Science.gov

Sample records for ozonation-biological coupled processes

  1. Ozone-biological activated carbon as a pretreatment process for reverse osmosis brine treatment and recovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lai Yoke; Ng, How Yong; Ong, Say Leong; Hu, Jiang Yong; Tao, Guihe; Kekre, Kiran; Viswanath, Balakrishnan; Lay, Winson; Seah, Harry

    2009-09-01

    Ozonation was used in this study to improve biodegradability of RO brine from water reclamation facilities. An ozone dosage ranging from 3 to 10 mg O(3)/L and contact times of 10 and 20 min in batch studies were found to increase the biodegradability (BOD(5)/TOC ratio) of the RO brine by 1.8-3.5 times. At the same time, total organic carbon (TOC) removal was in the range of 5.3-24.5%. The lab-scale ozone-biological activated carbon (BAC) at an ozone dosage of 6.0mg O(3)/L with 20-min contact time was able to achieve 3 times higher TOC removal compared to using BAC alone. Further processing with Capacitive Deionization (CDI) process was able to generate a product water with better water quality than the RO feed water, i.e., with more than 80% ions removal and a lower TOC concentration. The ozone-BAC pretreatment has the potential of reducing fouling in the CDI process. PMID:19580984

  2. [Removal characters of ozone-biological activated carbon process for typical pollutants in southern brooky regions of China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Lei-Lei

    2009-05-15

    The products of relative molecular weight (Mr) distribution, bromate (BrO3(-)) and trihalomethanes (THMs) were studied by ozone-biological activated carbon (O3-BAC) process for treating organic matters and bromide (Br(-)) in water source of southern brooky regions of China. The experimental results showed that dissolved organic matters (DOC) with Mr lower than 10(3) accounted for 80% of the total. The removal rate of DOC and SUVA (UV254/DOC) were 8% and 14% respectively by traditional treatment process with main removalonly for ones with Mr higher than 100 x 10(3). Only 30% of DOC and 31% of SUVA were decreased by O3-BAC process for the removal of ones with Mr between 10(3) and 5 x 10(3), in which the biotic degradation was certainly restricted by predominant organic matters of hydrophilic and Mr was lower than 1000. An obvious increase of BrO3(-) occurred in the effluent from ozone oxidation process when the dose of ozone beyond 2 mg/L which increased Br(-) concentration. This could increase the product of BrO3(-). A poor and unstable removal effect of BrO3(-) was observed in the effluent of BAC process during the experiment. Each species of THMs, decreasing 40% of total, was reduced by O3-BAC treatment compared with the traditional treatment process. But the products of brominated trihalomethanes, especially CHBr3 would be markedly increased by enhanced chlorine dosage and Br(-) concentration. PMID:19558108

  3. Treatment of waste metalworking fluid by a hybrid ozone-biological process.

    PubMed

    Jagadevan, Sheeja; Graham, Nigel J; Thompson, Ian P

    2013-01-15

    In metal machining processes, the regulation of heat generation and lubrication at the contact point are achieved by application of a fluid referred to as metalworking fluid (MWF). MWFs inevitably become operationally exhausted with age and intensive use, which leads to compromised properties, thereby necessitating their safe disposal. Disposal of this waste through a biological route is an increasingly attractive option, since it is effective with relatively low energy demands. However, successful biological treatment is challenging since MWFs are chemically complex, and include biocides specifically to retard microbial deterioration whilst the fluids are operational. In this study remediation of the recalcitrant component of a semi-synthetic MWF by a novel hybrid ozone-bacteriological treatment, was investigated. The hybrid treatment proved to be effective and reduced the chemical oxygen demand by 72% (26.9% and 44.9% reduction after ozonation and biological oxidation respectively). Furthermore, a near-complete degradation of three non-biodegradable compounds (viz. benzotriazole, monoethanolamine, triethanolamine), commonly added as biocides and corrosion inhibitors in MWF formulations, under ozonation was observed. PMID:23274939

  4. Application of integrated ozone biological aerated filters and membrane filtration in water reuse of textile effluents.

    PubMed

    He, Yaozhong; Wang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jinling; Yan, Jinli; Ge, Qilong; Gu, Xiaoyang; Jian, Lei

    2013-04-01

    A combined process including integrated ozone-BAFs (ozone biological aerated filters) and membrane filtration was first applied for recycling textile effluents in a cotton textile mill with capacity of 5000 m(3)/d. Influent COD (chemical oxygen demand) in the range of 82-120 mg/L, BOD5 (5-day biochemical oxygen demand) of 12.6-23.1 mg/L, suspended solids (SSs) of 38-52 mg/L and color of 32-64° were observed during operation. Outflows with COD≤45 mg/L, BOD5≤7.6 mg/L, SS≤15 mg/L, color≤8° were obtained after being decontaminated by ozone-BAF with ozone dosage of 20-25 mg/L. Besides, the average removal rates of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) and UV254 were 100% and 73.4% respectively. Permeate water produced by RO (reverse osmosis) could be reused in dyeing and finishing processes, while the RO concentrates could be discharged directly under local regulations with COD≤100 mg/L, BOD5≤21 mg/L, SS≤52 mg/L, color≤32°. Results showed that the combined process could guarantee water reuse with high quality, and solve the problem of RO concentrate disposal. PMID:23422307

  5. Coping Processes of Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Newton, Christopher R.; Rosen, Karen H.; Schulman, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the coping processes of couples experiencing infertility. Participants included 420 couples referred for advanced reproductive treatments. Couples were divided into groups based on the frequency of their use of eight coping strategies. Findings suggest that coping processes, which are beneficial to individuals, may be…

  6. Earthquake-Ionosphere Coupling Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamogawa, Masashi

    an ionospheric phenomenon attributed to tsunami, termed tsunamigenic ionospheric hole (TIH) [Kakinami and Kamogwa et al., GRL, 2012]. After the TEC depression accompanying a monoperiodic variation with approximately 4-minute period as an acoustic resonance between the ionosphere and the solid earth, the TIH gradually recovered. In addition, geomagnetic pulsations with the periods of 150, 180 and 210 seconds were observed on the ground in Japan approximately 5 minutes after the mainshock. Since the variation with the period of 180 seconds was simultaneously detected at the magnetic conjugate of points of Japan, namely Australia, field aligned currents along the magnetic field line were excited. The field aligned currents might be excited due to E and F region dynamo current caused by acoustic waves originating from the tsunami. This result implies that a large earthquake generates seismogenic field aligned currents. Furthermore, monoperiodical geomagnetic oscillation pointing to the epicenter of which velocity corresponds to Rayleigh waves occurs. This may occur due to seismogenic arc-current in E region. Removing such magnetic oscillations from the observed data, clear tsunami dynamo effect was found. This result implies that a large EQ generates seismogenic field aligned currents, seismogenic arc-current and tsunami dynamo current which disturb geomagnetic field. Thus, we found the complex coupling process between a large EQ and an ionosphere from the results of Tohoku EQ.

  7. Coupled transport processes in semipermeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, J.S.; Carnahan, C.L.

    1990-03-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes leads to nonlinear governing equations for direct and coupled mass transport processes. Analytical solutions of linearized versions of these equations can be used to verify numerical solutions of the nonlinear equations under conditions such that nonlinear terms are relatively small. This report presents derivations of the analytical solutions for one-dimensional and axisymmetric geometries. 7 refs.

  8. Coupled processes associated with nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with coupled processes which affect a nuclear waste repository. While there are many descriptive accounts of environmental degradation resulting from various land uses, the author emphasizes the geomorphic processes responsible for such changes and the reasons why various reclamation practices are valuable in environmental management.

  9. Coupling environmental models and geospatial data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandmeyer, Jo Ellen

    2000-10-01

    This research investigated geospatial functions for solving environmental problems from the perspective of the environmental modeler. Its purpose is to better understand the different approaches to coupling complex models and geospatial data processing, plus the implications for the coupled system. To this end, various coupling methodologies were systematically explored using a geographic information system (GIS) and an emissions processor (SMOKE) for air quality models (AQMs). SMOKE converts an emissions inventory into the format required by an AQM. A GIS creates a file describing the spatial distribution of emissions among the cells in a modeling domain. To demonstrate advantages of a coupled GIS---environmental model system, two methods of spatially distributing on-road mobile emissions to cells were examined. The existing method calculates emissions for each road class, but distributes emissions to the cells using population density. For the new method a GIS builds road density by class and then distributes the emissions using road density. Comparing these methods reveals a significantly different spatial pattern of emissions. Next, various model-coupling methodologies were analyzed, revealing numerous coupling approaches, some of which were categorized in the literature. Critiquing these categorizations while comparing them with documented implementations led to the development of a new coupling hierarchy. The properties of each hierarchical level are discussed with the advantages and limitations of each design. To successfully couple models, the spatial and temporal scales of all models in the coupled system and the spatiotemporal extents of the data must be reconciled. Finally, a case study demonstrated methodologies for coupling SMOKE and a GIS. One methodology required a new approach utilizing dynamically linked libraries. Consequently, emissions were processed using SMOKE from a GIS. Also, a new method of converting data from netCDF files into a database

  10. CAD/CAM-coupled image processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Rolf-Juergen; Rauh, W.

    1990-08-01

    Image processing systems have found wide application in industry. For most computer integrated manufacturing faci- lities it is necessary to adapt these systems thus that they can automate the interaction with and the integration of CAD and CAM Systems. In this paper new approaches will be described that make use of the coupling of CAD and image processing as well as the automatic generation of programmes for the machining of products.

  11. Induction coupled thermomagnetic processing: A disruptive technology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ahmad, Aquil; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail; Pfaffmann, George; Ludtka, Gerard Michael

    2016-06-01

    Here, one of the major goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is to achieve energy savings with a corresponding reduction in the carbon footprint. With this in mind, the DoE sponsored the Induction Coupled Thermomagnetic Processing (ITMP) project with major partners Eaton Corp., Ajax Tocco Magnethermic, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the viability of processing metals in a strong magnetic field.

  12. Coupled transport processes in semipermeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, J.S.; Carnahan, C.L.

    1990-04-01

    A numerical simulator has been developed to investigate the effects of coupled processes on heat and mass transport in semipermeable media. The governing equations on which the simulator is based were derived using the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The equations are nonlinear and have been solved numerically using the n-dimensional Newton's method. As an example of an application, the numerical simulator has been used to investigate heat and solute transport in the vicinity of a heat source buried in a saturated clay-like medium, in part to study solute transport in bentonite packing material surrounding a nuclear waste canister. The coupled processes considered were thermal filtration, thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis and ultrafiltration. In the simulations, heat transport by coupled processes was negligible compared to heat conduction, but pressure and solute migration were affected. Solute migration was retarded relative to the uncoupled case when only chemical osmosis was considered. When both chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis were included, solute migration was enhanced. 18 refs., 20 figs.

  13. Modeling of Inner Magnetosphere Coupling Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2011-01-01

    The Ring Current (RC) is the biggest energy player in the inner magnetosphere. It is the source of free energy for Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) wave excitation provided by a temperature anisotropy of RC ions, which develops naturally during inward E B convection from the plasmasheet. The cold plasmasphere, which is under the strong influence of the magnetospheric electric field, strongly mediates the RC-EMIC wave-particle-coupling process and ultimately becomes part of the particle and energy interplay. On the other hand, there is a strong influence of the RC on the inner magnetospheric electric and magnetic field configurations and these configurations, in turn, are important to RC dynamics. Therefore, one of the biggest needs for inner magnetospheric research is the continued progression toward a coupled, interconnected system with the inclusion of nonlinear feedback mechanisms between the plasma populations, the electric and magnetic fields, and plasma waves. As we clearly demonstrated in our studies, EMIC waves strongly interact with electrons and ions of energies ranging from approx.1 eV to approx.10 MeV, and that these waves strongly affect the dynamics of resonant RC ions, thermal electrons and ions, and the outer RB relativistic electrons. As we found, the rate of ion and electron scattering/heating in the Earth's magnetosphere is not only controlled by the wave intensity-spatial-temporal distribution but also strongly depends on the spectral distribution of the wave power. The latter is also a function of the plasmaspheric heavy ion content, and the plasma density and temperature distributions along the magnetic field lines. The above discussion places RC-EMIC wave coupling dynamics in context with inner magnetospheric coupling processes and, ultimately, relates RC studies with plasmaspheric and Superthermal Electrons formation processes as well as with outer RB physics.

  14. Coupled transport processes in semipermeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.; Jacobsen, J.S.

    1990-04-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes (TTIP) is used to derive governing equations and phenomenological equations for transport processes and chemical reactions in water-saturated semipermeable media. TTIP is based on three fundamental postulates. The first postulate, the assumption of local equilibrium, allows the formulation of balance equations for entropy. These equations are the bases for the derivation of governing equations for the thermodynamic variables, temperature, pressure, and composition. The governing equations involve vector fluxes of heat and mass and scalar rates of chemical reactions; in accordance with the second postulate of TTIP, these fluxes and rates are related, respectively, to all scalar driving forces (gradients of thermodynamic variables) acting within the system. The third postulate of TTIP states equality (the Onsager reciprocal relations) between certain of the phenomenological coefficients relating forces and fluxes. The description by TTIP of a system undergoing irreversible processes allows consideration of coupled transport processes such as thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis, and ultrafiltration. The coupled processes can make significant contributions to flows of mass and energy in slightly permeable, permselective geological materials such as clays and shales.

  15. Synthesis report on thermally driven coupled processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, E.L.

    1997-10-15

    The main purpose of this report is to document observations and data on thermally coupled processes for conditions that are expected to occur within and around a repository at Yucca Mountain. Some attempt is made to summarize values of properties (e.g., thermal properties, hydrologic properties) that can be measured in the laboratory on intact samples of the rock matrix. Variation of these properties with temperature, or with conditions likely to be encountered at elevated temperature in the host rock, is of particular interest. However, the main emphasis of this report is on direct observation of thermally coupled processes at various scales. Direct phenomenological observations are vitally important in developing and testing conceptual models. If the mathematical implementation of a conceptual model predicts a consequence that is not observed, either (1) the parameters or the boundary conditions used in the calculation are incorrect or (2) the conceptual basis of the model does not fit the experiment; in either case, the model must be revised. For example, the effective continuum model that has been used in thermohydrology studies combines matrix and fracture flow in a way that is equivalent to an assumption that water is imbibed instantaneously from fractures into adjacent, partially saturated matrix. Based on this approximation, the continuum-flow response that is analogous to fracture flow will not occur until the effective continuum is almost completely saturated. This approximation is not entirely consistent with some of the experimental data presented in this report. This report documents laboratory work and field studies undertaken in FY96 and FY97 to investigate thermally coupled processes such as heat pipes and fracture-matrix coupling. In addition, relevant activities from past years, and work undertaken outside the Yucca Mountain project are summarized and discussed. Natural and artificial analogs are also discussed to provide a convenient source of

  16. Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes

    SciTech Connect

    N.D. Francis; D. Sassani

    2000-03-31

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes an abstraction, for the performance assessment total system model, of the near-field host rock water chemistry and gas-phase composition. It also provides an abstracted process model analysis of potentially important differences in the thermal hydrologic (TH) variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository obtained from models that include fully coupled reactive transport with thermal hydrology and those that include thermal hydrology alone. Specifically, the motivation of the process-level model comparison between fully coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) and thermal-hydrologic-only (TH-only) is to provide the necessary justification as to why the in-drift thermodynamic environment and the near-field host rock percolation flux, the essential TH variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository, can be obtained using a TH-only model and applied directly into a TSPA abstraction without recourse to a fully coupled reactive transport model. Abstraction as used in the context of this AMR refers to an extraction of essential data or information from the process-level model. The abstraction analysis reproduces and bounds the results of the underlying detailed process-level model. The primary purpose of this AMR is to abstract the results of the fully-coupled, THC model (CRWMS M&O 2000a) for effects on water and gas-phase composition adjacent to the drift wall (in the near-field host rock). It is assumed that drift wall fracture water and gas compositions may enter the emplacement drift before, during, and after the heating period. The heating period includes both the preclosure, in which the repository drifts are ventilated, and the postclosure periods, with backfill and drip shield emplacement at the time of repository closure. Although the preclosure period (50 years) is included in the process models, the postclosure performance assessment starts at the end of this initial period

  17. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Rodriguez, Jose; Danilin, Michael; Scott, Courtney; Shia, Run-Lie; Eluszkiewicz, Junusz; Sze, Nien-Dak

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes among atmospheric chemistry, aerosol and climate, all important for quantitative assessments of global change. Among our priority are changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The work emphasizes two important aspects: (1) AER's continued participation in preparation of, and providing scientific input for, various scientific reports connected with assessment of stratospheric ozone and climate. These include participation in various model intercomparison exercises as well as preparation of national and international reports. and (2) Continued development of the AER three-wave interactive model to address how the transport circulation will change as ozone and the thermal properties of the atmosphere change, and assess how these new findings will affect our confidence in the ozone assessment results.

  18. Coupling Processes between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Lie; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    This is the third semi-annual report for NAS5-97039, covering January through June 1998. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling for this work are the AER 2-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER 2-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. We will continue developing our three-wave model so that we can help NASA determine the strengths and weaknesses of the next generation assessment models.

  19. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Lie; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the AER 2-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER 2-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. We will continue developing our three-wave model so that we can help NASA determine the strength and weakness of the next generation assessment models.

  20. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Lie; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the AER two-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER two-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. We will continue developing our three-wave model so that we can help NASA determine the strength and weakness of the next generation assessment models.

  1. Processes of Change in Self-Directed Couple Relationship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Keithia L.; Halford, W. Kim

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the learning processes involved in professionally supported self-directed couple relationship education (CRE). Fifty-nine couples completed Couple CARE, a systematic, self-directed CRE program designed in flexible delivery mode to be completed at home. Couples watched a DVD introducing key relationship ideas and skills…

  2. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm; Weisenstein, Debra; Rodriquez, Jose; Danilin, Michael; Scott, Courtney; Shia, Run-Lie; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Sze, Nien-Dak; Stewart, Richard W. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for NAS5-97039 for work performed between December 1996 and November 1999. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes among atmospheric chemistry, aerosol and climate, all important for quantitative assessments of global change. Among our priority are changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The work emphasizes two important aspects: (1) AER's continued participation in preparation of, and providing scientific input for, various scientific reports connected with assessment of stratospheric ozone and climate. These include participation in various model intercomparison exercises as well as preparation of national and international reports. (2) Continued development of the AER three-wave interactive model to address how the transport circulation will change as ozone and the thermal properties of the atmosphere change, and assess how these new findings will affect our confidence in the ozone assessment results.

  3. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Li; Sze, N. D.

    1997-01-01

    This is the first semi-annual report for NAS5-97039 summarizing work performed for January 1997 through June 1997. Work in this project is related to NAS1-20666, also funded by NASA ACMAP. The work funded in this project also benefits from work at AER associated with the AER three-dimensional isentropic transport model funded by NASA AEAP and the AER two-dimensional climate-chemistry model (co-funded by Department of Energy). The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the AER two-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER two-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry.

  4. Coupling Processes between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Shia, Run-Lie; Scott, Courtney J.; Sze, Nien Dak

    1998-01-01

    This is the fourth semi-annual report for NAS5-97039, covering the time period July through December 1998. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) two-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER two-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. For this six month period, we report on a modeling study of new rate constant which modify the NOx/NOy ratio in the lower stratosphere; sensitivity to changes in stratospheric water vapor in the future atmosphere; a study of N2O and CH4 observations which has allowed us to adjust diffusion in the 2-D CTM in order to obtain appropriate polar vortex isolation; a study of SF6 and age of air with comparisons of models and measurements; and a report on the Models and Measurements II effort.

  5. Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhanli

    2015-08-01

    Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks is investigated in this paper. As one crucial factor to determine the processing ability of nodes, the information flow with potential time lag is modeled by co-processing diffusion which couples the continuous time processing and the discrete diffusing dynamics. Exact results on master equation and stationary state are achieved to disclose the formation. In order to understand the evolution of the co-processing and design the optimal routing strategy according to the maximal entropic diffusion on networks, we propose the coupling entropy comprehending the structural characteristics and information propagation on social network. Based on the analysis of the co-processing model, we analyze the coupling impact of the structural factor and information propagating factor on the coupling entropy, where the analytical results fit well with the numerical ones on scale-free social networks.

  6. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimensional transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  7. Fostering new relational experience: clinical process in couple psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical goals for couple psychotherapy is to foster a new relational experience in the session where the couple feels safe enough to reveal more vulnerable emotions and to explore their defensive withdrawal, aggressive attacking, or blaming. The lived intimate experience in the session offers the couple an opportunity to gain integrative insight into their feelings, expectations, and behaviors that ultimately hinder intimacy. The clinical processes that are necessary include empathizing with the couple and facilitating safety within the session, looking for opportunities to explore emotions, ruptures, and unconscious motivations that maintain distance in the relationship, and creating a new relational experience in the session that has the potential to engender integrative insight. These clinical processes will be presented with empirical support. Experts from a session will be used to highlight how these processes influence the couple and promote increased intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24059733

  8. Process for fabricating a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  9. Phase transformations coupled to deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, Turab

    2013-06-01

    Phase transformation processes have a substantial impact on the inelastic and damage response of materials. Yet, our understanding of how different loading conditions affect volume fractions of transformed phases, microstructure and transformation pathways is very much in its infancy. With an emphasis on distilling single crystal physics that can, in principle, be incorporated into higher length scale models, I will discuss how recent atomistic simulations on Ti are beginning to provide insights into transformation pathways and the interplay of phase transformations and deformation processes. These simulations are complemented by shock experiments on Zr, Ti together with characterization studies at the Advanced Photon Source.

  10. Solar terrestrial coupling through space plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.

    2000-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project investigates plasma processes that govern the interaction between the solar wind, charged particles ejected from the sun, and the earth's magnetosphere, the region above the ionosphere governed by the terrestrial magnetic field. Primary regions of interest are the regions where different plasma populations interact with each other. These are regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, associated with magnetic flux and energy transfer and dynamic energy release. The investigations concerned charged particle transport and energization, and microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. The approaches combined space data analysis with theory and computer simulations.

  11. Dissociative identity disorder and the process of couple therapy.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, Heather B

    2013-01-01

    Couple therapy in the context of dissociative identity disorder (DID) has been neglected as an area of exploration and development in the couple therapy and trauma literature. What little discussion exists focuses primarily on couple therapy as an adjunct to individual therapy rather than as a primary treatment for couple distress and trauma. Couple therapy researchers have begun to develop adaptations to provide effective support to couples dealing with the impact of childhood trauma in their relationships, but little attention has been paid to the specific and complex needs of DID patients in couple therapy (H. B. MacIntosh & S. Johnson, 2008 ). This review and case presentation explores the case of "Lisa," a woman diagnosed with DID, and "Don," her partner, and illustrates the themes of learning to communicate, handling conflicting needs, responding to child alters, and addressing sexuality and education through their therapy process. It is the hope of the author that this discussion will renew interest in the field of couple therapy in the context of DID, with the eventual goal of developing an empirically testable model of treatment for couples. PMID:23282049

  12. Eliminating amplitude death by the asymmetry coupling and process delay in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenggui; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Coupling mode plays a key role in determining the dynamical behavior and realizing certain system's rhythm and function in the complex systems. In this work, the effects of the asymmetry and process delay in the coupling on the dynamical behavior are investigated. We find that both the asymmetry and process delay effectively reduce the region of the frequency-mismatch-induced amplitude death in the parameter space, and make the system to recover oscillation in the amplitude death regime so as to retain sustained system's rhythm function. Furthermore, we show the asymmetry and process delay can destroy synchronization. Our results suggest that the asymmetry coupling and process delay are of crucial importance in controlling amplitude death and synchronization, and hence that their considerations are vital for modeling real life problems.

  13. The coupling of pathways and processes through shared components

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The coupling of pathways and processes through shared components is being increasingly recognised as a common theme which occurs in many cell signalling contexts, in which it plays highly non-trivial roles. Results In this paper we develop a basic modelling and systems framework in a general setting for understanding the coupling of processes and pathways through shared components. Our modelling framework starts with the interaction of two components with a common third component and includes production and degradation of all these components. We analyze the signal processing in our model to elucidate different aspects of the coupling. We show how different kinds of responses, including "ultrasensitive" and adaptive responses, may occur in this setting. We then build on the basic model structure and examine the effects of additional control regulation, switch-like signal processing, and spatial signalling. In the process, we identify a way in which allosteric regulation may contribute to signalling specificity, and how competitive effects may allow an enzyme to robustly coordinate and time the activation of parallel pathways. Conclusions We have developed and analyzed a common systems platform for examining the effects of coupling of processes through shared components. This can be the basis for subsequent expansion and understanding the many biologically observed variations on this common theme. PMID:21714894

  14. Coupling and Hydrodynamic Limit for the Inclusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opoku, Alex; Redig, Frank

    2015-08-01

    We show propagation of local equilibrium for the symmetric inclusion process (SIP) after diffusive rescaling of space and time, as well as the local equilibrium property of the non-equilibrium steady state in the boundary driven SIP. The main tool is self-duality and a coupling between SIP particles and independent random walkers.

  15. Simulation of Stochastic Processes by Coupled ODE-PDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the emergence of randomness in solutions of coupled, fully deterministic ODE-PDE (ordinary differential equations-partial differential equations) due to failure of the Lipschitz condition as a new phenomenon. It is possible to exploit the special properties of ordinary differential equations (represented by an arbitrarily chosen, dynamical system) coupled with the corresponding Liouville equations (used to describe the evolution of initial uncertainties in terms of joint probability distribution) in order to simulate stochastic processes with the proscribed probability distributions. The important advantage of the proposed approach is that the simulation does not require a random-number generator.

  16. Fiber-coupled THz spectroscopy for monitoring polymeric compounding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, N.; Krumbholz, N.; Hasek, T.; Wilk, R.; Bartels, V.; Keseberg, C.; Pethukhov, V.; Mikulics, M.; Wetenkamp, L.; Koch, M.

    2007-06-01

    We present a compact, robust, and transportable fiber-coupled THz system for inline monitoring of polymeric compounding processes in an industrial environment. The system is built on a 90cm x 90cm large shock absorbing optical bench. A sealed metal box protects the system against dust and mechanical disturbances. A closed loop controller unit is used to ensure optimum coupling of the laser beam into the fiber. In order to build efficient and stable fiber-coupled antennas we glue the fibers directly onto photoconductive switches. Thus, the antenna performance is very stable and it is secured from dust or misalignment by vibrations. We discuss fabrication details and antenna performance. First spectroscopic data obtained with this system is presented.

  17. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    PubMed Central

    Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-01-01

    Here we characterize the low noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: there exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction. PMID:25768447

  18. Gene regulation and noise reduction by coupling of stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Reinitz, John

    2015-02-01

    Here we characterize the low-noise regime of a stochastic model for a negative self-regulating binary gene. The model has two stochastic variables, the protein number and the state of the gene. Each state of the gene behaves as a protein source governed by a Poisson process. The coupling between the two gene states depends on protein number. This fact has a very important implication: There exist protein production regimes characterized by sub-Poissonian noise because of negative covariance between the two stochastic variables of the model. Hence the protein numbers obey a probability distribution that has a peak that is sharper than those of the two coupled Poisson processes that are combined to produce it. Biochemically, the noise reduction in protein number occurs when the switching of the genetic state is more rapid than protein synthesis or degradation. We consider the chemical reaction rates necessary for Poisson and sub-Poisson processes in prokaryotes and eucaryotes. Our results suggest that the coupling of multiple stochastic processes in a negative covariance regime might be a widespread mechanism for noise reduction.

  19. Numerical simulation of the SAGD process coupled with geomechanical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingke

    Canada has vast oil sand resources. While a large portion of this resource can be recovered by surface mining techniques, a majority is located at depths requiring the application of in situ recovery technologies. Although a number of in situ recovery technologies exist, the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process has emerged as one of the most promising technologies to develop the in situ oil sands resources. During the SAGD operations, saturated steam is continuously injected into the oil sands reservoir, which induces pore pressure and stress variations. As a result, reservoir parameters and processes may also vary, particularly when tensile and shear failure occur. This geomechanical effect is obvious for oil sands material because oil sands have the in situ interlocked fabric. The conventional reservoir simulation generally does not take this coupled mechanism into consideration. Therefore, this research is to improve the reservoir simulation techniques of the SAGD process applied in the development of oil sands and heavy oil reservoirs. The analyses of the decoupled reservoir geomechanical simulation results show that the geomechanical behavior in SAGD has obvious impact on reservoir parameters, such as absolute permeability. The issues with the coupled reservoir geomechanical simulations of the SAGD process have been clarified and the permeability variations due to geomechanical behaviors in the SAGD process investigated. A methodology of sequentially coupled reservoir geomechanical simulation technique was developed based on the reservoir simulator, EXOTHERM, and the geomechanical simulator, FLAC. In addition, a representative geomechanical model of oil sands material was summarized in this research. Finally, this reservoir geomechanical simulation methodology was verified with the UTF Phase A SAGD project and applied in a SAGD operation with gas-over-bitumen geometry. Based on this methodology, the geomechanical effect on the SAGD production

  20. Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1987-04-13

    A method of processing materials. The invention enables ultrafine, ultrapure powders to be formed from solid ingots in a gas free environment. A plasma is formed directly from an ingot which insures purity. The vaporized material is expanded through a nozzle and the resultant powder settles on a cold surface. An inductively coupled plasma may also be used to process waste chemicals. Noxious chemicals are directed through a series of plasma tubes, breaking molecular bonds and resulting in relatively harmless atomic constituents. 3 figs.

  1. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in

  2. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sonnenthale

    2001-04-16

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are required

  3. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on water and gas

  4. Characterization of Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Processes Using Geophysical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2005-06-01

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes are naturally coupled and variable over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Many remediation approaches also induce dynamic transformations in natural systems, such as the generation of gases, precipitates and biofilms. These dynamic transformations are often coupled and can reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic materials, making it difficult to introduce amendments or to perform targeted remediation. Because it is difficult to predict these transformations, our ability to develop effective and sustainable remediation conditions at contaminated sites is often limited. Further complicating the problem is the inability to collect the necessary measurements at a high enough spatial resolution yet over a large enough volume for understanding field-scale transformations.

  5. Calcium dynamics in astrocyte processes during neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Yo; Couchman, Kiri; Lyons, Declan G; Collot, Mayeul; Agarwal, Amit; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Pfrieger, Frank W; Bergles, Dwight E; Charpak, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced neuronal activity in the brain triggers a local increase in blood flow, termed functional hyperemia, via several mechanisms, including calcium (Ca2+) signaling in astrocytes. However, recent in vivo studies have questioned the role of astrocytes in functional hyperemia because of the slow and sparse dynamics of their somatic Ca2+ signals and the absence of glutamate metabotropic receptor 5 in adults. Here, we reexamined their role in neurovascular coupling by selectively expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in astrocytes of the olfactory bulb. We show that in anesthetized mice, the physiological activation of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) terminals reliably triggers Ca2+ increases in astrocyte processes but not in somata. These Ca2+ increases systematically precede the onset of functional hyperemia by 1–2 s, reestablishing astrocytes as potential regulators of neurovascular coupling. PMID:25531572

  6. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Colwell; Corey Radtke; Mark Delwiche; Deborah Newby; Lynn Petzke; Mark Conrad; Eoin Brodie; Hope Lee; Bob Starr; Dana Dettmers; Ron Crawford; Andrzej Paszczynski; Nick Bernardini; Ravi Paidisetti; Tonia Green

    2006-06-01

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires different ?lines of evidence? indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. We are studying the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism first in the medial zone (TCE concentration: 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L) of a plume at the Idaho National Laboratory?s Test Area North (TAN) site and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site. We will use flow-through in situ reactors (FTISR) to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. TCE co-metabolic rates at TAN are being assessed and interpreted in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial co-metabolism relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  7. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick; Radtke, Corey; Newby, Deborah; Delwiche, Mark; Crawf, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Strap, Janice; Conrad, Mark; Brodic, Eoin; Starr, Robert; Lee, Hope

    2006-04-05

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires 'lines of evidence' indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. Our research will study the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism in contaminated aquifers first at the Idaho National Laboratory and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site, where natural attenuation of TCE is occurring. We will use flow-through in situ reactors to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. We will use new approaches (e.g., stable isotope probing, enzyme activity probes, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, proteomics) to assay the TCE co-metabolic rates, and interpret these rates in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different methane concentrations and groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites that are contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  8. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  9. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  10. Queueing up for enzymatic processing: correlated signaling through coupled degradation.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Natalie A; Mather, William H; Danino, Tal; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Williams, Ruth J; Tsimring, Lev S; Hasty, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput technologies have led to the generation of complex wiring diagrams as a post-sequencing paradigm for depicting the interactions between vast and diverse cellular species. While these diagrams are useful for analyzing biological systems on a large scale, a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the observed network connections is critical for the further development of systems and synthetic biology. Here, we use queueing theory to investigate how 'waiting lines' can lead to correlations between protein 'customers' that are coupled solely through a downstream set of enzymatic 'servers'. Using the E. coli ClpXP degradation machine as a model processing system, we observe significant cross-talk between two networks that are indirectly coupled through a common set of processors. We further illustrate the implications of enzymatic queueing using a synthetic biology application, in which two independent synthetic networks demonstrate synchronized behavior when common ClpXP machinery is overburdened. Our results demonstrate that such post-translational processes can lead to dynamic connections in cellular networks and may provide a mechanistic understanding of existing but currently inexplicable links. PMID:22186735

  11. A Fully Coupled Computational Model of the Silylation Process

    SciTech Connect

    G. H. Evans; R. S. Larson; V. C. Prantil; W. S. Winters

    1999-02-01

    This report documents the development of a new finite element model of the positive tone silylation process. Model development makes use of pre-existing Sandia technology used to describe coupled thermal-mechanical behavior in deforming metals. Material properties and constitutive models were obtained from the literature. The model is two-dimensional and transient and focuses on the part of the lithography process in which crosslinked and uncrosslinked resist is exposed to a gaseous silylation agent. The model accounts for the combined effects of mass transport (diffusion of silylation agent and reaction product), chemical reaction resulting in the uptake of silicon and material swelling, the generation of stresses, and the resulting material motion. The influence of stress on diffusion and reaction rates is also included.

  12. Upscaled modeling of CO2 injection with coupled thermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, Sarah; Stephansen, Annette; Dahle, Helge; Aavatsmark, Ivar

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale models of CO2 storage in geological formations must capture the relevant physical, chemical and thermodynamical processes that affect the migration and ultimate fate of injected CO2. These processes should be modeled over the appropriate length and time scales. Some important mechanisms include convection-driven dissolution, caprock roughness, and local capillary effects, all of which can impact the direction and speed of the plume as well as long-term trapping efficiency. In addition, CO2 can be injected at a different temperature than reservoir conditions, leading to significant density variation within the plume over space and time. This impacts buoyancy and migration patterns, which becomes particularly important for injection sites with temperature and pressure conditions near the critical point. Therefore, coupling thermal processes with fluid flow should be considered in order to correctly capture plume migration and trapping within the reservoir. A practical modeling approach for CO2 storage over relatively large length and time scales is the vertical-equilibrium model, which solves partially integrated conservation equations for flow in two lateral dimensions. We couple heat transfer within the vertical equilibrium framework for fluid flow, focusing on the thermal processes that most impact the CO2 plume. We investigate a simplified representation of heat exchange between the plume and the reservoir that also includes transport of heat within the plume. In addition, we explore CO2 thermodynamic models for reliable prediction of density under different injection pressures, temperatures and composition. The model concept is demonstrated on simple systems and applied to a realistic storage aquifer.

  13. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC Model is used solely for the validation of the THC

  14. Father responsivity: couple processes and the coconstruction of fatherhood.

    PubMed

    Matta, Dana Shawn; Knudson-Martin, Carmen

    2006-03-01

    Forty in-depth interviews of heterosexual parents of children 5 five years of age and younger are analyzed using a qualitative grounded theory approach to understand how couples coproduce fatherhood within their day-to-day relationships and in social, cultural, and economic contexts. The analysis identifies the construct "responsivity" as a central process through which, to varying degrees, fathers are aware of the needs of their wives and children and able to take an active part in meeting them. Three groups of fathers are examined according to their level of responsivity: low, moderate, and high. Factors influencing degree of father responsivity include gender constructions, power and the wife's influence, attunement, work schedules, and emotional tradeoffs. Implications for practice are suggested. PMID:16615251

  15. Anomalous diffusion and scaling in coupled stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Nemenman, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by problems in biochemical kinetics, we study statistical properties of an overdamped Langevin processes with the friction coefficient depending on the state of a similar, unobserved, process. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Pocker-Planck the friction coefficient of the first depends on the state of the second. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Focker-Planck equation for the probability distribution of the former. This has the fonn of diffusion equation with time-dependent diffusion coefficient, resulting in an anomalous diffusion. The diffusion exponent can not be predicted using a simple scaling argument, and anomalous scaling appears as well. The diffusion exponent of the Weiss-Havlin comb model is derived as a special case, and the same exponent holds even for weakly coupled processes. We compare our theoretical predictions with numerical simulations and find an excellent agreement. The findings caution against treating biochemical systems with unobserved dynamical degrees of freedom by means of standandard, diffusive Langevin descritpion.

  16. Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes (TH/THC/THM)

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-09

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the development of the Mountain-Scale Thermal-Hydrological (TH), Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical (THC), and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) Models and evaluate the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This Model Report was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.12.7), and was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. In this Model Report, any reference to ''repository'' means the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, and any reference to ''drifts'' means the emplacement drifts at the repository horizon. This Model Report provides the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses for analyzing mountain-scale hydrological/chemical/mechanical changes and predict flow behavior in response to heat release by radioactive decay from the nuclear waste repository at the Yucca Mountain site. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH Model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH Model captures mountain-scale three dimensional (3-D) flow effects, including lateral diversion at the PTn/TSw interface and mountain-scale flow patterns. The Mountain-Scale THC Model evaluates TH effects on water and gas chemistry, mineral dissolution/precipitation, and the resulting impact to UZ hydrological properties, flow and transport. The THM Model addresses changes in permeability due to mechanical and thermal disturbances in

  17. Evolutionary games of condensates in coupled birth-death processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Markus F.; Knebel, Johannes; Krueger, Torben; Frey, Erwin

    2015-03-01

    Condensation phenomena occur in many systems, both in a classical and a quantum mechanical context. Typically, the entities that constitute a system collectively concentrate in one distinct state during condensation. For example, cooling of an equilibrated bosonic gas may lead to condensation into the quantum ground state. Notably, the mathematical theory of this Bose-Einstein condensation is not limited to quantum theory but was also successfully applied to condensation in random networks. In our work, we follow the opposite path. We apply the theory of evolutionary dynamics to describe condensation in a bosonic system that is driven and dissipative. It was shown that the system may condense into multiple quantum states, but into which states has remained elusive. We find that vanishing of relative entropy production determines these states. We illuminate the physical principles underlying the condensation and show that the condensates do not need to be static but may engage in ``evolutionary games'' with exchange of particles. On the mathematical level, the condensation is described by coupled birth-death processes. The generic structure of these processes implies that our results also apply to condensation in other systems, ranging from population biology to chemical kinetics.

  18. 3-D Modelling of Electromagnetic, Thermal, Mechanical and Metallurgical Couplings in Metal Forming Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenot, Jean-Loup; Bay, Francois

    2007-04-07

    The different stages of metal forming processes often involve - beyond the mechanical deformations processes - other physical coupled problems, such as heat transfer, electromagnetism or metallurgy. The purpose of this paper is to focus on problems involving electromagnetic couplings. After a brief recall on electromagnetic modeling, we shall then focus on induction heating processes and present some results regarding heat transfer, as well as mechanical couplings. A case showing coupling for metallurgic microstructure evolution will conclude this paper.

  19. DRIFT-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (DST AND TH SEEPAGE) MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2005-01-13

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  20. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    J. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2004-09-29

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  1. Modeling of coupled geochemical and transport processes: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1989-10-01

    Early coupled models associated with fluid flow and solute transport have been limited by assumed conditions of constant temperature, fully saturated fluid flow, and constant pore fluid velocity. Developments including coupling of chemical reactions to variable fields of temperature and fluid flow have generated new requirements for experimental data. As the capabilities of coupled models expand, needs are created for experimental data to be used for both input and validation. 25 refs.

  2. Evolutionary games of condensates in coupled birth–death processes

    PubMed Central

    Knebel, Johannes; Weber, Markus F.; Krüger, Torben; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Condensation phenomena arise through a collective behaviour of particles. They are observed in both classical and quantum systems, ranging from the formation of traffic jams in mass transport models to the macroscopic occupation of the energetic ground state in ultra-cold bosonic gases (Bose–Einstein condensation). Recently, it has been shown that a driven and dissipative system of bosons may form multiple condensates. Which states become the condensates has, however, remained elusive thus far. The dynamics of this condensation are described by coupled birth–death processes, which also occur in evolutionary game theory. Here we apply concepts from evolutionary game theory to explain the formation of multiple condensates in such driven-dissipative bosonic systems. We show that the vanishing of relative entropy production determines their selection. The condensation proceeds exponentially fast, but the system never comes to rest. Instead, the occupation numbers of condensates may oscillate, as we demonstrate for a rock–paper–scissors game of condensates. PMID:25908384

  3. Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for making fine power using an inductively coupled plasma. The method provides a gas-free environment, since the plasma is formed without using a gas. The starting material used in the method is in solid form.

  4. Small spatial and fast temporal ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hua

    2000-09-01

    I have developed a two-dimensional, three-fluid model (electrons, ions and neutrals) to simulate small-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The code includes ionization and recombination processes, the Hall term in Ohm's law, and various heat sources in the energy equations. The electro-dynamic response and the evolution of the collision frequencies are treated self- consistently in a height resolved ionosphere. The model allows for the propagation of Alfvén waves. The simulation is particularly suited for fast temporal variations and small spatial scale ionospheric structures associated with filamentary aurora and ionospheric heating experiments (e.g. HAARP). I have investigated the evolution of field-aligned currents in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system and found several notable effects-ion heating due to plasma- neutral friction, electron heating resulting from energetic particle precipitation and ohmic dissipation by strong field-aligned currents. The simulation of plasma. heating in the ionosphere is motivated by a specific auroral event that was simultaneously observed with optical and radar instruments. The results indicate that a consistent explanation of this event requires ohmic heating of electrons in a strong field-aligned electric current layer. They suggest strongly that the observed sequence of events can be explained only if spatial structure is present in the ionosphere so that it requires at least a two-dimensional model. Electron heating in strong field-aligned currents also provides a mechanism to deposit energy in the F-region of ionosphere and thus can explain the formation of tall auroral arcs. The simulation of the formation of field-aligned currents shows a strong plasma density depletion in the region of downward field-aligned current layer. The depletion is due to the divergent flow of the plasma. Similarly, the plasma density increases in the region of upward field- aligned current because of the convergent plasma motion

  5. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  6. Client Discourses on the Process of Seeking Same-Sex Couple Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Jan; Peel, Elizabeth; Owen-Pugh, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    How same-sex couples manage the process of seeking help for their relationships is an under-researched area. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 people who had engaged in same-sex couple counselling, and were analysed using discourse analysis. The ways in which the couples positioned themselves as part of a "minority…

  7. Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A method for coating surfaces or implanting ions in an object using an inductively coupled plasma. The method provides a gas-free environment, since the plasma is formed without using a gas. The coating material or implantation material is intitially in solid form.

  8. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Chafin, Richard B.; Warren, Barbara K.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  9. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Chafin, R.B.; Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using a catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  10. Coupling processes related to the Sun-weather problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Physical mechanisms for coupling the energetics of solar activity to meteorological responses are reviewed. Although several hypotheses have been advanced, none can be said to be sufficiently complete to be applied to weather or climate prediction. Solar activity indicators potentially useful for forecasting are identified, including sunspots, solar flares, and magnetic sector boundary crossings. Additional experiments, studies, and analyses are required before Sun-weather concepts can be utilized for predicting meteorological responses.

  11. Panel discussion on near-field coupled processes with emphasis on performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Codell, R.B.; Baca, R.G.; Ahola, M.P.

    1996-04-01

    The presentations in this panel discussion involve the general topic of near-field coupled processes and postclosure performance assessment with an emphasis on rock mechanics. The potential impact of near-field rock mass deformation on repository performance was discussed, as well as topics including long term excavation deterioration, the performance of geologic seals, and coupled processes concerning rock mechanics in performance assessments.

  12. Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Kniseley, Richard N.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Merkle, Brian D.

    1990-01-30

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

  13. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  14. Low power, compact charge coupled device signal processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosshart, P. W.; Buss, D. D.; Eversole, W. L.; Hewes, C. R.; Mayer, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of charged coupled devices (CCDs) for performing programmable correlation for preprocessing environmental sensor data preparatory to its transmission to the ground were developed. A total of two separate ICs were developed and a third was evaluated. The first IC was a CCD chirp z transform IC capable of performing a 32 point DFT at frequencies to 1 MHz. All on chip circuitry operated as designed with the exception of the limited dynamic range caused by a fixed pattern noise due to interactions between the digital and analog circuits. The second IC developed was a 64 stage CCD analog/analog correlator for performing time domain correlation. Multiplier errors were found to be less than 1 percent at designed signal levels and less than 0.3 percent at the measured smaller levels. A prototype IC for performing time domain correlation was also evaluated.

  15. MODELING COUPLED HYDROLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES: LONG-TERM URANIUM TRANSPORT FOLLOWING PHOSPHOROUS-FERTILIZATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminants in the vadose zone are affected by the physical processes of water flow, heat movement and multicomponent transport, as well as generally by a range of interacting biogeochemical processes. Coupling these various processes within one integrated numerical simulator provides a process-ba...

  16. Coupled model of physical and biological processes affecting maize pollination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arritt, R.; Westgate, M.; Riese, J.; Falk, M.; Takle, E.

    2003-04-01

    Controversy over the use of genetically modified (GM) crops has led to increased interest in evaluating and controlling the potential for inadvertent outcrossing in open-pollinated crops such as maize. In response to this problem we have developed a Lagrangian model of pollen dispersion as a component of a coupled end-to-end (anther to ear) physical-biological model of maize pollination. The Lagrangian method is adopted because of its generality and flexibility: first, the method readily accommodates flow fields of arbitrary complexity; second, each element of the material being transported can be identified by its source, time of release, or other properties of interest. The latter allows pollen viability to be estimated as a function of such factors as travel time, temperature, and relative humidity, so that the physical effects of airflow and turbulence on pollen dispersion can be considered together with the biological aspects of pollen release and viability. Predicted dispersion of pollen compares well both to observations and to results from a simpler Gaussian plume model. Ability of the Lagrangian model to handle complex air flows is demonstrated by application to pollen dispersion in the vicinity of an agricultural shelter belt. We also show results indicating that pollen viability can be quantified by an "aging function" that accounts for temperature, humidity, and time of exposure.

  17. Solute coupled diffusion in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Nathan T; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2009-09-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging water treatment technology with potential applications in desalination and wastewater reclamation. In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on the opposite side of a semipermeable membrane; however, solutes diffuse simultaneously through the membrane in both directions and may jeopardize the process. In this study, we have comprehensively explored the effects of different operating conditions on the forward diffusion of solutes commonly found in brackish water and seawater, and reverse diffusion of common draw solution solutes. Results show that reverse transport of solutes through commercially available FO membranes range between 80 mg to nearly 3,000 mg per liter of water produced. Divalent feed solutes have low permeation rates (less than 1 mmol/m2-hr) while monovalent ions and uncharged solutes exhibit higher permeation. Findings have significant implications on the performance and sustainability of the FO process. PMID:19764248

  18. "The best is always yet to come": Relationship stages and processes among young LGBT couples.

    PubMed

    Macapagal, Kathryn; Greene, George J; Rivera, Zenaida; Mustanski, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Limited research has examined relationship development among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) couples in emerging adulthood. A better understanding of LGBT couples can inform the development of relationship education programs that reflect their unique needs. The following questions guided this study: (a) What are the stages and processes during young LGBT couples' relationship development? and (b) How do these compare with existing literature on heterosexual adults? A secondary goal was to explore similarities and differences between couples assigned male (MAAB) and female at birth (FAAB). Thirty-six couples completed interviews on their relationship history. Qualitative analyses showed that relationship stages and processes were similar to past research on heterosexuals, but participants' subjective experiences reflected their LGBT identities and emerging adulthood, which exerted additional stress on the relationship. These factors also affected milestones indicative of commitment among heterosexual adults (e.g., introducing partner to family). Mixed methods analyses indicated that MAAB couples described negotiating relationship agreements and safe sex in more depth than FAAB couples. Relationship development models warrant modifications to consider the impact of sexual and gender identity and emerging adulthood when applied to young LGBT couples. These factors should be addressed in interventions to promote relationship health among young LGBT couples. PMID:26053345

  19. It Takes Two? An Exploration of Processes and Outcomes in a Two-Session Couple Intervention.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Kay; Mock, D Jim; Stewart, J Wade

    2016-07-01

    Although relationship distress is common, couples often forego professional help due to concerns such as time constraints, financial costs, and stigma. The two-session relationship checkup is an alternative format of couple intervention developed to address these concerns. In this qualitative study, we interviewed 20 coupled participants and six clinicians to examine the checkup's processes and outcomes. The phenomenological themes that emerged revealed sequential processes by which this format works. Couple themes included client motivation, the therapeutic relationship, and therapeutic change in terms of perceptions and behaviors-particularly with regard to communication. Clinician data largely mirrored these themes. The results suggest the intervention addressed barriers to help-seeking and may be a viable selective option for at-risk couples. PMID:26525590

  20. Coupling between mantle and surface processes: Insights from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Ágnes; Sembroni, Andrea; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Thermal or density anomalies located beneath the lithosphere are thought to generate dynamic topography. Such a topographic signal compensates the viscous stresses originating from the anomaly driven mantle flow. It has been demonstrated that the erosion modulates the dynamic signal of topography changing the uplift rate by unload. The characteristic time for adjustments of dynamic topography due to surface erosion is likely similar to post-glacial rebound time (10000 - 50000 years). Here we present preliminary results of a new set of analogue models realized to study and quantify the contribution given by erosion to dynamic topography, during a process specifically driven by a positively buoyant deep anomaly. The adopted set up consists of a Plexiglas box (40x40x50 cm3) filled with glucose syrup as analogue upper mantle. A silicon plate positioned on the top of the syrup simulates the lithosphere. On the silicone plate is placed a thin layer of a high viscous glucose syrup which reproduces the upper, erodible layer of the crust. To simulate the positively buoyant anomaly we used an elastic, undeformable silicon ball free to rise by buoyancy in the syrup until the floating silicone plate is hit. The changes in topography have been monitored by using a 3D laser scan, while a side-view camera recorded the position of the rising ball in time. Data have been post-processed with image analysis techniques (e.g., Particle Image Velocimetry) in order to obtain the evolution of topography, uplift rate, erosion patterns of the top layer, bulge width and mantle circulation during the experiment. We ran experiments with and without the shallow, erodible crustal layer in order to quantify the effect of erosion on dynamic topography. Preliminary results showed that both the maximum topography and uplift rate are inversely proportional to the lithospheric thickness. The maximum uplift rate and the deformation of the lithospheric plate occurred just before the arrival of the

  1. Diagnosing coupled watershed processes using a fully-coupled groundwater, land-surface, surface water and mesoscale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Chow, F. K.

    2007-12-01

    A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with an integrated overland flow component, a land-surface model and a mesoscale atmospheric model is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes. These processes are influenced by land-surface topography and subsurface heterogeneity. This parallel, integrated model simulates spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. Spatial statistics are used to demonstrate spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating. Additionally, spectral transforms of subsurface arrival times are computed using a transient Lagrangian transport simulation. Macrodispersion is used to mimic the effects of subsurface heterogeneity for a range of Peclet numbers. The slopes of these transforms indicate fractal scaling of this system over a range of timescales. All of these techniques point to importance of realistically representing coupled processes and the need to understand and diagnose these processes in nature. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under contract W-7405-Eng-48. This project was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL

  2. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Sartorius, M.; Busch, A.; Krooss, B. M.; Littke, R.

    2012-12-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a subbituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia (figure). From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg-corrected permeability depends on gas type. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa, with increasing mean pore pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability is observed, which is attributed to a widening of cleat aperture. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane and CO2. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals was significantly lower (by 50%) than that of dry coals, no hysteresis was observed between sorption and desorption on dry and moisture-equilibrated samples and the

  3. Sequential Processes in Palladium-Catalyzed Silicon-Based Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Liu, Jack H.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Although developed somewhat later, silicon-based cross-coupling has become a viable alternative to the more conventional Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille-Kosugi-Migita, and Negishi cross-coupling reactions because of its broad substrate scope, high stability of silicon-containing reagents, and low toxicity of waste streams. An empowering and yet underappreciated feature unique to silicon-based cross-coupling is the wide range of sequential processes available. In these processes, simple precursors are first converted to complex silicon-containing cross-coupling substrates, and the subsequent silicon-based cross-coupling reaction affords an even more highly functionalized product in a stereoselective fashion. In so doing, structurally simple and inexpensive starting materials are quickly transformed into value-added and densely substituted products. Therefore, sequential processes are often useful in constructing the carbon backbones of natural products. In this review, studies of sequential processes involving silicon-based cross-coupling are discussed. Additionally, the total syntheses that utilize these sequential processes are also presented. PMID:23293392

  4. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Satorius, Michael; Busch, Andreas; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a sub bituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg corrected permeability shows a gas type dependence. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa we observe with increasing mean pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability which we attribute to a cleat aperture widening. The cleat volume compressibility (cf) also shows a dependence on the mean pore pressure. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. This permeability hysteresis is in accordance with results reported by Harpalani and McPherson (1985). The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals

  5. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Sartorius, M.; Busch, A.; Cumming, D.; Krooss, B. M.

    2012-04-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a sub bituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg corrected permeability shows a gas type dependence. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa we observe with increasing mean pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability which we attribute to a cleat aperture widening. The cleat volume compressibility (cf) also shows a dependence on the mean pore pressure. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. This permeability hysteresis is in accordance with results reported by Harpalani and McPherson (1985). The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals

  6. Coupling centrality and authority of co-processing model on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhanli; Li, Huibin

    2016-04-01

    Coupling centrality and authority of co-processing model on complex networks are investigated in this paper. As one crucial factor to determine the processing ability of nodes, the information flow with potential time lag is modeled by co-processing diffusion which couples the continuous time processing and the discrete diffusing dynamics. Exact results on master equation and stationary state are obtained to disclose the formation. Considering the influence of a node to the global dynamical behavior, coupling centrality and authority are introduced for each node, which determine the relative importance and authority of nodes in the diffusion process. Furthermore, the experimental results on large-scale complex networks confirm our analytical prediction.

  7. Panel report on coupled thermo-mechanical-hydro-chemical processes associated with a nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.; Mangold, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Four basic physical processes, thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical, are likely to occur in 11 different types of coupling during the service life of an underground nuclear waste repository. A great number of coupled processes with various degrees of importance for geological repositories were identified and arranged into these 11 types. A qualitative description of these processes and a tentative evaluation of their significance and the degree of uncertainty in prediction is given. Suggestions for methods of investigation generally include, besides theoretical work, laboratory and large scale field testing. Great efforts of a multidisciplinary nature are needed to elucidate details of several coupled processes under different temperature conditions in different geological formations. It was suggested that by limiting the maximum temperature to 100{sup 0}C in the backfill and in the host rock during the whole service life of the repository the uncertainties in prediction of long-term repository behavior might be considerably reduced.

  8. Effect of process parameters on temperature distribution in twin-electrode TIG coupling arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Xiong, Jun; Gao, Hongming; Wu, Lin

    2012-10-01

    The twin-electrode TIG coupling arc is a new type of welding heat source, which is generated in a single welding torch that has two tungsten electrodes insulated from each other. This paper aims at determining the distribution of temperature for the coupling arc using the Fowler-Milne method under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The influences of welding current, arc length, and distance between both electrode tips on temperature distribution of the coupling arc were analyzed. Based on the results, a better understanding of the twin-electrode TIG welding process was obtained.

  9. Synchronization of elastically coupled processive molecular motors and regulation of cargo transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The collective work of motor proteins plays an important role in cellular transport processes. Since measuring intermotor coupling and hence a comparison to theoretical predictions is difficult, we introduce the synchronization as an alternative observable for motor cooperativity. This synchronization can be determined from the ratio of the mean times of motor resting and stepping. Results from a multistate Markov chain model and Brownian dynamics simulations, describing the elastically coupled motors, coincide well. Our model can explain the experimentally observed effect of strongly increased transport velocities and powers by the synchronization and coupling of myosin V and kinesin I.

  10. Coupled finite element simulation and optimization of single- and multi-stage sheet-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamasco, Cynthia M.; Rais-Rohani, Masoud; Buijk, Arjaan

    2013-03-01

    This article presents the development and application of a coupled finite element simulation and optimization framework that can be used for design and analysis of sheet-forming processes of varying complexity. The entire forming process from blank gripping and deep drawing to tool release and springback is modelled. The dies, holders, punch and workpiece are modelled with friction, temperature, holder force and punch speed controlled in the process simulation. Both single- and multi-stage sheet-forming processes are investigated. Process simulation is coupled with a nonlinear gradient-based optimization approach for optimizing single or multiple design objectives with imposed sheet-forming response constraints. A MATLAB program is developed and used for data-flow management between process simulation and optimization codes. Thinning, springback, damage and forming limit diagram are used to define failure in the forming process design optimization. Design sensitivity analysis and optimization results of the example problems are presented and discussed.

  11. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  12. Benchmark initiative on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisch, K.; Annewandter, R.; Olden, P.; Mackay, E.; Bauer, S.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers involves multiple strongly interacting processes such as multiphase flow and geomechanical deformation, which threat to the seal integrity of CO2 repositories. Coupled simulation codes are required to establish realistic prognoses of the coupled process during CO2 injection operations. International benchmark initiatives help to evaluate, to compare and to validate coupled simulation results. However, there is no published code comparison study so far focusing on the impact of coupled multiphase flow and geomechanics on the long-term integrity of repositories, which is required to obtain confidence in the predictive capabilities of reservoir simulators. We address this gap by proposing a benchmark study. A wide participation from academic and industrial institutions is sought, as the aim of building confidence in coupled simulators become more plausible with many participants. Most published benchmark studies on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes have been performed within the field of nuclear waste disposal (e.g. the DECOVALEX project), using single-phase formulation only. As regards CO2 injection scenarios, international benchmark studies have been published comparing isothermal and non-isothermal multiphase flow processes such as the code intercomparison by LBNL, the Stuttgart Benchmark study, the CLEAN benchmark approach and other initiatives. Recently, several codes have been developed or extended to simulate the coupling of hydraulic and geomechanical processes (OpenGeoSys, ELIPSE-Visage, GEM, DuMuX and others), which now enables a comprehensive code comparison. We propose four benchmark tests of increasing complexity, addressing the coupling between multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection. In the first case, a horizontal non-faulted 2D model consisting of one reservoir and one cap rock is considered, focusing on stress and strain regime changes in the storage formation and the

  13. Coupled processes in single fractures, double fractures and fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.

    1986-12-01

    The emplacement of a nuclear waste repository in a fractured porous medium provides a heat source of large dimensions over an extended period of time. It also creates a large cavity in the rock mass, changing significantly the stress field. Such major changes induce various coupled thermohydraulic, hydromechanic and hydrochemical transport processes in the environment around a nuclear waste repository. The present paper gives, first, a general overview of the coupled processes involving thermal, mechanical, hydrological and chemical effects. Then investigations of a number of specific coupled processes are described in the context of fluid flow and transport in a single fracture, two intersecting fractures and a fractured porous medium near a nuclear waste repository. The results are presented and discussed.

  14. Multi-field coupled numerical simulation of hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sendong; Zhang, Liwen; Ruan, Jinhua; Mei, Hongyu; Zhen, Yu; Shi, Xinhua

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, based on rolling technology of hot reversible rolling mill, a multi-filed coupled finite element (FE) model of hot reversible rolling process of large dimension cross-section GCr15 steel rod is established. Thermal, mechanical and microstructural phenomena during the rolling process are coupled in the model. By employing grain growth experiment, double and single hit hot compression experiments, the austenite grain size growth mathematical model and recrystallization behavior mathematical models are determined. And a designed subprogram is coupled in the FE model. Actual hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel is simulated using the model and the distribution and evolution of different filed-variables, such as temperature, effective strain and austenite grain size are obtained. To verify the model predictions, hot rolling experiments are carried out and the temperature and microstructure of the rolling metal are compared with the predicted results. The comparison between the two sets of data shows a good agreement.

  15. Atmosphere-ocean coupled processes in the Madden-Julian oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, Charlotte A.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steven J.

    2015-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is a convectively coupled 30-70 day (intraseasonal) tropical atmospheric mode that drives variations in global weather but which is poorly simulated in most atmospheric general circulation models. Over the past two decades, field campaigns and modeling experiments have suggested that tropical atmosphere-ocean interactions may sustain or amplify the pattern of enhanced and suppressed atmospheric convection that defines the MJO and encourage its eastward propagation through the Indian and Pacific Oceans. New observations collected during the past decade have advanced our understanding of the ocean response to atmospheric MJO forcing and the resulting intraseasonal sea surface temperature fluctuations. Numerous modeling studies have revealed a considerable impact of the mean state on MJO ocean-atmosphere coupled processes, as well as the importance of resolving the diurnal cycle of atmosphere-upper ocean interactions. New diagnostic methods provide insight to atmospheric variability and physical processes associated with the MJO but offer limited insight on the role of ocean feedbacks. Consequently, uncertainty remains concerning the role of the ocean in MJO theory. Our understanding of how atmosphere-ocean coupled processes affect the MJO can be improved by collecting observations in poorly sampled regions of MJO activity, assessing oceanic and atmospheric drivers of surface fluxes, improving the representation of upper ocean mixing in coupled model simulations, designing model experiments that minimize mean state differences, and developing diagnostic tools to evaluate the nature and role of coupled ocean-atmosphere processes over the MJO cycle.

  16. Differences in Pornography Use Among Couples: Associations with Satisfaction, Stability, and Relationship Processes.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Brian J; Carroll, Jason S; Busby, Dean M; Brown, Cameron C

    2016-01-01

    The present study utilized a sample of 1755 adult couples in heterosexual romantic relationships to examine how different patterns of pornography use between romantic partners may be associated with relationship outcomes. While pornography use has been generally associated with some negative and some positive couple outcomes, no study has yet explored how differences between partners may uniquely be associated with relationship well-being. Results suggested that greater discrepancies between partners in pornography use were related to less relationship satisfaction, less stability, less positive communication, and more relational aggression. Mediation analyses suggested that greater pornography use discrepancies were primarily associated with elevated levels of male relational aggression, lower female sexual desire, and less positive communication for both partners which then predicted lower relational satisfaction and stability for both partners. Results generally suggest that discrepancies in pornography use at the couple level are related to negative couple outcomes. Specifically, pornography differences may alter specific couple interaction processes which, in turn, may influence relationship satisfaction and stability. Implications for scholars and clinicians interested in how pornography use is associated with couple process are discussed. PMID:26228990

  17. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco-Martin, Laura; Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone “Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures” (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  18. MASSIVELY PARALLEL FULLY COUPLED IMPLICIT MODELING OF COUPLED THERMAL-HYDROLOGICAL-MECHANICAL PROCESSES FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang; Derek Gaston

    2010-02-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing) to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. In order to increase our understanding of how reservoirs behave under these conditions, we have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a continuum multiphase flow and heat transport model. In DEM simulations, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external load is applied. DEM models have been applied to a very wide range of fracturing processes from the molecular scale (where thermal fluctuations play an important role) to scales on the order of 1 km or greater. In this approach, the continuum flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite element grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms and

  19. Coupling pre-mRNA processing to transcription on the RNA factory assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    It has been well-documented that nuclear processing of primary transcripts of RNA polymerase II occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to transcription. Moreover, increasing evidence indicates that transcription influences pre-mRNA splicing and even several post-splicing RNA processing events. In this review, we discuss the issues of how RNA polymerase II modulates co-transcriptional RNA processing events via its carboxyl terminal domain, and the protein domains involved in coupling of transcription and RNA processing events. In addition, we describe how transcription influences the expression or stability of mRNAs through the formation of distinct mRNP complexes. Finally, we delineate emerging findings that chromatin modifications function in the regulation of RNA processing steps, especially splicing, in addition to transcription. Overall, we provide a comprehensive view that transcription could integrate different control systems, from epigenetic to post-transcriptional control, for efficient gene expression. PMID:23392244

  20. Linking Tectonics and Surface Processes through SNAC-CHILD Coupling: Preliminary Results Towards Interoperable Modeling Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.; Kelbert, A.; Peckham, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that code coupling can be an efficient and flexible method for modeling complicated two-way interactions between tectonic and surface processes with SNAC-CHILD coupling as an example. SNAC is a deep earth process model (a geodynamic/tectonics model), built upon a scientific software framework called StGermain and also compatible with a model coupling framework called Pyre. CHILD is a popular surface process model (a landscape evolution model), interfaced to the CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System) modeling framework. We first present proof-of-concept but non-trivial results from a simplistic coupling scheme. We then report progress towards augmenting SNAC with a Basic Model Interface (BMI), a framework-agnostic standard interface developed by CSDMS that uses the CSDMS Standard Names as controlled vocabulary for model communication across domains. Newly interfaced to BMI, SNAC will be easily coupled with CHILD as well as other BMI-compatible models. In broader context, this work will test BMI as a general and easy-to-implement mechanism for sharing models between modeling frameworks and is a part of the NSF-funded EarthCube Building Blocks project, "Earth System Bridge: Spanning Scientific Communities with Interoperable Modeling Frameworks."

  1. A Coupled Modeling Approach for Root-Soil Interaction Processes Using DuMuX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, N.; Helmig, R.; Flemisch, B.; Koch, T.

    2015-12-01

    The water and nutrient uptake of plant roots in soils have a crucial influence on soil physical processes. The interacting processes between plant roots and soil are important for several agricultural problems, for example water management or leaching of pesticides. However, the coupled mechanisms of local soil and root water flow, transport of dissolved substances, root growth, and root uptake are difficult to measure and thus experimental data are rare. Numerical models can be used to understand these complex soil-root systems and help to analyze and interpret experimental measurements. The model approach presented here couples a root system and a soil model. Crucial for this approach is the 1D-3D grid coupling which combines a 1D network grid (root system) with the 3D soil grid. Based on that grid coupling, local processes are defined, for instance the local water uptake of a single root segment. Here, the interface conditions between roots and soil play a major role and we use local grid refinement strategies to better resolve these interface processes. This grid refinement of the 3D soil grid is based on the root network (1D grid) and adapts if root growth occurs. It offers the possibility to describe processes in the soil-plant continuum in a more physical manner avoiding empirical descriptions of root water uptake as a function of bulk matric potential, osmotic potential, root length density, and transpiration rate. Our coupling approach is included into the framework of DuMux, an open-source simulator for flow and transport processes in porous media. This implementation combines biological, chemical and physical processes in soil, inside roots, and at root-soil interfaces, and is contained in a sustainable and consistent framework for the implementation. We will show example simulations describing water flow, solute transport and root growth in a soil-root system.

  2. Fano-like coupling between two oppositely enhanced processes by diffraction in a dielectric grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-11-16

    Fano-like coupling was investigated extensively in plasmonic nanostructures, which is based on the interaction between the photonic and plasmonic resonance modes. Metallic photonic crystals consisting of waveguide metallic gratings are typical devices exhibiting strong Fano-coupling between waveguide and plasmon resonance modes. However, we demonstrate here that similar effects can also be achieved in waveguide dielectric grating structures. In this case, the broad-band strong optical extinction results from multifold diffraction processes, instead of the plasmonic absorption and scattering of light. The diffraction efficiency of the waveguide dielectric gratings was tuned by changing the duty cycle through adjusting the exposure time in interference lithography. Enhanced diffraction efficiency reduces the direct transmission while enhances the waveguide resonance mode, leading to a Fano-like coupling process. PMID:26698522

  3. Childhood Emotional Abuse and Attachment Processes in the Dyadic Adjustment of Dating Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Shelley A.; Cusimano, Angela M.; Benson, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to improve understanding of the mechanisms that link early maltreatment to later outcomes, this study investigated the mediation effects of adult attachment processes on the association between childhood emotional abuse and later romantic relationships among heterosexual couples. College students and their dating partners (N = 310;…

  4. Multi-Region Boundary Element Analysis for Coupled Thermal-Fracturing Processes in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Baotang; Kim, Hyung-Mok; Park, Eui-Seob; Kim, Taek-Kon; Wuttke, Manfred W.; Rinne, Mikael; Backers, Tobias; Stephansson, Ove

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a boundary element code development on coupled thermal-mechanical processes of rock fracture propagation. The code development was based on the fracture mechanics code FRACOD that has previously been developed by Shen and Stephansson (Int J Eng Fracture Mech 47:177-189, 1993) and FRACOM (A fracture propagation code—FRACOD, User's manual. FRACOM Ltd. 2002) and simulates complex fracture propagation in rocks governed by both tensile and shear mechanisms. For the coupled thermal-fracturing analysis, an indirect boundary element method, namely the fictitious heat source method, was implemented in FRACOD to simulate the temperature change and thermal stresses in rocks. This indirect method is particularly suitable for the thermal-fracturing coupling in FRACOD where the displacement discontinuity method is used for mechanical simulation. The coupled code was also extended to simulate multiple region problems in which rock mass, concrete linings and insulation layers with different thermal and mechanical properties were present. Both verification and application cases were presented where a point heat source in a 2D infinite medium and a pilot LNG underground cavern were solved and studied using the coupled code. Good agreement was observed between the simulation results, analytical solutions and in situ measurements which validates an applicability of the developed coupled code.

  5. Numerical methods for TVD transport and coupled relaxing processes in gases and plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    The construction of second-order upwind schemes for nonequilibrium plasmas, for both one- and two-fluid formulations is demonstrated. Coupled relaxation processes, including ionization kinetics and radiative processes and their algorithms for nonequilibrium, multiple temperature conditions are described as well. The paper applies the numerical techniques on some simple test cases, points out critical problems and their solutions, and makes qualitative comparisons with known results, whenever possible.

  6. Pilot scale treatment of chromite ore processing residue using sodium sulfide in single reduction and coupled reduction/stabilization processes.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Antonio; Ramírez, Martha; Hernández, Sergio; Schmidt, Winfried; Revah, Sergio

    2012-03-15

    Single Cr(VI) reduction and coupled reduction/stabilization (R/S) processes were evaluated at pilot scale to determine their effectiveness to treat chromite ore processing residue (COPR). Sodium sulfide was used as the reducing agent and cement, gypsum and lime were tested as the stabilizing agents. The pilot experiments were performed in a helical ribbon blender mixer with batches of 250 kg of COPR and mixing time up to 30 min. Na2S/Cr(VI) mass ratios of 4.6, 5.7 and 6.8 were evaluated in the single reduction process to treat COPR with Cr(VI) concentration of ≈4.2 g/kg. The R/S process was tested with a Na2S/Cr(VI) mass ratio of 5.7 and including stabilizing agents not exceeding 5% (w/w(COPR)), to treat COPR with a Cr(VI) content of ≈5.1g/kg. The single reduction process with a ratio of 6.8, reached Cr(VI) reduction efficiencies up to 97.6% in the first days, however these values decreased to around 93% after 380 days of storage. At this point the total Cr level was around 12.5 mg/L. Cr(VI) removal efficiencies exceeding 96.5% were reached and maintained during 380 days when the coupled R/S process was evaluated. Total Cr levels lower than 5 mg/l were attained at the initials days in all R/S batch tested, however after 380 days, concentrations below the regulatory limit were only found with gypsum (2%) as single agent and with a blend of cement (4%) and lime (1%). These results indicated that the coupled R/S process is an excellent alternative to stabilize COPR. PMID:21543156

  7. Magnetization process in a two-phase exchange-coupled system: A microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.H.; Feutrill, E.H.; Ding, J.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetization process in an exchange-coupled {alpha}-Fe+Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanocomposite has been studied by M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopy. Measurements in fields of up to 2 T confirm that the magnetization of the soft phase is strongly coupled to that of the hard phase. Analysis of magnetization curves and magic-angle spectra of saturated samples shows that the remanence is dominated by the hard phase. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tikare, Veena; Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain; Madison, Jonathan D.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Patterson, Burton R.; Homer, Eric R.

    2013-09-01

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  9. Coupling of a vacuum-ultraviolet-radiation source to a processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, J. D.; Upadhyaya, G. S.; Shohet, J. L.; Lauer, J. L.; Bathke, R. D.; Kukkady, K.

    2006-08-15

    A hollow capillary array is examined as a coupling window between an electron cyclotron resonance plasma vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) source and a separate processing chamber. The transmission of vuv through the capillary array as a function of wavelength is measured and shown to agree with theoretical calculations. A silicon wafer with a dielectric surface is then placed in the processing chamber and exposed to vuv, both with and without the capillary array. A Kelvin probe is used to measure the surface charge induced on the wafer by photoemission in both cases, which confirms the previously measured transmission values. The results show that a capillary array can efficiently couple vuv radiation from a source to a processing chamber without significant modification in the spectrum and its resulting effects on a material.

  10. Advances in Coupling of Kinetics and Molecular Scale Tools to Shed Light on Soil Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Donald

    2014-09-02

    Biogeochemical processes in soils such as sorption, precipitation, and redox play critical roles in the cycling and fate of nutrients, metal(loid)s and organic chemicals in soil and water environments. Advanced analytical tools enable soil scientists to track these processes in real-time and at the molecular scale. Our review focuses on recent research that has employed state-of-the-art molecular scale spectroscopy, coupled with kinetics, to elucidate the mechanisms of nutrient and metal(loid) reactivity and speciation in soils. We found that by coupling kinetics with advanced molecular and nano-scale tools major advances have been made in elucidating important soil chemical processes including sorption, precipitation, dissolution, and redox of metal(loids) and nutrients. Such advances will aid in better predicting the fate and mobility of nutrients and contaminants in soils and water and enhance environmental and agricultural sustainability.

  11. INFLUENCE OF COUPLED PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT FATE AND TRANSPORT IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The following chapter emphasizes subsurface environmental research investigations over the past 10 to 15 years that couple hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes as related to contaminant fate and transport. An attempt is made to focus on field-scale studies with possible reference to laboratory-scale endeavors. Much of the research discussed reflects investigations of the influence of coupled processes on the fate and transport of inorganic, radionuclide, and organic contaminants in subsurface environments as a result of natural processes or energy and weapons production endeavors that required waste disposal. The chapter provides on overview of the interaction between hydro-bio-geochemical processes in structured, heterogeneous subsurface environments and how these interactions control contaminant fate and transport, followed by experimental and numerical subsurface science research and case studies involving specific classes of inorganic and organic contaminants. Lastly, thought provoking insights are highlighted on why the study of subsurface coupled processes is paramount to understanding potential future contaminant fate and transport issues of global concern.

  12. A model-free definition of coupling strength for assessing the influence between climatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, J.; Kurths, J.

    2012-04-01

    Assessing the strength of influence between climatic processes from observational data is an important problem on the way to construct conceptual models or make predictions. An example being the influence of ENSO on the Indian Monsoon compared to the influence of other climatic processes. It is an especially difficult task if the interactions are nonlinear where linear measures like the Pearson correlation coefficient fail. Apart from nonlinearity, auto-dependencies in the processes can lead to misleading high values of coupling strength. There exist statistical methods that address these issues, but most of them assume some model, e.g., a linear model in the case of the partial correlation. We propose a measure based on conditional mutual information that makes no assumptions on the underlying model and is able to exclude auto-dependencies and even influences of external processes. We investigate how the strength measured relates to model systems where a coupling strength is known and discuss its limitations. The measure is applied to time series of different climate indices and gridded data sets to gain insights into the coupling strength between climatic teleconnections. Applied to more than two time series it is also able to shed light on mechanisms of interactions between multiple processes.

  13. Sequoia: A fault-tolerant tightly coupled multiprocessor for transaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, P.A.

    1988-02-01

    The Sequoia computer is a tightly coupled multiprocessor, and thus attains the performance advantages of this style of architecture. It avoids most of the fault-tolerance disadvantages of tight coupling by using a new fault-tolerance design. The Sequoia architecture is similar to other multimicroprocessor architectures, such as those of Encore and Sequent, in that it gives dozens of microprocessors shared access to a large main memory. It resembles the Stratus architecture in its extensive use of hardware fault-detection techniques. It resembles Stratus and Auragen in its ability to quickly recover all processes after a single point failure, transparently to the user. However, Sequoia is unique in its combination of a large-scale tightly coupled architecture with a hardware approach to fault tolerance. This article gives an overview of how the hardware architecture and operating systems (OS) work together to provide a high degree of fault tolerance with good system performance.

  14. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online. PMID:23305831

  15. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  16. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.

  17. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-01-01

    Optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation. PMID:26508587

  18. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Fang, F; Li, Q; Zhu, J; Yang, Y; Wu, Y Z; Zhao, H B; Lüpke, G

    2015-01-01

    Optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation. PMID:26508587

  19. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recoverymore » time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.« less

  20. The Coupling and Modeling of Eco-hydrological Processes in the Upper Reaches of Heihe River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dawen; Cong, Zhentao; Yang, Hanbo

    2013-04-01

    Developing new watershed models to couple the ecological, hydrological and social-economical processes for improving the understanding and regulation ability of the processes involved in water resources generation and transformation in the inland watersheds, is one important general scientific target of the NSFC Major Plan of "Integrated Research on the Eco-Hydrological Processes of Heihe Basin". With aims at this scientific target, the proposed research project will carry out a multi-scales and multi-processes study on eco-hydrology in the upper reaches of the Heihe River, identify the key eco-hydrological processes in the study region, develop a distributed eco-hydrological model for this region, and build a data assimilation and uncertainty analysis system for the developed model. Then this model will be used to assess the impacts of climate change and human activity on the runoff in the upper reaches of Heihe River. This study will improve the ability in simulating and predicting the runoff responses to environment changes in this basin, and also to promote the realization of the target of the NSFC Major Plan. This project will focus on the following three major researches: 1) the identification of key eco-hydrological processes and the overall structure designing of eco-hydrological model; 2) the development of distributed eco-hydrological watershed model; 3) the simulation and prediction of the eco-hydrological changes in the upper reaches of Heihe River. Through this study, it is expected to establish a benchmark eco-hydrological model for the mountainous watersheds with arid-cold climate and high elevation, where there are the most complex landscape, closely coupled ecological and hydrological system, and the most comprehensive hydrological processes. Also a breakthrough in the simulation of coupled eco-hydrological processes is expected.

  1. Coupled transport processes in semipermeable media. Part 2: Numerical method and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Janet S.; Carnahan, Chalon L.

    1990-04-01

    A numerical simulator has been developed to investigate the effects of coupled processes on heat and mass transport in semipermeable media. The governing equations on which the simulator is based were derived using the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The equations are nonlinear and have been solved numerically using the n-dimensional Newton's method. As an example of an application, the numerical simulator has been used to investigate heat and solute transport in the vicinity of a heat source buried in a saturated clay-like medium, in part to study solute transport in bentonite packing material surrounding a nuclear waste canister. The coupled processes considered were thermal filtration, thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis and ultrafiltration. In the simulations, heat transport by coupled processes was negligible compared to heat conduction, but pressure and solute migration were affected. Solute migration was retarded relative to the uncoupled case when only chemical osmosis was considered. When both chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis were included, solute migration was enhanced.

  2. Integrated Modeling and Experiments to Characterize Coupled Thermo-hydro-geomechanical-chemical processes in Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, H. S.; Carey, J. W.; Karra, S.; Porter, M. L.; Rougier, E.; Kang, Q.; Makedonska, N.; Hyman, J.; Jimenez Martinez, J.; Frash, L.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing phenomena involve fluid-solid interactions embedded within coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes over scales from microns to tens of meters. Feedbacks between processes result in complex dynamics that must be unraveled if one is to predict and, in the case of unconventional resources, facilitate fracture propagation, fluid flow, and interfacial transport processes. The proposed work is part of a broader class of complex systems involving coupled fluid flow and fractures that are critical to subsurface energy issues, such as shale oil, geothermal, carbon sequestration, and nuclear waste disposal. We use unique LANL microfluidic and triaxial core flood experiments integrated with state-of-the-art numerical simulation to reveal the fundamental dynamics of fracture-fluid interactions to characterize the key coupled processes that impact hydrocarbon production. We are also comparing CO2-based fracturing and aqueous fluids to enhance production, greatly reduce waste water, while simultaneously sequestering CO2. We will show pore, core and reservoir scale simulations/experiments that investigate the contolling mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production.

  3. Understanding Coupled Earth-Surface Processes through Experiments and Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, I.; Kim, W.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, both numerical models and experiments have been purposefully designed to ';isolate' singular components or certain processes of a larger mountain to deep-ocean interconnected source-to-sink (S2S) transport system. Controlling factors driven by processes outside of the domain of immediate interest were treated and simplified as input or as boundary conditions. Increasingly, earth surface processes scientists appreciate feedbacks and explore these feedbacks with more dynamically coupled approaches to their experiments and models. Here, we discuss key concepts and recent advances made in coupled modeling and experimental setups. In addition, we emphasize challenges and new frontiers to coupled experiments. Experiments have highlighted the important role of self-organization; river and delta systems do not always need to be forced by external processes to change or develop characteristic morphologies. Similarly modeling f.e. has shown that intricate networks in tidal deltas are stable because of the interplay between river avulsions and the tidal current scouring with both processes being important to develop and maintain the dentritic networks. Both models and experiment have demonstrated that seemingly stable systems can be perturbed slightly and show dramatic responses. Source-to-sink models were developed for both the Fly River System in Papua New Guinea and the Waipaoa River in New Zealand. These models pointed to the importance of upstream-downstream effects and enforced our view of the S2S system as a signal transfer and dampening conveyor belt. Coupled modeling showed that deforestation had extreme effects on sediment fluxes draining from the catchment of the Waipaoa River in New Zealand, and that this increase in sediment production rapidly shifted the locus of offshore deposition. The challenge in designing coupled models and experiments is both technological as well as intellectual. Our community advances to make numerical model coupling more

  4. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  5. High Efficiency Coupling of Optical Fibres with SU8 Micro-droplet Using Laser Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardi, Seema; Gupta, Ankur; Sundriyal, Poonam; Bhatt, Geeta; Kant, Rishi; Boolchandani, D.; Bhattacharya, Shantanu

    2016-09-01

    Apart from micro- structure fabrication, ablation, lithography etc., lasers find a lot of utility in various areas like precision joining, device fabrication, local heat delivery for surface texturing and local change of microstructure fabrication of standalone optical micro-devices (like microspheres, micro-prisms, micro-scale ring resonators, optical switches etc). There is a wide utility of such systems in chemical/ biochemical diagnostics and also communications where the standalone optical devices exist at a commercial scale but chip based devices with printed optics are necessary due to coupling issues between printed structures and external optics. This paper demonstrates a novel fabrication strategy used to join standalone optical fibres to microchip based printed optics using a simple SU8 drop. The fabrication process is deployed for fiber to fiber optical coupling and coupling between fiber and printed SU-8 waveguides. A CO2 laser is used to locally heat the coupling made up of SU8 material. Optimization of various dimensional parameters using design of experiments (DOE) on the bonded assembly has been performed as a function of laser power, speed, cycle control, spot size so on so forth. Exclusive optical [RF] modelling has been performed to estimate the transmissibility of the optical fibers bonded to each other on a surface with SU8. Our studies indicate the formation of a Whispering gallery mode (WGM) across the micro-droplet leading to high transmissibility of the signal. Through this work we have thus been able to develop a method of fabrication for optical coupling of standalone fibers or coupling of on-chip optics with off-chip illumination/detection.

  6. High Efficiency Coupling of Optical Fibres with SU8 Micro-droplet Using Laser Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardi, Seema; Gupta, Ankur; Sundriyal, Poonam; Bhatt, Geeta; Kant, Rishi; Boolchandani, D.; Bhattacharya, Shantanu

    2016-04-01

    Apart from micro- structure fabrication, ablation, lithography etc., lasers find a lot of utility in various areas like precision joining, device fabrication, local heat delivery for surface texturing and local change of microstructure fabrication of standalone optical micro-devices (like microspheres, micro-prisms, micro-scale ring resonators, optical switches etc). There is a wide utility of such systems in chemical/ biochemical diagnostics and also communications where the standalone optical devices exist at a commercial scale but chip based devices with printed optics are necessary due to coupling issues between printed structures and external optics. This paper demonstrates a novel fabrication strategy used to join standalone optical fibres to microchip based printed optics using a simple SU8 drop. The fabrication process is deployed for fiber to fiber optical coupling and coupling between fiber and printed SU-8 waveguides. A CO2 laser is used to locally heat the coupling made up of SU8 material. Optimization of various dimensional parameters using design of experiments (DOE) on the bonded assembly has been performed as a function of laser power, speed, cycle control, spot size so on so forth. Exclusive optical [RF] modelling has been performed to estimate the transmissibility of the optical fibers bonded to each other on a surface with SU8. Our studies indicate the formation of a Whispering gallery mode (WGM) across the micro-droplet leading to high transmissibility of the signal. Through this work we have thus been able to develop a method of fabrication for optical coupling of standalone fibers or coupling of on-chip optics with off-chip illumination/detection.

  7. Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-14

    In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

  8. Coupling of geochemical and multiphase flow processes for validation of the MUFITS reservoir simulator against TOUGHREACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Afanasyev, Andrey; Melnik, Oleg; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Coupled reactive transport simulations, especially in heterogeneous settings considering multiphase flow, are extremely time consuming and suffer from significant numerical issues compared to purely hydrodynamic simulations. This represents a major hurdle in the assessment of geological subsurface utilization, since it constrains the practical application of reactive transport modelling to coarse spatial discretization or oversimplified geological settings. In order to overcome such limitations, De Lucia et al. [1] developed and validated a one-way coupling approach between geochemistry and hydrodynamics, which is particularly well suited for CO2 storage simulations, while being of general validity. In the present study, the models used for the validation of the one-way coupling approach introduced by De Lucia et al. (2015), and originally performed with the TOUGHREACT simulator, are transferred to and benchmarked against the multiphase reservoir simulator MUFITS [2]. The geological model is loosely inspired by an existing CO2 storage site. Its grid comprises 2,950 elements enclosed in a single layer, but reflecting a realistic three-dimensional anticline geometry. For the purpose of this comparison, homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios in terms of porosity and permeability were investigated. In both cases, the results of the MUFITS simulator are in excellent agreement with those produced with the fully-coupled TOUGHREACT simulator, while profiting from significantly higher computational performance. This study demonstrates how a computationally efficient simulator such as MUFITS can be successfully included in a coupled process simulation framework, and also suggests ameliorations and specific strategies for the coupling of chemical processes with hydrodynamics and heat transport, aiming at tackling geoscientific problems beyond the storage of CO2. References [1] De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., and Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations

  9. Coupled simulation of an electromagnetic heating process using the finite difference time domain method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Tang, Juming; Liu, Fang

    2007-01-01

    Due to the complexity of interactions between microwaves and food products, a reliable and efficient simulation model can be a very useful tool to guide the design of microwave heating systems and processes. This research developed a model to simulate coupled phenomena of electromagnetic heating and conventional heat transfer by combining commercial electromagnetic software with a customer built heat transfer model. Simulation results were presented and compared with experimental results for hot water and microwave heating in a single mode microwave system at 915 MHz. Good agreement was achieved, showing that this model was able to provide insight into industrial electromagnetic heating processes. PMID:18351003

  10. Cross-frequency coupling in deep brain structures upon processing the painful sensory inputs.

    PubMed

    Liu, C C; Chien, J H; Kim, J H; Chuang, Y F; Cheng, D T; Anderson, W S; Lenz, F A

    2015-09-10

    Cross-frequency coupling has been shown to be functionally significant in cortical information processing, potentially serving as a mechanism for integrating functionally relevant regions in the brain. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that pain-related gamma oscillatory responses are coupled with low-frequency oscillations in the frontal lobe, amygdala and hippocampus, areas known to have roles in pain processing. We delivered painful laser pulses to random locations on the dorsal hand of five patients with uncontrolled epilepsy requiring depth electrode implantation for seizure monitoring. Two blocks of 40 laser stimulations were delivered to each subject and the pain-intensity was controlled at five in a 0-10 scale by adjusting the energy level of the laser pulses. Local-field-potentials (LFPs) were recorded through bilaterally implanted depth electrode contacts to study the oscillatory responses upon processing the painful laser stimulations. Our results show that painful laser stimulations enhanced low-gamma (LH, 40-70 Hz) and high-gamma (HG, 70-110 Hz) oscillatory responses in the amygdala and hippocampal regions on the right hemisphere and these gamma responses were significantly coupled with the phases of theta (4-7 Hz) and alpha (8-1 2 Hz) rhythms during pain processing. Given the roles of these deep brain structures in emotion, these findings suggest that the oscillatory responses in these regions may play a role in integrating the affective component of pain, which may contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the affective information processing in humans. PMID:26168707

  11. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  12. A COMSOL-GEMS interface for modeling coupled reactive-transport geochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Vahid Jafari; Li, Chang; Verba, Circe; Ideker, Jason H.; Isgor, O. Burkan

    2016-07-01

    An interface was developed between COMSOL MultiphysicsTM finite element analysis software and (geo)chemical modeling platform, GEMS, for the reactive-transport modeling of (geo)chemical processes in variably saturated porous media. The two standalone software packages are managed from the interface that uses a non-iterative operator splitting technique to couple the transport (COMSOL) and reaction (GEMS) processes. The interface allows modeling media with complex chemistry (e.g. cement) using GEMS thermodynamic database formats. Benchmark comparisons show that the developed interface can be used to predict a variety of reactive-transport processes accurately. The full functionality of the interface was demonstrated to model transport processes, governed by extended Nernst-Plank equation, in Class H Portland cement samples in high pressure and temperature autoclaves simulating systems that are used to store captured carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs.

  13. Treatment response in couple therapy: Relationship adjustment and individual functioning change processes.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M; Pinsof, William M; Haase, Claudia M

    2015-10-01

    This study, a naturalistic investigation of the process of change in relationship adjustment and individual functioning during conjoint therapy, examined the first 8 sessions of a multisystemic model of couple therapy, integrative problem-centered metaframeworks (Breunlin, Pinsof, Russell, & Lebow, 2011; Pinsof, Breunlin, Russell, & Lebow, 2011). The sample consisted of 125 heterosexual couples who reported on their relationship adjustment and individual functioning before every session using the Systemic Therapy Inventory of Change (Pinsof et al., 2009; Pinsof, Zinbarg, et al., in press). Data were analyzed using dyadic latent growth curve and cross-lagged models. For both men and women, relationship adjustment and individual functioning showed nonlinear change, increasing during Sessions 1-4 and stabilizing during Sessions 5-8. At pretreatment, women reported lower levels of relationship adjustment than men; no gender differences existed in initial levels of individual functioning or in the change trajectories of relationship adjustment or individual functioning. Higher relationship adjustment predicted positive change in individual functioning for men (but not for women). In contrast, there were no cross-lagged effects of individual functioning on relationship adjustment for men or women. The results demonstrate the importance of examining the processes by which relational and individual pathology respond to couple-based interventions. PMID:26376428

  14. Conservation Laws for Coupled Hydro-mechanical Processes in Unsaturated Porous Media: Theory and Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Borja, R I; White, J A

    2010-02-19

    We develop conservation laws for coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media using three-phase continuum mixture theory. From the first law of thermodynamics, we identify energy-conjugate variables for constitutive modeling at macroscopic scale. Energy conjugate expressions identified relate a certain measure of effective stress to the deformation of the solid matrix, the degree of saturation to the matrix suction, the pressure in each constituent phase to the corresponding intrinsic volume change of this phase, and the seepage forces to the corresponding pressure gradients. We then develop strong and weak forms of boundary-value problems relevant for 3D finite element modeling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media. The paper highlights a 3D numerical example illustrating the advances in the solution of large-scale coupled finite element systems, as well as the challenges in developing more predictive tools satisfying the basic conservation laws and the observed constitutive responses for unsaturated porous materials.

  15. Theory and computational modeling: Medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling in electron transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Feldberg, S.W.; Smalley, J.F.

    1998-03-01

    The continuing goal is to convert the rapidly accumulating mechanistic information about electron transfer (et) kinetics (often representable in terms of simple rate constants) into precise tools for fine-tuned control of the kinetics and for design of molecular-based systems which meet specified et characteristics. The present treatment will be limited to the kinetic framework defined by the assumption of transition state theory (TST). The primary objective of this paper is to report recent advances in the theoretical formulation, calculation, and analysis of energetics and electronic coupling pertinent to et in complex molecular aggregates. The control of et kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, both system energetics (especially reorganization energies (E{sub r}) and free energy changes ({Delta}G{sup 0})) and electronic coupling of local D and A sites, which for thermal processes is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate (i.e., the transition state). The authors first discuss TST rate constant models, emphasizing genetic features, but also noting some special features arising when metal electrodes are involved. They then turn to a consideration of detailed aspects of medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling. With these theoretical tools in hand, they examine the results of recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry and electrostatics, together with detailed analysis of the numerical results and comparison with recent electrochemical kinetic data.

  16. Selectiveness of laser processing due to energy coupling localization: case of thin film solar cell scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Grubinskas, S.; Gečys, P.; Gedvilas, M.

    2013-07-01

    Selectiveness of the laser processing is the top-most important for applications of the processing technology in thin-film electronics, including photovoltaics. Coupling of laser energy in multilayered thin-film structures, depending on photo-physical properties of the layers and laser wavelength was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Energy coupling within thin films highly depends on the film structure. The finite element and two-temperature models were applied to simulate the energy and temperature distributions inside the stack of different layers of a thin-film solar cell during a picosecond laser irradiation. Reaction of the films to the laser irradiation was conditioned by optical properties of the layers at the wavelength of laser radiation. Simulation results are consistent with the experimental data achieved in laser scribing of copper-indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells on a flexible polymer substrate using picosecond-pulsed lasers. Selection of the right laser wavelength (1064 nm or 1572 nm) enabled keeping the energy coupling in a well-defined volume at the interlayer interface. High absorption at inner interface of the layers triggered localized temperature increase. Transient stress caused by the rapid temperature rise facilitating peeling of the films rather than evaporation. Ultra-short pulses ensured high energy input rate into absorbing material permitting peeling of the layers with no influence on the remaining material.

  17. Processes, observations and parameters in a coupled surface water-groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Laura; Hill, Mary; Mehl, Steffen; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Hydrological models of surface-water flow and infiltration allow for a process-based representation of recharge to ground water models. Recharge is a fundamental and often difficult to quantify component of a groundwater system, in part because recharge and hydraulic conductivity changes tend to similarly affect hydraulic heads, the most common kind of observations in groundwater systems. Here the goal is to analyze the importance of using recharge derived from hydrologic processes for groundwater model development and furthermore the importance of a spatially distributed value of recharge. To achieve the goal we followed this procedure: 1) independently calibrate and test the groundwater and hydrological models (accomplished as described in Foglia et al., 2007GW, 2009WRR, in press WRR); 2) for the hydrological model, we present a new sensitivity analysis and calibration obtained with a set of observations that provides more detail at low flows, which was identified as important by Foglia et al. (2009); 3) couple the two models (here, one-way coupling transfers infiltration from the surface-water model to the groundwater model after multiplying by an estimated factor); 4) identify important parameters and observations using a sensitivity analysis conducted with linear statistics for this computationally demanding model; 5) use regression in an hypothesis testing framework to explore parameter and observation importance further and also explore resulting estimates and model fit. The analysis is carried out using s physically based models of groundwater flow (MOFLOW-2000) and surface hydrology (TOPKAPI) developed for the Maggia Valley in Southern Switzerland. Calibration and sensitivity analysis were performed using UCODE_2005. Sensitivity analysis is used to identify the most important observations for both the individual and coupled models. As expected, the observations belonging to the hydrological model play a more significant role in the coupled calibration

  18. Modeling coupled thermal-mechanical processes of frozen soil induced by borehole heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.

    2015-12-01

    To utilize the shallow geothermal energy, heat pumps are often coupled with Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHE) to provide heating and cooling for buildings. In cold regions, soil freezing around the BHE is a potential problem which will dramatically influence the underground soil temperature distribution, subsequently the inlet and outlet refrigerant temperature of the BHE, and finally the efficiency of the heat pump. In this study, a numerical model has been developed to simulate the coupled temperature evolution both inside the BHE, and the propagating freezing front in the surrounding soil. The coupled model was validated against analytical solutions and experimental data. The influence of the freezing process on the overall system performance is investigated by comparing one long BHE configuration without freezing and another short one with latent heat from the frozen groundwater. It is found that when freezing happens, the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump will decrease by around 0.5, leading to more electricity consumption. Furthermore, analysis of the simulation result reveals that the exploitation of latent heat through groundwater freezing is only economically attractive if electricity price is low and interest rate high, and it is not the case is most European countries.

  19. Contagion processes on the static and activity-driven coupling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yanjun; Jiang, Xin; Guo, Quantong; Ma, Yifang; Li, Meng; Zheng, Zhiming

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of network structure and the spreading of epidemic are common coexistent dynamical processes. In most cases, network structure is treated as either static or time-varying, supposing the whole network is observed in the same time window. In this paper, we consider the epidemics spreading on a network which has both static and time-varying structures. Meanwhile, the time-varying part and the epidemic spreading are supposed to be of the same time scale. We introduce a static and activity-driven coupling (SADC) network model to characterize the coupling between the static ("strong") structure and the dynamic ("weak") structure. Epidemic thresholds of the SIS and SIR models are studied using the SADC model both analytically and numerically under various coupling strategies, where the strong structure is of homogeneous or heterogeneous degree distribution. Theoretical thresholds obtained from the SADC model can both recover and generalize the classical results in static and time-varying networks. It is demonstrated that a weak structure might make the epidemic threshold low in homogeneous networks but high in heterogeneous cases. Furthermore, we show that the weak structure has a substantive effect on the outbreak of the epidemics. This result might be useful in designing some efficient control strategies for epidemics spreading in networks.

  20. Interpersonal forgiveness in emotion-focused couples' therapy: relating process to outcome.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Catalina Woldarsky; Greenberg, Leslie S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to relate the in-session processes involved in interpersonal forgiveness to outcome. The sample consisted of 33 couples who received 10-12 sessions of Emotion-focused couple therapy with the aim of resolving various forms of emotional injuries (i.e., transgression that violates the expectations of a close relationship, which leaves one partner feeling hurt and angry). The results of the present study were based on the analyses of 205 video-taped segments from 33 couples' therapies. Hypotheses relating the role of three in-session components of resolution, the injurer's "expression of shame"; the injured partner's "accepting response" to the shame, and the injured partner's "in-session expression of forgiveness", to outcome were tested using hierarchical linear regression analyses. Outcome measures included the Enright Forgiveness Inventory (The Enright Forgiveness Inventory user's manual. Madison: The International Forgiveness Institute, 2000), the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (Journal of Marriage and Family, 1976; 13: 723) and the The Interpersonal Trust Scale (Trust; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1985; 49: 95). PMID:25059412

  1. Advanced Simulation of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events (ASCETE) - Simulation Techniques for Realistic Tsunami Process Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Joern; Bader, Michael; Breuer, Alexander N.; van Dinther, Ylona; Gabriel, Alice-A.; Galvez Barron, Percy E.; Rahnema, Kaveh; Vater, Stefan; Wollherr, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    At the End of phase 1 of the ASCETE project a simulation framework for coupled physics-based rupture generation with tsunami propagation and inundation is available. Adaptive mesh tsunami propagation and inundation by discontinuous Galerkin Runge-Kutta methods allows for accurate and conservative inundation schemes. Combined with a tree-based refinement strategy to highly optimize the code for high-performance computing architectures, a modeling tool for high fidelity tsunami simulations has been constructed. Validation results demonstrate the capacity of the software. Rupture simulation is performed by an unstructured tetrahedral discontinuous Galerking ADER discretization, which allows for accurate representation of complex geometries. The implemented code was nominated for and was selected as a finalist for the Gordon Bell award in high-performance computing. Highly realistic rupture events can be simulated with this modeling tool. The coupling of rupture induced wave activity and displacement with hydrodynamic equations still poses a major problem due to diverging time and spatial scales. Some insight from the ASCETE set-up could be gained and the presentation will focus on the coupled behavior of the simulation system. Finally, an outlook to phase 2 of the ASCETE project will be given in which further development of detailed physical processes as well as near-realistic scenario computations are planned. ASCETE is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation.

  2. A Stable Clock Error Model Using Coupled First and Second Order Gauss-Markov Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Russell; Lee, Taesul

    2008-01-01

    Long data outages may occur in applications of global navigation satellite system technology to orbit determination for missions that spend significant fractions of their orbits above the navigation satellite constellation(s). Current clock error models based on the random walk idealization may not be suitable in these circumstances, since the covariance of the clock errors may become large enough to overflow flight computer arithmetic. A model that is stable, but which approximates the existing models over short time horizons is desirable. A coupled first- and second-order Gauss-Markov process is such a model.

  3. Parallel processing implementation for the coupled transport of photons and electrons using OpenMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, Edgardo

    2016-05-01

    In this work the use of OpenMP to implement the parallel processing of the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the coupled transport for photons and electrons is presented. This implementation was carried out using a modified EGSnrc platform which enables the use of the Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 (VS2013) environment, together with the developing tools available in the Intel Parallel Studio XE 2015 (XE2015). The performance study of this new implementation was carried out in a desktop PC with a multi-core CPU, taking as a reference the performance of the original platform. The results were satisfactory, both in terms of scalability as parallelization efficiency.

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Bernard P.; Martin, Paul F.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  5. Strong Asymmetric Coupling of Two Parallel Exclusion Processes: Effect of Unequal Injection Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Song; Dong, Peng; Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Yanna

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, strong asymmetric coupling of two parallel exclusion processes: effect of unequal injection rates will be investigated. It is a generalization of the work of Xiao et al. (Phys. Lett. A 8, 374 (2009)), in which the particles only move on two lanes with rate 1 toward right. We can obtain the diverse phase diagram and density profiles of the system. The vertical cluster mean-field approach and extensively Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the system, and theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with simulation results.

  6. The Experience of Chinese Couples Undergoing In Vitro Fertilization Treatment: Perception of the Treatment Process and Partner Support

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Li-Ying; Wu, Lai Har; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Background Couples undergoing In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Treatment suffer as dyads from the stressful experience of the painful treatment and the fear that the IVF cycle will fail. They are likely to report that their marital relationship has become unstable due to the prolonged period of treatment. Methods This is a qualitative study that was conducted to explore the experiences that Chinese couples have had with IVF treatment, especially their perceptions of the process and the support between couples. Results The interviews revealed that couples suffered from the process, experiencing physical and emotional pain, struggling with the urgency and inflexibility of bearing a child, and experiencing disturbances in their daily routines and work. The participants described how they endured the hardships as a couple and how it affected their relationship. The couples felt that sharing feelings and supporting each other contribute to psychological well-being and improves the marital relationship. They also identified some unfavorable aspects in their partner relationship. They were ambivalent about receiving social support from friends and family members. Conclusions With the couples indicating that the support that they received from each other affected their experience during the treatment process, it is suggested that a supportive intervention that focuses on enhancing the partnership of the couples and dealing with their inflexibility on the issue of bearing a child might result in improvements in the psychological status and marital relationship of infertile couples undergoing IVF treatment. PMID:26431545

  7. Sensitivity analysis of coupled groundwater processes within a land surface model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Miller, N. L.; Kollet, S. J.

    2004-05-01

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budgets that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, models for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM2.0) and a variably-saturated groundwater model (ParFlow) have been coupled as single model, in single-column and distributed form. An initial set of single column simulations based on data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) and synthetic data demonstrate the temporal dynamics of both of the coupled models. A 15-year single-column simulation using the data from the Usadievskiy catchment in Valdai, Russia demonstrate the coupled model's ability to accurately predict the soil moisture profile and location of the water table, in addition to water and energy balance within the watershed. The distributed coupled model will also be demonstrated using a series of spatially variable subsurface parameter runs, which will be used to investigate upscaling in land-surface models. The coupled model will ultimately be used to assist

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Coupled Groundwater Processes within a Land Surface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Miller, N L; Kollet, S J

    2004-05-05

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budgets that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, models for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM2.0) and a variably-saturated groundwater model (ParFlow) have been coupled as single model, in single-column and distributed form. An initial set of single column simulations based on data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) and synthetic data demonstrate the temporal dynamics of both of the coupled models. A 15-year single-column simulation using the data from the Usadievskiy catchment in Valdai, Russia demonstrate the coupled model's ability to accurately predict the soil moisture profile and location of the water table, in addition to water and energy balance within the watershed. The distributed coupled model will also be demonstrated using a series of spatially variable subsurface parameter runs, which will be used to investigate upscaling in land-surface models. The coupled model will ultimately be used to assist

  9. Neurovascular coupling during nociceptive processing in the primary somatosensory cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey-Gauthier, Renaud; Guillemot, Jean-Paul; Piché, Mathieu

    2013-08-01

    Neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been used extensively to investigate pain-related cerebral mechanisms. However, these methods rely on a tight coupling of neuronal activity to hemodynamic changes. Because pain may be associated with hemodynamic changes unrelated to local neuronal activity (eg, increased mean arterial pressure [MAP]), it is essential to determine whether the neurovascular coupling is maintained during nociceptive processing. In this study, local field potentials (LFP) and cortical blood flow (CBF) changes evoked by electrical stimulation of the left hind paw were recorded concomitantly in the right primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in 15 rats. LFP, CBF, and MAP changes were examined in response to stimulus intensities ranging from 3 to 30 mA. In addition, LFP, CBF, and MAP changes evoked by a 10-mA stimulation were examined during immersion of the tail in non-nociceptive or nociceptive hot water (counter-stimulation). SI neurovascular coupling was altered for stimuli of nociceptive intensities (P<0.001). This alteration was intensity-dependent and was strongly associated with MAP changes (r=0.98, P<0.001). However, when the stimulus intensity was kept constant, SI neurovascular coupling was not significantly affected by nociceptive counter-stimulation (P=0.4), which similarly affected the amplitude of shock-evoked LFP and CBF changes. It remains to be determined whether such neurovascular uncoupling occurs in humans, and whether it also affects other regions usually activated by painful stimuli. These results should be taken into account for accurate interpretation of fMRI studies that involve nociceptive stimuli associated with MAP changes. PMID:23707276

  10. Surface roughening of ground fused silica processed by atmospheric inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qiang; Li, Na; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo; Li, Guo; Ding, Fei; Jin, Huiliang

    2015-06-01

    Subsurface damage (SSD) is a defect that is inevitably induced during mechanical processes, such as grinding and polishing. This defect dramatically reduces the mechanical strength and the laser damage thresholds of optical elements. Compared with traditional mechanical machining, atmospheric pressure plasma processing (APPP) is a relatively novel technology that induces almost no SSD during the processing of silica-based optical materials. In this paper, a form of APPP, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), is used to process fused silica substrates with fluorocarbon precursor under atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology evolution of ICP-processed substrates was observed and characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the roughness evolves with the etching depth, and the roughness evolution is a single-peaked curve. This curve results from the opening and the coalescing of surface cracks and fractures. The coalescence procedure of these microstructures was simulated with two common etched pits on a polished fused silica surface. Understanding the roughness evolution of plasma-processed surface might be helpful in optimizing the optical fabrication chain that contains APPP.

  11. Hydromechanical coupling in fractured rock masses: mechanisms and processes of selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Hydromechanical (HM) coupling in fractured rock play an important role when events including dam failures, landslides, surface subsidences due to water withdrawal or drainage, injection-induced earthquakes and others are analysed. Generally, hydromechanical coupling occurs when a rock mass contain interconnected pores and fractures which are filled with water and pore/fracture pressures evolves. In the on hand changes in the fluid pressure can lead to stress changes, deformations and failures of the rock mass. In the other hand rock mass stress changes and deformations can alter the hydraulic properties and fluid pressures of the rock mass. Herein well documented case studies focussing on surface subsidence due to water withdrawal, reversible deformations of large-scale valley flanks and failure as well as deformation processes of deep-seated rock slides in fractured rock masses are presented. Due to pore pressure variations HM coupling can lead to predominantly reversible rock mass deformations. Such processes can be considered by the theory of poroelasticity. Surface subsidence reaching magnitudes of few centimetres and are caused by water drainage into deep tunnels are phenomenas which can be assigned to processes of poroelasticity. Recently, particular focus was given on large tunnelling projects to monitor and predict surface subsidence in fractured rock mass in oder to avoid damage of surface structures such as dams of large reservoirs. It was found that surface subsidence due to tunnel drainage can adversely effect infrastructure when pore pressure drawdown is sufficiently large and spatially extended and differential displacements which can be amplified due to topographical effects e.g. valley closure are occurring. Reversible surface deformations were also ascertained on large mountain slopes and summits with the help of precise deformation measurements i.e. permanent GPS or episodic levelling/tacheometric methods. These reversible deformations are often

  12. Analysis of the deep rolling process on turbine blades using the FEM/BEM-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcker, V.; Klocke, F.; Wegner, H.; Timmer, A.; Grzhibovskis, R.; Rjasanow, S.

    2010-06-01

    Highly stressed components of aircraft engines, like turbine blades, have to satisfy stringent requirements regarding durability and reliability. The induction of compressive stresses and strain hardening in their surface layer has proven as a promising method to significantly increase their fatigue resistance. The required surface layer properties can be achieved by deep rolling. The determination of optimal process parameters still requires elaborate experimental set-up and subsequent time- and cost-extensive measurements. In previous works the application of the Finite Element Method (FEM) was proposed as an effective and cost reducing alternative to predict the surface layer state for given process parameters. However, FEM requires very fine mesh in the surface layer to resolve the high stress gradients with sufficient accuracy. The hereby caused high time and memory requirements render an efficient simulation of complete turbine components as impossible. In this article a solution is offered by coupling the FEM with the Boundary Elements Method (BEM). It enables the computing of large scale models at low computational cost and high result accuracy. Different approaches of the FEM/BEM-coupling for the simulation of deep rolling are examined with regard to their stability and required computing time.

  13. A General Strategy for Nanohybrids Synthesis via Coupled Competitive Reactions Controlled in a Hybrid Process

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongming; Yang, Wantai; Song, Yuanjun; Shen, Xiaomiao; Wang, Junmei; Zhong, Xiaodi; Li, Shuai; Song, Yujun

    2015-01-01

    A new methodology based on core alloying and shell gradient-doping are developed for the synthesis of nanohybrids, realized by coupled competitive reactions, or sequenced reducing-nucleation and co-precipitation reaction of mixed metal salts in a microfluidic and batch-cooling process. The latent time of nucleation and the growth of nanohybrids can be well controlled due to the formation of controllable intermediates in the coupled competitive reactions. Thus, spatiotemporal-resolved synthesis can be realized by the hybrid process, which enables us to investigate nanohybrid formation at each stage through their solution color changes and TEM images. By adjusting the bi-channel solvents and kinetic parameters of each stage, the primary components of alloyed cores and the second components of transition metal doping ZnO or Al2O3 as surface coatings can be successively formed. The core alloying and shell gradient-doping strategy can efficiently eliminate the crystal lattice mismatch in different components. Consequently, varieties of gradient core-shell nanohybrids can be synthesized using CoM, FeM, AuM, AgM (M = Zn or Al) alloys as cores and transition metal gradient-doping ZnO or Al2O3 as shells, endowing these nanohybrids with unique magnetic and optical properties (e.g., high temperature ferromagnetic property and enhanced blue emission). PMID:25818342

  14. A general strategy for nanohybrids synthesis via coupled competitive reactions controlled in a hybrid process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongming; Yang, Wantai; Song, Yuanjun; Shen, Xiaomiao; Wang, Junmei; Zhong, Xiaodi; Li, Shuai; Song, Yujun

    2015-01-01

    A new methodology based on core alloying and shell gradient-doping are developed for the synthesis of nanohybrids, realized by coupled competitive reactions, or sequenced reducing-nucleation and co-precipitation reaction of mixed metal salts in a microfluidic and batch-cooling process. The latent time of nucleation and the growth of nanohybrids can be well controlled due to the formation of controllable intermediates in the coupled competitive reactions. Thus, spatiotemporal-resolved synthesis can be realized by the hybrid process, which enables us to investigate nanohybrid formation at each stage through their solution color changes and TEM images. By adjusting the bi-channel solvents and kinetic parameters of each stage, the primary components of alloyed cores and the second components of transition metal doping ZnO or Al2O3 as surface coatings can be successively formed. The core alloying and shell gradient-doping strategy can efficiently eliminate the crystal lattice mismatch in different components. Consequently, varieties of gradient core-shell nanohybrids can be synthesized using CoM, FeM, AuM, AgM (M = Zn or Al) alloys as cores and transition metal gradient-doping ZnO or Al2O3 as shells, endowing these nanohybrids with unique magnetic and optical properties (e.g., high temperature ferromagnetic property and enhanced blue emission). PMID:25818342

  15. Coupled analysis on landscape pattern and hydrological processes in Yanhe watershed of China.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Zhou, Z X

    2015-02-01

    As a typical experimental Soil and Water Conservation District, Yanhe watershed has long been plagued by soil erosion due to severe human disturbances. Exerting remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) technology, this paper firstly analyzed and simulated ecological hydrological process in Yanhe watershed based on SWAT model, constructed a comprehensive landscape indices which was closely related to soil erosion, and reflected the coupling relationship between regional landscape pattern change and soil erosion. The results are as follows: (1) Areas of different land use types remained relatively stable from 1990 to 2000 and then changed drastically from 2000 to 2010, which was characterized by lawn expansion and cultivated land shrinkage. (2) In terms of the spatial heterogeneity of hydrological response unit (HRUs), the correlation coefficient of seven selected landscape indices and runoff was very small, and cannot pass all significant testing. But correlation between the indices and sediment yield except for Total Core Area (TCA) and Interspersion and Juxtaposition Index (IJI) was remarkable. (3) According to 'the source-sink' theory of soil erosion, new landscape index-slope-HRU landscape index (SHLI) was built, and reflected the relationship between landscape pattern and soil erosion processes to a certain extent. (4) Coupling relationship between SHLI in 2010 and annual sediment was very prominent. In the sub-basin scale, SHLI has obvious regional differentiation from annual sediment. PMID:25461094

  16. Micro-Macro Coupling in Plasma Self-Organization Processes during Island Coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Weigang; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2008-01-25

    The collisionless island coalescence process is studied with particle-in-cell simulations, as an internal-driven magnetic self-organization scenario. The macroscopic relaxation time, corresponding to the total time required for the coalescence to complete, is found to depend crucially on the scale of the system. For small-scale systems, where the macroscopic scales and the dissipation scales are more tightly coupled, the relaxation time is independent of the strength of the internal driving force: the small-scale processes of magnetic reconnection adjust to the amount of the initial magnetic flux to be reconnected, indicating that at the microscopic scales reconnection is enslaved by the macroscopic drive. However, for large-scale systems, where the micro-macro scale separation is larger, the relaxation time becomes dependent on the driving force.

  17. Penrose process in a charged axion-dilaton coupled black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Chandrima; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-04-01

    Using the Newman-Janis method to construct the axion-dilaton coupled charged rotating black holes, we show that the energy extraction from such black holes via the Penrose process takes place from the axion/Kalb-Ramond field energy responsible for rendering the angular momentum to the black hole. Determining the explicit form for the Kalb-Ramond field strength, which is argued to be equivalent to spacetime torsion, we demonstrate that at the end of the energy extraction process, the spacetime becomes torsion free with a spherically symmetric non-rotating black hole remnant. In this context, applications to physical phenomena, such as the emission of neutral particles in astrophysical jets, are also discussed. It is seen that the infalling matter gains energy from the rotation of the black hole, or equivalently from the axion field, and that it is ejected as a highly collimated astrophysical jet.

  18. Numerical simulation of fine blanking process using fully coupled advanced constitutive equations with ductile damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.; Benafia, S.; Galmiche, J.; Sulaiman, H.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the modelling and adaptive numerical simulation of the fine blanking process. Thermodynamically-consistent constitutive equations, strongly coupled with ductile damage, together with specific boundary conditions (particular command of forces on blank holder and counterpunch) are presented. This model is implemented into ABAQUS/EXPLICIT using the Vumat user subroutine and connected with an adaptive 2D remeshing procedure. The different material parameters are identified for the steel S600MC using experimental tensile tests conducted until the final fracture. A parametric study aiming to examine the sensitivity of the process parameters (die radius, clearance die/punch) to the punch force and fracture surfaces topology (convex zone, sheared zone, fracture zone and the burr).

  19. Lattice Boltzmann technique for heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahem, A. M.; El-Amin, M. F.; Mohammadein, A. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process are studied by using the enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The proposed model is a modified version of thermal LB model, where could avoid iteration steps and ensures high accuracy. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with a D1Q2 lattice was used to determine the temperature field for one-dimensional melting by conduction and multi-distribution functions (MDF) with D2Q9 lattice was used to determine the density, velocity and temperature fields for two-dimensional melting by natural convection. Different boundary conditions including Dirichlet, adiabatic and bounce-back boundary conditions were used. The influence of increasing Rayleigh number (from 103 to 105) on temperature distribution and melting process is studied. The obtained results show that a good agreement with the analytical solution for melting by conduction case and with the benchmark solution for melting by convection.

  20. Plasma surface kinetics studies of silicon dioxide etch process in inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Yu, Dong-Hun; Cho, Deog-Gyun; Yook, Yeong-Geun; Chun, Poo-Reum; Lee, Se-Ah; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Im, Yeon-Ho

    2013-09-01

    With continuous decrease of nanoscale design rule, plasma etching processes to form high aspect ratio contact hole still remains a challenge to overcome their inherent drawbacks such as bowing and twisted feature. Due to their complexities there still exist big gaps between current research status and predictable modeling of this process. To address this issue, we proposed a surface kinetic model of silicon nitride etch process under inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas. For this work, the cut-off probe and quadrapole mass spectroscopy were used for measuring electrical plasma properties, the ion and neutral radical species. Furthermore, the systematic surface analysis was performed to investigate the thickness and chemical bonding of polymer passivation layer during the etch process. The proposed semi-global surface kinetic model can consider deposition of polymer passivation layer and silicon nitride etching self-consistently. The predicted modeling results showed good agreement with experimental data. We believe that our research will provide valuable information to avoid the empirical development of plasma etching process.

  1. Modeling the coupled mechanics, transport, and growth processes in collagen tissues.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdych, David J.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Klein, Patrick A.; in't Veld, Pieter J.; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop tools to model and simulate the processes of self-assembly and growth in biological systems from the molecular to the continuum length scales. The model biological system chosen for the study is the tendon fiber which is composed mainly of Type I collagen fibrils. The macroscopic processes of self-assembly and growth at the fiber scale arise from microscopic processes at the fibrillar and molecular length scales. At these nano-scopic length scales, we employed molecular modeling and simulation method to characterize the mechanical behavior and stability of the collagen triple helix and the collagen fibril. To obtain the physical parameters governing mass transport in the tendon fiber we performed direct numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport through an idealized fibrillar microstructure. At the continuum scale, we developed a mixture theory approach for modeling the coupled processes of mechanical deformation, transport, and species inter-conversion involved in growth. In the mixture theory approach, the microstructure of the tissue is represented by the species concentration and transport and material parameters, obtained from fibril and molecular scale calculations, while the mechanical deformation, transport, and growth processes are governed by balance laws and constitutive relations developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework.

  2. Report of the second meeting of the consultants on coupled processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Mangold, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    The second meeting of the Consultants on Coupled Processes Associated with Geological Disposal of Nuclear Waste occurred on January 15-16, 1985 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). All the consultants were present except Dr. K. Kovari, who presented comments in writing afterward. This report contains a brief summary of the presentations and discussions from the meeting. The main points of the speakers' topics are briefly summarized in the report. Some points that emerged during the discussions of the presentations are included in the text related to the respective talks. These comments are grouped under the headings: Comments on Coupled Processes in Unsaturated Fractured Porous Media, Comments on Overview of Coupled Processes, Presentations by Consultants on Selected Topics of Current Interest in Coupled Processes, and Recommendations for Underground Field Tests with Applications to Three Geologic Environments.

  3. Relevance of the time-quasi-polynomials in the classic linear thermodynamic theory of coupled transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, Cs.; Kirschner, I.; Bálint, Á.

    2014-07-01

    A general description of the basic system of ordinary differential equations of coupled transport processes is given within framework of a linear approximation and treated by tools of matrix analysis and group representation theory. It is shown that the technique of hyperdyads directly generalizes the method of simple dyadic decomposition of operators used earlier in the classical linear irreversible thermodynamics and leads to possible new applications of the concept of quasi-polynomials at descriptions of coupled transport processes.

  4. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiundar; Atlas, Robert; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur; Lin, Xin

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA Satellite and field campaign cloud related data sets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. Also we have implemented a Land Information System (LIS that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models into the MMF. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM) This modeling system has been applied and tested its performance for two different climate scenarios, El Nino (1998) and La Nina (1999). The coupled new modeling system produced more realistic propagation and intensity of tropical rainfall systems and intraseasonal oscillations, and diurnal variation of precipitation that are very difficult to forecast using even the state-of-the-art GCMs. In this talk I will present: (1) a brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (both Microphysical and land processes) and (2) The Goddard MMF and the Major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF) and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs).

  5. Soil remediation using a coupled process: soil washing with surfactant followed by photo-Fenton oxidation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Ricardo D; Trovó, Alam G; Nogueira, Raquel F Pupo

    2010-02-15

    In the present work the use of a coupled process, soil washing and photo-Fenton oxidation, was investigated for remediation of a soil contaminated with p,p'-DDT (DDT) and p,p'-DDE (DDE), and a soil artificially contaminated with diesel. In the soil washing experiments, Triton X-100 (TX-100) aqueous solutions were used at different concentrations to obtain wastewaters with different compositions. Removal efficiencies of 66% (DDT), 80% (DDE) and 100% (diesel) were achieved for three sequential washings using a TX-100 solution strength equivalent to 12 times the effective critical micelle concentration of the surfactant (12 CMC(eff)). The wastewater obtained was then treated using a solar photo-Fenton process. After 6h irradiation, 99, 95 and 100% degradation efficiencies were achieved for DDT, DDE and diesel, respectively. In all experiments, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon decreased by at least 95%, indicating that residual concentration of contaminants and/or TX-100 in the wastewater was very low. The co-extraction of metals was also evaluated. Among the metals analyzed (Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Mn and Co), only Cr and Mn were detected in the wastewater at concentrations above the maximum value permitted by current Brazilian legislation. The effective removal of contaminants from soil by the TX-100 washing process, together with the high degradation efficiency of the solar photo-Fenton process, suggests that this procedure could be a useful option for soil remediation. PMID:19853992

  6. Etch Process Sensitivity To An Inductively Coupled Plasma Etcher Treated With Fluorine-Based Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Songlin; Sun, Zhiwen; Qian, Xueyu; Yin, Gerald

    1997-10-01

    Significant etch rate drop after the treatment of an etch chamber with Fluorine-based plasma has been found for some silicon etch processes on an inductively coupled plasma reactor, which might cause problems in IC production line once the etch chamber runs alternative processes with F-based and F-free chemistry, or needs frequent cleaning with F-plasma. In this work, a systematic study of the root cause of process sensitivity to the etch chamber treated with F-plasma has been conducted. The experimental results show that pressure is a key factor to affect the etch rate drop. Processes at high pressure are more sensitive than those at low pressure because the quenching of neutral reactive species becomes more severe after the F-treatment. O2 addition also increases the etch rate sensitivity, basically due to higher O2(subscript: )concentration after F-treatment which enhances the oxidation of silicon. The EDX and XPS elemental analysis of the chamber interior wall reveals a significant composition change after the interaction with F-plasma, the altered surface might accelerate the recombination of free radical species.

  7. A coupled Bio-EF process for mineralization of the pharmaceuticals furosemide and ranitidine: Feasibility assessment.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Oturan, Nihal; Buisson, Didier; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-07-01

    A coupled Bio-EF treatment has been applied as a reliable process for the degradation of the pharmaceuticals furosemide (FRSM) and ranitidine (RNTD) in aqueous medium, in order to reduce the high energy consumption related to electrochemical technology. In the first stage of this study, electrochemical degradation of the drugs was assessed by the electro-Fenton process (EF) using a BDD/carbon-felt cell. Biodegradability of the drugs solutions was enhanced reaching BOD5/COD ratios close to the biodegradability threshold of 0.4, evidencing the formation of bio-compatible by-products (mainly short-chain carboxylic acids) which are suitable for biological post-treatment. Moreover, toxicity evaluation by the Microtox(®) method revealed that EF pre-treatment was able of detoxifying both, FRSM and RNTD solutions, constituting another indicator of biodegradability of EF treated solutions. In the second stage, electrolyzed solutions were treated by means of an aerobic biological process. A significant part of the short-chain carboxylic acids formed during the electrochemical phase was satisfactorily removed by the used selected microorganisms. The results obtained demonstrate the efficiency and feasibility of the integrated Bio-EF process. PMID:27155476

  8. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  9. Vertically Integrated Models for CO2 Storage with Coupled Thermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, S. E.; Gray, W. G.; Dahle, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 storage involves coupled processes that affect the migration and ultimate fate of injected CO2 over multiple length and time scales. Coupled thermal and mechanical processes may have implications for storage security, including thermally induced fracturing and loss of caprock integrity near the wellbore. This may occur when CO2 is injected at a different temperature from reservoir conditions, e.g. Snøhvit injection, potentially leading to large temperature, density and volume changes over space and time. In addition, thermally induced density changes impact plume buoyancy that may affect large-scale migration patterns in gravity-driven systems, e.g. Sleipner injection. This interaction becomes particularly important near the critical point. Therefore, thermal processes should be considered in order to correctly capture plume migration within the reservoir. A practical modeling approach for CO2 storage at the field scale is the vertical-equilibrium (VE) model, which solves partially integrated conservation equations for flow in two lateral dimensions. This class of models is well suited for strongly segregated flows. We extend the classical VE model to nonisothermal systems by integrating the heat transport equations, focusing on thermal processes that most impact the CO2 plume. The model allows for heating/cooling of the CO2 plume through heat exchange with the surrounding environment. The upscaling procedure assumes vertically constant temperature across the plume thickness for relatively thin plumes. Conduction across the plume boundaries, into the caprock above and brine below, is modeled by an analytical heat transfer function. As a starting point, we investigate the validity of the simplifying assumptions and heat transfer boundary conditions for relatively simple systems. We find that the upscaled model compares well for systems where heat advection in the plume is the dominant heat transport mechanism. For high CO2 flux, improvements to the model can be

  10. Coupled sulfur isotopic and chemical mass transfer modeling: Approach and application to dynamic hydrothermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1988-09-21

    A computational modeling code (EQPSreverse arrowS) has been developed to examine sulfur isotopic distribution pathways coupled with calculations of chemical mass transfer pathways. A post processor approach to EQ6 calculations was chosen so that a variety of isotopic pathways could be examined for each reaction pathway. Two types of major bounding conditions were implemented: (1) equilibrium isotopic exchange between sulfate and sulfide species or exchange only accompanying chemical reduction and oxidation events, and (2) existence or lack of isotopic exchange between solution species and precipitated minerals, parallel to the open and closed chemical system formulations of chemical mass transfer modeling codes. All of the chemical data necessary to explicitly calculate isotopic distribution pathways is generated by most mass transfer modeling codes and can be input to the EQPS code. Routines are built in to directly handle EQ6 tabular files. Chemical reaction models of seafloor hydrothermal vent processes and accompanying sulfur isotopic distribution pathways illustrate the capabilities of coupling EQPSreverse arrowS with EQ6 calculations, including the extent of differences that can exist due to the isotopic bounding condition assumptions described above. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Fiber coupling of high-power diode laser stack for direct polycarbonate processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Azkorbebeitia, U.; Mendez, E.; Viera, G.; Galán, M.; Otaduy, D.

    2010-02-01

    We present a novel optical system for fiber coupling of a commercial high power diode laser stack and the application of this laser system to transmission welding of engineering thermoplastics. The diode laser stack is made up of two 20% fill factor bars, emitting at 808 nm and with a total maximum output power of 120W CW. The stack was collimated using FSAC micro-optics lenses in the fast and slow axis, with a full angle divergence of <4mrad and <25mrad respectively. The optical design and simulations were carried out using ZEMAX®. Based on the design we built an optical set up, which is divided in two subsystems. The first one collimates the laser beam in order to achieve the best focus and couple it into the 400μm core fiber with NA0.22 and 70% efficiency. The second subsystem is designed for beam conformation after the fiber output, using collimation and beam shaping to have a Gaussian beam profile on the work piece. The laser system was applied to study the welding of polycarbonate plastics, based on the effects of selected welding parameters on the seam geometry and surface integrity. The quality of the spot welding has been analyzed obtaining welded seams with a mean diameter about 500-600μm, preserving the good technological properties of the thermoplastic considered in this work. The results show that we have successfully developed a novel laser system which is highly efficient for thermoplastics processing.

  12. “The Best is Always Yet to Come”: Relationship Stages and Processes Among Young LGBT Couples

    PubMed Central

    Macapagal, Kathryn; Greene, George J.; Rivera, Zenaida A.; Mustanski, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Limited research has examined relationship development among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) couples in emerging adulthood. A better understanding of LGBT couples can inform the development of relationship education programs that reflect their unique needs. The following questions guided this study: 1) what are the stages and processes during young LGBT couples’ relationship development? and 2) how do these compare to existing literature on heterosexual adults? A secondary goal was to explore similarities and differences between couples assigned male (MAAB) and female at birth (FAAB). Thirty-six couples completed interviews on their relationship history. Qualitative analyses showed that relationship stages and processes were similar to past research on heterosexuals, but participants’ subjective experiences reflected their LGBT identities and emerging adulthood, which exerted additional stress on the relationship. These factors also affected milestones indicative of commitment among heterosexual adults (e.g., introducing partner to family). Mixed-methods analyses indicated that MAAB couples described negotiating relationship agreements and safe sex in more depth than FAAB couples. Relationship development models warrant modifications to consider the impact of sexual and gender identity and emerging adulthood when applied to young LGBT couples. These factors should be addressed in interventions to promote relationship health among young LGBT couples. PMID:26053345

  13. Localization in covariance matrices of coupled heterogenous Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    We define a random-matrix ensemble given by the infinite-time covariance matrices of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes at different temperatures coupled by a Gaussian symmetric matrix. The spectral properties of this ensemble are shown to be in qualitative agreement with some stylized facts of financial markets. Through the presented model formulas are given for the analysis of heterogeneous time series. Furthermore evidence for a localization transition in eigenvectors related to small and large eigenvalues in cross-correlations analysis of this model is found, and a simple explanation of localization phenomena in financial time series is provided. Finally we identify both in our model and in real financial data an inverted-bell effect in correlation between localized components and their local temperature: high- and low-temperature components are the most localized ones.

  14. MI Coupling Processes in the Regions of Diffuse Aurora: Ionospheric Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Glocer, Alex; Sibeck, David

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation of high-energy magnetospheric electrons in the diffuse aurora contributes significant energy flux into the Earth's ionosphere. In the diffuse aurora, precipitating electrons initially injected from the plasma sheet via wave-particle interaction processes degrade in the atmosphere toward lower energies and produce secondary electrons via impact ionization of the neutral atmosphere. These initially precipitating electrons of magnetospheric origin can be additionally reflected back into the magnetosphere, leading to a series of multiple reflections that can greatly influence the initially precipitating flux at the upper ionospheric boundary, the resultant population of secondary electrons, and electrons cascading toward lower energies. It is found that magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is the key element in the formation of electron distribution function in the regions of diffuse aurora at ionospheric altitudes.

  15. In situ vitrification: Numerical studies of coupled heat transfer and viscous flow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Graham F.; MacKinnon, Robert J.; Murray, Paul E.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the formulation, results and conclusions of a series of numerical studies performed to support the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) In Situ Vitrification (ISV) treatability study. These studies were designed to explore some of the questions related to the dominant physical phenomena associated with the coupled electric field, heat transfer, and fluid flow processes. The work examines the case of a 3-D axisymmetric problem with a central electrode. Such issues as the form of an electric heating model, choice of boundary conditions, latent heat effects, and conductive and convective transport are considered. Some important conclusions and recommendations are made in relation to the convective effects, determination of property parameters, and the issue of a valid electrical heating model.

  16. In situ vitrification: Numerical studies of coupled heat transfer and viscous flow processes

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, G.F.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the formulation, results and conclusions of a series of numerical studies performed to support the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) In Situ Vitrification (ISV) treatability study. These studies were designed to explore some of the questions related to the dominant physical phenomena associated with the coupled electric field, heat transfer, and fluid flow processes. The work examines the case of a 3-D axisymmetric problem with a central electrode. Such issues as the form of an electric heating model, choice of boundary conditions, latent heat effects, and conductive and convective transport are considered. Some important conclusions and recommendations are made in relation to the convective effects, determination of property parameters, and the issue of a valid electrical heating model. 4 refs., 100 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Multi-scale Characterization and Prediction of Coupled Subsurface Biogeochemical-Hydrological Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Ken; Steefel, Carl; Banfield, Jill; Long, Phil; Slater, Lee; Pride, Steve; Jinsong Chen

    2006-06-01

    To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our previous laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled and homogeneous conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation. Examples include tracking the onset and aggregation of precipitates associated with sulfate reduction using seismic and complex resistivity methods (Williams et al., 2005; Ntarlagiannis et al., 2005) as well as estimating the volume of evolved gas associated with denitrification using radar velocity. These exciting studies illustrated that geophysical responses correlated with biogeochemical changes, but also that multiple factors could impact the geophysical signature and thus a better understanding as well as integration tools were needed to advance the techniques to the point where they can be used to provide quantitative estimates of system transformations.

  18. A protonation-coupled feedback mechanism controls the signalling process in bathy phytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Piwowarski, Patrick; Salewski, Johannes; Michael, Norbert; Fernandez Lopez, Maria; Rupp, Anna; Muhammad Qureshi, Bilal; Scheerer, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Siebert, Friedrich; Andrea Mroginski, Maria; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Phytochromes are bimodal photoswitches composed of a photosensor and an output module. Photoactivation of the sensor is initiated by a double bond isomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore and eventually leads to protein conformational changes. Recently determined structural models of phytochromes identify differences between the inactive and the signalling state but do not reveal the mechanism of photosensor activation or deactivation. Here, we report a vibrational spectroscopic study on bathy phytochromes that demonstrates that the formation of the photoactivated state and thus (de)activation of the output module is based on proton translocations in the chromophore pocket coupling chromophore and protein structural changes. These proton transfer steps, involving the tetrapyrrole and a nearby histidine, also enable thermal back-isomerization of the chromophore via keto-enol tautomerization to afford the initial dark state. Thus, the same proton re-arrangements inducing the (de)activation of the output module simultaneously initiate the reversal of this process, corresponding to a negative feedback mechanism.

  19. MODELING COUPLED PROCESSES OF MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wu; S. Mukhopadhyay; K. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-02-28

    A mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is developed for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. The TH model, consisting of three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the unsaturated zone, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, and thermal loading scenario under estimated current and future climate conditions. More specifically, the TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the most updated, best-estimated input parameters. This mountain-scale TH model simulates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale multiphase fluid flow, and evaluates the impact of radioactive waste heat on the hydrogeological system, including thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. For a better description of the ambient geothermal condition of the unsaturated zone system, the TH model is first calibrated against measured borehole temperature data. The ambient temperature calibration provides the necessary surface and water table boundary as well as initial conditions. Then, the TH model is used to obtain scientific understanding of TH processes in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone under the designed schedule of repository thermal load.

  20. Coupled diffusion processes and 2D affinities of adhesion molecules at synthetic membrane junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Christopher; Choudhuri, Kaushik; Schmid, Eva M.; Bakalar, Matthew H.; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Journot, Celine; Turberfield, Andrew; Wallace, Mark; Dustin, Michael

    A more complete understanding of the physically intrinsic mechanisms underlying protein mobility at cellular interfaces will provide additional insights into processes driving adhesion and organization in signalling junctions such as the immunological synapse. We observed diffusional slowing of structurally diverse binding proteins at synthetic interfaces formed by giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) that shows size dependence not accounted for by existing models. To model the effects of size and intermembrane spacing on interfacial reaction-diffusion processes, we describe a multistate diffusion model incorporating entropic effects of constrained binding. This can be merged with hydrodynamic theories of receptor-ligand diffusion and coupling to thermal membrane roughness. A novel synthetic membrane adhesion assay based on reversible and irreversible DNA-mediated interactions between GUVs and SLBs is used to precisely vary length, affinity, and flexibility, and also provides a platform to examine these effects on the dynamics of processes such as size-based segregation of binding and non-binding species.

  1. An EGSB-SBR based process for coupling methanogenesis and shortcut nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cui; Zhang, Daijun; He, Qiang; Lu, Peili; Ai, Hainan

    2013-01-01

    An integrated process consisting of an anaerobic/anoxic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor and an aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was developed by a mode of sequencing batch operation, in which methanogenesis, denitrification and anammox were coupled in EGSB with methanogenesis first, then denitrification and anammox simultaneously, and partial nitrification occurred in SBR for providing nitrite to EGSB. This process extended the application of the anammox process to the treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium. When the volumetric exchange ratio between EGSB and SBR was controlled at 57% with the influent pH at 6-8, 74.38-83.65% of NH(4)(+)-N, 72.68-83.12% of total nitrogen (TN) and 88.34-98.86% of COD were removed in a range of 200-4,500 mg/L COD and 40-90 mg/L NH(4)(+)-N respectively. TN removal by anammox and shortcut denitrification was 26.35-58.64 and 0-32.80% of the removed nitrogen, respectively. The results showed that the contribution of anammox gradually decreased with an increase in the C/N ratio of influent, whereas the reverse was true for shortcut denitrification. The COD removal by methanogenesis was 70.89-98.79% of the removed COD, and increased with increasing C/N ratio. PMID:24135114

  2. Influence of coupling of sorption and photosynthetic processes on trace element cycles in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical and biological processes have important roles in the transport and cycling of trace elements in natural waters, but their complex interactions are often not well understood. Trace-element concentrations may, for example, be controlled by adsorption-desorption reactions at mineral surfaces, with the equilibrium strongly influenced by pH. Variations in pH due to photosynthetic activity should result in concentration fluctuations as the adsorption-desorption equilibrium shifts with pH. To investigate these interactions, we have studied the effect of diurnal cycling of pH on dissolved arsenate in a perennial stream contaminated with arsenic. As expected, a diurnal cycle in arsenate concentration was observed, but surprisingly, the arsenate cycle lags several hours behind the pH cycle. Laboratory experiments show that the lag results from a slow approach to sorption equilibrium. Our observations demonstrate that the coupling of photosynthesis and sorption processes may have an important influence on the cycling of many trace elements and emphasize the importance of understanding sorption kinetics in modelling these processes.

  3. Structural factors controlling inter-plate coupling and earthquake rupture process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.

    2007-05-01

    Recent availability of a large number of ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs), a large volume of air-gun array and a long streamer cable for academics provide several new findings of lithospheric scale structures in subduction seismogenic zones. JAMSTEC has acquired long-offset seismic data using a super-densely deploy OBS (i.e. 1 - 5 km spacing OBSs along 100 - 500 km long profiles) in the Nankai seismogeinc zone, SW. Japan, since 1999. Long-offset multichannel seismic (MCS) data by a two-ship experiment, as well as conventional 2D MCS data, have been also acquired at a part of the profiles. Some of those profiles have been designed as combined onshore - offshore profiles for imaging a land-ocean transition zone. One of the most striking findings is an image of several scales of subducted seamounts/ridges in the Nankai trough seismogenic zone. We detected the subducted seamount/ridges, which are 50 - 100 km wide, distributing from near trough axis to ~ 40 km deep beneath the Japanese island. From a point of seismogenic process, an important aspect is that those structures are strongly correlated with slip zones of magnitude 8-class earthquakes, i.e.; subducted seamounts/ridge control the rupture propagations. Moreover, the most recent seismic study crossing the segmentation boundary between M=8 class earthquakes detected a high seismic velocity body forming a strongly coupled patch at the segmentation boundary. The numerical simulation incorporating all those structures explained the historic rupture patterns, and shows the occurrence of a giant earthquake along the entire Nankai trough, a distance of over 600 km long (Mw=8.7). The growth processes of a rupture revealed from the simulation are; 1) prior to the giant earthquake, a small slow event (or earthquake) occurs near the segmentation boundary, 2) this accelerates a very slow slip (slower than the plate convergent rate), at the strong patch, which reduces a degree of coupling, 3) then a rupture easily propagates

  4. Advanced low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio wastewater treatment by electrochemical and biological coupling process.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Shanbin; Xing, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen pollution in ground and surface water significantly affects the environment and its organisms, thereby leading to an increasingly serious environmental problem. Such pollution is difficult to degrade because of the lack of carbon sources. Therefore, an electrochemical and biological coupling process (EBCP) was developed with a composite catalytic biological carrier (CCBC) and applied in a pilot-scale cylindrical reactor to treat wastewater with a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 2. The startup process, coupling principle, and dynamic feature of the EBCP were examined along with the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), dissolved oxygen (DO), and initial pH on nitrogen removal. A stable coupling system was obtained after 51 days when plenty of biofilms were cultivated on the CCBC without inoculation sludge. Autotrophic denitrification, with [Fe(2+)] and [H] produced by iron-carbon galvanic cells in CCBC as electron donors, was confirmed by equity calculation of CODCr and nitrogen removal. Nitrogen removal efficiency was significantly influenced by HRT, DO, and initial pH with optimal values of 3.5 h, 3.5 ± 0.1 mg L(-1), and 7.5 ± 0.1, respectively. The ammonia, nitrate, and total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies of 90.1 to 95.3 %, 90.5 to 99.0 %, and 90.3 to 96.5 % were maintained with corresponding initial concentrations of 40 ± 2 mg L(-1) (NH3-N load of 0.27 ± 0.01 kg NH3-N m(-3) d(-1)), 20 ± 1 mg L(-1), and 60 ± 2 mg L(-1) (TN load of 0.41 ± 0.02 kg TN m(-3) d(-1)). Based on the Eckenfelder model, the kinetics equation of the nitrogen transformation along the reactor was N e  = N 0 exp (-0.04368 h/L(1.8438)). Hence, EBCP is a viable method for advanced low C/N ratio wastewater treatment. PMID:26564190

  5. Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment: Quantification and prediction of coupled processes in the terrestrial Arctic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Hinzman, L. D.; Graham, D. E.; Liang, L.; Norby, R.; Riley, W. J.; Rogers, A.; Rowland, J. C.; Thornton, P. E.; Torn, M. S.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.; NGEE Scientific Team

    2011-12-01

    Predicting the evolution of Arctic ecosystems to a changing climate is complicated by the many interactions and feedbacks that occur within and between components of the system. A new DOE Biological and Environmental Research project, called the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) is being initiated to address "how does permafrost degradation in a warming Arctic, and the associated changes in landscape evolution, hydrology, soil biogeochemical processes, and plant community succession, affect feedbacks to the climate system?". A multi-disciplinary team will use observations, experiments, and simulations carried out from the pore to the landscape scales to address these questions. We will combine field research (performed around thermokarst features in Alaska on the North Slope and Seward Peninsula), laboratory research using a variety of approaches and techniques, and remote sensing observations to improve modeling capabilities for high-latitude systems. Our research is organized into four interrelated 'Challenges' to quantify: (1) environmental controls on permafrost degradation and its influence on hydrological state, stocks, fluxes and pathways; (2) mechanisms that drive structural and functional responses of the tundra plant community to changing resource availability; (3) controls, mechanisms and rates driving biodegradation of soil organic matter; and (4) the impact of permafrost degradation on ecosystem albedo, energy partitioning and total climate forcing. Coordinated data acquisition will be performed using a variety of commonly-used terrestrial ecosystem characterization approaches as well as novel molecular microbiological, geophysical, isotopic and synchrotron techniques. These datasets will be used in parallel with models to identify the key controls on coupled geomechanical, hydrological, soil biogeochemical, vegetation and land-surface processes, as well as the manifestation of these coupled processes over a broad range of space and time

  6. Two-dimensional spectroscopy: An approach to distinguish Förster and Dexter transfer processes in coupled nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, Judith F.; Knorr, Andreas; Richter, Marten

    2015-04-01

    The linear and two-dimensional coherent optical spectra of Coulomb-coupled quantum emitters are discussed with respect to the underlying coupling processes. We present a theoretical analysis of the two different resonance energy transfer mechanisms between coupled nanostructures: Förster and Dexter interaction. Our investigation shows that the features visible in optical spectra of coupled quantum dots can be traced back to the nature of the underlying coupling mechanism (Förster or Dexter). Therefore, we discuss how the excitation transfer pathways can be controlled by choosing particular laser polarizations and mutual orientations of the quantum emitters in coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy. In this context, we analyze to what extent the delocalized double-excitonic states are bound to the optical selection rules of the uncoupled system.

  7. Control of coupling mass balance error in a process-based numerical model of surface-subsurface flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Marcello; Orlandini, Stefano; Paniconi, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    A process-based numerical model of integrated surface-subsurface flow is analyzed in order to identify, track, and reduce the mass balance errors affiliated with the model's coupling scheme. The sources of coupling error include a surface-subsurface grid interface that requires node-to-cell and cell-to-node interpolation of exchange fluxes and ponding heads, and a sequential iterative time matching procedure that includes a time lag in these same exchange terms. Based on numerical experiments carried out for two synthetic test cases and for a complex drainage basin in northern Italy, it is shown that the coupling mass balance error increases during the flood recession limb when the rate of change in the fluxes exchanged between the surface and subsurface is highest. A dimensionless index that quantifies the degree of coupling and a saturated area index are introduced to monitor the sensitivity of the model to coupling error. Error reduction is achieved through improvements to the heuristic procedure used to control and adapt the time step interval and to the interpolation algorithm used to pass exchange variables from nodes to cells. The analysis presented illustrates the trade-offs between a flexible description of surface and subsurface flow processes and the numerical errors inherent in sequential iterative coupling with staggered nodal points at the land surface interface, and it reveals mitigation strategies that are applicable to all integrated models sharing this coupling and discretization approach.

  8. Urban street canyons: Coupling dynamics, chemistry and within-canyon chemical processing of emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Vivien Bianca; Bloss, William James; Cai, Xiaoming

    2013-04-01

    Street canyons, formed by rows of buildings in urban environments, are associated with high levels of atmospheric pollutants emitted primarily from vehicles, and substantial human exposure. The street canyon forms a semi-enclosed environment, within which emissions may be entrained in a re-circulatory system; chemical processing of emitted compounds alters the composition of the air vented to the overlying boundary layer, compared with the primary emissions. As the prevailing atmospheric chemistry is highly non-linear, and the canyon mixing and predominant chemical reaction timescales are comparable, the combined impacts of dynamics and chemistry must be considered to quantify these effects. Here we report a model study of the coupled impacts of dynamical and chemical processing upon the atmospheric composition in a street canyon environment, to assess the impacts upon air pollutant levels within the canyon, and to quantify the extent to which within-canyon chemical processing alters the composition of canyon outflow, in comparison to the primary emissions within the canyon. A new model for the simulation of street canyon atmospheric chemical processing has been developed, by integrating an existing Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) dynamical model of canyon atmospheric motion with a detailed chemical reaction mechanism, a Reduced Chemical Scheme (RCS) comprising 51 chemical species and 136 reactions, based upon a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). The combined LES-RCS model is used to investigate the combined effects of mixing and chemical processing upon air quality within an idealised street canyon. The effect of the combination of dynamical (segregation) and chemical effects is determined by comparing the outputs of the full LES-RCS canyon model with those obtained when representing the canyon as a zero-dimensional box model (i.e. assuming mixing is complete and instantaneous). The LES-RCS approach predicts lower (canyon-averaged) levels of NOx, OH and HO

  9. Experimental and Computational Studies of Coupled Geomechanical and Hydrologic Processes in Wellbore Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Mori, H.; Porter, M. L.; Lewis, K. C.; Kelkar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Potential leakage from wells is an important issue in the protection of groundwater resources, CO2 sequestration, and hydraulic fracturing. The first defense in all of these applications is a properly constructed well with adequate Portland cement that effectively isolates the subsurface. The chief threat for such wells is mechanical disruption of the cement, cement/steel, or cement/caprock interfaces. This can occur through wellbore operations that pressurize/depressurize the steel tubing or create temperature transients (e.g., injection, production, hydraulic fracturing, and mechanical testing) as well as reservoir-scale stresses (e.g., filling or depletion of the reservoir) and tectonic stresses (e.g., the mobility of salt). However, there is relatively limited information available on the hydrologic consequences of such processes. Toward this end, we discuss recent experiments and computational models of coupled geomechanical and hydrologic processes in wellbore systems. Triaxial coreflood experiments with tomography were conducted on synthetic wellbore systems including cement-steel, rock-cement and rock-cement-steel composites. The aim of the experiments was to induce stresses through application of axial loads in order to create defects within the cement or at the cement/steel or cement/rock interface. High injection fluid pressures (supercritical CO2 × brine) were applied to the base of the initially impermeable composites. Mechanical failure resulted in creation of permeability, which was measured as a function of time (allowing for the possibility of Portland cement to deform and modify permeability). In addition, fracture patterns were characterized using x-ray tomography. We used the computer code FEHM to study coupled hydrologic and mechanical processes in the near-wellbore environment. The wellbore model was developed as a wedge within a radially symmetric 3D volume. The grid elements consist of the steel casing, the casing-cement interface, the

  10. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    SciTech Connect

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus

  11. Coupled finite element-Monte Carlo simulation of microstructure and texture evolution during thermomechanical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Sarma, G.; Zacharia, T.

    1998-11-01

    A novel simulation technique for predicting the microstructure and texture evolution during thermomechanical processing is presented. The technique involves coupling a finite element microstructural deformation model based on crystal plasticity with a Monte Carlo simulation of recovery and recrystallization. The finite element model captures the stored energy and the crystallographic orientation distributions in the deformed microstructure. The Monte Carlo simulation captures the microstructural evolution associated with recovery and recrystallization. A unique feature of the Monte Carlo simulation is that it treats recrystallization as a heterogeneous subgrain growth process, thus providing the natural link between nucleation and growth phenomena, and quantifying the role of recovery in these phenomena. Different nucleation mechanisms based on heterogeneous subgrain growth as well as strain induced boundary migration are automatically included in the recrystallization simulation. The simulations are shown to account for the extent of prior deformation on the microstructure and kinetics of recrystallization during subsequent annealing. The simulations also capture the influence of the presence of cube orientations in the initial microstructure, and the operation of non-octahedral slip during deformation of fcc polycrystals, on the recrystallization texture.

  12. Numerical investigation of coupled density-driven flow and hydrogeochemical processes below playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Enrico; Post, Vincent; Kohfahl, Claus; Prommer, Henning; Simmons, Craig T.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical modeling approaches with varying complexity were explored to investigate coupled groundwater flow and geochemical processes in saline basins. Long-term model simulations of a playa system gain insights into the complex feedback mechanisms between density-driven flow and the spatiotemporal patterns of precipitating evaporites and evolving brines. Using a reactive multicomponent transport model approach, the simulations reproduced, for the first time in a numerical study, the evaporite precipitation sequences frequently observed in saline basins ("bull's eyes"). Playa-specific flow, evapoconcentration, and chemical divides were found to be the primary controls for the location of evaporites formed, and the resulting brine chemistry. Comparative simulations with the computationally far less demanding surrogate single-species transport models showed that these were still able to replicate the major flow patterns obtained by the more complex reactive transport simulations. However, the simulated degree of salinization was clearly lower than in reactive multicomponent transport simulations. For example, in the late stages of the simulations, when the brine becomes halite-saturated, the nonreactive simulation overestimated the solute mass by almost 20%. The simulations highlight the importance of the consideration of reactive transport processes for understanding and quantifying geochemical patterns, concentrations of individual dissolved solutes, and evaporite evolution.

  13. Rocket experiment in a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Liu, H.; Abe, T.; Ono, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Saito, A.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, M. Y.

    Rocket experiment is carried out to investigate a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma of thermosphere and ionosphere at Kagoshima Space Center KSC of JAXA The rocket launch window is in the evening of July 31 - August 15 2007 Momentum transfer through collisional process of the neutral atmosphere and the plasma is a basic problem of atmospheric circulation and super rotation in the low latitude thermosphere and a medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbance MS-TID occurring in the mid-latitude ionosphere but the direct observation is not yet performed In the rocket experiment we observe plasma drift velocity plasma density and temperature and its fluctuations electric field magnetic field and neutral wind The neutral winds are estimated from the movements of Lithium clouds which are released at altitudes between 150km and 300km and scatter sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670 nm The Lithium clouds are observed by CCD imagers on ground The plan of rocket experiment ground observation system and science objectives are presented

  14. Plasma Characteristics Using Superimposed Dual Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasma Source for Next Generation Device Processing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Lee, Chul Hee; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2015-11-01

    U-shaped inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source was investigated as a linear plasma source for the next generation roll-to-toll flexible display processing. For the radio frequency power to the source, the dual frequency composed of 13.56 MHz and 2 MHz was used and the effect of dual frequency to the U-shaped ICP source on the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma uniformity was investigated. As the operating condition, 200 mTorr Ar was used without operating turbo pumps. The use of superimposed dual frequency composed of 13.56 MHz + 2 MHz instead the single frequency of 13.56 MHz increased the plasma density slightly at the same total power. In addition, the addition of 2 MHz rf power to 0.4 kW while maintaining 1 kW 13.56 MHz rf power not only decreased electron temperature but also improved both the plasma uniformity and the process uniformity measured by photoresist etching. Therefore, by using the dual frequency to the U-shaped ICP source, not only the plasma density but also plasma uniformity could be improved in addition to the decrease of possible damage to the substrate. PMID:26726573

  15. Comprehensive Representation of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Process Coupling in Numerical Models: Internal Dynamics and Basin Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istanbulluoglu, E.; Vivoni, E. R.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Bras, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Landscape morphology has an important control on the spatial and temporal organization of basin hydrologic response to climate forcing, affecting soil moisture redistribution as well as vegetation function. On the other hand, erosion, driven by hydrology and modulated by vegetation, produces landforms over geologic time scales that reflect characteristic signatures of the dominant land forming process. Responding to extreme climate events or anthropogenic disturbances of the land surface, infrequent but rapid forms of erosion (e.g., arroyo development, landsliding) can modify topography such that basin hydrology is significantly influenced. Despite significant advances in both hydrologic and geomorphic modeling over the past two decades, the dynamic interactions between basin hydrology, geomorphology and terrestrial ecology are not adequately captured in current model frameworks. In order to investigate hydrologic-geomorphic-ecologic interactions at the basin scale we present initial efforts in integrating the CHILD landscape evolution model (Tucker et al. 2001) with the tRIBS hydrology model (Ivanov et al. 2004), both developed in a common software environment. In this talk, we present preliminary results of the numerical modeling of the coupled evolution of basin hydro-geomorphic response and resulting landscape morphology in two sets of examples. First, we discuss the long-term evolution of both the hydrologic response and the resulting basin morphology from an initially uplifted plateau. In the second set of modeling experiments, we implement changes in climate and land-use to an existing topography and compare basin hydrologic response to the model results when landscape form is fixed (e.g. no coupling between hydrology and geomorphology). Model results stress the importance of internal basin dynamics, including runoff generation mechanisms and hydrologic states, in shaping hydrologic response as well as the importance of employing comprehensive

  16. Oil refinery wastewater treatment using coupled electrocoagulation and fixed film biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura S.; Rodriguez, Oscar M.; Reyna, Silvia; Sánchez-Salas, José Luis; Lozada, J. Daniel; Quiroz, Marco A.; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    Oil refinery wastewater was treated using a coupled treatment process including electrocoagulation (EC) and a fixed film aerobic bioreactor. Different variables were tested to identify the best conditions using this procedure. After EC, the effluent was treated in an aerobic biofilter. EC was capable to remove over 88% of the overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the wastewater under the best working conditions (6.5 V, 0.1 M NaCl, 4 electrodes without initial pH adjustment) with total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal slightly higher than 80%. Aluminum release from the electrodes to the wastewater was found an important factor for the EC efficiency and closely related with several operational factors. Application of EC allowed to increase the biodegradability of the sample from 0.015, rated as non-biodegradable, up to 0.5 widely considered as biodegradable. The effluent was further treated using an aerobic biofilter inoculated with a bacterial consortium including gram positive and gram negative strains and tested for COD and TPH removal from the EC treated effluent during 30 days. Cell count showed the typical bacteria growth starting at day three and increasing up to a maximum after eight days. After day eight, cell growth showed a plateau which agreed with the highest decrease on contaminant concentration. Final TPHs concentration was found about 600 mgL-1 after 30 days whereas COD concentration after biological treatment was as low as 933 mgL-1. The coupled EC-aerobic biofilter was capable to remove up to 98% of the total TPH amount and over 95% of the COD load in the oil refinery wastewater.

  17. A coupled thermodynamic/kinetic model for diffusional processes in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Matan, N.; Winand, H.M.A.; Carter, P.; Karunaratne, M.; Bogdanoff, P.D.; Reed, R.C.

    1998-08-10

    A coupled thermodynamic/kinetic model for diffusional processes in superalloys is described. Use is made of the generalized force-flux equations, and therefore an accurate knowledge of thermodynamical properties of the system is a prerequisite for the calculations. Calculations can be earned out in either the lattice-fixed (Kirkendall) or the mass-invariant (Matano) frame. In order to model transformations, e.g., involving the {gamma} and {gamma}{prime} phases, the concept of an interface sub-system is introduced. The numerical accuracy and stability associated with the treatment of the moving boundary is shown to be comparable to more traditional analyses which incorporate the Murray-Landis transformation. The results from the simulations are compared with experimental information, which includes (1) concentration profiles, (2) movement of inert markers and (3) observations of porosity formation. Particular attention is paid to the simulation of Ni-Al-Cr interdiffusion in the f.c.c. phase, for which reliable thermodynamic and kinetic information is available. Similar comparisons have been made for precipitation reactions involving the {gamma}{prime} phase, although the available information is very sparse. Observations made on a number of Ni-Ni{sub 3}(Al,Ti) couples can be simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Particular advantages of the method are (1) the interface between phases is treated in a novel way, which avoids numerical difficulties arising from the estimation of concentration gradients at phase boundaries, (2) it can be readily extended to multicomponent systems, and (3) the treatment of the Kirkendall drift of vacancies. It is clear that there is a great need for experimentation aimed at deducing kinetic data, e.g., diffusional mobilities, particularly for the {gamma}{prime} phase.

  18. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  19. Investigating redox processes under diffusive and advective flow conditions using a coupled omics and synchrotron approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Flynn, T. M.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Kelly, S.; Skinner, K.; Mishra, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Wu, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    FeIII- and SO42--reducing microorganisms and the mineral phases they produce have profound implications for many processes in aquatic and terrestrial systems. In addition, many of these microbially-catalysed geochemical transformations are highly dependent upon introduction of reactants via advective and diffusive hydrological transport. We have characterized microbial communities from a set of static microcosms to test the effect of ethanol diffusion and sulfate concentration on UVI-contaminated sediment. The spatial distribution, valence states, and speciation of both U and Fe were monitored in situ throughout the experiment by synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, in parallel with solution measurements of pH and the concentrations of sulfate, ethanol, and organic acids. After reaction initiation, a ~1-cm thick layer of sediment near the sediment-water (S-W) interface became visibly dark. Fe XANES spectra of the layer were consistent with the formation of FeS. Over the 4 year duration of the experiment, U LIII-edge XANES indicated reduction of U, first in the dark layer and then throughout the sediment. Next, the microcosms were disassembled and samples were taken from the overlying water and different sediment regions. We extracted DNA and characterized the microbial community by sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the Illumina MiSeq platform and found that the community evolved from its originally homogeneous composition, becoming significantly spatially heterogeneous. We have also developed an x-ray accessible column to probe elemental transformations as they occur along the flow path in a porous medium with the purpose of refining reactive transport models (RTMs) that describe coupled physical and biogeochemical processes in environmental systems. The elemental distribution dynamics and the RTMs of the redox driven processes within them will be presented.

  20. A fast readout and processing electronics for photon counting intensified charge-coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, P.; Bonelli, G.; Tanzi, E. G.; Uslenghi, M.; Poletto, L.; Tondello, G.

    2000-04-01

    The design features and the performances of a prototype photon counting imaging detector, being developed for the international ultraviolet (UV) space mission Spectrum UV, are presented. The photon counter is an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) in which photon events, generating an electron cascade through a high gain microchannel plate (MCP) stack, are transduced, via a phosphor screen and a fiber optics reducer, into a 3×3 pixel2, quasi-Gaussian charge distributions on a 15×15 μm2,512×512 pixel2 format CCD matrix. The CCD is read out in the frame-transfer mode at a pixel rate of 19.75 MHz, and its output data flow is acquired serially as to generate a 3×3 pixel2 event sash that sweeps dynamically the CCD matrix at the 50.6 ns rate of the readout clock. Each and every event sash is searched for the presence of events whose charge content lie within proper limits and satisfy a given set of morphological rules, i.e., a single peak charge profile. The centroid coordinates of identified events are determined with subpixel accuracy (up to a 210 bin/pixel) and subsequently stored as photon list coordinate pairs. The data acquisition and processing system is based on field programmable gate array technology and is capable of satisfying the requirements of real-time operation. The modular construction of the data acquisition and processing electronics provides a great deal of flexibility for supporting advancements in CCD readout techniques (multiple output and higher clocking speed) and of MCPs (larger formats, smaller pore, and higher dynamic range). The results of the performance verification of the data acquisition and processing system integrated with a laboratory ICCD prototype are presented and discussed.

  1. Coupled Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Processes Governing Arsenic Mobility Within Sediments of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocar, B. D.; Polizzotto, M. L.; Ying, S. C.; Benner, S. G.; Sampson, M.; Fendorf, S.

    2008-12-01

    Weathering of As-bearing rocks in the Himalayas has resulted in the transport of sediments down major river systems such as the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Red, Irrawaddy, and Mekong. Groundwater in these river basins commonly has As concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended drinking water limit (10 μg L-1) by more than an order of magnitude. Coupling of hydrology and biogeochemical processes underlies the elevated concentrations of As in these aquifers, necessitating studies that allow their deconvolution. Furthermore, to fully elucidate the biogeochemical mechanisms of sedimentary As release, the thermodynamic favorability of controlling biogeochemical reactions must be considered. We therefore used a combination of spectroscopic and wet chemical measurements to resolve the dominant processes controlling As release and transport in surficial soils/sediments within an As-afflicted field area of the Mekong delta. Based on these measurements, we assess the thermodynamic potential for As, Fe, and S reduction to transpire--major processes influencing As release and mobility. Our results illustrate that clay (0-12m deep) underlying oxbow and wetland environments are subjected to continuously reducing conditions due to ample carbon input and saturated conditions. Ensuing reductive mobilization of As from As-bearing Fe (hydr)oxides results in its migration to the underlying sandy aquifer (>12 m deep). Reactive transport modeling using PHREEQC and MIN3P, constrained with chemical and hydrologic field measurements, provides a calibrated illustration of As release and transport occurring within the clays underlying organic-rich, permanently inundated locations. These areas provide sufficient As to the aqueous phase for widespread contamination of the aquifer, and release is predicted to occur for several thousand years prior to depletion of As from the solid phase.

  2. Interactions of solutes and streambed sediment. 2. A dynamic analysis of coupled hydrologic and chemical processes that determine solute transport.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Solute transport in streams is determined by the interaction of physical and chemical processes. Data from an injection experiment for chloride and several cations indicate significant influence of solute-streambed processes on transport in a mountain stream. These data are interpreted in terms of transient storage processes for all tracers and sorption processes for the cations. Process parameter values are estimated with simulations based on coupled quasi-two-dimensional transport and first-order mass transfer sorption. Comparative simulations demonstrate the relative roles of the physical and chemical processes in determining solute transport. -from Author

  3. Process Coupling Between Mineral Transformation and U Speciation in Acid Waste Weathered Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdrial, N.; Kanematsu, M.; Wang, G.; Um, W.; O'Day, P. A.; Chorover, J.

    2013-12-01

    The need for better prediction of contaminant transport motivates multi-faceted lines of inquiry to build a strong bridge between molecular- and field-scale information. At Hanford (WA), millions of liters of U-containing acidic wastes have been discharged to the soil. In order to predict reactive contaminant migration in the soil, it is necessary to determine the process coupling that occurs between mineral transformation and uranium speciation in these acid-uranium waste weathered sediments. Furthermore, we seek to establish linkages between molecular-scale contaminant speciation and meso-scale contaminant lability, release and reactive transport. Unweathered Hanford sediments were reacted for 365 days with acidic (pH 3), uranium bearing waste solutions in batch experiments. The presence and absence of phosphate in the waste as a control on uranium speciation was also investigated. At dedicated reaction times (7, 14, 30, 90, 180 and 365 days) solid and solution chemistry were analyzed to determine weathering trajectories and contaminant speciation. As observed by XRD and U-EXAFS, when present, PO4 exerted a strong controls over uranium speciation at all pH with the rapid precipitation of meta-ankoleite [K(UO2PO4).3H2O] and near complete immobilization of U. Over prolonged reaction time, however, small fractions of boltwoodite [K(UO2)(HSiO4).3H2O] increased in PO4-high U systems. When PO4 was excluded from the reaction systems, U speciation was indirectly controlled by the pH of the reactant solution and its effect on primary mineral weathering. In this case, U immobilization remained limited with 25 to 50% of the uranium precipitated as becquerelite ([Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6.3H2O] or the K equivalent - compreignacite) and suspected boltwoodite. Differences between the systems are attributed to process coupling between acid chemistry and U geochemistry. Carbonate weathering contributed to rapidly buffer the pH to pH 7-8 in the absence of PO4 and to 6-7 in its presence

  4. Theory of proton-coupled electron transfer in energy conversion processes.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-12-21

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes, including photosynthesis and respiration. These reactions also form the basis of many types of solar fuel cells and electrochemical devices. Recent advances in the theory of PCET enable the prediction of the impact of system properties on the reaction rates. These predictions may guide the design of more efficient catalysts for energy production, including those based on artificial photosynthesis and solar energy conversion. This Account summarizes the theoretically predicted dependence of PCET rates on system properties and illustrates potential approaches for tuning the reaction rates in chemical systems. A general theoretical formulation for PCET reactions has been developed over the past decade. In this theory, PCET reactions are described in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states. A series of nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for both homogeneous and electrochemical PCET reactions have been derived in various well-defined limits. Recently this theory has been extended to include the effects of solvent dynamics and to describe ultrafast interfacial PCET. Analysis of the rate constant expressions provides insight into the underlying physical principles of PCET and enables the prediction of the dependence of the rates on the physical properties of the system. Moreover, the kinetic isotope effect, which is the ratio of the rates for hydrogen and deuterium, provides a useful mechanistic probe. Typically the PCET rate will increase as the electronic coupling and temperature increase and as the total reorganization energy and equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance decrease. The rate constant is predicted to increase as the driving force becomes more negative, rather than exhibit turnover behavior in the inverted region, because excited vibronic product states associated with low

  5. Coupled numerical approach combining finite volume and lattice Boltzmann methods for multi-scale multi-physicochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Li; He, Ya-Ling; Kang, Qinjun; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2013-12-15

    A coupled (hybrid) simulation strategy spatially combining the finite volume method (FVM) and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), called CFVLBM, is developed to simulate coupled multi-scale multi-physicochemical processes. In the CFVLBM, computational domain of multi-scale problems is divided into two sub-domains, i.e., an open, free fluid region and a region filled with porous materials. The FVM and LBM are used for these two regions, respectively, with information exchanged at the interface between the two sub-domains. A general reconstruction operator (RO) is proposed to derive the distribution functions in the LBM from the corresponding macro scalar, the governing equation of which obeys the convection–diffusion equation. The CFVLBM and the RO are validated in several typical physicochemical problems and then are applied to simulate complex multi-scale coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transport, and chemical reaction in a wall-coated micro reactor. The maximum ratio of the grid size between the FVM and LBM regions is explored and discussed. -- Highlights: •A coupled simulation strategy for simulating multi-scale phenomena is developed. •Finite volume method and lattice Boltzmann method are coupled. •A reconstruction operator is derived to transfer information at the sub-domains interface. •Coupled multi-scale multiple physicochemical processes in micro reactor are simulated. •Techniques to save computational resources and improve the efficiency are discussed.

  6. The dissipated energy of electrode surfaces: Temperature jumps from coupled transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeaux, D.; Ratkje, S.K.

    1996-03-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics for surfaces has been applied to the electrode surfaces of an electrochemical cell. It is shown that the temperature of the surface differs from that of the adjacent electrolyte and electrode, and that a temperature jump exists across the surface. mathematical expressions are derived for the temperature profiles of two cells at steady-state conditions. Methods for estimating transport coefficients for the coupled transport processes at the electrode surface are discussed. Possible numerical results for the temperature profile, the overpotential, and the dissipated energy are reported. The results reflect the relative importance of heat conductivities, electric conductivities, and the Peltier coefficients for the electrode surface phenomena in combination with bulk properties. Significant temperature jumps may occur at normal electrolysis conditions 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} A/m, and for temperature jump coefficients which are smaller than 10{sup 3} J/s K{sup 2} m{sup 2}. The overpotential may have contributions from the Peltier coefficients for the surface larger than the ohmic contribution. The method of analysis gives new information useful for heat control of electrochemical cells, electrode kinetic studies, and interpretation of overpotentials.

  7. A coupling kinetics model for pollutant release and transport in the process of landfill settlement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2012-10-01

    A coupling kinetics model is developed to simulate the release and transport of landfill leachate pollutants in a deformable municipal solid waste landfill by taking into account of landfill settlement, seepage of leachate water, hydrolyse of insoluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase, biodegradation of soluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase and aqueous one, growth of aerobic and anaerobic microorganism, and consumption of dissolved oxygen. The release and transport of organic pollutants and microorganisms in landfills in the process of landfill settlement was simulated by considering no hydraulic effect. Simulation results demonstrated that the interaction between landfill settlement and the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants was significant. Porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity were not constants because of the landfill settlement, which affected the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants, and furthermore acted on the landfill settlement. The simulation results accorded with the practical situation, which preliminarily verified the reliability of the mathematical model and the numerical program in this paper. PMID:23202755

  8. On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

  9. Density-fitted singles and doubles coupled cluster on graphics processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, David; Sumpter, Bobby G; DePrince, III, A. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    We adapt an algorithm for singles and doubles coupled cluster (CCSD) that uses density fitting (DF) or Cholesky decomposition (CD) in the construction and contraction of all electron repulsion integrals (ERI s) for use on heterogeneous compute nodes consisting of a multicore CPU and at least one graphics processing unit (GPU). The use of approximate 3-index ERI s ameliorates two of the major difficulties in designing scientific algorithms for GPU s: (i) the extremely limited global memory on the devices and (ii) the overhead associated with data motion across the PCI bus. For the benzene trimer described by an aug-cc-pVDZ basis set, the use of a single NVIDIA Tesla C2070 (Fermi) GPU accelerates a CD-CCSD computation by a factor of 2.1, relative to the multicore CPU-only algorithm that uses 6 highly efficient Intel core i7-3930K CPU cores. The use of two Fermis provides an acceleration of 2.89, which is comparable to that observed when using a single NVIDIA Kepler K20c GPU (2.73).

  10. Numerical study on coupled fluid flow and heat transfer process in parabolic trough solar collector tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.B.; He, Y.L.

    2010-10-15

    A unified two-dimensional numerical model was developed for the coupled heat transfer process in parabolic solar collector tube, which includes nature convection, forced convection, heat conduction and fluid-solid conjugate problem. The effects of Rayleigh number (Ra), tube diameter ratio and thermal conductivity of the tube wall on the heat transfer and fluid flow performance were numerically analyzed. The distributions of flow field, temperature field, local Nu and local temperature gradient were examined. The results show that when Ra is larger than 10{sup 5}, the effects of nature convection must be taken into account. With the increase of tube diameter ratio, the Nusselt number in inner tube (Nu{sub 1}) increases and the Nusselt number in annuli space (Nu{sub 2}) decreases. With the increase of tube wall thermal conductivity, Nu{sub 1} decreases and Nu{sub 2} increases. When thermal conductivity is larger than 200 W/(m K), it would have little effects on Nu and average temperatures. Due to the effect of the nature convection, along the circumferential direction (from top to down), the temperature in the cross-section decreases and the temperature gradient on inner tube surface increases at first. Then, the temperature and temperature gradients would present a converse variation at {theta} near {pi}. The local Nu on inner tube outer surface increases along circumferential direction until it reaches a maximum value then it decreases again. (author)

  11. Fission yeast switches mating type by a replication-recombination coupled process.

    PubMed

    Arcangioli, B; de Lahondès, R

    2000-03-15

    Fission yeast exhibits a homothallic life cycle, in which the mating type of the cell mitotically alternates in a highly regulated fashion. Pedigree analysis of dividing cells has shown that only one of the two sister cells switches mating type. It was shown recently that a site- and strand-specific DNA modification at the mat1 locus precedes mating-type switching. By tracking the fate of mat1 DNA throughout the cell cycle with a PCR assay, we identified a novel DNA intermediate of mating-type switching in S-phase. The time and rate of appearance and disappearance of this DNA intermediate are consistent with a model in which mating-type switching occurs through a replication-recombination coupled pathway. Such a process provides experimental evidence in support of a copy choice recombination model in Schizosaccharomyces pombe mating-type switching and is reminiscent of the sister chromatid recombination used to complete replication in the presence of certain types of DNA damage. PMID:10716938

  12. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+). PMID:22103768

  13. An approach to modeling coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical processes in geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palguta, Jennifer; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Hickman, Stephen H.; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between hydrothermal fluids and rock alter mineralogy, leading to the formation of secondary minerals and potentially significant physical and chemical property changes. Reactive transport simulations are essential for evaluating the coupled processes controlling the geochemical, thermal and hydrological evolution of geothermal systems. The objective of this preliminary investigation is to successfully replicate observations from a series of hydrothermal laboratory experiments [Morrow et al., 2001] using the code TOUGHREACT. The laboratory experiments carried out by Morrow et al. [2001] measure permeability reduction in fractured and intact Westerly granite due to high-temperature fluid flow through core samples. Initial permeability and temperature values used in our simulations reflect these experimental conditions and range from 6.13 × 10−20 to 1.5 × 10−17 m2 and 150 to 300 °C, respectively. The primary mineralogy of the model rock is plagioclase (40 vol.%), K-feldspar (20 vol.%), quartz (30 vol.%), and biotite (10 vol.%). The simulations are constrained by the requirement that permeability, relative mineral abundances, and fluid chemistry agree with experimental observations. In the models, the granite core samples are represented as one-dimensional reaction domains. We find that the mineral abundances, solute concentrations, and permeability evolutions predicted by the models are consistent with those observed in the experiments carried out by Morrow et al. [2001] only if the mineral reactive surface areas decrease with increasing clay mineral abundance. This modeling approach suggests the importance of explicitly incorporating changing mineral surface areas into reactive transport models.

  14. Some characteristics of midlatitude F layer storms generated by thermosphere-plasmasphere coupling processes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    In this dissertation, calculations are interpreted that have been made to describe stormtime variations in equinoctial dayside plasma parameters when the variations are primarily caused by processes dependent upon collisional coupling between the thermosphere and the plasmasphere. The calculations are made with a computer model formed by linking two theoretical models: a pre-existing thermospheric model that describes dayside variations in thermospheric parameters during stormtime heating of the thermosphere; a plasmaspheric model which was developed to describe dayside plasmaspheric variations caused by the thermospheric variations described by the thermospheric model and by variations in a magnetospheric electric field. Both portions of the computerized storm model solve partial differential equations describing conservation of species, momentum, and energy by replacing dependent variables with expansions in time series. The thermospheric portion of the storm model solves for variations in gas temperature, horizontal wind velocity, and densities of atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen while the plasmaspheric portion of the storm model solves for variations in ion densities of oxygen and hydrogen, ion fluxes and electrons, and heat fluxes through ions and electrons. Other calculations that have been used to describe variations in thermospheric and plasmaspheric parameters are summarized and the advantages and limitations of the model calculations used to obtain results presented in this dissertation are noted.

  15. A Coupling Kinetics Model for Pollutant Release and Transport in the Process of Landfill Settlement

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    A coupling kinetics model is developed to simulate the release and transport of landfill leachate pollutants in a deformable municipal solid waste landfill by taking into account of landfill settlement, seepage of leachate water, hydrolyse of insoluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase, biodegradation of soluble and degradable organic pollutants in solid phase and aqueous one, growth of aerobic and anaerobic microorganism, and consumption of dissolved oxygen. The release and transport of organic pollutants and microorganisms in landfills in the process of landfill settlement was simulated by considering no hydraulic effect. Simulation results demonstrated that the interaction between landfill settlement and the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants was significant. Porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity were not constants because of the landfill settlement, which affected the release, transport and biodegradation of landfill leachate pollutants, and furthermore acted on the landfill settlement. The simulation results accorded with the practical situation, which preliminarily verified the reliability of the mathematical model and the numerical program in this paper. PMID:23202755

  16. Modeling permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaka, S.; Kelkar, S.; Zyvoloski, G.; Pawar, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of a geothermal reservoir. Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation, while simultaneously increasing the likelihood of premature thermal breakthrough. Hence, the ability to accurately model the fracture-stress interaction in the presence of variations in temperature and fluid pressure is critical in effective reservoir development and management strategies. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes during multi-phase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method. The first example studies the role played by thermal and pore-pressure effects in enhancing the permeability in the near-wellbore region. In the second example, we will study permeability enhancement due to shear stresses farther away from the wellbore.

  17. Interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation processes during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Patiño-López, Luis D.; Putnis, Christine V.; Geisler, Thorsten; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos M.; Putnis, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The chemical weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals on the Earth's surface controls important geochemical processes such as erosion rates and soil formation, ore genesis or climate evolution. The dissolution of most of these minerals is typically incongruent, and results in the formation of surface coatings (altered layers, also known as leached layers). These coatings may significantly affect mineral dissolution rates over geological timescales, and therefore a great deal of research has been conducted on them. However, the mechanism of leached layer formation is a matter of vigorous debate. Here we report on an in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and real-time Mach-Zehnder phase-shift interferometry (PSI) study of the dissolution of wollastonite, CaSiO3, and dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2, as an example of surface coating formation during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals. Our in situ results provide clear direct experimental evidence that leached layers are formed in a tight interface-coupled two-step process: stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and subsequent precipitation of a secondary phase (silica in the case of wollastonite, or hydrated magnesium carbonate in the case of dolomite) from a supersaturated boundary layer of fluid in contact with the mineral surface. This occurs despite the bulk solution remaining undersaturated with respect to the secondary phase. The validation of such a mechanism given by the results reported here completely changes the conceptual framework concerning the mechanism of chemical weathering, and differs significantly from the concept of preferential leaching of cations postulated by most currently accepted incongruent dissolution models.

  18. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes in the Ionospheric Trough Region During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Moldwin, M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Coster, A. J.; Yizengaw, E.; Lyons, L. R.; Donovan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric troughs are regions of remarkable electron density depression at the subauroral and auroral latitudes, and are categorized into the mid-latitude trough or high-latitude trough, depending on their relative location to the auroral oval. Substorms are one fundamental element of geomagnetic activity, during which structured field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection flows develop in the subauroral and auroral ionosphere. The auroral/trough region is expected to experience severe electron density variations during substorms. Accurate specification of the trough dynamics during substorms and understanding its relationship with the structured FACs and convection flows are of important practical purpose, including providing observational foundations for assessing the attendant impact on navigation and communication. In addition, troughs are important since they map to magnetospheric boundaries allowing the remote sensing of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this talk, we discuss the dynamics of the mid-latitude and high-latitude troughs during substorms based on multi-instrument observations. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) data, we characterize the location and width of the mid-latitude trough through the substorm lifecycle and compare them with existing trough empirical models. Using a combination of incoherent scattering radar (ISR), GPS TEC, auroral imager and a data assimilative model, we investigate the relationship between the high-latitude trough and FACs as well as convection flows. The high-latitude trough is found to be collocated with a counter-clockwise convection flow vortex east of the Harang reversal region, and downward FACs as part of the substorm current system are suggested to be responsible for the high-latitude trough formation. In addition, complex ionospheric electron temperature within the high-latitude trough is found, i.e., increase in the E region while decrease in the F region. We discuss possible

  19. Scaling of coupled dilatancy-diffusion processes in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, I. G.; Bell, A. F.; Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M.

    2012-04-01

    Coupled dilatancy-diffusion processes resulting from microscopically brittle damage due to precursory cracking have been observed in the laboratory and suggested as a mechanism for earthquake precursors. One reason precursors have proven elusive may be the scaling in space: recent geodetic and seismic data placing strong limits on the spatial extent of the nucleation zone for recent earthquakes. Another may be the scaling in time: recent laboratory results on axi-symmetric samples show both a systematic decrease in circumferential extensional strain at failure and a delayed and a sharper acceleration of acoustic emission event rate as strain rate is decreased. Here we examine the scaling of such processes in time from laboratory to field conditions using brittle creep (constant stress loading) to failure tests, in an attempt to bridge part of the strain rate gap to natural conditions, and discuss the implications for forecasting the failure time. Dilatancy rate is strongly correlated to strain rate, and decreases to zero in the steady-rate creep phase at strain rates around 10-9 s-1 for a basalt from Mount Etna. The data are well described by a creep model based on the linear superposition of transient (decelerating) and accelerating micro-crack growth due to stress corrosion. The model produces good fits to the failure time in retrospect using the accelerating acoustic emission event rate, but in prospective tests on synthetic data with the same properties we find failure-time forecasting is subject to systematic epistemic and aleatory uncertainties that degrade predictability. The next stage is to use the technology developed to attempt failure forecasting in real time, using live streamed data and a public web-based portal to quantify the prospective forecast quality under such controlled laboratory conditions.

  20. Incorporating Ecosystem Processes Controlling Carbon Balance Into Models of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, W.; Brown, D. G.; Brunner, A.; Fouladbash, L.; Hadzick, Z.; Hutchins, M.; Kiger, S. E.; Makino, Y.; Nassauer, J. I.; Robinson, D. T.; Riolo, R. L.; Sun, S.

    2012-12-01

    A key element in the study of coupled human-natural systems is the interactions of human populations with vegetation and soils. In human-dominated landscapes, vegetation production and change results from a combination of ecological processes and human decision-making and behavior. Vegetation is often dramatically altered, whether to produce food for humans and livestock, to harvest fiber for construction and other materials, to harvest fuel wood or feedstock for biofuels, or simply for cultural preferences as in the case of residential lawns with sparse trees in the exurban landscape. This alteration of vegetation and its management has a substantial impact on the landscape carbon balance. Models can be used to simulate scenarios in human-natural systems and to examine the integration of processes that determine future trajectories of carbon balance. However, most models of human-natural systems include little integration of the human alteration of vegetation with the ecosystem processes that regulate carbon balance. Here we illustrate a few case studies of pilot-study models that strive for this integration from our research across various types of landscapes. We focus greater detail on a fully developed research model linked to a field study of vegetation and soils in the exurban residential landscape of Southeastern Michigan, USA. The field study characterized vegetation and soil carbon storage in 5 types of ecological zones. Field-observed carbon storage in the vegetation in these zones ranged widely, from 150 g C/m2 in turfgrass zones, to 6,000 g C/m2 in zones defined as turfgrass with sparse woody vegetation, to 16,000 g C/m2 in a zone defined as dense trees and shrubs. Use of these zones facilitated the scaling of carbon pools to the landscape, where the areal mixtures of zone types had a significant impact on landscape C storage. Use of these zones also facilitated the use of the ecosystem process model Biome-BGC to simulate C trajectories and also

  1. A network model shows the importance of coupled processes in the microbial N cycle in the Cape Fear River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, David E.; Lisa, Jessica A.; Song, Bongkeun; Tobias, Craig R.; Borrett, Stuart R.

    2012-06-01

    Estuaries serve important ecological and economic functions including habitat provision and the removal of nutrients. Eutrophication can overwhelm the nutrient removal capacity of estuaries and poses a widely recognized threat to the health and function of these ecosystems. Denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) are microbial processes responsible for the removal of fixed nitrogen and diminish the effects of eutrophication. Both of these microbial removal processes can be influenced by direct inputs of dissolved inorganic nitrogen substrates or supported by microbial interactions with other nitrogen transforming pathways such as nitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). The coupling of nitrogen removal pathways to other transformation pathways facilitates the removal of some forms of inorganic nitrogen; however, differentiating between direct and coupled nitrogen removal is difficult. Network modeling provides a tool to examine interactions among microbial nitrogen cycling processes and to determine the within-system history of nitrogen involved in denitrification and anammox. To examine the coupling of nitrogen cycling processes, we built a nitrogen budget mass balance network model in two adjacent 1 cm3 sections of bottom water and sediment in the oligohaline portion of the Cape Fear River Estuary, NC, USA. Pathway, flow, and environ ecological network analyses were conducted to characterize the organization of nitrogen flow in the estuary and to estimate the coupling of nitrification to denitrification and of nitrification and DNRA to anammox. Centrality analysis indicated NH4+ is the most important form of nitrogen involved in removal processes. The model analysis further suggested that direct denitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification had similar contributions to nitrogen removal while direct anammox was dominant to coupled forms of anammox. Finally, results also indicated that partial

  2. Tyrosine analogues for probing proton-coupled electron transfer processes in peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Nara, Susheel J; Valgimigli, Luca; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Pratt, Derek A

    2010-01-20

    A series of amino acids analogous to tyrosine, but differing in the physicochemical properties of the aryl alcohol side chain, have been prepared and characterized. These compounds are expected to be useful in understanding the relationships between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics in long-range proton-coupled electron transfer processes in peptides and proteins. Systematic changes in the acidity, redox potential, and O-H bond strength of the tyrosine side chain could be induced upon substituting the phenol for pyridinol and pyrimidinol moieties. Further modulation was possible by introducing methyl and t-butyl substitution in the position ortho to the phenolic hydroxyl. The unnatural amino acids were prepared by Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling of the corresponding halogenated aryl alcohol protected as their benzyl ethers with an organozinc reagent derived from N-Boc L-serine carboxymethyl ester. Subsequent debenzylation by catalytic hydrogenation yielded the tyrosine analogues in good yield. Spectrophotometric titrations revealed a decrease in tyrosine pK(a) of ca. 1.5 log units per included nitrogen atom, along with a corresponding increase in the oxidation (peak) potentials of ca. 200 mV, respectively. All told, the six novel amino acids described here have phenol-like side chains with pK(a)'s that span a range of 7.0 to greater than 10, and an oxidation (peak) potential range of greater than 600 mV at and around physiological pH. Radical equilibration EPR experiments were carried out to reveal that the O-H bond strengths increase systematically upon nitrogen incorporation (by ca. 0.5-1.0 kcal/mol), and radical stability and persistence increase systematically upon introduction of alkyl substitution in the ortho positions. The EPR spectra of the aryloxyl radicals derived from tyrosine and each of the analogues could be determined at room temperature, and each featured distinct spectral properties. The uniqueness of their spectra will be helpful in discerning

  3. Higher-Order Equation-of-Motion Coupled-Cluster Methods for Ionization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So

    2006-08-21

    Compact algebraic equations defining the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods for ionization potentials (IP-EOM-CC) have been derived and computer implemented by virtue of a symbolic algebra system largely automating these processes. Models with connected cluster excitation operators truncated after double, triple, or quadruple level and with linear ionization operators truncated after two-hole-one-particle (2h1p), three-hole-two-particle (3h2p), or four-hole-three-particle (4h3p) level (abbreviated as IP-EOM-CCSD, CCSDT, and CCSDTQ, respectively) have been realized into parallel algorithms taking advantage of spin, spatial, and permutation symmetries with optimal size dependence of the computational costs. They are based on spin-orbital formalisms and can describe both {alpha} and {beta} and ionizations from open-shell (doublet, triplet, etc.) reference states into ionized states with various spin magnetic quantum numbers. The application of these methods to Koopmans and satellite ionizations of N{sub 2} and CO (with the ambiguity due to finite basis sets eliminated by extrapolation) has shown that IP-EOM-CCSD frequently accounts for orbital relaxation inadequately and displays errors exceeding a couple of eV. However, these errors can be systematically reduced to tenths or even hundredths of an eV by IP-EOM-CCSDT or CCSDTQ. Comparison of spectroscopic parameters of the FH{sup +} and NH{sup +} radicals between IP-EOM-CC and experiments has also underscored the importance of higher-order IP-EOM-CC treatments. For instance, the harmonic frequencies of the {tilde A} {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup -} state of NH{sup +}+ are predicted to be 1285, 1723, and 1705 cm{sup -1} by IP-EOM-CCSD, CCSDT, and CCSDTQ, respectively, as compared to the observed value of 1707 cm{sup -1}. The small adiabatic energy separation (observed 0.04 eV) between the {tilde X} {sup 2}II and {tilde a} {sup 4}{sigma}{sup -} states of NH{sup +} also requires IP-EOM-CCSDTQ for a quantitative

  4. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of

  5. Microstructural Analysis of Coupled Mechanical and Chemical Diagenetic Processes in Deformation Bands in Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, C. M.; Eichhubl, P.; Elliott, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Deformation bands in sandstone and other porous rock have been shown to act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. Changes in flow properties are related to microscale textural changes that occur within the deformation bands through coupled mechanical and chemical diagenetic processes. Microscale textures relating to flow properties, such as brittle grain deformation, preferred cementation, and the entrainment of fines within bands can be studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging techniques. Conventional techniques for imaging deformation bands by SEM involve using mechanically polished thin sections. However, mechanical polishing can cause induced sample damage that limits microstructural observations. To mitigate sample damage, we use large-area and cross-sectional Ar ion beam milling to prepare deformation band samples for SEM imaging. These techniques preserve sample integrity allowing the imaging of cement and pore textures at submicron resolution. In an ion milled deformation band from the Entrada sandstone, we observe delicate euhedral quartz crystals that precipitated after band formation. In the same band, broken grain fragments that occupy space between larger framework grains are angular in shape, suggesting that they still bear freshly broken surfaces, not dulled and rounded by grain dissolution and cement overgrowth. The lack of widespread isopachous cement on grain fragments, and the observation, instead, of isolated slender quartz cement prisms indicates that cementation in these bands is highly localized. These localized cement growths increase roughness in the pore walls, increasing surface area and tortuosity in the flow pathway through the band. This may reduce permeability in the band without completely occluding flow pathways and pore connections within the bands.

  6. Studying coupled hydrological and micro-biological processes by means of tracer injections and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worman, A.; Kjellin, J. P.; Lindahl, A.; Johansson, H.

    2005-05-01

    To throw light on coupled hydrological, chemical and microbiological processes in treatment wetlands, this study uses both radioactive water and reactive tracers. A tracer mixture consisting of tritiated water, P-32 in the form of PO4- and N-15 in the form of N2O was injected to the 2.6 hectare large Ekeby wetland, Sweden. From the breakthrough curves of tritium, the mean residence time of water in pond 1 can be estimated to be about 3 to 3.5 days. The total injected activity of phosphorus was 17.98 GBq and about 13.73 GBq was recovered at the outlet during the investigation period ending 10 days and 16 hours after the start of the injection. This implies that 24% of the phosphate solution was removed in the November - December period in which the experiment was performed. The total injected amount of N-15 was 42.1 grams and 29.6 grams was retained at the effluent. This means that 30% of the nitrogen was either retained in the wetland or removed due to denitrification. An analysis of regular monitoring data shows that the annual removal rate in the entire wetland (each flow line passes two ponds in series) is about 50% for total phosphorus and 25% for total nitrogen. Probably, the most important mechanism for this removal is adsorption onto particulate matter and deposition. Analyses of vegetation material indicate that a certain (minor) fraction was adsorbed to submersed and emerging macrophytes, like Elodera Canadensis, Thypa sp. (Cattail) and Glyceria sp. (Manna grass). A 2D mathematical model for both water flow and solute transport could explain the N-transport through the wetland. The model accounts for the rate-limited exchange with bed sediments and denitrification in the water and bed sediment. Independent batch tests indicate a particularly high microbiological activity in the bed sediments. The rate-limited exchange with the bed limits also the denitrification capacity of the wetland.

  7. Mechanism of the cathodic process coupled to the oxidation of iron monosulfide by dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Duinea, Mădălina I; Costas, Andreea; Baibarac, Mihaela; Chiriță, Paul

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the mechanism of iron monosulfide (FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen (O2(aq)). Synthetic FeS was reacted with O2(aq) for 6days and at 25°C. We have characterized the initial and reacted FeS surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that during the aqueous oxidation of FeS new solid phases (disulfide, polysulfide, elemental sulfur, ferric oxyhydroxides and Fe3O4) develop on the mineral surface. The results of potentiodynamic polarization experiments show that after 2days of FeS electrode immersion in oxygen bearing solution (OBS) at initial pH 5.1 and 25°C the modulus of cathodic Tafel slopes dramatically decreases, from 393mV/dec to 86mV/dec. This decrease is ascribed to the change of the mechanism of electron transfer from cathodic sites to O2 (mechanism of cathodic process). The oxidation current densities (jox) indicate that mineral oxidative dissolution is not inhibited by pH increase up to 6.7. Another conclusion, which emerges from the analysis of jox, is that the dissolved Fe(3+) does not intermediate the aqueous oxidation of FeS. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) show that after 2days of contact between electrode and OBS the properties of FeS/water interface change. From the analysis of the EIS, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDX data we can conclude that the change of FeS/water interface properties accompanies the formation of new solid phases on the mineral surface. The new characteristics of the surface layer and FeS/water interface do not cause the inhibition of mineral oxidation. PMID:26773612

  8. Coupled Environmental Processes in the Mojave Desert and Implications for ET Covers as Stable Landforms

    SciTech Connect

    D. Shafer; M. Y oung; S. Zitzer; E. McDonald; T. Caldwell

    2006-01-18

    Monolayer evapotranspiration (ET) covers are the baseline method for closure of disposal sites for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed LLW, and transuranic (TRU) waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The regulatory timeline is typically 1,000 years for LLW and 10,000 years for TRU waste. Covers for such waste have different technical considerations than those with shorter timelines because they are subject to environmental change for longer periods of time, and because the environmental processes are often coupled. To evaluate these changes, four analog sites (approximately 30, 1,000 to 2,000, 7,000 to 12,500, and 125,000 years in age) on the NTS were analyzed to address the early post-institutional control period (the youngest site), the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of LLW, and the 10,000-year period for TRU waste. Tests included soil texture, structure, and morphology; surface soil infiltration and hydraulic conductivity; vegetation and faunal surveys; and literature reviews. Separate measurements were made in plant undercanopy and intercanopy areas. The results showed a progressive increase in silt and clay content of surface soils with age. Changes in soil texture and structure led to a fivefold decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity in intercanopy areas, but no change in undercanopies, which were subject to bioturbation. These changes may have been responsible for the reduction in total plant cover, most dramatically in intercanopy areas, primarily because more precipitation either runs off the site or is held nearer to the surface where plant roots are less common. The results suggest that covers may evolve over longer timeframes to stable landforms that minimize the need for active maintenance.

  9. Feedback regulation of the spc operon in Escherichia coli: translational coupling and mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Mattheakis, L C; Nomura, M

    1988-01-01

    The spc operon of Escherichia coli encodes 10 ribosomal proteins in the order L14, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30, and L15. This operon is feedback regulated by S8, which binds near the translation start site of L5 and inhibits translation of L5 directly and that of the distal genes indirectly. We constructed plasmids carrying a major portion of the spc operon genes under lac transcriptional control. The plasmids carried a point mutation in the S8 target site which abolished regulation and resulted in overproduction of plasmid-encoded ribosomal proteins upon induction. We showed that alteration of the AUG start codon of L5 to UAG decreased the synthesis rates of plasmid-encoded distal proteins, as well as L5, by approximately 20-fold, with a much smaller (if any) effect on mRNA synthesis rates, indicating coupling of the distal cistrons' translation with the translation of L5. This conclusion was also supported by experiments in which S8 was overproduced in trans. In this case, there was a threefold reduction in the synthesis rates of chromosome-encoded L5 and the distal spc operon proteins, but no decrease in the mRNA synthesis rate. These observations also suggest that transcription from ribosomal protein promoters may be special, perhaps able to overcome transcription termination signals. We also analyzed the state of ribosomal protein mRNA after overproduction of S8 in these experiments and found that repression of ribosomal protein synthesis was accompanied by stimulation of processing (and degradation) of spc operon mRNA. The possible role of mRNA degradation in tightening the regulation is discussed. Images PMID:3049533

  10. Plasmid R1 Conjugative DNA Processing Is Regulated at the Coupling Protein Interface▿

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Sanja; Lang, Silvia; Sut, Marta V.; Strohmaier, Heimo; Gruber, Christian J.; Koraimann, Günther; Cabezón, Elena; Moncalián, Gabriel; de la Cruz, Fernando; Zechner, Ellen L.

    2009-01-01

    Selective substrate uptake controls initiation of macromolecular secretion by type IV secretion systems in gram-negative bacteria. Type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) are essential, but the molecular mechanisms governing substrate entry to the translocation pathway remain obscure. We report a biochemical approach to reconstitute a regulatory interface between the plasmid R1 T4CP and the nucleoprotein relaxosome dedicated to the initiation stage of plasmid DNA processing and substrate presentation. The predicted cytosolic domain of T4CP TraD was purified in a predominantly monomeric form, and potential regulatory effects of this protein on catalytic activities exhibited by the relaxosome during transfer initiation were analyzed in vitro. TraDΔN130 stimulated the TraI DNA transesterase activity apparently via interactions on both the protein and the DNA levels. TraM, a protein interaction partner of TraD, also increased DNA transesterase activity in vitro. The mechanism may involve altered DNA conformation as TraM induced underwinding of oriT plasmid DNA in vivo (ΔLk = −4). Permanganate mapping of the positions of duplex melting due to relaxosome assembly with TraDΔN130 on supercoiled DNA in vitro confirmed localized unwinding at nic but ruled out formation of an open complex compatible with initiation of the TraI helicase activity. These data link relaxosome regulation to the T4CP and support the model that a committed step in the initiation of DNA export requires activation of TraI helicase loading or catalysis. PMID:19767437

  11. Evaluation of a coupled dispersion and aerosol process model against measurements near a major road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjola, M. A.; Pirjola, L.; Karppinen, A.; Härkönen, J.; Ketzel, M.; Kukkonen, J.

    2007-02-01

    A field measurement campaign was conducted near a major road "Itäväylä" in an urban area in Helsinki in 17-20 February 2003. Aerosol measurements were conducted using a mobile laboratory "Sniffer" at various distances from the road, and at an urban background location. Measurements included particle size distribution in the size range of 7 nm-10 μm (aerodynamic diameter) by the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and in the size range of 3-50 nm (mobility diameter) by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), total number concentration of particles larger than 3 nm detected by an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC), temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, driving route of the mobile laboratory, and traffic density on the studied road. In this study, we have compared measured concentration data with the predictions of the road network dispersion model CAR-FMI used in combination with an aerosol process model MONO32. The vehicular exhaust emissions, and atmospheric dispersion and transformation of fine and ultrafine particles was evaluated within the distance scale of 200 m (corresponding to a time scale of a couple of minutes). We computed the temporal evolution of the number concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions of various particle size classes. The atmospheric dilution rate of particles is obtained from the roadside dispersion model CAR-FMI. Considering the evolution of total number concentration, dilution was shown to be the most important process. The influence of coagulation and condensation on the number concentrations of particle size modes was found to be negligible at this distance scale. Condensation was found to affect the evolution of particle diameter in the two smallest particle modes. The assumed value of the concentration of condensable organic vapour of 1012 molecules cm-3 was shown to be in a disagreement with the measured particle size evolution, while the modelling runs with the

  12. Multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping process of multi coupled activities based on valid information evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiliang; Wang, Yunxia; Qiu, Shenghai

    2013-01-01

    Complex product development will inevitably face the design planning of the multi-coupled activities, and overlapping these activities could potentially reduce product development time, but there is a risk of the additional cost. Although the downstream task information dependence to the upstream task is already considered in the current researches, but the design process overall iteration caused by the information interdependence between activities is hardly discussed; especially the impact on the design process' overall iteration from the valid information accumulation process. Secondly, most studies only focus on the single overlapping process of two activities, rarely take multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping process of multi coupled activities into account; especially the inherent link between product development time and cost which originates from the overlapping process of multi coupled activities. For the purpose of solving the above problems, as to the insufficiency of the accumulated valid information in overlapping process, the function of the valid information evolution (VIE) degree is constructed. Stochastic process theory is used to describe the design information exchange and the valid information accumulation in the overlapping segment, and then the planning models of the single overlapping segment are built. On these bases, by analyzing overlapping processes and overlapping features of multi-coupling activities, multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping planning models are built; by sorting overlapping processes and analyzing the construction of these planning models, two conclusions are obtained: (1) As to multi-segment and multi-ply overlapping of multi coupled activities, the total decrement of the task set development time is the sum of the time decrement caused by basic overlapping segments, and minus the sum of the time increment caused by multiple overlapping segments; (2) the total increment of development cost is the sum of the cost

  13. Modeling Coupled Processes for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Mechanically Deforming Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S. A.; Pike, D. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling of coupled hydrological-mechanical processes in fault zones is critical for understanding the long-term behavior of fluids within the shallow crust. Here we utilize a previously developed cellular-automata (CA) model to define the evolution of permeability within a 2-D fault zone under compressive stress. At each time step, the CA model calculates the increase in fluid pressure within the fault at every grid cell. Pressure surpassing a critical threshold (e.g., lithostatic stress) causes a rupture in that cell, and pressure is then redistributed across the neighboring cells. The rupture can cascade through the spatial domain and continue across multiple time steps. Stress continues to increase and the size and location of rupture events are recorded until a percolating backbone of ruptured cells exists across the fault. Previous applications of this model consider uncorrelated random fields for the compressibility of the fault material. The prior focus on uncorrelated property fields is consistent with development of a number of statistical physics models including percolation processes and fracture propagation. However, geologic materials typically express spatial correlation and this can have a significant impact on the results of the pressure and permeability distributions. We model correlation of the fault material compressibility as a multiGaussian random field with a correlation length defined as the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the kernel used to create the field. The FWHM is varied from < 0.001 to approximately 0.47 of the domain size. The addition of spatial correlation to the compressibility significantly alters the model results including: 1) Accumulation of larger amounts of strain prior to the first rupture event; 2) Initiation of the percolating backbone at lower amounts of cumulative strain; 3) Changes in the event size distribution to a combined power-law and exponential distribution with a smaller power; and 4) Evolution of the

  14. A numerical study of synchronization in the process of biochemical substance exchange in a diffusively coupled ring of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Balaž, Igor; Arsenić, Ilija

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we numerically investigate a model of a diffusively coupled ring of cells. To model the dynamics of individual cells we propose a map with cell affinity, which is a generalization of the logistic map. First, the basic features of a one-cell system are studied in terms of the Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov complexity and Sample Entropy. Second, the notion of observational heterarchy, which is a perpetual negotiation process between different levels of the description of a phenomenon, is reviewed. After these preliminaries, we study how the active coupling induced by the consideration of the observational heterarchy modifies the synchronization property of the model with N=100 cells. It is shown numerically that the active coupling enhances synchronization of biochemical substance exchange in several different conditions of cell affinity.

  15. Deformation Processes In SE Tibet: How Coupled Are The Surface And The Deeper Lithosphere? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, P. K.; Meltzer, A.

    2010-12-01

    We all like to cite the Himalayan collision as a type example of continent-continent collision, and the region has been used as a natural laboratory by a considerable number of diverse investigations. Southeastern Tibet and the Lhasa Block provide an interesting case to consider in this context. Surrounding portions of the Himalayan-Tibet system have been and are being intensely deformed, whereas the Andean-arc lithosphere of the Lhasa Block has remained enigmatically unscathed. High elevations throughout much of the terrane are fairly uniform but the eastern and western portions of block have experienced very different degrees of exhumation. Regions that experienced more exhumation have thinner crustal thicknesses, with the results that that Moho is warped up with respect to the surface. Thicker, less-exhumed portions of the Lhasa Block currently are underlain by what is inferred to be eclogitized lower crust, but this eclogitization is not seen where exhumation is significant. Beneath SE Tibet, subduction of the Indian lithosphere has been complicated, with tomographic imaging showing variations in mantle structure that do not register with the strike of surface features. Adjacent to the Lhasa Block, the Namche Barwa-Gyala metamorphic massif demonstrates a strong coupling between shallower crustal flow and localized erosion that is significant for the evolution of the Lhasa Block in the way that this feature controls base level for the upper Tsangpo drainage and thus the erosional driver for the system. More broadly, a weak lower crust and lower-crustal flow have been invoked by many workers to explain aspects of the region’s deformation patterns and topography. Thus it would seem that in SE Tibet, mid-to-upper crustal, lower-crustal, and whole-lithosphere processes all have the potential to either impact Earth-surface dynamics or be impacted by them. This leads to a number of questions about the 4D nature and scale of compensation, controls on the evolution of

  16. Oxygen Sensitivity of Anammox and Coupled N-Cycle Processes in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    PubMed Central

    Kalvelage, Tim; Jensen, Marlene M.; Contreras, Sergio; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Lam, Phyllis; Günter, Marcel; LaRoche, Julie; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient measurements indicate that 30–50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ∼0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O2) on anammox, NH3 oxidation and NO3− reduction in 15N-labeling experiments with varying O2 concentrations (0–25 µmol L−1) in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O2 is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters. Based on our O2 assays we estimate the upper limit for anammox to be ∼20 µmol L−1. In contrast, NH3 oxidation to NO2− and NO3− reduction to NO2− as the main NH4+ and NO2− sources for anammox were only moderately affected by changing O2 concentrations. Intriguingly, aerobic NH3 oxidation was active at non-detectable concentrations of O2, while anaerobic NO3− reduction was fully active up to at least 25 µmol L−1 O2. Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O2 concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily controlled by the O2-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O2 on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH3 oxidation and NO3− reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O2 levels ∼20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O2 sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling. PMID:22216239

  17. Pulsed Cl2/Ar inductively coupled plasma processing: 0D model versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, E.; Brihoum, M.; Bodart, P.; Darnon, M.; Cunge, G.

    2014-11-01

    Comparisons between measurements and spatially-averaged (0D) simulations of low-pressure Ar and Cl2 pulsed-plasmas in an industrial inductively coupled reactor are reported. Our analysis focuses on the impact of the pulsing parameters (frequency f, duty cycle dc) on the chemical reactivity of the plasma and on the ion fluxes to the walls. Charged particle densities and ion fluxes are highly modulated when the plasma is pulsed at 1 kHz < f < 20 kHz. In rare gas Ar plasmas, the ion flux rise time is short (50 μs), therefore the dc has almost no influence on the ion flux value during the pulse. By contrast, in molecular electronegative Cl2 plasmas, both the value and rise/decay time of the ion flux during the on and off-periods depend strongly on the dc. This is because in Cl2 both the plasma chemistry and electronegativity depend on the dc. During the off-period, the electron density drops much faster than the negative ion density, leading to a large increase in plasma electronegativity. A minimum afterglow time (75 µs) is required for an ion-ion plasma to form and for the sheath to collapse, exposing the walls and wafers to a negative ion flux. The positive ion flux is 3 to 10 times smaller in Cl2 than in Ar for the same operating conditions. In contrast with charged species, the radical (Cl) kinetics are slow and thus the radical density is hardly modulated for f > 1 kHz. However, the dc strongly influences the Cl2/Cl density ratio and is an excellent knob for controlling the plasma chemical reactivity: the higher the dc the higher the Cl density. The trends and quantities in the 0D simulation are in close agreement with experiments. This proves the capacity of global models to reproduce the fundamental features of pulsed plasmas in simple chemistries and to assist the development of pulsed processes.

  18. Semiclassical analysis of the electron-nuclear coupling in electronic non-adiabatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Federica; Min, Seung Kyu; Gross, E. K. U.

    2015-10-01

    In the context of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, the coupling between electrons and nuclei beyond the adiabatic regime is encoded (i) in the time-dependent vector and scalar potentials and (ii) in the electron-nuclear coupling operator. The former appear in the Schroedinger-like equation that drives the evolution of the nuclear degrees of freedom, whereas the latter is responsible for inducing non-adiabatic effects in the electronic evolution equation. As we have devoted previous studies to the analysis of the vector and scalar potentials, in this paper we focus on the properties of the electron-nuclear coupling operator, with the aim of describing a numerical procedure to approximate it within a semiclassical treatment of the nuclear dynamics.

  19. Barrier distribution from 28Si+154Sm quasielastic scattering: Coupling effects in the fusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Behera, B. R.; Jhingan, A.; Nayak, B. K.; Dubey, R.; Sharma, Priya; Thakur, Meenu; Mahajan, Ruchi; Saneesh, N.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Khushboo; Kumar, A.; Mandal, S.; Saxena, A.; Sugathan, P.; Rowley, N.

    2016-05-01

    Barrier distribution for the 28Si+154Sm system has been extracted from large angle quasielastic scattering measurement to investigate the role of various channel couplings on fusion dynamics. The coupled channel calculations, including the collective excitation of the target and projectile, are observed to reproduce the experimental BD rather well. It seems that the role of neutron transfer, relative to collective excitation, is in fact weak in the 28Si+154Sm system even though it has positive Q-value for neutron transfer channels.

  20. Good Vibrations: Cross-Frequency Coupling in the Human Nucleus Accumbens during Reward Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Michael X.; Axmacher, Nikolai; Lenartz, Doris; Elger, Christian E.; Sturm, Volker; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is critical for reward-guided learning and decision-making. It is thought to "gate" the flow of a diverse range of information (e.g., rewarding, aversive, and novel events) from limbic afferents to basal ganglia outputs. Gating and information encoding may be achieved via cross-frequency coupling, in which bursts of…

  1. THE COUPLED TRICKLING FILTER-ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS: DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A case history report was prepared on the upgrading of the Livermore, California, Water Reclamation Plant from a conventional trickling filter plant with tertiary oxidation ponds to a coupled trickling filter-activated sludge plant producing a nitrified effluent low in BOD5, susp...

  2. Understanding the systematic air temperature biases in a coupled climate system model through a process-based decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, R.-C.; Yang, Yang; Cai, Ming; Rao, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative attribution analysis is performed on the systematic atmospheric temperature biases in a coupled climate system model (flexible global ocean-atmosphere-land system model, spectral version 2) in reference to the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Re-analysis Interim data during 1979-2005. By adopting the coupled surface-atmosphere climate feedback response analysis method, the model temperature biases are related to model biases in representing the radiative processes including water vapor, ozone, clouds and surface albedo, and the non-radiative processes including surface heat fluxes and other dynamic processes. The results show that the temperature biases due to biases in radiative and non-radiative processes tend to compensate one another. In general, the radiative biases tend to dominate in the summer hemisphere, whereas the non-radiative biases dominate in the winter hemisphere. The temperature biases associated with radiative processes due to biases in ozone and water vapor content are the main contributors to the total temperature bias in the tropical and summer stratosphere. The overestimated surface albedo in both polar regions always results in significant cold biases in the atmosphere above in the summer season. Apart from these radiative biases, the zonal-mean patterns of the temperature biases in both boreal winter and summer are largely determined by model biases in non-radiative processes. In particular, the stronger non-radiative process biases in the northern winter hemisphere are responsible for the relatively larger `cold pole' bias in the northern winter polar stratosphere.

  3. Estimation of Electron Temperature and Frequency Components in a Dual Frequency Capacitively-Coupled Plasma Processing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Toru; Mo, Yun; Masahiro, Horigome

    2008-10-01

    The measurement of electron temperature in RF plasma sources with Langmuir probes is difficult because of the influence of rf noise. We attempted to estimate the electron temperature in a capacitively-coupled plasma processing reactor with a Surface Wave Probe [1] which employs microwaves. We also estimated the frequency spectrum with the sensitive PAP [1, 2]. We measured the harmonics which appeared in the bulk plasma for various experimental conditions in the dual-frequency [60 MHz and 2MHz] capacitively-coupled plasma processing reactor. We estimated RF power spectra for several experimental conditions like RF power [500-2000W], gas pressure [3-20Pa], and gas species [Ar, CF4]. The measurement results suggest the existence of energy transport among several frequency spectrum. [1ex] [1] K. Nakamura, M. Ohata, and H. Sugai: J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 21, 325 (2003). [0pt] [2] T. Shirakawa and H. Sugai : Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 32, 5129 (1993).

  4. Coupled-Trajectory Quantum-Classical Approach to Electronic Decoherence in Nonadiabatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Seung Kyu; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E. K. U.

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel quantum-classical approach to nonadiabatic dynamics, deduced from the coupled electronic and nuclear equations in the framework of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function. The method is based on the quasiclassical interpretation of the nuclear wave function, whose phase is related to the classical momentum and whose density is represented in terms of classical trajectories. In this approximation, electronic decoherence is naturally induced as an effect of the coupling to the nuclei and correctly reproduces the expected quantum behavior. Moreover, the splitting of the nuclear wave packet is captured as a consequence of the correct approximation of the time-dependent potential of the theory. This new approach offers a clear improvement over Ehrenfest-like dynamics. The theoretical derivation presented in this Letter is supported by numerical results that are compared to quantum mechanical calculations.

  5. Coupled terrestrial-glacier-fjord-ocean processes in the Gulf of Alaska and Greenland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, P.; Truffer, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present coupled terrestrial-glacier-fjord-ocean system response to changes in forcing from the Gulf of Alaska focusing on the role of glacier runoff on the Alaska Coastal Current. These highly coupled systems remain severely under sampled in time and space, and point to the need for improved sampling techniques of the nearshore environment. We also present detailed measurements from western Greenland consisting of ice-strengthened satellite-tracked surface drifters equipped with CTDs covering the upper 15 m of the ocean deployed in concert with SST surface drifters, ADCPs and shipboard CTD data. This unique data set highlight the complexity of circulation and upper ocean heat and salt content in narrow glacially-dominated fjords.

  6. Ternary and coupled binary zinc tin oxide nanopowders: Synthesis, characterization, and potential application in photocatalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ivetić, T.B.; Finčur, N.L.; Đačanin, Lj. R.; Abramović, B.F.; Lukić-Petrović, S.R.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Mechanochemically synthesized nanocrystalline zinc tin oxide (ZTO) powders. • Photocatalytic degradation of alprazolam in the presence of ZTO water suspensions. • Coupled binary ZTO exhibits enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to ternary ZTO. - Abstract: In this paper, ternary and coupled binary zinc tin oxide nanocrystalline powders were prepared via simple solid-state mechanochemical method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman and reflectance spectroscopy were used to study the structure and optical properties of the obtained powder samples. The thermal behavior of zinc tin oxide system was examined through simultaneous thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetric analysis. The efficiencies of ternary (Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and ZnSnO{sub 3}) and coupled binary (ZnO/SnO{sub 2}) zinc tin oxide water suspensions in the photocatalytic degradation of alprazolam, short-acting anxiolytic of the benzodiazepine class of psychoactive drugs, under UV irradiation were determined and compared with the efficiency of pure ZnO and SnO{sub 2}.

  7. Coupled processes of fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical reactions in reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongkon; Schwartz, Franklin W.; Xu, Tianfu; Choi, Heechul, and Kim, In S.

    2004-01-02

    A complex pattern of coupling between fluid flow and mass transport develops when heterogeneous reactions occur. For instance, dissolution and precipitation reactions can change a porous medium's physical properties, such as pore geometry and thus permeability. These changes influence fluid flow, which in turn impacts the composition of dissolved constituents and the solid phases, and the rate and direction of advective transport. Two-dimensional modeling studies using TOUGHREACT were conducted to investigate the coupling between flow and transport developed as a consequence of differences in density, dissolution precipitation, and medium heterogeneity. The model includes equilibrium reactions for aqueous species, kinetic reactions between the solid phases and aqueous constituents, and full coupling of porosity and permeability changes resulting from precipitation and dissolution reactions in porous media. In addition, a new permeability relationship is implemented in TOUGHREACT to examine the effects of geochemical reactions and density difference on plume migration in porous media. Generally, the evolutions in the concentrations of the aqueous phase are intimately related to the reaction-front dynamics. Plugging of the medium contributed to significant transients in patterns of flow and mass transport.

  8. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  9. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  10. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470