extremely high mortality, but extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be used as procedural rescue option to improve outcomes when patients experience respiratory or cardiac arrest. From 2012 to 2014, 230 patients underwent TAVR and 10 patients (4.3%) required emergent venous-arterial ECMO support. Mean age was 83 years, median Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score was 15, and mean aortic gradient was 45 mm Hg. Median left ventricular ejection fraction was 35%. Access for most ECMOs was femoral; two patients required central arterial and femoral venous access. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated in response to hemodynamic collapse due to perforation of left ventricle (n = 2), aortic root rupture (n = 1), moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency (n = 1), left main impingement (n = 1), valve embolization (n = 1), severe hypotension and cardiac arrest after prolonged rapid pacing sequence (n = 1), ventricular fibrillation (n = 2), and ventricular tachycardia (n = 1). Median time of ECMO support was 87 minutes. There were three hospital deaths. Post-TAVR mean aortic gradient was 8 mm Hg and median hospital stay was 19 days. Additional procedures included valve-in-valve placement (n = 1), percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 1), surgical LV repair (n = 2), surgical valve replacement (n = 1), aortic root rupture repair, and coronary bypass grafting (n = 1). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is rescue therapy for hemodynamic instable patients who develop TAVR-related cardiac complications. PMID:26309098

  4. Rapid Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Overcomes Fulminant Myocarditis Induced by 5‑Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Pachika, Ajay; Grubb, Kendra J.; DeFilippis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Fulminant myocarditis is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness caused by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. Data supporting the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the treatment of fulminant myocarditis are limited. A 49-year-old, previously healthy white man, recently diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinoma, developed severe chest pain hours after completing his first 96-hour intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment. Over a period of 3 days from onset of symptoms, the patient developed cardiogenic shock secondary to fulminant myocarditis induced by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. This required emergency initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient's systolic function recovered by day 5, and on the 17th day he was discharged in hemodynamically stable condition, without symptoms of heart failure. This case shows the importance of prompt recognition of cardiogenic shock secondary to 5-fluorouracil–induced myocarditis and how the immediate initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can restore adequate tissue perfusion, leading to myocardial recovery and ultimately the survival of the patient. PMID:27127440

  5. Rapid Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Overcomes Fulminant Myocarditis Induced by 5‑Fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Amraotkar, Alok R; Pachika, Ajay; Grubb, Kendra J; DeFilippis, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Fulminant myocarditis is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness caused by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. Data supporting the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the treatment of fulminant myocarditis are limited. A 49-year-old, previously healthy white man, recently diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinoma, developed severe chest pain hours after completing his first 96-hour intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment. Over a period of 3 days from onset of symptoms, the patient developed cardiogenic shock secondary to fulminant myocarditis induced by 5-fluorouracil cardiotoxicity. This required emergency initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The patient's systolic function recovered by day 5, and on the 17th day he was discharged in hemodynamically stable condition, without symptoms of heart failure. This case shows the importance of prompt recognition of cardiogenic shock secondary to 5-fluorouracil-induced myocarditis and how the immediate initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can restore adequate tissue perfusion, leading to myocardial recovery and ultimately the survival of the patient. PMID:27127440

  6. Polyamines control of cation transport across plant membranes: implications for ion homeostasis and abiotic stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are unique polycationic metabolites, controlling a variety of vital functions in plants, including growth and stress responses. Over the last two decades a bulk of data was accumulated providing explicit evidence that polyamines play an essential role in regulating plant membrane transport. The most straightforward example is a blockage of the two major vacuolar cation channels, namely slow (SV) and fast (FV) activating ones, by the micromolar concentrations of polyamines. This effect is direct and fully reversible, with a potency descending in a sequence Spm4+ > Spd3+ > Put2+. On the contrary, effects of polyamines on the plasma membrane (PM) cation and K+-selective channels are hardly dependent on polyamine species, display a relatively low affinity, and are likely to be indirect. Polyamines also affect vacuolar and PM H+ pumps and Ca2+ pump of the PM. On the other hand, catabolization of polyamines generates H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals. Export of polyamines to the apoplast and their oxidation there by available amine oxidases results in the induction of a novel ion conductance and confers Ca2+ influx across the PM. This mechanism, initially established for plant responses to pathogen attack (including a hypersensitive response), has been recently shown to mediate plant responses to a variety of abiotic stresses. In this review we summarize the effects of polyamines and their catabolites on cation transport in plants and discuss the implications of these effects for ion homeostasis, signaling, and plant adaptive responses to environment. PMID:24795739

  7. Microbial responses to membrane cleaning using sodium hypochlorite in membrane bioreactors: Cell integrity, key enzymes and intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaomeng; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xueye; Zheng, Xiang; Ma, Jinxing; Wu, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is a commonly used reagent for membrane cleaning in membrane bioreactors (MBRs), while it, being a kind of disinfectant (oxidant), may impair viability of microbes or even totally inactivate them upon its diffusion into mixed liquor during membrane cleaning. In this study, we systematically examine the effects of NaClO on microorganisms in terms of microbial cell integrity, metabolism behaviours (key enzymes), and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) under various NaClO concentrations. Different proportions of microbial cells in activated sludge were damaged within several minutes dependent on NaClO dosages (5-50 mg/g-SS), and correspondingly organic matters were released to bulk solution. Inhibition of key enzymes involved in organic matter biodegradation, nitrification and denitrification was observed in the presence of NaClO above 1 mg/g-SS, and thus organic matter and nitrogen removal efficiencies were decreased. It was also demonstrated that intracellular ROS production was increased with the NaClO dosage higher than 1 mg/g-SS, which likely induced further damage to microbial cells. PMID:26512807

  8. Hydrogen-oxygen proton-exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, R.; Pham, M.; Leonida, A.; Mcelroy, J.; Nalette, T.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cells and SPE electrolyzers (products of Hamilton Standard) both use a Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) as the sole electrolyte. These solid electrolyte devices have been under continuous development for over 30 years. This experience has resulted in a demonstrated ten-year SPE cell life capability under load conditions. Ultimate life of PEM fuel cells and electrolyzers is primarily related to the chemical stability of the membrane. For perfluorocarbon proton exchange membranes an accurate measure of the membrane stability is the fluoride loss rate. Millions of cell hours have contributed to establishing a relationship between fluoride loss rates and average expected ultimate cell life. This relationship is shown. Several features have been introduced into SPE fuel cells and SPE electrolyzers such that applications requiring greater than or equal to 100,000 hours of life can be considered. Equally important as the ultimate life is the voltage stability of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells and electrolyzers. Here again the features of SPE fuel cells and SPE electrolyzers have shown a cell voltage stability in the order of 1 microvolt per hour. That level of stability has been demonstrated for tens of thousands of hours in SPE fuel cells at up to 500 amps per square foot (ASF) current density.

  9. Glucose transport and microvillus membrane physical properties along the crypt-villus axis of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, J B; DeSouza, D; Goel, M; Thiesen, S

    1990-01-01

    Both transport function and microvillus membrane physical properties evolve as the enterocyte matures and migrates up the crypt-villus axis. We isolated enriched fractions of villus tip, mid-villus, and crypt enterocytes from which microvillus membrane vesicles were prepared. Using this material we characterized the alterations that occur in microvillus membrane fluidity as the rabbit enterocyte matures and correlated these with kinetic studies of glucose transport. With increasing maturity the microvillus membrane becomes more rigid due to both an increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and alterations in individual phospholipid subclasses. Maximal rates of glucose transport were greatest in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from mature cells. However, the glucose concentration producing half-maximal rates of transport (Km) was significantly lower in crypt microvillus membrane vesicles, suggesting that a distinct glucose transporter existed in crypt enterocytes. This distinction disappeared when differences between membrane lipid environments were removed. By fluidizing villus-tip microvillus membrane vesicles, in vitro, to levels seen in the crypt microvillus membrane, we observed a reduction in the Km of this transport system. These data suggest that the kinetic characteristics of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter are dependent upon its local membrane environment. Images PMID:2318967

  10. A Plasma Membrane Association Module in Yeast Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-07-29

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in silico analyses and mutational studies we found that the C-terminal sequences of Gap1, Bap2, Hip1, Tat1, Tat2, Mmp1, Sam3, Agp1, and Gnp1 are about 50 residues long, associate with the PM, and have features that discriminate them from the termini of organellar amino acid transporters. We show that this sequence (named PMasseq) contains an amphipathic α-helix and the FWC signature, which is palmitoylated by palmitoyltransferase Pfa4. Variations of PMasseq, found in different AAPs, lead to different mobilities and localization patterns, whereas the disruption of the sequence has an adverse effect on cell viability. We propose that PMasseq modulates the function and localization of AAPs along the PM. PMasseq is one of the most complex protein signals for plasma membrane association across species and can be used as a delivery vehicle for the PM. PMID:27226538

  11. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  12. Mass Transport in Nanocomposite Materials for Membrane Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galizia, Michele; Puccini, Ilaria; Messori, Massimo; Grazia De Angelis, Maria; Sarti, Giulio C.

    2010-06-01

    The vapor transport properties of nanocomposite materials obtained with different techniques and based on a high free volume glassy polymer suitable for membrane separations, poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] (PTMSP), have been determined and modeled. The simple mixing in solution of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles with PTMSP leads to mixed matrix membranes, which show higher free volume and higher values of diffusivity and permeability than the pure polymeric material. If a sol-gel route is followed, with PTMSP and Tetraethoxysylane (TEOS) as precursor of the silica phase, one obtains hybrid matrices characterized by lower vapor diffusion and sorption values with respect to the pure polymer. Although the trends observed are very regular functions of the silica content in the composite, none of the behavior observed obeys traditional models for composites permeability, such as the Maxwell's one. Both types of behaviors were modeled considering the variation of polymer fractional free volume induced by the inorganic phase: in the mixed matrices the poor interactions between silica and polymer chains favor the formation of nanovoids at the interface, increasing the free volume and the vapor diffusivity, while in the more interconnected hybrid matrices the inorganic domains act as constraints, reducing the volume occupied by the polymeric phase, which is naturally endowed with a very high excess free volume.

  13. Visualizing Functional Motions of Membrane Transporters with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins. PMID:23298176

  14. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Swathirajan, S.

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  15. Regulation of nitrite transport in red blood cells by hemoglobin oxygen fractional saturation.

    PubMed

    Vitturi, Dario A; Teng, Xinjun; Toledo, José C; Matalon, Sadis; Lancaster, Jack R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2009-05-01

    Allosteric regulation of nitrite reduction by deoxyhemoglobin has been proposed to mediate nitric oxide (NO) formation during hypoxia. Nitrite is predominantly an anion at physiological pH, raising questions about the mechanism by which it enters the red blood cell (RBC) and whether this is regulated and coupled to deoxyhemoglobin-mediated reduction. We tested the hypothesis that nitrite transport by RBCs is regulated by fractional saturation. Using human RBCs, nitrite consumption was faster at lower fractional saturations, consistent with faster reactions with deoxyheme. A membrane-based regulation was suggested by slower nitrite consumption with intact versus lysed RBCs. Interestingly, upon nitrite addition, intracellular nitrite concentrations attained a steady state that, despite increased rates of consumption, did not change with decreasing oxygen tensions, suggesting a deoxygenation-sensitive step that either increases nitrite import or decreases the rate of nitrite export. A role for anion exchanger (AE)-1 in the control of nitrite export was suggested by increased intracellular nitrite concentrations in RBCs treated with DIDS. Moreover, deoxygenation decreased steady-state levels of intracellular nitrite in AE-1-inhibited RBCs. Based on these data, we propose a model in which deoxyhemoglobin binding to AE-1 inhibits nitrite export under low oxygen tensions allowing for the coupling between deoxygenation and nitrite reduction to NO along the arterial-to-venous gradient. PMID:19286940

  16. Fabrication of Eu(III) complex doped nanofibrous membranes and their oxygen-sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songzhu, Lin; Xiangting, Dong; Jinxian, Wang; Guixia, Liu; Wenshen, Yu; Ruokun, Jia

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization, and photophysical properties of Eu(TTA) 3ECIP, where TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, and ECIP = 1-ethyl-2-(N-ethyl-carbazole-yl-4-)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline. Its elementary application for oxygen-sensing application is also investigated by doping it into a polymer matrix of polystyrene (PS). Experimental data suggest that the 2.5 wt% doped Eu(TTA) 3ECIP/PS nanofibrous membrane exhibits a high sensitivity of 3.4 towards oxygen with a good linear relationship of R2 = 0.9962. In addition, the 2.5 wt% doped Eu(TTA) 3ECIP/PS nanofibrous membrane owns a quick response of 8 s towards oxygen, along with its excellent atmosphere insensitivity and photobleaching resistance. All these results suggest that both Eu(TTA) 3ECIP and Eu(TTA) 3ECIP/PS system are promising candidates for oxygen-sensing optical sensors.

  17. Morphology and Proton Transport in Sulfonated Block Copolymer and Mesoporous Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Wong, David; Beers, Keith; Balsara, Nitash

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to understand the fundamentals of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), we have developed a series of poly(styrene-b-ethylene-b-styrene) (SES) membranes. The SES membranes were subsequently sulfonated to yield proton conducting S-SES membranes. We examine the effects of sulfonation level, temperature and thermal history on the morphology of S-SES membranes in both dry and hydrated states. The effects of these parameters on water uptake and proton transport characteristics of the membranes are also examined. Furthermore, building upon the strategy we deployed in sulfonating the SES membranes, we fabricated mesoporous S-SES membranes, with pores lined up with the proton conducting channels. These membranes have three distinct phases: structural block, proton-conducting block, and void. We examine the effects of pore size, domain structure and sulfonation level on water uptake and proton conductivity of the mesoporous PEMs at different temperatures. This work is funded by Department of Energy.

  18. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These “bottom-up” models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  19. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    is incredible freedom in designing the block copolymer architecture in order to optimize the mechanical and other properties of the membrane without sacrificing conductivity. The derived scaling relationships are shown to be general for many block copolymer and ionic liquid chemistries. In certain cases, the mechanism of ion conduction in the ionic liquid is affected by block copolymer nanoconfinement. The introduction of excess neutral imidazole to [Im][TFSI] leads to enhanced proton conductivity as well as a high H+ transference number due to facilitated proton hopping between imidazole molecules. We show that there is increased proton hopping when the nonstoichiometric ionic liquid is confined to lamellar block copolymer nanodomains, which we hypothesize is due to changes in the hydrogen bond structure of the ionic liquid under confinement. This, in combination with unique ion aggregation behavior, leads to a lower activation energy for macroscopic ion transport compared to that in a corresponding homopolymer/ionic liquid mixture. Through this work, we further the understanding of the relationship between membrane composition, structure, and ion transport. The findings presented herein portend the rational design of nanostructured membranes having improved mechanical properties and conductivity.

  20. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  1. [Experience of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in critical care of respiratory failure in newborn with congenital diaphragmatic hernia in perinatal center].

    PubMed

    Burov, A A; Nikiforov, D V; Podurovskaia, Iu L; Dorofeeva, E I; Abramian, M A; Makhalin, M V; Shatalov, K V; Nikiforov, V S; Degtiarev, D N

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with an experience of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in preterm infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia during postoperative period in the perinatal center. PMID:24749262

  2. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  3. Transport properties of track-etched membranes having variable effective pore-lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Ali, Mubarak; Nasir, Saima; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The transport rate of molecules through polymeric membranes is normally limited because of their micrometer-scale thickness which restricts their suitability for more practical application. To study the effect of effective pore length on the transport behavior, polymer membranes containing cylindrical and asymmetric-shaped nanopores were prepared through a two-step ion track-etching technique. Permeation experiments were performed separately to investigate the transport properties (molecular flux and selectivity) of these track-etched membranes. The permeation data shows that the molecular flux across membranes containing asymmetric nanopores is higher compared to those having cylindrical pores. On the other hand, the cylindrical pore membranes exhibit higher selectivity than asymmetric pores for the permeation of charged molecules across the membrane. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of single-pore membranes further verify that asymmetric pores exhibit lower resistance for the flow of ions and therefore show higher currents than cylindrical pores. Moreover, unmodified and polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified asymmetric-shaped pore membranes were successfully used for the separation of cationic and anionic analyte molecules from their mixture, respectively. In this study, two distinct effects (pore geometry and pore density, i.e. number of pores cm-2), which mainly influence membrane selectivity and molecular transport rates, were thoroughly investigated in order to optimize the membrane performance. In this context, we believe that membranes with high molecular transport rates could readily find their application in molecular separation and controlled drug delivery processes.

  4. Transport properties of track-etched membranes having variable effective pore-lengths.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Ali, Mubarak; Nasir, Saima; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The transport rate of molecules through polymeric membranes is normally limited because of their micrometer-scale thickness which restricts their suitability for more practical application. To study the effect of effective pore length on the transport behavior, polymer membranes containing cylindrical and asymmetric-shaped nanopores were prepared through a two-step ion track-etching technique. Permeation experiments were performed separately to investigate the transport properties (molecular flux and selectivity) of these track-etched membranes. The permeation data shows that the molecular flux across membranes containing asymmetric nanopores is higher compared to those having cylindrical pores. On the other hand, the cylindrical pore membranes exhibit higher selectivity than asymmetric pores for the permeation of charged molecules across the membrane. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements of single-pore membranes further verify that asymmetric pores exhibit lower resistance for the flow of ions and therefore show higher currents than cylindrical pores. Moreover, unmodified and polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified asymmetric-shaped pore membranes were successfully used for the separation of cationic and anionic analyte molecules from their mixture, respectively. In this study, two distinct effects (pore geometry and pore density, i.e. number of pores cm(-2)), which mainly influence membrane selectivity and molecular transport rates, were thoroughly investigated in order to optimize the membrane performance. In this context, we believe that membranes with high molecular transport rates could readily find their application in molecular separation and controlled drug delivery processes. PMID:26553245

  5. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes.

    PubMed

    Zgurskaya, Helen I; Weeks, Jon W; Ntreh, Abigail T; Nickels, Logan M; Wolloscheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of the cell. Some transporters, together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) and outer membrane channels, assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protects bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates) to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes. PMID:25759685

  6. Mechanism of coupling drug transport reactions located in two different membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zgurskaya, Helen I.; Weeks, Jon W.; Ntreh, Abigail T.; Nickels, Logan M.; Wolloscheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Gram- negative bacteria utilize a diverse array of multidrug transporters to pump toxic compounds out of the cell. Some transporters, together with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) and outer membrane channels, assemble trans-envelope complexes that expel multiple antibiotics across outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and into the external medium. Others further potentiate this efflux by pumping drugs across the inner membrane into the periplasm. Together these transporters create a powerful network of efflux that protects bacteria against a broad range of antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the mechanism of coupling transport reactions located in two different membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic and biophysical approaches we have reconstructed the sequence of events leading to the assembly of trans-envelope drug efflux complexes and characterized the roles of periplasmic and outer membrane proteins in this process. Our recent data suggest a critical step in the activation of intermembrane efflux pumps, which is controlled by MFPs. We propose that the reaction cycles of transporters are tightly coupled to the assembly of the trans-envelope complexes. Transporters and MFPs exist in the inner membrane as dormant complexes. The activation of complexes is triggered by MFP binding to the outer membrane channel, which leads to a conformational change in the membrane proximal domain of MFP needed for stimulation of transporters. The activated MFP-transporter complex engages the outer membrane channel to expel substrates across the outer membrane. The recruitment of the channel is likely triggered by binding of effectors (substrates) to MFP or MFP-transporter complexes. This model together with recent structural and functional advances in the field of drug efflux provides a fairly detailed understanding of the mechanism of drug efflux across the two membranes. PMID:25759685

  7. Membrane-bound globin X protects the cell from reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jonas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Globin X (GbX) is a member of the globin family that emerged early in the evolution of Metazoa. In vertebrates, GbX is restricted to lampreys, fish, amphibians and some reptiles, and is expressed in neurons. Unlike any other metazoan globin, GbX is N-terminally acylated and anchored in the cell membrane via myristoyl and palmitoyl groups, suggesting a unique function. Here, we compared the capacity of GbX to protect a mouse neuronal cell line from hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with that of myoglobin. To evaluate the contribution of membrane-binding, we generated a mutated version of GbX without acyl groups. All three globins enhanced cell viability under hypoxia, with myoglobin having the most pronounced effect. GbX but not myoglobin protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress. Membrane-bound GbX was significantly more efficient than its mutated, soluble form. Furthermore, myoglobin and mutated GbX increased production of ROS upon H2O2-treatment, while membrane-bound GbX did not. The results indicate that myoglobin enhances O2 supply while GbX protects the cell membrane from ROS-stress. The ancient origin of GbX suggests that ROS-protection reflects the function of the early globins before they acquired a respiratory role. PMID:26631962

  8. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications. PMID:26797529

  9. KRW oxygen-blown gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

    1996-08-01

    This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestration of unused CO{sub 2}. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an equivalent CO{sub 2} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The base case is a 458-MW (gross generation) IGCC system that uses an oxygen-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and low-pressure glycol sulfur removal followed by Claus/SCOT treatment to produce a saleable product. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production for the entire energy cycle of 411 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.801 kg/k Whe. For comparison, in two cases, the gasifier output was taken through water-gas shift and then to low-pressure glycol H{sub 2}S recovery, followed by either low-pressure glycol or membrane CO{sub 2} recovery and then by a combustion turbine being fed a high-hydrogen-content fuel. Two additional cases employed chilled methanol for H{sub 2}S recovery and a fuel cell as the topping cycle with no shift stages. From the IGCC plant, a 500-km pipeline took the CO{sub 2} to geological sequestering. In a comparison of air-blown and oxygen-blown CO{sub 2}-release base cases, the cost of electricity for the air-blown IGCC was 56.86 mills/kWh, and the cost of oxygen-blown IGCC was 58.29 mills/kWh.

  10. Effect of nanoscale morphology on selective ethanol transport through block copolymer membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the effect of block copolymer domain size on transport of liquid mixtures through the membranes by presenting pervaporation data of an 8 wt% ethanol/water mixture through A-B-A and B-A-B triblock copolymer membranes. The A-block was chosen to facilitate ethanol transport while the B-blo...

  11. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  12. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.

  13. Application of Electron Structure Calculations to the Migration of Oxygen through a Perovskite Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Douglas A.

    The focus of this thesis is the application of electron structure calculations, particularly density functional theory, to the analysis of the process by which oxygen is able to migrate through a perovskite crystal. This property creates the possibility of using perovskite membranes to separate oxygen from air. This could be applied to the generation of syngas directly from natural gas without the need for a separate air separation unit. A perovskite has the nominal formula ABO3 where A is a rare earth type cation and B is a transition type cation. The structure consists of the B cations arranged in a cube with the A cation in the center. The oxygen ions are located at the midpoint of each B-B cube edge and form an octahedron centered on each B cation. Any real perovskite crystal will contain a certain fraction of vacancies at the oxygen sites. Oxygen migrates through the crystal by jumping from a neighboring site to the vacancy. The permeability of the crystal is thus a function of the concentration of vacancies and the activation energy of the jump from a neighboring site to the vacancy. These properties can be modified by adding dopants for the A and B cations. The literature contains a substantial amount of experimental work on the effect of such dopants. The overall migration process can be divided into components (i) the concentration of oxygen vacancies, (ii) the activation energy for a neighboring on-site oxygen atom to jump to the vacant site, (iii) the concentration of surface vacancies, and (iv) the processes by which oxygen ions transfer back and forth between the perovskite surface and the contiguous vapor space. Using SrTiO3 and LaCoO3 as model compounds, DFT calculations have been used to (i) calculate various properties of the perovskite crystal, (ii) estimate the activation energy of a jump between an occupied oxygen site and an adjacent vacant oxygen site, (iii) predict the effects of various dopants at the A and B site and (iv) analyze the

  14. Substantial Oxygen Flux in Dual-Phase Membrane of Ceria and Pure Electronic Conductor by Tailoring the Surface.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jong Hoon; Yun, Kyong Sik; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Younki; Yoo, Chung-Yul; Yu, Ji Haeng

    2015-07-15

    The oxygen permeation flux of dual-phase membranes, Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ-La0.7Sr0.3MnO3±δ (GDC/LSM), has been systematically studied as a function of their LSM content, thickness, and coating material. The electronic percolation threshold of this GDC/LSM membrane occurs at about 20 vol % LSM. The coated LSM20 (80 vol % GDC, 20 vol % LSM) dual-phase membrane exhibits a maximum oxygen flux of 2.2 mL·cm(-2)·min(-1) at 850 °C, indicating that to enhance the oxygen permeation flux, the LSM content should be adjusted to the minimum value at which electronic percolation is maintained. The oxygen ion conductivity of the dual-phase membrane is reliably calculated from oxygen flux data by considering the effects of surface oxygen exchange. Thermal cycling tests confirm the mechanical stability of the membrane. Furthermore, a dual-phase membrane prepared here with a cobalt-free coating remains chemically stable in a CO2 atmosphere at a lower temperature (800 °C) than has previously been achieved. PMID:26083529

  15. Development of Nanofiller-Modulated Polymeric Oxygen Enrichment Membranes for Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Jianzhong Lou; Shamsuddin Ilias

    2010-12-31

    North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina, has undertaken this project to develop the knowledge and the material to improve the oxygen-enrichment polymer membrane, in order to provide high-grade oxygen-enriched streams for coal combustion and gasification applications. Both experimental and theoretical approaches were used in this project. The membranes evaluated thus far include single-walled carbon nano-tube, nano-fumed silica polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and zeolite-modulated polyimide membranes. To document the nanofiller-modulated polymer, molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to calculate the theoretical oxygen molecular diffusion coefficient and nitrogen molecular coefficient inside single-walled carbon nano-tube PDMS membranes, in order to predict the effect of the nano-tubes on the gas-separation permeability. The team has performed permeation and diffusion experiments using polymers with nano-silica particles, nano-tubes, and zeolites as fillers; studied the influence of nano-fillers on the self diffusion, free volume, glass transition, oxygen diffusion and solubility, and perm-selectivity of oxygen in polymer membranes; developed molecular models of single-walled carbon nano-tube and nano-fumed silica PDMS membranes, and zeolites-modulated polyimide membranes. This project partially supported three graduate students (two finished degrees and one transferred to other institution). This project has resulted in two journal publications and additional publications will be prepared in the near future.

  16. Effect of sepsis on skeletal muscle oxygen consumption and tissue oxygenation: interpreting capillary oxygen transport data using a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel; Bateman, Ryon M; Ellis, Christopher G

    2004-12-01

    Inherent in the inflammatory response to sepsis is abnormal microvascular perfusion. Maldistribution of capillary red blood cell (RBC) flow in rat skeletal muscle has been characterized by increased 1) stopped-flow capillaries, 2) capillary oxygen extraction, and 3) ratio of fast-flow to normal-flow capillaries. On the basis of experimental data for functional capillary density (FCD), RBC velocity, and hemoglobin O2 saturation during sepsis, a mathematical model was used to calculate tissue O2 consumption (Vo2), tissue Po2 (Pt) profiles, and O2 delivery by fast-flow capillaries, which could not be measured experimentally. The model describes coupled capillary and tissue O2 transport using realistic blood and tissue biophysics and three-dimensional arrays of heterogeneously spaced capillaries and was solved numerically using a previously validated scheme. While total blood flow was maintained, capillary flow distribution was varied from 60/30/10% (normal/fast/stopped) in control to 33/33/33% (normal/fast/stopped) in average sepsis (AS) and 25/25/50% (normal/fast/stopped) in extreme sepsis (ES). Simulations found approximately two- and fourfold increases in tissue Vo2 in AS and ES, respectively. Average (minimum) Pt decreased from 43 (40) mmHg in control to 34 (27) and 26 (15) mmHg in AS and ES, respectively, and clustering fast-flow capillaries (increased flow heterogeneity) reduced minimum Pt to 14.5 mmHg. Thus, although fast capillaries prevented tissue dysoxia, they did not prevent increased hypoxia as the degree of microvascular injury increased. The model predicts that decreased FCD, increased fast flow, and increased Vo2 in sepsis expose skeletal muscle to significant regions of hypoxia, which could affect local cellular and organ function. PMID:15319199

  17. Faropenem Transport across the Renal Epithelial Luminal Membrane via Inorganic Phosphate Transporter Npt1

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Hiroshi; Tamai, Ikumi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; China, Kayoko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Tsuji, Akira

    2000-01-01

    We previously showed that the mouse inorganic phosphate transporter Npt1 operates in the hepatic sinusoidal membrane transport of anionic drugs such as benzylpenicillin and mevalonic acid. In the present study, the mechanism of renal secretion of penem antibiotics was examined by using a Xenopus oocyte expression system. Faropenem (an oral penem antibiotic) was transported via Npt1 with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.77 ± 0.34 mM in a sodium-independent but chloride ion-sensitive manner. When the concentration of chloride ions was increased, the transport activity of faropenem by Npt1 was decreased. Since the concentration gradient of chloride ions is in the lumen-to-intracellular direction, faropenem is expected to be transported from inside proximal tubular cells to the lumen. So, we tested the release of faropenem from Xenopus oocytes. The rate of efflux of faropenem from Npt1-expressing oocytes was about 9.5 times faster than that from control water-injected Xenopus oocytes. Faropenem transport by Npt1 was significantly inhibited by β-lactam antibiotics such as benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cephalexin, and cefazolin to 24.9, 40.5, 54.4, and 26.2% of that for the control, respectively. Zwitterionic β-lactam antibiotics showed lesser inhibitory effects on faropenem uptake than anionic derivatives, indicating that Npt1 preferentially transports anionic compounds. Other anionic compounds, such as indomethacin and furosemide, and the anion transport inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid significantly inhibited faropenem uptake mediated by Npt1. In conclusion, our results suggest that Npt1 participates in the renal secretion of penem antibiotics. PMID:10681320

  18. Faropenem transport across the renal epithelial luminal membrane via inorganic phosphate transporter Npt1.

    PubMed

    Uchino, H; Tamai, I; Yabuuchi, H; China, K; Miyamoto, K; Takeda, E; Tsuji, A

    2000-03-01

    We previously showed that the mouse inorganic phosphate transporter Npt1 operates in the hepatic sinusoidal membrane transport of anionic drugs such as benzylpenicillin and mevalonic acid. In the present study, the mechanism of renal secretion of penem antibiotics was examined by using a Xenopus oocyte expression system. Faropenem (an oral penem antibiotic) was transported via Npt1 with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.77 +/- 0.34 mM in a sodium-independent but chloride ion-sensitive manner. When the concentration of chloride ions was increased, the transport activity of faropenem by Npt1 was decreased. Since the concentration gradient of chloride ions is in the lumen-to-intracellular direction, faropenem is expected to be transported from inside proximal tubular cells to the lumen. So, we tested the release of faropenem from Xenopus oocytes. The rate of efflux of faropenem from Npt1-expressing oocytes was about 9.5 times faster than that from control water-injected Xenopus oocytes. Faropenem transport by Npt1 was significantly inhibited by beta-lactam antibiotics such as benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cephalexin, and cefazolin to 24.9, 40. 5, 54.4, and 26.2% of that for the control, respectively. Zwitterionic beta-lactam antibiotics showed lesser inhibitory effects on faropenem uptake than anionic derivatives, indicating that Npt1 preferentially transports anionic compounds. Other anionic compounds, such as indomethacin and furosemide, and the anion transport inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid significantly inhibited faropenem uptake mediated by Npt1. In conclusion, our results suggest that Npt1 participates in the renal secretion of penem antibiotics. PMID:10681320

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi membranes are the primary targets of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Julie A; Lawrence, Kevin A; Downey, Jennifer S; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Spirochetes living in an oxygen-rich environment or when challenged by host immune cells are exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These species can harm/destroy cysteinyl residues, iron-sulphur clusters, DNA and polyunsaturated lipids, leading to inhibition of growth or cell death. Because Borrelia burgdorferi contains no intracellular iron, DNA is most likely not a major target for ROS via Fenton reaction. In support of this, growth of B. burgdorferi in the presence of 5 mM H2O2 had no effect on the DNA mutation rate (spontaneous coumermycin A1 resistance), and cells treated with 10 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide or 10 mM H2O2 show no increase in DNA damage. Unlike most bacteria, B. burgdorferi incorporates ROS-susceptible polyunsaturated fatty acids from the environment into their membranes. Analysis of lipoxidase-treated B. burgdorferi cells by Electron Microscopy showed significant irregularities indicative of membrane damage. Fatty acid analysis of cells treated with lipoxidase indicated that host-derived linoleic acid had been dramatically reduced (50-fold) in these cells, with a corresponding increase in the levels of malondialdehyde by-product (fourfold). These data suggest that B. burgdorferi membrane lipids are targets for attack by ROS encountered in the various stages of the infective cycle. PMID:18373524

  20. Modelling the effects of cerebral microvasculature morphology on oxygen transport

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang Sub; Payne, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature plays a vital role in adequately supplying blood to the brain. Determining the health of the cerebral microvasculature is important during pathological conditions, such as stroke and dementia. Recent studies have shown the complex relationship between cerebral metabolic rate and transit time distribution, the transit times of all the possible pathways available dependent on network topology. In this paper, we extend a recently developed technique to solve for residue function, the amount of tracer left in the vasculature at any time, and transit time distribution in an existing model of the cerebral microvasculature to calculate cerebral metabolism. We present the mathematical theory needed to solve for oxygen concentration followed by results of the simulations. It is found that oxygen extraction fraction, the fraction of oxygen removed from the blood in the capillary network by the tissue, and cerebral metabolic rate are dependent on both mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution. For changes in cerebral blood flow, a positive correlation can be observed between mean transit time and oxygen extraction fraction, and a negative correlation between mean transit time and metabolic rate of oxygen. A negative correlation can also be observed between transit time heterogeneity and the metabolic rate of oxygen for a constant cerebral blood flow. A sensitivity analysis on the mean and heterogeneity of the transit time distribution was able to quantify their respective contributions to oxygen extraction fraction and metabolic rate of oxygen. Mean transit time has a greater contribution than the heterogeneity for oxygen extraction fraction. This is found to be opposite for metabolic rate of oxygen. These results provide information on the role of the cerebral microvasculature and its effects on flow and metabolism. They thus open up the possibility of obtaining additional valuable clinical information for diagnosing and treating

  1. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer–surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer–surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. PMID:26080734

  2. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-06-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer-surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer-surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies.

  3. Luminescent Nafion membranes dyed with ruthenium(II) complexes as sensing materials for dissolved oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fresnadillo, D.; Orellana, G.; Marazuela, M.D.; Moreno-Bondi, M.C.

    1999-09-14

    The absorption spectroscopy, photophysics, and dioxygen quenching of [RuL{sub 3}]{sup 2+} luminescent probes, where L stands for 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 5-octadecanamide-1,10-phenanthroline, and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dip), electrostatically loaded onto Nafion ionomer membrane have been investigated in air and in organic solvents and water, with the aim of developing rugged materials for optical sensing of molecular oxygen. The significant differences in size and hydrophobicity of the Ru(II) dyes have been used to probe their location within the perfluorinated ionomer pore network, as well as to gain insight into the oxygen accessibility to its microcrystalline and interfacial domains. While the absorption maximums of the probes (444--458nm) remain relative unchanged, their emission wavelengths (578--622 nm) are extremely sensitive to the degree of Nafion swelling by the solvent. This feature has been characterized by measuring the density (1.19--2.04 g cm{sup {minus}3}) of the solvent-saturated ionomer and the mass and volume fractions of solvents (0.0--0.7) uptake by the original acidic Nafion and Li{sup +}-, Na{sup +}-, or K{sup +}-exchanged films. The excited-state lifetimes of the [RuL{sub 3}]{sup 2+} complexes (0.03--4.9{micro}s) reflect important variations of the microenvironment around the luminescent probes, which are rationalized in terms of their location and oxygen accessibility when loaded onto the polysulfonated material. Emission quenching rate constants of 1.7 {+-} 0.3 M{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1} have been measured for the [Ru(dip){sub 3}]{sup 2+}-dyed films dipped in methanol; their oxygen sensitivity turns out to be independent of the Ru(II) loading and counterion of Nafion. Highly oxygen-sensitive luminescent membranes, suitable for continuous monitoring in organic solvents, water, or gas phase, have been prepared by immobilization of [Ru(dip){sub 3}]{sup 2+} indicator in 178-{micro}m thick Nafion, with response

  4. Effect of UV light on different structural and transport parameters of cellophane membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Benavente, J.; Vazquez, M.I.; De Abajo, J.

    1996-01-01

    A comparative study of UV light influence on structural and transport parameters of cellophane membranes was made. Changes in the chemical structure and electrical behavior of cellophane membranes were considered by determining the hydraulic permeability, salt diffusion coefficient, and resistance values, as well as some geometrical parameters, for an untreated membrane and two differently UV-treated cellophane membranes. Differences in the characteristic parameters for the three samples showed that radiation mainly affected the membrane structure, while only small changes in membrane electrical behavior were determined.

  5. Hypothesis about the function of membrane-buried proline residues in transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, C J; Deber, C M

    1986-01-01

    In a survey of the bilayer-spanning regions of integral membrane proteins, membrane-buried proline residues were found in nearly all transport proteins examined, whereas membrane-buried regions of nontransport proteins were largely devoid of intramembranous proline residues. When amino acids from the complete sequences of representative sets of transport and nontransport membrane proteins were analyzed for the distribution of proline residues between aqueous vs. membranous domains, proline was shown to be selectively excluded from membranous domains of the nontransport proteins, in accord with expectation from energetic and structural considerations. In contrast, proline residues in transport proteins were evenly distributed between aqueous and membranous domains, consistent with the notion that functional membrane-buried proline residues are selectively included in transport proteins. As cis peptide bonds involving proline arise in proteins and have been implicated in protein dynamic processes, the cis-trans isomerization of an Xaa-Pro peptide bond (Xaa = unspecified amino acid) buried within the membrane--and the resulting redirection of the protein chain--is proposed to provide the reversible conformational change requisite for the regulation (opening/closing) of a transport channel. Parallel to this function, the relatively negative character of the carbonyl groups of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds may promote their participation as intramembranous liganding sites for positive species in proton/cation transport processes. PMID:3456574

  6. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R.; Allen, Frances I.; Shnyrova, Anna V.; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y. Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M.; Frolov, Vadim A.; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-01

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these `CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  7. Numerical analysis of the effects of a high gradient magnetic field on flowing erythrocytes in a membrane oxygenator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the effect of a high gradient magnetic field on pressure characteristics of blood in a hollow fiber membrane oxygenator in a solenoid coil by means of numerical analysis. Deoxygenated erythrocytes are paramagnetic, and oxygenated erythrocytes are diamagnetic. Blood changes its magnetic susceptibility depending on whether it is carrying oxygen or not. Motion of blood was analyzed by solving the continuous equation and the Navier-Stokes equation. It was confirmed that oxygenation of deoxygenated blood in the downstream side of the applied magnetic field was effective for pressure rise in a non-uniform magnetic field. The pressure rise was enhanced greatly by an increase in magnetic field intensity. The results suggest that a membrane oxygenator works as an actuator and there is a possibility of self-circulation of blood through an oxygenator in a non-uniform magnetic field.

  8. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  9. 49 CFR 175.34 - Exceptions for cylinders of compressed oxygen or other oxidizing gases transported within the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exceptions for cylinders of compressed oxygen or... Exceptions for cylinders of compressed oxygen or other oxidizing gases transported within the State of Alaska. (a) Exceptions. When transported in the State of Alaska, cylinders of compressed oxygen or...

  10. An assessment of oxygen transfer efficiency in a gas permeable hollow fibre membrane biological reactor.

    PubMed

    Soreanu, G; Lishman, L; Dunlop, S; Behmann, H; Seto, P

    2010-01-01

    The clean water oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) of a full scale non-porous hollow fibre gas permeable (GP) membrane (surface area of 500 m(2)) was evaluated at inlet air pressures of 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8 atm using two established testing methods. To form a basis of comparison with traditional aeration technologies, additional testing was done with conventional aerators (fine bubble and coarse bubble diffusers) replacing the GP membrane. OTE can be established based on the re-aeration of deoxygenated water or by monitoring the catalytic oxidation of a sodium sulphite (Na(2)SO(3)) solution. In this study, OTE values determined by sulphite oxidation (SOTE(S)) were consistently higher than those established during re-aeration (SOTE(R)) suggesting that the chemical reaction was enhancing the mass transfer. The chemical reaction was sufficiently fast in the case of the GP membrane, that the gas phase limited the mass transfer. The GP membrane operating at 1.2 atm had a SOTE(S) of 70.6% and a SOTER of 52.2%. SOTE(R) for the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusers were 3.8% and 23.6%, respectively. This is comparable to the manufacturer's values, corrected for depth of 3.4% and 18.3%, respectively. Particularly, the derived OTE values were used to evaluate differences in energy consumption for a conventional treatment plant achieving carbon removal and nitrification. This analysis highlights the potential energy efficiency of GP membranes, which could be considered for the design of the membrane modules. PMID:20220238

  11. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    SciTech Connect

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-10-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels.

  12. Factors associated with blood oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure regulation during respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: data from a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Marcelo; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira; Barbosa, Edzangela Vasconcelos Santos; Hirota, Adriana Sayuri; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore the factors associated with blood oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure. Methods The factors associated with oxygen - and carbon dioxide regulation were investigated in an apneic pig model under veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. A predefined sequence of blood and sweep flows was tested. Results Oxygenation was mainly associated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow (beta coefficient = 0.036mmHg/mL/min), cardiac output (beta coefficient = -11.970mmHg/L/min) and pulmonary shunting (beta coefficient = -0.232mmHg/%). Furthermore, the initial oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure measurements were also associated with oxygenation, with beta coefficients of 0.160 and 0.442mmHg/mmHg, respectively. Carbon dioxide partial pressure was associated with cardiac output (beta coefficient = 3.578mmHg/L/min), sweep gas flow (beta coefficient = -2.635mmHg/L/min), temperature (beta coefficient = 4.514mmHg/ºC), initial pH (beta coefficient = -66.065mmHg/0.01 unit) and hemoglobin (beta coefficient = 6.635mmHg/g/dL). Conclusion In conclusion, elevations in blood and sweep gas flows in an apneic veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation model resulted in an increase in oxygen partial pressure and a reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure 2, respectively. Furthermore, without the possibility of causal inference, oxygen partial pressure was negatively associated with pulmonary shunting and cardiac output, and carbon dioxide partial pressure was positively associated with cardiac output, core temperature and initial hemoglobin. PMID:27096671

  13. Electrochemical instability of solvent membranes during electrodialytic cation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, V.N.; Kontush, A.S.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental data are reported concerning the uptake of water by solvent membranes during dialysis and electrodialysis when the solvent is nonaqueous and a macrocyclic carrier is present. Aspects of the electrochemical instability of solvent membranes are discussed, and particularly the discontinuous conductivity fluctuations and the three stages of development of electric breakdown. The cationic selectivity of the macrocyclic carrier, the amount of water present in the solvent membrane, and the character of electrochemical instability of the membrane are shown to be interrelated.

  14. Oxygen diffusion coefficient and solubility in a new proton exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Haug, A.T.; White, R.E.

    2000-03-01

    The electrochemical monitoring technique is used to measure the solubility and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in a new proton exchange membrane that is being developed by Cape Cod Research, Inc., Using the method of least squares, the data were fit to an analytical solution of Fick's second law to determine D and c{sub 0}. Values of 0.40 x 10{sup {minus}6}cm{sup 2}/s and 4.98 x 10{sup {minus}6} mol/cm{sup 3} were obtained for the diffusion coefficient and solubility, respectively, of the Cape Cod membrane. These values are significantly less than those of Nafion 117 tested under identical conditions.

  15. Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Intractable Pulmonary Insufficiency: Practical Issues and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Delnoij, T. S. R.; Driessen, R.; Sharma, A. S.; Bouman, E. A.; Strauch, U.; Roekaerts, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vv-ECMO) is a highly invasive method for organ support that is gaining in popularity due to recent technical advances and its successful application in the recent H1N1 epidemic. Although running a vv-ECMO program is potentially feasible for many hospitals, there are many theoretical concepts and practical issues that merit attention and require expertise. In this review, we focus on indications for vv-ECMO, components of the circuit, and management of patients on vv-ECMO. Concepts regarding oxygenation and decarboxylation and how they can be influenced are discussed. Day-to-day management, weaning, and most frequent complications are covered in light of the recent literature. PMID:27127794

  16. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge for Heart Failure and Cardiogenic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhao-peng; Wang, Hong; Hou, Xiao-tong

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) can be defined as cardiac structural or functional abnormality leading to a series of symptoms due to deficiency of oxygen delivery. In the clinical practice, acute heart failure (AHF) is usually performed as cardiogenic shock (CS), pulmonary edema, and single or double ventricle congestive heart failure. CS refers to depressed or insufficient cardiac output (CO) attributable to myocardial infarction, fulminant myocarditis, acute circulatory failure attributable to intractable arrhythmias or the exacerbation of chronic heart failure, postcardiotomy low CO syndrome, and so forth. Epidemiological studies have shown that CS has higher in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF. Besides, we call the induced, sustained circulatory failure even after administration of high doses of inotropes and vasopressors refractory cardiogenic shock. In handling these cases, mechanical circulatory support devices are usually needed. In this review, we discuss the current application status and clinical points in utilizing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). PMID:27294130

  17. Development of a Mock Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Circuit to Assess Recirculation.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Ishanth Devinda; Xie, Ashleigh; Iyer, Arjun; Pye, Roger; Dhital, Kumud

    2016-01-01

    A limitation of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) is the recirculating of newly oxygenated blood back to the VV-ECMO circuit. We compared cannulation strategies for combating recirculation utilizing a mock circulation loop (MCL) with ultrasonic flow probes and pressure transducers ensuring that the MCL was run at physiological hemodynamic parameters. Mean recirculation percentages were lower (ANOVA, F = 14.25; p = 0.0001) with the Wang-Zwische dual lumen cannula (4.00 ± 1.77, n = 7) than both the femoro-jugular (15.23 ± 7.00, n = 8) and the femoro-femoral cannulation configurations (13.49 ± 1.44, n = 8). PMID:26809084

  18. Stabilization of thylakoid membranes in isoprene-emitting plants reduces formation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Velikova, Violeta; Sharkey, Thomas D; Loreto, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Isoprene is emitted by a significant fraction of the world's vegetation. Isoprene makes leaves more thermotolerant, yet we do not fully understand how. We have recently shown that isoprene stabilizes thylakoid membranes under heat stress. Here we show that heat-stressed, isoprene-emitting transgenic Arabidopsis plants also produce a lower pool of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and that this was especially due to a lower accumulation of H2O2 in isoprene emitting plants. It remains difficult to disentangle whether in heat stressed plants isoprene also directly reacts with and quenches reactive oxygen species (ROS), or reduces ROS formation by stabilizing thylakoids. We present considerations that make the latter a more likely mechanism, under our experimental circumstances. PMID:22301981

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the treatment of adult sickle cell acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parhar, Ken; Parizkova, Barbora; Jones, Nicola; Valchanov, Kamen; Fowles, Jo-Anne; Besser, Martin; Telfer, Paul; Kaya, Banu; Vuylsteke, Alain; Rubino, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary haemoglobinopathy that results in polymerization of haemoglobin molecules and subsequent vaso-occlusion. A common cause of death in adults is acute chest syndrome (AChS) with resulting hypoxemic respiratory failure.Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) has been used successfully in acutely reversible respiratory failure when conventional mechanical ventilation has been unable to adequately oxygenate and ventilate in a lung-protective fashion.We present an adult SCD patient with severe respiratory failure due to AChS, successfully treated with VV-ECMO. We also discuss some of the technical challenges and considerations when using ECMO in the SCD patient. PMID:26130498

  20. Glycaemia regulates the glucose transporter number in the plasma membrane of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrakoudis, D; Ramlal, T; Rastogi, S; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1992-01-01

    The number of glucose transporters was measured in isolated membranes from diabetic-rat skeletal muscle to determine the role of circulating blood glucose levels in the control of glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. Three experimental groups of animals were investigated in the post-absorptive state: normoglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic, hyperglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic and hyperglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic made normoglycaemic/normoinsulinaemic by phlorizin treatment. Hyperglycaemia caused a reversible decrease in total transporter number, as measured by cytochalasin B binding, in both plasma membranes and internal membranes of skeletal muscle. Changes in GLUT4 glucose transporter protein mirrored changes in cytochalasin B binding in plasma membranes. However, there was no recovery of GLUT4 levels in intracellular membranes with correction of glycaemia. GLUT4 mRNA levels decreased with hyperglycaemia and recovered only partially with correction of glycaemia. Conversely, GLUT1 glucose transporters were only detectable in the plasma membranes; the levels of this protein varied directly with glycaemia, i.e. in the opposite direction to GLUT4 glucose transporters. This study demonstrates that hyperglycaemia, in the absence of hypoinsulinaemia, is capable of down-regulating the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle, the major site of peripheral resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose transport in diabetes. Furthermore, correction of hyperglycaemia causes a complete restoration of the transport system in the basal state (determined by the transporter number in the plasma membrane), but possibly only an incomplete recovery of the transport system's ability to respond to insulin (since there is no recovery of GLUT4 levels in the intracellular membrane insulin-responsive transporter pool). Finally, the effect of hyperglycaemia is specific for glucose transporter isoforms, with GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins varying respectively in parallel and opposite directions to levels of

  1. First Successful Surgical Reconstruction of Bilateral Transected Main Bronchi With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support.

    PubMed

    Biancosino, Christian; Krüger, Marcus; Kühn, Christian; Zinne, Norman; Wilhelmi, Michaela; Zeckey, Christian; Krettek, Christian; Gathen, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Complex tracheobronchial injuries, especially if both main bronchi are involved, are life threatening and their diagnosis and successful treatment concerning short-term as well as long-term results are most challenging. This is the first report on a successful reconstruction of a complex bilateral bronchial injury under extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. We present the course from prehospital treatment, establishment of ECMO in the emergency room to initial bronchoscopy, operative reconstruction, and intensive care therapy. Under these special circumstances ECMO provided a stable respiratory situation not only preoperatively but also intraoperatively without aggravating a compensated bronchial situation under aggressive ventilation. PMID:27449449

  2. Reactive oxygen species accelerate degradation of anion exchange membranes based on polyphenylene oxide in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Parrondo, Javier; Wang, Zhongyang; Jung, Min-Suk J; Ramani, Vijay

    2016-07-20

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) based on polyphenylene oxide (PPO) suffered quaternary-ammonium-cation-site degradation in alkaline environments. Surprisingly, the degradation rate was considerably faster in the presence of molecular oxygen. We postulated that the AEM cation-site catalyzes the reduction of dioxygen by hydroxide ions to yield the superoxide anion radical and the highly reactive hydroxyl free radical. We substantiated our hypothesis by using a phosphorous-containing spin trap (5-diisopropoxy-phosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide) to detect the adducts for both free radicals in situ using (31)P-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27381009

  3. Intracardiac Thrombosis Involving All Four Cardiac Chambers after Extracardiac Membranous Oxygenation Associated with MTHFR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Jun; Song, Seung Hwan; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Park, Young Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy diagnosed with acute myocarditis was treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Follow-up echocardiography eight hours after ECMO revealed intracardiac thrombosis involving all four heart chambers. Because of the high risk of systemic embolization due to a pedunculated thrombus of the aortic valve, we performed an emergency thrombectomy. After the operation, the patient had a minor neurologic sequela of left upper arm hypertonia, which had almost disappeared at the last outpatient clinic two months later. He was diagnosed with a major mutation in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase), which is related to thrombosis. PMID:27298801

  4. Clinical Research in Acute Fatal Illness: Lessons From Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Clinical research to evaluate the effectiveness of life support systems in acute fatal illness has unique problems of logistics, ethics, and consent. There have been 10 prospective comparative trials of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in acute fatal respiratory failure, utilizing different study designs. The trial designs were prospective controlled randomized, prospective adaptive randomized, sequential, and matched pairs. The trials were reviewed with regard to logistics, ethics, consent, statistical methods, economics, and impact. The matched pairs method is the best study design for evaluation of life support systems in acute fatal illness. PMID:25223826

  5. Native bivalvular endocarditis by Gemella haemolysans requiring venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akika; Kagihara, Jaclyn; Chung, Heath; Bolger, Dennis Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old otherwise healthy man presented with a 3-week history of malaise, headache, fever and rigors after he was treated with oral clindamycin for left parotitis and Gemella haemolysans bacteraemia. He developed G. haemolysans infective endocarditis, septic emboli and heart failure due to progressive bivalvular disease. He underwent urgent mechanical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair, which required venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, to support severe respiratory failure. This is the first documented case of G. haemolysans infective endocarditis affecting native aortic and mitral valves in a healthy adult. PMID:27539135

  6. Successful repair of aortic annulus rupture during transcatheter aortic valve replacement using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support.

    PubMed

    Negi, Smita I; Patel, Jay; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor

    2015-09-01

    Aortic annular rupture is a rare and much dreaded complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Device oversizing to prevent post-procedural paravalvular leak is the most commonly identified cause of this complication. However, mechanical stress in a heavily calcified non-compliant vessel can also lead to annular rupture in this older population. We describe a case of aortic annular rupture with involvement of right coronary artery ostium leading to cardiac tamponade and cardiac arrest, successfully managed by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, open drainage of the pericardial space, pericardial patching of the defect and bypass of the affected vessel with excellent post-procedural results. PMID:23990118

  7. Intracardiac Thrombosis Involving All Four Cardiac Chambers after Extracardiac Membranous Oxygenation Associated with MTHFR Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Jun; Song, Seung Hwan; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Park, Young Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju

    2016-06-01

    A 4-month-old boy diagnosed with acute myocarditis was treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Follow-up echocardiography eight hours after ECMO revealed intracardiac thrombosis involving all four heart chambers. Because of the high risk of systemic embolization due to a pedunculated thrombus of the aortic valve, we performed an emergency thrombectomy. After the operation, the patient had a minor neurologic sequela of left upper arm hypertonia, which had almost disappeared at the last outpatient clinic two months later. He was diagnosed with a major mutation in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase), which is related to thrombosis. PMID:27298801

  8. Cytomegalovirus Myocarditis Required Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support Followed by Ganciclovir Treatment in Infant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Jun; Jung, Jo Won; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Park, Young Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    A 7-month-old girl with no medical history was treated with mechanical circulatory support due to myocarditis. Her cardiac contractility did not improve despite more than one week of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment. Thus, we planned a heart transplant. However, a high level of cytomegalovirus was found in blood laboratory results by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The patient’s heart contractility recovered to normal range four days after ganciclovir treatment. She was discharged with slightly decreased cardiac contractility with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 45%. PMID:27298799

  9. Cocaine induction of dopamine transporter trafficking to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Elmer, Lawrence W; Zhong, Huailing; Scheys, Joshua O; Zhang, Lian

    2002-02-01

    Several previous human postmortem experiments have detected an increase in striatal [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT) in chronic cocaine users. However, animal experiments have found considerable variability in DAT radioligand binding levels in brain after cocaine administration, perhaps caused by length and dose of treatment and type of radioligand used. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake would be increased by exposure to cocaine through alterations in DAT cellular trafficking, rather than increased protein synthesis. Experiments were conducted in stably hDAT-transfected N2A cells and assessed the dose response and time course of cocaine effects on [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding to the DAT, [(3)H]dopamine uptake, measures of DAT protein and mRNA, as well as DAT subcellular location. Cocaine doses of 10(-6) M caused statistically significant increases in [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake after 12 and 3 h, respectively. Despite these increases in DAT function, there was no change in DAT total protein or mRNA. Immunofluorescence and biotinylation experiments indicated that cocaine treatment induced increases in plasma membrane DAT immunoreactivity and intracellular decreases. The present model system may further our understanding of regulatory alterations in DAT radioligand binding and function caused by cocaine exposure. PMID:11809869

  10. Proton Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, Megan; Tyagi, Madhu; Reimer, Jeffrey; Segalman, Rachel

    2011-03-01

    Nanostructured block copolymer/ionic liquid mixtures are of interest for creating membranes having high proton conductivity coupled with high thermal stability. In these mixtures, it is anticipated that nanoconfinement to block copolymer domains will affect ionic liquid proton transport properties. Using pulsed-field gradient NMR and quasi-elastic neutron scattering, this relationship has been investigated for mixtures of poly(styrene-b- 2-vinylpyridine) (S2VP) with ionic liquids composed of imidazole and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (HTFSI), where the ionic liquids selectively reside in the P2VP domains of the block copolymer. Proton mobility is highest in the neat ionic liquids when there is an excess of imidazole compared to HTFSI due to proton hopping between hydrogen-bonded imidazoles. As predicted, the amount of proton hopping can be tuned by nanoconfinement, as evidenced by the finding that a lamellar mixture of an imidazole- excess ionic liquid with S2VP has greater proton mobility than a corresponding disordered mixture of the ionic liquid with P2VP homopolymer.

  11. Alveolar proteinosis in extremis: a critical case treated with whole lung lavage without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-Liang; Chen, Yu; Zhong, Nan-Shan; Su, Zhu-Quan; Zhong, Chang-Hao; Li, Shi-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare idiopathic lung disease characterized by the accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material within the alveoli, which impairs gas transfer and decreases the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and can lead to respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage is the most effective therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, but may not be tolerated by patients with severe respiratory failure. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support is advocated for such patients to ensure appropriate oxygenation during lung lavage. We report a case of a 39-year-old patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and severe life-threatening respiratory failure, with an oxygen index of 51 when under mechanical ventilation. The patient was successfully treated with bilateral whole lung lavage without extracorporeal oxygenation. The results suggest that there is improved ventilation and perfusion matching when one lung is ventilated while the other is lavaged, may be the mechanism of which severe respiratory failure patient due to pulmonary alveolar proteinosis can complete whole lung lavage under one lung ventilation. PMID:26770609

  12. Ultra-small, highly stable, and membrane-impermeable fluorescent nanosensors for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-dong; Stolwijk, Judith A.; Sperber, Michaela; Meier, Robert J.; Wegener, Joachim; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the preparation of ultra-small fluorescent nanosensors for oxygen via a one-pot approach. The nanoparticles have a hydrophobic core capable of firmly hosting hydrophobic luminescent oxygen probes. Their surface is composed of a dense and long-chain poly(ethylene glycol) shell, which renders them cell-membrane impermeable but yet highly sensitive to oxygen, and also highly stable in aqueous solutions and cell culture media. These features make them potentially suitable for sensing oxygen in extracellular fluids such as blood, interstitial and brain fluid, in (micro) bioreactors and micro- or nanoscale fluidic devices. Four kinds of nanosensors are presented, whose excitation spectra cover a wide spectral range (395-630 nm), thus matching many common laser lines, and with emission maxima ranging from 565 to 800 nm, thereby minimizing interference from background luminescence of biomatter. The unquenched lifetimes are on the order of 5.8-234 μs, which—in turn—enables lifetime imaging and additional background separation via time-gated methods.

  13. Alveolar proteinosis in extremis: a critical case treated with whole lung lavage without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Liang; Chen, Yu; Zhong, Nan-Shan; Su, Zhu-Quan; Zhong, Chang-Hao; Li, Shi-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare idiopathic lung disease characterized by the accumulation of lipoproteinaceous material within the alveoli, which impairs gas transfer and decreases the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and can lead to respiratory failure. Whole lung lavage is the most effective therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, but may not be tolerated by patients with severe respiratory failure. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support is advocated for such patients to ensure appropriate oxygenation during lung lavage. We report a case of a 39-year-old patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and severe life-threatening respiratory failure, with an oxygen index of 51 when under mechanical ventilation. The patient was successfully treated with bilateral whole lung lavage without extracorporeal oxygenation. The results suggest that there is improved ventilation and perfusion matching when one lung is ventilated while the other is lavaged, may be the mechanism of which severe respiratory failure patient due to pulmonary alveolar proteinosis can complete whole lung lavage under one lung ventilation. PMID:26770609

  14. Hypoxia directly increases serotonin transport by porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, G.B.; Block, E.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Alterations in the physical state and composition of membrane lipids have been shown to interfere with a number of critical cellular and membrane functions including transmembrane transport. The authors have reported that hypoxia has profound effects upon the physical state and lipid composition of the PAEC plasma membrane bilayer and have suggested that this is responsible for increased serotonin uptake by these cells. In order to determine whether hypoxia has a direct effect on the plasma membrane transport of serotonin, they measured serotonin transport activity (1) in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from normoxic (20% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) and hypoxic (0% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) PAEC and (2) in PAEC plasma membrane vesicles that were exposed directly to normoxia or hypoxia. A 24-h exposure of PAEC to hypoxia resulted in a 40% increase in specific serotonin transport by plasma membrane vesicles derived from these cells. When plasma membrane vesicles were isolated and then directly exposed to normoxia or hypoxia for 1 h at 37C, a 31% increase in specific 5-HT transport was observed in hypoxic vesicles. Hypoxia did not alter the Km of serotonin transport (normoxia = 3.47 {mu}M versus hypoxia = 3.76 {mu}M) but markedly increased the maximal rate of transport (V{sup max}) (normoxia = 202.4 pmol/min/mg protein versus hypoxia = 317.9 pmol/min/mg protein). These results indicate that hypoxia increases serotonin transport in PAEC by a direct effect on the plasma membrane leading to an increase in the effective number of transporter molecules without alteration in transporter affinity for serotonin.

  15. Electro- and Magneto-Modulated Ion Transport through Graphene Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    The control of ion trans-membrane transport through graphene oxide (GO) membranes is achieved by electric and magnetic fields. Electric field can either increase or decrease the ion transport through GO membranes depending on its direction, and magnetic field can enhance the ion penetration monotonically. When electric field is applied across GO membrane, excellent control of ion fluidic flows can be done. With the magnetic field, the effective anchoring of ions is demonstrated but the modulation of the ion flowing directions does not occur. The mechanism of the electro- and magneto-modulated ion trans-membrane transport is investigated, indicating that the electric fields dominate the ion migration process while the magnetic fields tune the structure of nanocapillaries within GO membranes. Results also show that the ion selectivity of GO membranes can be tuned with the electric fields while the transport of ions can be enhanced synchronously with the magnetic fields. These excellent properties make GO membranes promising in areas such as field-induced mass transport control and membrane separation. PMID:25347969

  16. A novel cobalt-free, CO2-stable, and reduction-tolerant dual-phase oxygen-permeable membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongtao; Sun, Wenping; Zhu, Zhiwen; Liu, Tong; Liu, Wei

    2013-11-13

    A novel CO2-stable and reduction-tolerant Ce0.8Sm0.2O(2-δ)-La0.9Sr0.1FeO(3-δ) (SDC-LSF) dense dual-phase oxygen-permeable membrane was designed and evaluated in this work. Homogeneous SDC-LSF composite powders for membrane fabrication were synthesized via a one-pot combustion method. The chemical compatibility and ion interdiffusion behavior between the fluorite phase SDC and perovskite phase LSF during the synthesis process was studied. The oxygen permeation flux through the dense dual-phase composite membranes was evaluated and found to be highly dependent on the volume ratio of SDC and LSF. The SDC-LSF membrane with a volume ratio of 7:3 (SDC70-LSF30) possessed the highest permeation flux, achieving 6.42 × 10(-7) mol·cm(-2)·s(-1) under an air/CO gradient at 900 °C for a 1.1-mm-thick membrane. Especially, the membrane performance showed excellent durability and operated stably without any degradation at 900 °C for 450 h with helium, CO2, or CO as the sweep gas. The present results demonstrate that a SDC70-LSF30 dual-phase membrane is a promising chemically stable device for oxygen production and CO2 capture with sufficiently high oxygen permeation flux. PMID:24131378

  17. Morphology and Proton Transport in Porous Block Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Kortright, Jeffrey; Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Block copolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of a proton-conducting block and an uncharged structural block are attractive due to their potential in clean energy applications. Herein we demonstrate a novel approach of fabricating block copolymer electrolyte membranes, by inducing pores in the proton-conducting phase. We examine morphology of these membranes with contrast-matched resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSoXS) and electron tomography. Proton conductivity as a function of porosity and water activity is also investigated. By tuning the porosity of the membranes, we are able to adjust the water uptake of the membranes for improved proton conductivities, in both humid air and liquid water.

  18. Temperature dependence of oxygen evolution in the thylakoid membrane: thermal transitions above 273 K in steady-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Fragata, Mário; Viruvuru, Venkataramanaiah

    2009-11-19

    The temperature dependence of electron transport through photosystem II (PSII), measured as oxygen evolution, was investigated in thylakoid membranes irradiated with white light of 450 micromol of photons/(m(2) x s). The experiments were performed in steady-state conditions at temperatures between 273 and 303 K. The results show discontinuities, or thermal transitions, in the temperature-response curves of oxygen evolution. The experimental data was examined with the Marcus theory of electron transfer modified to take into account the oxygen evolution discontinuities. For this purpose, the Gibbs free energy of activation of the electron transfer reaction, DeltaG(o), is replaced in the classical Marcus equation with the expression DeltaH(o) - TDeltaS(o), where H(o) and DeltaS(o) are respectively the enthalpy and entropy of activation, and T is the temperature in kelvin. The result of the derivation is a summation of j Gaussian functions, or states, OE = 69 250 summation operator(j){(V(DA)(4)/lambdaT)(1/2) exp[-(T(max) - T)(2)/2Tsigma(o)(2)]}(j) (eq 1), where OE is expressed in micromol oxygen evolution.(mg Chl x h)(-1), and V(DA) is the electronic coupling matrix element between electron donor (D) and acceptor (A) wave functions, lambda the reorganization free energy, k(B) the Boltzmann constant, T(max) = (DeltaH(o) + lambda)/DeltaS(o), sigma(o) = (2k(B)lambda/DeltaS(o2))(1/2), and sigma = T(1/2)sigma(o) is the standard deviation of the Gaussian band. The mathematical simulations revealed the presence of six thermal transitions, or Gaussian bands with maxima at 275.3, 281.2, 286.4, 291.4, 297.1, and 302.4 K. The resolution of the Gaussian bands is about 0.55 owing to multiple band superpositions. The theoretical analyses showed that (i) the oxygen evolution in PSII is essentially dependent on V(DA)(2)/(lambdaT)(1/2) in the pre-exponential term of the modified Marcus equation (eq 1), and (ii) the reorganization energy, lambda, decreases exponentially with increasing

  19. Multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Eric D.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) enable efficient conversion of fuels to electricity. They have enormous potential due to the high energy density of the fuels they utilize (hydrogen or alcohols). Power density is a major limitation to wide-scale introduction of PEMFCs. Power density in hydrogen fuel cells is limited by accumulation of water in what is termed fuel cell `flooding.' Flooding may occur in either the gas diffusion layer (GDL) or within the flow channels of the bipolar plate. These components comprise the electrodes of the fuel cell and balance transport of reactants/products with electrical conductivity. This thesis explores the role of electrode materials in the fuel cell and examines the fundamental connection between material properties and multiphase transport processes. Water is generated at the cathode catalyst layer. As liquid water accumulates it will utilize the largest pores in the GDL to go from the catalyst layer to the flow channels. Water collects to large pores via lateral transport at the interface between the GDL and catalyst layer. We have shown that water may be collected in these large pores from several centimeters away, suggesting that we could engineer the GDL to control flooding with careful placement and distribution of large flow-directing pores. Once liquid water is in the flow channels it forms slugs that block gas flow. The slugs are pushed along the channel by a pressure gradient that is dependent on the material wettability. The permeable nature of the GDL also plays a major role in slug growth and allowing bypass of gas between adjacent channels. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have analogous multiphase flow issues where carbon dioxide bubbles accumulate, `blinding' regions of the fuel cell. This problem is fundamentally similar to water management in hydrogen fuel cells but with a gas/liquid phase inversion. Gas bubbles move laterally through the porous GDL and emerge to form large bubbles within the

  20. Heat and mass transport resistances in vacuum membrane distillation per drop

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, S.; Sarti, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is a separation process based on the use of microporous hydrophobic membranes. The membrane is located between an aqueous phase and a permeate, which is kept under vacuum at pressure values below the equilibrium vapor pressure of the feed. The liquid stream vaporizes at one side of the membrane, and the vapors diffuse through the gas phase inside the membrane pores. The process rate and performance are affected highly by the transport phenomena both in the liquid phase and through the membrane. Heat- and mass-transfer resistance in the liquid phase, as well as mass-transfer resistance through the membrane, play an important role in determining the process performance. Based on VMD experimental data for several binary aqueous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds, a simple criterion to investigate the role of each transport resistance on the separation efficiency is discussed.

  1. [Lipid oxidation in bilayer lipid membranes linked with the reaction of oxidation of NAD.H by atmospheric oxygen].

    PubMed

    Shchipumov, Iu A; Sokolov, V S; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Boguslavskiĭ, L I

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that along with NAD.H oxidation with air oxygen peroxide oxidation of lipids forming the membrane takes place in bilayer lipid membranes modified with ubiquinone. During nicotin amide oxidation proton absorption takes place. Peroxide oxidation of lipids results in the liberation of H+ ions, which in its turn brings about the formation of protone-deficient or enriched (against aqueous solution) layers adjacent to the membrane. The potential value on the membrane is shown to depend on nicotine amide and oxygen concentration, on ubiquinone presence and lipid composition of the membrane. It has been also indicated that the transmembrane potential difference is initiated with a sharp change of aqueous solution pH by 0.05--0.4 units. PMID:178383

  2. Isolation of photosystem II-enriched membranes and the oxygen-evolving complex subunit proteins from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Leng, Jing; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods to isolate highly active oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes and core complexes from higher plants, and to purify subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The membrane samples used as the material for various in vitro studies of PSII are prepared by solubilizing thylakoid membranes with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, and the core complexes are prepared by further solubilization of the PSII membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DDM). The OEC subunit proteins are dissociated from the PSII-enriched membranes by alkaline or salt treatment, and are then purified by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated high performance liquid chromatography system. PMID:20960116

  3. Microscopic Characterization of Membrane Transporter Function by In Silico Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, J V; Trebesch, N; Mayne, C G; Thangapandian, S; Shekhar, M; Mahinthichaichan, P; Baylon, J L; Jiang, T; Wang, Y; Muller, M P; Shinn, E; Zhao, Z; Wen, P-C; Tajkhorshid, E

    2016-01-01

    Membrane transporters mediate one of the most fundamental processes in biology. They are the main gatekeepers controlling active traffic of materials in a highly selective and regulated manner between different cellular compartments demarcated by biological membranes. At the heart of the mechanism of membrane transporters lie protein conformational changes of diverse forms and magnitudes, which closely mediate critical aspects of the transport process, most importantly the coordinated motions of remotely located gating elements and their tight coupling to chemical processes such as binding, unbinding and translocation of transported substrate and cotransported ions, ATP binding and hydrolysis, and other molecular events fueling uphill transport of the cargo. An increasing number of functional studies have established the active participation of lipids and other components of biological membranes in the function of transporters and other membrane proteins, often acting as major signaling and regulating elements. Understanding the mechanistic details of these molecular processes require methods that offer high spatial and temporal resolutions. Computational modeling and simulations technologies empowered by advanced sampling and free energy calculations have reached a sufficiently mature state to become an indispensable component of mechanistic studies of membrane transporters in their natural environment of the membrane. In this article, we provide an overview of a number of major computational protocols and techniques commonly used in membrane transporter modeling and simulation studies. The article also includes practical hints on effective use of these methods, critical perspectives on their strengths and weak points, and examples of their successful applications to membrane transporters, selected from the research performed in our own laboratory. PMID:27497175

  4. Modeling and simulation of oxygen-limited partial nitritation in a membrane-assisted bioreactor (MBR).

    PubMed

    Wyffels, Stijn; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; Boeckx, Pascal; Volcke, Eveline I P; Van Cleemput, Oswald; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Verstraete, Willy

    2004-06-01

    Combination of a partial nitritation process and an anaerobic ammonium oxidation process for the treatment of sludge reject water has some general cost-efficient advantages compared to nitrification-denitrification. The integrated process features two-stage autotrophic conversion of ammonium via nitrite to dinitrogen gas with lower demand for oxygen and no external carbon requirement. A nitrifying membrane-assisted bioreactor (MBR) for the treatment of sludge reject water was operated under continuous aeration at low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations with the purpose of generating nitrite accumulation. Microfiltration was applied to allow a high sludge retention time (SRT), resulting in a stable partial nitritation process. During start-up of the MBR, oxygen-limited conditions were induced by increasing the ammonium loading rate and decreasing the oxygen transfer. At a loading rate of 0.9 kg N m(-3) d(-1) and an oxygen concentration below 0.1 mg DO L(-1), conversion to nitrite was close to 50% of the incoming ammonium, thereby yielding an optimal effluent within the stoichiometric requirements for subsequent anaerobic ammonium oxidation. A mathematical model for ammonium oxidation to nitrite and nitrite oxidation to nitrate was developed to describe the oxygen-limited partial nitritation process within the MBR. The model was calibrated with in situ determinations of kinetic parameters for microbial growth, reflecting the intrinsic characteristics of the ammonium oxidizing growth system at limited oxygen availability and high sludge age. The oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) and the ammonium-loading rate were shown to be the appropriate operational variables to describe the experimental data accurately. The validated model was used for further steady state simulation under different operational conditions of hydraulic retention time (HRT), K(L)a, temperature and SRT, with the intention to support optimized process design. Simulation results indicated that

  5. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resulting in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.

  6. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  7. (13) C Breath Tests Are Feasible in Patients With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Devices.

    PubMed

    Bednarsch, Jan; Menk, Mario; Malinowski, Maciej; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Pratschke, Johann; Stockmann, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Temporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been established as an essential part of therapy in patients with pulmonary or cardiac failure. As physiological gaseous exchange is artificially altered in this patient group, it is debatable whether a (13) C-breath test can be carried out. In this proof of technical feasibility report, we assess the viability of the (13) C-breath test LiMAx (maximum liver function capacity) in patients on ECMO therapy. All breath probes for the test device were obtained directly via the membrane oxygenator. Data of four patients receiving liver function assessment with the (13) C-breath test LiMAx while having ECMO therapy were analyzed. All results were compared with validated scenarios of the testing procedures. The LiMAx test could successfully be carried out in every case without changing ECMO settings. Clinical course of the patients ranging from multiorgan failure to no sign of liver insufficiency was in accordance with the results of the LiMAx liver function test. The (13) C-breath test is technically feasible in the context of ECMO. Further evaluation of (13) C-breath test in general would be worthwhile. The LiMAx test as a (13) C-breath test accessing liver function might be of particular predictive interest if patients with ECMO therapy develop multiorgan failure. PMID:26527580

  8. Preoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to cardiac surgery in children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Hernandez, V; Thiagarajan, RR; Fynn-Thompson, F; Rajagopal, SK; Nento, DE; Yarlagadda, V; Teele, SA; Allan, CK; Emani, SM; Laussen, PC; Pigula, FA; Bacha, EA

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in bridging children with unrepaired heart defects to a definitive or palliative surgical procedure has been rarely reported. The goal of this study is to report our institutional experience with ECMO used to provide preoperative stabilization after acute cardiac or respiratory failure in patients with congenital heart disease before cardiac surgery. Methods A retrospective review of the ECMO database at Children's Hospital Boston was undertaken. Children with unrepaired congenital heart disease supported with ECMO for acute cardiac or respiratory failure as bridge to a definitive or palliative cardiac surgical procedure were identified. Data collection included patient demographics, indication for ECMO, details regarding ECMO course and complications, and survival to hospital discharge. Results Twenty-six patients (18 male, 8 female) with congenital heart disease were bridged to surgical palliation or anatomic repair with ECMO. Median age and weight at ECMO cannulation were, respectively, 0.12 months (range, 0 to 193) and 4 kg (range, 1.8 to 67 kg). Sixteen patients (62%) survived to hospital discharge. Variables associated with mortality included inability to decannulate from ECMO after surgery (p = 0.02) and longer total duration of ECMO (p = 0.02). No difference in outcomes was found between patients with single and biventricular anatomy. Conclusions Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, used as a bridge to surgery, represents a useful modality to rescue patients with failing circulation and unrepaired complex heart defects. PMID:19766826

  9. Charge transport in the electrospun nanofiber composite membrane's three-dimensional fibrous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGostin, Matthew B.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Myles, Timothy D.; Cassenti, Brice N.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a Fiber Network (FN) ion transport model is developed to simulate the three-dimensional fibrous microstructural morphology that results from the electrospinning membrane fabrication process. This model is able to approximate fiber layering within a membrane as well as membrane swelling due to water uptake. The discrete random fiber networks representing membranes are converted to resistor networks and solved for current flow and ionic conductivity. Model predictions are validated by comparison with experimental conductivity data from electrospun anion exchange membranes (AEM) and proton exchange membranes (PEM) for fuel cells as well as existing theories. The model is capable of predicting in-plane and thru-plane conductivity and takes into account detailed membrane characteristics, such as volume fraction, fiber diameter, fiber conductivity, and membrane layering, and as such may be used as a tool for advanced electrode design.

  10. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Ines; van Üüm, Jan; Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes. PMID:23555818

  11. ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). β-Barreled outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins are embedded in the outer membrane. All of these constituents are essential to the function of the outer membrane. The transport systems for lipoproteins have been characterized in detail. An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, LolCDE, initiates sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane to form a water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex in the periplasm. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB at the outer membrane and are incorporated into the lipid bilayer. A model analogous to the Lol system has been suggested for the transport of LPS, where an ABC transporter, LptBFG, mediates the detachment of LPS from the inner membrane. Recent developments in the functional characterization of ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:21670534

  12. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Richard Treglio; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard Blair; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Jon P. Wagner; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs

    2004-07-26

    During this quarter, work was focused on testing layered composite membranes under varying feed stream flow rates at high pressure. By optimizing conditions, H{sub 2} permeation rates as high as 423 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -2} at 440 C were measured. Membrane stability was investigated by comparison to composite alloy membranes. Permeation of alloyed membranes showed a strong dependence on the alloying element. Impedance analysis was used to investigate bulk and grain boundary conductivity in cermets. Thin film cermet deposition procedures were developed, hydrogen dissociation catalysts were evaluated, and hydrogen separation unit scale-up issues were addressed.

  13. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  14. Drug-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) rely on cell membrane properties to exert anticancer effects

    PubMed Central

    Molavian, Hamid R.; Goldman, Aaron; Phipps, Colin J.; Kohandel, Mohammad; Wouters, Bradly G.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sivaloganathan, Sivabal

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological concentrations of small molecule natural products, such as ascorbic acid, have exhibited distinct cell killing outcomes between cancer and normal cells whereby cancer cells undergo apoptosis or necrosis while normal cells are not adversely affected. Here, we develop a mathematical model for ascorbic acid that can be utilized as a tool to understand the dynamics of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cell death. We determine that not only do endogenous antioxidants such as catalase contribute to ROS-induced cell death, but also cell membrane properties play a critical role in the efficacy of ROS as a cytotoxic mechanism against cancer cells vs. normal cells. Using in vitro assays with breast cancer cells, we have confirmed that cell membrane properties are essential for ROS, in the form of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to induce cell death. Interestingly, we did not observe any correlation between intracellular H2O2 and cell survival, suggesting that cell death by H2O2 is triggered by interaction with the cell membrane and not necessarily due to intracellular levels of H2O2. These findings provide a putative mechanistic explanation for the efficacy and selectivity of therapies such as ascorbic acid that rely on ROS-induced cell death for their anti-tumor properties. PMID:27278439

  15. Impact of Embedded Endocannabinoids and Their Oxygenation by Lipoxygenase on Membrane Properties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    N-Arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol are the best characterized endocannabinoids. Their biological activity is subjected to metabolic control whereby a dynamic equilibrium among biosynthetic, catabolic, and oxidative pathways drives their intracellular concentrations. In particular, lipoxygenases can generate hydroperoxy derivatives of endocannabinoids, endowed with distinct activities within cells. The in vivo interaction between lipoxygenases and endocannabinoids is likely to occur within cell membranes; thus, we sought to ascertain whether a prototypical enzyme like soybean (Glycine max) 15-lipoxygenase-1 is able to oxygenate endocannabinoids embedded in synthetic vesicles and how these substances could affect the binding ability of the enzyme to different lipid bilayers. We show that (i) embedded endocannabinoids increase membrane fluidity; (ii) 15-lipoxygenase-1 preferentially binds to endocannabinoid-containing bilayers; and that (iii) 15-lipoxygenase-1 oxidizes embedded endocannabinoids and thus reduces fluidity and local hydration of membrane lipids. Together, the present findings reveal further complexity in the regulation of endocannabinoid signaling within the central nervous system, disclosing novel control by oxidative pathways. PMID:22860207

  16. The oxygen consumption of the placenta and foetal membranes in the sheep

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, A. G. M.; Dawes, G. S.; Fishman, A. P.; Hyman, A. I.; James, G. B.

    1966-01-01

    1. In anaesthetized sheep near term the O2 uptake of the foetus from the placenta was reduced to zero either by replacing the foetus with a mechanical pump, or by ventilation of the foetus after delivery or in utero. When umbilical arterial and venous PO2 were made equal, they were much less than maternal arterial PO2. 2. This difference in PO2 was attributed to O2 consumption both within the placental cotyledons and the extra-cotyledonary foetal membranes. 3. The foetal membranes and cord in the sheep are supplied by branches of umbilical blood vessels and constitute an oxygen-consuming by-pass on the foetal side of the placenta. 4. The O2 consumption of individual placental cotyledons was measured in vivo. 5. The combined O2 consumption of the whole placenta and foetal membranes in vivo was a considerable fraction of foetal O2 consumption. 6. The consequences of these observations are discussed in relation to O2 transfer across the placenta. ImagesFig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:5949598

  17. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  18. Drug-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) rely on cell membrane properties to exert anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    Molavian, Hamid R; Goldman, Aaron; Phipps, Colin J; Kohandel, Mohammad; Wouters, Bradly G; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sivaloganathan, Sivabal

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological concentrations of small molecule natural products, such as ascorbic acid, have exhibited distinct cell killing outcomes between cancer and normal cells whereby cancer cells undergo apoptosis or necrosis while normal cells are not adversely affected. Here, we develop a mathematical model for ascorbic acid that can be utilized as a tool to understand the dynamics of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cell death. We determine that not only do endogenous antioxidants such as catalase contribute to ROS-induced cell death, but also cell membrane properties play a critical role in the efficacy of ROS as a cytotoxic mechanism against cancer cells vs. normal cells. Using in vitro assays with breast cancer cells, we have confirmed that cell membrane properties are essential for ROS, in the form of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to induce cell death. Interestingly, we did not observe any correlation between intracellular H2O2 and cell survival, suggesting that cell death by H2O2 is triggered by interaction with the cell membrane and not necessarily due to intracellular levels of H2O2. These findings provide a putative mechanistic explanation for the efficacy and selectivity of therapies such as ascorbic acid that rely on ROS-induced cell death for their anti-tumor properties. PMID:27278439

  19. Oxygen radicals generated at reflow induce peroxidation of membrane lipids in reperfused hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, G; Flaherty, J T; Duilio, C; Tritto, I; Santoro, G; Elia, P P; Condorelli, M; Chiariello, M

    1991-01-01

    To test whether generation of oxygen radicals during postischemic reperfusion might promote peroxidation of cardiac membrane lipids, four groups of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were processed at the end of (a) control perfusion, (b) 30 min of total global ischemia at 37 degrees C without reperfusion, (c) 30 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion with standard perfusate, (d) 30 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion with the oxygen radical scavenger human recombinant superoxide dismutase (h-SOD). The left ventricle was homogenized and tissue content of malonyldialdehyde (MDA), an end product of lipid peroxidation, was measured on the whole homogenate as well as on various subcellular fractions. Reperfusion was accompanied by a significant increase in MDA content of the whole homogenate and of the fraction enriched in mitochondria and lysosomes. This phenomenon was not observed in hearts subjected to ischemia but not reperfused, and was similarly absent in those hearts which received h-SOD at reflow. Reperfused hearts also had significantly greater levels of conjugated dienes (another marker of lipid peroxidation) in the mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction. Again, this phenomenon did not occur in ischemic hearts or in reperfused hearts treated with h-SOD. Unlike the effect on tissue MDA and conjugated dienes, reperfusion did not significantly stimulate release of MDA in the cardiac effluent. Treatment with h-SOD was also associated with significant improvement in the recovery of cardiac function. In conclusion, these data directly demonstrate that postischemic reperfusion results in enhanced lipid peroxidation of cardiac membranes, which can be blocked by h-SOD, and therefore is most likely secondary to oxygen radical generation at reflow. Images PMID:1645750

  20. Experimental study of dissolved oxygen transport by regular waves through a perforated breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zegao; Yu, Ning; Liang, Bingchen; Zeng, Jixiong; Xie, Shaohua

    2016-02-01

    The perforated breakwater is an environmentally friendly coastal structure, and dissolved oxygen concentration levels are an important index to denote water quality. In this paper, oxygen transport experiments with regular waves through a vertical perforated breakwater were conducted. The oxygen scavenger method was used to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration of inner water body with the chemicals Na2SO3 and CoCl2. The dissolved oxygen concentration and wave parameters of 36 experimental scenarios were measured with different perforated arrangements and wave conditions. It was found that the oxygen transfer coefficient through wave surface, K1 a 1, is much lower than the oxygen transport coefficient through the perforated breakwater, K2 a 2. If the effect of K1 a 1 is not considered, the dissolved oxygen concentration computation for inner water body will not be greatly affected. Considering the effect of a permeable area ratio a, relative location parameter of perforations δ and wave period T, the aforementioned data of 30 experimental scenarios, the dimensional analysis and the least squares method were used to derive an equation of K2 a 2 (K2 a 2=0.0042 a 0.5 δ 0.2 T -1). It was validated with 6 other experimental scenarios data, which indicates an approximate agreement. Therefore, this equation can be used to compute the DO concentration caused by the water transport through perforated breakwater.

  1. Investigation of Zr-doped BSCF perovskite membrane for oxygen separation in the intermediate temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Ravkina, Olga; Klande, Tobias; Feldhoff, Armin

    2013-05-01

    The series of (Ba₀.₅Sr₀.₅)(Co₀.₈Fe₀.₂){sub 1–z}Zr{sub z}O{sub 3–δ} (z=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.09) was synthesized by a sol–gel method. The materials with a zirconium content up to 3 mol% were found to be single phase. Further increase results in formation of a mixed (Ba,Sr)ZrO₃ by-phase, which was found along the grain boundaries and in the grains. With increasing zirconium content the oxygen permeation flux decreases considerably. The effect of the zirconium substitution on the long-term phase stability was investigated by long-term oxygen permeation experiments and X-ray diffraction. A slight stabilization of the oxygen flux of (Ba₀.₅Sr{sub 0.5})(Co₀.₈Fe₀.₂)₀.₉₇Zr₀.₀₃O{sub 3–δ} was found after 180 h at 1023 K. However, all compositions show a decrease in permeation flux with time, but the pure BSCF membrane exhibited the strongest drop after 180 h of operation. The decomposition products of the cubic perovskite phase were found to be a hexagonal Ba{sub 0.5±x}Sr{sub 0.5±x}CoO₃ and a rhombohedral Ba{sub 1–x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub 2–y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 5–δ}. - Graphical abstract: Backscattered-electron channeling contrast image of BSCF membrane cross-section after long-term oxygen permeation at 1023 K showing different phases in different colors. Highlights: • Ba₀.₅Sr₀.₅Co₀.₈Fe₀.₂O{sub 3–δ} systematically doped with increasing amount of zirconium. • Cubic single-phase materials up to 3 wt% zirconium. • Mixed (Ba,Sr)ZrO₃ by-phase formed mainly in the grain boundaries. • Jänecke prism was proposed by XRD and EDXS data. • (Ba₀.₅Sr₀.₅)(Co₀.₈Fe₀.₂)₀.₉₇Zr₀.₀₃O{sub 3–δ} showed a slight stabilization of oxygen flux as compared to pure Ba₀.₅Sr₀.₅Co₀.₈Fe₀.₂O{sub 3–δ}.

  2. Abciximab-induced alveolar hemorrhage treated with rescue extracorporeal membranous oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew W; Blair, John E A; Flaherty, James D

    2015-04-01

    We describe a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting emergently with an anterior S-T elevation myocardial infarction that deteriorated into ventricular fibrillation requiring prompt resuscitation, resulting in cardiogenic shock. Emergency primary percutaneous coronary intervention of the left anterior descending coronary artery with adjunctive abciximab and heparin resulted in adequate coronary flow, and intra-aortic balloon pump was used to support hemodynamics. Within one hour of intervention, she developed acute respiratory distress with four-quadrant opacification of lung fields, difficulty with oxygenation, and hypotension. Emergency bronchoscopy revealed diffuse erythematous proximal airways with bloody secretions bilaterally confirming diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. An emergency veno-arterial extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO) circuit was placed at the bedside, acutely improving oxygenation and hemodynamics. She survived the hospitalization with multiple complications related to access site and prolonged intensive care unit stay, was discharged to acute rehabilitation. She is currently thriving 18 months post-procedure. This case highlights the use of ECMO in the often-fatal condition of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage related to glycoprotein inhibitor use. PMID:25381962

  3. Successful Treatment of Severe Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Refractory Shock Using Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Teerapuncharoen, Krittika; Sharma, Nirmal S; Barker, Andrew B; Wille, Keith M; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most common cause of poisoning and poisoning-related death in the United States. It is a tasteless and odorless poisonous gas produced from incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons, such as those produced by cars and heating systems. CO rapidly binds to hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, leading to tissue hypoxia, multiple-organ failure, and cardiovascular collapse. CO also binds to myocardial myoglobin, preventing oxidative phosphorylation in cardiac mitochondria and resulting in cardiac ischemia or stunning and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of CO poisoning is mainly supportive, and supplemental oxygen remains the cornerstone of therapy, whereas hyperbaric oxygen therapy is considered for patients with evidence of neurological and myocardial injury. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been utilized effectively in patients with respiratory failure and hemodynamic instability, but its use has rarely been reported in patients with CO poisoning. We report the successful use of venoarterial ECMO in a patient with severe CO poisoning and multiple-organ failure. PMID:25922545

  4. Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes for high flux gas transport.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangil; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Haibin; Sholl, David S; Marand, Eva

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple, fast, and practical route to vertically align carbon nanotubes on a porous support using a combination of self-assembly and filtration methods. The advantage of this approach is that it can be easily scaled up to large surface areas, allowing the fabrication of membranes for practical gas separation applications. The gas transport properties of thus constructed nanotube/polymer nanocomposite membranes are analogous to those of carbon nanotube membranes grown by chemical vapor deposition. This paper shows the first data for transport of gas mixtures through carbon nanotube membranes. The permeation of gas mixtures through the membranes exhibits different properties than those observed using single-gas experiments, confirming that non-Knudsen transport occurs. PMID:17685662

  5. Construction of a multilayer planar membrane applicable to ion-transport measurement.

    PubMed

    Setaka, M; Yano, M; Kwan, T; Shimizu, H

    1979-08-01

    Multilayer planar membranes applicable to ion-transport measurements were constructed from egg yolk lecithin, egg yolk lecithin-cholesterol mixture, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine between two tightly stretched cellulose sheets. While most of the phospholipids in the membranes were found by a spin label technique to be uniformly oriented with their long hydrocarbon chains perpendicular to the surfaces of the cellulose sheets, a small fraction of phospholipids were isotropically oriented in multilayer membranes. The amount of phospholipids with isotropic orientations decreased with increasing content of cholesterol in membranes and became zero in membranes of egg yolk lecithin-cholesterol mixture (molar ratio of 1: 0.67). The degree of orientation, S, of uniformly oriented phospholipids in membranes was also increased by adding cholesterol to the membranes. The orientation of phospholipids in membranes was rather stable in distilled water and in aqueous calcium chloride (1, 10, 100 mM), while a marked disordering of oriented phospholipids was induced in a aqueous solutions containing thymol, isopropanol, or butanol beyond certain specific concentrations. The membranes can be used for measurements of calcium permeation. An appreciable barrier function to calcium permeation was detected with these multilayer planar membranes as compared with control experiments using only cellulose sheets as membranes. A preliminary investigation suggested that changes in the orientational structure of phospholipids in the multilayer planar membranes are correlated with permeability properties of the membranes. PMID:225307

  6. Bacterial swimming and oxygen transport near contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuval, Idan; Cisneros, Luis; Dombrowski, Christopher; Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Kessler, John O.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2005-02-01

    Aerobic bacteria often live in thin fluid layers near solid-air-water contact lines, in which the biology of chemotaxis, metabolism, and cell-cell signaling is intimately connected to the physics of buoyancy, diffusion, and mixing. Using the geometry of a sessile drop, we demonstrate in suspensions of Bacillus subtilis the self-organized generation of a persistent hydrodynamic vortex that traps cells near the contact line. Arising from upward oxygentaxis and downward gravitational forcing, these dynamics are related to the Boycott effect in sedimentation and are explained quantitatively by a mathematical model consisting of oxygen diffusion and consumption, chemotaxis, and viscous fluid dynamics. The vortex is shown to advectively enhance uptake of oxygen into the suspension, and the wedge geometry leads to a singularity in the chemotactic dynamics near the contact line. bioconvection | chemotaxis | singularity | Bacillus subtilis

  7. Lipid diffusion in sperm plasma membranes exposed to peroxidative injury from oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Christova, Yonka; James, Peter S; Jones, Roy

    2004-07-01

    Unsaturated lipids in sperm plasma membranes are very susceptible to peroxidation when exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this investigation we have incubated ram spermatozoa in the presence of two ROS generating systems, ascorbate/FeSO4 and potassium peroxychromate (K3CrO8), and examined their effects on membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of a lipid reporter probe 5-(N-octadecanoyl)-aminofluorescein (ODAF). Peroxidation was monitored by malonaldehyde formation and changes in fluorescence emission of 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid (C11-BODIPY(581/591)). Ascorbate/FeSO4-induced peroxidation was inhibited by Vitamin E, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), 1,4-diazobicyclo(2,2,2)octane (DABCO), and to a lesser extent by ethanol. Added superoxide dismutase (SOD), gluthathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase were ineffective scavengers. K3CrO8 induced very rapid peroxidation that could be delayed, but not prevented, by Vitamin E, BHT, DABCO, ethanol, and mannitol; once again SOD, GPX, and catalase were ineffective scavengers. Neither peroxidation with ascorbate/FeSO4 nor K3CrO8, or added H2O2 or malonaldehyde perturbed ODAF diffusion in any region of the sperm plasma membrane. Vitamin E tended to enhance diffusion rates. Exogenous cumene hydroperoxide, however, reduced ODAF diffusion to low levels on the sperm head. These results suggest that the adverse effects of ROS on spermatozoa are more likely to be caused by direct oxidation of proteins and membrane permeabilisation than disturbance of lipid fluidity. PMID:15112331

  8. Effect of reactive oxygen species on lysosomal membrane integrity. A study on a lysosomal fraction.

    PubMed

    Zdolsek, J M; Svensson, I

    1993-01-01

    Using a lysosome-enriched "light mitochondrial" fraction of a rat liver homogenate, the effects of the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, superoxide- and hydroxyl radicals were determined. Alterations in the intralysosomal pH and the release of a lysosomal marker enzyme, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, were used as indicators of changes in the lysosomal membrane integrity. Lipid peroxidation of the fraction was assayed by TBARS measurement. Neither superoxide radicals, generated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase, nor a bolus dose of hydrogen peroxide (0.5-1.5 mM) induced any lysosomal damage. If, however, Fe(III)ADP was included in the superoxide radical-generating system, lysosomal membrane damage was detected, both as an increase in lysosomal pH and as a release of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, but only after a lag phase of about 7 min. Lipid peroxidation, on the other hand, proceeded gradually. Lysosomes treated with hydrogen peroxide displayed similar dose-dependent alterations, albeit only if both Fe(III)ADP and the reducing amino acid cysteine were added. In the latter system, however, alterations of the lysosomal membrane stability occurred more rapidly, showing a lag phase of only 2 min. Lipid peroxidation, which proceeded faster and displayed no lag phase, levelled out within 10 min. The results indicate that neither superoxide radicals nor hydrogen peroxide are by themselves damaging to lysosomes. Available catalytically active iron in Fe(II) form, however, allows reactions yielding powerful oxidative species--probably hydroxyl radicals formed via Fenton reactions--to take place inducing peroxidation of the lysosomal membranes resulting in dissipation of the proton-gradient and leakage of their enzyme contents. PMID:8148962

  9. Requirement for membrane potential in active transport of glutamine by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Plate, C A

    1979-01-01

    The effect of reducing the membrane potential on glutamine transport in cells of Escherichia coli has been investigated. Addition of valinomycin to tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-treated E. coli cells in the presence of 20 mM exogenous potassium reduced the membrane potential, as measured by the uptake of the lipophilic cation triphenylmethylphosphonium, and caused a complete inhibition of glutamine transport. Valinomycin plus potassium also caused a rapid decrease in the intracellular levels of ATP of normal E. coli cells, but had little if any effect on the ATP levels of two mutants of E. coli carrying lesions in the energy-transducing ATP complex (unc mutants). Yet both the membrane potential and the capacity to transport glutamine were depressed in the unc mutants by valinomycin and potassium. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that both ATP and a membrane potential are essential to the active transport of glutamine by E. coli cells. PMID:153897

  10. Concepts of oxygen transport at the microcirculatory level.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, M W

    1998-07-01

    This article compares and contrasts the classic paradigms underlying the development of chronic and acute hypoxia in tumors. The classic theory of Thomlinson and Gray suggested that chronic hypoxia is the result of large intravascular distances. Newer evidence suggests that a multiplicity of effects contribute to this process, including steep longitudinal gradients of partial pressure of oxygen (Po2) along the vascular tree before arteriolar entry into tumor, rheologic effects on red cell deformability brought on by intravascular hypoxia, uneven distribution of red cell fluxes in microvessels leading to plasma channels, irregular vascular geometry, and oxygen demand that is out of balance with the supply. The most common theories have suggested that vascular stasis is the most common source of acute hypoxia. If this were true, the incidence of this form of hypoxia would be relatively rare because most studies indicate that total stasis probably occurs less than 5% of the time. Studies have suggested, however, that spontaneous fluctuation in tumor blood flow, on the microregional level, can lead to tissue hypoxia, and total vascular stasis is not required. Spontaneous fluctuations in flow and Po2 appear to occur commonly. Thus, the most current evidence suggests that tumor oxygenation is in a continuous state of flux. Collectively, this new information has important implications for therapy resistance and gene expression. PMID:9634491

  11. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  12. Thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of gaseous products resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Results of calculations to determine thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of combustion product gases are presented. The product gases are those resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. The oxygen content of products resulting from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures was similiar to that of air; however, the oxygen contained in products of methane-oxygen combustion ranged from 20 percent by volume to zero for stoichiometric combustion. Calculations were made for products of reactant mixtures with fuel percentages, by mass, of 7.5 to 20. Results are presented for specific mixtures for a range of pressures varying from 0.0001 to 1,000 atm and for temperatures ranging from 200 to 3,800 K.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Fluconazole in Young Infants Supported with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Kevin M.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Moorthy, Ganesh; Wade, Kelly C.; Smith, P. Brian; Brouwer, Kim L. R.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Candida infections are a leading cause of infectious disease-related death in infants supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The ECMO circuit can alter drug pharmacokinetics (PK), thus standard fluconazole dosing in children on ECMO may result in suboptimal drug exposure. This study determined the PK of fluconazole in infants on ECMO. Methods Infants <120 days old received either intravenous fluconazole prophylaxis (25 mg/kg once a week) or treatment (12 mg/kg daily) while on ECMO. Paired plasma samples were collected pre- and post-oxygenator around doses 1 and 2 to calculate PK indices and describe oxygenator extraction. A 1-compartment model was fit to the data using non-linear regression. Surrogate pharmacodynamic targets for efficacy were evaluated. Results Ten infants were enrolled. After dose 1 (n=9), the median clearance was 17 mL/kg/h, the median volume of distribution was 1.5 L/kg, and the median exposure in the first 24 hours (AUC0–24) was 322 h*mg/L. After multiple doses (n=7), the median clearance was 22 mL/kg/h, the median volume of distribution was 1.9 L/kg, and the AUC0–24 was 352 h*mg/L. After dose 1, 78% of infants achieved the prophylaxis target, while only 11% achieved the therapeutic target. Oxygenator extraction of fluconazole was minimal (−2.0%, standard deviation 15.0), and extraction was not correlated with age of the ECMO circuit (rho= − 0.05). There were no adverse events related to fluconazole. Conclusions Infants on ECMO had higher volume of distribution but similar clearance when compared with historical controls not on ECMO. In infants on ECMO, a fluconazole dose of 25 mg/kg weekly provides adequate exposure for prophylaxis against Candida infections. However, higher doses may be needed for treatment. PMID:22627870

  14. Effect of plasma membrane fluidity on serotonin transport by endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Block, E.R.; Edwards, D. )

    1987-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of plasma membrane fluidity of lung endothelial cells on serotonin transport, porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were incubated for 3 h with either 0.1 mM cholesterol hemisuccinate, 0.1 mM cis-vaccenic acid, or vehicle (control), after which plasma membrane fluidity and serotinin transport were measured. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure fluidity in the plasma membrane. Serotonin uptake was calculated from the disappearance of ({sup 14}C)-serotonin from the culture medium. Cholesterol decreased fluidity in the subpolar head group and central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and decreased serotonin transport, whereas cis-vaccenic acid increased fluidity in the central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and also increased serotonin transport. Cis-vaccenic acid had no effect of fluidity in the subpolar head group region of the plasma membrane. These results provide evidence that the physical state of the central and midacyl chains within the pulmonary artery endothelial cell plasma membrane lipid bilayer modulates transmembrane transport of serotonin by these cells.

  15. Accurate control of oxygen level in cells during culture on silicone rubber membranes with application to stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Powers, Daryl E; Millman, Jeffrey R; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Rappel, Michael J; Colton, Clark K

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen level in mammalian cell culture is often controlled by placing culture vessels in humidified incubators with a defined gas phase partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2gas)). Because the cells are consuming oxygen supplied by diffusion, a difference between pO(2gas) and that experienced by the cells (pO(2cell)) arises, which is maximal when cells are cultured in vessels with little or no oxygen permeability. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that highly oxygen-permeable silicone rubber membranes can be used to control pO(2cell) during culture of cells in monolayers and aggregates much more accurately and can achieve more rapid transient response following a disturbance than on polystyrene and fluorinated ethylene-propylene copolymer membranes. Cell attachment on silicone rubber was achieved by physical adsorption of fibronectin or Matrigel. We use these membranes for the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells to cardiomyocytes and compare the results with culture on polystyrene or on silicone rubber on top of polystyrene. The fraction of cells that are cardiomyocyte-like increases with decreasing pO(2) only when using oxygen-permeable silicone membrane-based dishs, which contract on silicone rubber but not polystyrene. The high permeability of silicone rubber results in pO(2cell) being equal to pO(2gas) at the tissue-membrane interface. This, together with geometric information from histological sections, facilitates development of a model from which the pO(2) distribution within the resulting aggregates is computed. Silicone rubber membranes have significant advantages over polystyrene in controlling pO(2cell), and these results suggest they are a valuable tool for investigating pO(2) effects in many applications, such as stem cell differentiation. PMID:20039374

  16. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Adam E. Calihman; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangla; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-04-30

    During this quarter long term and high pressure hydrogen separation experiments were performed on Eltron's composite layered membranes. Membranes were tested at 400 C and a 300 psig feed stream with 40% hydrogen for up to 400 continuous hours. In addition membranes were tested up to 1000 psig as demonstration of the ability for this technology to meet DOE goals. Progress was made in the development of new hydrogen separation cermets containing high permeability metals. A sulfur tolerant catalyst deposition technique was optimized and engineering work on mechanical and process & control reports was continued.

  17. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2004-10-21

    During this quarter, work was focused on characterizing the stability of layered composite membranes in a one hundred percent permeate environment. Permeation data was also collected on cermets as a function of thickness. A thin film deposition procedure was used to deposit dense thin BCY/Ni onto a tubular porous support. Thin film tubes were then tested for permeation at ambient pressure. Process flow diagrams were prepared for inclusion of hydrogen separation membranes into IGCC power plants under varying conditions. Finally, membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation experiments were performed.

  18. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Jim Fisher; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangla; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-01-28

    During this quarter work was continued on characterizing the stability of layered composite membranes under a variety of conditions. Membrane permeation was tested up to 100 hours at constant pressure, temperature, and flow rates. In addition, design parameters were completed for a scale-up hydrogen separation demonstration unit. Evaluation of microstructure and effect of hydrogen exposure on BCY/Ni cermet mechanical properties was initiated. The fabrication of new cermets containing high permeability metals is reported and progress in the preparation of sulfur resistant catalysts is discussed. Finally, a report entitled ''Criteria for Incorporating Eltron's Hydrogen Separation Membranes into Vision 21 IGCC Systems and FutureGen Plants'' was completed.

  19. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium-barium phosphate composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment. PMID:23910337

  20. Decoupling Mechanical and Ion Transport Properties in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Lucas D.

    Polymer electrolytes are mixtures of a polar polymer and salt, in which the polymer replaces small molecule solvents and provides a dielectric medium so that ions can dissociate and migrate under the influence of an external electric field. Beginning in the 1970s, research in polymer electrolytes has been primarily motivated by their promise to advance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices, such as lithium