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Sample records for oxylipin biosynthetic enzymes

  1. Structural Insights Into the Evolutionary Paths of Oxylipin Biosynthetic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.-S.; Nioche, P.; Hamberg, M.; Raman, C.S.

    2009-05-20

    The oxylipin pathway generates not only prostaglandin-like jasmonates but also green leaf volatiles (GLVs), which confer characteristic aromas to fruits and vegetables. Although allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase are atypical cytochrome P450 family members involved in the synthesis of jasmonates and GLVs, respectively, it is unknown how these enzymes rearrange their hydroperoxide substrates into different products. Here we present the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AOS, free and in complex with substrate or intermediate analogues. The structures reveal an unusual active site poised to control the reactivity of an epoxyallylic radical and its cation by means of interactions with an aromatic {pi}-system. Replacing the amino acid involved in these steps by a non-polar residue markedly reduces AOS activity and, unexpectedly, is both necessary and sufficient for converting AOS into a GLV biosynthetic enzyme. Furthermore, by combining our structural data with bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, we have discovered previously unknown hydroperoxide lyase in plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, AOS in coral, and epoxyalcohol synthase in amphioxus. These results indicate that oxylipin biosynthetic genes were present in the last common ancestor of plants and animals, but were subsequently lost in all metazoan lineages except Placozoa, Cnidaria and Cephalochordata.

  2. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses. PMID:20079505

  3. A Covalent Linker Allows for Membrane Targeting of An Oxylipin Biosynthetic Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, N.C.; Niebuhr, M.; Tsuruta, H.; Bordelon, T.; Ridderbusch, O.; Dassey, A.; Brash, A.R.; Bartlett, S.G.; Newcomer, M.E.

    2009-05-18

    A naturally occurring bifunctional protein from Plexaura homomalla links sequential catalytic activities in an oxylipin biosynthetic pathway. The C-terminal lipoxygenase (LOX) portion of the molecule catalyzes the transformation of arachidonic acid (AA) to the corresponding 8R-hydroperoxide, and the N-terminal allene oxide synthase (AOS) domain promotes the conversion of the hydroperoxide intermediate to the product allene oxide (AO). Small-angle X-ray scattering data indicate that in the absence of a covalent linkage the two catalytic domains that transform AA to AO associate to form a complex that recapitulates the structure of the bifunctional protein. The SAXS data also support a model for LOX and AOS domain orientation in the fusion protein inferred from a low-resolution crystal structure. However, results of membrane binding experiments indicate that covalent linkage of the domains is required for Ca2+-dependent membrane targeting of the sequential activities, despite the noncovalent domain association. Furthermore, membrane targeting is accompanied by a conformational change as monitored by specific proteolysis of the linker that joins the AOS and LOX domains. Our data are consistent with a model in which Ca2+-dependent membrane binding relieves the noncovalent interactions between the AOS and LOX domains and suggests that the C2-like domain of LOX mediates both protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions.

  4. Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Proctor, A R; Kloos, W E

    1973-04-01

    Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes were assayed in various tryptophan mutants of Staphylococcus aureus strain 655 and the wild-type parent. All mutants, except trpB mutants, lacked only the activity corresponding to the particular biosynthetic block, as suggested previously by analysis of accumulated intermediates and auxonography. Tryptophan synthetase A was not detected in extracts of either trpA or trpB mutants but appeared normal in other mutants. Mutants in certain other classes exhibited partial loss of another particular tryptophan enzyme activity. Tryptophan synthetase B activity was not detected in cell extract preparations but was detected in whole cells. The original map order proposed for the S. aureus tryptophan gene cluster was clarified by the definition of trpD (phosphoribosyl transferase(-)) and trpF (phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase(-)) mutants. These mutants were previously unresolved and designated as trp(DF) mutants (anthranilate accumulators). Phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase enzymes were separable by molecular sieve chromatography, suggesting that these functions are coded by separate loci. Molecular sieve chromatography failed to reveal aggregates involving anthranilate synthetase, phosphoribosyl transferase, phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase, and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase, and this procedure provided an estimate of the molecular weights of these enzymes. Tryptophan was shown to repress synthesis of all six tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes, and derepression of all six activities was incident upon tryptophan starvation. Tryptophan inhibited the activity of anthranilate synthetase, the first enzyme of the pathway. PMID:4698207

  5. Oxylipins in moss development and defense

    PubMed Central

    de León, Inés Ponce; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acids that participate in plant development and defense against pathogen infection, insects, and wounding. Initial oxygenation of substrate fatty acids is mainly catalyzed by lipoxygenases (LOXs) and α-dioxygenases but can also take place non-enzymatically by autoxidation or singlet oxygen-dependent reactions. The resulting hydroperoxides are further metabolized by secondary enzymes to produce a large variety of compounds, including the hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and short-chain green leaf volatiles. In flowering plants, which lack arachidonic acid, oxylipins are produced mainly from oxidation of polyunsaturated C18 fatty acids, notably linolenic and linoleic acids. Algae and mosses in addition possess polyunsaturated C20 fatty acids including arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids, which can also be oxidized by LOXs and transformed into bioactive compounds. Mosses are phylogenetically placed between unicellular green algae and flowering plants, allowing evolutionary studies of the different oxylipin pathways. During the last years the moss Physcomitrella patens has become an attractive model plant for understanding oxylipin biosynthesis and diversity. In addition to the advantageous evolutionary position, functional studies of the different oxylipin-forming enzymes can be performed in this moss by targeted gene disruption or single point mutations by means of homologous recombination. Biochemical characterization of several oxylipin-producing enzymes and oxylipin profiling in P. patens reveal the presence of a wider range of oxylipins compared to flowering plants, including C18 as well as C20-derived oxylipins. Surprisingly, one of the most active oxylipins in plants, JA, is not synthesized in this moss. In this review, we present an overview of oxylipins produced in mosses and discuss the current knowledge related to the involvement of oxylipin-producing enzymes and their products in moss development and defense. PMID:26191067

  6. Oxylipins in moss development and defense.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, Inés; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acids that participate in plant development and defense against pathogen infection, insects, and wounding. Initial oxygenation of substrate fatty acids is mainly catalyzed by lipoxygenases (LOXs) and α-dioxygenases but can also take place non-enzymatically by autoxidation or singlet oxygen-dependent reactions. The resulting hydroperoxides are further metabolized by secondary enzymes to produce a large variety of compounds, including the hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and short-chain green leaf volatiles. In flowering plants, which lack arachidonic acid, oxylipins are produced mainly from oxidation of polyunsaturated C18 fatty acids, notably linolenic and linoleic acids. Algae and mosses in addition possess polyunsaturated C20 fatty acids including arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids, which can also be oxidized by LOXs and transformed into bioactive compounds. Mosses are phylogenetically placed between unicellular green algae and flowering plants, allowing evolutionary studies of the different oxylipin pathways. During the last years the moss Physcomitrella patens has become an attractive model plant for understanding oxylipin biosynthesis and diversity. In addition to the advantageous evolutionary position, functional studies of the different oxylipin-forming enzymes can be performed in this moss by targeted gene disruption or single point mutations by means of homologous recombination. Biochemical characterization of several oxylipin-producing enzymes and oxylipin profiling in P. patens reveal the presence of a wider range of oxylipins compared to flowering plants, including C18 as well as C20-derived oxylipins. Surprisingly, one of the most active oxylipins in plants, JA, is not synthesized in this moss. In this review, we present an overview of oxylipins produced in mosses and discuss the current knowledge related to the involvement of oxylipin-producing enzymes and their products in moss development and defense. PMID:26191067

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized. PMID:26139824

  8. Effect of photoperiod on gibberellin biosynthetic enzymes in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The photoperiodic control of stem elongation in spinach, a long day (LD) rosette plant, is mediated by gibberellins (GAs). The early 13-hydroxylated GA biosynthetic pathway from GA/sub 12/ to GA/sub 20/ operates in spinach: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two enzymes of this pathway, those converting GA/sub 53/ to GA/sub 44/ (GA/sub 53/ oxidase) and GA/sub 19/ to GA/sub 20/ (GA/sub 19/ oxidase), are regulated by light. The enzyme converting GA/sub 44/ to GA/sub 19/ (GA/sub 44/ oxidase) is not light-regulated. In the light GA/sub 53/ and GA/sub 18/ oxidase activities are increased, therefore causing the GA biosynthetic pathway to be turned on. This leads to the production of an active GA in LD, which causes an increase in stem elongation. Two the enzymes, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ oxidases, can be separated from one another by anion exchange HPLC. Estimates of the molecular weights of these two enzymes based on gel filtration HPLC will be reported.

  9. Crystallographic Trapping in the Rebeccamycin Biosynthetic Enzyme RebC

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, K.S.; Howard-Jones, A.R.; Hamill, M.J.; Elliott, S.J.; Walsh, C.T.; Drennan, C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The biosynthesis of rebeccamycin, an antitumor compound, involves the remarkable eight-electron oxidation of chlorinated chromopyrrolic acid. Although one rebeccamycin biosynthetic enzyme is capable of generating low levels of the eight-electron oxidation product on its own, a second protein, RebC, is required to accelerate product formation and eliminate side reactions. However, the mode of action of RebC was largely unknown. Using crystallography, we have determined a likely function for RebC as a flavin hydroxylase, captured two snapshots of its dynamic catalytic cycle, and trapped a reactive molecule, a putative substrate, in its binding pocket. These studies strongly suggest that the role of RebC is to sequester a reactive intermediate produced by its partner protein and to react with it enzymatically, preventing its conversion to a suite of degradation products that includes, at low levels, the desired product.

  10. Nanolipoprotein particles comprising a natural rubber biosynthetic enzyme complex and related products, methods and systems

    DOEpatents

    Hoeprich, Paul D.; Whalen, Maureen

    2016-04-05

    Provided herein are nanolipoprotein particles that comprise a biosynthetic enzyme more particularly an enzyme capable of catalyzing rubber or other rubbers polymerization, and related assemblies, devices, methods and systems.

  11. Characterization of sophorolipid biosynthetic enzymes from Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Saerens, Karen M J; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Soetaert, Wim

    2015-11-01

    Altering glycolipid structure by genetic engineering of Starmerella bombicola is a recently started research topic and worthy alternative to the unsuccessful selective feeding strategies conventionally applied to reach this goal. One question to be addressed when expressing heterologous proteins in S. bombicola is the activity of the subsequent biosynthetic enzymes toward such modified substrates. In this scope, we studied the substrate specificity of the UDP-glucosyltransferases UgtA1 and UgtB1, responsible for the stepwise synthesis of sophorolipids from a hydroxylated fatty acid, and that of the acetyltransferase, responsible for acetylation of the sophorolipid molecule. All enzymes showed specificity toward a C18:1 chained acceptor and both glucosyltransferases were highly selective toward the UDP-glucose donor. Severe product inhibition of the glucosyltransferases explains the limited accumulation of sophorolipid intermediates by earlier created single deletion mutants of S. bombicola. Finally, a more detailed study of the acetylation of sophorolipid intermediates sheds light on the enzymatic cascade during synthesis. PMID:26298016

  12. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  13. Prolonged starvation drives reversible sequestration of lipid biosynthetic enzymes and organelle reorganization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Harsha Garadi; da Silveira dos Santos, Aline Xavier; Kukulski, Wanda; Tyedmers, Jens; Riezman, Howard; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Cells adapt to changing nutrient availability by modulating a variety of processes, including the spatial sequestration of enzymes, the physiological significance of which remains controversial. These enzyme deposits are claimed to represent aggregates of misfolded proteins, protein storage, or complexes with superior enzymatic activity. We monitored spatial distribution of lipid biosynthetic enzymes upon glucose depletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several different cytosolic-, endoplasmic reticulum–, and mitochondria-localized lipid biosynthetic enzymes sequester into distinct foci. Using the key enzyme fatty acid synthetase (FAS) as a model, we show that FAS foci represent active enzyme assemblies. Upon starvation, phospholipid synthesis remains active, although with some alterations, implying that other foci-forming lipid biosynthetic enzymes might retain activity as well. Thus sequestration may restrict enzymes' access to one another and their substrates, modulating metabolic flux. Enzyme sequestrations coincide with reversible drastic mitochondrial reorganization and concomitant loss of endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria encounter structures and vacuole and mitochondria patch organelle contact sites that are reflected in qualitative and quantitative changes in phospholipid profiles. This highlights a novel mechanism that regulates lipid homeostasis without profoundly affecting the activity status of involved enzymes such that, upon entry into favorable growth conditions, cells can quickly alter lipid flux by relocalizing their enzymes. PMID:25761633

  14. Structures and Mechanisms of the Mycothiol Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Vetting, Matthew W.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Blanchard, John S.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, the genes encoding all four enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of mycothiol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been identified. Orthologues of each of these have been stably expressed and structurally characterized. The chemical mechanisms of all four have also been studied. Due to the unique phylogenetic distribution of mycothiol, and the enzymes responsible for its biosynthesis, these enzymes represent interesting potential targets for anti mycobacterial agents. PMID:19699138

  15. Localization and interactions between Arabidopsis auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Hawes, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The growth regulator auxin is involved in all key developmental processes in plants. A complex network of a multiplicity of potential biosynthetic pathways as well as transport, signalling plus conjugation and deconjugation lead to a complex and multifaceted system system for auxin function. This raises the question how such a system can be effectively organized and controlled. Here we report that a subset of auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER microsomal fractions also contain a significant percentage of auxin biosynthetic activity. This could point toward a model of auxin function using ER membrane location and subcellular compartmentation for supplementary layers of regulation. Additionally we show specific protein-protein interactions between some of the enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis. PMID:27208541

  16. Cellular Localization of Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Enzymes in Marchantia polymorpha. Uncovering a New Role of Oil Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Suire, Claude; Bouvier, Florence; Backhaus, Ralph A.; Bégu, Dominique; Bonneu, Marc; Camara, Bilal

    2000-01-01

    Like seed plants, liverworts synthesize and accumulate a myriad of isoprenoid compounds. Using antibodies raised against several isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes, we investigated their intracellular compartmentation by in situ immunolocalization from Marchantia polymorpha. The enzymes examined were deoxy-xylulose phosphate synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, monoterpene synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate reductase, phytoene synthase, and phytoene desaturase. Our results show that liverwort oil bodies, which are organelles bound by a single unit membrane, possess isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in plastids and the cytosol. We postulate that oil bodies play a dynamic role in cell metabolism in addition to their role as sites of essential oil accumulation and sequestration. The occurrence of such enzymes in different cellular compartments might be due to multiple targeting of gene products to various organelles. PMID:11080275

  17. Integrative genomic mining for enzyme function to enable engineering of a non-natural biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Wai Shun; Tran, Stephen; Marcheschi, Ryan; Bertolani, Steve; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Liao, James C.; Siegel, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to biosynthetically produce chemicals beyond what is commonly found in Nature requires the discovery of novel enzyme function. Here we utilize two approaches to discover enzymes that enable specific production of longer-chain (C5–C8) alcohols from sugar. The first approach combines bioinformatics and molecular modelling to mine sequence databases, resulting in a diverse panel of enzymes capable of catalysing the targeted reaction. The median catalytic efficiency of the computationally selected enzymes is 75-fold greater than a panel of naively selected homologues. This integrative genomic mining approach establishes a unique avenue for enzyme function discovery in the rapidly expanding sequence databases. The second approach uses computational enzyme design to reprogramme specificity. Both approaches result in enzymes with >100-fold increase in specificity for the targeted reaction. When enzymes from either approach are integrated in vivo, longer-chain alcohol production increases over 10-fold and represents >95% of the total alcohol products. PMID:26598135

  18. Integrative genomic mining for enzyme function to enable engineering of a non-natural biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Mak, Wai Shun; Tran, Stephen; Marcheschi, Ryan; Bertolani, Steve; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Liao, James C; Siegel, Justin B

    2015-01-01

    The ability to biosynthetically produce chemicals beyond what is commonly found in Nature requires the discovery of novel enzyme function. Here we utilize two approaches to discover enzymes that enable specific production of longer-chain (C5-C8) alcohols from sugar. The first approach combines bioinformatics and molecular modelling to mine sequence databases, resulting in a diverse panel of enzymes capable of catalysing the targeted reaction. The median catalytic efficiency of the computationally selected enzymes is 75-fold greater than a panel of naively selected homologues. This integrative genomic mining approach establishes a unique avenue for enzyme function discovery in the rapidly expanding sequence databases. The second approach uses computational enzyme design to reprogramme specificity. Both approaches result in enzymes with >100-fold increase in specificity for the targeted reaction. When enzymes from either approach are integrated in vivo, longer-chain alcohol production increases over 10-fold and represents >95% of the total alcohol products. PMID:26598135

  19. Designing universal primers for the isolation of DNA sequences encoding Proanthocyanidins biosynthetic enzymes in Crataegus aronia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hawthorn is the common name of all plant species in the genus Crataegus, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Crataegus are considered useful medicinal plants because of their high content of proanthocyanidins (PAs) and other related compounds. To improve PAs production in Crataegus tissues, the sequences of genes encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes are required. Findings Different bioinformatics tools, including BLAST, multiple sequence alignment and alignment PCR analysis were used to design primers suitable for the amplification of DNA fragments from 10 candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in PAs biosynthesis in C. aronia. DNA sequencing results proved the utility of the designed primers. The primers were used successfully to amplify DNA fragments of different PAs biosynthesis genes in different Rosaceae plants. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of the alignment PCR approach to isolate DNA sequences encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes in Rosaceae plants. PMID:22883984

  20. Pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes of Salmonella typhimurium, repressed specifically by growth in the presence of cytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Kelln, R A; Kinahan, J J; Foltermann, K F; O'Donovan, G A

    1975-01-01

    The repressive effects of exogenous cytidine on growing cells was examined in a specially constructed strain in which the pool sizes of endogenous uridine 5'-diphosphate and uridine 5'-triphosphate cannot be varied by the addition of uracil and/or uridine to the medium. Five enzymes of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and one enzyme of the arginine biosynthetic pathway were assayed from cells grown under a variety of conditions. Cytidine repressed the synthesis of dihydroorotase (encoded by pyrC), dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (encoded by pyrD), and ornithine transcarbamylase (encoded by argI). Moreover, aspartate transcarbamylase (encoded by pyrB) became further derepressed upon cytidine addition, whereas no change occurred in the levels of the last two enzymes (encoded by pyrE and pyrF) of the pyrimidine pathway. Quantitative nucleotide pool determinations have provided evidence that any individual ribo- or deoxyribonucleoside mono-, di-, or triphosphate of cytosine or uracil is not a repressing metabolite for the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes. Other nucleotide derivatives or ratios must be considered. PMID:1102530

  1. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Booker, Matthew A; DeLong, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed. PMID:26134162

  2. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes1

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Matthew A.; DeLong, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed. PMID:26134162

  3. exo-Brevicomin biosynthetic pathway enzymes from the Mountain Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

    PubMed

    Song, Minmin; Delaplain, Patrick; Nguyen, Trang T; Liu, Xibei; Wickenberg, Leah; Jeffrey, Christopher; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2014-10-01

    exoBrevicomin (exo-7-ethyl-5-methyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane) is an important semiochemical for a number of beetle species, including the highly destructive Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae). It is also found in other insects and the African elephant. Despite its significance, very little is known about its biosynthesis. A recent microarray analysis implicated a small cluster of three D. ponderosae genes in exo-brevicomin biosynthesis, two of which had identifiable open reading frames (Aw et al., 2010; BMC Genomics 11:215). Here we report further expression profiling of two genes in that cluster and functional analysis of their recombinantly-produced enzymes. One encodes a short-chain dehydrogenase that used NAD(P)(+) as a co-factor to catalyze the oxidation of (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol to (Z)-6-nonen-2-one. We therefore named the enzyme (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol dehydrogenase (ZnoDH). The other encodes the cytochrome P450, CYP6CR1, which epoxidized (Z)-6-nonen-2-one to 6,7-epoxynonan-2-one with very high specificity and substrate selectivity. Both the substrates and products of the two enzymes are intermediates in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway. Thus, ZnoDH and CYP6CR1 are enzymes that apparently catalyze the antepenultimate and penultimate steps in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway, respectively. PMID:25138711

  4. Assembly of Lipoic Acid on Its Cognate Enzymes: an Extraordinary and Essential Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2016-06-01

    Although the structure of lipoic acid and its role in bacterial metabolism were clear over 50 years ago, it is only in the past decade that the pathways of biosynthesis of this universally conserved cofactor have become understood. Unlike most cofactors, lipoic acid must be covalently bound to its cognate enzyme proteins (the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases and the glycine cleavage system) in order to function in central metabolism. Indeed, the cofactor is assembled on its cognate proteins rather than being assembled and subsequently attached as in the typical pathway, like that of biotin attachment. The first lipoate biosynthetic pathway determined was that of Escherichia coli, which utilizes two enzymes to form the active lipoylated protein from a fatty acid biosynthetic intermediate. Recently, a more complex pathway requiring four proteins was discovered in Bacillus subtilis, which is probably an evolutionary relic. This pathway requires the H protein of the glycine cleavage system of single-carbon metabolism to form active (lipoyl) 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases. The bacterial pathways inform the lipoate pathways of eukaryotic organisms. Plants use the E. coli pathway, whereas mammals and fungi probably use the B. subtilis pathway. The lipoate metabolism enzymes (except those of sulfur insertion) are members of PFAM family PF03099 (the cofactor transferase family). Although these enzymes share some sequence similarity, they catalyze three markedly distinct enzyme reactions, making the usual assignment of function based on alignments prone to frequent mistaken annotations. This state of affairs has possibly clouded the interpretation of one of the disorders of human lipoate metabolism. PMID:27074917

  5. Sporopollenin biosynthetic enzymes interact and constitute a metabolon localized to the endoplasmic reticulum of tapetum cells.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, Benjamin; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heitz, Thierry; Legrand, Michel

    2013-06-01

    The sporopollenin polymer is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall. Recently fatty acid derivatives have been shown to be the precursors of sporopollenin building units. ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB, TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 have been demonstrated to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here all these sporopollenin biosynthetic enzymes but TKPR2 have been immunolocalized to endoplasmic reticulum of anther tapetal cells. Pull-down experiments demonstrated that tagged recombinant proteins interacted to form complexes whose constituents were characterized by immunoblotting. In vivo protein interactions were evidenced by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid analysis and by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer studies in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, which were used to test the possibility that the enzymes interact to form a biosynthetic metabolon. Various pairs of proteins fused to two distinct fluorochromes were coexpressed in N. benthamiana leaf tissues and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer measurements demonstrated that proteins interacted pairwise in planta. Taken together, these results suggest the existence of a sporopollenin metabolon. PMID:23632852

  6. Amylopectin biosynthetic enzymes from developing rice seed form enzymatically active protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Natsuko; Oitome, Naoko F.; Matsushima, Ryo; Hayashi, Mari; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Amylopectin is a highly branched, organized cluster of glucose polymers, and the major component of rice starch. Synthesis of amylopectin requires fine co-ordination between elongation of glucose polymers by soluble starch synthases (SSs), generation of branches by branching enzymes (BEs), and removal of misplaced branches by debranching enzymes (DBEs). Among the various isozymes having a role in amylopectin biosynthesis, limited numbers of SS and BE isozymes have been demonstrated to interact via protein–protein interactions in maize and wheat amyloplasts. This study investigated whether protein–protein interactions are also found in rice endosperm, as well as exploring differences between species. Gel permeation chromatography of developing rice endosperm extracts revealed that all 10 starch biosynthetic enzymes analysed were present at larger molecular weights than their respective monomeric sizes. SSIIa, SSIIIa, SSIVb, BEI, BEIIb, and PUL co-eluted at mass sizes >700kDa, and SSI, SSIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 co-eluted at 200–400kDa. Zymogram analyses showed that SSI, SSIIIa, BEI, BEIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 eluted in high molecular weight fractions were active. Comprehensive co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed associations of SSs–BEs, and, among BE isozymes, BEIIa–Pho1, and pullulanase-type DBE–BEI interactions. Blue-native-PAGE zymogram analyses confirmed the glucan-synthesizing activity of protein complexes. These results suggest that some rice starch biosynthetic isozymes are physically associated with each other and form active protein complexes. Detailed analyses of these complexes will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the unique branch and cluster structure of amylopectin, and the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:25979995

  7. Amylopectin biosynthetic enzymes from developing rice seed form enzymatically active protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Natsuko; Oitome, Naoko F; Matsushima, Ryo; Hayashi, Mari; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2015-08-01

    Amylopectin is a highly branched, organized cluster of glucose polymers, and the major component of rice starch. Synthesis of amylopectin requires fine co-ordination between elongation of glucose polymers by soluble starch synthases (SSs), generation of branches by branching enzymes (BEs), and removal of misplaced branches by debranching enzymes (DBEs). Among the various isozymes having a role in amylopectin biosynthesis, limited numbers of SS and BE isozymes have been demonstrated to interact via protein-protein interactions in maize and wheat amyloplasts. This study investigated whether protein-protein interactions are also found in rice endosperm, as well as exploring differences between species. Gel permeation chromatography of developing rice endosperm extracts revealed that all 10 starch biosynthetic enzymes analysed were present at larger molecular weights than their respective monomeric sizes. SSIIa, SSIIIa, SSIVb, BEI, BEIIb, and PUL co-eluted at mass sizes >700kDa, and SSI, SSIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 co-eluted at 200-400kDa. Zymogram analyses showed that SSI, SSIIIa, BEI, BEIIa, BEIIb, ISA1, PUL, and Pho1 eluted in high molecular weight fractions were active. Comprehensive co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed associations of SSs-BEs, and, among BE isozymes, BEIIa-Pho1, and pullulanase-type DBE-BEI interactions. Blue-native-PAGE zymogram analyses confirmed the glucan-synthesizing activity of protein complexes. These results suggest that some rice starch biosynthetic isozymes are physically associated with each other and form active protein complexes. Detailed analyses of these complexes will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the unique branch and cluster structure of amylopectin, and the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:25979995

  8. A cell-free framework for rapid biosynthetic pathway prototyping and enzyme discovery.

    PubMed

    Karim, Ashty S; Jewett, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    Speeding up design-build-test (DBT) cycles is a fundamental challenge facing biochemical engineering. To address this challenge, we report a new cell-free protein synthesis driven metabolic engineering (CFPS-ME) framework for rapid biosynthetic pathway prototyping. In our framework, cell-free cocktails for synthesizing target small molecules are assembled in a mix-and-match fashion from crude cell lysates either containing selectively enriched pathway enzymes from heterologous overexpression or directly producing pathway enzymes in lysates by CFPS. As a model, we apply our approach to n-butanol biosynthesis showing that Escherichia coli lysates support a highly active 17-step CoA-dependent n-butanol pathway in vitro. The elevated degree of flexibility in the cell-free environment allows us to manipulate physiochemical conditions, access enzymatic nodes, discover new enzymes, and prototype enzyme sets with linear DNA templates to study pathway performance. We anticipate that CFPS-ME will facilitate efforts to define, manipulate, and understand metabolic pathways for accelerated DBT cycles without the need to reengineer organisms. PMID:26996382

  9. Functional characterization and substrate specificity of spinosyn rhamnosyltransferase by in vitro reconstitution of spinosyn biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Lin; Chen, Yi-Hsine; Lin, Yu-Chin; Tsai, Kuo-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Tai

    2009-03-13

    Spinosyn, a potent insecticide, is a novel tetracyclic polyketide decorated with d-forosamine and tri-O-methyl-L-rhamnose. Spinosyn rhamnosyltransferase (SpnG) is a key biocatalyst with unique sequence identity and controls the biosynthetic maturation of spinosyn. The rhamnose is critical for the spinosyn insecticidal activity and cell wall biosynthesis of the spinosyn producer, Saccharopolyspora spinosa. In this study, we have functionally expressed and characterized SpnG and the three enzymes, Gdh, Epi, and Kre, responsible for dTDP-L-rhamnose biosynthesis in S. spinosa by purified enzymes from Escherichia coli. Most notably, the substrate specificity of SpnG was thoroughly characterized by kinetic and inhibition experiments using various NDP sugar analogs made by an in situ combination of NDP-sugar-modifying enzymes. SpnG was found to exhibit striking substrate promiscuity, yielding corresponding glycosylated variants. Moreover, the critical residues presumably involved in catalytic mechanism of Gdh and SpnG were functionally evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis. The information gained from this study has provided important insight into molecular recognition and mechanism of the enzymes, especially SpnG. The results have made possible the structure-activity characterization of SpnG, as well as the use of SpnG or its engineered form to serve as a combinatorial tool to make spinosyn analogs with altered biological activities and potency. PMID:19126547

  10. Fluorescent profiling of modular biosynthetic enzymes by complementary metabolic and activity based probes.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jordan L; Mercer, Andrew C; Burkart, Michael D

    2008-04-23

    The study of the enzymes responsible for natural product biosynthesis has proven a valuable source of new enzymatic activities and been applied to a number of biotechnology applications. Protein profiling could prove highly complementary to genetics based approaches by allowing us to understand the activity, transcriptional control, and post-translational modification of these enzymes in their native and dynamic proteomic environments. Here we present a method for the fluorescent profiling of PKS, NRPS, and FAS multidomain modular synthases in their whole proteomes using complementary metabolic and activity based probes. After first examining the reactivity of these activity based probes with a variety of purified recombinant PKS, NRPS, and FAS enzymes in vitro, we apply this duel labeling strategy to the analysis of modular synthases in a human breast cancer cell line and two strains of the natural product producer Bacillus subtilis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that complementary protein profiling approaches can prove highly useful in the identification and assignment of inhibitor specificity and domain structure of these modular biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:18376827

  11. Functional Characterization of the Vitamin K2 Biosynthetic Enzyme UBIAD1

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Yoshihisa; Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natsumi; Okuda, Naoko; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Uchino, Yuri; Kimoto, Takashi; Funahashi, Nobuaki; Kamao, Maya; Tsugawa, Naoko; Okano, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    UbiA prenyltransferase domain-containing protein 1 (UBIAD1) plays a significant role in vitamin K2 (MK-4) synthesis. We investigated the enzymological properties of UBIAD1 using microsomal fractions from Sf9 cells expressing UBIAD1 by analysing MK-4 biosynthetic activity. With regard to UBIAD1 enzyme reaction conditions, highest MK-4 synthetic activity was demonstrated under basic conditions at a pH between 8.5 and 9.0, with a DTT ≥0.1 mM. In addition, we found that geranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate were also recognized as a side-chain source and served as a substrate for prenylation. Furthermore, lipophilic statins were found to directly inhibit the enzymatic activity of UBIAD1. We analysed the aminoacid sequences homologies across the menA and UbiA families to identify conserved structural features of UBIAD1 proteins and focused on four highly conserved domains. We prepared protein mutants deficient in the four conserved domains to evaluate enzyme activity. Because no enzyme activity was detected in the mutants deficient in the UBIAD1 conserved domains, these four domains were considered to play an essential role in enzymatic activity. We also measured enzyme activities using point mutants of the highly conserved aminoacids in these domains to elucidate their respective functions. We found that the conserved domain I is a substrate recognition site that undergoes a structural change after substrate binding. The conserved domain II is a redox domain site containing a CxxC motif. The conserved domain III is a hinge region important as a catalytic site for the UBIAD1 enzyme. The conserved domain IV is a binding site for Mg2+/isoprenyl side-chain. In this study, we provide a molecular mapping of the enzymological properties of UBIAD1. PMID:25874989

  12. Partial purification and characterization of seleno-tRNA biosynthetic enzyme(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Politino, M.; Veres, Z.; Tsai, L.; Stadtman, T.C. )

    1991-03-11

    up Selenium modification of tRNA has been previously demonstrated in broken cell preparations from Methanococcus vannielii and Salmonella typhimurium. Chromatography of the extracts from these bacteria on phenyl Sepharose yielded active enzyme(s) which eluted at 0.2 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Added E. coli bulk tRNA was used as substrate. Consistent with the results obtained from the broken cell preparations, ARP and o-acetyl serine were required for full activity. Dilution of {sup 75}Se incorporated into the tRNA by unlabeled L-selenocysteine suggests that this amino acid may serve as the selenium donor. RPC-5 chromatography of the {sup 75}Se-labeled tRNA products revealed two major radioactive tRNA peaks eluting at 0.6 M and 0.8 M NaCl. Fractionation of E. coli bulk tRNA by RPC-5 chromatography prior to addition to the assay demonstrated that for S. typhimurium the tRNA eluting at 0.6 M and 0.8 M NaCl could serve as a substrate with the 0.8 M fraction exhibiting the highest specific activity. Nucleoside analysis of the labeled tRNA mixtures revealed two as yet unidentified radioactive peaks on the HPLC profile.

  13. Betacyanin Biosynthetic Genes and Enzymes Are Differentially Induced by (a)biotic Stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus

    PubMed Central

    Casique-Arroyo, Gabriela; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma; González de la Vara, Luis; Délano-Frier, John P.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah) was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT), two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively), and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT), plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1) were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT) activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple) was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the proposal that

  14. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  15. Dual Role of a Biosynthetic Enzyme, CysK, in Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaundal, Soni; Uttam, Manju; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Contact dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is the phenomenon where CDI+ bacterial strain (inhibitor) inhibits the growth of CDI−strain (target) by direct cell to cell contact. CDI is mediated by cdiBAI gene cluster where CdiB facilitates the export of CdiA, an exotoxin, on the cell surface and CdiI acts as an immunity protein to protect CDI+ cells from autoinhibition. CdiA-CT, the C-terminal region of the toxin CdiA, from uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (UPEC536) is a latent tRNase that requires binding of a biosynthetic enzyme CysK (O-acetylserine sulfyhydrylase) for activation in the target cells. CdiA-CT can also interact simultaneously with CysK and immunity protein, CdiI, to form a ternary complex in UPEC536. But the role of CysK in the ternary complex is not clear. We studied the hydrodynamic, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of binary and ternary complexes using AUC, ITC and SPR respectively, to investigate the role of CysK in UPEC536. We report that CdiA-CT binds CdiI and CysK with nanomolar range affinity. We further report that binding of CysK to CdiA-CT improves its affinity towards CdiI by ~40 fold resulting in the formation of a more stable complex with over ~130 fold decrease in dissociation rate. Thermal melting experiments also suggest the role of CysK in stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex as Tm of the binary complex shifts ~10°C upon binding CysK. Hence, CysK acts a modulator of CdiA-CT/CdiI interactions by stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex and may play a crucial role in preventing autoinhibition in UPEC536. This study reports a new moonlighting function of a biosynthetic enzyme, CysK, as a modulator of toxin/immunity interactions in UPEC536 inhibitor cells. PMID:27458806

  16. Plastid-localized amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Plantae are predominantly composed of non-cyanobacterial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Moustafa, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Studies of photosynthetic eukaryotes have revealed that the evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria involved the recruitment of non-cyanobacterial proteins. Our phylogenetic survey of >100 Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded plastid enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis identified only 21 unambiguous cyanobacterial-derived proteins. Some of the several non-cyanobacterial plastid enzymes have a shared phylogenetic origin in the three Plantae lineages. We hypothesize that during the evolution of plastids some enzymes encoded in the host nuclear genome were mistargeted into the plastid. Then, the activity of those foreign enzymes was sustained by both the plastid metabolites and interactions with the native cyanobacterial enzymes. Some of the novel enzymatic activities were favored by selective compartmentation of additional complementary enzymes. The mosaic phylogenetic composition of the plastid amino acid biosynthetic pathways and the reduced number of plastid-encoded proteins of non-cyanobacterial origin suggest that enzyme recruitment underlies the recompartmentation of metabolic routes during the evolution of plastids. PMID:23233874

  17. Production of wax esters in plant seed oils by oleosomal cotargeting of biosynthetic enzymes[S

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Mareike; Iven, Tim; Ahmann, Katharina; Hornung, Ellen; Stymne, Sten; Feussner, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Wax esters are neutral lipids exhibiting desirable properties for lubrication. Natural sources have traditionally been whales. Additionally some plants produce wax esters in their seed oil. Currently there is no biological source available for long chain length monounsaturated wax esters that are most suited for industrial applications. This study aimed to identify enzymatic requirements enabling their production in oilseed plants. Wax esters are generated by the action of fatty acyl-CoA reductase (FAR), generating fatty alcohols and wax synthases (WS) that esterify fatty alcohols and acyl-CoAs to wax esters. Based on their substrate preference, a FAR and a WS from Mus musculus were selected for this study (MmFAR1 and MmWS). MmWS resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas MmFAR1 associates with peroxisomes. The elimination of a targeting signal and the fusion to an oil body protein yielded variants of MmFAR1 and MmWS that were cotargeted and enabled wax ester production when coexpressed in yeast or Arabidopsis. In the fae1 fad2 double mutant, rich in oleate, the cotargeted variants of MmFAR1 and MmWS enabled formation of wax esters containing >65% oleyl-oleate. The data suggest that cotargeting of unusual biosynthetic enzymes can result in functional interplay of heterologous partners in transgenic plants. PMID:22878160

  18. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  19. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles.

    PubMed

    Frej, Anna D; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A; Otto, Grant P; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H; Claus, Sandrine P; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-05-15

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1(-) mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  20. The lysine biosynthetic enzyme Lys4 influences iron metabolism, mitochondrial function and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Do, Eunsoo; Park, Minji; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2016-09-01

    The lysine biosynthesis pathway via α-aminoadipate in fungi is considered an attractive target for antifungal drugs due to its absence in mammalian hosts. The iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme homoaconitase converts homocitrate to homoisocitrate in the lysine biosynthetic pathway, and is encoded by LYS4 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we identified the ortholog of LYS4 in the human fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, and found that LYS4 expression is regulated by iron levels and by the iron-related transcription factors Hap3 and HapX. Deletion of the LYS4 gene resulted in lysine auxotrophy suggesting that Lys4 is essential for lysine biosynthesis. Our study also revealed that lysine uptake was mediated by two amino acid permeases, Aap2 and Aap3, and influenced by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). Furthermore, the lys4 mutant showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, agents that challenge cell wall/membrane integrity, and azole antifungal drugs. We showed that these phenotypes were due in part to impaired mitochondrial function as a result of LYS4 deletion, which we propose disrupts iron homeostasis in the organelle. The combination of defects are consistent with our observation that the lys4 mutant was attenuated virulence in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis. PMID:27353379

  1. Complete Proteomic-Based Enzyme Reaction and Inhibition Kinetics Reveal How Monolignol Biosynthetic Enzyme Families Affect Metabolic Flux and Lignin in Populus trichocarpa[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack P.; Naik, Punith P.; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Shi, Rui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jie; Shuford, Christopher M.; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Williams, Cranos M.; Muddiman, David C.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    We established a predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model for the 21 enzymes and 24 metabolites of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway using Populus trichocarpa secondary differentiating xylem. To establish this model, a comprehensive study was performed to obtain the reaction and inhibition kinetic parameters of all 21 enzymes based on functional recombinant proteins. A total of 104 Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters and 85 inhibition kinetic parameters were derived from these enzymes. Through mass spectrometry, we obtained the absolute quantities of all 21 pathway enzymes in the secondary differentiating xylem. This extensive experimental data set, generated from a single tissue specialized in wood formation, was used to construct the predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model to provide a comprehensive mathematical description of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway. The model was validated using experimental data from transgenic P. trichocarpa plants. The model predicts how pathway enzymes affect lignin content and composition, explains a long-standing paradox regarding the regulation of monolignol subunit ratios in lignin, and reveals novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis. This model provides an explanation of the effects of genetic and transgenic perturbations of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in flowering plants. PMID:24619611

  2. The second enzyme in pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic pathway is related to the heme-dependent dioxygenase superfamily†

    PubMed Central

    De Laurentis, Walter; Khim, Leang; Anderson, J.L. Ross; Adam, Ariane; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Phillips, Robert S.; Chapman, Stephen K.; van Pee, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a commonly used and clinically effective treatment for fungal infections and provides the structural basis for the more widely used fludioxinil. The pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic pathway consists of four chemical steps, the second of which is the rearrangement of 7-chloro-tryptophan by the enzyme PrnB, a reaction that is so far unprecedented in biochemistry. When expressed in Pseudomonas fluorescens, PrnB is red in color due to the fact that it contains 1 mole of heme b per mole of protein. The crystal structure unexpectedly establishes PrnB as a member of the heme-dependent dioxygenase superfamily with significant structural but not sequence homology to the two-domain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme (IDO). The heme-binding domain is also structurally similar to that of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Here we report the binary complex structures of PrnB with D- and L-tryptophan and D- and L-chloro-tryptophan. The structures identify a common hydrophobic pocket for the indole ring but exhibit unusual heme ligation and substrate binding when compared with that observed in the TDO crystal structures. Our solution studies support the heme ligation observed in the crystal structures. Purification of the hexahistidine-tagged PrnB yields homogeneous protein that only displays in vitro activity with 7-chloro-L-tryptophan after reactivation with crude extract from the host strain, suggesting that an as yet unknown cofactor is required for activity. Mutation of the proximal heme ligand results, not surprisingly, in inactive enzyme. Redox titrations show that PrnB displays a significantly different reduction potential to that of IDO or TDO, indicating possible differences in the PrnB catalytic cycle. This is confirmed by the absence of tryptophan dioxygenase activity in PrnB, although a stable oxyferrous adduct (which is the first intermediate in the TDO/IDO catalytic cycle) can be generated. We propose that PrnB shares a key catalytic step with TDO and IDO

  3. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of the Crucial Cysteine Biosynthetic Pathway Enzyme O-Acetyl Serine Sulfhydrylase.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Mohit; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is of fundamental importance for the growth, survival, and pathogenicity of the many pathogens. This pathway is present in many species but is absent in mammals. The ability of pathogens to counteract the oxidative defences of a host is critical for the survival of these pathogens during their long latent phases, especially in anaerobic pathogens such as Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania donovani, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Salmonella typhimurium. All of these organisms rely on the de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway to assimilate sulphur and maintain a ready supply of cysteine. The de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway, on account of its being important for the survival of pathogens and at the same time being absent in mammals, is an important drug target for diseases such as amoebiasis, trichomoniasis & tuberculosis. Cysteine biosynthesis is catalysed by two enzymes: serine acetyl transferase (SAT) followed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). OASS is well studied, and with the availability of crystal structures of this enzyme in different conformations, it is a suitable template for structure-based inhibitor development. Moreover, OASS is highly conserved, both structurally and sequence-wise, among the above-mentioned organisms. There have been several reports of inhibitor screening and development against this enzyme from different organisms such as Salmonella typhimurium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Entamoeba histolytica. All of these inhibitors have been reported to display micromolar to nanomolar binding affinities for the open conformation of the enzyme. In this review, we highlight the structural similarities of this enzyme in different organisms and the attempts for inhibitor development so far. We also propose that the intermediate state of the enzyme may be the ideal target for the design of effective highaffinity inhibitors. PMID:26303427

  4. Characterization and developmental expression of genes encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in Citrus paradisi Macf.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcio G C; Moreira, Cristina D; Melton, John R; Otoni, Wagner C; Moore, Gloria A

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the full-length cDNA sequences of PSY, PDS, and ZDS, encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in the carotenoid pathway of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), were isolated and characterized for the first time. CpPSY contained a 1311-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 436 amino acids, CpPDS contained a 1659-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 552 amino acids, and CpZDS contained a 1713-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 570 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CpPSY shares homology with PSYs from Citrus, tomato, pepper, Arabidopsis, and the monocot PSY1 group, while CpPDS and CpZDS are most closely related to orthologs from Citrus and tomato. Expression analysis revealed fluctuations in CpPSY, CpPDS, and CpZDS transcript abundance and a non-coordinated regulation between the former and the two latter genes during fruit development in albedo and juice vesicles of white ('Duncan') and red ('Flame') grapefruits. A 3× higher upregulation of CpPSY expression in juice vesicles of red-fleshed 'Flame' as compared to white-fruited 'Duncan' was observed in the middle stages of fruit development, which correlates with the well documented accumulation pattern of lycopene in red grapefruit. Together with previous data, our results suggest that the primary mechanism controlling lycopene accumulation in red grapefruit involves the transcriptional upregulation of CpPSY, which controls the flux into the carotenoid pathway, and the downregulated expression of CpLCYB2, which controls the step of cyclization of lycopene in chromoplasts during fruit ripening. A correlation between CpPSY expression and fruit color evolution in red grapefruit is demonstrated. PMID:21594623

  5. Biosynthetic Anthracycline Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Jarmo; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko; Schneider, Gunter; Mäntsälä, Pekka

    In addition to synthetic and semisynthetic methods, new anthracycline structures have been generated by biosynthetic methods: genetic engineering of Streptomyces production strains, bioconversion and chemoenzymatic synthesis. In this review, we discuss the set of molecules potentially producible by biosynthetic methods and which structures have so far been realized. Biosynthetic variation in the anthracycline molecule manifests itself either as structure changes in the tetracyclic aglycone, or as variation in glycosylation. Understanding the biosynthetic sequence and knowledge of the substrate specificities of the enzymes participating in it enable rational generation of new anthracycline diversity. Future possibilities include protein engineering of the biosynthetic enzymes to improve the production of new structural combinations.

  6. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  7. Identification of protein-protein interactions of isoflavonoid biosynthetic enzymes with 2-hydroxyisoflavanone synthase in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.).

    PubMed

    Waki, Toshiyuki; Yoo, DongChan; Fujino, Naoto; Mameda, Ryo; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Yamashita, Satoshi; Motohashi, Reiko; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Aoki, Toshio; Ayabe, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic enzymes, including those involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, are proposed to form weakly bound, ordered protein complexes, called "metabolons". Some hypothetical models of flavonoid biosynthetic metabolons have been proposed, in which metabolic enzymes are believed to anchor to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via ER-bound cytochrome P450 isozymes (P450s). However, no convincing evidence for the interaction of flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes with P450s has been reported previously. Here, we analyzed binary protein-protein interactions of 2-hydroxyisoflavanone synthase 1 (GmIFS1), a P450 (CYP93C), with cytoplasmic enzymes involved in isoflavone biosynthesis in soybean. We identified binary interactions between GmIFS1 and chalcone synthase 1 (GmCHS1) and between GmIFS1 and chalcone isomerases (GmCHIs) by using a split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid system. These binary interactions were confirmed in planta by means of bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) using tobacco leaf cells. In these BiFC analyses, fluorescence signals that arose from the interaction of these cytoplasmic enzymes with GmIFS1 generated sharp, network-like intracellular patterns, which was very similar to the ER-localized fluorescence patterns of GmIFS1 labeled with a fluorescent protein. These observations provide strong evidence that, in planta, interaction of GmCHS1 and GmCHIs with GmIFS1 takes place on ER on which GmIFS1 is located, and also provide important clues to understand how enzymes and proteins form metabolons to establish efficient metabolic flux of (iso)flavonoid biosynthesis. PMID:26694697

  8. LDS1-produced oxylipins are negative regulators of growth, conidiation and fumonisin synthesis in the fungal maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Scala, Valeria; Giorni, Paola; Cirlini, Martina; Ludovici, Matteo; Visentin, Ivan; Cardinale, Francesca; Fabbri, Anna A; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo; Battilani, Paola; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins are fatty acid-derived signaling compounds produced by all eukaryotes so far investigated; in mycotoxigenic fungi, they modulate toxin production and interactions with the host plants. Among the many enzymes responsible for oxylipin generation, Linoleate Diol Synthase 1 (LDS1) produces mainly 8-hydroperoxyoctadecenoic acid and subsequently different di-hydroxyoctadecenoic acids. In this study, we inactivated a copy of the putative LDS1 ortholog (acc. N. FVEG_09294.3) of Fusarium verticillioides, with the aim to investigate its influence on the oxylipin profile of the fungus, on its development, secondary metabolism and virulence. LC-MS/MS oxylipin profiling carried out on the selected mutant strain revealed significant quali-quantitative differences for several oxylipins when compared to the WT strain. The Fvlds1-deleted mutant grew better, produced more conidia, synthesized more fumonisins and infected maize cobs faster than the WT strain. We hypothesize that oxylipins may act as regulators of gene expression in the toxigenic plant pathogen F. verticillioides, in turn causing notable changes in its phenotype. These changes could relate to the ability of oxylipins to re-shape the transcriptional profile of F. verticillioides by inducing chromatin modifications and exerting a direct control on the transcription of secondary metabolism in fungi. PMID:25566199

  9. LDS1-produced oxylipins are negative regulators of growth, conidiation and fumonisin synthesis in the fungal maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Valeria; Giorni, Paola; Cirlini, Martina; Ludovici, Matteo; Visentin, Ivan; Cardinale, Francesca; Fabbri, Anna A.; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo; Battilani, Paola; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins are fatty acid-derived signaling compounds produced by all eukaryotes so far investigated; in mycotoxigenic fungi, they modulate toxin production and interactions with the host plants. Among the many enzymes responsible for oxylipin generation, Linoleate Diol Synthase 1 (LDS1) produces mainly 8-hydroperoxyoctadecenoic acid and subsequently different di-hydroxyoctadecenoic acids. In this study, we inactivated a copy of the putative LDS1 ortholog (acc. N. FVEG_09294.3) of Fusarium verticillioides, with the aim to investigate its influence on the oxylipin profile of the fungus, on its development, secondary metabolism and virulence. LC-MS/MS oxylipin profiling carried out on the selected mutant strain revealed significant quali-quantitative differences for several oxylipins when compared to the WT strain. The Fvlds1-deleted mutant grew better, produced more conidia, synthesized more fumonisins and infected maize cobs faster than the WT strain. We hypothesize that oxylipins may act as regulators of gene expression in the toxigenic plant pathogen F. verticillioides, in turn causing notable changes in its phenotype. These changes could relate to the ability of oxylipins to re-shape the transcriptional profile of F. verticillioides by inducing chromatin modifications and exerting a direct control on the transcription of secondary metabolism in fungi. PMID:25566199

  10. Structure of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin, a mammalian NAD[superscript +]biosynthetic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiangbin; Bheda, Poonam; Revollo, Javier R.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) synthesizes nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide in a mammalian NAD{sup +} biosynthetic pathway and is required for SirT1 activity in vivo. Nampt has also been presumed to be a cytokine (PBEF) or a hormone (visfatin). The crystal structure of Nampt in the presence and absence of NMN shows that Nampt is a dimeric type II phosphoribosyltransferase and provides insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

  11. Sporopollenin Biosynthetic Enzymes Interact and Constitute a Metabolon Localized to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Tapetum Cells[W

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Benjamin; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heitz, Thierry; Legrand, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The sporopollenin polymer is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall. Recently fatty acid derivatives have been shown to be the precursors of sporopollenin building units. ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB, TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 have been demonstrated to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here all these sporopollenin biosynthetic enzymes but TKPR2 have been immunolocalized to endoplasmic reticulum of anther tapetal cells. Pull-down experiments demonstrated that tagged recombinant proteins interacted to form complexes whose constituents were characterized by immunoblotting. In vivo protein interactions were evidenced by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid analysis and by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer studies in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, which were used to test the possibility that the enzymes interact to form a biosynthetic metabolon. Various pairs of proteins fused to two distinct fluorochromes were coexpressed in N. benthamiana leaf tissues and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer measurements demonstrated that proteins interacted pairwise in planta. Taken together, these results suggest the existence of a sporopollenin metabolon. PMID:23632852

  12. A new locus (leuK) affecting the regulation of branched-chain amino acid, histidine, and tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C S; West, R; Hilderman, R H; Bayliss, F T; Klines, E L

    1978-01-01

    A locus (leuK) affecting regulation of the leucine operon was selected by isolating a spontaneous Ara+ derivative of an Escherichia coli B/r strain carrying an ara-leu fusion in which the arabinose operon is under leucine control. Genetic analyses by P1 transduction demonstrated that the lesion is located to the right of the galactose operon. Regulation of the biosynthetic enzymes for leucine, isoleucine-valine, histidine, and tryptophan was altered in a strain carrying leuK16. High-level gene expression in the heterozygous merodiploid strain F' leuK+/leuK16) demonstrated the dominance of the mutant allele to the wild-type allele. No apparent effect was observed in the mutant on N-acetylornithinase, a biosynthetic enzyme in the arginine pathway, nor on any of the 18 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases examined. However, compared with that of the parent strain, the extent of the charging of leucyl-, isoleucyl-, valyl-, histidyl-, and arginyl-tRNA was decreased in the mutant. PMID:355232

  13. X-ray analysis of butirosin biosynthetic enzyme BtrN redefines structural motifs for AdoMet radical chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Peter J.; Grove, Tyler L.; Booker, Squire J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2013-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosamine (DOIA) dehydrogenases are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of 2-deoxystreptamine–containing aminoglycoside antibiotics. In contrast to most DOIA dehydrogenases, which are NAD-dependent, the DOIA dehydrogenase from Bacillus circulans (BtrN) is an S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) radical enzyme. To examine how BtrN employs AdoMet radical chemistry, we have determined its structure with AdoMet and substrate to 1.56 Å resolution. We find a previously undescribed modification to the core AdoMet radical fold: instead of the canonical (β/α)6 architecture, BtrN displays a (β5/α4) motif. We further find that an auxiliary [4Fe-4S] cluster in BtrN, thought to bind substrate, is instead implicated in substrate–radical oxidation. High structural homology in the auxiliary cluster binding region between BtrN, fellow AdoMet radical dehydrogenase anSME, and molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic enzyme MoaA provides support for the establishment of an AdoMet radical structural motif that is likely common to ∼6,400 uncharacterized AdoMet radical enzymes. PMID:24048029

  14. Rational design of a transition state analogue with picomolar affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PvdQ, a siderophore biosynthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Kenneth D; Wu, Rui; Er, Joyce A V; Liu, Dali; Fast, Walter

    2013-10-18

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa enzyme PvdQ can process different substrates involved in quorum-sensing or in siderophore biosynthesis. Substrate selectivity was evaluated using steady-state kinetic constants for hydrolysis of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (HSLs) and p-nitrophenyl fatty acid esters. PvdQ prefers substrates with alkyl chains between 12 and 14 carbons long that do not bear a 3-oxo substitution and is revealed here to have a relatively high specificity constant for selected N-acyl-HSLs (kcat/KM = 10(5) to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). However, endogenous P. aeruginosa N-acyl-HSLs are ≥100-fold disfavored, supporting the conclusion that PvdQ was not primarily evolved to regulate endogenous quorum-sensing. PvdQ plays an essential biosynthetic role for the siderophore pyoverdine, on which P. aeruginosa depends for growth in iron-limited environments. A series of alkylboronate inhibitors was found to be reversible, competitive, and extremely potent (Ki ≥ 190 pM). A 1.8 Å X-ray structure shows that 1-tridecylboronic acid forms a monocovalent bond with the N-terminal β-chain Ser residue in the PvdQ heterodimer, mimicking a reaction transition state. This boronic acid inhibits growth of P. aeruginosa in iron-limited media, reproducing the phenotype of a genetic pvdQ disruption, although co-administration of an efflux pump inhibitor is required to maintain growth inhibition. These findings support the strategy of designing boron-based inhibitors of siderophore biosynthetic enzymes to control P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:23883096

  15. Biosynthesis of pteridines in Neurospora crassa, Phycomyces blakesleeanus and Euglena gracilis: detection and characterization of biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maier, J; Ninnemann, H

    1995-01-01

    Occurrence, biosynthesis and some functions of tetrahydrobiopterin (H4biopterin) in animals are well known. The biochemistry of H4biopterin in other organisms than animals was hitherto not widely investigated. Recently H4biopterin was found in the phytoflagellate Euglena gracilis, in the zygomycete Phycomyces blakesleeanus and in the ascomycete Neurospora crassa. In Euglena, Neurospora and Phycomyces the enzymatic activities of GTP cyclohydrolase I, 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase and sepiapterin reductase are detectable and the biosynthesis follows the same steps as were shown for animals. The biosynthetic enzymes, however, show a much lower sensitivity to those inhibitors that act on vertebrate enzymes. 2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine as inhibitor of GTP cyclohydrolase I and N-acetylserotonin or N-methoxyacetylserotonin as inhibitors of sepiapterin reductase can decrease pteridine biosynthesis significantly, in vitro and in vivo. The apparent Km values are in general higher when compared with the respective animal enzymes. In Neurospora, the conversion of GTP to dihydroneopterin triphosphate was closely associated with subsequent production of 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin due to the high activity of dihydroneopterin aldolase, different from all other tested organisms. Investigations involving inhibition of pteridine synthesis might be a useful tool for evaluating the hypothesis that pteridines in fungi and plants are co-chromophores of various blue light-dependent, flavin-containing photoreceptors. PMID:7899493

  16. Continuous spectrophotometric assays for three regulatory enzymes of the arginine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Kentaro; Akashi, Kinya; Yokota, Akiho

    2007-09-15

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (AGS), N-acetylglutamate kinase (AGK), and glutamate N-acetyltransferase (GAT) are the key enzymes in the synthesis of arginine that serves as an important precursor for the synthesis of protein, polyamines, urea, and nitric oxide. Current assays available for these three enzymes are laborious and time-consuming and do not allow continuous monitoring of enzyme activities. Here we established continuous enzyme assays for AGS, AGK, and GAT based on the coupling of AGS and GAT reactions to AGK followed by coupling of the AGK reaction to N-acetylglutamate 5-phosphate reductase (AGPR). The rate of AGPR-dependent oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate was monitored continuously as a change in absorbance at 340 nm using spectrophotometry. These methods were applied to kinetic analyses for Escherichia coli AGK, E. coli AGS, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAT, and the kinetic parameters obtained in the coupling assays showed nearly the same values as those obtained previously using discontinuous assays. The specificity of these coupled assays was confirmed by the lack of enzyme activity from extracts of E. coli AGS-, E. coli AGK-, and S. cerevisiae GAT-deletion mutants. Moreover, the coupled assay enabled us to measure AGS activity from mammalian liver mitochondrial extracts, known to be an important regulatory enzyme for the urea cycle. These coupled enzyme assays are rapid, highly sensitive, and reproducible. PMID:17651682

  17. Horizontal Gene Transfer and Redundancy of Tryptophan Biosynthetic Enzymes in Dinotoms

    PubMed Central

    Imanian, Behzad; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    A tertiary endosymbiosis between a dinoflagellate host and diatom endosymbiont gave rise to “dinotoms,” cells with a unique nuclear and mitochondrial redundancy derived from two evolutionarily distinct eukaryotic lineages. To examine how this unique redundancy might have affected the evolution of metabolic systems, we investigated the transcription of genes involved in biosynthesis of the amino acid tryptophan in three species, Durinskia baltica, Kryptoperidinium foliaceum, and Glenodinium foliaceum. From transcriptome sequence data, we recovered two distinct sets of protein-coding transcripts covering the entire tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. Phylogenetic analyses suggest a diatom origin for one set of the proteins, which we infer to be expressed in the endosymbiont, and that the other arose from multiple horizontal gene transfer events to the dinoflagellate ancestor of the host lineage. This is the first indication that these cells retain redundant sets of transcripts and likely metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of small molecules and extend their redundancy to their two distinct nuclear genomes. PMID:24448981

  18. Intimal smooth muscle cells are a source but not a sensor of anti-inflammatory CYP450 derived oxylipins

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Scott; Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred B.; Yaqoob, Muhammad M.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Gilroy, Derek; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2015-08-07

    Vascular pathologies are associated with changes in the presence and expression of morphologically distinct vascular smooth muscle cells. In particular, in complex human vascular lesions and models of disease in pigs and rodents, an intimal smooth muscle cell (iSMC) which exhibits a stable epithelioid or rhomboid phenotype in culture is often found to be present in high numbers, and may represent the reemergence of a distinct developmental vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype. The CYP450-oxylipin - soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway is currently of great interest in targeting for cardiovascular disease. sEH inhibitors limit the development of hypertension, diabetes, atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation in animal models. We have investigated the expression of CYP450-oxylipin-sEH pathway enzymes and their metabolites in paired intimal (iSMC) and medial (mSMC) cells isolated from rat aorta. iSMC basally released significantly larger amounts of epoxy-oxylipin CYP450 products from eicosapentaenoic acid > docosahexaenoic acid > arachidonic acid > linoleic acid, and expressed higher levels of CYP2C12, CYP2B1, but not CYP2J mRNA compared to mSMC. When stimulated with the pro-inflammatory TLR4 ligand LPS, epoxy-oxylipin production did not change greatly in iSMC. In contrast, LPS induced epoxy-oxylipin products in mSMC and induced CYP2J4. iSMC and mSMC express sEH which metabolizes primary epoxy-oxylipins to their dihydroxy-counterparts. The sEH inhibitors TPPU or AUDA inhibited LPS-induced NFκB activation and iNOS induction in mSMC, but had no effect on NFκB nuclear localization or inducible nitric oxide synthase in iSMC; effects which were recapitulated in part by addition of authentic epoxy-oxylipins. iSMCs are a rich source but not a sensor of anti-inflammatory epoxy-oxylipins. Complex lesions that contain high levels of iSMCs may be more resistant to the protective effects of sEH inhibitors. - Highlights: • We examined oxylipin production in different

  19. Diterpene synthesis in Stevia rebaudiana: recruitment and up-regulation of key enzymes from the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Richman, A S; Gijzen, M; Starratt, A N; Yang, Z; Brandle, J E

    1999-08-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaves accumulate a mixture of at least eight different glycosides derived from the tetracyclic diterpene steviol. These natural products taste intensely sweet and have similar biosynthetic origins to those of gibberellic acid (GA). The initial steps leading to the formation of GA result from the two-step cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) to (-)-kaurene via the action of two terpene cyclases (-)-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) and (-)-kaurene synthase (KS). Steviol biosynthesis probably uses the same mechanism although the genes and enzymes from S. rebaudiana that are involved in the cyclization of GGDP have not been characterized. We have isolated both the CPS and KS genes from S. rebaudiana and found that recombinant CPS and KS were catalytically active, suggesting that the CPS and KS genes participate in steviol biosynthesis. The genes coding for CPS and KS are usually present in single copies in most plant species and their expression is normally low and limited to rapidly growing tissues. The KS gene has been duplicated in the S. rebaudiana genome and both the KS and CPS genes are highly expressed in mature leaves, a pattern opposite to that found with GA biosynthesis. This pattern may, at least in part, lead to temporal and spatial separation of GA and steviol biosynthesis and probably helps to prevent over-expression from interfering with normal GA metabolism. Our results show that CPS and KS are part of the steviol glycoside biosynthetic pathway and that Stevia rebaudiana has recruited two genes to secondary metabolism from a highly regulated pathway involved in hormone biosynthesis. PMID:10504563

  20. The induction of two biosynthetic enzymes helps Escherichia coli sustain heme synthesis and activate catalase during hydrogen peroxide stress

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Stefano; Imlay, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hydrogen peroxide pervades many natural environments, including the phagosomes that mediate cell-based immunity. Transcriptomic analysis showed that during protracted low-grade H2O2 stress, Escherichia coli responds by activating both the OxyR defensive regulon and the Fur iron-starvation response. OxyR induced synthesis of two members of the nine-step heme biosynthetic pathway: ferrochelatase (HemH) and an isozyme of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (HemF). Mutations that blocked either adaptation caused the accumulation of porphyrin intermediates, inadequate activation of heme enzymes, low catalase activity, defective clearance of H2O2, and a failure to grow. Genetic analysis indicated that HemH induction is needed to compensate for iron sequestration by the mini-ferritin Dps. Dps activity protects DNA and proteins by limiting Fenton chemistry, but it interferes with the ability of HemH to acquire the iron that it needs to complete heme synthesis. HemF is a manganoprotein that displaces HemN, an iron-sulfur enzyme whose synthesis and/or stability is apparently problematic during H2O2 stress. Thus the primary responses to H2O2, including the sequestration of iron, require compensatory adjustments in the mechanisms of iron-cofactor synthesis. The results support the growing evidence that oxidative stress is primarily an iron pathology. PMID:25664592

  1. Underpinning Starch Biology with in vitro Studies on Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes and Biosynthetic Glycomaterials

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Ellis C.; Field, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Starch makes up more than half of the calories in the human diet and is also a valuable bulk commodity that is used across the food, brewing and distilling, medicines and renewable materials sectors. Despite its importance, our understanding of how plants make starch, and what controls the deposition of this insoluble, polymeric, liquid crystalline material, remains rather limited. Advances are hampered by the challenges inherent in analyzing enzymes that operate across the solid–liquid interface. Glyconanotechnology, in the form of glucan-coated sensor chips and metal nanoparticles, present novel opportunities to address this problem. Herein, we review recent developments aimed at the bottom-up generation and self-assembly of starch-like materials, in order to better understand which enzymes are required for starch granule biogenesis and metabolism. PMID:26442250

  2. Probing the Druggability Limits for Enzymes of the NAD Biosynthetic Network in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Padiadpu, Jyothi; Mishra, Madhulika; Sharma, Eshita; Mala, Uchurappa; Somasundaram, Kumar; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-05-23

    The biosynthesis of NAD constitutes an important metabolic module in the cell, since NAD is an essential cofactor involved in several metabolic reactions. NAD concentrations are known to be significantly increased in several cancers, particularly in glioma, consistent with the observation of up-regulation of several enzymes of the network. Modulating NAD biosynthesis in glioma is therefore an attractive therapeutic strategy. Here we report reconstruction of a biochemical network of NAD biosynthesis consisting of 22 proteins, 36 metabolites, and 86 parameters, tuned to mimic the conditions in glioma. Kinetic simulations of the network provide comprehensive insights about the role of individual enzymes. Further, quantitative changes in the same network between different states of health and disease enable identification of drug targets, based on specific alterations in the given disease. Through simulations of enzyme inhibition titrations, we identify NMPRTase as a potential drug target, while eliminating other possible candidates NMNAT, NAPRTase, and NRK. We have also simulated titrations of both binding affinities as well as inhibitor concentrations, which provide insights into the druggability limits of the target, a novel aspect that can provide useful guidelines for designing inhibitors with optimal affinities. Our simulations suggest that an inhibitor affinity of 10 nM used in a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 μM achieves a near maximal inhibition response for NMPRTase and that increasing the affinity any further is not likely to have a significant advantage. Thus, the quantitative appreciation defines a maximal extent of inhibition possible for a chosen enzyme in the context of its network. Knowledge of this type enables an upper affinity threshold to be defined as a goal in lead screening and refinement stages in drug discovery. PMID:26958865

  3. Regulation of the Tyrosine Biosynthetic Enzymes in Salmonella typhimurium: Analysis of the Involvement of Tyrosyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid and Tyrosyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Synthetase1

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, J.; Artz, S. W.; Zalkin, H.

    1972-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium were isolated that require tyrosine for growth because of an altered tyrosyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase. Extracts of one strain (JK10) contain a labile enzyme with decreased ability to transfer tyrosine to tRNATyr and a higher Km for tyrosine than the wild-type enzyme. Strain JK10 maintains repressed levels of the tyrosine biosynthetic enzymes when the growth rate is restricted due to limitation of charged tRNATyr. Several second-site revertants of strain JK10 exhibit temperature-sensitive growth due to partially repaired, heat-labile tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. The tyrosine biosynthetic enzymes are not derepressed in thermosensitive strains grown at the restrictive temperature. A class of tyrosine regulatory mutants, designated tyrR, contains normal levels of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNATyr. These results suggest that charging of tRNATyr is not necessary for repression. This conclusion is substantiated by the finding that 4-aminophenylalanine, a tyrosine analogue which causes repression of the tyrosine biosynthetic enzymes, is not attached to tRNATyr in vivo, nor does it inhibit the attachment reaction in vitro. A combined regulatory effect due to the simultaneous presence of tyrS and tyrR mutations in the same strain was detected. The possibility of direct participation of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in tyrosine regulation is discussed. PMID:4404819

  4. Atlas of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthetic pathways reveals common occurrence of nonmodular enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Fewer, David P.; Holm, Liisa; Rouhiainen, Leo; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides are a diverse group of natural products with complex chemical structures and enormous pharmaceutical potential. They are synthesized on modular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme complexes by a conserved thiotemplate mechanism. Here, we report the widespread occurrence of NRPS and PKS genetic machinery across the three domains of life with the discovery of 3,339 gene clusters from 991 organisms, by examining a total of 2,699 genomes. These gene clusters display extraordinarily diverse organizations, and a total of 1,147 hybrid NRPS/PKS clusters were found. Surprisingly, 10% of bacterial gene clusters lacked modular organization, and instead catalytic domains were mostly encoded as separate proteins. The finding of common occurrence of nonmodular NRPS differs substantially from the current classification. Sequence analysis indicates that the evolution of NRPS machineries was driven by a combination of common descent and horizontal gene transfer. We identified related siderophore NRPS gene clusters that encoded modular and nonmodular NRPS enzymes organized in a gradient. A higher frequency of the NRPS and PKS gene clusters was detected from bacteria compared with archaea or eukarya. They commonly occurred in the phyla of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria in bacteria and the phylum of Ascomycota in fungi. The majority of these NRPS and PKS gene clusters have unknown end products highlighting the power of genome mining in identifying novel genetic machinery for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:24927540

  5. Divergent non-heme iron enzymes in the nogalamycin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Siitonen, Vilja; Selvaraj, Brinda; Niiranen, Laila; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Nogalamycin, an aromatic polyketide displaying high cytotoxicity, has a unique structure, with one of the carbohydrate units covalently attached to the aglycone via an additional carbon–carbon bond. The underlying chemistry, which implies a particularly challenging reaction requiring activation of an aliphatic carbon atom, has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unusual C5′′–C2 carbocyclization is catalyzed by the non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)–dependent SnoK in the biosynthesis of the anthracycline nogalamycin. The data are consistent with a mechanistic proposal whereby the Fe(IV) = O center abstracts the H5′′ atom from the amino sugar of the substrate, with subsequent attack of the aromatic C2 carbon on the radical center. We further show that, in the same metabolic pathway, the homologous SnoN (38% sequence identity) catalyzes an epimerization step at the adjacent C4′′ carbon, most likely via a radical mechanism involving the Fe(IV) = O center. SnoK and SnoN have surprisingly similar active site architectures considering the markedly different chemistries catalyzed by the enzymes. Structural studies reveal that the differences are achieved by minor changes in the alignment of the substrates in front of the reactive ferryl-oxo species. Our findings significantly expand the repertoire of reactions reported for this important protein family and provide an illustrative example of enzyme evolution. PMID:27114534

  6. Mevalonate Analogues as Substrates of Enzymes in the Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, Takashi; Park, Chan Sun; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Sun, Meihao; Michels, Theodore; Leyh, Thomas S.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Survival of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae requires a functional mevalonate pathway, which produces isopentenyl diphosphate, the essential building block of isoprenoids. Flux through this pathway appears to be regulated at the mevalonate kinase (MK) step, which is strongly feedback-inhibited by diphosphomevalonate (DPM), the penultimate compound in the pathway. The human mevalonate pathway is not regulated by DPM, making the bacterial pathway an attractive antibiotic target. Since DPM has poor drug characteristics, being highly charged, we propose to use unphosphorylated, cell-permeable prodrugs based on mevalonate that will be phosphorylated in turn by MK and phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) to generate the active compound in situ. To test the limits of this approach, we synthesized a series of C3-substituted mevalonate analogues to probe the steric and electronic requirements of the MK and PMK active sites. MK and PMK accepted substrates with up to two additional carbons, showing a preference for small substitutents. This result establishes the feasibility of using a prodrug strategy for DPM-based antibiotics in S. pneumoniae and identified several analogues to be tested as inhibitors of MK. Among the substrates accepted by both enzymes were cyclopropyl, vinyl, and ethynyl mevalonate analogues that, when diphosphorylated, might be mechanism-based inactivators of the next enzyme in the pathway, diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase. PMID:20056424

  7. Divergent non-heme iron enzymes in the nogalamycin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Siitonen, Vilja; Selvaraj, Brinda; Niiranen, Laila; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-05-10

    Nogalamycin, an aromatic polyketide displaying high cytotoxicity, has a unique structure, with one of the carbohydrate units covalently attached to the aglycone via an additional carbon-carbon bond. The underlying chemistry, which implies a particularly challenging reaction requiring activation of an aliphatic carbon atom, has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unusual C5''-C2 carbocyclization is catalyzed by the non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)-dependent SnoK in the biosynthesis of the anthracycline nogalamycin. The data are consistent with a mechanistic proposal whereby the Fe(IV) = O center abstracts the H5'' atom from the amino sugar of the substrate, with subsequent attack of the aromatic C2 carbon on the radical center. We further show that, in the same metabolic pathway, the homologous SnoN (38% sequence identity) catalyzes an epimerization step at the adjacent C4'' carbon, most likely via a radical mechanism involving the Fe(IV) = O center. SnoK and SnoN have surprisingly similar active site architectures considering the markedly different chemistries catalyzed by the enzymes. Structural studies reveal that the differences are achieved by minor changes in the alignment of the substrates in front of the reactive ferryl-oxo species. Our findings significantly expand the repertoire of reactions reported for this important protein family and provide an illustrative example of enzyme evolution. PMID:27114534

  8. Characterization of the de novo biosynthetic enzyme of platelet activating factor, DDT-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase, of human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsoupras, Alexandros Basilios; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Iatrou, Christos; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Demopoulos, Constantinos Alexandros

    2007-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, is implicated in several proinflammatory/inflammatory diseases such as glomerulonephritis, glomerulosclerosis, atherosclerosis, cancer, allergy, and diabetes. PAF can be produced by several renal cells under appropriate stimuli and it is thought to be implicated in renal diseases. The aim of this study is the characterization of DTT-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase (PAF-CPT) of human mesangial cell (HMC), the main regulatory enzyme of PAF de novo biosynthetic pathway. Microsomal fractions of mesangial cells were isolated and enzymatic activity and kinetic parameters were determined by TLC and in vitro biological test in rabbit washed platelets. The effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA), dithiothreitol (DTT), divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+), EDTA, and various chemicals on the activity of PAF-CPT of HMC was also studied. Moreover, preliminary in vitro tests have been performed with several anti-inflammatory factors such as drugs (simvastatin, IFNa, rupatadine, tinzaparin, and salicylic acid) and bioactive compounds of Mediterranean diet (resveratrol and lipids of olive oil, olive pomace, sea bass "Dicentrarchus labrax," and gilthead sea bream "Sparus aurata"). The results indicated that the above compounds can influence PAF-CPT activity of HMC. PMID:17710109

  9. Crystal Structure of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Enzyme of the Mithramycin Biosynthetic Pathway†

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Miranda P.; Bosserman, Mary A.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Wehenkel, Marie; Rohr, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), mostly flavoproteins, were shown to be powerful biocatalysts for synthetic organic chemistry applications and were also suggested to play key roles for the biosyntheses of various natural products. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of MtmOIV, a 56 kD homo-dimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent monooxygenase, which catalyzes the key frame-modifying step of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway and currently the only BVMO proven to react with its natural substrate via a Baeyer-Villiger reaction. MtmOIV’s structure was determined by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement to a resolution of 2.9Å. MtmOIV cleaves a C-C bond, essential for the conversion of the biologically inactive precursor, premithramycin B, into the active drug mithramycin. The MtmOIV structure combined with substrate docking calculations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments implicate several residues to participate in co-factor and substrate binding. Future experimentation aimed at broadening the substrate specificity of the enzyme could facilitate the generation of chemically diverse mithramycin analogues through combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:19364090

  10. Crystal structure of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase MtmOIV, the key enzyme of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway .

    PubMed

    Beam, Miranda P; Bosserman, Mary A; Noinaj, Nicholas; Wehenkel, Marie; Rohr, Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), mostly flavoproteins, were shown to be powerful biocatalysts for synthetic organic chemistry applications and were also suggested to play key roles for the biosyntheses of various natural products. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of MtmOIV, a 56 kDa homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent monooxygenase, which catalyzes the key frame-modifying step of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway and currently the only BVMO proven to react with its natural substrate via a Baeyer-Villiger reaction. MtmOIV's structure was determined by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement to a resolution of 2.9 A. MtmOIV cleaves a C-C bond, essential for the conversion of the biologically inactive precursor, premithramycin B, into the active drug mithramycin. The MtmOIV structure combined with substrate docking calculations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments identifies several residues that participate in cofactor and substrate binding. Future experimentation aimed at broadening the substrate specificity of the enzyme could facilitate the generation of chemically diverse mithramycin analogues through combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:19364090

  11. Crystal Structure of Baeyer−Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Enzyme of the Mithramycin Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Beam, Miranda P.; Bosserman, Mary A.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Wehenkel, Marie; Rohr, Jurgen; Kentucky

    2009-06-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs), mostly flavoproteins, were shown to be powerful biocatalysts for synthetic organic chemistry applications and were also suggested to play key roles for the biosyntheses of various natural products. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of MtmOIV, a 56 kDa homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent monooxygenase, which catalyzes the key frame-modifying step of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway and currently the only BVMO proven to react with its natural substrate via a Baeyer-Villiger reaction. MtmOIV's structure was determined by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement to a resolution of 2.9 A. MtmOIV cleaves a C-C bond, essential for the conversion of the biologically inactive precursor, premithramycin B, into the active drug mithramycin. The MtmOIV structure combined with substrate docking calculations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments identifies several residues that participate in cofactor and substrate binding. Future experimentation aimed at broadening the substrate specificity of the enzyme could facilitate the generation of chemically diverse mithramycin analogues through combinatorial biosynthesis.

  12. Pathway for isoleucine formation form pyruvate by leucine biosynthetic enzymes in leucine-accumulating isoleucine revertants of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Kisumi, M; Komatsubara, S; Chibata, I

    1977-07-01

    Leaky revertants isolated from isoleucine auxotrophs of Serratia marcescens mutant resistant to alpha-aminobutyric acid were previously reported to accumulate leucine in the medium, due to the absence of both feedback inhibition and repression of leucine biosynthesis. Growth of the revertant was accelerated by pyruvate, D(-)-citramalate, citraconate, and alpha-ketobutyrate, but not by threonine. Extracts of the revertant exhibited high activities of pyruvate-dependent coenzyme A liberation from acetyl-coenzyme A, hydration of citraconate, and conversion of citraconate to alpha-ketobutyrate, but showed no threonine-deaminating activity. In the leucine-accumulating revertants the above three activities were not affected by leucine, but in the wild strain and other revertants accumulating no leucine all or one of these activities was controlled by leucine. A leucine auxotroph isolated from the leucine-accumulating revertant showed isoleucine auxotrophy as well. From these data, it is concluded that, in leucine-accumulating revertants, of S. marcescent, isoleucine, is synthesized from alpha-ketobutyrate via citramalate formed from pyruvate annd acetyl-coenzyme A by leucine biosynthetic enzymes, as a result of desensitization of alpha-isopropylmalate synthetase to feedback inhibition. PMID:142769

  13. Antibacterial Drug Discovery Targeting the Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthetic Enzyme LpxC.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Alice L

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme LpxC (UDP-3-O-(R-3-hydroxymyristoyl)-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase) is broadly conserved across Gram-negative bacteria and is essential for synthesis of lipid A, the membrane anchor of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), which are a major component of the outer membrane in nearly all Gram-negative bacteria. LpxC has been the focus of target-directed antibiotic discovery projects in numerous pharmaceutical and academic groups for more than 20 years. Despite intense effort, no LpxC inhibitor has been approved for therapeutic use, and only one has yet reached human studies. This article will summarize the history of LpxC as a drug target and the parallel history of research on LpxC biology. Both academic and industrial researchers have used LpxC inhibitors as tool compounds, leading to increased understanding of the differing mechanisms for regulation of LPS synthesis in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27235477

  14. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  15. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27102611

  16. Effect of squalene synthase inhibition on the expression of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes, LDL receptor, and cholesterol 7 alpha hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Keller, R K

    1994-06-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the committed step in the biosynthesis of sterols. Treating rats with zaragozic acid A, a potent inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused marked increases in hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, HMG-CoA reductase, squalene synthase, and LDL receptor mRNA levels. The increase in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA fully accounted for the increases seen in enzyme protein and activity. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase mRNA and activity were only slightly increased by zaragozic acid A, while cholesterol 7 alpha hydroxylase mRNA levels were decreased substantially. When rats were pretreated with zaragozic acid A, there was no change in mRNA levels for the cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes or cholesterol 7 alpha hydroxylase upon subsequent treatment with mevalonolactone. Under these same conditions, the enzymatic activity of HMG-CoA reductase was also unaffected. Mevalonolactone treatment reduced the zaragozic acid A-mediated increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Feeding cholesterol eliminated the zaragozic acid A-induced increase in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA levels. These results suggest that inhibition of squalene synthase decreases the level of a squalene-derived regulatory product, resulting in altered amounts of several mRNAs and coordinate increases in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA, protein, and activity. The increase in HMG-CoA reductase gene expression was closely related to the degree of inhibition of cholesterol synthesis caused by zaragozic acid A. PMID:7911291

  17. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Hortua Triana, Miryam Andrea; Huynh, My-Hang; Garavito, Manuel F; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Carruthers, Vern B; Löffler, Monika; Zimmermann, Barbara H

    2012-08-01

    The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway in the protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is essential for parasite growth during infection. To investigate the properties of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TgDHOD), the fourth enzyme in the T. gondii pyrimidine pathway, we expressed and purified recombinant TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibited a specific activity of 84U/mg, a k(cat) of 89s(-1), a K(m)=60μM for l-dihydroorotate, and a K(m)=29μM for decylubiquinone (Q(D)). Quinones lacking or having short isoprenoid side chains yielded lower k(cat)s than Q(D). As expected, fumarate was a poor electron acceptor for this family 2 DHOD. The IC(50)s determined for A77-1726, the active derivative of the human DHOD inhibitor leflunomide, and related compounds MD249 and MD209 were, 91μM, 96μM, and 60μM, respectively. The enzyme was not significantly affected by brequinar or TTFA, known inhibitors of human DHOD, or by atovaquone. DSM190, a known inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum DHOD, was a poor inhibitor of TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibits a lengthy 157-residue N-terminal extension, consistent with a potential organellar targeting signal. We constructed C-terminally c-myc tagged TgDHODs to examine subcellular localization of TgDHOD in transgenic parasites expressing the tagged protein. Using both exogenous and endogenous expression strategies, anti-myc fluorescence signal colocalized with antibodies against the mitochondrial marker ATPase. These findings demonstrate that TgDHOD is associated with the parasite's mitochondrion, revealing this organelle as the site of orotate production in T. gondii. The TgDHOD gene appears to be essential because while gene tagging was successful at the TgDHOD gene locus, attempts to delete the TgDHOD gene were not successful in the KU80 background. Collectively, our study suggests that TgDHOD is an excellent target for the development of anti-Toxoplasma drugs. PMID:22580100

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Triana, Miryam Andrea Hortua; Huynh, My-Hang; Garavito, Manuel F.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Carruthers, Vern B.; Löffler, Monika; Zimmermann, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway in the protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is essential for parasite growth during infection. To investigate the properties of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TgDHOD), the fourth enzyme in the T. gondii pyrimidine pathway, we expressed and purified recombinant TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibited a specific activity of 84 U/mg, a kcat of 89 sec−1, a Km = 60 μM for L-dihydroorotate, and a Km = 29 μM for decylubiquinone (QD). Quinones lacking or having short isoprenoid side chains yielded lower kcats than QD. As expected, fumarate was a poor electron acceptor for this family 2 DHOD. The The IC50s determined for A77-1726, the active derivative of the human DHOD inhibitor leflunomide, and related compounds MD249 and MD209 were, 91 μM, 96 μM, and 60 μM, respectively. The enzyme was not significantly affected by brequinar or TTFA, known inhibitors of human DHOD, or by atovaquone. DSM190, a known inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum DHOD, was a poor inhibitor of TgDHOD. TgDHOD exhibits a lengthy 157-residue N-terminal extension, consistent with a potential organellar targeting signal. We constructed C-terminally c-myc tagged TgDHODs to examine subcellular localization of TgDHOD in transgenic parasites expressing the tagged protein. Using both exogenous and endogenous expression strategies, anti-myc fluorescence signal colocalized with antibodies against the mitochondrial marker ATPase. These findings demonstrate that TgDHOD is associated with the parasite’s mitochondrion, revealing this organelle as the site of orotate production in T gondii. The TgDHOD gene appears to be essential because while gene tagging was successful at the TgDHOD gene locus, attempts to delete the TgDHOD gene were not successful in the KU80 background. Collectively, our study suggests that TgDHOD is an excellent target for the development of anti-Toxoplasma drugs. PMID:22580100

  19. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas quinolone signal biosynthetic enzyme, in complex with anthranilate.

    PubMed

    Bera, Asim K; Atanasova, Vesna; Robinson, Howard; Eisenstein, Edward; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C; Parsons, James F

    2009-09-15

    Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, is an intercellular alkyl quinolone signaling molecule produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alkyl quinolone signaling is an atypical system that, in P. aeruginosa, controls the expression of numerous virulence factors. PQS is synthesized from the tryptophan pathway intermediate, anthranilate, which is derived either from the kynurenine pathway or from an alkyl quinolone specific anthranilate synthase encoded by phnAB. Anthranilate is converted to PQS by the enzymes encoded by the pqsABCDE operon and pqsH. PqsA forms an activated anthraniloyl-CoA thioester that shuttles anthranilate to the PqsD active site where it is transferred to Cys112 of PqsD. In the only biochemically characterized reaction, a condensation then occurs between anthraniloyl-PqsD and malonyl-CoA or malonyl-ACP, a second PqsD substrate, forming 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ). The role PqsD plays in the biosynthesis of other alkyl quinolones, such as PQS, is unclear, though it has been reported to be required for their production. No evidence exists that DHQ is a PQS precursor, however. Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical approximately 170-residue alphabetaalphabetaalpha domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an approximately 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and

  20. Bioinformatic and Biochemical Characterizations of C–S Bond Formation and Cleavage Enzymes in the Fungus Neurospora crassa Ergothioneine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ergothioneine is a histidine thiol derivative. Its mycobacterial biosynthetic pathway has five steps (EgtA-E catalysis) with two novel reactions: a mononuclear nonheme iron enzyme (EgtB) catalyzed oxidative C–S bond formation and a PLP-mediated C–S lyase (EgtE) reaction. Our bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicate that the fungus Neurospora crassa has a more concise ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway because its nonheme iron enzyme, Egt1, makes use of cysteine instead of γ-Glu-Cys as the substrate. Such a change of substrate preference eliminates the competition between ergothioneine and glutathione biosyntheses. In addition, we have identified the N. crassa C–S lyase (NCU11365) and reconstituted its activity in vitro, which makes the future ergothioneine production through metabolic engineering feasible. PMID:25275953

  1. Functional convergence of oxylipin and abscisic acid pathways controls stomatal closure in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Kolla, Venkat A; Wang, Chang-Quan; Nasafi, Zainab; Hicks, Derrick R; Phadungchob, Bpantamars; Chehab, Wassim E; Brandizzi, Federica; Froehlich, John; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-03-01

    Membranes are primary sites of perception of environmental stimuli. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are major structural constituents of membranes that also function as modulators of a multitude of signal transduction pathways evoked by environmental stimuli. Different stresses induce production of a distinct blend of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids, "oxylipins." We employed three Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes to examine the oxylipin signature in response to specific stresses and determined that wounding and drought differentially alter oxylipin profiles, particularly the allene oxide synthase branch of the oxylipin pathway, responsible for production of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA). Specifically, wounding induced both 12-OPDA and JA levels, whereas drought induced only the precursor 12-OPDA. Levels of the classical stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) were also mainly enhanced by drought and little by wounding. To explore the role of 12-OPDA in plant drought responses, we generated a range of transgenic lines and exploited the existing mutant plants that differ in their levels of stress-inducible 12-OPDA but display similar ABA levels. The plants producing higher 12-OPDA levels exhibited enhanced drought tolerance and reduced stomatal aperture. Furthermore, exogenously applied ABA and 12-OPDA, individually or combined, promote stomatal closure of ABA and allene oxide synthase biosynthetic mutants, albeit most effectively when combined. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Brassica napus verified the potency of this combination in inducing stomatal closure in plants other than Arabidopsis. These data have identified drought as a stress signal that uncouples the conversion of 12-OPDA to JA and have revealed 12-OPDA as a drought-responsive regulator of stomatal closure functioning most effectively together with ABA. PMID:24429214

  2. Organization of the terminal two enzymes of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Orientation of protoporphyrinogen oxidase and evidence for a membrane complex.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, G C; Andrew, T L; Karr, S W; Dailey, H A

    1988-03-15

    Protoporhyrinogen oxidase (EC 1.3.3.4), the penultimate enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the removal of six hydrogens from protoporphyrinogen IX to form protoporphyrin IX. The enzyme in eukaryotes is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. In the present study we have examined requirements for solubilization of this enzyme and find that it behaves as an intrinsic membrane protein that is solubilized only with detergents such as sodium cholate. The in situ orientation of the enzyme with respect to the inner mitochondrial membrane places the active site on the cytosolic face of this membrane rather than the matrix side where the active site of ferrochelatase, the terminal pathway enzyme, is located. Examination of the kinetics of the two terminal enzymes in mitochondrial membranes demonstrates that substrate channeling occurs between these terminal two-pathway enzymes. However, examination of solubilized and membrane-reconstituted enzymes shows no evidence for a stable complex. Based upon these and previous data a model for the terminal three-pathway enzymes is presented. PMID:3346226

  3. Seasonal alteration in amounts of lignans and their glucosides and gene expression of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes in the Forsythia suspense leaf.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kinuyo; Satake, Honoo

    2013-01-01

    Lignans of Forsythia spp. are essential components of various Chinese medicines and health diets. However, the seasonal alteration in lignan amounts and the gene expression profile of lignan-biosynthetic enzymes has yet to be investigated. In this study, we have assessed seasonal alteration in amounts of major lignans, such as pinoresinol, matairesinol, and arctigenin, and examined the gene expression profile of pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR), pinoresinol-glucosylating enzyme (UGT71A18), and secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase (SIRD) in the leaf of Forsythia suspense from April to November. All of the lignans in the leaf continuously increased from April to June, reached the maximal level in June, and then decreased. Ninety percent of pinoresinol and matairesinol was converted into glucosides, while approximately 50% of arctigenin was aglycone. PLR was stably expressed from April to August, whereas the PLR expression was not detected from September to November. In contrast, the UGT71A18 expression was found from August to November, but not from April to July. The SIRD expression was prominent from April to May, not detected in June to July, and then increased again from September to November. These expression profiles of the lignan-synthetic enzymes are largely compatible with the alteration in lignan contents. Furthermore, such seasonal lignan profiles are in good agreement with the fact that the Forsythia leaves for Chinese medicinal tea are harvested in June. This is the first report on seasonal alteration in lignans and the relevant biosynthetic enzyme genes in the leaf of Forsythia species. PMID:23832493

  4. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that’s highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity

  5. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant.

    PubMed

    Seman-Kamarulzaman, Ahmad-Faris; Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong; Hassan, Maizom

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that's highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity towards

  6. CYP450-derived oxylipins mediate inflammatory resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Derek W.; De Maeyer, Roel P. H.; Bystrom, Jonas; Newson, Justine; Lih, Fred B.; Stables, Melanie; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation has emerged as an active process in immunobiology, with cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system being critical in mediating efferocytosis and wound debridement and bridging the gap between innate and adaptive immunity. Here we investigated the roles of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxy-oxylipins in a well-characterized model of sterile resolving peritonitis in the mouse. Epoxy-oxylipins were produced in a biphasic manner during the peaks of acute (4 h) and resolution phases (24–48 h) of the response. The epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A (epoxI) given at 24 h selectively inhibited arachidonic acid- and linoleic acid-derived CYP450-epoxy-oxlipins and resulted in a dramatic influx in monocytes. The epoxI-recruited monocytes were strongly GR1+, Ly6chi, CCR2hi, CCL2hi, and CX3CR1lo. In addition, expression of F4/80 and the recruitment of T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells were suppressed. sEH (Ephx2)−/− mice, which have elevated epoxy-oxylipins, demonstrated opposing effects to epoxI-treated mice: reduced Ly6chi monocytes and elevated F4/80hi macrophages and B, T, and dendritic cells. Ly6chi and Ly6clo monocytes, resident macrophages, and recruited dendritic cells all showed a dramatic change in their resolution signature following in vivo epoxI treatment. Markers of macrophage differentiation CD11b, MerTK, and CD103 were reduced, and monocyte-derived macrophages and resident macrophages ex vivo showed greatly impaired phagocytosis of zymosan and efferocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes following epoxI treatment. These findings demonstrate that epoxy-oxylipins have a critical role in monocyte lineage recruitment and activity to promote inflammatory resolution and represent a previously unidentified internal regulatory system governing the establishment of adaptive immunity. PMID:27226306

  7. CYP450-derived oxylipins mediate inflammatory resolution.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Derek W; Edin, Matthew L; De Maeyer, Roel P H; Bystrom, Jonas; Newson, Justine; Lih, Fred B; Stables, Melanie; Zeldin, Darryl C; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-06-01

    Resolution of inflammation has emerged as an active process in immunobiology, with cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system being critical in mediating efferocytosis and wound debridement and bridging the gap between innate and adaptive immunity. Here we investigated the roles of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxy-oxylipins in a well-characterized model of sterile resolving peritonitis in the mouse. Epoxy-oxylipins were produced in a biphasic manner during the peaks of acute (4 h) and resolution phases (24-48 h) of the response. The epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A (epoxI) given at 24 h selectively inhibited arachidonic acid- and linoleic acid-derived CYP450-epoxy-oxlipins and resulted in a dramatic influx in monocytes. The epoxI-recruited monocytes were strongly GR1(+), Ly6c(hi), CCR2(hi), CCL2(hi), and CX3CR1(lo) In addition, expression of F4/80 and the recruitment of T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells were suppressed. sEH (Ephx2)(-/-) mice, which have elevated epoxy-oxylipins, demonstrated opposing effects to epoxI-treated mice: reduced Ly6c(hi) monocytes and elevated F4/80(hi) macrophages and B, T, and dendritic cells. Ly6c(hi) and Ly6c(lo) monocytes, resident macrophages, and recruited dendritic cells all showed a dramatic change in their resolution signature following in vivo epoxI treatment. Markers of macrophage differentiation CD11b, MerTK, and CD103 were reduced, and monocyte-derived macrophages and resident macrophages ex vivo showed greatly impaired phagocytosis of zymosan and efferocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes following epoxI treatment. These findings demonstrate that epoxy-oxylipins have a critical role in monocyte lineage recruitment and activity to promote inflammatory resolution and represent a previously unidentified internal regulatory system governing the establishment of adaptive immunity. PMID:27226306

  8. The Patatin-Containing Phospholipase A pPLAIIα Modulates Oxylipin Formation and Water Loss in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Yu; Zheng, Yong; Bahn, Sung Chul; Pan, Xiang-Qing; Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R.; Scheu, Brad; Welti, Ruth; Hong, Yue-Yun; Wang, Xue-Min

    2012-01-01

    The patatin-related phospholipase A (pPLA) hydrolyzes membrane glycerolipids to produce monoacyl compounds and free fatty acids. Phospholipids are cleaved by pPLAIIα at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions, and galactolipids, including those containing oxophytodienoic acids, can also serve as substrates. Ablation of pPLAIIα decreased lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine levels, but increased free linolenic acid. pPLAIIα-deficient plants displayed a higher level of jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate, as well as the oxylipin-biosynthetic intermediates 13-hydroperoxylinolenic acid and 12-oxophytodienoic acid than wild-type (WT) plants. The expression of genes involved in oxylipin production was also higher in the pPLAIIα-deficient mutant than in WT plants. The mutant plants lost water more quickly than WT plants. The stomata of WT and mutant plants responded similarly to abscisic acid. In response to desiccation, the mutant and WT leaves produced abscisic acid at the same rate, but, after 4 h of desiccation, the jasmonic acid level was much higher in mutant than WT leaves. These results indicate that pPLAIIα negatively regulates oxylipin production and suggest a role in the removal of oxidatively modified fatty acids from membranes. PMID:22259021

  9. Production of Eicosanoids and Other Oxylipins by Pathogenic Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Noverr, Mairi C.; Erb-Downward, John R.; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2003-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated metabolites of fatty acids. Eicosanoids are a subset of oxylipins and include the prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which are potent regulators of host immune responses. Host cells are one source of eicosanoids and oxylipins during infection; however, another potential source of eicosanoids is the pathogen itself. A broad range of pathogenic fungi, protozoa, and helminths produce eicosanoids and other oxylipins by novel synthesis pathways. Why do these organisms produce oxylipins? Accumulating data suggest that phase change and differentiation in these organisms are controlled by oxylipins, including prostaglandins and lipoxygenase products. The precise role of pathogen-derived eicosanoids in pathogenesis remains to be determined, but the potential link between pathogen eicosanoids and the development of TH2 responses in the host is intriguing. Mammalian prostaglandins and leukotrienes have been studied extensively, and these molecules can modulate Th1 versus Th2 immune responses, chemokine production, phagocytosis, lymphocyte proliferation, and leukocyte chemotaxis. Thus, eicosanoids and oxylipins (host or microbe) may be mediators of a direct host-pathogen “cross-talk” that promotes chronic infection and hypersensitivity disease, common features of infection by eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:12857780

  10. 78 kDa receptor for Man6P-independent lysosomal enzyme targeting: Biosynthetic transport from endoplasmic reticulum to 'high-density vesicles'

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso . E-mail: gonor@biomedicas.unam.mx; Ortega Cuellar, Daniel D.; Michalak, Colette

    2006-04-15

    Recent work has shown that the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate and the 78 kDa receptors for lysosomal enzyme targeting are located in different cell compartments. While the mannose 6-phosphate receptor is enriched in the Percoll fractions that contain Golgi apparatus, most of the 78 kDa receptor is localized in a heavy fraction at the bottom of the Percoll gradient. This report presents the biosynthetic transport of the 78 kDa receptor. Newly synthesized 78 kDa receptor was transported to Golgi from endoplasmic reticulum with a half life of 5 min. From the Golgi apparatus, the receptor takes two routes; about 15-25% is transported to the plasma membrane, and the rest migrates to late endosomes, subsequently to prelysosomes and finally to the dense vesicles. The 78 kDa receptor starts appearing at the dense vesicles 120 min after biosynthesis and reaches a maximum of 40-50% of the total receptor. Treatment of cells with NH{sub 4}Cl causes depletion of the receptor from the dense vesicles and prelysosomes and corresponding augmentation in endosomes and plasma membrane. These results suggest that the 78 kDa receptor cycles between compartments and that the dense vesicles seem to represent the most distal compartment in the biosynthetic pathway of this receptor.

  11. Starch biosynthetic genes and enzymes are expressed and active in the absence of starch accumulation in sugar beet tap-root

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the predominant storage compound in underground plant tissues like roots and tubers. An exception is sugar beet tap-root (Beta vulgaris ssp altissima) which exclusively stores sucrose. The underlying mechanism behind this divergent storage accumulation in sugar beet is currently not fully known. From the general presence of starch in roots and tubers it could be speculated that the lack in sugar beet tap-roots would originate from deficiency in pathways leading to starch. Therefore with emphasis on starch accumulation, we studied tap-roots of sugar beet using parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) as a comparator. Results Metabolic and structural analyses of sugar beet tap-root confirmed sucrose as the exclusive storage component. No starch granules could be detected in tap-roots of sugar beet or the wild ancestor sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). Analyses of parsnip showed that the main storage component was starch but tap-root tissue was also found to contain significant levels of sugars. Surprisingly, activities of four main starch biosynthetic enzymes, phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase and starch branching enzyme, were similar in sugar beet and parsnip tap-roots. Transcriptional analysis confirmed expression of corresponding genes. Additionally, expression of genes involved in starch accumulation such as for plastidial hexose transportation and starch tuning functions could be determined in tap-roots of both plant species. Conclusion Considering underground storage organs, sugar beet tap-root upholds a unique property in exclusively storing sucrose. Lack of starch also in the ancestor sea beet indicates an evolved trait of biological importance. Our findings in this study show that gene expression and enzymatic activity of main starch biosynthetic functions are present in sugar beet tap-root during storage accumulation. In view of this, the complete lack of starch in sugar beet tap-roots is enigmatic. PMID

  12. Structure of the D-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, A.K.; Robinson, H.; Atanasova, V.; Gamage, S.; Parsons, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound D-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  13. Biologically Active Oxylipins from Enzymatic and Nonenzymatic Routes in Macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Mariana; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are rich and heterogeneous sources of great chemical diversity, among which oxylipins are a well-recognized class of natural products. Algal oxylipins comprise an assortment of oxygenated, halogenated, and unsaturated functional groups and also several carbocycles, varying in ring size and position in lipid chain. Besides the discovery of structurally diverse oxylipins in macroalgae, research has recently deciphered the role of some of these metabolites in the defense and innate immunity of photosynthetic marine organisms. This review is an attempt to comprehensively cover the available literature on the chemistry, biosynthesis, ecology, and potential bioactivity of oxylipins from marine macroalgae. For a better understanding, enzymatic and nonenzymatic routes were separated; however, both processes often occur concomitantly and may influence each other, even producing structurally related molecules. PMID:26805855

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthetic enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase from Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Azim, N.; Deery, E.; Warren, M. J.; Erskine, P.; Cooper, J. B.; Wood, S. P.; Akhtar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses an early step of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthesis pathway in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. The enzyme possesses a dipyrromethane cofactor which is covalently linked by a thioether bridge to an invariant cysteine residue. Expression in Escherichia coli of a His-tagged form of Bacillus megaterium PBGD permitted the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the enzyme from this species at high resolution. PMID:23908040

  15. A highly selective biosynthetic pathway to non-natural C50 carotenoids assembled from moderately selective enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Furubayashi, Maiko; Ikezumi, Mayu; Takaichi, Shinichi; Maoka, Takashi; Hemmi, Hisashi; Ogawa, Takuya; Saito, Kyoichi; Tobias, Alexander V; Umeno, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology aspires to construct natural and non-natural pathways to useful compounds. However, pathways that rely on multiple promiscuous enzymes may branch, which might preclude selective production of the target compound. Here, we describe the assembly of a six-enzyme pathway in Escherichia coli for the synthesis of C50-astaxanthin, a non-natural purple carotenoid. We show that by judicious matching of engineered size-selectivity variants of the first two enzymes in the pathway, farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDS) and carotenoid synthase (CrtM), branching and the production of non-target compounds can be suppressed, enriching the proportion of C50 backbones produced. We then further extend the C50 pathway using evolved or wild-type downstream enzymes. Despite not containing any substrate- or product-specific enzymes, the resulting pathway detectably produces only C50 carotenoids, including ∼90% C50-astaxanthin. Using this approach, highly selective pathways can be engineered without developing absolutely specific enzymes. PMID:26168783

  16. A highly selective biosynthetic pathway to non-natural C50 carotenoids assembled from moderately selective enzymes.

    PubMed

    Furubayashi, Maiko; Ikezumi, Mayu; Takaichi, Shinichi; Maoka, Takashi; Hemmi, Hisashi; Ogawa, Takuya; Saito, Kyoichi; Tobias, Alexander V; Umeno, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology aspires to construct natural and non-natural pathways to useful compounds. However, pathways that rely on multiple promiscuous enzymes may branch, which might preclude selective production of the target compound. Here, we describe the assembly of a six-enzyme pathway in Escherichia coli for the synthesis of C50-astaxanthin, a non-natural purple carotenoid. We show that by judicious matching of engineered size-selectivity variants of the first two enzymes in the pathway, farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDS) and carotenoid synthase (CrtM), branching and the production of non-target compounds can be suppressed, enriching the proportion of C50 backbones produced. We then further extend the C50 pathway using evolved or wild-type downstream enzymes. Despite not containing any substrate- or product-specific enzymes, the resulting pathway detectably produces only C50 carotenoids, including ∼ 90% C50-astaxanthin. Using this approach, highly selective pathways can be engineered without developing absolutely specific enzymes. PMID:26168783

  17. Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants overexpressing chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase of Blastochloris viridis elucidate functions of enzymes in late bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Harada, Jiro; Nomata, Jiro; Yamamoto, Haruki; Fujita, Yuichi; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductases (CORs) from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-producing Rhodobacter species and BChl b-producing Blastochloris viridis show distinct substrate recognition and different catalytic hydrogenation reactions, and that these two types of CORs therefore cause committed steps for BChls a and b biosynthesis. In this study, COR genes from B. viridis were incorporated and overexpressed in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. We found that the following two factors are essential in making R. sphaeroides produce BChl b: the loss of functions of both intrinsic COR and 8-vinyl reductase (BciA) in the host R. sphaeroides strain; and expression of the BchYZ catalytic components of COR from B. viridis, not the complete set of COR (BchXYZ), in the host strain. In addition, we incorporated bchYZ of B. viridis into the R. sphaeroides mutant lacking BchJ and BciA, resulting in the strain accumulating both BChl a and BChl b. This is the first example of an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium producing BChls a and b together. The results suggest that BchJ enhances activity of the intrinsic COR. The physiological significance of BchJ in pigment biosynthetic pathways will be discussed. PMID:25978726

  18. Development and Validation of a High-Throughput Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Approach for Screening of Oxylipins and Their Precursors.

    PubMed

    Wolfer, Arnaud M; Gaudin, Mathieu; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2015-12-01

    Lipid mediators, highly bioactive compounds synthesized from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), have a fundamental role in the initiation and signaling of the inflammatory response. Although extensively studied in isolation, only a limited number of analytical methods offer a comprehensive coverage of the oxylipin synthetic cascade applicable to a wide range of human biofluids. We report the development of an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) assay to quantify oxylipins and their PUFA precursors in 100 μL of human serum, plasma, urine, and cell culture supernatant. A single 15 min UHPLC run enables the quantification of 43 oxylipins and 5 PUFAs, covering pro and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators synthesized across the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) pathways. The method was validated in multiple biofluid matrixes (serum, plasma, urine, and cell supernatant) and suppliers, ensuring its suitability for large scale metabonomic studies. The approach is accurate, precise, and reproducible (RSD < 15%) over multiple days and concentrations. Very high sensitivity is achieved with limits of quantification inferior to picograms for the majority of analytes (0.05-125 pg) and linear range spanning up to 5 orders of magnitude. This enabled the quantification of the great majority of these analytes at their low endogenous level in human biofluids. We successfully applied the procedure to individuals undergoing a fasting intervention; oxylipin profiles highlighted significantly altered PUFA and inflammatory profiles in accordance with previously published studies as well as offered new insight on the modulation of the biosynthetic cascade responsible for the regulation of oxylipins. PMID:26501362

  19. The Fungal Product Terreic Acid is a Covalent Inhibitor of the Bacterial Cell Wall Biosynthetic Enzyme UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase (MurA)†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Huijong; Yang, Yan; Olesen, Sanne H.; Becker, Andreas; Betzi, Stephane; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2010-01-01

    Terreic acid is a metabolite with antibiotic properties produced by the fungus Aspergillus terreus. We found that terreic acid is a covalent inhibitor of the bacterial cell wall biosynthetic enzyme MurA from E. cloacae and E. coli in-vitro. The crystal structure of the MurA dead-end complex with terreic acid revealed that the quinine ring is covalently attached to the thiol group of Cys115, the molecular target of the antibiotic fosfomycin. Kinetic characterization established that the inactivation requires the presence of substrate UNAG (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine), proceeding with an inactivation rate constant of kinact = 130 M−1s−1. Although the mechanisms of inactivation are similar, fosfomycin is approximately 50 times more potent than terreic acid, and the structural consequences of covalent modification by these two inhibitors are fundamentally different. The MurA-fosfomycin complex exists in the closed enzyme conformation, with the Cys115-fosfomycin adduct buried in the active site. In contrast, the dead-end complex with terreic acid is open, free of UNAG, and has the Cys115-terreic acid adduct solvent–exposed. It appears that terreic acid reacts with Cys115 in the closed, binary state of the enzyme, but that the resulting Cys115-terreic acid adduct imposes steric clashes in the active site. As a consequence, the loop containing Cys115 rearranges, the enzyme opens and UNAG is released. The differential kinetic and structural characteristics of MurA inactivation by terreic acid and fosfomycin reflect the importance of non-covalent binding potential, even for covalent inhibitors, to ensure inactivation efficiency and specificity. PMID:20392080

  20. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH): first genome-wide search positions trait-determining variants acting additively in the proximal promoter

    PubMed Central

    Mustapic, Maja; Maihofer, Adam X.; Mahata, Manjula; Chen, Yuqing; Baker, Dewleen G.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) is the biosynthetic enzyme catalyzing formation of norepinephrine. Changes in DBH expression or activity have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric disorders. Genetic determination of DBH enzymatic activity and its secretion are only incompletely understood. We began with a genome-wide association search for loci contributing to DBH activity in human plasma. Initially, in a population sample of European ancestry, we identified the proximal DBH promoter as a region harboring three common trait-determining variants (top hit rs1611115, P = 7.2 × 10−51). We confirmed their effects on transcription and showed that the three variants each acted additively on gene expression. Results were replicated in a population sample of Native American descent (top hit rs1611115, P = 4.1 × 10−15). Jointly, DBH variants accounted for 57% of DBH trait variation. We further identified a genome-wide significant SNP at the LOC338797 locus on chromosome 12 as trans-quantitative trait locus (QTL) (rs4255618, P = 4.62 × 10−8). Conditional analyses on DBH identified a third genomic region contributing to DBH variation: a likely cis-QTL adjacent to DBH in SARDH (rs7040170, P = 1.31 × 10−14) on chromosome 9q. We conclude that three common SNPs in the DBH promoter act additively to control phenotypic variation in DBH levels, and that two additional novel loci (SARDH and LOC338797) may also contribute to the expression of this catecholamine biosynthetic trait. Identification of DBH variants with strong effects makes it possible to take advantage of Mendelian randomization approaches to test causal effects of this intermediate trait on disease. PMID:24986918

  1. Method development and analysis of free HS and HS in proteoglycans from pre- and postmenopausal women: Evidence for biosynthetic pathway changes in sulfotransferase and sulfatase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Miller, Rebecca L.; Leary, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is one of the most complex and informative biopolymers found on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix as either free HS fragments or constituents of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). Analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains in human serum at the disaccharide level has great potential for early disease diagnosis and prognosis, however, the low concentration of HS in human serum, together with the complexity of the serum matrix, limits the information on HS. In this study, we present and validate the development of a new sensitive method for in-depth compositional analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains. This protocol involved several steps including weak anion exchange chromatography, ultrafiltration and solid phase extraction for enhanced detection prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Using this protocol, a total of 51 serum samples from 26 premenopausal and 25 postmenopausal women were analyzed. Statistically significant differences in heparin/HS disaccharide profiles were observed. The proportion of N-acetylation and N-sulfation in both free HS and HSPG sugar chains were significantly different between pre- and postmenopausal women, indicating changes in N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferases (NDSTs), the enzymes involved in the initial step of the biosynthetic pathway. Differences in the proportion of 6-O-sulfation suggest that 6-O-sulfotransferase and/or 6-O-sulfatase enzymes may also be implicated. PMID:23659730

  2. PACAP Controls Adrenomedullary Catecholamine Secretion and Expression of Catecholamine Biosynthetic Enzymes at High Splanchnic Nerve Firing Rates Characteristic of Stress Transduction in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stroth, N.; Kuri, B. A.; Mustafa, T.; Chan, S.-A.

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptide PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide) is a cotransmitter of acetylcholine at the adrenomedullary synapse, where autonomic regulation of hormone secretion occurs. We have previously reported that survival of prolonged metabolic stress in mice requires PACAP-dependent biosynthesis and secretion of adrenomedullary catecholamines (CAs). In the present experiments, we show that CA secretion evoked by direct high-frequency stimulation of the splanchnic nerve is abolished in native adrenal slices from male PACAP-deficient mice. Further, we demonstrate that PACAP is both necessary and sufficient for CA secretion ex vivo during stimulation protocols designed to mimic stress. In vivo, up-regulation of transcripts encoding adrenomedullary CA-synthesizing enzymes (tyrosine hydroxylase, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase) in response to both psychogenic and metabolic stressors (restraint and hypoglycemia) is PACAP-dependent. Stressor-induced alteration of the adrenomedullary secretory cocktail also appears to require PACAP, because up-regulation of galanin mRNA is abrogated in male PACAP-deficient mice. We further show that hypoglycemia-induced corticosterone secretion is not PACAP-dependent, ruling out the possibility that glucocorticoids are the main mediators of the aforementioned effects. Instead, experiments with bovine chromaffin cells suggest that PACAP acts directly at the level of the adrenal medulla. By integrating prolonged CA secretion, expression of biosynthetic enzymes and production of modulatory neuropeptides such as galanin, PACAP is crucial for adrenomedullary function. Importantly, our results show that PACAP is the dominant adrenomedullary neurotransmitter during conditions of enhanced secretory demand. PMID:23221599

  3. Lipoprotein Lipase releases esterified oxylipins from Very Low Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Gregory C.; Newman, John W.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the distribution of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in lipoprotein particles. If these oxidation products are released by lipoprotein lipase (LpL), then their delivery to peripheral tissues with bulk lipids could influence cellular function. Using 26 week old normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic Zucker rats, we measured PUFA alcohols, epoxides, diols, ketones and triols (i.e. oxylipins) in esterified and non-esterified fractions of whole plasma, VLDL, and LpL-generated VLDL-lipolysates. Whole plasma, VLDL, and lipolysate oxylipin profiles were distinct and altered by hyperlipidemia. While >90% of the whole plasma oxylipins were esterified, the fraction of each oxylipin class in the VLDL varied: 46% of alcohols, 30% of epoxides, 19% of diols, <10% of ketones, <1% triols. Whole plasma was dominated by arachidonate alcohols, while the linoleate alcohols, epoxides and ketones showed an increased prevalence in VLDL. LpL-mediated VLDL lipolysis of PUFA alcohols, diols and ketones was detected and the relative abundance of oxygenated linoleates was enhanced in the lipolysates, relative to their corresponding VLDL. In summary esterified oxylipins were seen to be LpL substrates with heterogeneous distributions among lipoprotein classes. Moreover, oxylipin distributions are changes within the context of obesity-associated dyslipidemia. These results support the notion that the VLDL-LpL axis may facilitate the delivery of plasma oxylipins to the periphery. The physiological implication of these findings are yet to be elucidated, however these molecules are plausible indicators of systemic oxidative stress, and could report this status to the peripheral tissues. PMID:19042114

  4. A cautionary tale of structure-guided inhibitor development against an essential enzyme in the aspartate-biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Thangavelu, Bharani; Bhansali, Pravin; Viola, Ronald E

    2014-12-01

    The aspartate pathway is essential for the production of the amino acids required for protein synthesis and of the metabolites needed in bacterial development. This pathway also leads to the production of several classes of quorum-sensing molecules that can trigger virulence in certain microorganisms. The second enzyme in this pathway, aspartate β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH), is absolutely required for bacterial survival and has been targeted for the design of selective inhibitors. Fragment-library screening has identified a new set of inhibitors that, while they do not resemble the substrates for this reaction, have been shown to bind at the active site of ASADH. Structure-guided development of these lead compounds has produced moderate inhibitors of the target enzyme, with some selectivity observed between the Gram-negative and Gram-positive orthologs of ASADH. However, many of these inhibitor analogs and derivatives have not yet achieved the expected enhanced affinity. Structural characterization of these enzyme-inhibitor complexes has provided detailed explanations for the barriers that interfere with optimal binding. Despite binding in the same active-site region, significant changes are observed in the orientation of these bound inhibitors that are caused by relatively modest structural alterations. Taken together, these studies present a cautionary tale for issues that can arise in the systematic approach to the modification of lead compounds that are being used to develop potent inhibitors. PMID:25478842

  5. Structure of the d-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Asim K.; Atanasova, Vesna; Gamage, Swarna; Robinson, Howard; Parsons, James F.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF from P. agglomerans has been solved alone and in complex with phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate. Apo EhpF was solved and refined in two different space groups at 1.95 and 2.3 Å resolution and the EhpF–phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate complex structure was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound d-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  6. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control.

    PubMed

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Heylen, Kevin; Rougé, Pierre; Powell, Charles A; Shatters, Robert G; Smagghe, Guy; Borovsky, Dov

    2014-05-01

    enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of JH III. PMID:24657668

  7. Regulation of NAD biosynthetic enzymes modulates NAD-sensing processes to shape mammalian cell physiology under varying biological cues.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Silverio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    In addition to its role as a redox coenzyme, NAD is a substrate of various enzymes that split the molecule to either catalyze covalent modifications of target proteins or convert NAD into biologically active metabolites. The coenzyme bioavailability may be significantly affected by these reactions, with ensuing major impact on energy metabolism, cell survival, and aging. Moreover, through the activity of the NAD-dependent deacetylating sirtuins, NAD behaves as a beacon molecule that reports the cell metabolic state, and accordingly modulates transcriptional responses and metabolic adaptations. In this view, NAD biosynthesis emerges as a highly regulated process: it enables cells to preserve NAD homeostasis in response to significant NAD-consuming events and it can be modulated by various stimuli to induce, via NAD level changes, suitable NAD-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, with focus on the relevant rate-limiting enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. PMID:25770681

  8. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  9. Effect of exogenous hormones on transcription levels of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthetic enzymes in the silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Yang, HuanHuan; Yao, LiLi; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B6 includes 6 pyridine derivatives, among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a coenzyme for over 140 enzymes. Animals acquire their vitamin B6 from food. Through a salvage pathway, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is synthesized from pyridoxal, pyridoxine or pyridoxamine, in a series of reactions catalyzed by pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase. The regulation of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte biosynthesis and pyridoxal 5'-phospahte homeostasis are at the center of study for vitamin B6 nutrition. How pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones has not been reported so far. Our previous studies have shown that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate level in silkworm larva displays cyclic developmental changes. In the current study, effects of exogenous juvenile hormone and molting hormone on the transcription level of genes coding for the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte were examined. Results show that pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase are regulated at the transcription level by development and are responsive to hormones. Molting hormone stimulates the expression of genes coding for pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase, and juvenile hormone appears to work against molting hormone. Whether pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones in general is an important issue for further studies. PMID:26780217

  10. New N-acetyltransferase fold in the structure and mechanism of the phosphonate biosynthetic enzyme FrbF.

    PubMed

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E; DeSieno, Matthew A; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K

    2011-10-14

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098. PMID:21865168

  11. Enhancing a Pathway-Genome Database (PGDB) to Capture Subcellular Localization of Metabolites and Enzymes: The Nucleotide-Sugar Biosynthetic Pathways of Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.; Karpinets, T. V.; Chang, C. H.; Bar-Peled, M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how cellular metabolism works and is regulated requires that the underlying biochemical pathways be adequately represented and integrated with large metabolomic data sets to establish a robust network model. Genetically engineering energy crops to be less recalcitrant to saccharification requires detailed knowledge of plant polysaccharide structures and a thorough understanding of the metabolic pathways involved in forming and regulating cell-wall synthesis. Nucleotide-sugars are building blocks for synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. The biosynthesis of nucleotide-sugars is catalyzed by a multitude of enzymes that reside in different subcellular organelles, and precise representation of these pathways requires accurate capture of this biological compartmentalization. The lack of simple localization cues in genomic sequence data and annotations however leads to missing compartmentalization information for eukaryotes in automatically generated databases, such as the Pathway-Genome Databases (PGDBs) of the SRI Pathway Tools software that drives much biochemical knowledge representation on the internet. In this report, we provide an informal mechanism using the existing Pathway Tools framework to integrate protein and metabolite sub-cellular localization data with the existing representation of the nucleotide-sugar metabolic pathways in a prototype PGDB for Populus trichocarpa. The enhanced pathway representations have been successfully used to map SNP abundance data to individual nucleotide-sugar biosynthetic genes in the PGDB. The manually curated pathway representations are more conducive to the construction of a computational platform that will allow the simulation of natural and engineered nucleotide-sugar precursor fluxes into specific recalcitrant polysaccharide(s).

  12. Inhibition of green tea and the catechins against 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the key enzyme of the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hui, Xian; Liu, Hui; Tian, Fang-Lin; Li, Fei-Fei; Li, Heng; Gao, Wen-Yun

    2016-09-01

    1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) is the first committed enzyme in the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway and also a validated antimicrobial target. Green tea which is rich in polyphenolic components such as the catechins, possesses a plenty of pharmacological activities, in particular an antibacterial effect. To uncover the antibacterial mechanism of green tea and to seek new DXR inhibitors from natural sources, the DXR inhibitory activity of green tea and its main antimicrobial catechins were investigated in this study. The results show that the raw extract of green tea and its ethyl acetate fraction are able to suppress DXR activity explicitly. Further determination of the DXR inhibitory capacity of eight catechin compounds demonstrates that the most active compound is gallocatechin gallate that is able to inhibit around 50% activity of DXR at 25μM. Based on these data, the primary structure-activity relationship of the catechins against DXR is discussed. This study would be very helpful to elucidate the antimicrobial mechanism of green tea and the catechins and also would be very useful to direct the rational utilization of them as food additives. PMID:27439219

  13. n-Alkylboronic acid inhibitors reveal determinants of ligand specificity in the quorum-quenching and siderophore biosynthetic enzyme PvdQ.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Kenneth D; Wu, Rui; Liu, Dali; Fast, Walter

    2014-10-28

    The enzyme PvdQ (E.C. 3.5.1.97) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase that catalyzes the removal of an N-myristyl substituent from a biosynthetic precursor of the iron-chelating siderophore pyoverdine. Inhibitors of pyoverdine biosynthesis are potential antibiotics since iron is essential for growth and scarce in most infections. PvdQ also catalyzes hydrolytic amide bond cleavage of selected N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals used by some Gram-negative pathogens to coordinate the transcription of virulence factors. The resulting quorum-quenching activity of PvdQ has potential applications in antivirulence therapies. To inform both inhibitor design and enzyme engineering efforts, a series of n-alkylboronic acid inhibitors of PvdQ was characterized to reveal determinants of ligand selectivity. A simple homologation series results in compounds with Ki values that span from 4.7 mM to 190 pM, with a dependence of ΔGbind values on chain length of -1.0 kcal/mol/CH2. X-ray crystal structures are determined for the PvdQ complexes with 1-ethyl-, 1-butyl-, 1-hexyl-, and 1-octylboronic acids at 1.6, 1.8, 2.0, and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. The 1-hexyl- and 1-octylboronic acids form tetrahedral adducts with the active-site N-terminal Ser217 in the β-subunit of PvdQ, and the n-alkyl substituents are bound in the acyl-group binding site. The 1-ethyl- and 1-butylboronic acids also form adducts with Ser217 but instead form trigonal planar adducts and extend their n-alkyl substituents into an alternative binding site. These results are interpreted to propose a ligand discrimination model for PvdQ that informs the development of PvdQ-related tools and therapeutics. PMID:25290020

  14. Identifying the emerging human pathogen Scedosporium prolificans by using a species-specific monoclonal antibody that binds to the melanin biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R; Ryder, Lauren S; Le Cocq, Kate; Soanes, Darren M

    2015-04-01

    The dematiaceous (melanized) fungus Scedosporium prolificans is an emerging and frequently fatal pathogen of immunocompromised humans and which, along with the closely related fungi Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium apiospermum and S. aurantiacum in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex, is a contributing aetiology to tsunami lung and central nervous system infections in near-drowning victims who have aspirated water laden with spores. At present, the natural habitat of the fungus is largely unknown, and accurate detection methods are needed to identify environmental reservoirs of infectious propagules. In this study, we report the development of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (CA4) specific to S. prolificans, which does not cross-react with closely related fungi in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex or with a wide range of mould and yeast species pathogenic to humans. Using genome sequencing of a soil isolate and targeted gene disruption of the CA4 antigen-encoding gene, we show that mAb CA4 binds to the melanin-biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase. Enzyme-deficient mutants produce orange-brown or green-brown spore suspensions compared with the black spore suspension of the wild-type strain. Using mAb CA4 and a mAb (HG12) specific to the related fungi P. boydii, P. apiosperma, S. apiospermum and S. aurantiacum, we demonstrate how the mAbs can be used in combination with a semiselective isolation procedure to track these opportunistic pathogens in environmental samples containing mixed populations of human pathogenic fungi. Specificity of mAb CA4 was confirmed by sequencing of the internally transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA-encoding regions of fungi isolated from estuarine muds. PMID:24684242

  15. Plasma Catecholamines (CA) and Gene Expression of CA Biosynthetic Enzymes in Adrenal Medulla and Sympathetic Ganglia of Rats Exposed to Single or Repeated Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, J.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.; Kvetnansky, R.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in blood collected directly during a single or 8-times repeated centrifugation at hypergravity 4G, using remote controlled equipment. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge hypergravity-induced increase. After the last blood collection during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge decelerated and stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels showed none or small changes. Repeated exposure to hypergravity 4G (8 days for 60 min) eliminated the increase in plasma EPI levels at the 15 min interval but did not markedly affect plasma NE levels. To explain these findings we measured mRNA levels of CA biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in the adrenal medulla (AM) and stellate ganglia (SG) of rats exposed to continuous hypergravity (2G) up to 6 days. In AM, TH, DBH and PNMT mRNA levels were significantly increased in intervals up to 3 days, however, after 6 day hypergravity exposure, no significant elevation was found. In SG, no significant changes in gene expression of CA enzymes were seen both after a single or repeated hypergravity. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary system, whereas the sympathoneural system is not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that during repeated or continuous exposure of the organism to hypergravity the adrenomedullary system is adapted, whereas sympathoneural system is not affected.

  16. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoprenoids constitute a vast family of natural compounds performing diverse and essential functions in all domains of life. In most eubacteria, isoprenoids are synthesized through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The production of MEP is usually catalyzed by deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR-I) but a few organisms use an alternative DXR-like enzyme (DXR-II). Results Searches through 1498 bacterial complete proteomes detected 130 sequences with similarity to DXR-II. Phylogenetic analysis identified three well-resolved clades: the DXR-II family (clustering 53 sequences including eleven experimentally verified as functional enzymes able to produce MEP), and two previously uncharacterized NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductase families (designated DLO1 and DLO2 for DXR-II-like oxidoreductases 1 and 2). Our analyses identified amino acid changes critical for the acquisition of DXR-II biochemical function through type-I functional divergence, two of them mapping onto key residues for DXR-II activity. DXR-II showed a markedly discontinuous distribution, which was verified at several levels: taxonomic (being predominantly found in Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes), metabolic (being mostly found in bacteria with complete functional MEP pathways with or without DXR-I), and phenotypic (as no biological/phenotypic property was found to be preferentially distributed among DXR-II-containing strains, apart from pathogenicity in animals). By performing a thorough comparative sequence analysis of GC content, 3:1 dinucleotide frequencies, codon usage and codon adaptation indexes (CAI) between DXR-II sequences and their corresponding genomes, we examined the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), as opposed to an scenario of massive gene loss, in the evolutionary origin and diversification of the DXR-II subfamily in bacteria. Conclusions Our analyses support a single origin of the DXR-II family through functional divergence, in which constitutes

  17. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  18. Mechanistic insights into 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, a key enzyme of the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Tian, Jie; Sun, Wei; Qin, Wei; Gao, Wen-Yun

    2013-11-01

    The binding mode of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) to 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) (EC 1.1.1.267) from Escherichia coli was investigated via (18) O isotope exchange experiments and determination of the kinetic parameters of the reaction. The results support a C3-C4 substrate binding mode in which DXP chelates a DXR-bound divalent cation via its hydroxyl groups at C3 and C4. Based on this binding mode and the early results, a catalytic cycle for the conversion of DXP to 2-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate mediated by DXR including a pseudo-single molecule transition state of the retro-aldol intermediates is proposed. Taking into account the binding mode of DXP and the catalytic cycle of DXR, the mechanistic insights of DXR are disclosed and the current discrepancies concerning the catalysis of this enzyme are interpreted within the accepted retro-aldol/aldol sequence. PMID:24010408

  19. Diurnal Variations of Mouse Plasma and Hepatic Bile Acid Concentrations as well as Expression of Biosynthetic Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Guo, Grace L.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Diurnal fluctuation of bile acid (BA) concentrations in the enterohepatic system of mammals has been known for a long time. Recently, BAs have been recognized as signaling molecules beyond their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis. Methods and Results The current study depicted diurnal variations of individual BAs detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) in serum and livers collected from C57BL/6 mice fed a regular chow or a chow containing cholestyramine (resin). Circadian rhythms of mRNA of vital BA-related nuclear receptors, enzymes, and transporters in livers and ilea were determined in control- and resin-fed mice, as well as in farnesoid X receptor (FXR) null mice. The circadian profiles of BAs showed enhanced bacterial dehydroxylation during the fasting phase and efficient hepatic reconjugation of BAs in the fed phase. The resin removed more than 90% of BAs with β-hydroxy groups, such as muricholic acids and ursodeoxycholic acid, from serum and livers, but did not exert as significant influence on CA and CDCA in both compartments. Both resin-fed and FXR-null mouse models indicate that BAs regulate their own biosynthesis through the FXR-regulated ileal fibroblast growth factor 15. BA flux also influences the daily mRNA levels of multiple BA transporters. Conclusion BA concentration and composition exhibit circadian variations in mouse liver and serum, which influences the circadian rhythms of BA metabolizing genes in liver and ileum. The diurnal variations of BAs appear to serve as a signal that coordinates daily nutrient metabolism in mammals. PMID:21346810

  20. CYP82Y1 Is N-Methylcanadine 1-Hydroxylase, a Key Noscapine Biosynthetic Enzyme in Opium Poppy*

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Noscapine is a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid investigated for its potent pharmacological properties. Although structurally elucidated more than a century ago, the biosynthesis of noscapine has not been established. Radiotracer studies have shown that noscapine is derived from the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine and has been proposed to proceed through (S)-N-methylcanadine. However, pathway intermediates involved in the conversion of N-methylcanadine to noscapine have not been identified. We report the isolation and characterization of the cytochrome P-450 CYP82Y1, which catalyzes the 1-hydroxylation of N-methylcanadine to 1-hydroxy-N-methylcanadine. Comparison of transcript and metabolite profiles of eight opium poppy chemotypes revealed four cytochrome P-450s, three from the CYP82 and one from the CYP719 families, that were tightly correlated with noscapine accumulation. Recombinant CYP82Y1 was the only enzyme that accepted (R,S)-N-methylcanadine as a substrate with strict specificity and high affinity. As expected, CYP82Y1 was abundantly expressed in opium poppy stems where noscapine accumulation is highest among plant organs. Suppression of CYP82Y1 using virus-induced gene silencing caused a significant reduction in the levels of noscapine, narcotoline, and a putative downstream secoberbine intermediate and also resulted in increased accumulation of the upstream pathway intermediates scoulerine, tetrahydrocolum-bamine, canadine, and N-methylcanadine. The combined biochemical and physiological data support the 1-hydroxylation of (S)-N-methylcanadine catalyzed by CYP82Y1 as the first committed step in the formation of noscapine in opium poppy. PMID:24324259

  1. Impact of phyto-oxylipins in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth

    2002-07-01

    Phyto-oxylipins are metabolites produced in plants by the oxidative transformation of unsaturated fatty acids via a series of diverging metabolic pathways. Biochemical dissection and genetic approaches have provided compelling evidence that these oxygenated derivatives actively participate in plant defense mechanisms. During the past decade, interest in this field was focused on the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (one branch of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism) and on its relationship to the other plant defense-signaling pathways. However, recently, antisense strategies have revealed that oxylipins other than jasmonates are probably also essential for the resistance of plants to pathogens. PMID:12119169

  2. Antibiotic oxylipins from Alternanthera brasiliana and its endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Marília Almeida; Kai, Marco; Mithöfer, Axel; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson

    2015-02-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Alternanthera brasiliana stem extracts resulted in the isolation of an antibiotically active fraction. Five human pathogenic bacteria were used to guide the fractionation process for the isolation of antimicrobial compounds. Finally, 17 linoleate oxylipins were identified by LC-MS/MS and NMR spectroscopy. Five of the isolated compounds present in A. brasiliana tissues were also detected to be synthesized by endophytic bacteria of the genus Bacillus that were isolated from A. brasiliana. It is speculated that the antibiotic oxylipins from A. brasiliana might derive from bacteria and be involved in an ecological relationship between this plant and its endophytes. PMID:25433629

  3. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Li, Xueying; Li, Xinzheng; Zheng, Desong; Sun, Quanxi; Liu, Jiang; Li, Yaxiao; Hua, Jinping; Qi, Baoxiu

    2016-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine) within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT) PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high expression of

  4. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Desong; Sun, Quanxi; Liu, Jiang; Li, Yaxiao; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine) within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT) PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high expression of

  5. Advances in Our Understanding of Oxylipins Derived from Dietary PUFAs12

    PubMed Central

    Gabbs, Melissa; Leng, Shan; Devassy, Jessay G; Monirujjaman, Md; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins formed from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the main mediators of PUFA effects in the body. They are formed via cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 pathways, resulting in the formation of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids (FAs), epoxy FAs, lipoxins, eoxins, hepoxilins, resolvins, protectins (also called neuroprotectins in the brain), and maresins. In addition to the well-known eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid, recent developments in lipidomic methodologies have raised awareness of and interest in the large number of oxylipins formed from other PUFAs, including those from the essential FAs and the longer-chain n–3 (ω-3) PUFAs. Oxylipins have essential roles in normal physiology and function, but can also have detrimental effects. Compared with the oxylipins derived from n–3 PUFAs, oxylipins from n–6 PUFAs generally have greater activity and more inflammatory, vasoconstrictory, and proliferative effects, although there are notable exceptions. Because PUFA composition does not necessarily reflect oxylipin composition, comprehensive analysis of the oxylipin profile is necessary to understand the overall physiologic effects of PUFAs mediated through their oxylipins. These analyses should include oxylipins derived from linoleic and α-linolenic acids, because these largely unexplored bioactive oxylipins constitute more than one-half of oxylipins present in tissues. Because collated information on oxylipins formed from different PUFAs is currently unavailable, this review provides a detailed compilation of the main oxylipins formed from PUFAs and describes their functions. Much remains to be elucidated in this emerging field, including the discovery of more oxylipins, and the understanding of the differing biological potencies, kinetics, and isomer-specific activities of these novel PUFA metabolites. PMID:26374175

  6. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene encoding the pyoverdin biosynthetic enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Visca, P; Ciervo, A; Orsi, N

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase catalyzes the hydroxylation of L-ornithine (L-Orn), which represents an early step in the biosynthesis of the peptidic moiety of the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A gene bank of DNA from P. aeruginosa PAO1 (ATCC 15692) was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR3 and mobilized into the L-Orn N5-oxygenase-defective (pvdA) P. aeruginosa mutant PALS124. Screening for fluorescent transconjugants made it possible to identify the trans-complementing cosmid pPV4, which was able to restore pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity in the pvdA mutant PALS124. The 17-kb PAO1 DNA insert of pPV4 contained at least two genetic determinants involved in pyoverdin synthesis, i.e., pvdA and pvdC4, as shown by complementation analysis of a set of mutants blocked in different steps of the pyoverdin biosynthetic pathway. Deletion analysis, subcloning, and transposon mutagenesis enabled us to locate the pvdA gene in a minimum DNA fragment of 1.7 kb flanked by two SphI restriction sites. Complementation of the pvdA mutation was under stringent iron control; both pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity were undetectable in cells of the trans-complemented mutant which had been grown in the presence of 100 microM FeCl3. The entire nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene, from which the primary structure of the encoded polypeptide was deduced, was determined. The pvdA structural gene is 1,278 bp; the cloned DNA fragment contains at the 5' end of the gene a putative ribosome-binding site but apparently lacks known promoterlike sequences. The P. aeruginosa L-Orn N5-oxygenase gene codes for a 426-amino-acid peptide with a predicted molecular mass of 47.7 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.1. The enzyme shows approximately 50% homology with functional analogs, i.e., L-lysine N6-hydroxylase of aerobactin-producing Escherichia coli and L-Orn N5-oxygenase of ferrichrome-producing Ustilago maydis. The pvd

  7. Hepatic oxylipin profiles in obese rats: Effect of antioxidant supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity induces biochemical changes in lipid metabolism. The extent to which enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid (per)oxidation products, oxylipins, are altered by obesity is of great interest. Conflicting data exist regarding oxidative damage to lipids in obesity. We investigated the extent to which ...

  8. The emerging role of oxylipins in thrombosis and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Benjamin E; Ahmed, Intekhab; Holinstat, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death in the US, is predicted to increase due to the shift in age of the general population and increase in CVD risk factors such as obesity and diabetes. New therapies are required to decrease the prevalence of CVD risk factors (obesity and diabetes) as well as reduce atherothrombosis, the major cause of CVD related mortality. Oxylipins, bioactive metabolites derived from the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, play a role in the progression of CVD risk factors and thrombosis. Aspirin, a cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor, decreases atherothrombotic associated mortality by 25%. These potent effects of aspirin have shown the utility of modulating oxylipin signaling pathways to decrease CVD mortality. The role of many oxylipins in the progression of CVD, however, is still uncertain or controversial. An increased understanding of the role oxylipins play in CVD risk factors and thrombosis could lead to new therapies to decrease the prevalence of CVD and its associated mortality. PMID:24432004

  9. Changes in PTGS1 and ALOX12 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Are Associated with Changes in Arachidonic Acid, Oxylipins, and Oxylipin/Fatty Acid Ratios in Response to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Claire C.; Kamita, Shizuo George; Sacchi, Romina; Yang, Jun; Nording, Malin L.; Georgi, Katrin; Hegedus Karbowski, Christine; German, J. Bruce; Weiss, Robert H.; Hogg, Ronald J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zivkovic, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is a high degree of inter-individual variability among people in response to intervention with omega-3 fatty acids (FA), which may partly explain conflicting results on the effectiveness of omega-3 FA for the treatment and prevention of chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study we sought to evaluate whether part of this inter-individual variability in response is related to the regulation of key oxylipin metabolic genes in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Methods Plasma FA and oxylipin profiles from 12 healthy individuals were compared to PBMC gene expression profiles following six weeks of supplementation with fish oil, which delivered 1.9 g/d eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1.5 g/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Fold changes in gene expression were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results Healthy individuals supplemented with omega-3 FA had differential responses in prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 1 (PTGS1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (ALOX12), and interleukin 8 (IL-8) gene expression in isolated PBMCs. In those individuals for whom plasma arachidonic acid (ARA) in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipid class decreased in response to omega-3 intervention, there was a corresponding decrease in gene expression for PTGS1 and ALOX12. Several oxylipin product/FA precursor ratios (e.g. prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)/ARA for PTGS1 and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE)/ARA for ALOX12) were also associated with fold change in gene expression, suggesting an association between enzyme activity and gene expression. The fold-change in PTGS1 gene expression was highly positively correlated with ALOX12 gene expression but not with PTGS2, whereas IL-8 and PTGS2 were positively correlated. Conclusions The regulation of important oxylipin metabolic genes in PBMCs varied with the extent of change in ARA concentrations in the case of PTGS1 and ALOX12

  10. Impact of Divergent Selection on the Abundance and Activities of Lignin Biosynthetic Enzymes in Switchgrass, and Characterization of Recombinant Switchgrass CAD and COMT Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relative composition of lignin monomers in cell walls provides key information on the integrated functions of the underlying biosynthetic machinery, as well as useful window into the efficacy of broad or narrow selection criteria for improvement of plants with more optimal biomass quality. Here...

  11. AHL-priming functions via oxylipin and salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sebastian T.; Schikora, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative action between the host plant and associated bacteria is crucial for the establishment of an efficient interaction. In bacteria, the synchronized behavior of a population is often achieved by a density-dependent communication called quorum sensing. This behavior is based on signaling molecules, which influence bacterial gene expression. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are such molecules in many Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, some AHLs are responsible for the beneficial effect of bacteria on plants, for example the long chain N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) can prime Arabidopsis and barley plants for an enhanced defense. This AHL-induced resistance phenomenon, named AHL-priming, was observed in several independent laboratories during the last two decades. Very recently, the mechanism of priming with oxo-C14-HSL was shown to depend on an oxylipin and salicylic acid (SA). SA is a key element in plant defense, it accumulates during different plant resistance responses and is the base of systemic acquired resistance. In addition, SA itself can prime plants for an enhanced resistance against pathogen attack. On the other side, oxylipins, including jasmonic acid (JA) and related metabolites, are lipid-derived signaling compounds. Especially the oxidized fatty acid derivative cis-OPDA, which is the precursor of JA, is a newly described player in plant defense. Unlike the antagonistic effect of SA and JA in plant–microbe interactions, the recently described pathway functions through a synergistic effect of oxylipins and SA, and is independent of the JA signaling cascade. Interestingly, the oxo-C14-HSL-induced oxylipin/SA signaling pathway induces stomata defense responses and cell wall strengthening thus prevents pathogen invasion. In this review, we summarize the findings on AHL-priming and the related signaling cascade. In addition, we discuss the potential of AHL-induced resistance in new strategies of plant protection. PMID

  12. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  13. Biosynthetic pathways of ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  14. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  15. Target-specific identification and characterization of the putative gene cluster for brasilinolide biosynthesis revealing the mechanistic insights and combinatorial synthetic utility of 2-deoxy-l-fucose biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsien-Tai; Weng, Chien-Pao; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Hung

    2016-02-14

    Brasilinolides exhibiting potent immunosuppressive and antifungal activities with remarkably low toxicity are structurally characterized by an unusual modified 2-deoxy-l-fucose (2dF) attached to a type I polyketide (PK-I) macrolactone. From the pathogenic producer Nocardia terpenica (Nocardia brasiliensis IFM-0406), a 210 kb genomic fragment was identified by target-specific degenerate primers and subsequently sequenced, revealing a giant nbr gene cluster harboring genes (nbrCDEF) required for TDP-2dF biosynthesis and those for PK-I biosynthesis, modification and regulation. The results showed that the genetic and domain arrangements of nbr PK-I synthases agreed colinearly with the PK-I structures of brasilinolides. Subsequent heterologous expression of nbrCDEF in Escherichia coli accomplished in vitro reconstitution of TDP-2dF biosynthesis. The catalytic functions and mechanisms of NbrCDEF enzymes were further characterized by systematic mix-and-match experiments. The enzymes were revealed to display remarkable substrate and partner promiscuity, leading to the establishment of in vitro hybrid deoxysugar biosynthetic pathways throughout an in situ one-pot (iSOP) method. This study represents the first demonstration of TDP-2dF biosynthesis at the enzyme and molecular levels, and provides new hope for expanding the structural diversity of brasilinolides by combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:26754528

  16. Impact of circulating esterified eicosanoids and other oxylipins on endothelial function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosanoids including epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (HETEs) and other oxylipins derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids have emerging roles in endothelial inflammation and its atherosclerotic consequences. Unlike many eicosanoids, they are known to be esterified in c...

  17. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of the LPS Biosynthetic Enzyme D-alpha,beta-D-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate Phosphatase (GmhB) from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.; Sugiman-Marangos, S; Zhang, K; Valvano, M; Wright, G; Junop, M

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide is a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and provides a permeability barrier to many commonly used antibiotics. ADP-heptose residues are an integral part of the LPS inner core, and mutants deficient in heptose biosynthesis demonstrate increased membrane permeability. The heptose biosynthesis pathway involves phosphorylation and dephosphorylation steps not found in other pathways for the synthesis of nucleotide sugar precursors. Consequently, the heptose biosynthetic pathway has been marked as a novel target for antibiotic adjuvants, which are compounds that facilitate and potentiate antibiotic activity. D-{alpha},{beta}-D-Heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase (GmhB) catalyzes the third essential step of LPS heptose biosynthesis. This study describes the first crystal structure of GmhB and enzymatic analysis of the protein. Structure-guided mutations followed by steady state kinetic analysis, together with established precedent for HAD phosphatases, suggest that GmhB functions through a phosphoaspartate intermediate. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationship of GmhB, a new target for combatting Gram-negative bacterial infection.

  18. Characterization of the enzyme CbiH60 involved in anaerobic ring contraction of the cobalamin (vitamin B12) biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Moore, Simon J; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Lawrence, Andrew D; Deery, Evelyne; Howard, Mark J; Rigby, Stephen E J; Warren, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic pathway for the biosynthesis of cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) has remained poorly characterized because of the sensitivity of the pathway intermediates to oxygen and the low activity of enzymes. One of the major bottlenecks in the anaerobic pathway is the ring contraction step, which has not been observed previously with a purified enzyme system. The Gram-positive aerobic bacterium Bacillus megaterium has a complete anaerobic pathway that contains an unusual ring contraction enzyme, CbiH(60), that harbors a C-terminal extension with sequence similarity to the nitrite/sulfite reductase family. To improve solubility, the enzyme was homologously produced in the host B. megaterium DSM319. CbiH(60) was characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance and shown to contain a [4Fe-4S] center. Assays with purified recombinant CbiH(60) demonstrate that the enzyme converts both cobalt-precorrin-3 and cobalt factor III into the ring-contracted product cobalt-precorrin-4 in high yields, with the latter transformation dependent upon DTT and an intact Fe-S center. Furthermore, the ring contraction process was shown not to involve a change in the oxidation state of the central cobalt ion of the macrocycle. PMID:23155054

  19. Characterization of the Enzyme CbiH60 Involved in Anaerobic Ring Contraction of the Cobalamin (Vitamin B12) Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Simon J.; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Lawrence, Andrew D.; Deery, Evelyne; Howard, Mark J.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic pathway for the biosynthesis of cobalamin (vitamin B12) has remained poorly characterized because of the sensitivity of the pathway intermediates to oxygen and the low activity of enzymes. One of the major bottlenecks in the anaerobic pathway is the ring contraction step, which has not been observed previously with a purified enzyme system. The Gram-positive aerobic bacterium Bacillus megaterium has a complete anaerobic pathway that contains an unusual ring contraction enzyme, CbiH60, that harbors a C-terminal extension with sequence similarity to the nitrite/sulfite reductase family. To improve solubility, the enzyme was homologously produced in the host B. megaterium DSM319. CbiH60 was characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance and shown to contain a [4Fe-4S] center. Assays with purified recombinant CbiH60 demonstrate that the enzyme converts both cobalt-precorrin-3 and cobalt factor III into the ring-contracted product cobalt-precorrin-4 in high yields, with the latter transformation dependent upon DTT and an intact Fe-S center. Furthermore, the ring contraction process was shown not to involve a change in the oxidation state of the central cobalt ion of the macrocycle. PMID:23155054

  20. Plasma fatty acids, oxylipins, and risk of myocardial infarction: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Koh, Hiromi W L; Choi, Hyungwon; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Newman, John W; Su, Jin; Fang, Jinling; Ong, Choon Nam; van Dam, Rob M

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to examine the prospective association between plasma FAs, oxylipins, and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Singapore Chinese population. A nested case-control study with 744 incident AMI cases and 744 matched controls aged 47-83 years was conducted within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Nineteen plasma FAs and 12 oxylipins were quantified using MS. These were grouped into 12 FA clusters and 5 oxylipin clusters using hierarchical clustering, and their associations with AMI risk were assessed. Long-chain n-3 FAs [odds ratio (OR) = 0.67 per SD increase, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.84, P < 0.001] and stearic acid (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44-0.97, P = 0.03) were inversely associated with AMI risk, whereas arachidonic acid (AA) was positively associated with AMI risk (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.03-1.52, P = 0.02) in the multivariable model with adjustment for other FAs. Further adjustment for oxylipins did not substantially change these associations. An inverse association was observed between AA-derived oxylipin, thromboxane (TX)B2, and AMI risk (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.71-0.93, P = 0.003). Circulating long-chain n-3 FAs and stearic acid were associated with a lower and AA was associated with a higher AMI risk in this Chinese population. The association between the oxylipin TXB2 and AMI requires further research. PMID:27371261

  1. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  2. Diversifying Carotenoid Biosynthetic Pathways by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Daisuke; Tobias, Alexander V.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms and plants synthesize a diverse array of natural products, many of which have proven indispensable to human health and well-being. Although many thousands of these have been characterized, the space of possible natural products—those that could be made biosynthetically—remains largely unexplored. For decades, this space has largely been the domain of chemists, who have synthesized scores of natural product analogs and have found many with improved or novel functions. New natural products have also been made in recombinant organisms, via engineered biosynthetic pathways. Recently, methods inspired by natural evolution have begun to be applied to the search for new natural products. These methods force pathways to evolve in convenient laboratory organisms, where the products of new pathways can be identified and characterized in high-throughput screening programs. Carotenoid biosynthetic pathways have served as a convenient experimental system with which to demonstrate these ideas. Researchers have mixed, matched, and mutated carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and screened libraries of these “evolved” pathways for the emergence of new carotenoid products. This has led to dozens of new pathway products not previously known to be made by the assembled enzymes. These new products include whole families of carotenoids built from backbones not found in nature. This review details the strategies and specific methods that have been employed to generate new carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in the laboratory. The potential application of laboratory evolution to other biosynthetic pathways is also discussed. PMID:15755953

  3. Membrane-association determinants of the omega-amino acid monooxygenase PvdA, a pyoverdine biosynthetic enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Imperi, Francesco; Putignani, Lorenza; Tiburzi, Federica; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Cipollone, Rita; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    The L-ornithine N(delta)-oxygenase PvdA catalyses the N(delta)-hydroxylation of L-ornithine in many Pseudomonas spp., and thus provides an essential enzymic function in the biogenesis of the pyoverdine siderophore. Here, we report a detailed analysis of the membrane topology of the PvdA enzyme from the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Membrane topogenic determinants of PvdA were identified by computational analysis, and verified in Escherichia coli by constructing a series of translational fusions between PvdA and the PhoA (alkaline phosphatase) reporter enzyme. The inferred topological model resembled a eukaryotic reverse signal-anchor (type III) protein, with a single N-terminal domain anchored to the inner membrane, and the bulk of the protein spanning the cytosol. According to this model, the predicted transmembrane region should overlap the putative FAD-binding site. Cell fractionation and proteinase K accessibility experiments in P. aeruginosa confirmed the membrane-bound nature of PvdA, but excluded the transmembrane topology of its N-terminal hydrophobic region. Mutational analysis of PvdA, and complementation assays in a P. aeruginosa DeltapvdA mutant, demonstrated the dual (structural and functional) role of the PvdA N-terminal domain. PMID:18757814

  4. The Crystal Structure of the Novobiocin Biosynthetic Enzyme NovP: The First Representative Structure for the TylF O-Methyltransferase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    García, Inmaculada Gómez; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Usón, Isabel; Meyers, Caren L. Freel; Walsh, Christopher T.; Lawson, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary NovP is an S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferase that catalyses the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of the aminocoumarin antibiotic novobiocin. Specifically, it methylates at the 4-OH of the noviose moiety, and the resultant methoxy group is important for the potency of the mature antibiotic: previous crystallographic studies have shown that this group interacts directly with the target enzyme DNA gyrase, which is a validated drug target. We have determined the high resolution crystal structure of NovP from Streptomyces spheroides as a binary complex with its desmethylated co-substrate, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. The structure displays a typical class I methyltransferase fold, in addition to motifs that are consistent with a divalent metal-dependent mechanism. This is the first representative structure of a methyltransferase from the TylF superfamily, which includes a number of enzymes implicated in the biosynthesis of antibiotics and other therapeutics. The NovP structure reveals a number of distinctive structural features that, based on sequence conservation, are likely to be characteristic of the superfamily. These include a helical 'lid' region that gates access to the co-substrate binding pocket, and an active centre that contains a 3-Asp putative metal-binding site. A further conserved Asp likely acts as the general base that initiates the reaction by deprotonating the 4-OH group of the noviose unit. Using in silico docking we have generated models of the enzyme-substrate complex that are consistent with the proposed mechanism. Furthermore, these models suggest that NovP is unlikely to tolerate significant modifications at the noviose moiety, but could show increasing substrate promiscuity as a function of the distance of the modification from the methylation site. These observations could inform future attempts to utilise NovP for methylating a range of glycosylated compounds. PMID:19857499

  5. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins

    PubMed Central

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J.; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  6. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  7. The selective utilization of substrates in vivo by the phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes Ept1p and Cpt1p in yeast.

    PubMed

    Boumann, Henry A; de Kruijff, Ben; Heck, Albert J R; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2004-07-01

    In yeast, the aminoalcohol phosphotransferases Ept1p and Cpt1p catalyze the final steps in the CDP-ethanolamine and CDP-choline routes leading to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. To determine how these enzymes contribute to the molecular species profiles of PE and PC in vivo, wild-type, cpt1Delta, and ept1Delta cells were pulse labeled with deuterated ethanolamine and choline. Analysis of newly synthesized PE and PC using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that PE and PC produced by Ept1p and Cpt1p have different species compositions, demonstrating that the enzymes consume distinct sets of diacylglycerol species in vivo. Using the characteristic phospholipid species profiles produced by Ept1p and Cpt1p as molecular fingerprints, it was also shown that in vivo CDP-monomethylethanolamine is preferentially used as substrate by Ept1p, whereas CDP-dimethylethanolamine and CDP-propanolamine are converted by Cpt1p. PMID:15225629

  8. The Product of the LEU-3 Cistron as a Regulatory Element for the Production of the Leucine Biosynthetic Enzymes of Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Polacco, Joseph C.; Gross, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    A class of intracistronic (or closely linked) partial reversions of leu-3 mutations has been found to be conditionally constitutive with respect to the synthesis of isopropylmalate isomerase (specified by the leu-2 cistron) and β-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (specified by the leu-1 cistron), two of the enzymes of leucine biosynthesis in Neurospora. The intermediate level of enzyme production by these leu-3cc mutants is independent of the obligatory inducer effector, α-isopropylmalate, but dependent upon the presence of the branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine, valine and leucine. The properties of leu-3+, leu-3 and leu-3cc in heterokaryons indicate that the transnuclear regulatory activity of the leu-3 product varies specifically as a function of available effector molecules. The information presented suggests that the leu-3 cistron is responsible not only for the production of a "positive" regulatory substance necessary for the expression of the leu-1 and leu-2 cistrons, but that it probably serves also a coordinating role in the expression of many of the genes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism. PMID:4744402

  9. The biosynthetic gene cluster for coronamic acid, an ethylcyclopropyl amino acid, contains genes homologous to amino acid-activating enzymes and thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, M; Bender, C L

    1994-01-01

    Coronamic acid (CMA), an ethylcyclopropyl amino acid derived from isoleucine, functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of coronatine, a chlorosis-inducing phytotoxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180. The DNA required for CMA biosynthesis (6.9 kb) was sequenced, revealing three distinct open reading frames (ORFs) which share a common orientation for transcription. The deduced amino acid sequence of a 2.7-kb ORF designated cmaA contained six core sequences and two conserved motifs which are present in a variety of amino acid-activating enzymes, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Furthermore, CmaA contained a spatial arrangement of histidine, aspartate, and arginine residues which are conserved in the ferrous active site of some nonheme iron(II) enzymes which catalyze oxidative cyclizations. The deduced amino acid sequence of a 1.2-kb ORF designated cmaT was related to thioesterases of both procaryotic and eucaryotic origins. These data suggest that CMA assembly is similar to the thiotemplate mechanism of nonribosomal peptide synthesis. No significant similarities between a 0.9-kb ORF designated cmaU and other database entries were found. The start sites of two transcripts required for CMA biosynthesis were identified in the present study. pRG960sd, a vector containing a promoterless glucuronidase gene, was used to localize and study the promoter regions upstream of the two transcripts. Data obtained in the present study indicate that CMA biosynthesis is regulated at the transcriptional level by temperature. Images PMID:8002582

  10. Mutations in genes for the F420 biosynthetic pathway and a nitroreductase enzyme are the primary resistance determinants in spontaneous in vitro-selected PA-824-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Haver, Hana L; Chua, Adeline; Ghode, Pramila; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B; Singhal, Amit; Mathema, Barun; Wintjens, René; Bifani, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    Alleviating the burden of tuberculosis (TB) requires an understanding of the genetic basis that determines the emergence of drug-resistant mutants. PA-824 (pretomanid) is a bicyclic nitroimidazole class compound presently undergoing the phase III STAND clinical trial, despite lacking identifiable genetic markers for drug-specific resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the genetic polymorphisms of spontaneously generated PA-824-resistant mutant strains by surveying drug metabolism genes for potential mutations. Of the 183 independently selected PA-824-resistant M. tuberculosis mutants, 83% harbored a single mutation in one of five nonessential genes associated with either PA-824 prodrug activation (ddn, 29%; fgd1, 7%) or the tangential F420 biosynthetic pathway (fbiA, 19%; fbiB, 2%; fbiC, 26%). Crystal structure analysis indicated that identified mutations were specifically located within the protein catalytic domain that would hinder the activity of the enzymes required for prodrug activation. This systematic analysis conducted of genotypes resistant to PA-824 may contribute to future efforts in monitoring clinical strain susceptibility with this new drug therapy. PMID:26100695

  11. The 1.6 Astroms Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis MshC: The Penultimate Enzyme in the Mycothiol Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, L.; Fan, F; Vetting, M; Blanchard, J

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis MshC catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of GlcN-Ins and l-cysteine to form l-Cys-GlcN-Ins, the penultimate step in mycothiol biosynthesis. Attempts to crystallize the native, full-length MshC have been unsuccessful. However, incubation of the enzyme with the cysteinyl adenylate analogue, 5?-O-[N-(l-cysteinyl)-sulfamonyl]adenosine (CSA), followed by a 24-h limited trypsin proteolysis yielded an enzyme preparation that readily crystallized. The three-dimensional structure of MshC with CSA bound in the active site was solved and refined to 1.6 A. The refined structure exhibited electron density corresponding to the entire 47 kDa MshC molecule, with the exception of the KMSKS loop (residues 285-297), a loop previously implicated in the formation of the adenylate in related tRNA synthases. The overall tertiary fold of MshC is similar to that of cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, with a Rossmann fold catalytic domain. The interaction of the thiolate of CSA with a zinc ion at the base of the active site suggests that the metal ion participates in amino acid binding and discrimination. A number of active site residues were observed to interact with the ligand, suggesting a role in substrate binding and catalysis. Analysis utilizing modeling of the proteolyzed loop and GlcN-Ins docking, as well as the examination of sequence conservation in the active site suggests similarities and differences between cysteinyl-tRNA synthetases and MshC in recognition of the substrates for their respective reactions.

  12. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species. PMID:24747481

  13. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Lenz, Petra H

    2014-06-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species. PMID:24747481

  14. Non-nucleoside Inhibitors of BasE, An Adenylating Enzyme in the Siderophore Biosynthetic Pathway of the Opportunistic Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Neres, João; Engelhart, Curtis A.; Drake, Eric J.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Fu, Peng; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Gulick, Andrew M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophores are small-molecule iron chelators produced by bacteria and other microorganisms for survival under iron limiting conditions, such as found in a mammalian host. Siderophore biosynthesis is essential for the virulence of many important Gram-negative pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. We performed high-throughput screening of against BasE, which is involved in siderophore biosynthesis in A. baumannii and identified 6-phenyl-1-(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-4-carboxylic acid 15. Herein we report the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of a systematic series of analogues of the HTS hit 15. Analogue 67 is the most potent analogue with a KD of 2 nM against BasE. Structural characterization of the inhibitors with BasE reveal they bind in a unique orientation in the active site occupying all three substrate binding sites, and thus can be considered multisubstrate inhibitors. These results provide a foundation for future studies aimed at both increasing enzyme potency and antibacterial activity. PMID:23437866

  15. In vitro assay of the chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane-bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-07-01

    The first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis is the Mg-chelatase-catalyzed insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. Since iron insertion into protoporphyrin leads to heme formation, Mg-chelatase lies at the branch point of heme and chlorophyll synthesis in chloroplasts. Little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase, as it has been assayed only in intact cucumber chloroplasts. In this report we describe an in vitro assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts was 3- to 4-fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts. This activity survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated by centrifugation into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity, and both were inactivated by boiling indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane-bound protein(s). The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol of Mg-deuteroporphyrin per h per mg of protein, and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity and the enzymen was sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 20 {mu}M). Broken and reconstituted cucumber chloroplasts were unable to maintain Mg-chelatase activity. However, the cucumber supernatant fraction was active when combined with the pellet fraction of peas; the converse was not true, which suggested that the cucumber pellet was the component that lost activity during lysis.

  16. Generation of Bioactive Oxylipins from Exogenously Added Arachidonic, Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acid in Primary Human Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Winter, Tanja; Ravandi, Amir; Dalvi, Siddhartha; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-05-01

    The human blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood and is formed in part by microvessel endothelial cells. The brain contains significant amounts of arachidonic acid (ARA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which potentially give rise to the generation of bioactive oxylipins. Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acid metabolites that are involved in an assortment of biological functions regulating neurological health and disease. Since it is not known which oxylipins are generated by human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs), they were incubated for up to 30 min in the absence or presence of 0.1-mM ARA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or DHA bound to albumin (1:1 molar ratio), and the oxylipins generated were examined using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Of 135 oxylipins screened in the media, 63 were present at >0.1 ng/mL at baseline, and 95 were present after incubation with fatty acid. Oxylipins were rapidly generated and reached maximum levels by 2-5 min. While ARA, EPA and DHA each stimulated the production of oxylipins derived from these fatty acids themselves, ARA also stimulated the production of oxylipins from endogenous 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids, including α-linolenic acid. Oxylipins generated by the lipoxygenase pathway predominated both in resting and stimulated states. Oxylipins formed via the cytochrome P450 pathway were formed primarily from DHA and EPA, but not ARA. These data indicate that HBMECs are capable of generating a plethora of bioactive lipids that have the potential to modulate BBB endothelial cell function. PMID:26439837

  17. Intracellular co-localization of the Escherichia coli enterobactin biosynthetic enzymes EntA, EntB, and EntE.

    PubMed

    Pakarian, Paknoosh; Pawelek, Peter D

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria utilize small-molecule iron chelators called siderophores to support growth in low-iron environments. The Escherichia coli catecholate siderophore enterobactin is synthesized in the cytoplasm upon iron starvation. Seven enzymes are required for enterobactin biosynthesis: EntA-F, H. Given that EntB-EntE and EntA-EntE interactions have been reported, we investigated a possible EntA-EntB-EntE interaction in E. coli cells. We subcloned the E. coli entA and entB genes into bacterial adenylate cylase two-hybrid (BACTH) vectors allowing for co-expression of EntA and EntB with N-terminal fusions to the adenylate cyclase fragments T18 or T25. BACTH constructs were functionally validated using the CAS assay and growth studies. Co-transformants expressing T18/T25-EntA and T25/T18-EntB exhibited positive two-hybrid signals indicative of an intracellular EntA-EntB interaction. To gain further insights into the interaction interface, we performed computational docking in which an experimentally validated EntA-EntE model was docked to the EntB crystal structure. The resulting model of the EntA-EntB-EntE ternary complex predicted that the IC domain of EntB forms direct contacts with both EntA and EntE. BACTH constructs that expressed the isolated EntB IC domain fused to T18/T25 were prepared in order to investigate interactions with T25/T18-EntA and T25/T18-EntE. CAS assays and growth studies demonstrated that T25-IC co-expressed with the EntB ArCP domain could complement the E. coli entB(-) phenotype. In agreement with the ternary complex model, BACTH assays demonstrated that the EntB IC domain interacts with both EntA and EntE. PMID:27470582

  18. Asthmatics Exhibit Altered Oxylipin Profiles Compared to Healthy Individuals after Subway Air Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Nording, Malin; Klepczynska-Nyström, Anna; Sköld, Magnus; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Grunewald, Johan; Svartengren, Magnus; Hammock, Bruce D.; Larsson, Britt-Marie; Eklund, Anders; Wheelock, Åsa M.; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and oxidants are important factors in causing exacerbations in asthmatics, and the source and composition of pollutants greatly affects pathological implications. Objectives This randomized crossover study investigated responses of the respiratory system to Stockholm subway air in asthmatics and healthy individuals. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins were quantified in the distal lung to provide a measure of shifts in lipid mediators in association with exposure to subway air relative to ambient air. Methods Sixty-four oxylipins representing the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways were screened using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)-fluid. Validations through immunocytochemistry staining of BAL-cells were performed for 15-LOX-1, COX-1, COX-2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Multivariate statistics were employed to interrogate acquired oxylipin and immunocytochemistry data in combination with patient clinical information. Results Asthmatics and healthy individuals exhibited divergent oxylipin profiles following exposure to ambient and subway air. Significant changes were observed in 8 metabolites of linoleic- and α-linolenic acid synthesized via the 15-LOX pathway, and of the COX product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Oxylipin levels were increased in healthy individuals following exposure to subway air, whereas asthmatics evidenced decreases or no change. Conclusions Several of the altered oxylipins have known or suspected bronchoprotective or anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting a possible reduced anti-inflammatory response in asthmatics following exposure to subway air. These observations may have ramifications for sensitive subpopulations in urban areas. PMID:21897859

  19. Plasma fatty acids, oxylipins, and risk of myocardial infarction: the Singapore Chinese health study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: We aimed to examine the prospective association between plasma fatty acids (FAs), oxylipins and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Singapore Chinese population. Methods: A nested case-control study with 744 incident AMI cases and 744 matched controls aged 47-83 years was condu...

  20. Quantitative profiling of oxylipins through comprehensive lc-ms/ms analysis: Application in cardiac surgery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxylipins, including eicosanoids, affect a broad range of biological processes, such as the initiation and resolution of inflammation. These compounds, also referred to as lipid mediators, are (non-) enzymatically generated by oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA). A...

  1. LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE RELEASES ESTERIFIED OXYLIPINS FROM VERY LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the lipoprotein distribution of oxidized PUFAs, and we speculate that lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a determinant in the release of VLDL-associated oxylipins. Here, using 12 wk old normolipidemic (lean) and hyperlipidemic (obese) Zucker-rats, we measured PUFA al...

  2. Ethanolamide Oxylipins of Linolenic Acid Can Negatively Regulate Arabidopsis Seedling Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Keereetaweep, Jantana; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Hornung, Ellen; Feussner, Ivo; Chapman, Kent D.

    2013-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are fatty-acid derivatives with potent biological activities in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms. Polyunsaturated NAEs are among the most abundant NAE types in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana, and they can be metabolized by either fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or by lipoxygenase (LOX) to low levels during seedling establishment. Here, we identify and quantify endogenous oxylipin metabolites of N-linolenoylethanolamine (NAE 18:3) in Arabidopsis seedlings and show that their levels were higher in faah knockout seedlings. Quantification of oxylipin metabolites in lox mutants demonstrated altered partitioning of NAE 18:3 into 9- or 13-LOX pathways, and this was especially exaggerated when exogenous NAE was added to seedlings. When maintained at micromolar concentrations, NAE 18:3 specifically induced cotyledon bleaching of light-grown seedlings within a restricted stage of development. Comprehensive oxylipin profiling together with genetic and pharmacological interference with LOX activity suggested that both 9-hydroxy and 13-hydroxy linolenoylethanolamides, but not corresponding free fatty-acid metabolites, contributed to the reversible disruption of thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts of seedling cotyledons. We suggest that NAE oxylipins of linolenic acid represent a newly identified, endogenous set of bioactive compounds that may act in opposition to progression of normal seedling development and must be depleted for successful establishment. PMID:24151297

  3. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  4. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the oxylipin composition of lipoproteins in hypertriglyceridemic, statin-treated subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Oxylipins mediate many physiological processes, including inflammation and vascular function. Generally considered local and transient, we suggest their presence in lipoproteins indicates they also mediate the effects lipoproteins have on inflammation and vascular biology. To support th...

  5. Modulation of blood oxylipin levels by long-chain omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in hyper- and normolipidemic men

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Schmidt, Simone; Kressel, Gaby; Willenberg, Ina; Hammock, Bruce D; Hahn, Andreas; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) such as EPA and DHA have been shown to possess beneficial health effects, and it is believed that many of their effects are mediated by their oxygenated products (oxylipins). Recently, we have shown that serum levels of several hydroxy, epoxy, and dihydroxy FAs are dependent on the individual status of the parent FAs in a cohort of normo- and hyperlipidemic subjects. So far, the effect of an increased dietary LC n-3 PUFA intake on hydroxy, epoxy, and dihydroxy FA levels has not been investigated in subjects with mild combined hyperlipidemia. Subjects and Methods In the present study, we compared oxylipin patterns of 10 hyperlipidemic (cholesterol >200 mg/dl; triglyceride >150 mg/ml) and 10 normolipidemic men in response to twelve weeks of LC n-3 PUFA intake (1.14 g DHA and 1.56 g EPA). Levels of 44 free hydroxy, epoxy and dihydroxy FAs were analyzed in serum by LC-MS. Additionally, oxylipin levels were compared with their parent PUFA levels in erythrocyte membranes; a biomarker for the individual PUFA status. Results Differences in the oxylipin pattern between normo- and hyperlipidemic subjects were minor before and after treatment. In all subjects, levels of EPA-derived oxylipins (170–4,800 pM) were considerably elevated after LC n-3 PUFA intake (150–1,400 %), the increase of DHA-derived oxylipins (360–3,900 pM) was less pronounced (30–130 %). The relative change of EPA in erythrocyte membranes is strongly correlated (r ≥ 0.5; p<0.05) with the relative change of corresponding epoxy and dihydroxy FA serum levels. The effect on arachidonic acid (AA)-derived oxylipin levels (140–27,100 pM) was inconsistent. Discussion and Conclusions The dietary LC PUFA composition has a direct influence on the endogenous oxylipin profile, including several highly biological active EPA- and DHA-derived lipid mediators. The shift in oxylipin pattern appears to be dependent on the initial LC PUFA

  6. Quantitative profiling of oxylipins through comprehensive LC-MS/MS analysis of Fusarium verticillioides and maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Ludovici, Matteo; Ialongo, Cristiano; Reverberi, Massimo; Beccaccioli, Marzia; Scarpari, Marzia; Scala, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is one of the most important fungal pathogens causing ear and stalk rot in maize, even if frequently asymptomatic, producing a harmful series of compounds named fumonisins. Plant and fungal oxylipins play a crucial role in determining the outcome of the interaction between the pathogen and its host. Moreover, oxylipins result as signals able to modulate the secondary metabolism in fungi. In keeping with this, a novel, quantitative LC-MS/MS method was designed to quantify up to 17 different oxylipins produced by F. verticillioides and maize kernels. By applying this method, we were able to quantify oxylipin production in vitro - F. verticillioides grown into Czapek-Dox/yeast extract medium amended with 0.2% w/v of cracked maize - and in vivo, i.e. during its growth on detached mature maize ears. This study pinpoints the role of oxylipins in a plant pathogen such as F. verticillioides and sets up a novel tool aimed at understanding the role oxylipins play in mycotoxigenic pathogens during their interactions with respective hosts. PMID:25255035

  7. The Nicotiana attenuata GLA1 lipase controls the accumulation of Phytophthora parasitica-induced oxylipins and defensive secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Stefan; Kallenbach, Mario; Baldwin, Ian T.; Bonaventure, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of GLYCEROLIPASE A1 (ir-gla1 plants) are compromised in the herbivore- and wound-induced accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA). However, these plants accumulate wild-type (WT) levels of JA and divinyl-ethers (DVE) during Phytophthora parasitica infection (Bonaventure et al., 2011). By profiling oxylipin-enriched fractions with targeted and untargeted LC-QTOF approaches, we demonstrate that the accumulation of 9-hydroxy-10E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid (9-OH-18:2) and additional C18 and C19 oxylipins is reduced by ca. 20-fold in P. parasitica infected ir-gla1 leaves compared to WT. This reduced accumulation of oxylipins was accompanied by a reduced accumulation of unsaturated free fatty acids and specific lysolipid species. Untargeted metabolic profiling of total leaf extracts showed that 87 metabolites accumulated differentially in leaves of P. parasitica-infected ir-gla1 plants with glycerolipids, hydroxylated-diterpene glycosides and phenylpropanoid derivatives accounting together for ca. 20% of these 87 metabolites. Thus, P. parasitica-induced oxylipins may participate in the regulation of metabolic changes during infection. Together, the results demonstrate that GLA1 plays a distinct role in the production of oxylipins during biotic stress responses, supplying substrates for 9-OH-18:2 and additional C18 and C19 oxylipin formation during P. parasitica infection whereas supplying substrates for the biogenesis of JA during herbivory and mechanical wounding. PMID:24450863

  8. Serum-Based Oxylipins Are Associated with Outcomes in Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Harms, Amy C.; Vreeken, Rob J.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Cheng, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with systolic heart failure are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality. Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying these events. We sought to better understand if oxylipins, a diverse class of lipid metabolites derived from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, were associated with these outcomes in recipients of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Methods Among 479 individuals from the PROSE-ICD study, baseline serum were analyzed and quantitatively profiled for 35 known biologically relevant oxylipin metabolites. Associations with ICD shocks for ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Six oxylipins, 17,18-DiHETE (HR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99 per SD change in oxylipin level), 19,20-DiHDPA (HR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.98), 5,6-DiHETrE (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.91), 8,9-DiHETrE (HR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.95), 9,10-DiHOME (HR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.00), and PGF1α (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.71) were associated with the risk of appropriate ICD shock after multivariate adjustment for clinical factors. Additionally, 4 oxylipin-to-precursor ratios, 15S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3), 17,18-DiHETE / FA (20:5-ω3), 19,20-DiHDPA / FA (20:5-ω3), and 5S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3) were positively associated with the risk of all-cause mortality. Conclusion In a prospective cohort of patients with primary prevention ICDs, we identified several novel oxylipin markers that were associated with appropriate shock and mortality using metabolic profiling techniques. These findings may provide new insight into the potential biologic pathways leading to adverse events in this patient population. PMID:27281224

  9. Variation in the Trichothecene Mycotoxin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are produced by some plant pathogenic species of the fungus Fusarium and can contribute to its virulence on some plants. In Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes are encoded at three loci: the single-gene TRI101 locus; the two-gene ...

  10. Biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxuan; Zeng, Xinyi; Sun, Chao; Chen, Shilin

    2014-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most extensively investigated medicinal plants, which can produce more than 130 alkaloids, including the powerful antitumor drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here we review the recent advances in the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in C. roseus, and the identification and characterization of the corresponding enzymes involved in this pathway. Strictosidine is the central intermediate in the biosynthesis of different TIAs, which is formed by the condensation of secologanin and tryptamine. Secologanin is derived from terpenoid (isoprenoid) biosynthetic pathway, while tryptamine is derived from indole biosynthetic pathway. Then various specific end products are produced by different routes during downstream process. Although many genes and corresponding enzymes have been characterized in this pathway, our knowledge on the whole TIA biosynthetic pathway still remains largely unknown up to date. Full elucidation of TIA biosynthetic pathway is an important prerequisite to understand the regulation of the TIA biosynthesis in the medicinal plant and to produce valuable TIAs by synthetic biological technology. PMID:25159992

  11. Heterologous Expression and Manipulation of Three Tetracycline Biosynthetic Pathways**

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Kim, Woncheol; Pickens, Lauren B.; Gao, Xue; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Three and one: Three tetracycline biosynthetic pathways have been overexpressed and manipulated in heterologous host Streptomyces lividans K4-114. New tetracycline modifying enzymes have been identified through a series of gene inactivation and intermediate characterization. The collection of newly discovered tailoring enzyme and the heterologous platform will promote our understanding of tetracycline biosynthesis, as well as our performance to engineer tetracycline biosynthesis in an efficient manner. PMID:23024027

  12. Differential effects of EPA versus DHA on postprandial vascular function and the plasma oxylipin profile in men[S

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Seán; Tejera, Noemi; Awwad, Khader; Rigby, Neil; Fleming, Ingrid; Cassidy, Aedin; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the impact of EPA versus DHA on arterial stiffness and reactivity and underlying mechanisms (with a focus on plasma oxylipins) in the postprandial state. In a three-arm crossover acute test meal trial, men (n = 26, 35–55 years) at increased CVD risk received a high-fat (42.4 g) test meal providing 4.16 g of EPA or DHA or control oil in random order. At 0 h and 4 h, blood samples were collected to quantify plasma fatty acids, long chain n-3 PUFA-derived oxylipins, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide, and serum lipids and glucose. Vascular function was assessed using blood pressure, reactive hyperemia index, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index (AIx). The DHA-rich oil significantly reduced AIx by 13% (P = 0.047) with the decrease following EPA-rich oil intervention not reaching statistical significance. Both interventions increased EPA- and DHA-derived oxylipins in the acute postprandial state, with an (1.3-fold) increase in 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoic acid evident after DHA intervention (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a single dose of DHA significantly improved postprandial arterial stiffness as assessed by AIx, which if sustained would be associated with a significant decrease in CVD risk. The observed increases in oxylipins provide a mechanistic insight into the AIx effect. PMID:27170732

  13. A diet containing a nonfat dry milk matrix significantly alters systemic endocannabinoids and oxylipins in diet-induced obese mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Diets rich in dairy and/or calcium (Ca) have been associated with reductions in adiposity and inflammation, but the mechanisms underlying this remain to be fully elucidated. Oxylipins and endocannabinoids are bioactive lipids, which influence energy homeostasis, adipose function, insuli...

  14. Detection of omega-3 oxylipins in human plasma and response to treatment with omega-3 acid ethyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long chain omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids have beneficial health effects, but the molecular mediators of these effects are not well-characterized. Oxygenated n-3 FAs (oxylipins) may be an important class of mediators. Members of this chemic...

  15. Limited value of pro-inflammatory oxylipins and cytokines as circulating biomarkers in endometriosis - a targeted 'omics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yie Hou; Cui, Liang; Fang, Jinling; Chern, Bernard Su Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, complex gynecologic disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial-like tissues at extrauterine sites. Elevation in protein and lipid mediators of inflammation including oxylipins and cytokines within the peritoneum characterize the inflamed pelvic region and may contribute to the survival and growth of displaced endometrial tissues. The presence of a clinically silent but molecularly detectable systemic inflammation in endometriosis has been proposed. Thus, we examined serum oxylipin and immunomodulatory protein levels in 103 women undergoing laparoscopy to evaluate systematically any involvement in systemic pathophysiological inflammation in endometriosis. Oxylipin levels were similar between women with and without endometriosis. Stratification by menstrual phase or severity did not offer any difference. Women with ovarian endometriosis had significantly lower 12-HETE relative to peritoneal endometriosis (-50.7%). Serum oxylipin levels were not associated with pre-operative pain symptoms. Changes to immunomodulatory proteins were minimal, with IL-12(p70), IL-13 and VEGF significantly lower in mild endometriotic women compared to non-endometriotic women (-39%, -54% and -76% respectively). Verification using C-reactive protein as a non-specific marker of inflammation further showed similar levels between groups. The implications of our work suggest pro-inflammatory mediators in the classes studied may have potentially limited value as circulating biomarkers for endometriosis, suggesting of potentially tenuous systemic inflammation in endometriosis. PMID:27193963

  16. Differential effects of EPA versus DHA on postprandial vascular function and the plasma oxylipin profile in men.

    PubMed

    McManus, Seán; Tejera, Noemi; Awwad, Khader; Vauzour, David; Rigby, Neil; Fleming, Ingrid; Cassidy, Aedin; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to investigate the impact of EPA versus DHA on arterial stiffness and reactivity and underlying mechanisms (with a focus on plasma oxylipins) in the postprandial state. In a three-arm crossover acute test meal trial, men (n = 26, 35-55 years) at increased CVD risk received a high-fat (42.4 g) test meal providing 4.16 g of EPA or DHA or control oil in random order. At 0 h and 4 h, blood samples were collected to quantify plasma fatty acids, long chain n-3 PUFA-derived oxylipins, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide, and serum lipids and glucose. Vascular function was assessed using blood pressure, reactive hyperemia index, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index (AIx). The DHA-rich oil significantly reduced AIx by 13% (P = 0.047) with the decrease following EPA-rich oil intervention not reaching statistical significance. Both interventions increased EPA- and DHA-derived oxylipins in the acute postprandial state, with an (1.3-fold) increase in 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoic acid evident after DHA intervention (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a single dose of DHA significantly improved postprandial arterial stiffness as assessed by AIx, which if sustained would be associated with a significant decrease in CVD risk. The observed increases in oxylipins provide a mechanistic insight into the AIx effect. PMID:27170732

  17. Targeted metabolomics of the arachidonic acid cascade: current state and challenges of LC-MS analysis of oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Ina; Ostermann, Annika I; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of eicosanoids and oxylipins derived from other polyunsaturated fatty acids in biological samples is crucial for a better understanding of the biology of these lipid mediators. Moreover, a robust and reliable quantification is necessary to monitor the effects of pharmaceutical intervention and diet on the arachidonic acid (AA) cascade, one of today's most relevant drug targets. Low (sub-nanomolar) concentrations and a large number of structurally similar analytes, including regioisomers, require high chromatographic resolution and selective and sensitive mass spectrometry analysis. Currently, reversed-phase liquid chromatography in combination with detection on sensitive triple-quadrupole instruments, operating in selected reaction monitoring mode, is the main method of quantitative oxylipin analysis. A lack of standardized sample collection, handling, and preparation procedures, degradation of the analytes during sample preparation, and purity and availability of standards (internal standards) are the major problems of targeted metabolomics approaches for the AA cascade. Major challenges for instrumental analytical methods are the detection of esterified oxylipins, and separation and individual detection of oxylipin isomers. Solving these problems would help to further knowledge of the biology of lipid mediators, and is an important task for bio-analytical research. PMID:25577350

  18. Effect of acute and chronic DSS induced colitis on plasma eicosanoid and oxylipin levels in the rat.

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Ina; Ostermann, Annika I; Giovannini, Samoa; Kershaw, Olivia; von Keutz, Anne; Steinberg, Pablo; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2015-07-01

    Eicosanoids and oxylipins are potent lipid mediators involved in the regulation of inflammation. In order to evaluate their role and suitability as biomarkers in colitis, we analyzed their systemic levels in the acute and chronic phase of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis. Male Fischer 344 rats were treated in three cycles with 4% DSS in the drinking water (4 days followed by 10 days recovery) and blood was drawn 3 days prior to the first DSS treatment and on days 4, 11, 32 and 39. Histopathological evaluation of the colon tissue after 42 days showed that the animals developed a mild to severe chronic colitis. Consistently, prostaglandin levels were massively (twofold) elevated in the colonic tissue. LC-MS based targeted metabolomics was used to determine plasma oxylipin levels at the different time points. In the acute phase of inflammation directly after DSS treatment, epoxy-fatty acid (FA), dihydroxy-FA and hydroxy-FA plasma concentrations were uniformly elevated. With each treatment cycle the increase in these oxylipin levels was more pronounced. Our data suggest that in the acute phase of colitis release of polyunsaturated FAs from membranes in the inflamed tissue is reflected by a uniform increase of oylipins formed in different branches of the arachidonic acid cascade. However, during the recovery phases the systemic oxylipin pattern is not or only moderately altered and does not allow to evaluate the onset of chronic inflammation in the colon. PMID:25908302

  19. Plasma oxylipin profiling identifies polyunsaturated vicinal diols as responsive to arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intake in growing piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dose-responsiveness of plasma oxylipins to incremental dietary intake of arachidonic (20:4n-6; ARA) and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3; DHA) acid was determined in piglets. Piglets randomly received one of six formulas (n=8 per group) from day 3 to 27 postnatally. Diets contained varying ARA and DHA l...

  20. Oxylipins in the spikemoss Selaginella martensii: Detection of divinyl ethers, 12-oxophytodienoic acid and related cyclopentenones.

    PubMed

    Ogorodnikova, Anna V; Mukhitova, Fakhima K; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2015-10-01

    Green tissues of spikemoss Selaginella martensii Spring possessed the complex oxylipins patterns. Major oxylipins were the products of linoleic and α-linolenic acids metabolism via the sequential action of 13-lipoxygenase and divinyl ether synthase (DES) or allene oxide synthase (AOS). AOS products were represented by 12-oxophytodienoic acid (12-oxo-PDA) isomers. Exceptionally, S. martensii possesses high level of 12-oxo-9(13),15-PDA, which is very uncommon in flowering plants. Separate divinyl ethers were purified after micro-preparative incubations of linoleic or α-linolenic acids with homogenate of S. martensii aerial parts. The NMR data allowed us to identify all geometric isomers of divinyl ethers. Linoleic acid was converted to divinyl ethers etheroleic acid, (11Z)-etheroleic acid and a minority of (ω5Z)-etheroleic acid. With α-linolenate precursor, the specificity of divinyl ether biosynthesis was distinct. Etherolenic and (ω5Z)-etherolenic acids were the prevailing products while (11Z)-etherolenic acid was a minor one. Divinyl ethers are detected first time in non-flowering land plant. These are the first observations of fatty acid metabolism through the lipoxygenase pathway in spikemosses (Lycopodiophyta). PMID:26277770

  1. An Abscisic Acid-Independent Oxylipin Pathway Controls Stomatal Closure and Immune Defense in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mondy, Samuel; Tranchimand, Sylvain; Rumeau, Dominique; Boudsocq, Marie; Garcia, Ana Victoria; Douki, Thierry; Bigeard, Jean; Laurière, Christiane; Chevalier, Anne; Castresana, Carmen; Hirt, Heribert

    2013-01-01

    Plant stomata function in innate immunity against bacterial invasion and abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to regulate this process. Using genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that (i) the Arabidopsis thaliana nine-specific-lipoxygenase encoding gene, LOX1, which is expressed in guard cells, is required to trigger stomatal closure in response to both bacteria and the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide flg22; (ii) LOX1 participates in stomatal defense; (iii) polyunsaturated fatty acids, the LOX substrates, trigger stomatal closure; (iv) the LOX products, fatty acid hydroperoxides, or reactive electrophile oxylipins induce stomatal closure; and (v) the flg22-mediated stomatal closure is conveyed by both LOX1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and involves salicylic acid whereas the ABA-induced process depends on the protein kinases OST1, MPK9, or MPK12. Finally, we show that the oxylipin and the ABA pathways converge at the level of the anion channel SLAC1 to regulate stomatal closure. Collectively, our results demonstrate that early biotic signaling in guard cells is an ABA-independent process revealing a novel function of LOX1-dependent stomatal pathway in plant immunity. PMID:23526882

  2. Flavoenzymes: Versatile Catalysts in Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Wencewicz, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin-based coenzymes, tightly bound to enzymes catalyzing substrate oxidations and reductions, enable an enormous range of chemical transformations in biosynthetic pathways. Flavoenzymes catalyze substrate oxidations involving amine and alcohol oxidations and desaturations to olefins, the latter setting up Diels-Alder cyclizations in lovastatin and solanapyrone biosyntheses. Both C4a and N5 of the flavin coenzymes are sites for covalent adduct formation. For example, the reactivity of dihydroflavins with molecular oxygen leads to flavin-4a-OOH adducts which then carry out a diverse range of oxygen transfers, including Baeyer-Villiger type ring expansions, olefin epoxidations, halogenations via transient HOCl generation, and an oxidative Favorskii rerrangement during enterocin assembly. PMID:23051833

  3. Common biosynthetic origins for polycyclic tetramate macrolactams from phylogenetically diverse bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Joshua A V; Oh, Dong-Chan; Cao, Shugeng; Currie, Cameron R; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2010-06-29

    A combination of small molecule chemistry, biosynthetic analysis, and genome mining has revealed the unexpected conservation of polycyclic tetramate macrolactam biosynthetic loci in diverse bacteria. Initially our chemical analysis of a Streptomyces strain associated with the southern pine beetle led to the discovery of frontalamides A and B, two previously undescribed members of this antibiotic family. Genome analyses and genetic manipulation of the producing organism led to the identification of the frontalamide biosynthetic gene cluster and several biosynthetic intermediates. The biosynthetic locus for the frontalamides' mixed polyketide/amino acid structure encodes a hybrid polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS), which resembles iterative enzymes known in fungi. No such mixed iterative PKS-NRPS enzymes have been characterized in bacteria. Genome-mining efforts revealed strikingly conserved frontalamide-like biosynthetic clusters in the genomes of phylogenetically diverse bacteria ranging from proteobacteria to actinomycetes. Screens for environmental actinomycete isolates carrying frontalamide-like biosynthetic loci led to the isolation of a number of positive strains, the majority of which produced candidate frontalamide-like compounds under suitable growth conditions. These results establish the prevalence of frontalamide-like gene clusters in diverse bacterial types, with medicinally important Streptomyces species being particularly enriched. PMID:20547882

  4. Common biosynthetic origins for polycyclic tetramate macrolactams from phylogenetically diverse bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Joshua A. V.; Oh, Dong-Chan; Cao, Shugeng; Currie, Cameron R.; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2010-01-01

    A combination of small molecule chemistry, biosynthetic analysis, and genome mining has revealed the unexpected conservation of polycyclic tetramate macrolactam biosynthetic loci in diverse bacteria. Initially our chemical analysis of a Streptomyces strain associated with the southern pine beetle led to the discovery of frontalamides A and B, two previously undescribed members of this antibiotic family. Genome analyses and genetic manipulation of the producing organism led to the identification of the frontalamide biosynthetic gene cluster and several biosynthetic intermediates. The biosynthetic locus for the frontalamides’ mixed polyketide/amino acid structure encodes a hybrid polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS), which resembles iterative enzymes known in fungi. No such mixed iterative PKS-NRPS enzymes have been characterized in bacteria. Genome-mining efforts revealed strikingly conserved frontalamide-like biosynthetic clusters in the genomes of phylogenetically diverse bacteria ranging from proteobacteria to actinomycetes. Screens for environmental actinomycete isolates carrying frontalamide-like biosynthetic loci led to the isolation of a number of positive strains, the majority of which produced candidate frontalamide-like compounds under suitable growth conditions. These results establish the prevalence of frontalamide-like gene clusters in diverse bacterial types, with medicinally important Streptomyces species being particularly enriched. PMID:20547882

  5. Identification and characterization of a welwitindolinone alkaloid biosynthetic gene cluster in the stigonematalean Cyanobacterium Hapalosiphon welwitschii.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Fuhrman, Heather A; Ittiamornkul, Kuljira; Sevco, Tyler J; Kwak, Daniel H; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-03-21

    The identification of a 36 kb welwitindolinone (wel) biosynthetic gene cluster in Hapalosiphon welwitschii UTEX B1830 is reported. Characterization of the enzymes responsible for assembling the early biosynthetic intermediates geranyl pyrophosphate and 3-((Z)-2′-isocyanoethenyl)indole as well as a dedicated N-methyltransferase in the maturation of N-methylwelwitindolinone C isothiocyanate solidified the link between the wel pathway and welwitindolinone biosynthesis. Comparative analysis of the ambiguine and welwitindolinone biosynthetic pathways in two different organisms provided insights into the origins of diverse structures within hapalindole-type molecules. PMID:24677572

  6. Lipid and oxylipin profiles during aging and sprout development in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Fauconnier, Marie Laure; Welti, Ruth; Blée, Elizabeth; Marlier, Michel

    2003-07-21

    Potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Bintje) were stored at 20 degrees C for 210 days without desprouting to study the lipoxygenase pathway during aging. After 15 days of storage, potato tubers sprouted, while after 45-60 days, apical dominance was lost and multiple sprouts developed. Analysis of the fatty acid hydroperoxides (HPOs) revealed that 9-S-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid (9-HPOD) was the main oxylipin formed. Between 45 and 60 days of storage, increases in the levels of 9-HPOD and colneleic acid were observed. Analysis of phospholipids and galactolipids by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) showed that a decrease in the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) occurred between 0 and 45 days of aging. The decrease in the amount of linoleic acid in complex lipids correlates well with the amount of 9-HPOD and colneleic acid produced. PMID:12880871

  7. Activation of Shikimate, Phenylpropanoid, Oxylipins, and Auxin Pathways in Pectobacterium carotovorum Elicitors-Treated Moss.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Schmelz, Eric; Ponce de León, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed complex defense mechanisms to cope with microbial pathogens. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to the activation of defense. While substantial progress has been made in understanding the activation of plant defense by PAMPs and DAMPs recognition in tracheophytes, far less information exists on related processes in early divergent plants like mosses. The aim of this study was to identify genes that were induced in P. patens in response to elicitors of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, using a cDNA suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. A total of 239 unigenes were identified, including genes involved in defense responses related to the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, and oxylipin pathways. The expression levels of selected genes related to these pathways were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR, confirming their rapid induction by P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors. In addition, P. patens induced cell wall reinforcement after elicitor treatment by incorporation of phenolic compounds, callose deposition, and elevated expression of Dirigent-like encoding genes. Small molecule defense markers and phytohormones such as cinnamic acid, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and auxin levels all increased in elicitor-treated moss tissues. In contrast, salicylic acid levels decreased while abscisic acid levels remained unchanged. P. patens reporter lines harboring an auxin-inducible promoter fused to β-glucuronidase revealed GUS activity in protonemal and gametophores tissues treated with elicitors of P.c. carotovorum, consistent with a localized activation of auxin signaling. These results indicate that P. patens activates the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, oxylipins, and auxin pathways upon treatment with P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors. PMID:27047509

  8. Activation of Shikimate, Phenylpropanoid, Oxylipins, and Auxin Pathways in Pectobacterium carotovorum Elicitors-Treated Moss

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Schmelz, Eric; Ponce de León, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed complex defense mechanisms to cope with microbial pathogens. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to the activation of defense. While substantial progress has been made in understanding the activation of plant defense by PAMPs and DAMPs recognition in tracheophytes, far less information exists on related processes in early divergent plants like mosses. The aim of this study was to identify genes that were induced in P. patens in response to elicitors of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, using a cDNA suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. A total of 239 unigenes were identified, including genes involved in defense responses related to the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, and oxylipin pathways. The expression levels of selected genes related to these pathways were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR, confirming their rapid induction by P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors. In addition, P. patens induced cell wall reinforcement after elicitor treatment by incorporation of phenolic compounds, callose deposition, and elevated expression of Dirigent-like encoding genes. Small molecule defense markers and phytohormones such as cinnamic acid, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and auxin levels all increased in elicitor-treated moss tissues. In contrast, salicylic acid levels decreased while abscisic acid levels remained unchanged. P. patens reporter lines harboring an auxin-inducible promoter fused to β-glucuronidase revealed GUS activity in protonemal and gametophores tissues treated with elicitors of P.c. carotovorum, consistent with a localized activation of auxin signaling. These results indicate that P. patens activates the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, oxylipins, and auxin pathways upon treatment with P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors. PMID:27047509

  9. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    SciTech Connect

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  10. Effects of Three Volatile Oxylipins on Colony Development in Two Species of Fungi and on Drosophila Larval Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guohua; Padhi, Sally; Lee, Samantha; Hung, Richard; Zhao, Guozhu; Bennett, Joan W

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of three volatile oxylipins on colony development in two fungi and on Drosophila larval metamorphosis. Using an airborne exposure technique, three common and volatile oxylipins (1-octen-3-ol, (E)-2-hexenal, and 1-hexanol) were compared for their effects on spore germination and colony growth in Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum, as well as for their effects on the morphogenesis of larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. Conidia of both A. niger and P. chrysogenum plated in the presence of low concentrations (50 ppm) of these three volatile organic compounds (VOCs) formed fewer colony-forming units (CFUs) and exhibited reduced radial growth of colonies as compared to controls. When A. niger and P. chrysogenum spores were germinated in the presence of the enantiomers of 1-octen-3-ol, (R)-(-)-1-octen-3-ol had the greatest impact on colony morphology (decreased sporulation and colony diameter), while (S)-(+)-1-octen-3-ol and the racemic form yielded similar morphological changes but to a lesser extent. In addition, Drosophila larvae exposed to vapors of these oxylipins exhibited serious delays in metamorphosis and toxic effects on pupae and adult stages. Low concentration of these three VOCs can significantly inhibit the formation of CFUs and the growth of fungi. (R)-(-)-1-octen-3-ol imposed the greatest impact on fungal morphology compared to (S)-(+)-1-octen-3-ol and the racemic form. The three volatile oxylipins could also delay the metamorphosis of Drosophila and impose toxic effects on its pupae and adult stages. PMID:26126831

  11. Plug-and-Play Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Biosynthetic Gene Discovery in Engineered Yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dastmalchi, M; Li, J; Chang, L; Chen, X; Hagel, J M; Facchini, P J

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) metabolism has been the focus of a considerable research effort over the past half-century, primarily because of the pharmaceutical importance of several compounds produced by opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Advancements in genomics technologies have substantially accelerated the rate of gene discovery over the past decade, such that most biosynthetic enzymes involved in the formation of the major alkaloids of opium poppy have now been isolated and partially characterized. Not unexpectedly, the availability of all perceived biosynthetic genes has facilitated the reconstitution of several BIA pathways in microbial hosts, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Product yields are currently insufficient to consider the commercial production of high-value BIAs, such as morphine. However, the rudimentary success demonstrated by the uncomplicated and routine assembly of a multitude of characterized BIA biosynthetic genes provides a valuable gene discovery tool for the rapid functional identification of the plethora of gene candidates available through increasingly accessible genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic databases. BIA biosynthetic gene discovery represents a substantial research opportunity largely owing to the wealth of existing enzyme data mostly obtained from a single plant species. Functionally novel enzymes and variants with potential metabolic engineering applications can be considered the primary targets. Selection of candidates from sequence repositories is facilitated by the monophyletic relationship among biosynthetic genes belonging to a wide range of enzyme families, such as the numerous cytochromes P450 and AdoMet-dependent O- and N-methyltransferases that operate in BIA metabolism. We describe methods for the rapid functional screening of uncharacterized gene candidates encoding potential BIA biosynthetic enzymes using yeast strains engineered to perform selected metabolic conversions. As an initial

  12. Accessing natural product biosynthetic processes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bumpus, Stefanie B; Kelleher, Neil L

    2008-10-01

    Two important classes of natural products are made by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs). With most biosynthetic intermediates covalently tethered during biogenesis, protein mass spectrometry (MS) has proven invaluable for their interrogation. New mass spectrometric assay formats (such as selective cofactor ejection and proteomics style LC-MS) are showcased here in the context of functional insights into new breeds of NRPS/PKS enzymes, including the first characterization of an 'iterative' PKS, the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotics, the study of a new strategy for PKS initiation via a GNAT-like mechanism, and the analysis of branching strategies in the so-called 'AT-less' NRPS/PKS hybrid systems. The future of MS analysis of NRPS and PKS biosynthetic pathways lies in adoption and development of methods that continue bridging enzymology with proteomics as both fields continue their post-genomic acceleration. PMID:18706516

  13. Discovery of the lomaiviticin biosynthetic gene cluster in Salinispora pacifica

    PubMed Central

    Janso, Jeffrey E.; Haltli, Brad A.; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Kulowski, Kerry; Waldman, Abraham J.; Zha, Li; Nakamura, Hitomi; Bernan, Valerie S.; He, Haiyin; Carter, Guy T.; Koehn, Frank E.; Balskus, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    The lomaiviticins are a family of cytotoxic marine natural products that have captured the attention of both synthetic and biological chemists due to their intricate molecular scaffolds and potent biological activities. Here we describe the identification of the gene cluster responsible for lomaiviticin biosynthesis in Salinispora pacifica strains DPJ-0016 and DPJ-0019 using a combination of molecular approaches and genome sequencing. The link between the lom gene cluster and lomaiviticin production was confirmed using bacterial genetics, and subsequent analysis and annotation of this cluster revealed the biosynthetic basis for the core polyketide scaffold. Additionally, we have used comparative genomics to identify candidate enzymes for several unusual tailoring events, including diazo formation and oxidative dimerization. These findings will allow further elucidation of the biosynthetic logic of lomaiviticin assembly and provide useful molecular tools for application in biocatalysis and synthetic biology. PMID:25045187

  14. Biosynthetic Pathway for Mannopeptimycins, Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotics Active against Drug-Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Magarvey, Nathan A.; Haltli, Brad; He, Min; Greenstein, Michael; Hucul, John A.

    2006-01-01

    The mannopeptimycins are a novel class of lipoglycopeptide antibiotics active against multidrug-resistant pathogens with potential as clinically useful antibacterials. This report is the first to describe the biosynthesis of this novel class of mannosylated lipoglycopeptides. Included here are the cloning, sequencing, annotation, and manipulation of the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL 30439. Encoded by genes within the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic gene cluster are enzymes responsible for the generation of the hexapeptide core (nonribosomal peptide synthetases [NRPS]) and tailoring reactions (mannosylation, isovalerylation, hydroxylation, and methylation). The NRPS system is noncanonical in that it has six modules utilizing only five amino acid-specific adenylation domains and it lacks a prototypical NRPS macrocyclizing thioesterase domain. Analysis of the mannopeptimycin gene cluster and its engineering has elucidated the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic pathway and provides the framework to make new and improved mannopeptimycins biosynthetically. PMID:16723579

  15. Biosynthetic pathway for mannopeptimycins, lipoglycopeptide antibiotics active against drug-resistant gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Magarvey, Nathan A; Haltli, Brad; He, Min; Greenstein, Michael; Hucul, John A

    2006-06-01

    The mannopeptimycins are a novel class of lipoglycopeptide antibiotics active against multidrug-resistant pathogens with potential as clinically useful antibacterials. This report is the first to describe the biosynthesis of this novel class of mannosylated lipoglycopeptides. Included here are the cloning, sequencing, annotation, and manipulation of the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL 30439. Encoded by genes within the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic gene cluster are enzymes responsible for the generation of the hexapeptide core (nonribosomal peptide synthetases [NRPS]) and tailoring reactions (mannosylation, isovalerylation, hydroxylation, and methylation). The NRPS system is noncanonical in that it has six modules utilizing only five amino acid-specific adenylation domains and it lacks a prototypical NRPS macrocyclizing thioesterase domain. Analysis of the mannopeptimycin gene cluster and its engineering has elucidated the mannopeptimycin biosynthetic pathway and provides the framework to make new and improved mannopeptimycins biosynthetically. PMID:16723579

  16. Biosynthetic Polymers as Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of functional polymers encoded with biomolecules has been an extensive area of research for decades. As such, a diverse toolbox of polymerization techniques and bioconjugation methods has been developed. The greatest impact of this work has been in biomedicine and biotechnology, where fully synthetic and naturally derived biomolecules are used cooperatively. Despite significant improvements in biocompatible and functionally diverse polymers, our success in the field is constrained by recognized limitations in polymer architecture control, structural dynamics, and biostabilization. This Perspective discusses the current status of functional biosynthetic polymers and highlights innovative strategies reported within the past five years that have made great strides in overcoming the aforementioned barriers. PMID:27375299

  17. Mechanistic Advances in Plant Natural Product Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Usera, Aimee R.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances The biosynthetic pathways of plant natural products offer an abundance of knowledge to scientists in many fields. Synthetic chemists can be inspired by the synthetic strategies that nature uses to construct these compounds. Chemical and biological engineers are working to reprogram these biosynthetic pathways to more efficiently produce valuable products. Finally, biochemists and enzymologists are interested in the detailed mechanisms of the complex transformations involved in construction of these natural products. Study of biosynthetic enzymes and pathways therefore has a wide-ranging impact. In recent years, many plant biosynthetic pathways have been characterized, particularly the pathways that are responsible for alkaloid biosynthesis. Here we highlight recently studied alkaloid biosynthetic enzymes that catalyze production of numerous complex medicinal compounds, as well as the specifier proteins in glucosinosolate biosynthesis, whose structure and mechanism of action are just beginning to be unraveled. PMID:19632140

  18. Biosynthetic Studies of Aziridine Formation in Azicemicins

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Liu, Hung-wen

    2009-01-01

    The azicemicins, which are angucycline-type antibiotics produced by the actinomycete, Kibdelosporangium sp. MJ126-NF4, contain an aziridine ring attached to the polyketide core. Feeding experiments using [1-13C]acetate or [1,2-13C2] acetate indicated that the angucycline skeleton is biosynthesized by a type II polyketide synthase. Isotope-tracer experiments using deuterium-labeled amino acids revealed that aspartic acid is the precursor of the aziridine moiety. Subsequent cloning and sequencing efforts led to the identification of the azicemicin (azic) gene cluster spanning ~50 kbp. The cluster harbors genes typical for type II polyketide synthesis. Also contained in the cluster are genes for two adenylyl transferases, a decarboxylase, an additional acyl carrier protein (ACP), and several oxygenases. On the basis of the assigned functions of these genes, a possible pathway for aziridine ring formation in the azecimicins can now be proposed. To obtain support for the proposed biosynthetic pathway, two genes encoding adenylyltransferases were overexpressed and the resulting proteins were purified. Enzyme assays showed that one of the adenylyltransferases specifically recognizes aspartic acid, providing strong evidence, in addition to the feeding experiments, that aspartate is the precursor of the aziridine moiety. The results reported herein set the stage for future biochemical studies of aziridine biosynthesis and assembly. PMID:19928906

  19. Biosynthetic porphyrins and the origin of photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauzerall, D.; Ley, A.; Mercer-Smith, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Since the prebiotic atmosphere was anaerobic, if not reducing, a useful function of primordial photosynthesis would have been to photooxidize reduced substrates such as Fe(+2), S(-2) or reduced organic molecules and to emit hydrogen. Experiments have shown that the early biogenic pigments uroporphyrin and coproporphyrin do photooxidize organic compounds and emit hydrogen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. These experiments were carried out in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH under anaerobic atmosphere, and quantum yields near 10-2 were obtained. Thus relevant prebiotic conditions were maintained. Rather then to further optimize conditions, attempts were made to replace the platinum catalyst by a more prebiotically suitable catalyst. Trials with an Fe4S4(SR)4 cluster, in analogy to the present hydrogenase and nitrogenase, were not successful. However, experiments using cobalt complexes to catalyze the formation of hydrogen are promising. In analogy with biological photosynthetic systems which group pigments, electron transfer molecules and enzymes in clusters for efficiency, it was found that binding the biogenic porphyrins to the polyvinyl alcohol used to support the platinum catalyst did increase the quantum yield of the reaction. It was also found that ultraviolet light can serve to photo-oxidize porphyrinogens to porphyrins under anaerobic conditions. Thus the formation of the colorless porphyriogens by the extraordinarily simple biosynthetic pathway would not be a problem because of the prevalence of UV light in the prebiotic, anoxic atmosphere.

  20. EXPANSION OF BISINDOLE BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAYS BY COMBINATORIAL CONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi-Ling; Ryan, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cladoniamides are indolotryptoline natural products that derive from indolocarbazole precursors. Here, we present a microbial platform to artificially redirect the cladoniamide pathway to generate unnatural bisindoles for drug discovery. Specifically, we target glycosyltransferase, halogenase, and oxidoreductase genes from the phylogenetically-related indolocarbazole rebeccamycin and staurosporine pathways. We generate a series of novel compounds, reveal details about the substrate specificities of a number of enzymes, and set the stage for future efforts to develop new catalysts and compounds by engineering of bisindole genes. The strategy for structural diversification we use here could furthermore be applied to other natural product families with known biosynthetic genes. PMID:25548949

  1. PERTURBATIONS OF THE LIGNIN BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY AND THEIR POTENTIAL TO IMPACT PLANT CELL WALL UTILIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects on lignification of perturbing most of the genes for enzymes on the monolignol biosynthetic pathway have now been reasonably well studied, particularly in angiosperms. Early studies sought to reduce lignin content with the idea of targeting the key barrier to efficient utilization of pla...

  2. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  3. PERTURBATIONS OF THE LIGNIN BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY AND THEIR POTENTIAL TO IMPACT PULP AND PAPER PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects on lignification of perturbing most of the genes for enzymes on the monolignol biosynthetic pathway have now been reasonably well studied, particularly in angiosperms. Early studies sought to reduce lignin content with the idea of targeting the key barrier to efficient utilization of pla...

  4. Effect of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase on the Modulation of Coronary Reactive Hyperemia: Role of Oxylipins and PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Ahmad; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Morisseau, Christophe; Nayeem, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH) is a physiological response to ischemic insult that prevents the potential harm associated with an interruption of blood supply. The relationship between the pharmacologic inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and CRH response to a brief ischemia is not known. sEH is involved in the main catabolic pathway of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which are converted into dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). EETs protect against ischemia/reperfusion injury and have numerous beneficial physiological effects. We hypothesized that inhibition of sEH by t-AUCB enhances CRH in isolated mouse hearts through changing the oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EETs/DHETs ratio. Compared to controls, t-AUCB-treated mice had increased CRH, including repayment volume (RV), repayment duration, and repayment/debt ratio (p < 0.05). Treatment with t-AUCB significantly changed oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EET/DHET ratio, increase in EpOME/DiHOME ratio, increase in the levels of HODEs, decrease in the levels of mid-chain HETEs, and decrease in prostanoids (p < 0.05). Treatment with MS-PPOH (CYP epoxygenase inhibitor) reduced CRH, including RV (p < 0.05). Involvement of PPARγ in the modulation of CRH was demonstrated using a PPARγ-antagonist (T0070907) and a PPARγ-agonist (rosiglitazone). T0070907 reduced CRH (p < 0.05), whereas rosiglitazone enhanced CRH (p < 0.05) in isolated mouse hearts compared to the non-treated. These data demonstrate that sEH inhibition enhances, whereas CYP epoxygenases-inhibition attenuates CRH, PPARγ mediate CRH downstream of the CYP epoxygenases-EET pathway, and the changes in oxylipin profiles associated with sEH-inhibition collectively contributed to the enhanced CRH. PMID:27583776

  5. Variation in nucleotide sequence of TRI1 in 13 trichothecene-producing species of Fusarium: evidence for a complex evolutionary history of a mycotoxin biosynthetic locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecenes are mycotoxins produced by several genera of fungi, including some agriculturally important Fusarium species. In the two species, Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides, that have been examined most thoroughly, trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes are encoded at three loci: (1) ...

  6. Selective inhibitors of a PAF biosynthetic enzyme lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Tarui, Megumi; Shindou, Hideo; Kumagai, Kazuo; Morimoto, Ryo; Harayama, Takeshi; Hashidate, Tomomi; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagase, Takahide; Shimizu, Takao

    2014-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent pro-inflammatory phospholipid mediator. In response to extracellular stimuli, PAF is rapidly biosynthesized by lyso-PAF acetyltransferase (lyso-PAFAT). Previously, we identified two types of lyso-PAFATs: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT)1, mostly expressed in the lungs where it produces PAF and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine essential for respiration, and LPCAT2, which biosynthesizes PAF and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the inflammatory cells. Under inflammatory conditions, LPCAT2, but not LPCAT1, is activated and upregulated to produce PAF. Thus, it is important to develop inhibitors specific for LPCAT2 in order to ameliorate PAF-related inflammatory diseases. Here, we report the first identification of LPCAT2-specific inhibitors, N-phenylmaleimide derivatives, selected from a 174,000-compound library using fluorescence-based high-throughput screening followed by the evaluation of the effects on LPCAT1 and LPCAT2 activities, cell viability, and cellular PAF production. Selected compounds competed with acetyl-CoA for the inhibition of LPCAT2 lyso-PAFAT activity and suppressed PAF biosynthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with a calcium ionophore. These compounds had low inhibitory effects on LPCAT1 activity, indicating that adverse effects on respiratory functions may be avoided. The identified compounds and their derivatives will contribute to the development of novel drugs for PAF-related diseases and facilitate the analysis of LPCAT2 functions in phospholipid metabolism in vivo. PMID:24850807

  7. Cloning and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster for kutznerides

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Danica Galonić; Hrvatin, Siniša; Neumann, Christopher S.; Strieker, Matthias; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    Kutznerides, actinomycete-derived cyclic depsipetides, consist of six nonproteinogenic residues, including a highly oxygenated tricyclic hexahydropyrroloindole, a chlorinated piperazic acid, 2-(1-methylcyclopropyl)-glycine, a β-branched-hydroxy acid, and 3-hydroxy glutamic acid, for which biosynthetic logic has not been elucidated. Herein we describe the biosynthetic gene cluster for the kutzneride family, identified by degenerate primer PCR for halogenating enzymes postulated to be involved in biosyntheses of these unusual monomers. The 56-kb gene cluster encodes a series of six nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) modules distributed over three proteins and a variety of tailoring enzymes, including both mononuclear nonheme iron and two flavin-dependent halogenases, and an array of oxygen transfer catalysts. The sequence and organization of NRPS genes support incorporation of the unusual monomer units into the densely functionalized scaffold of kutznerides. Our work provides insight into the formation of this intriguing class of compounds and provides a foundation for elucidating the timing and mechanisms of their biosynthesis. PMID:17940045

  8. Unique marine derived cyanobacterial biosynthetic genes for chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Kleigrewe, Karin; Gerwick, Lena; Sherman, David H; Gerwick, William H

    2016-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are a prolific source of structurally unique and biologically active natural products that derive from intriguing biochemical pathways. Advancements in genome sequencing have accelerated the identification of unique modular biosynthetic gene clusters in cyanobacteria and reveal a wealth of unusual enzymatic reactions involved in their construction. This article examines several interesting mechanistic transformations involved in cyanobacterial secondary metabolite biosynthesis with a particular focus on marine derived modular polyketide synthases (PKS), nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and combinations thereof to form hybrid natural products. Further, we focus on the cyanobacterial genus Moorea and the co-evolution of its enzyme cassettes that create metabolic diversity. Progress in the development of heterologous expression systems for cyanobacterial gene clusters along with chemoenzymatic synthesis makes it possible to create new analogs. Additionally, phylum-wide genome sequencing projects have enhanced the discovery rate of new natural products and their distinctive enzymatic reactions. Summarizing, cyanobacterial biosynthetic gene clusters encode for a large toolbox of novel enzymes that catalyze unique chemical reactions, some of which may be useful in synthetic biology. PMID:26758451

  9. A biosynthetic pathway for anandamide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Harvey-White, Judith; Osei-Hyiaman, Douglas; Razdan, Raj; Gong, Qian; Chan, Andrew C.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Huang, Bill X.; Kim, Hee-Yong; Kunos, George

    2006-01-01

    The endocannabinoid arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide) is a lipid transmitter synthesized and released “on demand” by neurons in the brain. Anandamide is also generated by macrophages where its endotoxin (LPS)-induced synthesis has been implicated in the hypotension of septic shock and advanced liver cirrhosis. Anandamide can be generated from its membrane precursor, N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) through cleavage by a phospholipase D (NAPE–PLD). Here we document a biosynthetic pathway for anandamide in mouse brain and RAW264.7 macrophages that involves the phospholipase C (PLC)-catalyzed cleavage of NAPE to generate a lipid, phosphoanandamide, which is subsequently dephosphorylated by phosphatases, including PTPN22, previously described as a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Bacterial endotoxin (LPS)-induced synthesis of anandamide in macrophages is mediated exclusively by the PLC/phosphatase pathway, which is up-regulated by LPS, whereas NAPE–PLD is down-regulated by LPS and functions as a salvage pathway of anandamide synthesis when the PLC/phosphatase pathway is compromised. Both PTPN22 and endocannabinoids have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, suggesting that the PLC/phosphatase pathway of anandamide synthesis may be a pharmacotherapeutic target. PMID:16938887

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Associated Changes in the Plasma Non-Esterified Fatty Acids, Oxylipins and Endocannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Grapov, Dmitry; Adams, Sean H.; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Newman, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has profound effects on metabolism that can be detected in plasma. While increases in circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) are well-described in diabetes, effects on signaling lipids have received little attention. Oxylipins and endocannabinoids are classes of bioactive fatty acid metabolites with many structural members that influence insulin signaling, adipose function and inflammation through autocrine, paracrine and endocrine mechanisms. To link diabetes-associated changes in plasma NEFA and signaling lipids, we quantitatively targeted >150 plasma lipidome components in age- and body mass index-matched, overweight to obese, non-diabetic (n = 12) and type 2 diabetic (n = 43) African-American women. Diabetes related NEFA patterns indicated ∼60% increase in steroyl-CoA desaturase activity and ∼40% decrease in very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid chain shortening, patterns previously associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Further, epoxides and ketones of eighteen carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids were elevated >80% in diabetes and strongly correlated with changes in NEFA, consistent with their liberation during adipose lipolysis. Endocannabinoid behavior differed by class with diabetes increasing an array of N-acylethanolamides which were positively correlated with pro-inflammatory 5-lipooxygenase-derived metabolites, while monoacylglycerols were negatively correlated with body mass. These results clearly show that diabetes not only results in an increase in plasma NEFA, but shifts the plasma lipidomic profiles in ways that reflect the biochemical and physiological changes of this pathological state which are independent of obesity associated changes. PMID:23144998

  11. Metabolic Profiling of Alternative NAD Biosynthetic Routes in Mouse Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Valerio; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Conforti, Laura; Magni, Giulio; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia; Orsomando, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the “amidated” and “deamidated” routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS). First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide). In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease. PMID:25423279

  12. Circulating levels of endocannabinoids and oxylipins altered by dietary lipids in older women are likely associated with previously identified gene targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postmenopausal women (PMW) report marginal n-3 PUFA intakes and are at risk of chronic diseases associated with the skeletal, muscular, and cardiovascular systems. Our investigation characterized the endocannabinoids (EC), oxylipins (OL), and global metabolites (GM) in white PMW (75 ± 7 y), randomiz...

  13. Limited value of pro-inflammatory oxylipins and cytokines as circulating biomarkers in endometriosis – a targeted ‘omics study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yie Hou; Cui, Liang; Fang, Jinling; Chern, Bernard Su Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Chan, Jerry K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, complex gynecologic disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial-like tissues at extrauterine sites. Elevation in protein and lipid mediators of inflammation including oxylipins and cytokines within the peritoneum characterize the inflamed pelvic region and may contribute to the survival and growth of displaced endometrial tissues. The presence of a clinically silent but molecularly detectable systemic inflammation in endometriosis has been proposed. Thus, we examined serum oxylipin and immunomodulatory protein levels in 103 women undergoing laparoscopy to evaluate systematically any involvement in systemic pathophysiological inflammation in endometriosis. Oxylipin levels were similar between women with and without endometriosis. Stratification by menstrual phase or severity did not offer any difference. Women with ovarian endometriosis had significantly lower 12-HETE relative to peritoneal endometriosis (−50.7%). Serum oxylipin levels were not associated with pre-operative pain symptoms. Changes to immunomodulatory proteins were minimal, with IL-12(p70), IL-13 and VEGF significantly lower in mild endometriotic women compared to non-endometriotic women (−39%, −54% and −76% respectively). Verification using C-reactive protein as a non-specific marker of inflammation further showed similar levels between groups. The implications of our work suggest pro-inflammatory mediators in the classes studied may have potentially limited value as circulating biomarkers for endometriosis, suggesting of potentially tenuous systemic inflammation in endometriosis. PMID:27193963

  14. Effects of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi on gene expression levels of the calanoid copepod Calanus sinicus.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, Chiara; Carotenuto, Ylenia; Vitiello, Valentina; Buttino, Isabella; Romano, Giovanna; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Ianora, Adrianna

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are eukaryotic unicellular plants that constitute one of the major components of marine phytoplankton, comprising up to 40% of annual productivity at sea and representing 25% of global carbon-fixation. Diatoms have traditionally been considered a preferential food for zooplankton grazers such as copepods, but, in the last two decades, this beneficial role has been challenged after the discovery that many species of diatoms produce toxic metabolites, collectively termed oxylipins, that induce reproductive failure in zooplankton grazers. Diatoms are the dominant natural diet of Calanus sinicus, a cold-temperate calanoid copepod that supports secondary production of important fisheries in the shelf ecosystems of the Northwest Pacific Ocean, Yellow Sea, Sea of Japan and South China Sea. In this study, the effect of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi on C. sinicus has been evaluated by analyzing expression level changes of genes involved in defense and detoxification systems. Results show that C. sinicus is more resistant to a diet of this diatom species in terms of gene expression patterns, compared to the congeneric species Calanus helgolandicus which is an important constituent of the temperate waters of the Atlantic Ocean and northern Mediterranean Sea. These findings contribute to the better understanding of genetic and/or phenotypic flexibility of copepod species and their capabilities to cope with stress by identifying molecular markers (such as stress and detoxification genes) as biosensors for environmental perturbations (e.g. toxins and contaminants) affecting marine copepods. PMID:25666254

  15. Diatom-derived oxylipins induce cell death in sea urchin embryos activating caspase-8 and caspase 3/7.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Nadia; Varrella, Stefano; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G; Somma, Domenico; Leonardi, Antonio; Mellone, Stefano; Zuppa, Antonio; Costantini, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive secondary metabolites with cytotoxic activity collectively termed oxylipins, including polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs), hydroxyacids (HEPEs), oxo-acids and epoxyalcohols. Previous results showed that at higher concentrations, the PUA decadienal induced apoptosis on copepods and sea urchin embryos via caspase-3 activation; at lower concentrations decadienal affected the expression levels of the caspase-8 gene in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. In the present work, we studied the effects of other common oxylipins produced by diatoms: two PUAs (heptadienal and octadienal) and four hydroxyacids (5-, 9- 11- and 15-HEPE) on P. lividus cell death and caspase activities. Our results showed that (i) at higher concentrations PUAs and HEPEs induced apoptosis in sea urchin embryos, detected by microscopic observation and through the activation of caspase-3/7 and caspase-8 measured by luminescent assays; (ii) at low concentrations, PUAs and HEPEs affected the expression levels of caspase-8 and caspase-3/7 (isolated for the first time here in P. lividus) genes, detected by Real Time qPCR. These findings have interesting implications from the ecological point of view, given the importance of diatom blooms in nutrient-rich aquatic environments. PMID:27130972

  16. Volatile terpenes from actinomycetes: a biosynthetic study correlating chemical analyses to genome data.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Patrick; Citron, Christian A; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2013-11-25

    The volatile terpenes of 24 actinomycetes whose genomes have been sequenced (or are currently being sequenced) were collected by use of a closed-loop stripping apparatus and identified by GC/MS. The analytical data were compared against a phylogenetic analysis of all 192 currently available sequences of bacterial terpene cyclases (excluding geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases). In addition to the several groups of terpenes with known biosynthetic origin, selinadienes were identified as a large group of biosynthetically related sesquiterpenes that are produced by several streptomycetes. The detection of a large number of previously unrecognised side products of known terpene cyclases proved to be particularly important for an in depth understanding of biosynthetic pathways to known terpenes in actinomycetes. Interpretation of the chemical analytical data in the context of the phylogenetic tree of bacterial terpene cyclases pointed to the function of three new enzymes: (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase, selina-3,7(11)-diene synthase and aristolochene synthase. PMID:24243698

  17. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stahlhut, Steen G; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh; Harrison, Scott J; Maury, Jérôme; Neves, Ana Rute; Forster, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are an underutilized pool of bioactive molecules for applications in the food, pharma and nutritional industries. One such molecule is fisetin, which is present in many fruits and vegetables and has several potential health benefits, including anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer's disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin pathway in Escherichia coli. We propose a novel biosynthetic pathway from the amino acid, tyrosine, utilizing nine heterologous enzymes. The pathway proceeds via the synthesis of two flavanones never produced in microorganisms before--garbanzol and resokaempferol. We show for the first time a functional biosynthetic pathway and establish E. coli as a microbial platform strain for the production of fisetin and related flavonols. PMID:26192693

  18. Evolution of alternative biosynthetic pathways for vitamin C following plastid acquisition in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Glen; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Pornsaksit, Varissa; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an enzyme co-factor in eukaryotes that also plays a critical role in protecting photosynthetic eukaryotes against damaging reactive oxygen species derived from the chloroplast. Many animal lineages, including primates, have become ascorbate auxotrophs due to the loss of the terminal enzyme in their biosynthetic pathway, L-gulonolactone oxidase (GULO). The alternative pathways found in land plants and Euglena use a different terminal enzyme, L-galactonolactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). The evolutionary processes leading to these differing pathways and their contribution to the cellular roles of ascorbate remain unclear. Here we present molecular and biochemical evidence demonstrating that GULO was functionally replaced with GLDH in photosynthetic eukaryote lineages following plastid acquisition. GULO has therefore been lost repeatedly throughout eukaryote evolution. The formation of the alternative biosynthetic pathways in photosynthetic eukaryotes uncoupled ascorbate synthesis from hydrogen peroxide production and likely contributed to the rise of ascorbate as a major photoprotective antioxidant. PMID:25768426

  19. Structural Diversification of Lyngbyatoxin A by Host-Dependent Heterologous Expression of the tleABC Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihan; Hoshino, Shotaro; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2016-08-01

    Natural products have enormous structural diversity, yet little is known about how such diversity is achieved in nature. Here we report the structural diversification of a cyanotoxin-lyngbyatoxin A-and its biosynthetic intermediates by heterologous expression of the Streptomyces-derived tleABC biosynthetic gene cluster in three different Streptomyces hosts: S. lividans, S. albus, and S. avermitilis. Notably, the isolated lyngbyatoxin derivatives, including four new natural products, were biosynthesized by crosstalk between the heterologous tleABC gene cluster and the endogenous host enzymes. The simple strategy described here has expanded the structural diversity of lyngbyatoxin A and its biosynthetic intermediates, and provides opportunities for investigation of the currently underestimated hidden biosynthetic crosstalk. PMID:27194569

  20. The Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Zorbamycin, a Member of the Bleomycin Family of Antitumor Antibiotics, from Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC 21892

    PubMed Central

    Galm, Ute; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Wang, Liyan; George, Nicholas P.; Oh, Tae-Jin; Yi, Fan; Tao, Meifeng; Coughlin, Jane M.; Shen, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthetic gene cluster for the glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotic zorbamycin (ZBM) was cloned by screening a cosmid library of Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC 21892. Sequence analysis revealed 40 ORFs belonging to the ZBM biosynthetic gene cluster. However, only 23 and 22 ORFs showed striking similarities to the biosynthetic gene clusters for the bleomycins (BLMs) and tallysomycins (TLMs), respectively; the remaining ORFs do not show significant homology to ORFs from the related BLM and TLM clusters. The ZBM gene cluster consists of 16 nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes encoding eight complete NRPS modules, three incomplete didomain NRPS modules, and eight freestanding single NRPS domains or associated enzymes, a polyketide synthase (PKS) gene encoding one PKS module, six sugar biosynthesis genes, as well as genes encoding other biosynthesis and resistance proteins. A genetic system using Escherichia coli-Streptomyces flavoviridis intergeneric conjugation was developed to enable ZBM gene cluster boundary determinations and biosynthetic pathway manipulations. PMID:19081934

  1. Elucidation of Pseurotin Biosynthetic Pathway Points to Trans-Acting C-Methyltransferase and Source of Chemical Diversity Generation**

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Fukutomi, Manami; Saruwatari, Takayoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hotta, Kinya; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pseurotins comprise a family of structurally related Aspergillal natural products having interesting bioactivity. However, little is known about the biosynthetic steps involved in the formation of their complex chemical features. Here, we systematically deleted the pseurotin biosynthetic genes in A. fumigatus and performed in vivo and in vitro characterization of the tailoring enzymes to determine the biosynthetic intermediates and the gene products responsible for the formation of each intermediate. This allowed us to elucidate the main biosynthetic steps leading to the formation of pseurotin A from the predominant precursor, azaspirene. The study revealed the combinatorial nature of the biosynthesis of the pseurotin family of compounds and the intermediates. Most interestingly, we report the first identification of an epoxidase–C-methyltransferase bifunctional fusion protein PsoF that appears to methylate the nascent polyketide backbone carbon atom in trans. PMID:24939566

  2. Diversity and abundance of phosphonate biosynthetic genes in nature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaomin; Doroghazi, James R.; Janga, Sarath C.; Zhang, Jun Kai; Circello, Benjamin; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Labeda, David P.; Metcalf, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphonates, molecules containing direct carbon–phosphorus bonds, compose a structurally diverse class of natural products with interesting and useful biological properties. Although their synthesis in protozoa was discovered more than 50 y ago, the extent and diversity of phosphonate production in nature remains poorly characterized. The rearrangement of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate, catalyzed by the enzyme PEP mutase (PepM), is shared by the vast majority of known phosphonate biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the pepM gene can be used as a molecular marker to examine the occurrence and abundance of phosphonate-producing organisms. Based on the presence of this gene, phosphonate biosynthesis is common in microbes, with ∼5% of sequenced bacterial genomes and 7% of genome equivalents in metagenomic datasets carrying pepM homologs. Similarly, we detected the pepM gene in ∼5% of random actinomycete isolates. The pepM-containing gene neighborhoods from 25 of these isolates were cloned, sequenced, and compared with those found in sequenced genomes. PEP mutase sequence conservation is strongly correlated with conservation of other nearby genes, suggesting that the diversity of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways can be predicted by examining PEP mutase diversity. We used this approach to estimate the range of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways in nature, revealing dozens of discrete groups in pepM amplicons from local soils, whereas hundreds were observed in metagenomic datasets. Collectively, our analyses show that phosphonate biosynthesis is both diverse and relatively common in nature, suggesting that the role of phosphonate molecules in the biosphere may be more important than is often recognized. PMID:24297932

  3. Localization of the pre-squalene segment of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway in mammalian peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Werner J; Tape, Khanichi N; Shackelford, Janis E; Duan, Xueying; Kasumov, Takhar; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri; Krisans, Skaidrite K

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the early steps in the isoprenoid/cholesterol biosynthetic pathway occur in peroxisomes. However, the role of peroxisomes in cholesterol biosynthesis has recently been questioned in several reports concluding that three of the peroxisomal cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes, namely mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, and mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, do not localize to peroxisomes in human cells even though they contain consensus peroxisomal targeting signals. We re-investigated the subcellular localization of the cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes of the pre-squalene segment in human cells by using new stable isotopic techniques and data computations with isotopomer spectral analysis, in combination with immunofluorescence and cell permeabilization techniques. Our present findings clearly show and confirm previous studies that the pre-squalene segment of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is localized to peroxisomes. In addition, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that acetyl-CoA derived from peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long-chain fatty acids and medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is preferentially channeled to cholesterol synthesis inside the peroxisomes without mixing with the cytosolic acetyl-CoA pool. PMID:17180682

  4. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway: thinking in all dimensions.

    PubMed

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2013-07-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signaling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavor of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and predictability of metabolic engineering of carotenoids rests in the ability to target carotenoids for specific physiological purposes as well as to simultaneously modify carotenoids along with other desired traits. Here, we ask whether predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway is indeed possible. Despite a long history of research on the pathway, at this point in time we can only describe the pathway as a parts list and have almost no knowledge of the location of the complete pathway, how it is assembled, and whether there exists any trafficking of the enzymes or the carotenoids themselves. We discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the "complete" pathway and make the argument that predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway (and other pathways) will require investigation of the three dimensional state of the pathway as it may exist in plastids of different ultrastructures. Along with this message we point out the need to develop new types of visualization tools and resources that better reflect the dynamic nature of biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23683930

  5. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  6. THE CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY: THINKING IN ALL DIMENSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2013-01-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signalling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavour of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and predictability of metabolic engineering of carotenoids rests in the ability to target carotenoids for specific physiological purposes as well as to simultaneously modify carotenoids along with other desired traits. Here, we ask whether predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway is indeed possible. Despite a long history of research on the pathway, at this point in time we can only describe the pathway as a parts list and have almost no knowledge of the location of the complete pathway, how it is assembled, and whether there exists any trafficking of the enzymes or the carotenoids themselves. We discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the “complete” pathway and make the argument that predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway (and other pathways) will require investigation of the three dimensional state of the pathway as it may exist in plastids of different ultrastructures. Along with this message we point out the need to develop new types of visualization tools and resources that better reflect the dynamic nature of biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23683930

  7. Plasma oxylipin profiling identifies polyunsaturated vicinal diols as responsive to arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intake in growing piglets.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Maaike J; Dane, Adrie D; Strassburg, Katrin; Vreeken, Rob J; Newman, John W; Salem, Norman; Tyburczy, Cynthia; Brenna, J Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The dose-responsiveness of plasma oxylipins to incremental dietary intake of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6; ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3; DHA) was determined in piglets. Piglets randomly received one of six formulas (n = 8 per group) from days 3 to 27 postnatally. Diets contained incremental ARA or incremental DHA levels as follows (% fatty acid, ARA/DHA): (A1) 0.1/1.0; (A2) 0.53/1.0; (A3-D3) 0.69/1.0; (A4) 1.1/1.0; (D1) 0.66/0.33; and (D2) 0.67/0.62, resulting in incremental intake (g/kg BW/day) of ARA: 0.07 ± 0.01, 0.43 ± 0.03, 0.55 ± 0.03, and 0.82 ± 0.05 at constant DHA intake (0.82 ± 0.05), or incremental intake of DHA: 0.27 ± 0.02, 0.49 ± 0.03, and 0.81 ± 0.05 at constant ARA intake (0.54 ± 0.04). Plasma oxylipin concentrations and free plasma PUFA levels were determined at day 28 using LC-MS/MS. Incremental dietary ARA intake dose-dependently increased plasma ARA levels. In parallel, ARA intake dose-dependently increased ARA-derived diols 5,6- and 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (DiHETrE) and linoleic acid-derived 12,13-dihydroxyoctadecenoic acid (DiHOME), downstream metabolites of cytochrome P450 expoxygenase (CYP). The ARA epoxide products from CYP are important in vascular homeostatic maintenance. Incremental DHA intake increased plasma DHA and most markedly raised the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) metabolite 17,18-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (DiHETE) and the DHA metabolite 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoic acid (DiHDPE). In conclusion, increasing ARA and DHA intake dose-dependently influenced endogenous n-6 and n-3 oxylipin plasma concentrations in growing piglets, although the biological relevance of these findings remains to be determined. PMID:23543770

  8. Profiling the Oxylipin and Endocannabinoid Metabolome by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS in Human Plasma to Monitor Postprandial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Späth, Jana; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Nording, Malin L.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive lipids, including oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and related compounds may function as specific biochemical markers of certain aspects of inflammation. However, the postprandial responsiveness of these compounds is largely unknown; therefore, changes in the circulating oxylipin and endocannabinoid metabolome in response to a challenge meal were investigated at six occasions in a subject who freely modified her usual diet. The dietary change, and especially the challenge meal itself, represented a modification of precursor fatty acid status, with expectedly subtle effects on bioactive lipid levels. To detect even the slightest alteration, highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods for bioactive lipid profiling was employed. A previously validated UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for profiling the endocannabinoid metabolome was used, while validation of an UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for oxylipin analysis was performed with acceptable outcomes for a majority of the parameters according to the US Food and Drug Administration guidelines for linearity (0.9938 < R2 < 0.9996), limit of detection (0.0005–2.1 pg on column), limit of quantification (0.0005–4.2 pg on column), inter- and intraday accuracy (85–115%) and precision (< 5%), recovery (40–109%) and stability (40–105%). Forty-seven of fifty-two bioactive lipids were detected in plasma samples at fasting and in the postprandial state (0.5, 1, and 3 hours after the meal). Multivariate analysis showed a significant shift of bioactive lipid profiles in the postprandial state due to inclusion of dairy products in the diet, which was in line with univariate analysis revealing seven compounds (NAGly, 9-HODE, 13-oxo-ODE, 9(10)-EpOME, 12(13)-EpOME, 20-HETE, and 11,12-DHET) that were significantly different between background diets in the postprandial state (but not at fasting). The only change in baseline levels at fasting

  9. Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress Re-Shapes the Oxylipin Profile of Aspergillus flavus and Its Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Marco; Ludovici, Matteo; Sanzani, Simona Marianna; Ippolito, Antonio; Aiese Cigliano, Riccardo; Sanseverino, Walter; Scarpari, Marzia; Scala, Valeria; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is an efficient producer of mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxin B1, probably the most hepatocarcinogenic naturally-occurring compound. Although the inducing agents of toxin synthesis are not unanimously identified, there is evidence that oxidative stress is one of the main actors in play. In our study, we use menadione, a quinone extensively implemented in studies on ROS response in animal cells, for causing stress to A. flavus. For uncovering the molecular determinants that drive A. flavus in challenging oxidative stress conditions, we have evaluated a wide spectrum of several different parameters, ranging from metabolic (ROS and oxylipin profile) to transcriptional analysis (RNA-seq). There emerges a scenario in which A. flavus activates several metabolic processes under oxidative stress conditions for limiting the ROS-associated detrimental effects, as well as for triggering adaptive and escape strategies. PMID:26512693

  10. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of the Grecocycline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bilyk, Oksana; Sekurova, Olga N.; Zotchev, Sergey B.; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast is a rapid and inexpensive method for cloning and assembly of large DNA fragments, which relies on natural homologous recombination. Two vectors, based on p15a and F-factor replicons that can be maintained in yeast, E. coli and streptomycetes have been constructed. These vectors have been successfully employed for assembly of the grecocycline biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. Acta 1362. Fragments of the cluster were obtained by PCR and transformed together with the “capture” vector into the yeast cells, yielding a construct carrying the entire gene cluster. The obtained construct was heterologously expressed in S. albus J1074, yielding several grecocycline congeners. Grecocyclines have unique structural moieties such as a dissacharide side chain, an additional amino sugar at the C-5 position and a thiol group. Enzymes from this pathway may be used for the derivatization of known active angucyclines in order to improve their desired biological properties. PMID:27410036

  11. Discovery of a widely distributed toxin biosynthetic gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun W.; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Markley, Andrew L.; Hensler, Mary E.; Gonzalez, David; Wohlrab, Aaron; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Nizet, Victor; Dixon, Jack E.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriocins represent a large family of ribosomally produced peptide antibiotics. Here we describe the discovery of a widely conserved biosynthetic gene cluster for the synthesis of thiazole and oxazole heterocycles on ribosomally produced peptides. These clusters encode a toxin precursor and all necessary proteins for toxin maturation and export. Using the toxin precursor peptide and heterocycle-forming synthetase proteins from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, we demonstrate the in vitro reconstitution of streptolysin S activity. We provide evidence that the synthetase enzymes, as predicted from our bioinformatics analysis, introduce heterocycles onto precursor peptides, thereby providing molecular insight into the chemical structure of streptolysin S. Furthermore, our studies reveal that the synthetase exhibits relaxed substrate specificity and modifies toxin precursors from both related and distant species. Given our findings, it is likely that the discovery of similar peptidic toxins will rapidly expand to existing and emerging genomes. PMID:18375757

  12. Toward a biosynthetic route to sclareol and amber odorants.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Michel; Pastore, Laurence; Mirata, Marco A; Khim, Samretthy; Schouwey, Marina; Deguerry, Fabienne; Pineda, Virginia; Rocci, Letizia; Daviet, Laurent

    2012-11-21

    Ambergris, a waxy substance excreted by the intestinal tract of the sperm whale, has been a highly prized fragrance ingredient for millenia. Because of supply shortage and price inflation, a number of ambergris substitutes have been developed by the fragrance industry. One of the key olfactory components and most appreciated substitutes of ambergris, Ambrox is produced industrially by semisynthesis from sclareol, a diterpene-diol isolated from Clary sage. In the present study, we report the cloning and functional characterization of the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of sclareol. Furthermore, we reconstructed the sclareol biosynthetic pathway in genetically engineered Escherichia coli and reached sclareol titers of ~1.5 g/L in high-cell-density fermentation. Our work provides a basis for the development of an alternative, sustainable, and cost-efficient route to sclareol and other diterpene analogues. PMID:23113661

  13. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of the Grecocycline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Bilyk, Oksana; Sekurova, Olga N; Zotchev, Sergey B; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast is a rapid and inexpensive method for cloning and assembly of large DNA fragments, which relies on natural homologous recombination. Two vectors, based on p15a and F-factor replicons that can be maintained in yeast, E. coli and streptomycetes have been constructed. These vectors have been successfully employed for assembly of the grecocycline biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. Acta 1362. Fragments of the cluster were obtained by PCR and transformed together with the "capture" vector into the yeast cells, yielding a construct carrying the entire gene cluster. The obtained construct was heterologously expressed in S. albus J1074, yielding several grecocycline congeners. Grecocyclines have unique structural moieties such as a dissacharide side chain, an additional amino sugar at the C-5 position and a thiol group. Enzymes from this pathway may be used for the derivatization of known active angucyclines in order to improve their desired biological properties. PMID:27410036

  14. Pictet–Spengler reaction-based biosynthetic machinery in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Ge, Hui Ming; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Nan; Mei, Ya Ning; Jiang, Rong; Li, Sui Jun; Chen, Chao Jun; Jiao, Rui Hua; Xu, Qiang; Ng, Seik Weng; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The Pictet–Spengler (PS) reaction constructs plant alkaloids such as morphine and camptothecin, but it has not yet been noticed in the fungal kingdom. Here, a silent fungal Pictet–Spenglerase (FPS) gene of Chaetomium globosum 1C51 residing in Epinephelus drummondhayi guts is described and ascertained to be activable by 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). The activated FPS expression enables the PS reaction between 1-MT and flavipin (fungal aldehyde) to form “unnatural” natural products with unprecedented skeletons, of which chaetoglines B and F are potently antibacterial with the latter inhibiting acetylcholinesterase. A gene-implied enzyme inhibition (GIEI) strategy has been introduced to address the key steps for PS product diversifications. In aggregation, the work designs and validates an innovative approach that can activate the PS reaction-based fungal biosynthetic machinery to produce unpredictable compounds of unusual and novel structure valuable for new biology and biomedicine. PMID:25425666

  15. The Methymycin/Pikromycin Biosynthetic Pathway: A Model for Metabolic Diversity in Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kittendorf, Jeffrey D.; Sherman, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The methymycin/pikromycin (Pik) macrolide pathway represents a robust metabolic system for analysis of modular polyketide biosynthesis. The enzymes that comprise this biosynthetic pathway display unprecedented substrate flexibility, combining to produce six structurally diverse macrolide antibiotics in Streptomyces venezuelae. Thus, it is appealing to consider that the pikromycin biosynthetic enzymes could be leveraged for high throughput production of novel macrolide antibiotics. Accordingly, efforts over the past decade have focused on the detailed investigation of the six-module polyketide synthase, desosamine sugar assembly and glycosyl transfer, and the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that is responsible for hydroxylation. This review summarizes the advances in understanding of pikromycin biosynthesis that have been gained during the course of these investigations. PMID:19027305

  16. Comprehensive curation and analysis of fungal biosynthetic gene clusters of published natural products.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Fuga; Tsai, Kathleen J S; Harvey, Colin J B; Li, James Jian; Ary, Beatrice E; Berlew, Erin E; Boehman, Brenna L; Findley, David M; Friant, Alexandra G; Gardner, Christopher A; Gould, Michael P; Ha, Jae H; Lilley, Brenna K; McKinstry, Emily L; Nawal, Saadia; Parry, Robert C; Rothchild, Kristina W; Silbert, Samantha D; Tentilucci, Michael D; Thurston, Alana M; Wai, Rebecca B; Yoon, Yongjin; Aiyar, Raeka S; Medema, Marnix H; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms produce a wide range of natural products (NPs) with clinically and agriculturally relevant biological activities. In bacteria and fungi, genes encoding successive steps in a biosynthetic pathway tend to be clustered on the chromosome as biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Historically, "activity-guided" approaches to NP discovery have focused on bioactivity screening of NPs produced by culturable microbes. In contrast, recent "genome mining" approaches first identify candidate BGCs, express these biosynthetic genes using synthetic biology methods, and finally test for the production of NPs. Fungal genome mining efforts and the exploration of novel sequence and NP space are limited, however, by the lack of a comprehensive catalog of BGCs encoding experimentally-validated products. In this study, we generated a comprehensive reference set of fungal NPs whose biosynthetic gene clusters are described in the published literature. To generate this dataset, we first identified NCBI records that included both a peer-reviewed article and an associated nucleotide record. We filtered these records by text and homology criteria to identify putative NP-related articles and BGCs. Next, we manually curated the resulting articles, chemical structures, and protein sequences. The resulting catalog contains 197 unique NP compounds covering several major classes of fungal NPs, including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, and alkaloids. The distribution of articles published per compound shows a bias toward the study of certain popular compounds, such as the aflatoxins. Phylogenetic analysis of biosynthetic genes suggests that much chemical and enzymatic diversity remains to be discovered in fungi. Our catalog was incorporated into the recently launched Minimum Information about Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) repository to create the largest known set of fungal BGCs and associated NPs, a resource that we anticipate will guide future genome mining and

  17. Complete Biosynthetic Pathway of the C50 Carotenoid Bacterioruberin from Lycopene in the Extremely Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Ando, Ai; Miyoko, Nobuhiro; Fukui, Toshiaki; Takaichi, Shinichi; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon that requires high concentrations of NaCl for growth, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). By homology analysis, a gene cluster, including c0507, c0506, and c0505, was found and predicted to be involved in the synthesis of bacterioruberin. To elucidate the function of the encoded enzymes, we constructed Ha. japonica mutants of these genes and analyzed carotenoids produced by the mutants. Our research showed that c0507, c0506, and c0505 encoded a carotenoid 3,4-desaturase (CrtD), a bifunctional lycopene elongase and 1,2-hydratase (LyeJ), and a C50 carotenoid 2″,3″-hydratase (CruF), respectively. The above three carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes catalyze the reactions that convert lycopene to bacterioruberin in Ha. japonica. This is the first identification of functional CrtD and CruF in archaea and elucidation of the complete biosynthetic pathway of bacterioruberin from lycopene. IMPORTANCE Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). In this study, we have identified three BR biosynthetic enzymes and have elucidated their functions. Among them, two enzymes were found in an archaeon for the first time. Our results revealed the biosynthetic pathway responsible for production of BR in Ha. japonica and provide a basis for investigating carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in other extremely halophilic archaea. Elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in Ha. japonica may also prove useful for producing the C50 carotenoid BR efficiently by employing genetically modified haloarchaeal strains. PMID:25712483

  18. Identification of a 12-gene fusaric acid biosynthetic gene cluster in Fusarium species through comparative and functional genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, genes involved in biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite (SM) are often located adjacent to one another in the genome and are coordinately regulated. These SM biosynthetic gene clusters typically encode enzymes, one or more transcription factors, and a transport protein. Fusaric acid is a ...

  19. Changes in Retinal N-Acylethanolamines and their Oxylipin Derivatives During the Development of Visual Impairment in a Mouse Model for Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Christa L; Keereetaweep, Jantana; Johnson, Heather M; Grillo, Stephanie L; Chapman, Kent D; Koulen, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Neurons are especially susceptible to oxidative damage, which is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disease. Certain N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) have been shown to protect neurons from oxidative stress. Since glaucoma may be considered a neurodegenerative disorder and the survival of retinal neurons could also be influenced by N-acylethanolamines, our goal was to quantify changes in certain N-acylethanolamine species and their oxylipin derivatives in the retina of a mouse model for glaucoma. We also sought to identify relationships between these and parameters of glaucoma disease development, specifically intraocular pressure, visual acuity, and contrast sensitivity. Five N-acylethanolamine species and three NAE oxylipin derivatives were quantified in retina from young and aged DBA/2Crl mice. N-Acylethanolamines and NAE-oxylipins in retinal extracts were quantified against deuterated standards by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Levels (nmol/g dry weight) of N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide; NAE 20:4) were significantly (p = 0.008) decreased in aged (2.875 ± 0.6702) compared to young animals (5.175 ± 0.971). Conversely, the anandamide oxylipin, 15(S)-HETE ethanolamide (15(S)-HETE EA), was significantly (p = 0.042) increased in aged (0.063 ± 0.009) compared to young animals (0.039 ± 0.011). Enzymatic depletion of the anandamide pool by 15-lipoxygenase and consequent accumulation of 15(S)-HETE ethanolamine may contribute to decreased visual function in glaucomatous mice. Since N-acylethanolamines effectively attenuate glaucoma pathogenesis and associated visual impairment, our data provides additional rationale and novel targets for glaucoma therapies. PMID:27221132

  20. Synthesis of the (9R,13R)-isomer of LDS1, a flower-inducing oxylipin isolated from Lemna paucicostata.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Yuki; Ogura, Yusuke; Towada, Ryo; Kuwahara, Shigefumi

    2016-08-01

    The first synthesis of the (9R,13R)-stereoisomer of LDS1, a flower-inducing oxylipin isolated from Lemna paucicostata, has been achieved from a known allylic alcohol by a seven-step sequence that involves the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons olefination to construct its full carbon framework and an enzymatic hydrolysis of a penultimate methyl ester intermediate to provide the target molecule. PMID:27023212

  1. Asymmetric Total Syntheses of (+)- and (−)-Versicolamide B and Biosynthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kenneth A.; Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Williams, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most well-studied, synthetically useful organic transformations. While a significant number of naturally occurring substances are postulated to arise by biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions, rigorous confirmation of a mechanistically distinct natural Diels-Alderase enzyme remains elusive. Within this context, several related fungi within the Aspergillus genus produce a number of metabolites of opposite absolute configuration including (+)- or (−)-versicolamide B. These alkaloids are hypothesized to arise via biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions implying that each Aspergillus species possesses enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. Herein, experimental validation of these biosynthetic proposals via deployment of the IMDA reaction as a key step in the asymmetric total syntheses of (+)- and (−)-versicolamide B is described. Laboratory validation of the proposed biosynthetic Diels-Alder construction, coupled with the secondary metabolite profile of the producing fungi, reveals that each Aspergillus species has evolved enantiomerically distinct indole oxidases, as well as enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. PMID:20300443

  2. Heterologous stable expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes using the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Bach, Søren Spanner; King, Brian Christopher; Zhan, Xin; Simonsen, Henrik Toft; Hamberger, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Heterologous and stable expression of genes encoding terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes in planta is an important tool for functional characterization and is an attractive alternative to expression in microbial hosts for biotechnological production. Despite improvements to the procedure, such as streamlining of large scale Agrobacterium infiltration and upregulation of the upstream pathways, transient in planta heterologous expression quickly reaches limitations when used for production of terpenoids. Stable integration of transgenes into the nuclear genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens has already been widely recognized as a viable alternative for industrial-scale production of biopharmaceuticals. For expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, and reconstruction of heterologous pathways, Physcomitrella has unique attributes that makes it a very promising biotechnological host. These features include a high native tolerance to terpenoids, a simple endogenous terpenoid profile, convenient genome editing using homologous recombination, and cultivation techniques that allow up-scaling from single cells in microtiter plates to industrial photo-bioreactors. Beyond its use for functional characterization of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, engineered Physcomitrella can be a green biotechnological platform for production of terpenoids. Here, we describe two complementary and simple procedures for stable nuclear transformation of Physcomitrella with terpenoid biosynthetic genes, selection and cultivation of transgenic lines, and metabolite analysis of terpenoids produced in transgenic moss lines. We also provide tools for metabolic engineering through genome editing using homologous recombination. PMID:24777804

  3. Biosynthetic route towards saxitoxin and shunt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Shigeki; Cho, Yuko; Konoki, Keiichi; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Oshima, Yasukatsu; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Saxitoxin, the most potent voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, is one of the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) produced by cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. Recently, putative biosynthetic genes of PSTs were reported in these microorganisms. We previously synthesized genetically predicted biosynthetic intermediates, Int-A’ and Int-C’2, and also Cyclic-C’ which was not predicted based on gene, and identified them all in the toxin-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis (TA04) and the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense (Axat-2). This study examined the incorporation of 15N-labeled intermediates into PSTs (C1 and C2) in A. circinalis (TA04). Conversions from Int-A’ to Int-C’2, from Int-C’2 to Cyclic-C’, and from Int-A’ and Int-C’2 to C1 and C2 were indicated using high resolution-LC/MS. However, Cyclic-C’ was not converted to C1 and C2 and was detected primarily in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that Int-A’ and Int-C’2 are genuine precursors of PSTs, but Int-C’2 converts partially to Cyclic-C’ which is a shunt product excreted to outside the cells. This paper provides the first direct demonstration of the biosynthetic route towards saxitoxin and a shunt pathway. PMID:26842222

  4. The bifurcation of the cyanogenic glucoside and glucosinolate biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Mette; Kannangara, Rubini M; Olsen, Carl E; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Gleadow, Roslyn M; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Bak, Søren; Motawie, Mohammed S; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2015-11-01

    The biosynthetic pathway for the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin in sorghum has previously been shown to involve the sequential production of (E)- and (Z)-p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime. In this study we used microsomes prepared from wild-type and mutant sorghum or transiently transformed Nicotiana benthamiana to demonstrate that CYP79A1 catalyzes conversion of tyrosine to (E)-p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime whereas CYP71E1 catalyzes conversion of (E)-p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime into the corresponding geometrical Z-isomer as required for its dehydration into a nitrile, the next intermediate in cyanogenic glucoside synthesis. Glucosinolate biosynthesis is also initiated by the action of a CYP79 family enzyme, but the next enzyme involved belongs to the CYP83 family. We demonstrate that CYP83B1 from Arabidopsis thaliana cannot convert the (E)-p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime to the (Z)-isomer, which blocks the route towards cyanogenic glucoside synthesis. Instead CYP83B1 catalyzes the conversion of the (E)-p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime into an S-alkyl-thiohydroximate with retention of the configuration of the E-oxime intermediate in the final glucosinolate core structure. Numerous microbial plant pathogens are able to detoxify Z-oximes but not E-oximes. The CYP79-derived E-oximes may play an important role in plant defense. PMID:26361733

  5. Different Biosynthetic Pathways to Fosfomycin in Pseudomonas syringae and Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Young; Ju, Kou-San; Metcalf, William W.; Evans, Bradley S.; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2012-01-01

    Fosfomycin is a wide-spectrum antibiotic that is used clinically to treat acute cystitis in the United States. The compound is produced by several strains of streptomycetes and pseudomonads. We sequenced the biosynthetic gene cluster responsible for fosfomycin production in Pseudomonas syringae PB-5123. Surprisingly, the biosynthetic pathway in this organism is very different from that in Streptomyces fradiae and Streptomyces wedmorensis. The pathways share the first and last steps, involving conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to phosphonopyruvate (PnPy) and 2-hydroxypropylphosphonate (2-HPP) to fosfomycin, respectively, but the enzymes converting PnPy to 2-HPP are different. The genome of P. syringae PB-5123 lacks a gene encoding the PnPy decarboxylase found in the Streptomyces strains. Instead, it contains a gene coding for a citrate synthase-like enzyme, Psf2, homologous to the proteins that add an acetyl group to PnPy in the biosynthesis of FR-900098 and phosphinothricin. Heterologous expression and purification of Psf2 followed by activity assays confirmed the proposed activity of Psf2. Furthermore, heterologous production of fosfomycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a fosmid encoding the fosfomycin biosynthetic cluster from P. syringae PB-5123 confirmed that the gene cluster is functional. Therefore, two different pathways have evolved to produce this highly potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:22615277

  6. Different biosynthetic pathways to fosfomycin in Pseudomonas syringae and Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Young; Ju, Kou-San; Metcalf, William W; Evans, Bradley S; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2012-08-01

    Fosfomycin is a wide-spectrum antibiotic that is used clinically to treat acute cystitis in the United States. The compound is produced by several strains of streptomycetes and pseudomonads. We sequenced the biosynthetic gene cluster responsible for fosfomycin production in Pseudomonas syringae PB-5123. Surprisingly, the biosynthetic pathway in this organism is very different from that in Streptomyces fradiae and Streptomyces wedmorensis. The pathways share the first and last steps, involving conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to phosphonopyruvate (PnPy) and 2-hydroxypropylphosphonate (2-HPP) to fosfomycin, respectively, but the enzymes converting PnPy to 2-HPP are different. The genome of P. syringae PB-5123 lacks a gene encoding the PnPy decarboxylase found in the Streptomyces strains. Instead, it contains a gene coding for a citrate synthase-like enzyme, Psf2, homologous to the proteins that add an acetyl group to PnPy in the biosynthesis of FR-900098 and phosphinothricin. Heterologous expression and purification of Psf2 followed by activity assays confirmed the proposed activity of Psf2. Furthermore, heterologous production of fosfomycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a fosmid encoding the fosfomycin biosynthetic cluster from P. syringae PB-5123 confirmed that the gene cluster is functional. Therefore, two different pathways have evolved to produce this highly potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:22615277

  7. Recent advances in Cannabis sativa research: biosynthetic studies and its potential in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Taura, Futoshi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    Cannabinoids, consisting of alkylresorcinol and monoterpene groups, are the unique secondary metabolites that are found only in Cannabis sativa. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabichromene (CBC) are well known cannabinoids and their pharmacological properties have been extensively studied. Recently, biosynthetic pathways of these cannabinoids have been successfully established. Several biosynthetic enzymes including geranylpyrophosphate:olivetolate geranyltransferase, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) synthase and cannabichromenic acid (CBCA) synthase have been purified from young rapidly expanding leaves of C. sativa. In addition, molecular cloning, characterization and localization of THCA synthase have been recently reported. THCA and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), its substrate, were shown to be apoptosis-inducing agents that might play a role in plant defense. Transgenic tobacco hairy roots expressing THCA synthase can produce THCA upon feeding of CBGA. These results open the way for biotechnological production of cannabinoids in the future. PMID:17691992

  8. Reassembled biosynthetic pathway for large-scale carbohydrate synthesis: alpha-Gal epitope producing "superbug".

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Zhang, Wei; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Wang, Peng George

    2002-01-01

    A metabolic pathway engineered Escherichia coli strain (superbug) containing one plasmid harboring an artificial gene cluster encoding all the five enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of Galalpha l,3Lac through galactose metabolism has been developed. The plasmid contains a lambda promoter, a c1857 repressor gene, an ampicillin resistance gene, and a T7 terminator. Each gene was preceded by a Shine - Dalgarno sequence for ribosome binding. In a reaction catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli strain, Galalpha 1,3Lac trisaccharide accumulated at concentrations of 14.2 mM (7.2 gL(-1)) in a reaction mixture containing galactose, glucose, lactose, and a catalytic amount of uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose. This work demonstrates that large-scale synthesis of complex oligosaccharides can be achieved economically and efficiently through a single, biosynthetic pathway engineered microorganism. PMID:17590953

  9. Biosynthetic pathway for acrylic acid from glycerol in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenhua; Xu, Ying; Xian, Mo; Niu, Wei; Guo, Jiantao; Liu, Huizhou; Zhao, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Acrylic acid is an important industrial feedstock. In this study, a de novo acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source glycerol was constructed in Escherichia coli. The acrylic acid was produced from glycerol via 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, 3-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, and acrylyl-CoA. The acrylate production was improved by screening and site-directed mutagenesis of key enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase and chromosomal integration of some exogenous genes. Finally, our recombinant strain produced 37.7 mg/L acrylic acid under shaking flask conditions. Although the acrylate production is low, our study shows feasibility of engineering an acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source. Furthermore, the reasons for limited acrylate production and further strain optimization that should be performed in the future were also discussed. PMID:26782744

  10. Regulation of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and its integration with fatty acid biosynthesis in the oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sterols are vital structural and regulatory components in eukaryotic cells; however, their biosynthetic pathways and functional roles in microalgae remain poorly understood. Results In the oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica, the sterol biosynthetic pathway produces phytosterols as minor products and cholesterol as the major product. The evidence together with their deduced biosynthetic pathways suggests that N. oceanica exhibits features of both higher plants and mammals. Temporal tracking of sterol profiles and sterol-biosynthetic transcripts in response to changes in light intensity and nitrogen supply reveal that sterols play roles in cell proliferation, chloroplast differentiation, and photosynthesis. Furthermore, the dynamics of fatty acid (FA) and FA-biosynthetic transcripts upon chemical inhibitor-induced sterol depletion reveal possible co-regulation of sterol production and FA synthesis, in that the squalene epoxidase inhibitor terbinafine reduces sterol content yet significantly elevates free FA production. Thus, a feedback regulation of sterol and FA homeostasis is proposed, with the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS, the committed enzyme in isoprenoid and sterol biosynthesis) gene potentially subject to feedback regulation by sterols. Conclusion These findings reveal features of sterol function and biosynthesis in microalgae and suggest new genetic engineering or chemical biology approaches for enhanced oil production in microalgae. PMID:24920959