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Sample records for ozone hole 1999-2005

  1. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  2. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  3. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  4. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  5. The Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Because the effects are so serious, many investigators have been racing to determine the causes of the hole which develops each southern spring within the polar vortex, an isolated air mass that circulates around the South Pole during a large part of the year. This paper reviews two of the foremost theories for this ozone hole. Mechanisms of the pollution theory, which proposes that the cause is chlorofluorocarbons and nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere, are reviewed. The second theory proposes a natural shift in the air movements that transport ozone-rich air into the polar stratosphere during the southern spring as the cause. Current data suggest both theories are correct, but data are considered inconclusive.

  6. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  7. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  8. The 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million km2. This area is most strongly controlled by levels of inorganic chlorine and bromine oncentrations. In addition, dynamical variations modulate the size of the ozone hole by either cooling or warming the polar vortex collar region. We will review the size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. Using a simple trajectory model, we will demonstrate the sensitivity of the ozone hole to dynamical forcing, and we will use these observations to discuss the size of the ozone hole during the 2002 Austral spring. We will further show how the Cly decreases in the stratosphere will cause the ozone hole to decrease by 1-1.5% per year. We will also show results from a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) that has been continuously run since 1999. These CTM results directly show how strong dynamics acts to reduce the size of the ozone hole.

  9. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Sue

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. Herein we demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating C1 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area s variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  10. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. In this talk we will demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating 61 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area's variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  11. The 1991 Antarctic ozone hole - TOMS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Schoeberl, Mark; Newman, Paul; Stolarski, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Antarctic springtime ozone decline, as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), was similar to those of earlier deep ozone hole years, 1987, 1989, and 1990. The minimum total ozone value was recorded on October 5, 1991 at 108 Dobson units near the South Pole. This was 8 DU lower than in any of the earlier years. Four of the last five years have exhibited an extensive, deep ozone hole. The area of the hole was about the same as in 1987, 1989, and 1990. The recovery of the low total ozone values occurred in mid-November as the polar vortex broke up.

  12. The Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    The ozone hole is a massive loss of ozone that annually occurs over Antarctica during the Austral spring (August-November). Man-made chlorine and bromine compounds cause the ozone hole. As opposed to local urban pollution, the hole illustrates how man-made chemicals can affect the atmosphere over enormous regions remote from their release point. These chlorine and bromine gases have long lifetimes in the atmosphere; hence, the ozone hole will slowly recover into the next few decades. In this talk I will briefly cover some of the history of the Antarctic ozone hole and the theory behind the phenomena. I will then discuss the recovery of ozone over Antarctica. State-of-the-art computer models project the recovery of the ozone hole to 1980 levels by about 2050. However, this recovery may be affected by greenhouse warming.

  13. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this talk, I will show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. The ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. This 2070 recovery is 20 years later than recent projections. I will also discuss current assessments of mid-latitude ozone recovery.

  14. Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve; Schauffler, Sue; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS and OMI instruments. The severity of the hole has been assessed using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole), the average size during the September-October period, and the ozone mass deficit. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. We use two methods to estimate ozone hole recovery. First, we use projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates in a parametric model. Second, we use a coupled chemistry climate model to assess recovery. We find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. Furthermore, full recovery to 1980 levels will not occur until approximately 2068. We will also show some error estimates of these dates and the impact of climate change on the recovery.

  15. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We will show estimates of both when the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery, and when the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels.

  16. When will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the .TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to, both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. The ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. This 2070 recovery is 20 years later than recent projections.

  17. Quantitative characterization of the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, T.; Sakoda, Y.; Matsubara, K.; Takao, T.; Akagi, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Shibata, S.; Naganuma, H.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole is studied based on the TOMS data and the JMA data-set of stratospheric temperature in relation with the possible role of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's). The effective mass of depleted ozone in the ozone hole at its annual mature stage reached a historical maximum of 55 Mt in 1991, 4.3 times larger than in 1981. The ozone depletion rate during 30 days before the mature ozone hole does not show any appreciable long-term trend but the interannual fluctuations do, ranging from 0.169 to 0.689 Mt/day with the average of 0.419 Mt/day for the period of 1979 - 1991. The depleted ozone mass has the highest correlation with the region below 195 K on the 30 mb surface in June, whereas the ozone depletion rate correlates most strongly with that in August. The present result strongly suggests that the long-term evolution of the mature ozone hole is caused both by the interannual change of the latitudinal coverage of the early PSC's, which may control the latitude and date of initiation of ozone decrease, and by that of the spatial coverage of the mature PSC's which may control the ozone depletion rate in the Antarctic spring.

  18. Formation of the 1988 Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, A.J.; Stolarski, R.S.; Schoeberl, M.R. )

    1989-05-01

    The 1988 Antarctic ozone hole, as observed with the Nimbus 7 TOMS instrument, formed in August but failed to deepen significantly during September. The structure of the surrounding total ozone maxima also differed from the prior year. The 1987 total ozone pattern was pole centered and symmetrical. During 1988 a persistent strong wavenumber 1 perturbation in total ozone developed in August which resulted in displacement of the polar ozone minimum to the base of the Antarctic Peninsula. Subsequently, a series of transient events diminished and a larger scale decrease in polar total ozone began. The decrease lasted less than two weeks, resulting in a net change of only 25 DU compared with the nearly 100 DU decline observed during the same period in 1987. The minimum values remained roughly constant until October 19, 1988 and then increased rapidly. The 1988 Antarctic ozone hole subsequently drifted off the Antarctic continent in late October and dissipated in mid-November.

  19. Antarctic Ozone Hole on September 17, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellite data show the area of this year's Antarctic ozone hole peaked at about 26 million square kilometers-roughly the size of North America-making the hole similar in size to those of the past three years, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Researchers have observed a leveling-off of the hole size and predict a slow recovery. Over the past several years the annual ozone hole over Antarctica has remained about the same in both its size and in the thickness of the ozone layer. 'This is consistent with human-produced chlorine compounds that destroy ozone reaching their peak concentrations in the atmosphere, leveling off, and now beginning a very slow decline,' said Samuel Oltmans of NOAA's Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder, Colo. In the near future-barring unusual events such as explosive volcanic eruptions-the severity of the ozone hole will likely remain similar to what has been seen in recent years, with year-to-year differences associated with meteorological variability. Over the longer term (30-50 years) the severity of the ozone hole in Antarctica is expected to decrease as chlorine levels in the atmosphere decline. The image above shows ozone levels on Spetember 17, 2001-the lowest levels observed this year. Dark blue colors correspond to the thinnest ozone, while light blue, green, and yellow pixels indicate progressively thicker ozone. For more information read: 2001 Ozone Hole About the Same Size as Past Three Years. Image courtesy Greg Shirah, GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio, based on data from the TOMS science team

  20. Chemistry and Dynamics of the Unusual 2015 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch of the World Meteorological Organization includes several stations in Antarctica that keep a close eye on the ozone layer during the ozone hole season. Observations made during the unusually large ozone hole of 2015 will be compared to ozone holes from 2003 to 2014 and interpreted in light of the meteorological conditions. Satellite observations will be used to get a more general picture of the size and depth of the ozone hole and will also be used to calculate various metrics for ozone hole severity. In 2003, 2005 and 2006, the ozone hole was relatively large with more ozone loss than normal. This is in particular the case for 2006, which by most ozone hole metrics was the most severe ozone hole on record. On the other hand, the ozone holes of 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2012, 2013 and 2014 were less severe than normal, and only the very special ozone hole of 2002 had less ozone depletion when one regards the ozone holes of the last decade. The South Polar vortex of 2015 was unusually stable and long-lived, so ozone depletion lasted longer than seen in recent years. The ozone hole area, i.e. the area where total ozone is less that 220 DU, averaged over the worst 60 consecutive days was larger in 2015 than in any other year since the beginning of the ozone hole era in the early 1980s.

  1. Largest-ever Ozone Hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA instrument has detected an Antarctic ozone 'hole' (what scientists call an 'ozone depletion area') that is three times larger than the entire land mass of the United States-the largest such area ever observed. The 'hole' expanded to a record size of approximately 11 million square miles (28.3 million square kilometers) on Sept. 3, 2000. The previous record was approximately 10.5 million square miles (27.2 million square km) on Sept. 19, 1998. The ozone hole's size currently has stabilized, but the low levels in its interior continue to fall. The lowest readings in the ozone hole are typically observed in late September or early October each year. 'These observations reinforce concerns about the frailty of Earth's ozone layer. Although production of ozone-destroying gases has been curtailed under international agreements, concentrations of the gases in the stratosphere are only now reaching their peak. Due to their long persistence in the atmosphere, it will be many decades before the ozone hole is no longer an annual occurrence,' said Dr. Michael J. Kurylo, manager of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. Ozone molecules, made up of three atoms of oxygen, comprise a thin layer of the atmosphere that absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Most atmospheric ozone is found between approximately six miles (9.5 km) and 18 miles (29 km) above the Earth's surface. Scientists continuing to investigate this enormous hole are somewhat surprised by its size. The reasons behind the dimensions involve both early-spring conditions, and an extremely intense Antarctic vortex. The Antarctic vortex is an upper-altitude stratospheric air current that sweeps around the Antarctic continent, confining the Antarctic ozone hole. 'Variations in the size of the ozone hole and of ozone depletion accompanying it from one year to the next are not unexpected,' said Dr. Jack Kaye, Office of Earth Sciences Research Director, NASA Headquarters

  2. Total ozone changes in the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Doiron, Scott D.; Sechrist, Frank; Galimore, Reginald

    1988-01-01

    The development of the Antarctic ozone minimum was observed in 1987 with the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument. In the first half of August the near-polar (60 and 70 deg S) ozone levels were similar to those of recent years. By September, however, the ozone at 70 and 80 deg S was clearly lower than any previous year including 1985, the prior record low year. The levels continued to decrease throughout September until October 5 when a new record low of 109 DU was established at a point near the South Pole. This value is 29 DU less than the lowest observed in 1985 and 48 DU less than the 1986 low. The zonal mean total ozone at 60 deg S remained constant throughout the time of ozone hole formation. The ozone decline was punctuated by local minima formed away from the polar night boundary at about 75 deg S. The first of these, on August 15 to 17, formed just east of the Palmer Peninsula and appears to be a mountain wave. The second major minimum formed on September 5 to 7 again downwind of the Palmer Peninsula. This event was larger in scale than the August minimum and initiated the decline of ozone across the polar region. The 1987 ozone hole was nearly circular and pole centered for its entire life. In previous years the hole was perturbed by intrusions of the circumpolar maximum into the polar regions, thus causing the hole to be elliptical. The 1987 hole also remained in place until the end of November, a few days longer than in 1985, and this persistence resulted in the latest time for recovery to normal values yet observed.

  3. The Antarctic Ozone Hole: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Solomon, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone hole, an annual occurrence during austral spring, is caused by heterogeneous conversion of hydrogen chloride and chlorine nitrate to chlorine radicals. These reactions take place of polar stratospheric cloud particles in the cold, isolate Antarctic winter vortex. The chlorine radicals participate in chemical reactions that rapidly deplete ozone when sunlight returns at the end of polar night. International agreements eliminated production of the culprit anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons in the late 1990s, but due to their long stratospheric lifetime (50-100 years), the ozone hole will continue its annual appearance for years to come.

  4. CANOZE measurements of the Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. F. J.; Kerr, J. B.; Fast, H.

    1988-01-01

    In CANOZE 1 (Canadian Ozone Experiment), a series of 20 ozone profile measurements were made in April, 1986 from Alert at 82.5 N. CANOZE is the Canadian program for study of the Arctic winter ozone layer. In CANOZE 2, ozone profile measurements were made at Saskatoon, Edmonton, Churchill and Resolute during February and March, 1987 with ECC ozonesondes. Ground based measurements of column ozone, nitrogen dioxide and hydrochloric acid were conducted at Saskatoon. Two STRATOPROBE balloon flights were conducted on February 26 and March 19, 1987. Two aerosol flights were conducted by the University of Wyoming. The overall results of this study will be reported and compared with the NOZE findings. The results from CANOZE 3 in 1988, are also discussed. In 1988, as part of CANOZE 3, STRATOPROBE balloon flights were conducted from Saskatchewan on January 27 and February 13. A new lightweight infrared instrument was developed and test flown. A science flight was successfully conducted from Alert (82.5 N) on March 9, 1988 when the vortex was close to Alert; a good measurement of the profile of nitric acid was obtained. Overall, the Arctic spring ozone layer exhibits many of the features of the Antarctic ozone phenomenon, although there is obviously not a hole present every year. The Arctic ozone field in March, 1986 demonstrated many similarities to the Antarctic ozone hole. The TOMS imagery showed a crater structure in the ozone field similar to the Antarctic crater in October. Depleted layers of ozone were found in the profiles around 15 km, very similar to those reported from McMurdo. Enhanced levels of nitric acid were measured in air which had earlier been in the vortex. The TOMS imagery for March 1987 did not show an ozone crater, but will be examined for an ozone crater in February and March, 1988, the target date for the CANOZE 3 project.

  5. Tropospheric ozone in the vicinity of the ozone hole - 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Warren, Linda S.; Hypes, Warren D.; Tuck, Adrian F.; Kelly, Kenneth K.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on ozone measurements in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere over Antarctica, obtained by NASA DC-8 aircraft during the August/September 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The ozone mixing ratios as high as several hundred ppbv were measured, but in all cases these ratios were observed in pockets of upper atmospheric air, both in the vicinity of and away from the location of the ozone hole. The background ozone values in the surrounding troposphere were typically in the range of 20-50 ppbv. Correlation of tropospheric ozone observations with the boundaries of the ozone hole differed in the course of the experiment. During the August 28 - September 2 flights, encounters with ozone-rich air were limited, and the background tropospheric ozone appeared to decrease beneath the hole. For the later flights, and as the ozone hole deepened, the ozone-rich air was frequently observed in the vicinity of the hole, and the average ozone values at the flight altitude were frequently higher than the background values.

  6. Another deep Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1990-10-19

    Again in 1990, drastic depletion of stratospheric ozone over the South Pole has been measured, in August 140 Dobson units, far below the 220 Dobson units typically seen over Antarctica. This extensive destruction of ozone is determined to be brought about by sunshine acting in combination with the chlorine released from chlorofluorohydrocarbons (CFCs) by icy stratospheric clouds. It is concluded that CFC concentrations have now reached a level that will almost totally destroy the ozone in the lower stratosphere in most years.

  7. Observations of the Antarctic Ozone Hole from 2003 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch of WMO includes several stations in Antarctica that keep a close eye on the ozone layer during the ozone hole season. Observations made during the ozone holes from 2003 to 2014 will be compared to each other and interpreted in light of the meteorological conditions. Satellite observations will be used to get a more general picture of the size and depth of the ozone hole and will also be used to calculate various metrics for ozone hole severity. In 2003, 2005 and 2006, the ozone hole was relatively large with more ozone loss than normal. This is in particular the case for 2006, which by most ozone hole metrics was the most severe ozone hole on record. On the other hand, the ozone holes of 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2012 were less severe than normal, and only the very special ozone hole of 2002 had less ozone depletion when one regards the ozone holes of the last decade. The ozone hole of 2011 suffered more ozone depletion than in 2010, but it was quite average in comparison to other years of the last decade. The situation was similar in 2013 and 2014. The interannual variability will be discussed with the help of meteorological data, such as temperature conditions, possibility for polar stratospheric clouds, vortex shape and vortex longevity.

  8. Antarctic ozone hole hits record depth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-18

    A bad year for the ozone over Antarctica looked like a good bet this year. For the past 2 years, stratospheric ozone destruction has equaled the record set in 1987. Now things look even worse, with a record-setting ozone hole. In 1987, 1989, and 1990, the minimum amount of ozone over Antarctica early each October was 120 to 125 Dobson units compared to the typical level of 220 that prevailed before manmade Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) began eating into the ozone layer. The depletion allowed as much as twice the usual amount of biologically damaging ultraviolet light to reach the earth's surface. But researchers took some comfort in the fact that the hole seemed to have hit a barrier to further losses. Now that barrier may have been breached. On 6 October, the satellite-borne Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer detected an ozone minimum of 110 Dobson units. The region of the lower stratosphere where icy cloud particles and the chlorine of CFCs combine to destroy ozone - between 14 and 24 kilometers - looks much the same as it did in 1987.

  9. Tropospheric ozone in the vicinity of the ozone hole: 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, G.L.; Warren, L.S. ); Hypes, W.D. ); Tuck, A.F.; Kelly, K.K. ); Krueger, A.J. )

    1989-11-30

    Tropospheric ozone measurements over Antarctica aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft are summarized. As part of the August/September 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, the aircraft flew 13 missions covering a latitude of 53{degree}-90{degree}S, at altitudes to 13 km. Ozone mixing ratios as high as several hundred parts per billion by volume (ppbv) were measured, but in all cases these ratios were observed in pockets or patches of upper atmospheric air. These pockets were observed both in the vicinity of and away from the location of the ozone hole. At times, and as a result of these pockets, the ozone levels at the flight altitude of the aircraft, as averaged beneath the boundaries of the stratospheric ozone hole, were 2-3 times higher than background tropospheric values. The data suggest that the ozone-rich air seldom penetrated below about 9-km altitude. Background ozone values in the surrounding troposphere were typically in the range of 20-50 ppbv. Correlation of tropospheric ozone observations with the boundaries of the ozone hole differed during the experiment. During the early flights (August 28 through September 2), encounters with ozone-rich air were limited and background tropospheric ozone (at the flight altitude) appeared to decrease beneath the hole. For many of the later flights, and as the hole deepened, the reverse was noted, in that ozone-rich air was frequently observed in the vicinity of the hole and, as noted earlier, average ozone at the flight altitude was frequently higher than background values.

  10. Pinatubo fails to deepen the ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1992-10-15

    When the Philippine volcano Pinatubo exploded last year, pumping the upper atmosphere full of find debris, researchers foresaw yet another assault on the stratosphere's beleaguered ozone layer. Some calculations of the effects of volcanic debris implied that as much as 25% to 30% of the ozone shield over temperature latitudes might be eaten away by the volcanic haze - five times the observed loss over the past decade. Early measurements didn't bear out that concern, but researchers weren't prepared to call off the alarm until the verdict came in from the most vulnerable part of the planet's ozone layer, the frigid stratosphere over Antarctica. Although the hole was more extensive than ever before, probably because of unusual weather patterns, total ozone bottomed out well above the record set last year - even a tad above the low levels seen in 1987, 1989, and 1990.

  11. Antarctic Ozone Hole: Self-Recovery in Late Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shia, R.

    2008-12-01

    It is well accepted that the mixing with the air from middle latitudes leads to the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in the late spring after the vortex breaking. However, no models have successfully simulated the ozone recovery using this mechanism. Model usually fills up the ozone hole much slower than observations. Using the TOMS data of daily ozone column density, a budget analysis of two boxes, one from 60° S to the south pole and the other from 30° S to 60° S, shows that the mixing with the air from the middle latitudes alone cannot makes the ozone hole fully recovered, even if all the available extra ozone in the middle latitudes had been used to fill the hole. Therefore, increasing the mixing between the polar region and the middle latitudes cannot improve the model simulations of the recovery of the ozone hole. The time evolution of the total amount of ozone in those two boxes demonstrates that an extra ozone source is helping to fill the hole, especially in the early stage of the recovery. Based on the current knowledge of the ozone chemistry and transport in the stratosphere, the source of the extra ozone is very likely the one that is sequestered during the growing phase of the ozone hole. This means a significant part of the ozone, which is supposedly depleted during the growing phase of the ozone hole has actually not been destroyed photochemically, but is transformed into, e.g. a complex to avoid being detected as ozone. Once the physical and chemical conditions are changed after the vortex breaking the hidden ozone comes back into its normal gaseous form to fill the ozone hole. This conjecture would not only solve the ozone budget problem in the recovery phase of the Antarctic ozone hole and the problem of overestimation by the models of its dilution effects in the southern stratosphere but also reconcile the apparent contradiction between the observed rates of ozone depletion during the growing phase of the ozone hole and a recent lab

  12. Dynamics Explorer 1 SOI images of the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Bressette, W. E.; Chen, C.; Pitts, M. C.; Craven, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer (DE) satellite carries an Auroral Imaging Package which contains filters designed for performing backscatter ultraviolet measurements to measure total column ozone in the Earth's middle and lower atmosphere. Measurements are obtained at 317.5 mm (to measure ozone absorption) and 360 nm (to measure scene reflectivity). In October 1985 and 1986, measurements were obtained near apogee of the Antarctic ozone hole. The only other high spatial resolution measurements were obtained from the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) experiment. In October 1987, the Dynamics Explorer apogee had precessed into the Northern Hemisphere preventing measurements of the ozone hole. However, measurements should be obtained from DE of the ozone hole in both 1988 and 1989. Considering that the Nimbus 7 TOMS instrument has long exceeded its expected lifetime, the DE Spin Scan Ozone Imager (SOI) experiment could easily play a crucial role in studies of the ozone hole over the next few years.

  13. Unequivocal detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole through significant increases in atmospheric layers with minimum ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Jos; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    An important new landmark in present day ozone research is presented through MLS satellite observations of significant ozone increases during the ozone hole season that are attributed unequivocally to declining ozone depleting substances. For many decades the Antarctic ozone hole has been the prime example of both the detrimental effects of human activities on our environment as well as how to construct effective and successful environmental policies. Nowadays atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are on the decline and first signs of recovery of stratospheric ozone and ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole have been observed. The claimed detection of significant recovery, however, is still subject of debate. In this talk we will discuss first current uncertainties in the assessment of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole by using multi-variate regression methods, and, secondly present an alternative approach to identify ozone hole recovery unequivocally. Even though multi-variate regression methods help to reduce uncertainties in estimates of ozone recovery, great care has to be taken in their application due to the existence of uncertainties and degrees of freedom in the choice of independent variables. We show that taking all uncertainties into account in the regressions the formal recovery of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole cannot be established yet, though is likely before the end of the decade (before 2020). Rather than focusing on time and area averages of total ozone columns or ozone profiles, we argue that the time evolution of the probability distribution of vertically resolved ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole contains a better fingerprint for the detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole. The advantages of this method over more tradition methods of trend analyses based on spatio-temporal average ozone are discussed. The 10-year record of MLS satellite measurements of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole shows a

  14. The 1990 Antarctica ozone hole as observed by TOMS. [Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul; Stolarski, Richard; Schoeberl, Mark; Mcpeters, Richard; Krueger, Arlin

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 Antarctic ozone hole matched the record 1987 ozone hole in depth, duration, and area. During the formation phase of the hole (August), total ozone values were the lowest yet recorded. The decline rate approximately matched the record 1987 decline and reached a minimum of 125 Dobson Units on October 4, 1990. October total ozone averages were marginally higher that 1987. As during 1987, the 1990 total ozone values within the hole slowly and steadily increased during the mid-October through November period. The ozone hole breakup was the latest yet recorded (early December), with low ozone values persisting over the pole through December, setting a record low for December average polar ozone. Temperatures were near average during the early spring, but were below normal for the late spring. Temperatures in the early spring of 1990 were substantially warmer than those observed in the early spring of 1987.

  15. The 1990 Antarctic ozone hole as observed by TOMS. [Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.; Stolarski, R.; Schoeberl, M.; McPeters, R.; Krueger, A.

    1991-04-01

    The 1990 Antarctic ozone hole matched the record 1987 ozone hole in depth, duration, and area. During the formation phase of the hole (August), total ozone values were the lowest yet recorded. The decline rate approximately matched the record 1987 decline, and reached a minimum of 125 Dobson Units on October 4, 1990. October total ozone averages were marginally higher than 1987. As during 1987, the 1990 total ozone values within the hole slowly and steadily increased during the mid-October through November period. The ozone hole breakup was the latest yet recorded (early December), with low ozone values persisting over the pole through December, setting a record low for December average polar ozone. Temperatures were near average during the early spring, but were below normal for the late-spring. Temperatures in the early spring of 1990 were substantially warmer than those observed in the early spring of 1987.

  16. Impact of ozone mini-holes on the heterogeneous destruction of stratospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Stenke, A; Grewe, V

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive study of ozone mini-holes over the mid-latitudes of both hemispheres is presented, based on model simulations with the coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM representing atmospheric conditions in 1960, 1980, 1990 and 2015. Ozone mini-holes are synoptic-scale regions of strongly reduced total ozone, directly associated with tropospheric weather systems. Mini-holes are supposed to have chemical and dynamical impacts on ozone levels. Since ozone levels over northern mid-latitudes show a negative trend of approximately -4%/decade and since it exists a negative correlation between total column ozone and erythemally active solar UV-radiation reaching the surface it is important to understand and assess the processes leading to the observed ozone decline. The simulated mini-hole events are validated with a mini-hole climatology based on daily ozone measurements with the TOMS (total ozone mapping spectrometer) instrument on the satellite Nimbus-7 between 1979 and 1993. Furthermore, possible trends in the event frequency and intensity over the simulation period are assessed. In the northern hemisphere the number of mini-hole events in early winter decreases between 1960 and 1990 and increases towards 2015. In the southern hemisphere a positive trend in mini-hole event frequency is detected between 1960 and 2015 in spring associated with the increasing Antarctic Ozone Hole. Finally, the impact of mini-holes on the stratospheric heterogeneous ozone chemistry is investigated. For this purpose, a computer-based detection routine for mini-holes was developed for the use in ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM. This method prevents polar stratospheric cloud formation and therefore heterogeneous ozone depletion inside mini-holes. Heterogeneous processes inside mini-holes amount to one third of heterogeneous ozone destruction in general over northern mid- and high-latitudes during winter (January-April) in the simulation. PMID:12653290

  17. Estimating when the Antarctic Ozone Hole will Recover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). The severity of the hole has been assessed from satellites using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period. Profile information shows that ozone is completely destroyed in the 14-2 1 km layer by early October. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international a'greements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We estimate that the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of size decrease in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. Estimates of the ozone hole's recovery from models reveal important differences that will be discussed.

  18. Estimating When the Antarctic Ozone Hole Will Recover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). The severity of the hole has been assessed from satellites using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period. Profile information shows that ozone is completely destroyed in the 14-21 km layer by early October. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We estimate that the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of size decrease in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. Estimates of the ozone hole's recovery from models reveal important differences that will be discussed.

  19. Height resolved ozone hole structure as observed by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; de Laat, A. T. J.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; König-Langlo, G.; Wittig, J.

    2009-06-01

    We present Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) ozone profiles that were operationally retrieved with the KNMI Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) algorithm for the period September-December 2008. It is shown that it is possible to accurately measure the vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone for Antarctic ozone hole conditions from spectra measured at ultraviolet wavelengths from a nadir viewing instrument. Comparisons with ozone sonde observations from the Neumayer station at the Antarctic coast show a good agreement for various ozone profile shapes representing different phases of the annual recurring ozone hole cycle. A preliminary analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the ozone hole shows for example that at the vortex edges ozone rich mid-latitude middle and upper stratospheric layers can be found over ozone depleted lower stratospheric ‘ozone hole’ layers. These Antarctic ozone profile observations combined with the daily global coverage of GOME-2 enables the monitoring of the three-dimensional structure of the ozone hole on a daily basis.

  20. Detecting the Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We will show estimates of both when the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery, and when the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels.

  1. Observations of the 1995 ozone hole over Punta Arenas, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Sahai, Y.; Casiccia, C. A. R. S.; Zamorano, B. F.; Valderrama, V. V.

    1997-07-01

    We examine the appearance of the ozone hole over a populated area with more than 100,000 inhabitants. The largest population concentrations on the South American continent nearest the ozone hole region are Punta Arenas, Chile (53.0°S, 70.9°W) and Ushuaia, Argentina (54.5°S, 68.0°W), located close to the strait of Magallanes, opposite the Antarctic Peninsula. A special field mission was held in Punta Arenas, in September-October 1995 to investigate the vertical distribution of ozone during the appearance of the Antarctic ozone hole. Previous work has shown that the city of Punta Arenas is located at the edge of the hole area and is affected every year during a few days in the October period. The ozone trend near these locations is -0.5% per year using the yearly averages and -1.2% per year using the October means. This trend is 2 to 5 times larger than the global average. Several ozonesondes of the electrochemical concentration cell type were launched from Punta Arenas to determine the vertical distribution of ozone during "normal" and "perturbed" conditions. The ozone hole passed over Punta Arenas on October 12, 13 and 14, 1995. In addition to the sondes, which were launched once a day, ozone column amounts and UVB radiation were measured with a ground-based ozone Brewer spectrophotometer. The strongest ozone depletion over Punta Arenas in 1995 occurred on October 13, when the ozone column decreased from a "normal" value of about 325 Dobson Units (DU) to 200 DU; the vertical distribution of ozone on October 13 compared with October 6 shows depleted ozone roughly 50% less during hole conditions in the stratosphere. The UVB intensities have increased accordingly. The spectral ratio for October 13 to October 4 is 13 times larger at 297 nm.

  2. On the Size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is a region of extremely large ozone depletion that is roughly centered over the South Pole. Since 1979, the area coverage of the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million sq km. In the 8-year period from 1981 to 1989, the area expanded by 18 Million sq km. During the last 5 years, the hole has been observed to exceed 25 Million sq km over brief periods. In the spring of 2002, the size of the ozone hole barely reached 20 Million sq km for only a couple of days. We will review these size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. The area is derived from the area enclosed by the 220 DU total ozone contour. We will discuss the rationale for the choice of 220 DU: 1) it is located near the steep gradient between southern mid-latitudes and the polar region, and 2) 220 DU is a value that is lower than the pre-1979 ozone observations over Antarctica during the spring period. The phenomenal growth of the ozone hole was directly caused by the increases of chlorine and bromine compounds in the stratosphere. In this talk, we will show the relationship of the ozone hole's size to the interannual variability of Antarctic spring temperatures. In addition, we will show the relationship of these same temperatures to planetary-scale wave forcings.

  3. Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (Pre-Flight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The first segment of this video gives an overview of the Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, an international effort using balloon payloads, ground based instruments, and airborne instruments to study ozone depletion and the hole in the ozone over Antarctica which occurs every spring. False color imagery taken from NASA's Nimbus 7 satellite which documents daily changes in ozone is also shown. The second segment of this video shows actual take-off and flight footage of the two aircraft used in the experiment: the DC-8 Flying Laboratory and the high flying ER-2.

  4. Is the Ozone Hole over Your Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Eugene C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey of first year university science students regarding their understanding of the ozone layer, ozone depletion, and the effect of ozone depletion on Australia. Suggests that better teaching resources for environmental issues such as ozone depletion and global warming are needed before improvements in student understanding can be…

  5. Interagency cooperative scientific program to investigate antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    NASA, The Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Science Foundation and its National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the Chemical Manufacturer's Association have announced a cooperative investigation of the Antarctic ozone hole. The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment will fly specially instrumented NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft into the Antarctic ozone hole from August 17 through September 29. The experiments have been designed not only to test existing Antarctic ozone hole theories but to provide for a wide base of high quality atmospheric data in the event that none of the current hypotheses proves to be adequate. This experiment is prompted by recent observations that have shown a dramatic and unexpected downward trend in the amount of ozone in a column of air over the Antarctic in the period between late winter and early spring.

  6. What Controls the Size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Newman, Paul A.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Nash, Eric R.

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is a region of extremely large ozone depletion that is roughly centered over the South Pole. Since 1979, the area coverage of the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million square kilometers. In the 8-year period from 1981 to 1989, the area expanded by 18 Million square kilometers. During the last 5 years, the hole has been observed to exceed 25 Million square kilometers over brief periods. We will review these size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. The area is derived from the area enclosed by the 220 DU total ozone contour. We will discuss the rationale for the choice of 220 DU: 1) it is located near the steep gradient between southern mid-latitudes and the polar region, and 2) 220 DU is a value that is lower than the pre- 1979 ozone observations over Antarctica during the spring period. The phenomenal growth of the ozone hole was directly caused by the increases of chlorine and bromine compounds in the stratosphere. In this talk, we will show the relationship of the ozone hole's size to the interannual variability of Antarctic spring temperatures. In addition, we will show the relationship of these same temperatures to planetary-scale wave forcings.

  7. The southern hemisphere ozone hole split in 2002.

    PubMed

    Varotsos, Costas

    2002-01-01

    Among the most important aspects of the atmospheric pollution problem are the anthropogenic impacts on the stratospheric ozone layer, the related trends of the total ozone content drop and the solar ultraviolet radiation enhancement at the Earth's surface level. During September 2002, the ozone hole over the Antarctic was much smaller than in the previous six years. It has split into two separate holes, due to the appearance of sudden stratospheric warming that has never been observed before in the southern hemisphere. The analysis of this unprecedented event is attempted, regarding both the meteorological and photochemical aspects, in terms of the unusual thermal field patterns and the induced polar vortex disturbances. PMID:12515343

  8. Balloonborne ozone and aerosol measurements in the antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.J.; Harder, J.W.; Rolf, S.R.; Rosen, J.M. )

    1987-01-01

    The National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) was mounted in 1986 using winter fly-in flights to McMurdo Station in August, which is approximately the time the ozone reduction begins. The University of Wyoming Atmospheric Physics group participated in this expedition through balloonborne measurements of the vertical distribution of ozone and aerosol particles. Between 24 August and 6 November, 33 ozone soundings, 6 aerosol sounding, and 3 condensation nuclei soundings were conducted using polyethylene balloons which were able to penetrate the cold (< {minus}80C) antarctic stratosphere. The authors summarize these results here.

  9. Chemistry and dynamics of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    The Antarctic ozone hole is caused by human-produced chlorine and bromine compounds. The unique cold conditions of the Antarctic lower stratosphere in winter and spring allow for the development of polar stratospheric clouds. Chemical reactions on these stratospheric cloud particle surfaces (heterogeneous chemistry) release chlorine from reservoir species into highly reactive species that are easily photolyzed. Chlorine and bromine catalytic cycles result in massive ozone depletion during August and September. By early October, ozone is completely destroyed in the lower stratosphere over Antarctica. The amount of total ozone began a downward trend in the 1970s and stopped in the early 1990s. Current models indicate an ozone hole return date around 2067.

  10. The Ozone Hole of 2002 as Measured by TOMS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; McPeters, Richard D.; Newman, Paul A.

    2005-03-01

    Since its discovery in 1985, the ozone hole has been regularly mapped using the data from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments on several satellites. The current TOMS, on the Earth Probe satellite, has been taking measurements since 1996. The ozone hole first appeared during the 1980s. Since 1990, the hole has consistently developed during each Antarctic spring over a broad area with the minimum total ozone value reaching about 100 Dobson units (DU; 1 DU = 2.69 × 1016 molecules cm-2) in late September or early October. The year 2002 was markedly different from the past 12 years. A series of strong wave events weakened the South Polar vortex. In late September, a major stratospheric warming took place, reversing the direction of the polar flow and the latitudinal temperature gradient. This warming resulted in a division of the ozone hole into two pieces, one that migrated to lower latitudes and disappeared and one that reformed over the Pole in a weakened form. The development of this year's unusual ozone hole is shown here and is contrasted to a climatology of the years since 1990. Minimum daily values of total ozone barely reached 150 DU in contrast to values nearer to 100. The area of the ozone hole briefly reached 18 × 106 km2, then dropped rapidly to only 2 × 106 km2, and finally recovered to about 8 × 106 km2 before disappearing in early November. The positive anomaly compared with the last 12 yr near the Pole was accompanied by a smaller negative anomaly north of 45°S.

  11. Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer observations of the 1993 ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Newman, P. A.; Mcpeters, R.; Krueger, A. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Seftor, C. J.; Torres, O.; Jaross, G.; Cebula, R. P.; Larko, D.

    1995-01-01

    The development of the springtime (September-November) Antarctic ozone hole was observed by the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectromter (TOMS) to result in the lowest ozone value, 85 DU (Dobson units) on October 8, 1993, ever measured by TOMS. During late September and early October the region of extremely low ozone values was centered on the geographical pole between 85 deg S and 90 deg S. The geographical extent of the ozone hole region, the area within the 220-DU contour, reached a maximum during the first week in October at a near-circular area covering 24 x 10(exp 6) sq km reaching to the southern tip of South America. This approximately matched the 1992 area record. After the maximum area was reached in early October, the 1993 ozone hole region was significantly larger than during 1992 throughout the remainder of the month of October. The very low ozone values over the Antarctic continent have been confirmed by independent ground-based data. Unlike 1992, the formation of the 1993 Antarctic ozone hole does not coincide with unusually low ozone values observed over most of the globe for the past 2 years. The most recent ozone data from Meteor 3/TOMS show that there has been a recovery at all latitudes from the extraordinarily low values observed during 1992 and part of 1993 after the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Meteor 3/TOMS is described and compared with Nimbus 7/TOMS during the 1991 to May 1993 overlap period. Observations of the 1992 ozone hole are presented from both instruments and are shown to agree within 5 DU.

  12. Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer observations of the 1993 ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.R.; Newman, P.A.; Mcpeters, R.; Krueger, A.J.; Bhartia, P.K.; Seftor, C.J.; Torres, O.; Jaross, G.; Cebula, R.P.; Larko, D. |

    1995-02-01

    The development of the springtime (September-November) Antarctic ozone hole was observed by the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectromter (TOMS) to result in the lowest ozone value, 85 DU (Dobson units) on October 8, 1993, ever measured by TOMS. During late September and early October the region of extremely low ozone values was centered on the geographical pole between 85 deg S and 90 deg S. The geographical extent of the ozone hole region, the area within the 220-DU contour, reached a maximum during the first week in October at a near-circular area covering 24 x 10(exp 6) sq km reaching to the southern tip of South America. This approximately matched the 1992 area record. After the maximum area was reached in early October, the 1993 ozone hole region was significantly larger than during 1992 throughout the remainder of the month of October. The very low ozone values over the Antarctic continent have been confirmed by independent ground-based data. Unlike 1992, the formation of the 1993 Antarctic ozone hole does not coincide with unusually low ozone values observed over most of the globe for the past 2 years. The most recent ozone data from Meteor 3/TOMS show that there has been a recovery at all latitudes from the extraordinarily low values observed during 1992 and part of 1993 after the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Meteor 3/TOMS is described and compared with Nimbus 7/TOMS during the 1991 to May 1993 overlap period. Observations of the 1992 ozone hole are presented from both instruments and are shown to agree within 5 DU.

  13. Review of atmospheric ozone and current thinking on the Antarctic ozone hole. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A general review of the formation, global distribution and concentration variations on different temporal scales of atmospheric ozone is presented. The nature and extent of the recently discovered Antarctic ozone hole is discussed, and summaries of the various theories that have been advanced to account for this phenomenon are reviewed.

  14. An Ozone Increase in the Antarctic Summer Stratosphere: A Dynamical Response to the Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.; Gupta, M.; Newman, P. A.; Pawson, S.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Profiles of ozone concentration retrieved from the SBUV series of satellites show an increase between 1979 and 1997 in the summertime Antarctic middle stratosphere (approx. 25-10 hPa). Data over the South Pole from ozone sondes confirm the increase. A similar ozone increase is produced in a chemistry climate model that allows feedback between constituent changes and the stratospheric circulation through radiative heating. A simulation that excludes the radiative coupling between predicted ozone and the circulation does not capture this ozone increase. We show that the ozone increase in our model simulations is caused by a dynamical feedback in response to the changes in the stratospheric wind fields forced by the radiative perturbation associated with the Antarctic ozone hole.

  15. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  16. On the size of the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Nash, Eric R.

    2004-11-01

    A primary estimate of the severity of the Antarctic ozone hole is its size. The size is calculated from the area contained by total column ozone values less than 220 Dobson Units (DU) during September-October. The 220-DU value is used because it is lower than pre-1980 observed ozone values, and because it is in the strong ozone gradient region. We quantitatively show that the ozone hole size is primarily sensitive to effective stratospheric chlorine trends, and secondarily to the year-to-year variations in temperatures near the edge of the polar vortex. Temperatures are in turn sensitive to variations in tropospheric planetary wave forcing of the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere. Currently the average hole size reaches approximately 25 million km2 each spring. Slow decreases of ozone depleting substances will only result in a decrease of about 1 million km2 by 2015. This slow size decrease will be obscured by large dynamically forced year-to-year variations of 4 million km2 (1σ), and possibly delayed by greenhouse gas cooling of the Antarctic stratosphere.

  17. Decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Yung, Y L; Zurek, R W

    1996-04-20

    Ozone column amounts obtained by the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) in the southern polar region are analyzed during late austral winter and spring (days 240-300) for 1980-1991 using area-mapping techniques and area-weighted vortex averages. The vortex here is defined using the -50 PVU (1 PVU = 1.0 x 10(-6) K kg-1 m2 s-1) contour on the 500 K isentropic surface. The principal results are: (1) there is a distinct change after 1985 in the vortex-averaged column ozone depletion rate during September and October, the period of maximum ozone loss, and (2) the vortex-averaged column ozone in late August (day 240) has dropped by 70 Dobson units (DU) in a decade due to the loss in the dark and the dilution effect. The mean ozone depletion rate in the vortex between day 240 and the day of minimum vortex-averaged ozone is about 1 DU d-1 at the beginning of the decade, increasing to about 1.8 DU d-1 by 1985, and then apparently saturating thereafter. The vortex-average column ozone during September and October has declined at the rate of 11.3 DU yr-1 (3.8%) from 1980 to 1987 (90 DU over 8 years) and at a smaller rate of 2 DU yr-1 (0.9%) from 1987 to 1991 (10 DU over 5 years, excluding the anomalous year 1988). We interpret the year-to-year trend in the ozone depletion rate during the earlier part of the decade as due to the rise of anthropogenic chlorine in the atmosphere. The slower trend at the end of the decade indicates saturation of ozone depletion in the vortex interior, in that chlorine amounts in the mid-1980s were already sufficiently high to deplete most of the ozone in air within the isolated regions of the lower-stratospheric polar vortex. In subsequent years, increases in stratospheric chlorine may have enhanced wintertime chemical loss of ozone in the south polar vortex even before major losses during the Antarctic spring. PMID:11539364

  18. Causes and effects of a hole. [in Antarctic ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results from the U.S. National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) to Antarctica are reviewed. The NOZE ozonesonde measurements showed significant vertical structure in the hole, with 80 percent depletion in some of the 1 km layers but only 20 percent in adjacent layers. The depletion was confined to the 12-20 km region, beginning first at higher altitude and progressing downward. This is strong evidence against the theory that the ozone hole is due to solar activity producing odd nitrogen at high altitudes which is transported downwards, leading to enhanced odd-nitrogen catalytic cycles that destroy ozone. Nitrous oxide data show unusually low concentrations within the polar vortex, which is evidence against the theory that the hole is caused by a purely dynamical mechanism in which rising air motions within the polar vortex lead to reduced column densities of ozone. It is tentatively concluded that a chemical mechanism involving man-made chlorofluorocarbons is the likely cause of ozone depletion in the hole.

  19. The ozone hole - The role of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    The role of polar stratospheric clouds in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is considered. Several researchers have suggested that the decrease in ozone over Antarctica is related to the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) which had been observed in the antarctic winter stratosphere. Some of the pertinent characteristics of polar stratospheric clouds are discussed, and it is shown how these clouds may participate in the ozone destruction process. The satellite data for PSCs is analyzed, and statistical information regarding the number and maximum extinctions of these clouds is presented. Evidence that the polar stratospheric clouds are composed of frozen nitric acid is considered. It is suggested that the evaporation of the clouds, in late August and September, will release HOCl and HNO3 to the environment. This could be followed by the photodissociation of HOCl to OH and Cl, which would very effectively destroy ozone. However, the ozone destruction mechanism could be halted when enough of the evaporated nitric acid is photolized.

  20. Monitoring and future projections of the Antarctic Ozone Hole using the new Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarova, N. A.; Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Rault, D. F.; Seftor, C. J.; Xu, P.

    2013-12-01

    Using the new Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), launched October 2011 on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, we have studied the structure and evolution of the 2012 and 2013 ozone holes. The 1st ozone hole observations by OMPS began in 2012. We quality check the OMPS measurements by comparing to other satellite instruments (Aura MLS, OMI and SBUV) and ozone sonde balloon measurements. The comparisons reveal that OMPS is producing excellent Antarctic ozone hole information, and, thus, OMPS data can be used to continue the historical record of Antarctic ozone observations. In 2012 the ozone hole developed quite normally in the August to-late September 2012 period, but disappeared much more rapidly during the late-September to November period than it would be expected in a normal year. This resulted in the second weakest ozone hole observed since 1988. Some have suggested that the rapid 2012 disappearance is evidence that the Montreal Protocol is working. However, the development of the ozone hole in August and September is largely driven by chlorine and bromine from human-produced compounds, and the normal development of the ozone hole in August-September 2012 suggests that chlorine and bromine levels were roughly the same as previous years. At the same time, observations from meteorological data show that there were stronger than average weather systems, faster warming during the September -November period, and stronger vertical motions, that led to a rapid decay of the 2012 ozone hole. Hence, the weak ozone hole of 2012 is not evidence that the Montreal Protocol has impacted the ozone hole. The characteristics of the 2013 ozone hole, as observed by OMPS, will also be shown in the presentation. Model predictions suggest that the ozone hole will begin showing signs of recovery in about 2018, and it will be fully recovered back to 1980 levels in about 2065. We will update projections of the ozone hole recovery using a parametric model

  1. DISC0VR, a unique tool to study the mechanisms that generate ozone mini-holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitelbaum, H.

    2011-12-01

    An ozone mini-hole is a region of strongly depleted column total ozone amount, that can persist for several days. They are characterized by a rapid and small-scale decrease of columnar ozone and an equally rapid recovery after a few days. "Mini ozone holes" are frequently observed at northern hemisphere mid-latitudes in winter. They evolve rapidly and according to some authors, may originate because of northeast motions of air patches with low total ozone content. However, several other studies attribute the formation of ozone mini-holes to the uplift of air masses that decrease the ozone columnar content by simply decreasing the pressure thickness of the ozone layer, without changing the mixing ratio. According to these studies, the latter mechanism explains the main reduction of ozone that occurs between the tropopause and the ozone maximum during an ozone mini-hole event. Since ozone mini-holes cannot be the result of ozone chemical destruction, they should be the result of meteorological processes. In many cases the mini-holes move, the direction and speed of movement is of great importance for the study of the mechanism that causes the phenomenon. DISCOVR, because of its spatial resolution, continuous time coverage and its ability to detect ozone, can describe the irregularities of ozone and its displacement. Complemented by a method of tracing air mass trajectories (FLEXTRA) the DSCOVR observations will allow us to determine the mechanisms of ozone mini-holes formation.

  2. Hidden homicide increases in the USA, 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Webster, Daniel; Baker, Susan P

    2008-07-01

    Prior to 1999, dramatic fluctuations in homicide rates were driven by changes in the rates of firearm homicide among men aged 15-24. Since 2000, the overall homicide rate has appeared stable, masking any changes in population subgroups. We analyzed recent trends in homicide rates by weapon, age, race, gender, state, and urbanization to determine whether the risk of victimization increased substantially during 1999-2005 for demographic subgroups. The analysis of WISQARS data and Wonder data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed no trend in the homicide rate nationally between 1999 and 2005; this obscured large increases in firearm homicide rates among black men aged 25-44 and among white men aged 25-34. Between 1999 and 2005, for ages 25-44 combined, the increase for black men was 31% compared with 12% for white men. Significant increases among men aged 25-44 occurred in Alabama, California, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washington. The firearm homicide rate increased the most in large central metropolitan areas (+32%) and large fringe metropolitan areas (+30%) for men aged 25-44. We conclude that the recent, unrecognized increases in firearm homicide among men aged 25-44, especially black men, in large metropolitan areas merit the attention of policymakers. PMID:18509760

  3. Improving forecast of Antarctic ozone hole by using Aura OMI ozone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Long, C. S.; Miller, A. J.; Flynn, L.; Beck, T.; Wu, W.; Hou, Y.; Iredell, M.; Moorthi, S.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole can be predicted by major operational numerical models up to seven days in advance. Beyond seven days the predictions are hindered in part by the model's nonlinear dynamics and in part by the lack of ozone observation inside the polar night vortex. By assimilating Aura OMI total ozone in the NCEP global forecast system (GFS), which currently uses NOAA-16 SBUV/2 ozone only, the global coverage and horizontal resolution of ozone observations are greatly enhanced. Partly because OMI has higher latitudinal resolution and cross-track measuring capacity, while the NOAA-16 orbit has drifted to a mid afternoon equator crossing time, the OMI data cover farther poleward than the SBUV/2 data in the austral winter. One expects that including OMI total ozone will help not only earlier detection and better forecast of the Antarctic ozone hole, but also to improve the forecast of polar temperature and polar vortex. Results from forecast experiments with NCEP GFS are used to determine to what extent improvements can be made by adding the OMI information.

  4. The 1989 Antarctic ozone hole as observed by TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.; Schoeberl, M.R.; McPeters, R.D.; Krueger, A.J. ); Newman, P.A. )

    1990-08-01

    In 1989 the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite observed the springtime decrease in Antarctic total ozone for the 11th consecutive year. The 1989 minimum values of total ozone measured by TOMS declined throughout the month of September a6t a rate nearly identical to 1987. The National Meteorological Center analysis of lower stratospheric temperatures in August and September 1989 also showed conditions similar to those observed in 1987. A minimum in total ozone of 111 DU was reached on October 7, 1989. Within uncertainties this is the same as previously observed minimum on October 5, 1987. The area of the ozone hole as defined by the 220 DU contour grew rapidly during early September. It reached a mid-September peak of 7.5% of the southern hemisphere or 19 million square kilometers, essentially the same as observed in 1987. From mid October through November 1989, minimum polar total ozone values increased and the are within the 220 DU contour decreased more rapidly than during the comparable period of 1987. The more rapid erosion of the 1989 ozone hole resulted from strong wave number one perturbations of the vortex dynamics in late October.

  5. TRANSPORT, RADIATIVE, AND DYNAMICAL EFFECTS OF THE ANTARCTIC OZONE HOLE: A GFDL "SKYHI" MODEL EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GFDL 'SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic "ozone hole" phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. oth the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated ...

  6. The 2010 Antarctic ozone hole: Observed reduction in ozone destruction by minor sudden stratospheric warmings

    PubMed Central

    de Laat, A. T. J.; van Weele, M.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite observations show that the 2010 Antarctic ozone hole is characterized by anomalously small amounts of photochemical ozone destruction (40-60% less than the 2005-2009 average). Observations from the MLS instrument show that this is mainly related to reduced photochemical ozone destruction between 20-25 km altitude. Lower down between 15-20 km the atmospheric chemical composition and photochemical ozone destruction is unaffected. The modified chemical composition and chemistry between 20-25 km altitude in 2010 is related to the occurrence of a mid-winter minor Antarctic Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW). The measurements indicate that the changes in chemical composition are related to downward motion of air masses rather than horizontal mixing, and affect stratospheric chemistry for several months. Since 1979, years with similar anomalously small amounts of ozone destruction are all characterized by either minor or major SSWs, illustrating that their presence has been a necessary pre-condition for reduced Antarctic stratospheric ozone destruction. PMID:22355557

  7. The 2010 Antarctic ozone hole: observed reduction in ozone destruction by minor sudden stratospheric warmings.

    PubMed

    de Laat, A T J; van Weele, M

    2011-01-01

    Satellite observations show that the 2010 Antarctic ozone hole is characterized by anomalously small amounts of photochemical ozone destruction (40-60% less than the 2005-2009 average). Observations from the MLS instrument show that this is mainly related to reduced photochemical ozone destruction between 20-25 km altitude. Lower down between 15-20 km the atmospheric chemical composition and photochemical ozone destruction is unaffected. The modified chemical composition and chemistry between 20-25 km altitude in 2010 is related to the occurrence of a mid-winter minor Antarctic Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW). The measurements indicate that the changes in chemical composition are related to downward motion of air masses rather than horizontal mixing, and affect stratospheric chemistry for several months. Since 1979, years with similar anomalously small amounts of ozone destruction are all characterized by either minor or major SSWs, illustrating that their presence has been a necessary pre-condition for reduced Antarctic stratospheric ozone destruction. PMID:22355557

  8. Heterogeneous physicochemistry of the polar ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, R.P. ); Toon, O.B. ); Hamill, P. )

    1989-11-30

    The heterogeneous physical and chemical processes that occur in the presence of and involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are investigated. The theory developed here is guided by, and compared for consistency with, the extensive observations from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The authors first describe the characteristics of PSCs that affect chemical processes, such as particle composition, cloud surface area and mass, and aerosol mechanical time constants. The vapor pressures of trace compounds measured over ice in laboratory settings are discussed and shown to be consistent with in situ observations and simple thermodynamics. The mechanism for the formation of nitric acid haze (type I PSC) is elucidated. To estimate key chemical time constants, they derive expressions for the rates of mass transfer to PSC particles and reaction rates on surfaces; here, laboratory measurements of sticking coefficients are related to the fundamental parameters of surface physics and chemistry. They reach several important conclusions. The HCL + ClONO{sub 2}, ClONO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}O{sub 5} + HCl, and N{sub 2}O{sub 5} + H{sub 2}O reactions can occur on early forming type I PSC (haze) particles, converting inert chlorine to active chlorine (Cl{sub 2}, HOCl, and ClONO{sub 2}) and active nitrogen to HNO{sub 3} relatively quickly. Denitrification occurs somewhat later in the winter season with the formation of type II PSC (ice cirrus) clouds, which can absorb HNO{sub 3} in solid solution and remove the HNO{sub 3} by sedimentation; the degree of denitrification is sensitive to the cooling rate and the time constant for condensation of nitric acid haze. Dechlorination does not occur as efficiently as denitrification because the HCl reservoir is effectively depleted by conversion into active chlorine before the onset of type II cloud formation and denitrification.

  9. Global impact of the Antarctic ozone hole: Chemical Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, M.; Jaffe, A.H. )

    1990-03-20

    A model is presented for the chemical mixing of stratosphere air over spatial scales from tens of kilometers to meters. Photochemistry, molecular diffusion, and strain (the stretching of air parcels due to wind shear) are combined into a single one-dimensional model. The model is applied to the case in which chemically perturbed air parcels from the Antarctic stratosphere are transported to mid-latitudes and strained into thin ribbon-like filaments until they are diffusively mixed with the ambient stratosphere. For this sensitivity study the authors consider four types of Antarctic air: a control case representing unprocessed polar air; heterogeneous processing by polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) that has repartitioned the Cl{sub x} and NO{sub y} families; processing that also includes denitrification and dehydration; and all processing plus 90% ozone depletion. Large abundances of ClO, resulting initially from heterogeneous processing of stratospheric air on PSCs, are sustained by extensive denitrification. (One exception is the case of Antarctic air with major ozone depletion in which ClO is converted rapidly to HCl upon release of small amounts of NO{sub x} as a result of the extremely nonlinear Cl{sub x}-NO{sub y} chemical system.) ClO concentrations in the mid-latitude stratosphere should be enhanced by as much as a factor of 5 due to the mixing of air processed around the Antarctic vortex and will remain elevated for most of the following season. Chemical propagation of the Antarctic ozone hole occurs in two phases: rapid loss of ozone in the heterogeneously processed parcels as they evolve in isolation, and more slowly, a relative recovery of ozone over the following months. Another important effect is the transport of denitrified Antarctic air reducing NO{sub x} and hence the total catalytic destruction of ozone throughout the southern mid-latitudes.

  10. Does the Antarctic ozone hole have a future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. Fred

    1988-11-01

    In spite of recent discoveries related to the mechanism of the Antarctic ozone hole (AOH), we do not as yet have a sufficient scientific base to answer important policy questions: is the AOH a completely new phenomenon, or is it are current one? Is it produced by human activities? And what can and should be done about it? I suggest here a hypothesis concerning the cause of the AOH, which may provide at least partial answers.The AOH is more than a scientific curiosity. Its dramatic discovery in 1985 raised fears about the fate of global ozone and provided the impetus for an international effort to limit and roll back the worldwide production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), synthetic chemicals widely used in refrigeration and industrial processes.

  11. UV photolysis of ClOOCl and the ozone hole.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jim J; Chen, Andrew F; Lee, Yuan T

    2011-07-01

    The photochemistry of the ClO dimer (ClOOCl) plays a central role in the catalytic destruction of polar stratospheric ozone. In spite of decades of intense investigations, some of its laboratory photochemical data had not reached the desired accuracy to allow a reliable simulation of the stratospheric ozone loss until recently. Inevitable impurities in ClOOCl samples have obstructed conventional measurements. In particular, an absorption measurement of ClOOCl in 2007, which gave much lower cross sections than previous studies, implied that the formation of the ozone hole cannot be explained with current chemical models. Scientists have wondered whether the model is insufficient or the data is erroneous. Efforts aiming to resolve this controversy are reviewed in this paper, which emphasizes newly developed experiments to determine two critical photochemical properties of ClOOCl--its absorption cross section and product branching ratio--including the first reported product branching ratio at 351.8 nm photolysis. PMID:21538907

  12. The Antarctic Ozone Hole: Initial Results from Aura / OMI Compared with TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Newman, P.

    2004-01-01

    A series of TOMS instruments (on November 7 , Meteor 3, and Earth Probe) has been monitoring the annual development of the Antarctic ozone hole since the 1980s. The ozone mapping instrument on Aura, OMI, is expected to take over this record of observation from the aging Earth Probe TOMS instrument. The area of the ozone hole can be taken as a sensitive indicator of the magnitude of ozone destruction each year. The timing of initial formation of the ozone hole and its duration are sensitive to the atmospheric dynamics of the southern polar regions. The entire TOMS data record (1978 - 2004) has recently been reprocessed with the new version 8 algorithm, which includes a revised calibration. The effect has been to slightly increase ozone hole area over earlier estimates, but only by 23%. OMI (ozone monitoring instrument) on Aura is a hyperspectral imaging instrument that operates in a pushbroom mode to measure solar backscattered radiation in the ultraviolet and visible. OMI has higher spatial resolution than TOMS - 14 x 24 km versus 38 km x 38 km from TOMS. OMI has now begin mapping total column ozone on a global basis in a measurement similar to TOMS. The ozone hole measurements for 2003 are compared with those from Earth Probe TOMS.

  13. Association of Smoking with Body Weight in US High School Students, 1999-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Jiang, Nan; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association of current smoking with body mass index (BMI) and perceived body weight among high school students in the United States. Methods: We analyzed data from the 1999-2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Results: Perceived body weight and BMI were associated with adolescents' current smoking. Adjusted odds ratios…

  14. Research Spotlight: Ozone hole shift exposed South America to increased ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofori, Leslie; Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-12-01

    The ozone layer, which protects humans, plants, and animals from potentially damaging ultraviolet (UV) light from the Sun, develops a hole above Antarctica in September that typically lasts until early December. However, in November 2009, that hole shifted its position, leaving the southern tip of South America exposed to UV light at levels much greater than normal.

  15. Decending motion of particle and its effect on ozone hole chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaka, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Particle descending motion is one possible process which causes ozone loss near the tropopause in the Antarctic spring. However, this particle size distribution has not yet been measured. Particle settling is an important redistribution process of the chemical constituents contained in the particles. To understand particle settling effects on the Ozone Hole, information on the size distribution and the chemical composition of the particles is necessary.

  16. A chemical definition of the boundary of the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, M. H.; Powell, J. A.; Tuck, A. F.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Krueger, A. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gary, B. L.; Margitan, J. J.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    A program designed to study the Antarctic ozone hole using ER-2 high-altitude and DC-8 aircraft was conducted out of Punta Arenas, Chile during August 17-September 22, 1987. Graphs are presented of ozone and chlorine monoxide when crossing the boundary of the chemically perturbed region on August 23 and on September 21. Interpretations of ClO, H2O, and N2O measurements are presented, indicating ongoing diabetic cooling and advective poleward transport across the boundary.

  17. Large stratospheric sudden warming in Antarctic late winter and shallow ozone hole in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzawa, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Sadao )

    1990-01-01

    There occurred a large stratospheric sudden warming in the southern hemisphere in late winter of 1988 which competes in suddenness and size with major mid-winter warmings in the northern hemisphere. Associated with the dynamical phenomenon of the sudden warming, total ozone increased over the eastern hemispheric part of Antarctica. The sudden warming as well as other warmings which followed it made the 1988 Antarctic ozone hole shallow in depth and small in area.

  18. Transport, radiative, and dynamical effects of the antarctic ozone hole: A GFDL SKYHI' model experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlman, J.D; Umscheid, L.J. ); Pinto, J.P. )

    1994-02-15

    The GFDL SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic ozone hole' phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated by parameterized simplifications of the still somewhat uncertain chemical processes. The modeled total column ozone depletions are near 25% in spring over Antarctica, with 1% depletion reaching equatorial latitudes by the end of the 4 1/2-year model experiment. In the lower stratosphere, ozone reductions of 5% reach to the equator. Large coolings of about 8 K are simulated in the lower stratospheric over Antarctica in late spring, while a general cooling of about 1-1.5 K is present throughout the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere. The model atmosphere experiences a long-term positive temperature-chemical feedback because significant ozone reductions carry over into the next winter. The overall temperature response to the reduced ozone is essentially radiative in character. However, substantial dynamical changes are induced by the ozone hole effect. The Antarctic middle stratosphere in late spring warms by about 6 K over Antarctica and the lower midlatitude stratosphere warms by approximately 1 K. These warming spots are produced mainly by an increased residual circulation intensity. Also, the Antarctic vortex becomes tighter and more confined as a result of the reduced ozone. These two dynamical effects combine to steepen the meridional slope of quasi-conservative trace constituent isolines. Thus, the entire transport, radiative, and dynamical climatology of the springtime stratosphere is affected to an important degree by the ozone hole phenomenon. Over the entire year, however, these dynamical effects are considerably smaller. 27 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Transport, radiative, and dynamical effects of the antarctic ozone hole: A GFDL 'SKYHI' model experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlman, J.D.; Pinto, J.P.; Umscheid, L.J.

    1994-02-15

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory 'SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic 'ozone hole' phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated by parameterized simplifications of the still uncertain, more complete chemical processes. The modeled total column ozone depletions are near 25% in spring over Antarctica, with 1% depletion reaching equatorial latitudes by the end of the 4 1/2 year model experiment. In the lower stratosphere, ozone reductions of 5% reach to the equator. Large coolings of about 8 C are simulated in the lower stratosphere over Antarctica in late spring, while a general cooling of about 1-1.5 C is present throughout the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere. The model atmosphere experiences a long-term positive temperature-chemical feedback because significant ozone reductions carry over into the next winter. The overall temperature response to the reduced ozone is essentially radiative in character. However, substantial dynamical changes are induced by the ozone hole effect. The Antarctic middle stratosphere in late spring warms by about 6 C over Antarctica and the lower mid-latitude stratosphere warms by approximately one degree. These warming spots are produced mainly by an increased residual circulation intensity.

  20. Arctic "ozone hole" in a cold volcanic stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Tabazadeh, A; Drdla, K; Schoeberl, M R; Hamill, P; Toon, O B

    2002-03-01

    Optical depth records indicate that volcanic aerosols from major eruptions often produce clouds that have greater surface area than typical Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A trajectory cloud-chemistry model is used to study how volcanic aerosols could affect springtime Arctic ozone loss processes, such as chlorine activation and denitrification, in a cold winter within the current range of natural variability. Several studies indicate that severe denitrification can increase Arctic ozone loss by up to 30%. We show large PSC particles that cause denitrification in a nonvolcanic stratosphere cannot efficiently form in a volcanic environment. However, volcanic aerosols, when present at low altitudes, where Arctic PSCs cannot form, can extend the vertical range of chemical ozone loss in the lower stratosphere. Chemical processing on volcanic aerosols over a 10-km altitude range could increase the current levels of springtime column ozone loss by up to 70% independent of denitrification. Climate models predict that the lower stratosphere is cooling as a result of greenhouse gas built-up in the troposphere. The magnitude of column ozone loss calculated here for the 1999--2000 Arctic winter, in an assumed volcanic state, is similar to that projected for a colder future nonvolcanic stratosphere in the 2010 decade. PMID:11854461

  1. Australian Students' Appreciation of the Greenhouse Effect and the Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Examines students' explanations of the greenhouse effect and the hole in the ozone layer, using a life-world and scientific dichotomy. Illuminates ideas often expressed in classrooms and sheds light on the progression in students' developing powers of explanation. Contains 17 references. (DDR)

  2. The morphology and meteorology of Southern Hemisphere spring total ozone mini-holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Lait, Leslie R.; Schoeberl, Mark R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the properties of mini-hole events. Both Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data and National Meteorological Center (NMC) meteorological analyses will be used to determine the horizontal, vertical and temporal characteristics of the mini-holes. Mini-holes are rapidly developing (1 to 5 days), small horizontal scale (1000 to 3000 km) features which appear in the polar total ozone field during September and October of each year. Typically, a total of 1 to 6 mini-holes appear each year in either the Palmer penninsula region or over the East Antarctica ice sheet. The mini-holes do not develop over these two regions, but they intensify most dramatically there (possibly associated with the local orography). The mini-holes are associated with cold pools of air in the lower stratosphere, anti-cyclonic (geopotential height highs) disturbances to their west, high potential vorticity slightly to the east, and strong northward flow. These meteorological features are baroclinic, having a distinct westward tilt with increasing altitude.

  3. Evolution of the Antarctic polar vortex in spring: Response of a GCM to a prescribed Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boville, B. A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    The possible effect of the Antartic ozone hole on the evolution of the polar vortex during late winter and spring using a general circulation model (GCM) is examined. The GCM is a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model whose domain extends from the surface to the mesosphere and is similar to that described on Boville and Randel (1986). Ozone is not a predicted variable in the model. A zonally averaged ozone distribution is specified as a function of latitude, pressure and month for the radiation parameterization. Rather that explicitly address reasons for the formation of the ozone hole, researchers postulate its existence and ask what effect it has on the subsequent evolution of the vortex. The evolution of the model when an ozone hole is imposed is then discussed.

  4. Changes of the Antarctic ozone hole: Controlling mechanisms, seasonal predictability, and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salby, Murry L.; Titova, Evgenia A.; Deschamps, Lilia

    2012-05-01

    The ozone hole changes considerably from one year to the next. It varies between conditions in which springtime ozone is strongly depleted to others in which ozone is only weakly depleted. Those changes are shown to closely track anomalous planetary wave forcing of the residual circulation. The strong coherence with planetary wave forcing is consistent with similar coherence of springtime temperature, which modulates Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC). By controlling the lifetime of PSC, anomalous wave forcing determines the net activation of chlorine and bromine and, hence, springtime depletion of ozone during individual years. The strong coherence with planetary wave forcing affords long-range predictability. It supports a seasonal forecast of springtime depletion, which, through the ozone mass deficit, perturbs ozone across much of the Southern Hemisphere during subsequent months of summer. Conditioned upon wintertime wave structure, a hindcast of springtime depletion faithfully predicts the anomalous ozone observed. A reliable forecast of tropospheric planetary waves would thus enable springtime depletion to be predicted. The current evolution of Antarctic ozone is dominated by dynamically-induced changes. Representing its climate variability, those large changes obscure the more gradual evolution of springtime depletion, like that associated with the decline of chlorine. The strong dependence on planetary wave forcing, however, enables dynamically-induced changes of ozone to be identified accurately. Removing them unmasks the secular variation of Antarctic ozone, the part coherent over a decade and longer. Independent of dynamically-induced changes, that component discriminates to changes associated with stratospheric composition. It reveals a gradual but systematic rebound over the last decade. The upward trend is shown to be robust, significant at the 99.5% level. Uncertainty in this trend is thus small enough to make the probability of it arising through

  5. Radiative aspects of Antarctic ozone hole in 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akiyoshi, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Uryu, M.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the radiative heating effects of aerosols during September - October, 1985, at Antarctica, researchers solved the radiative transfer equation using a one-dimensional model, which includes the absorption of solar energy by water vapor, carbon dioxide, ozone and aerosols, the thermal emission and absorption by the above species and in addition, Rayleigh and Mie scattering, and the surface scattering effects. In this calculation, they used data of ozone density, water vapor density and aerosol extinction at 0.385, 0.453, 0.525 and 1.02 mu m in the stratosphere obtained by SAGE II satellite and meteorological data from NOAA. Results show that the Antarctic stratosphere is nearly in radiative equilibrium during that period, if the effects of aerosols are excluded. It is also shown that the heating effects of aerosols are too small to cause effective upward motions, in spite of some ambiguous parameters such as aerosol composition. The parameter dependences of results are also discussed.

  6. Increase in Ozone hole and hence UV-B Preceding Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2007-05-01

    Before the occurrence of earthquake, the change has been observed in ozone hole as well as UV-B flux in the atmosphere of the earth. After earthquake the UV-B flux reduces, which is correlated with the fluctuation in atmospheric temperature as well as Electron flux in Sun-Earth environment. Actual measurement show a linear relationship in between Coronal Mass Ejection and increase in Solar UV- B before the earthquakes in various parts of India.

  7. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  8. An Earlier Natural Mechanism Proposal for the Closure of the Ozone Hole and the Present 30% Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz M.; Al-Kuhaimi, Siham A.; Bebars, Aisha

    2011-06-01

    A prolonged period of reduced solar activity of the order of few decades is expected owing to the presence of weak solar cycles series like those around 1800 and 1900 AD. Reduced UV flux is forecasted. The multitude of phytoplanktons in the Antarctic Ocean which are harmed by excessive UV passing through the ozone hole are expected to recover owing to the reduced solar UV doze even with the existence of ozone hole. An increase of only 10% of the phytoplankton would remove about 5 Gigatons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere annually (which is equal to the amount of carbon dioxide emitted currently by fossil fuel utilization) and sink it into the ocean. Reduction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will lead to cooling of the troposphere and hence warming of Antarctic stratospheric clouds which are the sight of ozone destruction. Eventually, this procedure will hopefully lead to Antarctic ozone hole closure. The paper also discuss the implication of the 1997 solar induced climate change on the appearance of the Arctic ozone hole and the reduction of the Antarctic ozone hole. Anther more serious solar indsolarinduced climate change is currently on due to the end of the first weak solar cycle number 23 and the start of predicated second weaker solar cycle number 24. A climate change, which has already brought global cooling to the earth. The Ozone hole has been closed by 30% in 2007 as prdicted which a triumph is for the subject of sun-Earth connections. It is also predicted that further closures in the coming few years will occur due to solar induced climate changes. The forecast of the ozone hole closure was predicted in earlier papers.

  9. Effects of injected ice particles in the lower stratosphere on the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, H.; Kinnison, D. E.; Petersen, A. K.; Vitt, F.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2015-05-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole will continue to be observed in the next 35-50 years, although the emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have gradually been phased out during the last two decades. In this paper, we suggest a geo-engineering approach that will remove substantial amounts of hydrogen chloride (HCl) from the lower stratosphere in fall, and hence limit the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole in late winter and early spring. HCl will be removed by ice from the atmosphere at temperatures higher than the threshold under which polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are formed if sufficiently large amounts of ice are supplied to produce water saturation. A detailed chemical-climate numerical model is used to assess the expected efficiency of the proposed geo-engineering method, and specifically to calculate the removal of HCl by ice particles. The size of ice particles appears to be a key parameter: larger particles (with a radius between 10 and 100 µm) appear to be most efficient for removing HCl. Sensitivity studies lead to the conclusions that the ozone recovery is effective when ice particles are supplied during May and June in the latitude band ranging from 70°S to 90°S and in the altitude layer ranging from 10 to 26 km. It appears, therefore, that supplying ice particles to the Antarctic lower stratosphere could be effective in reducing the depth of the ozone hole. In addition, photodegradation of CFCs might be accelerated when ice is supplied due to enhanced vertical transport of this efficient greenhouse gas.

  10. Stratospheric column NO2 anomalies over Russia related to the 2011 Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aheyeva, Viktoryia; Gruzdev, Aleksandr; Elokhov, Aleksandr; Grishaev, Mikhail; Salnikova, Natalia

    2013-04-01

    We analyze data of spectrometric measurements of stratospheric column NO2 contents at mid- and high-latitude stations of Zvenigorod (55.7°N, Moscow region), Tomsk (56.5°N, West Siberia), and Zhigansk (66.8°N, East Siberia). Measurements are done in visual spectral range with zenith-viewing spectrometers during morning and evening twilights. Alongside column NO2 contents, vertical profiles of NO2 are retrieved at the Zvenigorod station. Zvenigorod and Zhigansk are the measurement stations within the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). For interpretation of results of analysis of NO2 data, data of Ozone Monitoring Instrument measurements of total column ozone and rawinsonde data are also analyzed and back trajectories calculated with the help of HYSPLIT trajectory model are used. Significant negative anomalies in stratospheric NO2 columns accompanied by episodes of significant cooling of the stratosphere and decrease in total ozone were observed at the three stations in the winter-spring period of 2011. Trajectory analysis shows that the anomalies were caused by the transport of stratospheric air from the region of the ozone hole observed that season in the Arctic. Although negative NO2 anomalies due to the transport from the Arctic were also observed in some other years, the anomalies in 2011 have had record magnitudes. Analysis of NO2 vertical profiles at Zvenigorod shows that the NO2 anomaly in 2011 compared to other years anomalies was additionally contributed by the denitrification of the Arctic lower stratosphere. NO2 profiles show that a certain degree of the denitrification probably survived even after the ozone hole.

  11. Polar stratospheric ozone: interactions with climate change, results from the EU project RECONCILE, and the 2010/11 Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, Marc

    2013-04-01

    One of the most profound and well known examples of human impacts on atmospheric chemistry is the so called ozone hole. During the second half of the 20th century, anthropogenic emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) led to a significant increase in stratospheric chlorine levels and hence the rate of ozone removal by catalytic cycles involving chlorine. While CFCs were essentially banned by the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its subsequent amendments, and stratospheric chlorine levels have recently started to decline again, another anthropogenic influence may at least delay the recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer: climate change, with little doubt a result of human emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, has led to changes in stratospheric temperature and circulation. The large ozone losses that typically occur in polar regions in spring are particularly affected by these changes. Here, we give an overview of the ozone-climate interactions affecting polar stratospheric ozone loss, and present latest results from the international research project RECONCILE funded by the European Commission. Remaining open questions will be discussed including the possible impacts of recently suggested geoengineering concepts to artificially enhance the stratospheric aerosol loading. A special focus will also be put on the 2010/11 Arctic winter that saw the first Arctic Ozone hole, including an impact study on surface UV radiation in the densely populated northern mid-latitudes.

  12. Influence of the heterogeneous reaction HCL + HOCl on an ozone hole model with hydrocarbon additions

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Cicerone, R.J.; Turco, R.P.

    1994-02-20

    Injection of ethane or propane has been suggested as a means for reducing ozone loss within the Antarctic vortex because alkanes can convert active chlorine radicals into hydrochloric acid. In kinetic models of vortex chemistry including as heterogeneous processes only the hydrolysis and HCl reactions of ClONO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, parts per billion by volume levels of the light alkanes counteract ozone depletion by sequestering chlorine atoms. Introduction of the surface reaction of HCl with HOCl causes ethane to deepen baseline ozone holes and generally works to impede any mitigation by hydrocarbons. The increased depletion occurs because HCl + HOCl can be driven by HO{sub x} radicals released during organic oxidation. Following initial hydrogen abstraction by chlorine, alkane breakdown leads to a net hydrochloric acid activation as the remaining hydrogen atoms enter the photochemical system. Lowering the rate constant for reactions of organic peroxy radicals with ClO to 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} does not alter results, and the major conclusions are insensitive to the timing of the ethane additions. Ignoring the organic peroxy radical plus ClO reactions entirely restores remediation capabilities by allowing HO{sub x} removal independent of HCl. Remediation also returns if early evaporation of polar stratospheric clouds leaves hydrogen atoms trapped in aldehyde intermediates, but real ozone losses are small in such cases. 95 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Radar imagery of Mercury’s putative polar ice: 1999-2005 Arecibo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, John K.; Slade, Martin A.; Rice, Melissa S.

    2011-01-01

    We present an updated survey of Mercury's putative polar ice deposits, based on high-resolution (1.5-km) imaging with the upgraded Arecibo S-band radar during 1999-2005. The north pole has now been imaged over a full range of longitude aspects, making it possible to distinguish ice-free areas from radar-shadowed areas and thus better map the distribution of radar-bright ice. The new imagery of the south pole, though derived from only a single pair of dates in 2005, improves on the pre-upgrade Arecibo imagery and reveals many additional ice features. Some medium-size craters located within 3° of the north pole show near-complete ice coverage over their floors, central peaks, and southern interior rim walls and little or no ice on their northern rim walls, while one large (90 km) crater at 85°N shows a sharp ice-cutoff line running across its central floor. All of this is consistent with the estimated polar extent of permanent shading from direct sunlight. Some craters show ice in regions that, though permanently shaded, should be too warm to maintain unprotected surface ice owing to indirect heating by reflected and reradiated sunlight. However, the ice distribution in these craters is in good agreement with models invoking insulation by a thin dust mantle. Comparisons with Goldstone X-band radar imagery indicate a wavelength dependence that could be consistent with such a dust mantle. More than a dozen small ice features have been found at latitudes between 67° and 75°. All of this low-latitude ice is probably sheltered in or under steep pole-facing crater rim walls, although, since most is located in the Mariner-unimaged hemisphere, confirmation must await imaging by the MESSENGER orbiter. These low-latitude features are concentrated toward the "cold longitudes," possibly indicating a thermal segregation effect governed by indirect heating. The radar imagery places the corrected locations of the north and south poles at 7°W, 88.35°N and 90°W, 88.7

  14. UV spectral irradiance monitoring during the 1988 and 1989 Antarctic ozone holes

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.R.; Lucas, T.B.; Morrow, J.H.; Yeh, J. )

    1990-01-09

    UV spectral irradiance incident at the United States bases at McMurdo, Palmer, and the South Pole, in Antarctica, and at an Argentina Laboratory in Ushuaia is being routinely monitored by the NSF UV Spectroradiometer Network. Coverage includes the 1988 and 1989 ozone hole seasons and show marked differences between these two years. Many different methods of assessing UV irradiance or exposure are found in the literature. The degree of contrast between the 1988 and 1989 seasons varies widely depending upon the UV assessment method chosen. Data will be presented describing how different assessment methods present this time series.

  15. On the relevance of the methane oxidation cycle to ozone hole chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rolf; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    High concentrations of active chlorine are clearly responsible for the observed ozone depletion during the Antarctic polar spring. However, the mechanism behind the activation of chlorine from the reservoirs species HCl and ClONO2 and the maintenance of extremely high levels of active chlorine after polar sunrise is less well understood. Here, we focus on the influence of the methane oxidation cycle on 'ozone hole' chemistry through its effect on HOx and ClOx radicals. We demonstrate the great potential importance of the heterogeneous reaction HCl + HOCl yields Cl2 + H2O and the gasphase reaction ClO + CH3O2 yields ClOO + CH3O under sunlight conditions in polar spring. Under these conditions, the heterogeneous reaction is the main sink for HOx radicals. Through this channel, the HCl reservoir may be almost completely depleted. The gas phase reaction may control the levels of the CH3O2 radical, provided that high levels of ClO exist. Otherwise this radical initiates a sequence of reactions leading to a considerable loss of active chlorine. Moreover, the production of HOx radicals is reduced, and thereby the efficiency of the heterogeneous reaction limited. The two reactions together may accomplish the complete conversion of HCl into active chlorine, thereby leading to a rapid destruction of ozone.

  16. Ocular and dermatologic health effects of ultraviolet radiation exposure from the ozone hole in southern Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Schein, O D; Vicencio, C; Muñoz, B; Gelatt, K N; Duncan, D D; Nethercott, J; Honeyman, J; Koren, H S; West, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study sought to investigate numerous reports emanating from Punta Arenas, Chile (population 110,000, latitude 53 degrees S), that associated acute ocular and dermatologic disease in humans and animals with excess ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the setting of the thinning of the ozone column. METHODS. Ophthalmologic and dermatologic records in Punta Arenas were systematically reviewed to enumerate sentinel diagnoses potentially associated with UV-B exposure, ocular examinations on representative animal populations were performed, and the ambient UV-B exposure in the region during the time of maximal thinning was estimated. RESULTS. No increase in patient visits or conditions attributable to UV-B exposure was seen for periods of known ozone depletion compared with control periods. Although ambient UV-B exposure was 1.6 to 2.3 times the habitual exposure on individual days, this excess exposure conferred only a 1% increase in annual exposure on the region. CONCLUSION. This study does not support existing lay reports of ocular and dermatologic disease in humans and animals that had been associated with the ozone hole over southern Chile. PMID:7702120

  17. Measurements of Active Chlorine in the Antarctic Ozone Hole: 1986 to 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, P.; Barrett, J.; Connor, B.; Mooney, T.; Parrish, A.

    2005-12-01

    We will present and compare ground-based microwave measurements of stratospheric chlorine monoxide, ClO, from 1986, 1987 and 1996 through 2005 obtained from McMurdo and Scott Base, Antarctica (78° S). These measurements demonstrate the evolution of the ClO altitude profile (from 15 to 40 km) as the ozone hole progresses from the onset of sunlight in early August until the beginning of the breakup of the vortex in early October. The measurements from 1986 and 1987 were part of the National Ozone Expedition and the 1996 to 2005 measurements are carried out as part of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change, NDSC. The 1986 measurements were the first detection of a huge excess of chlorine monoxide during the Antarctic ozone hole period and the 1987 measurements produced the first full altitude profile of ClO over Antarctica. The last 10 years of measurements were carried out with an instrument very similar to the one used in the 1980's, but automated for continuous operation. The ClO altitude profile from the older measurements will be compared to the more recent measurements and variations in the time sequence of active chlorine from year to year will be discussed. We will also report on changes and/or trends in the peak mixing ratios from year to year both within the 10 year sequence (1996 to 2005) and between the recent measurements and the data from the 1980's. The measurements will also be compared to models to test the current understanding of chlorine chemistry.

  18. Tracing the second stage of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone-hole with a "big data" approach to multivariate regressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, A. T. J.; van der A, R. J.; van Weele, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a sensitivity analysis of multivariate regressions of recent springtime Antarctic vortex ozone trends using a "big data" ensemble approach. Our results indicate that the poleward heat flux (Eliassen-Palm flux) and the effective chlorine loading respectively explain most of the short-term and long-term variability in different Antarctic springtime total ozone records. The inclusion in the regression of stratospheric volcanic aerosols, solar variability and the quasi-biennial oscillation is shown to increase rather than decrease the overall uncertainty in the attribution of Antarctic springtime ozone because of large uncertainties in their respective records. Calculating the trend significance for the ozone record from the late 1990s onwards solely based on the fit of the effective chlorine loading is not recommended, as this does not take fit residuals into account, resulting in too narrow uncertainty intervals, while the fixed temporal change of the effective chlorine loading does not allow for any flexibility in the trends. When taking fit residuals into account in a piecewise linear trend fit, we find that approximately 30-60% of the regressions in the full ensemble result in a statistically significant positive springtime ozone trend over Antarctica from the late 1990s onwards. Analysis of choices and uncertainties in time series show that, depending on choices in time series and parameters, the fraction of statistically significant trends in parts of the ensemble can range from negligible to a complete 100% significance. We also find that, consistent with expectations, the number of statistically significant trends increases with increasing record length. Although our results indicate that the use multivariate regressions is a valid approach for assessing the state of Antarctic ozone hole recovery, and it can be expected that results will move towards more confidence in recovery with increasing record length, uncertainties in choices

  19. Effect "negative viscosity" as possible mechanism of ozone hole are formed above Antarctica at last quarter of XX century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrey, Nagurny

    2010-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms of the ozone hole formation over Antarctica can be a meridional transport of ozone deficit by the mesoscale vortexes generated by perturbations in the stratospheric circumpolar vortex. This transport can occur against the global ozone gradient in the polar stratosphere. An assessment of the value and sign of the macro-turbulent exchange coefficient provides understanding of the intensity and direction of large-scale vortex diffusion in the framework of the equations of heat, moisture and momentum transfer. The local viscosity can be negative at this since the turbulent viscosity, heat conductivity and diffusion coefficients characterize already not the physical properties of fluids and gases but the statistical properties of their turbulent motions. According to the definition of Viktor Starr (1968), "negative viscosity" leads to the impulse transfer against a zonal gradient. So, the small-scale energy passes to zonal energy and in the equations of transfer of the conservative properties of the atmosphere (temperature, humidity, ozone, etc.), the transfer can be against the average zonal gradient. To estimate macro-turbulent exchange coefficients, we shall use a procedure, which is similar by structure to the procedure, which is used for reduction of the non-linear Burger's equation to the linear equation of heat conductivity. Whereas in 1980, one mainly observes the positive values of meridional turbulent exchange coefficient, but to 1988 and especially in 2003, these values within the stratospheric vortex are predominantly negative. The growth of the negative value of the meridional transfer coefficient simultaneously with the increased area and the "depth" of the ozone hole allow us to interpret the development of the ozone hole in terms of the mechanism of "negative" viscosity, responsible for transfer of kinetic energy by smaller-scale vortexes towards large-scale perturbations enhancing thus the intensity of the stratospheric

  20. Latitudinal UVR-PAR measurements in Argentina: extent of the 'ozone hole'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis Orce, V.; Walter Helbling, E.

    1997-10-01

    The UVR-PAR Argentinean Monitoring Network started its operation in September 1994 recording ultraviolet (UVR) and Photosynthetic Available Radiation (PAR) at a frequency of once per minute, at four sites, throughout the entire year. Four spectroradiometers (GUV-511, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.) were installed at research centers separated by about 8-12 degrees of latitude, extending from the Subantarctic-Fueguian region to the Tropic of Capricorn. The instruments are located in populated areas ranging from 30,000 to 11 million people and with extremely different climate regimes and conditions of tropospheric pollution. Our ground-based data indicated that the irradiance increased steadily from south to north. This increase was also observed in the calculated daily doses of UV-B (280-320 nm); however, daily integrated values for UV-A (320-400 nm) and PAR (400-700 nm) were higher at mid-latitudes (Puerto Madryn, 42°47'S). A similar south-to-north increase was evident in the ratio of the energy at 305 nm and 340 nm wavelengths (with low 305/340 ratios indicating high total ozone column concentration), with low values at Ushuaia (55°01'S) and high values at Jujuy (24°10'S). However, the 305/340 ratios increased significantly over their normal spring values at two sites, Ushuaia and Puerto Madryn, for variable time periods during October-December. Our data suggest that the ozone hole was over South America extending to about 38°S for at least a week during October and about two weeks during November-December of the years of 1994 and 1995. However, it should be noted that the erythemal irradiance, in the area influenced by the ozone hole, was at all times lower than that in Buenos Aires and well below the value at Jujuy (tropical station). This study also indicates that when assessing the impact of solar UVR upon organisms, other variables such as cloud cover, solar zenith angle, day length, latitude, and atmospheric pollution should be considered in addition to

  1. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Earth's surface. It shields us from the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is ... enough good ozone, people may get too much ultraviolet radiation. This may increase the risk of skin ...

  2. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  3. Enhancement of hole injection using ozone treated Ag nanodots dispersed on indium tin oxide anode for organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jong-Min; Bae, Jung-Hyeok; Jeong, Jin-A; Jeong, Soon-Wook; Park, No-Jin; Kim, Han-Ki; Kang, Jae-Wook; Kim, Jang-Joo; Yi, Min-Su

    2007-04-16

    The authors report the enhancement of hole injection using an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode covered with ultraviolet (UV) ozone-treated Ag nanodots for fac tris (2-phenylpyridine) iridium Ir(ppy){sub 3}-doped phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-visible spectrometer analysis exhibit that UV-ozone treatment of the Ag nanodots dispersed on the ITO anode leads to formation of Ag{sub 2}O nanodots with high work function and high transparency. Phosphorescent OLEDs fabricated on the Ag{sub 2}O nanodot-dispersed ITO anode showed a lower turn-on voltage and higher luminescence than those of OLEDs prepared with a commercial ITO anode. It was thought that, as Ag nanodots changed to Ag{sub 2}O nanodots by UV-ozone treatment, the decrease of the energy barrier height led to the enhancement of hole injection in the phosphorescent OLEDs.

  4. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  5. Analysis of the Extraterrestrial Influences on the Antarctic Ozone Hole Size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Madriga, M.; Velasco-Herrera, V. M.; Perez-Peraza, J. A.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we look for evidences of relationships between the Antarctic Ozone Hole Size (OHS) and the Solar Cycle (SC) periodicities, as well as with the Cosmic Rays (CR) fluxes. With this goal in mind we also analyze the Antarctic temperature anomalies, linked with the OHS, and their response to the SC and CR variations. By means of wavelet transformation based on the Morlet wavelet, it is found that (OHS) present a prominent periodicity frequency at ~ 3.5 yrs. Then, applying the Wavelet Coherence analysis to two time-series, it is found: (1) there is a common signal along time (September-november) of ~ 3.5 yrs. between (OHS) and Cosmic Ray (CR): from 1988 to 1990 with a coherence coefficient of 0.8 and from 1998 to 2002 with a coherence coefficient of 0.9. In both periods the relationship is of non-linear nature. (2) the coherence between the time series of (OHS) and Antarctic temperature (AT) is of linear nature (anticorrelation) with a coherence factor > 0.85 in the periods 1985-1990 and 1998-2002. (3) the coherence between the time series of (RC) and (AT) at polar altitude of 10-30 Km is of non-linear nature between 1986-1990 and of linear nature in the period 1991-1996 with coherence within in the interval [0.65-0.7] in both cases. Between 1997-2002 there is a non-linear relation with coherence in the interval [0.7-0.9]. (4) the coherence between (SC) and (AT) is of non-linear nature is in the range [0.7-0.85] in the period 1987-1992. Preliminary inferences seems to indicate that there is a relationship between the the Ozone Hole Size and Cosmic Rays.

  6. The Antarctic Ice Sheet, Sea Ice, and the Ozone Hole: Satellite Observations of how they are Changing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2012-01-01

    Antarctica is the Earth's coldest and highest continent and has major impacts on the climate and life of the south polar vicinity. It is covered almost entirely by the Earth's largest ice sheet by far, with a volume of ice so great that if all the Antarctic ice were to go into the ocean (as ice or liquid water), this would produce a global sea level rise of about 60 meters (197 feet). The continent is surrounded by sea ice that in the wintertime is even more expansive than the continent itself and in the summertime reduces to only about a sixth of its wintertime extent. Like the continent, the expansive sea ice cover has major impacts, reflecting the sun's radiation back to space, blocking exchanges between the ocean and the atmosphere, and providing a platform for some animal species while impeding other species. Far above the continent, the Antarctic ozone hole is a major atmospheric phenomenon recognized as human-caused and potentially quite serious to many different life forms. Satellites are providing us with remarkable information about the ice sheet, the sea ice, and the ozone hole. Satellite visible and radar imagery are providing views of the large scale structure of the ice sheet never seen before; satellite laser altimetry has produced detailed maps of the topography of the ice sheet; and an innovative gravity-measuring two-part satellite has allowed mapping of regions of mass loss and mass gain on the ice sheet. The surrounding sea ice cover has a satellite record that goes back to the 1970s, allowing trend studies that show a decreasing sea ice presence in the region of the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas, to the west of the prominent Antarctic Peninsula, but increasing sea ice presence around much of the rest of the continent. Overall, sea ice extent around Antarctica has increased at an average rate of about 17,000 square kilometers per year since the late 1970s, as determined from satellite microwave data that can be collected under both light and

  7. Formation of the Antarctic ozone hole by the ClO dimer mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, J. W.; Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R. L.; Jaramillo, M.; Emmons, L.

    1988-01-01

    New measurements of the low-altitude ClO profile, made during September 1987, are presented along with detailed observations of ozone depletion over McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the same period. The results show that both the rate and altitude range of ozone depletion can be quantitatively accounted for by a mechanism in which the ClO dimer is the important intermediary in the catalytic destruction of ozone. An alternative bromine mechanism appears capable of contributing only 5-15 percent to the ozone loss rate.

  8. The Ozone Hole - from today's observations to long-term predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, M.; Reconcile Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The effects of the Montreal Protocol will very likely result in ozone recovery during the next few decades. In the long run, climate change and possible geoengineering ventures to mitigate climate change may radically alter the temperature, circulation patterns and chemical composition in the stratosphere. To realistically predict the response of the ozone layer to these changes and the future evolution of Arctic ozone, a complete and correct representation of all relevant processes is necessary. Using a comprehensive approach of laboratory experiments, field observations, microphysical and chemical transport modeling as well as data assimilation, the EU project RECONCILE aims to produce reliable parameterizations of the key processes in Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion and bridge them to a large scale chemistry climate model (CCM). We will present a compact overview of the project activities and the highlights of the extensive field campaign with the high-flying aircraft M55-Geophysica from Kiruna, Sweden, in the cold Arctic winter 2009/10.

  9. From closing the atmospheric ozone hole to reducing climate change. Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ewart, Gary W; Rom, William N; Braman, Sidney S; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2015-02-01

    Global warming presents U.S. and transnational leaders with enormous political and policy challenges. World leadership addressed a similar worldwide environmental challenge in the 1980s and 1990s when scientists advised that accelerating emission of man-made chlorofluorocarbons was depleting the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The process that led to global agreement on reducing depletion of the ozone layer holds valuable lessons, and some ironies, for scientists and policy makers seeking now to address global climate change. By understanding the international treaty process, how science informed that process, and how the physician community played a constructive role in the transition away from commercial use of ozone-depleting gases three decades ago, environmental activists can better understand the challenges, opportunities, and potential solutions under current consideration in affecting global climate change. PMID:25706493

  10. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  11. Polar processing and development of the 2004 Antarctic ozone hole : first results from MLS on Aura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Read, W. G.; Schwartz, M. J.; Waters, J. W.; Harwood, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on Aura is providing an extensive data set on stratospheric winter polar processing, including the first daily global observations of HCl, together with simultaneous measurements of ClO, HNO3, H2O, O3, N2O, and temperature (among others). We present first results charting the evolution of these quantities during the 2004 Antarctic late winter. MLS observations of chlorine deactivation and ozone loss during this period are shown to be consistent with results from the SLIMCAT chemical transport model.

  12. Observations of chlorine monoxide over Scott Base, Antarctica, during the ozone hole, 1996-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connor, Brian; Solomon, Philip; Barrett, James; Mooney, Thomas; Parrish, Alan

    2007-01-01

    We report observations of chlorine monoxide, ClO, in the lower stratosphere, made from Scott Base (77.85º S, 166.77º E) in springtime during each year, 1996-2005. The ClO amounts in the atmosphere are retrieved from remote measurements of microwave emission spectra. ClO column densities of up to about 2.5 × 1015 cm-2 are recorded during September, when chlorine is present in chemically active forms due to reactions on the surface of Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) particles. Maximum mixing ratios of ClO are approximately 2 ppbv. The annual average of ClO column density during the activation period is anticorrelated with similar averages of ozone column measured at nearby Arrival Heights, with correlation coefficient of –0.81, and with averages of ozone mass integrated over the entire polar region, with similar correlation coefficients. There was a substantial decrease in ClO amounts during 2002-2004. There has been no systematic change in the timing of chlorine deactivation attributable to secular change in the Antarctic vortex

  13. From ozone mini-holes and mini-highs towards extreme value theory: New insights from extreme events and non-stationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last few decades negative trends in stratospheric ozone have been studied because of the direct link between decreasing stratospheric ozone and increasing surface UV-radiation. Recently a discussion on ozone recovery has begun. Long-term measurements of total ozone extending back earlier than 1958 are limited and only available from a few stations in the northern hemisphere. The world's longest total ozone record is available from Arosa, Switzerland (Staehelin et al., 1998a,b). At this site total ozone measurements have been made since late 1926 through the present day. Within this study (Rieder et al., 2009) new tools from extreme value theory (e.g. Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007) are applied to select mathematically well-defined thresholds for extreme low and extreme high total ozone. A heavy-tail focused approach is used by fitting the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) to the Arosa time series. Asymptotic arguments (Pickands, 1975) justify the use of the GPD for modeling exceedances over a sufficiently high (or below a sufficiently low) threshold (Coles, 2001). More precisely, the GPD is the limiting distribution of normalized excesses over a threshold, as the threshold approaches the endpoint of the distribution. In practice, GPD parameters are fitted, to exceedances by maximum likelihood or other methods - such as the probability weighted moments. A preliminary step consists in defining an appropriate threshold for which the asymptotic GPD approximation holds. Suitable tools for threshold selection as the MRL-plot (mean residual life plot) and TC-plot (stability plot) from the POT-package (Ribatet, 2007) are presented. The frequency distribution of extremes in low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone and their influence on the long-term changes in total ozone are analyzed. Further it is shown that from the GPD-model the distribution of so-called ozone mini holes (e.g. Bojkov and Balis, 2001) can be precisely estimated and that the

  14. Interannual variability of the Antarctic ozone hole in a GCM. Part 2: A comparison of unforced and QBO-induced variability

    SciTech Connect

    Shindell, D.T.; Rind, D.; Balachandran, N. )

    1999-06-15

    Simulations were performed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies GCM including a prescribed quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), applied at a constant maximum value, and a physically realistic parameterization of the heterogeneous chemistry responsible for severe polar ozone loss. While the QBO is primarily a stratospheric phenomenon, in this model the QBO modulates the amount and propagation of planetary wave energy in the troposphere as well as in the stratosphere. Dynamical activity is greater in the easterly than in the unforced case, while westerly years are dynamically more quiescent. By altering zonal winds and potential vorticity, the QBO forcing changes the refraction of planetary waves beginning in midwinter, causing the lower-stratospheric zonal average temperatures at Southern Hemisphere high latitudes to be [approximately]3--5 K warmer in the easterly phase than in the westerly during the late winter and early spring. Ozone loss varies nonlinearly with temperature, due to the sharp threshold for formation of heterogeneous chemistry surfaces, so that the mean daily total mass of ozone depleted in this region during September was 8.7 [times] 10[sup 10] kg in the QBO easterly maximum, as compared with 12.0 [times] 10[sup 10] kg in the westerly maximum and 10.3 [times] 10[sup 10] kg in the unforced case. Through this mechanism, the midwinter divergence of the Eliassen-Palm flux is well correlated with the subsequent springtime total ozone loss (R[sup 2] = 0.6). The chemical ozone loss differences are much larger than QBO-induced transport differences in the authors' model. Inclusion of the QBO forcing also increased the maximum variability in total ozone loss from the [approximately]20% value found in the unforced runs to [approximately]50%. These large variations in ozone depletion are very similar in size to the largest observed variations in the severity of the ozone hole. The results suggest that both random variability and periodic QBO forcing are

  15. Evolution of the Southern Hemisphere ozone hole as seen by TOMS from August 1979 to December 1991. (Videotape)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The computerized color images of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) showed the ozone distribution and levels in the Earth's southern hemisphere from August 1979 to December 1991 in this video. The annual variations were presented in a monthly format and the ozone levels were measured in Dobson units.

  16. Observation of ozone and aerosols in the Antarctic ozone hole of 1991 under the Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) Project. Preliminary result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Masahiko; Murata, Isao; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Kondo, Yutaka; Kanzawa, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary results for the PPB (Polar Patrol Balloon) experiment. The balloon was launched at 07:55 UT on 23 September and dropped at 21 UT on 28 September 1991. During the period, ozone and aerosol concentrations were measured correspondingly along the track. During the Lagrangian type observation, drastic change of ozone concentration in 'same air mass' and positive correlation between ozone concentration and sulfate aerosol amount were obtained at the level within 80-78 hPa. During the descent motion at 80 deg S active PSC's (type-1 and -2) were observed from 200 hPa to 80 hPa.

  17. Balloon-borne observations of the development and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Harder, J. W.; Rolf, S. R.; Rosen, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The vertical distribution of ozone measured at McMurdo Station, Antarctica using balloon-borne sensors on 33 occasions during November 6, 1986 - August 25, 1986 is described. These observations suggest a highly structured cavity confined to the 12-20 km altitude region. In the 17-19 km altitude range, the ozone volume mixing ratio declined from about 2 ppm at the end of August to about 0.5 ppm by mid-October. The average decay in this region can be described as exponential with a half life of about 25 days. While total ozone, as obtained from profile integration, declined only about 35 percent, the integrated ozone between 14 and 18 km declined more than 70 percent. Vertical ozone profiles in the vortex revealed unusual structure with major features from 1 to 5 km thick which had suffered ozone depletions as great as 90 percent.

  18. Identification of influential events concerning the Antarctic ozone hole over southern Brazil and the biological effects induced by UVB and UVA radiation in an endemic treefrog species.

    PubMed

    Passaglia Schuch, André; Dos Santos, Mauricio Beux; Mendes Lipinski, Victor; Vaz Peres, Lucas; Dos Santos, Caroline Peripolli; Zanini Cechin, Sonia; Jorge Schuch, Nelson; Kirsh Pinheiro, Damaris; da Silva Loreto, Elgion Lúcio

    2015-08-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) due to ozone depletion has been affecting both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and it may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations in specific localities. In this work, influential events concerning the Antarctic ozone hole were identified in a dataset containing 35 years of ozone measurements over southern Brazil. The effects of environmental doses of UVB and UVA radiation were addressed on the morphology and development of Hypsiboas pulchellus tadpole (Anura: Hylidae), as well as on the induction of malformation after the conclusion of metamorphosis. These analyzes were complemented by the detection of micronucleus formation in blood cells. 72 ozone depletion events were identified from 1979 to 2013. Surprisingly, their yearly frequency increased three-fold during the last 17 years. The results clearly show that H. pulchellus tadpole are much more sensitive to UVB than UVA light, which reduces their survival and developmental rates. Additionally, the rates of micronucleus formation by UVB were considerably higher compared to UVA even after the activation of photolyases enzymes by a further photoreactivation treatment. Consequently, a higher occurrence of malformation was observed in UVB-irradiated individuals. These results demonstrate the severe genotoxic impact of UVB radiation on this treefrog species and its importance for further studies aimed to assess the impact of the increased levels of solar UVB radiation on declining species of the Hylidae family. PMID:25957080

  19. Epidemiology and molecular biology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): a population-based study in the South of Switzerland, 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Paola; Spitale, Alessandra; Banfi, Sara; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Frattini, Milo; Bordoni, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized at the molecular level by c-kit or PDGFRA oncogene mutations. Although GISTs raised major interest in past decades, population-based studies are still rare. Materials and Methods. All GISTs diagnosed in Southern Switzerland (1999-2005) were identified using Ticino Cancer Registry and analysed for c-kit and PDGFRA mutations. Clinical and molecular features were studied. Results. Annual incidence of GISTs was 1.47 cases/100,000 inhabitants (median age: 64 years; median size: 6.0 cm). Most GISTs arose in the stomach (60.5%). The malignancy risk was very-low/low in 47% of patients. DNA sequences showed a gene alteration in either c-kit or PDGFRA genes in 72.5% of patients. Mutations occurred mostly in c-kit exon 11 (60%). No mutations in c-kit exons 13 or 17 were found. An equal number of alterations in exons 12 and 18, and no mutations in exon 14 were observed in the PDGFRA gene. Discussion. This is the first comprehensive population-based study of GISTs incidence and molecular biology characterization in Central Europe. Our incidence data showed higher age-standardized rates compared to other European countries. The gene mutation spectrum differed when compared to the literature. This is relevant to improve the molecular profile knowledge based on Cancer Registry data. PMID:18785120

  20. CO2 and O3 vertical distributions over the Showa Station, Antarctica before and during the ozone hole formation in 2014, measured by balloon-borne CO2 and O3 instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Ouchi, M.; Imasu, R.; Kawasaki, M.

    2015-12-01

    The vertical and horizontal distributions of CO2 mixing ratio in the troposphere and stratosphere are considered to include the information on the source and sink of CO2, as well as transport of air masses in the atmosphere. However, only a limited number of vertical profiles for CO2 mixing ratio, which were typically obtained based on aircraft-based observations, are available. We have originally developed a new balloon-born instrument (CO2 sonde) to measure CO2 vertical profile from surface up to about 10 km in altitude. The ozone hole formation is typically observed in the early spring over Antarctica. To our knowledge, no study focusing on the change in the CO2 vertical profile before and after the ozone hole formation has been reported. In the present study, we launched four CO2 sondes at Syowa Station, Antarctica between June and October in 2014 to obtain CO2 vertical distributions before and during the ozone hole formation. Observations of ozone vertical distributions using traditional ozone sondes were also conducted on the same days. In the presentation, we will report the relationships between the vertical distributions of CO2 and ozone.

  1. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  2. Not just about sunburn--the ozone hole's profound effect on climate has significant implications for Southern Hemisphere ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sharon A; Erickson, David J

    2015-02-01

    Climate scientists have concluded that stratospheric ozone depletion has been a major driver of Southern Hemisphere climate processes since about 1980. The implications of these observed and modelled changes in climate are likely to be far more pervasive for both terrestrial and marine ecosystems than the increase in ultraviolet-B radiation due to ozone depletion; however, they have been largely overlooked in the biological literature. Here, we synthesize the current understanding of how ozone depletion has impacted Southern Hemisphere climate and highlight the relatively few documented impacts on terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Reviewing the climate literature, we present examples of how ozone depletion changes atmospheric and oceanic circulation, with an emphasis on how these alterations in the physical climate system affect Southern Hemisphere weather, especially over the summer season (December-February). These potentially include increased incidence of extreme events, resulting in costly floods, drought, wildfires and serious environmental damage. The ecosystem impacts documented so far include changes to growth rates of South American and New Zealand trees, decreased growth of Antarctic mosses and changing biodiversity in Antarctic lakes. The objective of this synthesis was to stimulate the ecological community to look beyond ultraviolet-B radiation when considering the impacts of ozone depletion. Such widespread changes in Southern Hemisphere climate are likely to have had as much or more impact on natural ecosystems and food production over the past few decades, than the increased ultraviolet radiation due to ozone depletion. PMID:25402975

  3. Chemical ozone loss and ozone mini-hole event during the Arctic winter 2010/2011 as observed by SCIAMACHY and GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Eichmann, K.-U.; Aschmann, J.; Bramstedt, K.; Weber, M.; von Savigny, C.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, A.; Wittrock, F.; Khosrawi, F.; Bauer, R.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-04-01

    Record breaking loss of ozone (O3) in the Arctic stratosphere has been reported in winter-spring 2010/2011. We examine in detail the composition and transformations occurring in the Arctic polar vortex using total column and vertical profile data products for O3, bromine oxide (BrO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), chlorine dioxide (OClO), and polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) retrieved from measurements made by SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartography) on-board Envisat (Environmental Satellite), as well as total column ozone amount, retrieved from the measurements of GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) on MetOp-A (Meteorological Experimental Satellite). Similarly we use the retrieved data from DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements made in Ny-Ålesund (78.55° N, 11.55° E). A chemical transport model (CTM) has been used to relate and compare Arctic winter-spring conditions in 2011 with those in the previous year. In late winter-spring 2010/2011 the chemical ozone loss in the polar vortex derived from SCIAMACHY observations confirms findings reported elsewhere. More than 70% of O3 was depleted by halogen catalytic cycles between the 425 and 525 K isentropic surfaces, i.e. in the altitude range ~16-20 km. In contrast, during the same period in the previous winter 2009/2010, a typical warm Arctic winter, only slightly more than 20% depletion occurred below 20 km, while 40% of O3 was removed above the 575 K isentrope (~23 km). This loss above 575 K is explained by the catalytic destruction by NOx descending from the mesosphere. In both Arctic winters 2009/2010 and 2010/2011, calculated O3 losses from the CTM are in good agreement to our observations and other model studies. The mid-winter 2011 conditions, prior to the catalytic cycles being fully effective, are also investigated. Surprisingly, a significant loss of O3 around 60%, previously not discussed in detail, is observed in mid-January 2011 below

  4. Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011.

    PubMed

    Manney, Gloria L; Santee, Michelle L; Rex, Markus; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Pitts, Michael C; Veefkind, Pepijn; Nash, Eric R; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Froidevaux, Lucien; Poole, Lamont R; Schoeberl, Mark R; Haffner, David P; Davies, Jonathan; Dorokhov, Valery; Gernandt, Hartwig; Johnson, Bryan; Kivi, Rigel; Kyrö, Esko; Larsen, Niels; Levelt, Pieternel F; Makshtas, Alexander; McElroy, C Thomas; Nakajima, Hideaki; Parrondo, Maria Concepción; Tarasick, David W; von der Gathen, Peter; Walker, Kaley A; Zinoviev, Nikita S

    2011-10-27

    Chemical ozone destruction occurs over both polar regions in local winter-spring. In the Antarctic, essentially complete removal of lower-stratospheric ozone currently results in an ozone hole every year, whereas in the Arctic, ozone loss is highly variable and has until now been much more limited. Here we demonstrate that chemical ozone destruction over the Arctic in early 2011 was--for the first time in the observational record--comparable to that in the Antarctic ozone hole. Unusually long-lasting cold conditions in the Arctic lower stratosphere led to persistent enhancement in ozone-destroying forms of chlorine and to unprecedented ozone loss, which exceeded 80 per cent over 18-20 kilometres altitude. Our results show that Arctic ozone holes are possible even with temperatures much milder than those in the Antarctic. We cannot at present predict when such severe Arctic ozone depletion may be matched or exceeded. PMID:21964337

  5. Arctic ozone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Zurer, P.S.

    1989-03-06

    Scientists have returned from the first comprehensive probe of the Arctic stratosphere with unexpectedly dire results: The winter atmosphere in the north polar region is loaded with the same destructive chlorine compounds that cause the Antarctic ozone hole. Atmospheric researchers who only a few weeks ago were comforted by the thought that the warmer Northern Hemisphere is strongly protected from the processes that lead to massive losses of ozone during spring in Antarctica now see very little standing in the way of an Arctic ozone hole.

  6. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  7. An automated ozone photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    A photometer capable of automatically measuring ozone concentration data to very high resolution during scientific research flights in the earth's atmosphere was developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. This instrument was recently deployed to study the ozone hole over Antarctica. Ozone is detected by absorbing 253.7-nm radiation from an ultraviolet lamp which shines through the sample of air and impinges on a vacuum phototube. A lower output from the phototube indicates more ozone present in the air sample. The photometer employs a CMOS 280 control, data collection, and storage.

  8. Rebound of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salby, Murry; Titova, Evgenia; Deschamps, Lilia

    2011-05-01

    Restrictions on CFCs have led to a gradual decline of Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC). A rebound of Antarctic ozone, however, has remained elusive, masked by large interannual changes that dominate its current evolution. A positive response of ozone is not expected to emerge for at least 1-2 decades, possibly not for half a century. We show that interannual changes of the Antarctic ozone hole are accounted for almost perfectly by changes in dynamical forcing of the stratosphere. The close relationship enables dynamically-induced changes of ozone to be removed, unmasking the climate signal associated with CFCs. The component independent of dynamically-induced changes exhibits a clear upward trend over the last decade - the first signature of a rebound in Antarctic ozone. It enables ozone to be tracked relative to CFCs and other changes of climate.

  9. The National Ozone Expedition, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, S. )

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen scientists from four separate institutions came to McMurdo Station during the period from August to November, 1986, to carry out an intensive stratospheric measurement program aimed at obtaining further data on the antarctic ozone hole. The results from the composite of experiments strongly suggest that chemistry (specifically, the chemistry of anthropogenically produced halocarbon species) probably plays an important role in the development of the antarctic ozone hole. If the antarctic ozone hole is due to mankind's use of chlorofluorocarbons, then it represents the first time that the environment has been shown to be sensitive to man's activities on a global scale.

  10. Ozone trends: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staehelin, J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Appenzeller, C.; Eberhard, J.

    2001-05-01

    Ozone plays a very important role in our atmosphere because it protects any living organisms at the Earth's surface against the harmful solar UVB and UVC radiation. In the stratosphere, ozone plays a critical role in the energy budget because it absorbs both solar UV and terrestrial IR radiation. Further, ozone in the tropopause acts as a strong greenhouse gas, and increasing ozone trends at these altitudes contribute to climate change. This review contains a short description of the various techniques that provided atmospheric ozone measurements valuable for long-term trend analysis. The anthropogenic emissions of substances that deplete ozone (chlorine- and bromine-containing volatile gases) have increased from the 1950s until the second half of the 1980s. The most severe consequence of the anthropogenic release of ozone-depleting substances is the "Antarctic ozone hole." Long-term observations indicate that stratospheric ozone depletion in the southern winter-spring season over Antarctica started in the late 1970s, leading to a strong decrease in October total ozone means. Present values are only approximately half of those observed prior to 1970. In the Arctic, large ozone depletion was observed in winter and spring in some recent years. Satellite and ground-based measurements show no significant trends in the tropics but significant long-term decreasing trends in the northern and southern midlatitudes (of the order of 2-4% per decade in the period from 1970 to 1996 and an acceleration in trends in the 1980s). Ozone at northern midlatitudes decreased by -7.4±2% per decade at 40 km above mean sea level, while ozone loss was small at 30 km. Large trends were found in the lower stratosphere, -5.1±1.8% at 20 km and -7.3±4.6% at 15 km, where the bulk of the ozone resides. The possibility of a reduction in the observed trends has been discussed recently, but it is very hard to distinguish this from the natural variability. As a consequence of the Montreal Protocol

  11. Nimbus-7 TOMS Antarctic ozone atlas: August through November, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at the Antarctic and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1989 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 30, 1989. The 1989 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of 1987, reaching a comparable depth in early October. This was in sharp contrast to the much weaker hole of 1988. The 1989 ozone hole remained at polar latitudes as it filled in November, in contrast to other recent years when the hole drifted to mid-latitudes before disappearing. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1989 ozone distribution to that of other years.

  12. UV-ozone-treated MoO3 as the hole-collecting buffer layer for high-efficiency solution-processed SQ:PC71BM photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian-Qian; Yang, Dao-Bin; Zhao, Su-Ling; Huang, Yan; Xu, Zheng; Gong, Wei; Fan, Xing; Liu, Zhi-Fang; Huang, Qing-Yu; Xu, Xu-Rong

    2014-03-01

    The enhanced performance of a squaraine compound, with 2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as the acceptor, in solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices is obtained by using UV-ozone-treated MoO3 as the hole-collecting buffer layer. The optimized thickness of the MoO3 layer is 8 nm, at which the device shows the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) among all devices, resulting from a balance of optical absorption and charge transport. After being treated by UV-ozone for 10 min, the transmittance of the MoO3 film is almost unchanged. Atomic force microscopy results show that the treated surface morphology is improved. A high PCE of 3.99% under AM 1.5 G illumination (100 mW/cm2) is obtained.

  13. Correlation between cosmic rays and ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q-B

    2009-03-20

    This Letter reports reliable satellite data in the period of 1980-2007 covering two full 11-yr cosmic ray (CR) cycles, clearly showing the correlation between CRs and ozone depletion, especially the polar ozone loss (hole) over Antarctica. The results provide strong evidence of the physical mechanism that the CR-driven electron-induced reaction of halogenated molecules plays the dominant role in causing the ozone hole. Moreover, this mechanism predicts one of the severest ozone losses in 2008-2009 and probably another large hole around 2019-2020, according to the 11-yr CR cycle. PMID:19392251

  14. Scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone: 1989, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A scientific review is presented of the current understanding of stratospheric ozone. There have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's protective ozone layer. There are four major findings that each heighten the concern that chlorine and bromine containing chemicals can lead to a significant depletion of stratospheric ozone: (1) Antarctic ozone hole (the weight of evidence indicates that chlorinated and brominated chemicals are responsible for the ozone hole); (2) Perturbed arctic chemistry (the same potentially ozone destroying processes were identified in the Arctic stratosphere); (3) Long term ozone decreases; and (4) Model limitations (gaps in theoretical models used for assessment studies).

  15. Scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone: 1989, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A scientific review is presented of the current understanding of stratospheric ozone. There have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's protective ozone layer. There are four major findings that each heighten the concern that chlorine and bromine containing chemicals can lead to a significant depletion of stratospheric ozone: (1) Antarctic ozone hole (the weight of evidence indicates that chlorinated and brominated chemicals are responsible for the ozone hole; (2) Perturbed arctic chemistry (the same potentially ozone destroying processes were identified in the Arctic stratosphere); (3) Long term ozone decreases; and (4) Model limitations (gaps in theoretical models used for assessment studies).

  16. Record Arctic ozone depletion could occur again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    In the winter of 2010-2011, ozone levels above the Arctic declined to record lows, creating the first Arctic ozone hole, similar to the well-known Antarctic ozone hole. Scientists believe the ozone depletion was due partly to unusually cold temperatures in the stratosphere above the Arctic, as colder stratospheric temperatures make ozone-destroying chemicals such as chlorine more active. As global climate change continues, the Arctic stratosphere is expected to get colder, but levels of ozone-destroying chemicals should decline, as emissions of these chemicals were banned by the Montreal Protocol. To try to learn more about Arctic ozone dynamics and determine whether the Arctic ozone hole is likely to recur, Sinnhuber et al. looked at satellite observations of temperature, ozone, water vapor, and chemicals that affect ozone in the Arctic atmosphere. They also used a model to determine how sensitive ozone levels are to stratospheric temperatures and chemistry. They found that their model accurately reproduced measured conditions. Their model suggests that stratospheric temperatures 1°C lower than in the 2010-2011 winter would result in locally nearly complete ozone depletion in the Arctic lower stratosphere with current levels of chemicals. A 10% reduction in ozone-depleting chemicals would be offset by a 1°C decrease in stratospheric temperatures.

  17. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  18. The ozone backlash

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-06-11

    While evidence for the role of chlorofluorocarbons in ozone depletion grows stronger, researchers have recently been subjected to vocal public criticism of their theories-and their motives. Their understanding of the mechanisms of ozone destruction-especially the annual ozone hole that appears in the Antarctic-has grown stronger, yet everywhere they go these days, they seem to be confronted by critics attacking their theories as baseless. For instance, Rush Limbaugh, the conservative political talk-show host and now-best-selling author of The Way Things Ought to Be, regularly insists that the theory of ozone depletion by CFCs is a hoax: bladerdash and poppycock. Zoologist Dixy Lee Ray, former governor of the state of Washington and former head of the Atomic Energy Commission, makes the same argument in her book, Trashing the Planet. The Wall Street Journal and National Review have run commentaries by S. Fred Singer, a former chief scientists for the Department of Transportation, purporting to shoot holes in the theory of ozone depletion. Even the June issue of Omni, a magazine with a circulation of more than 1 million that publishes a mixture of science and science fiction, printed a feature article claiming to expose ozone research as a politically motivated scam.

  19. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  20. Children's and adults' knowledge and models of reasoning about the ozone layer and its depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Bisanz, Gay L.

    2003-01-01

    As environmental concepts, the ozone layer and ozone hole are important to understand because they can profoundly influence our health. In this paper, we examined: (a) children's and adults' knowledge of the ozone layer and its depletion, and whether this knowledge increases with age' and (b) how the 'ozone layer' and 'ozone hole' might be structured as scientific concepts. We generated a standardized set of questions and used it to interview 24 kindergarten students, 48 Grade 3 students, 24 Grade 5 students, and 24 adults in university, in Canada. An analysis of participants' responses revealed that adults have more knowledge than children about the ozone layer and ozone hole, but both adults and children exhibit little knowledge about protecting themselves from the ozone hole. Moreover, only some participants exhibited 'mental models' in their conceptual understanding of the ozone layer and ozone hole. The implications of these results for health professionals, educators, and scientists are discussed.

  1. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Antarctic ozone atlas: August through November 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Scott, Courtney J.; Larko, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of stratospheric ozone, and to support continuing research at the Antarctic Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1991 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 30, 1991. The 1991 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of the 1987, 1989, and 1990 holes, reaching a comparable depth in early October. However, the 1991 ozone hole filled far more rapidly than in 1987 or 1989, and nearly 4 weeks earlier than in 1990.

  2. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  3. Record low ozone measured at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the austral spring of 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.J.; Deshler, T.

    1994-12-31

    The annual springtime ozone hole over Antarctica has been studied extensively since it was first reported. The University of Wyoming has participated in monitoring the development of the ozone hole over Antarctica since 1986 using balloonborne instruments to measure vertical profiles of ozone and particles at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. During austral spring 1993, record minimums in total column ozone were observed along with a record low within the main ozone layer at 12-20 kilometers (km). 6 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Calculations of Polar Ozone Loss Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Wu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate vortex-averaged ozone loss rates at 465-K potential temperature during the Aug.-Sept. time period in the southern hemisphere and Feb.-Mar. time period in the northern hemisphere. Ozone loss rates are calculated two ways. First, from the time series of measurements of 03. Second, from measurements of ClO, from which ozone loss is inferred based on our theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone destruction. Both measurement sets are from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument. We find good agreement between vortex-averaged ozone loss rates calculated from these methods. Our analysis provides no support for recent work suggesting that current theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone loss underestimate the observed decrease in polar ozone during the ozone "hole" period.

  5. New assaults seen on Earth's ozone shield

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1992-02-14

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other manmade chemicals have already caused a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica. CFCs have also been clearly implicated in limited ozone losses - but as yet no hole - over the Arctic. And ozone has been disappearing over the latitudes of the US for more than a decade. Researchers speculate that a full-blown ozone hole will appear over the Arctic, perhaps within the next month that might well slide south to affect densely populated areas of Europe. And expect ozone losses in other parts of the world to be more rapid than had been predicted, though researchers can't say just where. These grim forecasts reflect a newly proven systemic vulnerability in the upper atmosphere.

  6. Spatial observation of the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin-Beekmann, Sophie

    2010-04-01

    This article provides an overview of the various satellite instruments, which have been used to observe stratospheric ozone and other chemical compounds playing a key role in stratospheric chemistry. It describes the various instruments that have been launched since the late 1970s for the measurement of total ozone column and ozone vertical profile, as well as the major satellite missions designed for the study of stratospheric chemistry. Since the discovery of the ozone hole in the early 1980s, spatial ozone measurements have been widely used to evaluate and quantify the spatial extension of polar ozone depletion and global ozone decreasing trends as a function of latitude and height. Validation and evaluation of satellite ozone data have been the subject of intense scientific activity, which was reported in the various ozone assessments of the state of the ozone layer published after the signature of the Montreal protocol. Major results, based on satellite observations for the study of ozone depletion at the global scale and chemical polar ozone loss, are provided. The use of satellite observations for the validation of chemistry climate models that simulate the recovery of the ozone layer and in data assimilation is also described.

  7. The 1988 Antarctic ozone monitoring Nimbus-7 TOMS data atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.

    1989-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at McMurdo, Syowa, and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1988 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 17, 1988. Although total ozone in mini-holes briefly dropped below 150 DU in late August, the main ozone hole is seen to be much less pronounced than in 1987. Minimum values, observed in late September and early October 1988, were seldom less than 175 DU. Compared with the same period in 1987, when a pronounced ozone hole whose minimum value of 109 Dobson Units (DU) was the lowest total ozone ever observed, the 1988 ozone hole is displaced from the South Pole, opposing a persistent maximum with values consistently above 500 DU. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1988 ozone distribution to that of other years.

  8. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Toon, O.B. ); Turco, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    During the Antarctic winter, strange and often invisible clouds form in the stratosphere over the pole. These clouds of ice and frozen nitric acid play a crucial role in the chemical cycle responsible for the recent appearance of the annual ozone hole. Their chemistry removes compounds that would normally trap ozone-destroying free chlorine produced by the breakdown of CFCs. The paper describes these clouds, their formation, and the mechanisms by which these clouds help chlorine destroy ozone.

  9. National Ozone Expedition: Microwave radiometer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    de Zafra, R.; Solomon, P. )

    1987-09-01

    To measure vertical profiles of chlorine monoxide, nitrous oxide, hydrogen cyanide, and ozone, the authors will use a millimeter-wave spectrometer. Of these measurements the levels of chlorine monoxide should help to describe potential causes of the cause of the ozone hole. If the ozone depletion is chlorine related, abundances of chlorine monoxide, taken approximately 12 miles (20 kilometers) above the Earth's surface, could be 100 times greater than normal.

  10. A feasibility study of methods for stopping the depletion of ozone over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Ways of stopping the ozone depletion in the ozone hole over Antarctica were studied. The basic objectives were: (1) to define and understand the phenomenon of the ozone hole; (2) to determine possible methods of stopping the ozone depletion; (3) to identify unknowns about the hole and possible solutions. Two basic ways of attacking the problem were identified. First is replenishment of ozone as it is being depleted. Second is elimination of ozone destroying agents from the atmosphere. The second method is a more permanent form of the solution. Elimination and replenishment methods are discussed in detail.

  11. Feasibility study of methods for stopping the depletion of ozone over Antarctica. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Ways of stopping the ozone depletion in the ozone hole over Antarctica were studied. The basic objectives were: (1) to define and understand the phenomenon of the ozone hole; (2) to determine possible methods of stopping the ozone depletion; (3) to identify unknowns about the hole and possible solutions. Two basic ways of attacking the problem were identified. First is replenishment of ozone as it is being depleted. Second is elimination of ozone destroying agents from the atmosphere. The second method is a more permanent form of the solution. Elimination and replenishment methods are discussed in detail.

  12. An automated ozone photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    A photometer capable of automatically measuring ozone concentration data to very high resolution during scientific research flights in the Earth's atmosphere was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. This instrument was recently deployed to study the ozone hole over Antarctica. Ozone is detected by absorbing 253.7-nm radiation from an ultraviolet lamp which shines through the sample of air and impinges on a vacuum phototube. A lower output from the phototube indicates more ozone present in the air sample. The photometer employs a CMOS Z80 microprocessor with an STD bus system for experiment control, data collection, and storage. Data are collected and stored in nonvolatile memory for experiments lasting up to 8 hr. Data are downloaded to a portable ground-support computer and processed after the aircraft lands. An independent single-board computer in the STD bus also calculates ozone concentration in real time with less resolution than the CMOS Z80 system, and sends this value to a cockpit meter to aid the pilot in navigation.

  13. Assimilation of MLS and OMI Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone data from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were assimilated into the ozone model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). This assimilation produces ozone fields that are superior to those from the operational GMAO assimilation of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument data. Assimilation of Aura data improves the representation of the "ozone hole" and the agreement with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III and ozone sonde data. Ozone in the lower stratosphere is captured better: mean state, vertical gradients, spatial and temporal variability are all improved. Inclusion of OMI and MLS data together, or separately, in the assimilation system provides a way of checking how consistent OMI and MLS data are with each other, and with the ozone model. We found that differences between OMI total ozone column data and model forecasts decrease after MLS data are assimilated. This indicates that MLS stratospheric ozone profiles are consistent with OMI total ozone columns. The evaluation of error characteristics of OMI and MLS ozone will continue as data from newer versions of retrievals becomes available. We report on the initial step in obtaining global assimilated ozone fields that combine measurements from different Aura instruments, the ozone model at the GMAO, and their respective error characteristics. We plan to use assimilated ozone fields in estimation of tropospheric ozone. We also plan to investigate impacts of assimilated ozone fields on numerical weather prediction through their use in radiative models and in the assimilation of infrared nadir radiance data from NASA's Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

  14. Ozone Depletion by Hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Mlawer, E. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Bailey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are second-generation replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other substances that caused the 'ozone hole'. Atmospheric concentrations of HFCs are projected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Coupled chemistry-climate simulations forced by these projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere in 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs modulate atmospheric temperature, thereby changing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and enhancing the stratospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Sensitivity simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to atmospheric change in 2050, as compared with HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation and dynamics, for a likely 2050 climate, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 4.3x10-4 to 3.5x10-2; previously HFCs were assumed to have negligible ODPs since these species lack chlorine or bromine atoms. The ozone impacts of HFCs are further investigated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The GEOSCCM is a three-dimensional, fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. Sensitivity simulations in which CO2, CFC-11 and HCFC-22 are enhanced individually are used as proxies for the atmospheric response to the HFC concentrations expected by the mid-21st century. Sensitivity simulations provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of these greenhouse gases on global total ozone, and can be used to assess their effects on the recovery of Antarctic ozone.

  15. A Comparison of Runoff Quantity and Quality from Two Small Basins Undergoing Implementation of Conventional and Low-Impact-Development (LID) Strategies: Cross Plains, Wisconsin, Water Years 1999-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental managers are often faced with the task of designing strategies to accommodate development while minimizing adverse environmental impacts. Low-impact development (LID) is one such strategy that attempts to mitigate environmental degradation commonly associated with impervious surfaces. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, studied two residential basins in Cross Plains, Wis., during water years 1999?2005. A paired-basin study design was used to compare runoff quantity and quality from the two basins, one of which was developed in a conventional way and the other was developed with LID. The conventional-developed basin (herein called ?conventional basin?) consisted of curb and gutter, 40-foot street widths, and a fully connected stormwater-conveyance system. The LID basin consisted of grassed swales, reduced impervious area (32-foot street widths), street inlets draining to grass swales, a detention pond, and an infiltration basin. Data collected in the LID basin represented predevelopment through near-complete build-out conditions. Smaller, more frequent precipitation events that produced stormwater discharge from the conventional basin were retained in the LID basin. Only six events with precipitation depths less than or equal to 0.4 inch produced measurable discharge from the LID basin. Of these six events, five occurred during winter months when underlying soils are commonly frozen, and one was likely a result of saturated soil from a preceding storm. In the conventional basin, the number of discharge events, using the same threshold of precipitation depth, was 180, with nearly one-half of those resulting from precipitation depths less than 0.2 inch. Precipitation events capable of producing appreciable discharge in the LID basin were typically those of high intensity or precipitation depth or those that occurred after soils were already saturated. Total annual discharge volume measured from

  16. A search For Artic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Four atmospheric scientists took off with their instruments for Greenland last week, where they will try to see if depletion of stratospheric ozone in the Arctic can be detected as it has been in Antarctica since 1985.Members of the scientific team include Susan Solomon and George Mount of the Aeronomy Laboratory at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colo., and Ryan Sanders and Roger Jakoubec of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science in Norman, Okla. These four participated in previous National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) investigations at McMurdo Station in Antarctica that helped document the ozonehole,” decreases of up to 50% in ozone during the early austral spring in September and October of the last 2 years (1986-1987).

  17. Emergence of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Ivy, Diane J; Kinnison, Doug; Mills, Michael J; Neely, Ryan R; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-07-15

    Industrial chlorofluorocarbons that cause ozone depletion have been phased out under the Montreal Protocol. A chemically driven increase in polar ozone (or "healing") is expected in response to this historic agreement. Observations and model calculations together indicate that healing of the Antarctic ozone layer has now begun to occur during the month of September. Fingerprints of September healing since 2000 include (i) increases in ozone column amounts, (ii) changes in the vertical profile of ozone concentration, and (iii) decreases in the areal extent of the ozone hole. Along with chemistry, dynamical and temperature changes have contributed to the healing but could represent feedbacks to chemistry. Volcanic eruptions have episodically interfered with healing, particularly during 2015, when a record October ozone hole occurred after the Calbuco eruption. PMID:27365314

  18. Emergence of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Susan; Ivy, Diane J.; Kinnison, Doug; Mills, Michael J.; Neely, Ryan R.; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Industrial chlorofluorocarbons that cause ozone depletion have been phased out under the Montreal Protocol. A chemically driven increase in polar ozone (or “healing”) is expected in response to this historic agreement. Observations and model calculations together indicate that healing of the Antarctic ozone layer has now begun to occur during the month of September. Fingerprints of September healing since 2000 include (i) increases in ozone column amounts, (ii) changes in the vertical profile of ozone concentration, and (iii) decreases in the areal extent of the ozone hole. Along with chemistry, dynamical and temperature changes have contributed to the healing but could represent feedbacks to chemistry. Volcanic eruptions have episodically interfered with healing, particularly during 2015, when a record October ozone hole occurred after the Calbuco eruption.

  19. Estimation of errors in the TOMS total ozone measurement during the Antarctica ozone campaign of August/September 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Taylor, S.; Wellemeyer, C.

    1988-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Nimbus-7 satellite provides the primary source of total ozone data for the study of total ozone in the polar regions of the earth. There are two types of instrument related errors: a slowly developing drift in the instrument calibration since the launch of the instrument in October 1978 and an increase in the measurement noise beginning April, 1984. It is estimated that by October 1987, the accumulated error in the TOMS total ozone measurement due to instrument drift is about 6 m-atm-cm. The sign of the error is such that the TOMS is slightly overpredicting the long-term decrease of the Antarctica ozone. The increase in the measurement noise is more difficult to quantify, affecting some measurements by as much as 10 D.U. and others not at all. A detailed analysis of this error and its potential impact on the studies of total ozone from TOMS will be provided. There are three categories of algorithmic errors: (1) error due the unusual shape of the ozone profile in the ozone hole; (2) error caused by very low atmospheric temperatures in the ozone hole affecting the ozone absorption cross-sections at the TOMS wavelengths; and (3) errors resulting from occasionally thick stratospheric clouds that sometimes reach to 20 km in the ozone hole.

  20. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  1. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  2. The World Already Avoided: Quantifying the Ozone Benefits Achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; McKenzie, Richard; Velders, Guus; Pyle, John

    2015-04-01

    Chlorine and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic Ozone Hole expected to disappear by ~2050. However, we show that by 2014 the Montreal Protocol has already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using an off-line 3-D atmospheric chemistry model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with benefits for surface UV and climate. A deep Arctic Ozone Hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given the meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic Ozone Hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The ozone decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ~15% by 2013.

  3. Recent and Future Evolution of the Stratospheric Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dameris, Martin; Loyola, Diego

    Since the early 1980s significant depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere, in other words the ozone hole, has been observed every year over the South Pole area in Antarctic spring. In the meantime destruction of stratospheric ozone has been detected globally. Emissions of man-made halogenated chemicals play a dominant role in ozone loss. Combined analyses of observations and numerical modeling help to understand the complex interplay of the dynamic and chemical processes involved. Evaluated models provide a base for predicting the future recovery of the ozone layer expected for the middle of this century.

  4. Scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone: 1989, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of the current understanding of stratospheric ozone (SO). The focus is on four major current aspects of SO: (1) polar ozone; (2) global trends; (3) theoretical predictions; and (4) halocarbon ozone depleting materials and global warming potentials. Other ozone related topics are also discussed: (1) the trends of stratospheric temperature, stratospheric aerosols, source gases, and surface ultraviolet radiation; and (2) the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere as it pertains to the lifetimes of ozone related chemicals. There have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's protective ozone layer. There are four major findings that each heighten the concern that chlorine and bromine containing chemicals can lead to a significant depletion of SO: (1) Antarctic Ozone Hole; (2) Perturbed Arctic Chemistry; (3) Long-term Ozone Decreases; and (4) Model Limitations.

  5. Ozone variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duetsch, H. U.

    1983-09-01

    The annual and long-term variations in the atmospheric ozone layer were examined on the basis of 55 yr of data taken at Aroya, Switzerland and 25 yr of data gathered by the global ozone network. Attention was given to annual and biennial variations, which showed that the midlatitude peak concentration was affected by a quasi-biennial variation of the tropical stratospheric circulation. Smaller scale circulation patterns were dominant in the lower stratosphere, although an observed negative trend of the total ozone was equally distributed between the troposphere and 24 km altitude. The global ozone increase detected in the 1960s was possible due to general circulation alterations, but may also have been influenced by injection of NO(x) into the atmosphere during atomic bomb testing.

  6. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  7. The evolution of ozone observed by UARS MLS in the 1992 late winter southern polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Manney, G.L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Elson, L.S.; Fishbein, E.F.; Zurek, R.W. ); Harwood, R.S.; Lahoz, W.A. )

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents initial data analysis of ozone distributions in the southern polar vortex region during the winter of 1992. The data comes from the microwave limb sounder on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The data provides never before available coverage of the polar stratosphere, and reveals the development of an ozone hole from column ozone data, changes in ozone mixing ratios in the lower stratosphere consistent with ozone destruction processes in the stratosphere, and evidence to support the transport of ozone toward the pole by tidal wave activity in the stratosphere. The ozone measurements are compared with the development of the polar vortex derived from national meteorological center data.

  8. Ozone depletion: Can global action rescue the deteriorating ozone layer

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.H.

    1992-04-03

    Until recently, severe depletion of the Earth's protective ozone layer - which blocks harmful solar radiation - was thought to be confined to a [open quotes]hole[close quotes] over Antarctica. But in February NASA scientists raised new concerns when they reported that the 25-mile-wide layer apparently is thinning over the Northern Hemisphere and other populated areas. Findings to be released this month may even show that a second hole has opened over northern New England, Canada, northern Europe, Russia and China. Led by the US, once complacent governments are now scrambling to accelerate the elimination of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other chemicals that destroy ozone. Their response to this global threat could provide a model for international cooperation in combating similar environmental dangers.

  9. Ozone vertical profile changes over South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Komhyr, W. D.; Lathrop, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Important changes in the ozone vertical profile over South Pole, Antarctica have occurred both during the recent period of measurements, 1986-1991, and since an earlier set of soundings was carried out from 1967-1971. From the onset of the 'ozone hole' over Antarctica in the early 1980s, there has been a tendency for years with lower spring ozone amounts to alternate with years with somewhat higher (although still depleted) ozone amounts. Beginning in 1989 there have been three consecutive years of strong depletion although the timing of the breakdown of the vortex has varied from year to year. Comparison of the vertical profiles between the two periods of study reveals the dramatic decreases in the ozone amounts in the stratosphere between 15-21 km during the spring. In addition, it appears that summer values are also now much lower in this altitude region.

  10. Looking at Ozone From a New Angle: Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment-2 (SOLSE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Janz, Scott; Brown, Tammy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ozone layer above Earth is our planet's fragile sunscreen, protecting people, vegetation, and wildlife. NASA has been measuring ozone for more than 20 years by looking down, but SOLSE-2 will show that more information is available by looking at ozone from the side, at Earth's limb or atmospheric boundary. When the ozone layer is compromised, increased ultraviolet (UV) levels from the sun cause health problems ranging from severe sunburns to skin cancer and cataracts. A concerted global effort has been made to reduce or eliminate the production of chemicals that deplete ozone, but the ozone layer is not expected to recover for many decades because these chemicals can remain active in the atmosphere for up to 100 years. We know now that ozone monitoring needs to be focused in the lower stratosphere. The discovery of the ozone hole in 1985 demonstrated that very large changes in ozone were occurring in the lower stratosphere near 20 km, instead of the upper stratosphere as first expected, and where current ozone instruments are focused. Measuring ozone from a tangential perspective that is centered at the limb provides ozone profiles concentrated in the lower stratosphere. The first flight of SOLSE proved that this technique achieves the accuracy and coverage of traditional measurements, and surpasses the altitude resolution and depth of retrieval of conventional techniques. Results from the first flight convinced the science community to design the next generation ozone monitoring satellite based on SOLSE. The Ozone Mapping and Profiling Suite (OMPS) is currently being built for the NPOESS satellite. The primary objective of SOLSE-2 is to confirm the promising results of the first flight over a wider range of viewing conditions and spectral wavelengths. Sometimes a really hard problem can be solved when you look at it from a different angle! While scientists conduct research, protect yourself by observing the UV index and spend less unprotected time outdoors.

  11. Stratospheric ozone chemistry in the Antarctic: what determines the lowest ozone values reached and their recovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, J.-U.; Brautzsch, K.; Pommrich, R.; Solomon, S.; Müller, R.

    2011-12-01

    Balloon-borne observations of ozone from the South Pole Station have been reported to reach ozone mixing ratios below the detection limit of about 10 ppbv at the 70 hPa level by late September. After reaching a minimum, ozone mixing ratios increase to above 1 ppmv on the 70 hPa level by late December. While the basic mechanisms causing the ozone hole have been known for more than 20 yr, the detailed chemical processes determining how low the local concentration can fall, and how it recovers from the minimum have not been explored so far. Both of these aspects are investigated here by analysing results from the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). As ozone falls below about 0.5 ppmv, a balance is maintained by gas phase production of both HCl and HOCl followed by heterogeneous reaction between these two compounds in these simulations. Thereafter, a very rapid, irreversible chlorine deactivation into HCl can occur, either when ozone drops to values low enough for gas phase HCl production to exceed chlorine activation processes or when temperatures increase above the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) threshold. As a consequence, the timing and mixing ratio of the minimum ozone depends sensitively on model parameters, including the ozone initialisation. The subsequent ozone increase between October and December is linked mainly to photochemical ozone production, caused by oxygen photolysis and by the oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane.

  12. Children's and Adults' Knowledge and Models of Reasoning about the Ozone Layer and Its Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Bisanz, Gay L.

    2003-01-01

    Examines children's and adults' knowledge of the ozone layer and its depletion, whether this knowledge increases with age, and how the ozone layer and ozone hole might be structured as scientific concepts. Uses a standardized set of questions to interview children and adults in Canada. Discusses implications of the results for health…

  13. Children's Models of Understanding of Two Major Global Environmental Issues (Ozone Layer and Greenhouse Effect).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Aims to quantify the models that 13- and 14 year-old students hold about the causes of the greenhouse effect and ozone layer depletion. Assesses the prevalence of those ideas that link the two phenomena. Twice as many students think that holes in the ozone layer cause the greenhouse effect than think the greenhouse effect causes ozone depletion.…

  14. An improved measure of ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, P. E.; Tilmes, S.; Bodeker, G. E.; Randel, W. J.; McDonald, A. J.; Nakajima, H.

    2007-06-01

    Ozone mass deficit is a commonly used index to quantify Antarctic ozone depletion. However, as currently defined, this measure is not robust with respect to reflecting chemical ozone loss within the Antarctic vortex. Therefore, in this study, a new definition of ozone mass deficit (OMD) is developed. The 220 Dobson Unit based value currently used as the threshold for ozone depletion has been replaced with a new ozone background representative of pre-ozone-hole conditions. Second, the new OMD measure is based on ozone measurements within the dynamical vortex. A simpler method is also proposed whereby calculation of the vortex edge is avoided by using the average latitude of the vortex edge (62°S) as the spatial limiting contour. An indication of the errors in OMD introduced when using this simpler approach is provided. By comparing vortex average total ozone loss (defined using the new background and limiting contour) with partial column accumulated chemical ozone loss calculated with the tracer-tracer correlation method for 1992-2004 and in more detail for 1996 and 2003, it is shown that the new OMD measure is representative of chemical ozone loss within the vortex. In addition the new criteria have been applied to the calculation of ozone hole area. The sensitivity of the new measures to uncertainties in the background have been quantified. The new ozone loss measures underestimate chemical ozone loss in highly dynamically disturbed years (2002 and 2004), and criteria for identifying these years are presented. The new measures should aid chemistry-climate model intercomparisons since ozone biases in the models are avoided.

  15. Detection and Attribution of the Recovery of Polar Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). The severity of the hole has been assessed from satellites using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole), calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period, and by estimating ozone mass deficit. Profile information shows that ozone is completely destroyed in the 14-2 1 km layer by early October. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Both models and projections of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) into the 21St century reveal that polar ozone levels should recover in the 2060- 2070 period. In this talk, we will review current projections of polar ozone recovery. Using models and ODs projections, we explore both the past, near future (2008-2025), and far future (> 2025) levels of polar ozone. Finally, we will discuss various factors that complicate recovery such as greenhouse gas changes (e.g., cooling in the upper stratosphere) and the acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation.

  16. Nimbus-7 TOMS Antarctic ozone atlas: August - December 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.; Scott, Courtney J.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at the Antarctic and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1990 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period 1 Aug. through 31 Dec. 1990. The 1990 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of 1987 and 1989, reaching a comparable depth in early October. This was in sharp contrast to the much weaker hold of 1988. The 1990 ozone hole remained at polar latitudes as it filled in Nov., in contrast to other recent years when the hold drifted to mid-latitudes before disappearing. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1990 ozone distribution to that of other years. A new calibration scheme (Version 6) was used to process 1990 ozone values, as well as to reprocess those of previous years.

  17. Ensemble simulations of the decline and recovery of polar ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. J.; Austin, J.

    2005-12-01

    An ensemble of simulations of a coupled chemistry-climate model is completed for the period 1960 to 2100. The simulations are divided into two periods, 1960-2005 and 1990-2100. For the past, the model is forced with observed sea surface temperatures, the observed concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons and greenhouse gases, observed aerosol amounts and the observed solar cycle. For the future, the model is forced with the sea surface temperatures taken from a coupled atmosphere-ocean climate simulation for the same model, while the other forcings are taken from a variety of sources. The 15-year overlap between the `past' runs and the `future' runs allowed the results to be tested for the sensitivity to the forcing data. The Antarctic ozone hole developed rapidly in the model from about the late 1970s and the minimum ozone agrees well with observations, albeit with a slight low bias. The ozone hole area is smaller than observed and scales approximately linearly with minimum ozone. Absolute Minimum ozone is attained during the period 2000-2015, but the ozone hole disappears somewhat more slowly than it initially took to form. The ozone hole does not generally dissappear until about 2065, almost two decades later than current expectations. However, depending on the precise definition chosen, and depending on interannual variability and ensemble member, some results as early as 2050 may be devoid of the Antarctic ozone hole, while other results beyond 2075 may have a small ozone hole. In contrast the Arctic recovered to 1980 conditions by about 2040, but with an even larger range of possible dates. No equivalent of the Antarctic ozone hole was simulated in the Arctic. Allowing for model bias, the minimum ozone was about 200 DU, with bias-corrected values below 225DU attained during the period 1995-2020. The depth of the Antarctic ozone hole is driven primarily by changes in halogen amounts, whereas in the Arctic halogen amounts, although important, have a weaker impact

  18. The ozone layer is recovering in mid-latitudes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casiccia, Claudio; Zamorano, Felix; Viana, Roberta; Paes Lema, Neusa; Quel, Eduardo; Wolfram, Elian

    2010-05-01

    During the recent decades there has been an increasing concern related to ozone layer and solar ultraviolet radiation, UV-B (280-320 nm), reaching the surface of the earth. The Antarctic Ozone Hole (AOH) is a phenomenon of strong ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere, this is a consequence of heterogeneous chemical reactions and dynamical processes which enhance ozone losses by reactions with chlorine. Punta Arenas (53.0S,70.9W) is the southernmost city in Chile with a population of approximately 120000. Due to its location, well within the area affected by the Antarctic Ozone Hole. Systematic observation of ozone and UV-B with a Brewer spectrophotometer have been made in order study during the ozone hole conditions. In addition, the vertical distribution using ozosonde has been investigated during campaigns in spring time and in 2009 started regularly ECC-ozonesonde measurements, also since 2002 measurements of the ozone vertical distribution using Umkehr technique have been carry out. Intercomparisons with different ozone measurement platforms were presented. Particularly we compared a DIAL ozone vertical profile in Rio Gallegos (Argentina) with an ozonesonde measurement launched in Punta Arenas. The results were in good agreement over the 16-32 km altitude range. Also, here we present measurements of column ozone, vertical distribution of ozone and ultraviolet radiation UV-B made in Punta Arenas and Magallanes region to period 1992-2009. To analyze the behavior of the stratospheric ozone layer over Magallanes was used the reference AVE-CLI-TOMS minus twice the standard deviation of the reference mean (TOMS;1978-1987, mean monthly - 2SD). The number of days per year shows an interesting cycle of 8 to 10 years, but monthly variations did not show a significant decrease, especially during September-October period.

  19. Quantifying the ozone and ultraviolet benefits already achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Dhomse, S. S.; Feng, W.; McKenzie, R. L.; Velders, G.J.M.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine- and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic ozone hole expected to disappear by ∼2050. However, we show that by 2013 the Montreal Protocol had already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using a 3D atmospheric chemistry transport model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with beneficial impacts on surface ultraviolet. A deep Arctic ozone hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic ozone hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ∼15% by 2013. PMID:26011106

  20. Quantifying the ozone and ultraviolet benefits already achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Dhomse, S. S.; Feng, W.; McKenzie, R. L.; Velders, G. J. M.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Chlorine- and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic ozone hole expected to disappear by ~2050. However, we show that by 2013 the Montreal Protocol had already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using a 3D atmospheric chemistry transport model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with beneficial impacts on surface ultraviolet. A deep Arctic ozone hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic ozone hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ~15% by 2013.

  1. Quantifying the ozone and ultraviolet benefits already achieved by the Montreal Protocol.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, M P; Dhomse, S S; Feng, W; McKenzie, R L; Velders, G J M; Pyle, J A

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine- and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic ozone hole expected to disappear by ∼2050. However, we show that by 2013 the Montreal Protocol had already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using a 3D atmospheric chemistry transport model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with beneficial impacts on surface ultraviolet. A deep Arctic ozone hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic ozone hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ∼15% by 2013. PMID:26011106

  2. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion - Comparison with previous year depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15 percent during September 1988, compared to nearly 50 percent during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30-60 deg S. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  3. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion: Comparison with previous year depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Stolarski, R.S.; Krueger, A.J. )

    1989-05-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15% during September 1988 compared to nearly 50% during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30{degree}-60{degree}S. The standard deviation also correlates with the QBO cycling of the tropical winds. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  4. TROP OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activity Area (F01) The NRMRL tropospheric ozone research program is both coordinated with the research efforts of others and planned to achieve the most important unmet research needs that draw upon its unique expertise. For example, NRMRL emissions research in this area is co...

  5. Ozone loss hits us where we live

    SciTech Connect

    Appenzeller, T.

    1991-11-01

    The news about Earth's ozone layer just keeps getting worse. Three weeks ago, NASA researchers reported that the ozone hole over the Antarctic hit a record depth this year. Now comes the United Nations Environment Program, together with the World Meteorological Organization, with an even more distressing assessment of the state of the ozone layer. For the first time, the 80-member UN panel said, measurements show the ozone shield is eroding over temperate latitudes in summer, exposing crops and people to a larger dose of ultraviolet light just when they are most vulnerable. For a small group of atmospheric modelers, though, the bad news is bittersweet. Four months ago researchers predicted summertime ozone losses of just the magnitude the UN panel has now reported: about 3% over the past decade for northern temperate latitudes. Ozone modelers are encouraged by the agreement, particularly because other models are now yielding the same result. The modeling effort was spurred by earlier measurements showing a serious erosion of ozone at midlatitudes, mainly in winter. In 1988, an analysis of data collected from the ground showed that ozone levels at the latitude of the US were dropping by about 1% to 3% per decade; last April, an analysis of measurements from the satellite-borne Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer boosted that figure to between 4% and 5%. Those findings raised the question: What mechanisms could be driving the midlatitude losses The fact that the losses seemed to be concentrated in winter suggested one possibility. The winter ozone losses at the poles are driven by chemical reactions taking place on the surface of ice crystals in polar stratospheric clouds. Such clouds don't form at temperate latitudes. But some researchers suggested that masses of air already depleted in ozone or enriched in reactive chlorine by the chemistry in the polar clouds might be escaping to temperate latitudes during the winter.

  6. 1992 ozone depletion: A response to the Pinatubo eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article focuses on the debate about whether or not the Mount Pinatubo eruption affected the springtime Antarctica ozone hole. By September 1992 the ozone hole was larger and growing at a faster pace than in previous years. However, confounding factors include an abrupt shift in the position of the polar vortex, disparity between data sets from satellite and balloon data, increasingly significant ozone loses at lower altitude and increase in depletion above 25 meters. Volcanic aerosols probably contributed but the extent still is unresolved.

  7. UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of Upper Atmosphere Ozone and Chlorine Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R.; Read, W.; Waters, J.

    1994-01-01

    UARS MLS observations of stratospheric ozone and chlorine monoxide are described. Enhanced concentrations of ClO, the predominant form of reactive chlorine responsible for ozone depletion, are seen within both the northern and southern winter polar vortices. In the southern hemisphere, this leads directly to the development of the annual Antarctic ozone hole. While ozone depletion is also observed in the north, it is less severe and there is considerable interannual variability.

  8. Ozone and aircraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cabin ozone problem is discussed. Cabin ozone in terms of health effects, the characteristics of ozone encounters by aircraft, a brief history of studies to define the problem, corrective actions taken, and possible future courses of action are examined. It is suggested that such actions include avoiding high ozone concentrations by applying ozone forecasting in flight planning procedures.

  9. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  10. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. ); Anderson, J.G.; Toohey, D.W. ); Fahey, D.W.; Kawa, S.R. ); Jones, R.L. ); McKenna, D.S. ); Poole, L.R. )

    1991-05-31

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. most of the available chlorine (HCl and ClONO{sub 2}) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} throughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO{sub 3}, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15% at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8% losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50% over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  11. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  12. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  13. Ozone crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Roan, S.

    1989-01-01

    The author presents an account of the depletion of the atmosphere's ozone layer since the discovery of the phenomenon 15 years ago. The book recounts the flight to ban chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and describes the science, the people, and the politics involved, up to the March 1988 international treaty restricting CFC production. It surveys the media's coverage, describes the struggle for remedies, and offers a prognosis for the future.

  14. Black holes

    PubMed Central

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries. PMID:11553801

  15. The chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, A.

    1997-01-01

    In the early 1980`s the Antarctic ozone hole was discovered. The ozone loss was 50 percent in the lower stratosphere during springtime, which is made possible by the conditions over Antarctica in winter. The absence of sunlight in the stratosphere during polar winter causes the stratospheric air column there to cool and sink, drawing air from lower latitudes into the upper stratosphere. This lower-latitude air gets closer to the Earth`s axis of rotation as it moves poleward and is accelerated by the need to conserve angular momentum to greater and greater westerly wind speeds forming a vortex bounded by the polar night jet stream. The air entering the vortex contains reactive ozone-destroying species. The observed ozone losses occurred concurrently with increases of chlorofluorocarbon increases.

  16. The search for signs of recovery of the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Elizabeth C; Andersen, Signe Bech

    2006-05-01

    Evidence of mid-latitude ozone depletion and proof that the Antarctic ozone hole was caused by humans spurred policy makers from the late 1980s onwards to ratify the Montreal Protocol and subsequent treaties, legislating for reduced production of ozone-depleting substances. The case of anthropogenic ozone loss has often been cited since as a success story of international agreements in the regulation of environmental pollution. Although recent data suggest that total column ozone abundances have at least not decreased over the past eight years for most of the world, it is still uncertain whether this improvement is actually attributable to the observed decline in the amount of ozone-depleting substances in the Earth's atmosphere. The high natural variability in ozone abundances, due in part to the solar cycle as well as changes in transport and temperature, could override the relatively small changes expected from the recent decrease in ozone-depleting substances. Whatever the benefits of the Montreal agreement, recovery of ozone is likely to occur in a different atmospheric environment, with changes expected in atmospheric transport, temperature and important trace gases. It is therefore unlikely that ozone will stabilize at levels observed before 1980, when a decline in ozone concentrations was first observed. PMID:16672963

  17. "Holes" in Student Understanding: Addressing Prevalent Misconceptions regarding Atmospheric Environmental Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Sara C.; Walz, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a misconception among undergraduate students that global warming is caused by holes in the ozone layer. In this study, we evaluated the presence of this and other misconceptions surrounding atmospheric chemistry that are responsible for the entanglement of the greenhouse effect and the ozone hole in students' conceptual frameworks. We…

  18. Observations and theories related to Antarctic ozone changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; Watson, R. T.; Cox, Richard A.; Kolb, C.; Mahlman, J.; Mcelroy, M.; Plumb, A.; Ramanathan, V.; Schoeberl, M.; Solomon, S.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, there was a report of a large, sudden, and unanticipated decrease in the abundance of springtime Antarctic ozone over the last decade. By 1987, ozone decreases of more than 50 percent in the total column, and 95 percent locally between 15 and 20 km, had been observed. The scientific community quickly rose to the challenge of explaining this remarkable discovery; theoreticians soon developed a series of chemical and dynamical hypotheses to explain the ozone loss. Three basic theories were proposed to explain the springtime ozone hole. (1) The ozone hole is caused by the increasing atmospheric loadings of manmade chemicals containing chlorine (chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and bromine (halons)). These chemicals efficiently destroy ozone in the lower stratosphere in the Antarctic because of the special geophysical conditions, of an isolated air mass (polar vortex) with very cold temperatures, that exist there. (2) The circulation of the atmosphere in spring has changed from being predominantly downward over Antarctica to upward. This would mean that ozone poor air from the troposphere, instead of ozone rich air from the upper stratosphere, would be transported into the lower Antarctic stratosphere. (3) The abundance of the oxides of nitrogen in the lower Antarctic stratosphere is periodically enhanced by solar activity. Nitrogen oxides are produced in the upper mesosphere and thermosphere and then transported downward into the lower stratosphere in Antarctica, resulting in the chemical destruction of ozone. The climatology and trends of ozone, temperature, and polar stratospheric clouds are discussed. Also, the transport and chemical theories for the Antarctic ozone hole are presented.

  19. Volcanoes, Polar Clouds and Arctic Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite observations and model calculations show 5 to 10% local column ozone loss in some tropical and mid latitude locations, following El Chichon and Mount Pinatubo eruptions. The rapid deepening of the Antarctic ozone hole in the early 1980s has also been partially attributed to chemistry on volcanic aerosols from a number of large eruptions. Here the effects of volcanoes on Arctic polar processes are explored. Large polar stratospheric cloud particles that cause denitrification cannot form in a volcanically perturbed environment. Denitrification can increase Arctic ozone loss by up to 30% in a future colder climate. However, we show that enhanced chemical processing on volcanic aerosols can increase Arctic ozone loss in a cold year by about 60% independent of denitrification. A coupled chemistry-microphysics model is used to show that widespread distribution of volcanic aerosols in 2000 could have caused severe springtime ozone depletion in the Arctic stratosphere. While, volcanic aerosols can strongly affect the current Arctic column ozone abundance in a cold year, denitrification effects on ozone can only become important in a much colder lower stratosphere.

  20. Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2011-02-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Anton Koekemoer; 1. Black holes, entropy, and information G. T. Horowitz; 2. Gravitational waves from black-hole mergers J. G. Baker, W. D. Boggs, J. M. Centrella, B. J. Kelley, S. T. McWilliams and J. R. van Meter; 3. Out-of-this-world physics: black holes at future colliders G. Landsberg; 4. Black holes in globular clusters S. L. W. McMillan; 5. Evolution of massive black holes M. Volonteri; 6. Supermassive black holes in deep multiwavelength surveys C. M. Urry and E. Treister; 7. Black-hole masses from reverberation mapping B. M. Peterson and M. C. Bentz; 8. Black-hole masses from gas dynamics F. D. Macchetto; 9. Evolution of supermassive black holes A. Müller and G. Hasinger; 10. Black-hole masses of distant quasars M. Vestergaard; 11. The accretion history of supermassive black holes K. Brand and the NDWFS Boötes Survey Teams; 12. Strong field gravity and spin of black holes from broad iron lines A. C. Fabian; 13. Birth of massive black-hole binaries M. Colpi, M. Dotti, L. Mayer and S. Kazantzidis; 14. Dynamics around supermassive black holes A. Gualandris and D. Merritt; 15. Black-hole formation and growth: simulations in general relativity S. L. Shapiro; 16. Estimating the spins of stellar-mass black holes J. E. McClintock, R. Narayan and R. Shafee; 17. Stellar relaxation processes near the Galactic massive black hole T. Alexander; 18. Tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes S. Gezari; 19. Where to look for radiatively inefficient accretion flows in low-luminosity AGN M. Chiaberge; 20. Making black holes visible: accretion, radiation, and jets J. H. Krolik.

  1. Change in ozone trends at southern high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E.-S.; Cunnold, D. M.; Newchurch, M. J.; Salawitch, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term ozone variations at 60-70degS in spring are investigated using ground-based and satellite measurements. Strong positive correlation is shown between year-to-year variations of ozone and temperature in the Antarctic collar region in Septembers and Octobers. Based on this relationship, the effect of year-to-year variations in vortex dynamics has been filtered out. This process results in an ozone time series that shows increasing springtime ozone losses over the Antarctic until the mid-1990s. Since approximately 1997 the ozone losses have leveled off. The analysis confirms that this change is consistent across all instruments and is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. This analysis quantifies the beginning of the recovery of the ozone hole, which is expected from the leveling off of stratospheric halogen loading due to the ban on CFCs and other halocarbons initiated by the Montreal Protocol.

  2. Unprecedented Arctic Ozone Loss in 2011: An Echo of the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    Chemical ozone destruction occurs over both polar regions in local winter/spring. In the Antarctic, an ozone hole currently forms every year via near-complete chemical destruction of vortex ozone between ~15 and 22km. In contrast, Arctic ozone loss is highly variable and has heretofore been much more limited. In early 2011, however, Arctic chemical ozone destruction approached that in the Antarctic ozone hole. While other Arctic winters had lower temperatures at particular times, and in 1997 temperatures were conducive to chemical processing as late in the season as in 2011, no other Arctic winter had as continuous and prolonged a cold period over the entire lower stratosphere as did 2010/2011. The processes leading to the unprecedented chemical loss in 2011 are detailed using aerosol (PSC) profiles from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and trace gas profiles (including HNO3, reservoir (HCl) and reactive (ClO) chlorine species,and ozone) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) total ozone measurements show the extent of column loss in comparison to other Arctic winters and the Antarctic. The extent of Arctic chemical ozone loss in the 2010/2011 winter was, for the first time, large enough to be clearly identifiable as an Arctic ozone hole.

  3. Ozone minimum occurs in Antarctica in the springtime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1989-01-01

    Observations on the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole in the upper atmosphere are summarized, and the mechanism responsible for the ozone depletion in the spring is examined. It is shown that the sequence of events begins with the absorption of H2O, N2O5, HCl, and ClONO2 on the cloud ice particles in the winter and chemical reactions among absorbed chemicals which release (HNO3)s, Cl2, HOCl, and ClNO2. With the return of sunlight in the spring, the clouds evaporate, and the Cl2, HOCl, and ClONO2 molecules are destroyed by sunlight to form Cl atoms. These attack ozone, producing a reduction of ozone that accounts for the bulk of the ozone decrease observed by the ground-based ozone monitors. Data on the ozone concentration for the period between 1957 through 1987 indicate that the southern ozone hole has been intensifying since 1975 as the amount of man-made chlorine increases.

  4. Evolution of the total ozone field during the breakdown of the Antarctic circumpolar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.P. )

    1990-09-20

    Nine years of total ozone measurements from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Nimbus 7 are used to study the evolution of the southern hemisphere total ozone field during the breakdown of the Antarctic circumpolar vortex. The TOMS data provide detailed maps of the morphology of the ozone field and reliable estimates of the vertically integrated meridional transport of ozone during the springtime period when the breakdown occurs (September, October, November). In estimating the ozone transport, chemical effects, including those thought to be responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole, are neglected. This approximation appears to be valid for times scales of a few days to a week. On this time scale, local ozone changes are primarily due to transport. Planetary-scale waves, especially zonal wave numbers 1 and 2 dominate the eddy variance and ozone transport. Wave number 1 is quasistationary, while wave number 2 is eastward moving with a period of {approximately}10 days. Before the breakdown the planetary-scale waves transport ozone poleward (equatorward) as their amplitude increases (decreases). During the vortex breakdown and filling of the ozone hole, when poleward ozone transport is large, planetary wave amplitudes generally decrease.

  5. The Changing South Polar Cap of Mars: 1999-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    13 July 2005 The south polar residual cap of Mars is composed of layered, frozen carbon dioxide. In 1999, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) showed that the carbon dioxide layers have been eroded to form a variety of circular pits, arcuate scarps, troughs, buttes, and mesas. In 2001, MOC images designed to provide repeated views of the areas imaged in 1999 -- with the hope of creating stereo (3-D) images, so that the height of scarps and depth of pits could be measured -- showed that the scarps had retreated, pits enlarged, and buttes and mesas shrank. Only carbon dioxide is volatile enough in the martian environment to have caused such dramatic changes -- the scarps were seen to retreat at an average rate of 3 meters (about 3 yards) per Mars year. Most of the scarp retreat occurs during the southern summer season; in some areas the scarps move as much as 8 meters, in others, only 1 meter per Mars year.

    Three Mars years have now elapsed since MOC first surveyed the south polar cap in 1999. Over the past several months, MGS MOC has been re-imaging areas that were seen in 1999, 2001, and 2003, to develop a detailed look at how the landscape has been changing. This animated GIF provides an example of the dramatic changes that have occurred during the past three martian years. The first image, a sub-frame of M09-05244, was acquired on 21 November 1999. The second image, a sub-frame of S06-00973, was obtained on 11 May 2005. The animation shows the changes that have occurred between 1999 and 2005. Each summer, the cap has lost more carbon dioxide. This may mean that the carbon dioxide content of the martian atmosphere has been increasing, bit by very tiny little bit, each of the years that MGS has been orbiting the red planet. These observations also imply that there was once a time, in the not-too-distant past (because there are no impact craters on the polar cap), when the atmosphere was somewhat thinner and colder, to permit the layers of carbon dioxide to form in the first place. Just as Earth's environment is very different today than it was just 11,000 or so years ago, the martian environment has also been changing on a similar time scale.

    Location near: 88.9oS, 25.7oW Image width: width: 0.6 km (0.4 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  6. Educating Older Adults: Discourses, Ideologies & Policies 1999-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This article tells the story of policies relevant to education, ageism and older adults between 1999 and 2005. It follows an article published in a previous "New Zealand Journal of Adult Learning" that described and critiqued policy developments between the 1980s and 2001. The story is located in the context of ongoing historical struggles between…

  7. Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    1992-09-01

    Foreword to the French edition; Foreword to the English edition; Acknowledgements; Part I. Gravitation and Light: 1. First fruits; 2. Relativity; 3. Curved space-time; Part II. Exquisite Corpses: 4. Chronicle of the twilight years; 5. Ashes and diamonds; 6. Supernovae; 7. Pulsars; 8. Gravitation triumphant; Part III. Light Assassinated: 9. The far horizon; 10. Illuminations; 11. A descent into the maelstrom; 12. Map games; 13. The black hole machine; 14. The quantum black hole; Part IV. Light Regained: 15. Primordial black holes; 16. The zoo of X-ray stars; 17. Giant black holes; 18. Gravitational light; 19. The black hole Universe; Appendices; Bibliography; Name index; Subject index.

  8. Ozone mapper survives Soviet coup

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-06

    NASA's latest satellite-borne monitor of the Earth's protective ozone layer went operational a little earlier than planned last month. The unprecedented launch - on a Soviet weather satellite - of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) took place on 15 August. Three days later so did the coup that has shaken the Soviet Union to its foundations. So, instead of waiting weeks to let the instrument adjust to space conditions, NASA engineers, who were in Moscow to monitor the launch, turned TOMS on before going home - just 5 days post-launch. No problems resulted, and the orbiting instrument, which for the first 2 months of its 2-year mission will track the formation of this year's Antarctic ozone hole, is now returning data to both US and Soviet ground stations. The launch of a new TOMS was an urgent imperative for US atmospheric researchers. The old one, now approaching its 13th year in orbit on the NASA satellite Nimbus-7, was showing its age and threatened to quit working. Because of the tight launch schedules following the Challenger disaster, NASA sought outside help to get TOMS off the ground. The Soviet Union turned out to be the best partner: it is developing a new network of Meteor meteorology satellites, and the 1987 US/USSR space cooperation agreement allowed the Soviet Cyclone booster to become the Americans' savior.

  9. About ozone depletion in stratosphere over Brazil in last decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Inácio M.; Imai, Takeshi; Seguchi, Tomio

    The depletion of stratospheric ozone, resulting from the emission of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has become a major issue since 1980. The decrease in stratospheric ozone over the polar regions has been pronounced at the South Pole than at the North Pole. In mid-latitude and equatorial regions, ozone depletion becomes less important; it depends on seasonal effects and on the characteristics of a particular region. The detailed mechanism by which the polar ozone holes form is different from that for the mid-latitude thinning, but the most important process in both trends is the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine and bromine. The main source of these halogen atoms in the stratosphere is photodissociation of CFC compounds, commonly called freons, and of bromofluorocarbon compounds known as halons. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere after being emitted at the surface. Both ozone depletion mechanisms strengthened as emissions of CFCs and halons increased [1]. Measurements of stratospheric ozone carried out on several locations in Brazil and on the South Pole in the last decade (1996-2005), using detectors placed on ground, stratospheric balloons and Earth Probe TOMS satellites, are presented here. Detailed series analysis from 1980 up to the present describes a mean ozone depletion of 4[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone/depletion.

  10. Climate change and atmospheric chemistry: how will the stratospheric ozone layer develop?

    PubMed

    Dameris, Martin

    2010-10-25

    The discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1985 was a surprise for science. For a few years the reasons of the ozone hole was speculated about. Soon it was obvious that predominant meteorological conditions led to a specific situation developing in this part of the atmosphere: Very low temperatures initiate chemical processes that at the end cause extreme ozone depletion at altitudes of between about 15 and 30 km. So-called polar stratospheric clouds play a key role. Such clouds develop at temperatures below about 195 K. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on cloud particles initiate the destruction of ozone molecules. The future evolution of the ozone layer will not only depend on the further development of concentrations of ozone-depleting substances, but also significantly on climate change. PMID:20922727

  11. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been regulated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.; Velders, G. J. M.

    2009-03-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the scientific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling studies. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements that largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fully-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an annual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation, 17% of the globally-averaged column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed by 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower stratosphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near zero by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increases, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  12. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been regulated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.; Velders, G. J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the scientific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements that largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fully-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an annual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation, 17% of the globally-average column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed by 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower stratosphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near zero by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increases, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  13. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been regulated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.; Velders, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the scientific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. The nations of the world implemented the Montreal Protocol (and amendments) which stopped ODS production in 1992. In this presentation we use a fully coupled radiation- chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an annual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation, 17% of the globally average column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed by 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower stratosphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near zero by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet (UV) radiation increases, tripling the erythemal (sunburn) radiation in the northern summer mid-latitudes by 2065.

  14. What Would Have Happened to the Ozone Layer if Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been Regulated?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.; Velders, G. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the sci entific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depl eting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory m easurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements t hat largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fu lly-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an ann ual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation 1.7 % of the globa lly-average column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed b y 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observ ed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower strat osphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near ze ro by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as curren tly observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increa ses, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  15. A video atlas of TOMS ozone data, 1978-88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesters, D.; Krueger, A. J.

    1989-12-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), on-board NASA's Nimbus-7 weather satellite, has been observing ozone over the earth once daily for the last 10 yr. A time-lapse atlas of 3440 color-coded images drawn from the TOMS archive from 1978 to 1988 has been visualized on a standard VHS videotape that is now available from NASA. The rapid and complex ozone variations presented demonstrate the difficulty of separating man-induced climate changes from natural variability. This article presents a few images from the atlas and describes interesting features in the animation, such as the correlation between ozone and 'the weather', and the recent deepening of the annual ozone hole over the South Pole. Originally intended as a browsing tool for the TOMS digital database, the videotape is a vivid presentation of the earth's atmospheric dynamics and chemistry that is recommended for scientists, educators, policy makers, and citizens concerned about the global environment.

  16. A video atlas of TOMS ozone data, 1978-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Krueger, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), on-board NASA's Nimbus-7 weather satellite, has been observing ozone over the earth once daily for the last 10 yr. A time-lapse atlas of 3440 color-coded images drawn from the TOMS archive from 1978 to 1988 has been visualized on a standard VHS videotape that is now available from NASA. The rapid and complex ozone variations presented demonstrate the difficulty of separating man-induced climate changes from natural variability. This article presents a few images from the atlas and describes interesting features in the animation, such as the correlation between ozone and 'the weather', and the recent deepening of the annual ozone hole over the South Pole. Originally intended as a browsing tool for the TOMS digital database, the videotape is a vivid presentation of the earth's atmospheric dynamics and chemistry that is recommended for scientists, educators, policy makers, and citizens concerned about the global environment.

  17. Ozone hits low levels over Antarctica, U. S

    SciTech Connect

    Zurer, P.

    1993-10-04

    This year's Antarctic ozone hole is as deep as any ever observed and is approaching the record geographical extent of 1992, according to preliminary satellite data. In addition, both groundbased and satellite observations indicate that ozone concentrations over the U.S. hit record lows earlier this year. For more than a decade, almost all the ozone at certain altitudes over Antarctica has been destroyed as the Sun returns to the polar region in September. This dramatic photochemical depletion, catalyzed by chlorine and bromine from man-made compounds, reaches its nadir in early October. Ozone levels return to near normal later in the season, when the circular pattern of winds that isolates air over Antarctica breaks down, and ozone-rich air pours in from the north.

  18. Ozone in the free atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C. (Editor); Prasad, S. S. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The present book provides a summary of the state of scientific knowledge of stratospheric and free tropospheric ozone as it exists at the beginning of 1983. Ozone photochemistry in the stratosphere is discussed, taking into account fundamental molecular properties, the absorption spectrum of ozone, photodissociation, ozone formation and destruction in the upper atmosphere, the photochemistry of odd-hydrogen, the photochemistry of odd-nitrogen, the photochemistry of odd-chlorine, and photochemistry-temperature coupling. The observed distribution of atmospheric ozone and its variations are considered along with ozone transport, ozone in the troposphere, stratospheric ozone perturbations, and climatic and biological effects. Attention is given to the techniques of observing atmospheric ozone, horizontal-vertical ozone transport and conservative quantities, measurements of tropospheric ozone, the tropospheric ozone budget, ozone models, natural ozone variations, and anthropogenic ozone perturbations.

  19. The ASSET intercomparison of ozone analyses: method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H. J.; Fonteyn, D.; Jackson, D. R.; Juckes, M. N.; Massart, S.; Peuch, V.-H.; Rharmili, S.; Segers, A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims to summarise the current performance of ozone data assimilation (DA) systems, to show where they can be improved, and to quantify their errors. It examines 11 sets of ozone analyses from 7 different DA systems. Two are numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems based on general circulation models (GCMs); the other five use chemistry transport models (CTMs). The systems examined contain either linearised or detailed ozone chemistry, or no chemistry at all. In most analyses, MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) ozone data are assimilated; two assimilate SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) observations instead. Analyses are compared to independent ozone observations covering the troposphere, stratosphere and lower mesosphere during the period July to November 2003. Biases and standard deviations are largest, and show the largest divergence between systems, in the troposphere, in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere, in the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere, and the Antarctic ozone hole region. However, in any particular area, apart from the troposphere, at least one system can be found that agrees well with independent data. In general, none of the differences can be linked to the assimilation technique (Kalman filter, three or four dimensional variational methods, direct inversion) or the system (CTM or NWP system). Where results diverge, a main explanation is the way ozone is modelled. It is important to correctly model transport at the tropical tropopause, to avoid positive biases and excessive structure in the ozone field. In the southern hemisphere ozone hole, only the analyses which correctly model heterogeneous ozone depletion are able to reproduce the near-complete ozone destruction over the pole. In the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere (above 5 hPa), some ozone photochemistry schemes caused large but easily remedied biases. The diurnal cycle of ozone in the

  20. Impact of climate variability on tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Grewe, Volker

    2007-03-01

    A simulation with the climate-chemistry model (CCM) E39/C is presented, which covers both the troposphere and stratosphere dynamics and chemistry during the period 1960 to 1999. Although the CCM, by its nature, is not exactly representing observed day-by-day meteorology, there is an overall model's tendency to correctly reproduce the variability pattern due to an inclusion of realistic external forcings, like observed sea surface temperatures (e.g. El Niño), major volcanic eruption, solar cycle, concentrations of greenhouse gases, and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. Additionally, climate-chemistry interactions are included, like the impact of ozone, methane, and other species on radiation and dynamics, and the impact of dynamics on emissions (lightning). However, a number of important feedbacks are not yet included (e.g. feedbacks related to biogenic emissions and emissions due to biomass burning). The results show a good representation of the evolution of the stratospheric ozone layer, including the ozone hole, which plays an important role for the simulation of natural variability of tropospheric ozone. Anthropogenic NO(x) emissions are included with a step-wise linear trend for each sector, but no interannual variability is included. The application of a number of diagnostics (e.g. marked ozone tracers) allows the separation of the impact of various processes/emissions on tropospheric ozone and shows that the simulated Northern Hemisphere tropospheric ozone budget is not only dominated by nitrogen oxide emissions and other ozone pre-cursors, but also by changes of the stratospheric ozone budget and its flux into the troposphere, which tends to reduce the simulated positive trend in tropospheric ozone due to emissions from industry and traffic during the late 80s and early 90s. For tropical regions the variability in ozone is dominated by variability in lightning (related to ENSO) and stratosphere-troposphere exchange (related to Northern Hemisphere Stratospheric

  1. Ozone Trend Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The detection of anthropogenic disturbances in the Earth's ozone layer was studied. Two topics were addressed: (1) the level at which a trend in total ozoning is detected by existing data sources; and (2) empirical evidence in the prediction of the depletion in total ozone. Error sources are identified. The predictability of climatological series, whether empirical models can be trusted, and how errors in the Dobson total ozone data impact trend detectability, are discussed.

  2. 2001 OZONE DESIGN VALUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is generated by a complex atmoshperic chemical process. Industrial and automobile pollutants in the form of oxides of nitrogen and hydrocarbons react in the atmosphere when air is stagnant and temperatures are high to form ozone. Ozone is known to cause adverse health eff...

  3. 2020 OZONE DESIGN VALUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is generated by a complex atmoshperic chemical process. Industrial and automobile pollutants in the form of oxides of nitrogen and hydrocarbons react in the atmosphere when air is stagnant and temperatures are high to form ozone. Ozone is known to cause adverse health eff...

  4. OZONE BYPRODUCT FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ozone for water treatment has been increasing as ozone has great potential for degrading water pollutants and inactivating viruses, Giardia cysts, and Cryptosporidium oocysts. Although it appears that ozone generates less undesirable disinfection by-products (DBPs) th...

  5. Ozone Antimicrobial Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is a potent germicide that has been used extensively for water purification. In Europe, 90 percent of the municipal water systems are treated with ozone, and in France, ozone has been used to treat drinking water since 1903. However, there is limited information on the bioc...

  6. Climatology and trends in the forcing of the stratospheric ozone transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, E.; Weare, B. C.

    2011-07-01

    A thorough analysis of the ozone transport was carried out using the Transformed-Mean Eulerian (TEM) tracer continuity equation and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40). In this budget analysis, the chemical net production term, which is calculated as the residual of the other terms, displays the correct features of a chemical sink and source term, including location and seasonality, and shows good agreement in magnitude compared to other methods of calculating ozone loss rates. This study provides further insight into the role of the eddy ozone transport and underlines its fundamental role in the recovery of the ozone hole during spring. The trend analysis reveals that the ozone hole intensification over the 1980-2001 period is not solely related to the trend in chemical losses, but more specifically to the balance between the trends in chemical losses and ozone transport. That is because, in the Southern Hemisphere from October to December, the large increase in the chemical destruction of ozone is balanced by an equally large trend in the eddy transport, associated with a small increase in the mean transport. This study shows that the increase in the eddy transport is characterized by more poleward ozone eddy flux by transient waves in the midlatitudes and by stationary waves in the polar region. Overall, this study makes clearer the close interaction between the trends in ozone chemistry and ozone transport. It reveals that the eddy ozone transport and its long-term changes are an important natural mitigation mechanism for the ozone hole. This work also underlines the need for diagnostics of the eddy transport in chemical transport models used to investigate future ozone recovery.

  7. CFCs, their replacements, and the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Noakes, T J

    1995-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have become widely used in a variety of applications, ranging from aerosols to refrigeration, through their unique combination of the properties of nonflammability and general inertness. However, their chemical stability, which makes CFCs relatively safe and non-toxic, is also responsible for their potential to damage the environment. From 1974 opinion developed that CFCs might indirectly affect the stratospheric 'ozone layer' through their ability to transport halogens, particularly chlorine, to this level. By the mid 1980s a consensus emerged that atmospheric CFCs could contribute significantly to ozone depletion and an annual thinning (a 'hole') in the ozone layer over the Antarctic was reported. Some of the atmospheric chemistry which is believed to occur, and some of the measurements made on the ozone 'layer' are reviewed together with the environmental regulatory actions that have been taken. These are leading to a controlled rapid phase out of a number of industrial chemicals, including CFCs. The pharmaceutical industry uses significant quantities of CFCs as propellants in metered dose inhalers (MDIs). Two suitable alternative molecules, the hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs) HFA134a and HFA227, which have the required properties but are not ozone depleting, are introduced. PMID:10150493

  8. The origin of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.

    2006-05-01

    Highest atmospheric ozone production rates can be found at around 30 km in the tropical stratosphere, leading to ozone mixing ratios of about 10 ppmv. Those stratospheric air masses are then transported to extra-tropical latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. This is considered the main mechanism to generate mid- and high latitude ozone. By applying the climate-chemistry models E39/C and MAECHAM4/CHEM, this view is investigated in more detail. The origin of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere is analysed, by incorporating a diagnostics ("marked ozone origin tracers") into the models, which allows to identify the origin of ozone. In most regions the simulated local ozone concentration is dominated by local ozone production, i.e. less than 50% of the ozone at higher latitudes of the stratosphere is produced in the tropics, which conflicts with the idea that the tropics are the global source for stratospheric ozone. Although episodic stratospheric intrusions occur basically everywhere, the main ozone stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange is connected to exchange processes at the sub-tropical jet-stream. The simulated tropospheric influx of ozone amounts to 420 Tg per year, and originates in the Northern Hemisphere from the extra-tropical stratosphere, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere a re-circulation of tropical tropospheric ozone contributes most to the influx of ozone into the troposphere. In the model E39/C, the upper troposphere of both hemispheres is clearly dominated by tropical tropospheric ozone (40%-50%) except for northern summer hemisphere, where the tropospheric contribution (from the tropics as well as from the Northern Hemisphere) does not exceed 20%.

  9. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  10. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  11. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  12. Executive summary of the ozone trends panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Trenberth, K.E.

    1988-07-01

    The report evidently focuses on global aspects of ozone, and the Antarctic ozone hole is just one part. But it is mainly in the Antarctic, where the extreme cold and unique atmospheric circulation of the southern spring occur, that the evidence for drastic decreases in ozone is unequivocal and where, because of direct measurements of the chemical composition of the statosphere during the Antarctic ozone expeditions, the primary responsibility for ozone depletion can be assigned to CFCs. Small decreases in ozone have been found over the rest of the globe, but they are not yet alarming since they are comparable to natural variations. In fact, most of the decrease in ozone in the Northern Hemisphere from 1979 to 1985 appears to have been associated with the 11-year sunspot cycle and with the reduction in ultraviolet radiation emitted from the sun during that period. As well, previously published reports of much larger decreases in ozone amounts were biased by drift in the calibration of the satellite instruments used, as the executive summary explains.

  13. Accord on the deepening problem of ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    In September representatives of 24 or 46 negotiating nations signed a treaty designed to freeze and eventually cut the world's consumption of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), a class of chemicals implicated in the depletion of the ozone layer. The treaty also calls for a freeze on halons, a class of similar ozone-depleting chemicals used primarily in fire extinguishers. Yet, even under the scenario prescribed by the treaty, a 2% loss of ozone by the mid-21st century is still forecast. At the same time as the treaty signing, scientists organized by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration were flying airplanes into the upper reaches of the ozone layer over Antarctica. They found the ozone hole, which appears each spring, this year to be the largest yet - reflecting a 55% decrease in ozone concentration from 1979. High levels of chlorine were recorded along with low levels of ozone. The scientists also found that ozone levels could drop dramatically in the course of one day, indicating that the meteorological dynamics of the South Pole could be contributing to the loss caused by the chlorine. In the US there are signs of a movement to eliminate the use of CFCs in manufacturing the plastic foams that hold fast-food hamburgers.

  14. History of Ozone Research: From Schonbein to the Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    In 1840, C.F. Schonbein recognized that the smell generated in several different electrical and chemical processes was a single substance. He named this substance "ozein" from the Greek for "to smell". This substance we know today as ozone. Several periods can be distinguished in the continued development of our understanding of ozone. Throughout the late 19th century, the identity and properties of ozone were established and described. Ozone was recognized to be a constituent of normal air and tests were established to measure its concentration. Its disinfectant properties were recognized. New methods were developed for making ozone in the laboratory. In 1879, ultraviolet spectroscopic techniques were applied to the measurement of the solar spectrum and it was discovered by Comu that the spectrum was cut off at about 300 nm wavelength. Hartley suggested, based on laboratory measurements, that this cutoff was due to ozone in the atmosphere which he correctly asserted was somewhere in the upper atmosphere. This began the period of development of the amount and distribution of ozone throughout the atmosphere. In 1930, Chapman put forward the first theory of the formation and destruction of ozone. By the mid-1960s it was becoming obvious that the description of the chemical loss term was inadequate. By the early 1970s the chemical destruction of ozone by the oxides of hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, and bromine was recognized as an essential element in the chemical balance determining the ozone concentration. Today, ozone is a broad research project which crosses the boundaries of traditional disciplines. Stratospheric ozone loss due to chlorofluorocarbons is a newsworthy item. The Antarctic ozone hole opens up every spring. The provisions of the Montreal Protocol were agreed upon by countries around the world and promise to reduce the future levels of ozone-destroying chlorine in the stratosphere. Ozone concentrations in polluted cities are a subject of local and

  15. Does cosmic-ray-induced heterogeneous chemistry influence stratospheric polar ozone loss?

    PubMed

    Müller, Rolf; Grooss, Jens-Uwe

    2009-11-27

    Cosmic-ray (CR) -induced heterogeneous reactions of halogenated species have been suggested to play the dominant role in causing the Antarctic ozone hole. However, measurements of total ozone in Antarctica do not show a compact and significant correlation with CR activity. Further, a substantial CR-induced heterogeneous loss of chlorofluorocarbons is incompatible with multiyear satellite observations of N2O and CFC-12. Thus, CR-induced heterogeneous reactions cannot be considered as an alternative mechanism causing the Antarctic ozone hole. PMID:20366127

  16. Stratospheric ClO and ozone from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Manney, G. L.; Elson, L. S.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric ozone and of ClO (the predominant form of reactive chlorine responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion) are reported for both the Arctic and Antarctic winters of the past 18 months. Chlorine in the lower stratosphere was almost completely converted to chemically reactive forms in both the northern and southern polar winter vortices. This occurred in the south long before the development of the Antarctic ozone hole, suggesting that ozone loss can be masked by influx of ozone-rich air.

  17. Chemical Loss of Polar Ozone: Present Understanding and Remaining Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross; Canty, Tim; Cunnold, Derek; Dorf, Marcel; Frieler, Katja; Godin-Beekman, Sophie; Newchurch, Michael; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Rex, Markus; Stimpfle, Rick; Streibel, Martin; vonderGathen, Peter; Weisenstein, Debra; Yan, Eun-Su

    2005-01-01

    Not long after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was established that halogen compounds, supplied to the atmosphere mainly by anthropogenic activities, are the primary driver of polar ozone loss. We will briefly review the chemical mechanisms that cause polar ozone loss and the early evidence showing the key role played by anthropogenic halogens. Recently, stratospheric halogen loading has leveled off, due to adherence to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments that has essentially banned CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and other halocarbons. We will describe recent reports of the first stage of recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole (e.g., a statistically significant slowing of the downward trend), associated with the leveling off of stratospheric halogens. Despite this degree of understanding, we will discuss the tendency of photochemical models to underestimate the observed rate of polar ozone loss and a hypothesis that has recently been put forth that might resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we will briefly discuss chemical loss of Arctic ozone, which

  18. Sensitivity of the FVGCM to Changes in Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski; Pawson, S.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Douglass, A.; Newman, P.

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out an experiment with the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). This experiment consisted of two different imposed changes in the climatological ozone fields assumed in the radiation code. for conditions with no significant ozone hole. This distribution was obtained from a 50-year simulation of the full stratospheric ozone chemistry, with a time-dependent chlorine loading, done with our off-line chemical transport model (CTM). Three years (1978-1980) of this simulation were averaged to form a monthly, zonal-mean ozone distribution that was used in the 20-year integration of the FVGCM for "unperturbed" conditions. The second 20-year GCM integration included a fully-developed ozone hole. This ozone distribution was from three years, 1998-2000, from the same CTM simulation. The goal of this work is to determine the coupled response of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. These experiments are the first step in understanding the coupled response. An important initial question concerns the significance of the signals: if 20-year integrations turn out to be too short, the runs will be extended.

  19. Theoretical support for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    This investigation was to provide theoretical support during and after the deployment of NASA research aircraft to Punta Arenas, Chile during August and September of 1987 to conduct the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The experiment was very successful in demonstrating the role of anthropogenic chlorine in producing the ozone hole over Antarctica during September and October of 1987. The PI worked primarily on using tracer data from the ER-2 aircraft to show that transport could not have caused the ozone hole in 1987, and that transport of chemical species into the polar vortex was very weak during the period of the experiment. The presence of gravity waves was also very apparent in the ER-2 data, and papers were published on this analysis and on the use of meteorological analyses to position the aircraft within the vortex.

  20. Theoretical support for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was to provide theoretical support during and after the deployment of NASA research aircraft to Punta Arenas, Chile during August and September of 1987 to conduct the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The experiment was very successful in demonstrating the role of anthropogenic chlorine in producing the ozone hole over Antarctica during September and October of 1987. The PI worked primarily on using tracer data from the ER-2 aircraft to show that transport could not have caused the ozone hole in 1987, and that transport of chemical species into the polar vortex was very weak during the period of the experiment. The presence of gravity waves was also very apparent in the ER-2 data, and papers were published on this analysis and on the use of meteorological analyses to position the aircraft within the vortex.

  1. Observational evidence of the influence of Antarctic stratospheric ozone variability on middle atmosphere dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, N.; Espy, P. J.; Hibbins, R. E.; Fritts, D. C.; Kavanagh, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    Modeling results have suggested that the circulation of the stratosphere and mesosphere in spring is strongly affected by the perturbations in heating induced by the Antarctic ozone hole. Here using both mesospheric MF radar wind observations from Rothera Antarctica (67°S, 68°W) as well as stratospheric analysis data, we present observational evidence that the stratospheric and mesospheric wind strengths are highly anti-correlated, and show their largest variability in November. We find that these changes are related to the total amount of ozone loss that occurs during the Antarctic spring ozone hole and particularly with the ozone gradients that develop between 57.5°S and 77.5°S. The results show that with increasing ozone loss during spring, winter conditions in the stratosphere and mesosphere persist longer into the summer. These results are discussed in the light of observations of the onset and duration of the Antarctic polar mesospheric cloud season.

  2. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  3. Ozone flow visualization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Stedman, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques using ozone for tracing gas flows are proposed whereby ozone is detected through its strong absorption of ultraviolet light, which is easily made visible with fluorescent materials, or through its reaction with nitric oxide to form excited nitrogen dioxide, which in relaxing emits detectable light. It is shown that response speeds in the kHz range are possible with an ultraviolet detection system for initial ozone concentrations of about 1%.

  4. Reinterpretation of ozone data from Base Roi Baudouin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelder, H.; Muller, C.

    1994-01-01

    The ozone Dobson measurements obtained in Antarctica at the Belgian 'Base Roi Baudouin' (70 deg 26 min S, 24 deg 19 min E) in 1965 and 1966 were retrieved from the KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute) archives in De Bilt. Despite excellent treatment at the time by the meteorologists in charge at the KNMI (Wisse and Meerburg, 1969), a study of the original observers notes was made in order to check possible seasonal ozone phenomena. No systematic anomaly in the first analysis was found; meteorological data from the site together with Brewer-Mast ozone soundings concur that the conditions did not correspond either in 1965 nor 1966 to the current ozone hole (Farman et al., 1985) situation, however, the data yields excellent correlation with stratospheric temperature and shows in 1966 a clear November maximum in opposition to an October value around 344 Dobson units.

  5. Quasi-biennial modulation of the Antarctic ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lait, Leslie R.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Newman, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in total ozone and temperature has been extracted from 9 years of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations and National Meteorological Center (NMC) analyses. Years in which QBO-related variations in the total ozone and temperature are positive are found to correspond to years with smaller September Antarctic total ozone hole decline rates and vice versa. The QBO appears to be responsible for September decline rate deviations up to 0.4 Dobson units (DU) per day. Also, the QBO at mid-latitudes appears to be better correlated with the 30-mbar tropical QBO winds than with those at 50 mbar. Possible mechanisms that would explain these phenomena are discussed.

  6. The 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment: the Nimbus-7 TOMS Data Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Ardanuy, Philip E.; Sechrist, Frank S.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Galimore, Reginald N.

    1988-01-01

    Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were suppled within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile, over a telecommunications network designed specifically for this purpose. The TOMS data preparation and method of transfer over the telecommunications links are reviewed. This atlas includes a complete set of the near-real-time TOMS orbital overpass data over regions around the Palmer Peninsula of Antarctica for the period of August 8 through September 29, 1987. Also provided are daily polar orthographic projections of TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere from August through November 1987. In addition, a chronology of the salient points of the experiment, along with some latitudinal cross sections and time series at locations of interest of the TOMS total ozone observations are presented. The TOMS total ozone measurements are evaluated along the flight tracks of each of the ER-2 and DC-8 missions during the experiment. The ozone hole is shown here to develop in a monotonic progression throughout late August and September. The minimum total ozone amount was found on 5 October, when its all-time lowest value of 109 DU is recorded. The hole remains well defined, but fills gradually from mid-October through mid-November. The hole's dissolution is observed here to begin in mid-November, when it elongates and begins to rotate. By the end of November, the south pole is no longer located within the ozone hole.

  7. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    2008-01-01

    We use a chemistry-climate model and new estimates of smoke produced by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the impact on stratospheric ozone of a regional nuclear war between developing nuclear states involving 100 Hiroshima-size bombs exploded in cities in the northern subtropics. We find column ozone losses in excess of 20% globally, 25–45% at midlatitudes, and 50–70% at northern high latitudes persisting for 5 years, with substantial losses continuing for 5 additional years. Column ozone amounts remain near or <220 Dobson units at all latitudes even after three years, constituting an extratropical “ozone hole.” The resulting increases in UV radiation could impact the biota significantly, including serious consequences for human health. The primary cause for the dramatic and persistent ozone depletion is heating of the stratosphere by smoke, which strongly absorbs solar radiation. The smoke-laden air rises to the upper stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow, so that much of the stratosphere is ultimately heated by the localized smoke injections. Higher stratospheric temperatures accelerate catalytic reaction cycles, particularly those of odd-nitrogen, which destroy ozone. In addition, the strong convection created by rising smoke plumes alters the stratospheric circulation, redistributing ozone and the sources of ozone-depleting gases, including N2O and chlorofluorocarbons. The ozone losses predicted here are significantly greater than previous “nuclear winter/UV spring” calculations, which did not adequately represent stratospheric plume rise. Our results point to previously unrecognized mechanisms for stratospheric ozone depletion. PMID:18391218

  8. Investigations of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange of Ozone Derived From MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Ziemke, Jerry R.

    2006-01-01

    Daily high-resolution maps of stratospheric ozone have been constructed using observations by MLS combined with trajectory information. These fields are used to determine the extratropical stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone for the year 2005 using two diagnostic methods. The resulting two annual estimates compare well with past model- and observational-based estimates. Initial analyses of the seasonal characteristics indicate that significant STE of ozone in the polar regions occurs only during spring and early summer. We also examine evidence that the Antarctic ozone hole is responsible for a rapid decrease in the rate of ozone STE during the SH spring. Subtracting the high-resolution stratospheric ozone fiom OMI total column measurements creates a high-resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) product. The HTOR fields are compared to the spatial distribution of the ozone STE. We show that the mean tropospheric ozone maxima tend to occur near locations of significant ozone STE. This suggests that STE may be responsible for a significant fraction of many mean tropospheric ozone anomalies.

  9. Past changes, current state and future evolution of the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin-Beekmann, S.

    2013-05-01

    The ozone layer has been under scrutiny since the discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in the mid-eighties (Farman et al., 1985). The rapid disclosure of the main processes involved in polar ozone destruction lead to the signature of the Montreal Protocol that regulates the emission of ozone depleting substances (ODS). The objective of this presentation is to review the current understanding of past changes and current state of the ozone layer, the evolution of ODS concentration in the atmosphere and assess the projections of ozone recovery. Satellite measurements revealed a peak of ODS concentration in the mid and end of the nineties and ODS concentrations have started to decrease, albeit at a slower pace than during the increase period due to the atmospheric lifetimes of these compounds. The total ozone content has stabilized at global scale since the beginning of the 21st century. In 2009, integrated ozone content was about 3.5 % smaller in the 60°S-60°N region compared to values prior to 1980 (WMO, 2011). Climate change will influence the recovery of stratospheric. Both ozone depletion and increase of carbon dioxide induce a cooling of the stratosphere. In the winter polar stratosphere, this cooling enhances the formation of polar stratospheric clouds involved in the formation of the ozone hole. In the high stratosphere, it slows the chemical reactions destroying ozone and accelerates its reformation (WMO, 2011). Besides, most chemistry-climate models predict an acceleration of the stratospheric meridional circulation, which would speed up the ozone recovery (Eyring et al., 2010). This recovery is forecasted in periods ranging between 2015 and 2030 and between 2030 and 2040 in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. The Antarctic ozone hole will not disappear before 2050. Because of the acceleration of the meridional circulation, models simulate a super-recovery of ozone in the high latitude regions and an under recovery in the tropics. At

  10. Modeling the climate impact of Southern Hemisphere ozone depletion: The importance of the ozone data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. J.; Davis, S. M.; Hassler, B.; Solomon, S.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The ozone hole is an important driver of recent Southern Hemisphere (SH) climate change, and capturing these changes is a goal of climate modeling. Most climate models are driven by off-line ozone data sets. Previous studies have shown that there is a substantial range in estimates of SH ozone depletion, but the implications of this range have not been examined systematically. We use a climate model to evaluate the difference between using the ozone forcing (Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate (SPARC)) used by many Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) models and one at the upper end of the observed depletion estimates (Binary Database of Profiles (BDBP)). In the stratosphere, we find that austral spring/summer polar cap cooling, geopotential height decreases, and zonal wind increases in the BDBP simulations are all doubled compared to the SPARC simulations, while tropospheric responses are 20-100% larger. These results are important for studies attempting to diagnose the climate fingerprints of ozone depletion.

  11. Climatology and trends in the forcing of the stratospheric ozone transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, E.; Weare, B. C.

    2011-02-01

    A thorough analysis of the ozone transport was carried out using the Transformed-Mean Eulerian (TEM) tracer transport equation and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40). In this budget analysis, the chemical net production term, which is calculated as the residual of the other terms, displays the correct features of a chemical sink and source term, including location and seasonality, and shows a good agreement in magnitude compared to other methods of calculating ozone loss rates. This study provides further insight into the role of the eddy ozone transport and underlines its fundamental role in the recovery of the ozone hole during spring. The trend analysis reveals that the ozone hole intensification over the 1980-2001 period is not directly related to the trend in chemical losses, but more specifically to the balance in the trends in chemical losses and transport. That is because, in the SH from October to December, the large increase in the chemical destruction of ozone is balanced by an equally large trend in the eddy transport, associated with a small increase in the mean transport. This study shows that the increase in the eddy transport is characterized by more poleward ozone eddy flux by transient waves in the midlatitudes and by stationary waves in the polar region. This is primarily due to the presence of storm tracks in the midlatitudes and of the asymmetric Antarctic topography and ice-sea heating contrasts near the pole. Overall, this study makes clear of the fact that without an increase in the eddy ozone transport over the 1980-2001 period, the ozone hole over Antarctica would be drastically more severe. This underlines the need for careful diagnostics of the eddy ozone transport in modeling studies of long-term changes in stratospheric ozone.

  12. On the surface impact of Arctic stratospheric ozone extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, N.; Polvani, L. M.; Solomon, S.

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive stratosphere-resolving atmospheric model, with interactive stratospheric ozone chemistry, coupled to ocean, sea ice and land components is used to explore the tropospheric and surface impacts of large springtime ozone anomalies in the Arctic stratosphere. Coupling between the Antarctic ozone hole and Southern Hemisphere climate has been identified in numerous studies, but connections of Arctic ozone loss to surface climate have been more difficult to elucidate. Analyzing an ensemble of historical integrations with all known natural and anthropogenic forcings specified over the period 1955-2005, we find that extremely low stratospheric ozone changes are able to produce large and robust anomalies in tropospheric wind, temperature and precipitation in April and May over large portions of the Northern Hemisphere (most notably over the North Atlantic and Eurasia). Further, these ozone-induced surface anomalies are obtained only in the last two decades of the 20th century, when high concentrations of ozone depleting substances generate sufficiently strong stratospheric temperature anomalies to impact the surface climate. Our findings suggest that coupling between chemistry and dynamics is essential for a complete representation of surface climate variability and climate change not only in Antarctica but also in the Arctic.

  13. The Ozone Trends Panel - CFCs and evidence-based policymaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, R.

    2012-12-01

    My involvement with the issue of stratospheric ozone depletion started with my Ph.D studies, which predated the seminal paper of Rowland and Molina in 1974, and focussed on understanding how chlorine and bromine atoms and free radicals interacted with atmospheric constituents (e.g., ozone, oxygen atoms, nitric oxide, nitrogen oxide, methane, etc). My post-doctoral studies and work at the Jet Propulsion laboratory continued my gas-phase kinetic studies into reactions of both stratospheric and tropospheric importance, including understanding the rates of reactions between the hydroxyl radical and HCFCs. This work, along with the results of other laboratory studies, provided a major input to the theoretical modelling work which was projecting significant ozone losses from continued use of chlorofluorocarbons and halons. In 1980 I became the program manager for stratospheric ozone depletion at NASA and provided funding for some ground-breaking laboratory studies, field measurements and theoretical modelling, some in collaboration with NOAA, the fluorocarbon industry and international partners. Highlights included the Antarctic and Arctic aircraft campaigns, which demonstrated beyond doubt that chlorinated and brominated species were the cause of the significant losses of ozone in the polar spring, initiated through novel heterogeneous chemical reactions in the lower stratosphere - the most dramatic observation being the so-called Antarctic Ozone hole. These findings played a critical role in strengthening the Montreal Protocol. In 1980, after joining NASA, I initiated the first International Stratospheric Ozone Assessment, which provided much of the scientific evidence used to develop the 1985 Convention to protect stratospheric ozone. Subsequent international assessments provided the scientific basis for the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the following adjustments and amendments. Key among these assessments was the International Ozone Trends Panel where Sherry Rowland

  14. Balloonborne measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the austral spring of 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.J.; Deshler, T. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports some of the findings of an overall study of the ozone hole over Antarctica. Vertical profiles of ozone and aerosols were measured, and the inclusion of aerosols from the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo was of particular interest. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  15. The effect of ozone depletion on the Southern Annular Mode and stratosphere-troposphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Fraser; McDonald, Adrian; Morgenstern, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of ozone depletion and recovery on the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Using the NIWA-UKCA chemistry-climate model, we compare reference runs with forcing due to greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances to sensitivity simulations in which ozone depleting substances are fixed at their 1960 levels. We find that ozone depletion leads to an increased frequency of extreme anomalies and increased persistence of the SAM in the stratosphere as well as stronger, more persistent stratosphere-troposphere coupling. This change in the strength of the stratosphere-troposphere coupling has implications for extended range weather forecasting. Currently the stratosphere provides an appreciable amount of predictability to the troposphere on time scales of one or two months, however we find that this effect reduces over time as stratospheric ozone recovers to pre-ozone hole levels towards the latter part of this century.

  16. Seven years of total ozone from the TOMS instrument - A report on data quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Albert J.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Silberstein, David S.

    1986-01-01

    Seven years of TOMS total ozone data are currently available. Recently a new ozone retrieval algorithm based on improved ozone absorption cross section was implemented that has introduced 6-7 percent discontinuity in the archived data sets at the end of the fifth year of instrument operation. Until all data are reprocessed with the new algorithm users can use a table of correction factors given in this paper to make the data set internally consistent. This paper also presents a comparison of TOMS results with Amundsen Scott Dobson station. Though the agrement in most years is good, in 1983-84 the Dobson station reported unusually high values of ozone while TOMS saw the very low ozone values associated with the Antarctica ozone hole.

  17. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  18. Surface Ozone in Kiev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Mikulskaya, I. A.; Kiforenko, S. I.; Blum, O. B.; Sheminova, V. A.; Veles, A. A.

    The study of total ozone over Kiev and its concentration changes with height in the troposphere has been made on the base of ground-based observations with the infrared Fourier-spectrometer in the Main Astronomical Observatory of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (MAO NASU) as part of ESA-NIVR-KNMI project no 2907 "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and atmospheric profiles "(2005-2008) [1,2,4]. Ground-level ozone in Kiev for an episode of its high concentrations in August 2000 was also simulated with the model of urban air pollution UAM-V [5,6]. In 2008 the satellite data Aura-OMI on profiles of ozone in the atmosphere OMO3PR became available (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/ Aura/data-holdings/OMI/ omo3pr_v003.shtml). They include ozone content in the lower layer of the atmosphere, beginning from 2005, which can be used to evaluate the ground-level ozone in all cities of Ukraine. The comparison of the data of ozone air pollution in Kiev (ozone - the pollutant of the first class of danger) and medical statistics data of of respiratory system (RS) diseases of the city population was carried out with the package "Statistica". A regression analysis, prognostic regression modelling, and retrospective prognosis of the epidemiological situation with respect to RS pathologies in Kiev in 2000-2006 were performed.

  19. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Fioletov, Vitali; Bishop, Lane; Godin, Sophie; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Kirchhoff, Volker; Chanin, Marie-Lise; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Chu, William

    1991-01-01

    An update of the extensive reviews of the state of knowledge of measured ozone trends published in the Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel is presented. The update contains a review of progress since these reports, including reviewing of the ozone records, in most cases through March 1991. Also included are some new, unpublished reanalyses of these records including a complete reevaluation of 29 stations located in the former Soviet Union. The major new advance in knowledge of the measured ozone trend is the existence of independently calibrated satellite data records from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAG) instruments. These confirm many of the findings, originally derived from the Dobson record, concerning northern mid-latitude changes in ozone. We now have results from several instruments, whereas the previously reported changes were dependent on the calibration of a single instrument. This update will compare the ozone records from many different instruments to determine whether or not they provide a consistent picture of the ozone change that has occurred in the atmosphere. The update also briefly considers the problem of stratospheric temperature change. As in previous reports, this problem received significantly less attention, and the report is not nearly as complete. This area needs more attention in the future.

  20. Saving Our Ozone Shield.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoste, Beatrice

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and continued use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as related to stratospheric ozone depletion. Presents the characteristics of CFCs conducive to the chemical reaction with ozone, the history of CFC use and detection of related environmental problems, health hazards, and alternatives to CFC use. (MCO)

  1. Observing trends in total ozone and extreme ozone events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-05-01

    The ozone layer in the stratosphere has been recovering since the 1989 Montreal Protocol reduced the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Fitzka et al. observed trends in total ozone levels and the vertical distribution of ozone at Hoher Sonnblick, a mountain in Austria, from 1994 to 2011.

  2. Extreme Events: low and high total ozone over Arosa, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    The frequency distribution of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone is analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland - for details see Staehelin et al.,1998a,b), with new tools from extreme value theory (e.g. Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007). A heavy-tail focused approach is used through the fitting of the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) to the Arosa time series. Asymptotic arguments (Pickands, 1975) justify the use of the GPD for modeling exceedances over a high (or below a low) enough threshold (Coles, 2001). The analysis shows that the GPD is appropriate for modeling the frequency distribution in total ozone above or below a mathematically well-defined threshold. While previous studies focused on so termed ozone mini-holes and mini-highs (e.g. Bojkov and Balis, 2001, Koch et al., 2005), this study is the first to present a mathematical description of extreme events in low and high total ozone for a northern mid-latitudes site (Rieder et al., 2009). The results show (a) an increase in days with extreme low (ELOs) and (b) a decrease in days with extreme high total ozone (EHOs) during the last decades, (c) that the general trend in total ozone is strongly determined by these extreme events and (d) that fitting the GPD is an appropriate method for the estimation of the frequency distribution of so-called ozone mini-holes. Furthermore, this concept allows one to separate the effect of Arctic ozone depletion from that of in situ mid-latitude ozone loss. As shown by this study, ELOs and EHOs have a strong influence on mean values in total ozone and the "extremes concept" could be further used also for validation of Chemistry-Climate-Models (CCMs) within the scientific community. References: Bojkov, R. D., and Balis, D.S.: Characteristics of episodes with extremely low ozone values in the northern middle latitudes 1975-2000, Ann. Geophys., 19, 797-807, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of

  3. Holes in the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Holes in the Heart? Holes in the heart are simple congenital (kon-JEN- ... the heart. However, some babies are born with holes in the upper or lower septum. A hole ...

  4. The Two Faces of Ozone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Provides answers to questions regarding the ozone problem: (1) nature of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere; (2) possibility of sending the excess ozone at ground level to the stratosphere; (3) possibility of producing pure ozone and carrying it to the stratosphere; and (4) banning chlorofluorocarbons. (YP)

  5. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using ozone involves the introduction of ozone gas (O3) into the subsurface to degrade organic contaminants of concern. Ozone is tri-molecular oxygen (O2) that is a gas under atmospheric conditions and is a strong oxidant. Ozone may react with ...

  6. Large climate-induced changes in ultraviolet index and stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, Michaela I.; Shepherd, Theodore G.

    2009-10-01

    Now that stratospheric ozone depletion has been controlled by the Montreal Protocol, interest has turned to the effects of climate change on the ozone layer. Climate models predict an accelerated stratospheric circulation, leading to changes in the spatial distribution of stratospheric ozone and an increased stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux. Here we use an atmospheric chemistry climate model to isolate the effects of climate change from those of ozone depletion and recovery on stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux and the clear-sky ultraviolet radiation index-a measure of potential human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. We show that under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change moderate emissions scenario, global stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux increases by 23% between 1965 and 2095 as a result of climate change. During this time, the clear-sky ultraviolet radiation index decreases by 9% in northern high latitudes-a much larger effect than that of stratospheric ozone recovery-and increases by 4% in the tropics, and by up to 20% in southern high latitudes in late spring and early summer. The latter increase in the ultraviolet index is equivalent to nearly half of that generated by the Antarctic `ozone hole' that was created by anthropogenic halogens. Our results suggest that climate change will alter the tropospheric ozone budget and the ultraviolet index, which would have consequences for tropospheric radiative forcing, air quality and human and ecosystem health.

  7. Impact of EOS MLS ozone data on medium-extended range ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, J. C. H.; Haigh, J. D.; Jackson, D. R.

    2014-08-01

    As the stratosphere is largely characterized by its ozone abundance, the quality of the ozone field is important for a realistic representation of the stratosphere in weather and climate models. While the stratosphere is directly affected by radiative heating from ozone photodissociation, ozone abundance might also impact the representation of the troposphere since the stratosphere and troposphere are dynamically linked. In this paper, we examine the potential benefits of using ozone data from the Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) for medium-extended range tropospheric forecasts in a current numerical weather prediction system. The global component of the Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System is used, which is run at a resolution of N216 L85 with 24 ensemble members. We compare two scenarios of 31 day forecasts covering the same period, one with the current operational ozone climatology and the other with a monthly mean zonally averaged ozone field computed from the MLS data set. In the extreme case of the Arctic "ozone hole" of March 2011, our results show a general reduction in stratospheric forecast errors in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere as a result of the improved representation of ozone. However, even in such a scenario, where the MLS ozone field is much superior to that of the control, we find that tropospheric forecast errors in the medium-extended range are dominated by the spread of ensemble members and no significant reduction in the root-mean-square forecast errors.

  8. Southern America stratospheric ozone variation during the last decade (1996-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, T.; Martin, I.; Iha, K.; Souza, S.

    Stratospheric ozone variation in the last decade reveals important dynamics of environmental areas in Brazil possible to be correlated with natural disasters like droughts in the Amazon region and the first hurricane observed in Santa Catarina at sea temperatures bellow 22 r C in South America A team of 74 ozone specialists lead by Prof Fahey from 1965 to 2001 elaborated a very well known graphic The graphic shows that the global ozone remained constant from 1965 to 1980 with 3 000 megatons of Global Ozone when it started to quickly decline in approximately 3 or 80 megatons per year In 2001 more than 50 of the ozone was depleted IPCC specialists recognize the ozone depletion of Fahey studies in the IPCC 2001 8-1 decision the Climate Change and the Ozone Depletion In 2002 Fahey s works went through a deep methodological conference being approved by 44 more specialists in Atmospheric Chemistry in Les Diabretes Switzerland The ozone hole after 1985 reached about 27 millions km 2 or 5 of the surface of the Planet and there practically all the stratospheric ozone annually disappeared in the beginning of October Projecting these figures until 2005 we reached 70 when Katrina Hurricane and Amazons River drought happens and in 2015 the depletion will reach 100 But between 2003 and 2005 the IPCC using the same graphic and exchanging the annual loss of ozone quota for deviation specialist starts saying that the problem will be solved in 2050 That the biggest deviation of --5 was in 1993

  9. The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-Up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S.R.; Douglass, A. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Margitan, J. J.; Sen, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding stratospheric ozone loss to the point of accurately predicting ozone in the future requires correctly distinguishing chemical from transport-induced changes in ozone. For example, evaluating the impact of chlorine reduction in controlling stratospheric ozone loss requires estimating the amount of ozone lost in chemical reactions in the polar winter and spring. The Northern Hemisphere winter polar region is a particularly crucial and interesting area because it appears that the Northern vortex may currently be poised near the threshold of extreme ozone destruction such as that which now occurs annually in the Antarctic ozone "hole." In this presentation we explore the interaction of ozone transport and chemistry through the Northern late summer and fall seasons as the vortex circulation becomes established. This phase of the seasonal cycle determines the starting point for heterogeneous processes and chlorine-driven loss that take control in the winter vortex. Using a combination of profile data from POAM, HALOE, and in situ measurements, we show that relatively low ozone at high latitudes in the middle stratosphere is associated with vortex airmasses and that these ozone abundances evolve photochemically from characteristically higher values at the end of the summer. The zonal variance of ozone mixing ratio also increases greatly at this time consistent with increasing wave-driven transport. Comparison with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model is used to generalize the findings from the limited set of observations and quantify the relative roles of transport and chemistry in determining the ozone mixing ratio distributions.

  10. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been regulated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, L.; Newman, P. A.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.; Velders, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was negotiated in 1987 and by 2010 had been signed by all of the nations of the world. In this presentation we use a fully coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ozone depletion substances (ODSs) were never regulated. In this “world avoided” simulation, ODS levels increase by 3% per year. From 1980 to 2020 we find that 17% of the globally average column ozone is destroyed, and from 1980 to 2065 67% is destroyed. Severe polar depletions (e.g., the Antarctic ozone hole) become year-round rather than just seasonal. Ozone levels in the tropical lower stratosphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near zero by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical lower stratospheric upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet (UV) radiation increases, tripling the erythemal (sunburn) radiation in the northern summer mid-latitudes by 2065.

  11. Ozone variations for Brisbane Australia and Mexico City over the period 1958-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Deschamps, L.; Galindo, I.; Zenteno, G.

    2007-05-01

    Ozone variations over the period 1958 to 2004 for Brisbane, Australia and Mexico City, Mexico are presented in this paper. Ground-based total ozone data sets are compared with ERA40 and TOMS and used to estimate the total ozone variations. A significant spectral peak at wavelength between 10-11 years which corresponds to the solar cycle was found in the series. The data sets were deseasonalized and the anomalies relative to the period pre-ozone-hole (1970-1980) were calculated. The data sets show changes in the rate of the total ozone decline during the 80's while the ozone decline during the 90's is fairly constant. Ozone decline related to volcanic eruptions is seen during the 80's and 90's. Tropopause temperature and 50hPa temperature data sets for the same period were also deseasonalized and the anomalies relative to the period pre-ozone-hole (1970-1980) were calculated. For both cities, a decline of the 50hPa temperature is seen during the 80's. For the tropopause temperature, Brisbane shows a decline during the 80's, while Mexico City shows an increase, which could be related to the impact of volcanic eruptions

  12. Ozone depletion and UVB radiation: impact on plant DNA damage in southern South America.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, M C; Ballaré, C L; Giordano, C V; Scopel, A L; Zima, A M; Szwarcberg-Bracchitta, M; Searles, P S; Caldwell, M M; Díaz, S B

    1999-12-21

    The primary motivation behind the considerable effort in studying stratospheric ozone depletion is the potential for biological consequences of increased solar UVB (280-315 nm) radiation. Yet, direct links between ozone depletion and biological impacts have been established only for organisms of Antarctic waters under the influence of the ozone "hole;" no direct evidence exists that ozone-related variations in UVB affect ecosystems of temperate latitudes. Indeed, calculations based on laboratory studies with plants suggest that the biological impact of ozone depletion (measured by the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA) is likely to be less marked than previously thought, because UVA quanta (315-400 nm) may also cause significant damage, and UVA is unaffected by ozone depletion. Herein, we show that the temperate ecosystems of southern South America have been subjected to increasingly high levels of ozone depletion during the last decade. We found that in the spring of 1997, despite frequent cloud cover, the passages of the ozone hole over Tierra del Fuego (55 degrees S) caused concomitant increases in solar UV and that the enhanced ground-level UV led to significant increases in DNA damage in the native plant Gunnera magellanica. The fluctuations in solar UV explained a large proportion of the variation in DNA damage (up to 68%), particularly when the solar UV was weighted for biological effectiveness according to action spectra that assume a sharp decline in quantum efficiency with increasing wavelength from the UVB into the UVA regions of the spectrum. PMID:10611381

  13. Measurements of springtime Antarctic ozone depletion and development of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The research described herein consists of two parts. The first part is a description of the design of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer to measure ozone and the results of a flight using this instrument. The second part describes modifications made on the standard commercially available electrochemical ozonesonde and the results of some experiments performed both in the laboratory and during stratospheric balloon flights. Using this modified ECC system, 33 successful balloon flights were made at McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the austral spring of 1986 to study the temporal and vertical development of the so-called Antarctic Ozone Hole. Photometric measurements of ozone in the atmosphere can be accomplished by exploiting 253.65 nanometer absorption feature of ozone. Using a single light source and beam splitting optics, matched optical paths can be generated through two absorption cells. The ozonesonde data gave a very clear picture of the development of the Ozone Hole. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Depletion occurs between about 12 and 20 km. (2) The most efficient region of ozone depletion decreases in altitude with time. Height profiles show subregions where ozone removal is highly efficient. (3) At 18 km, the ozone mixing ratio decays with a half-life of 25 days.

  14. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  15. A Total Ozone Dependent Ozone Profile Climatology Based on Ozone-Sondes and Aura MLS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labow, G. J.; McPeters, R. D.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    A new total ozone-based ozone profile climatology has been created for use in satellite and/or ground based ozone retrievals. This climatology was formed by combining data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) with data from balloon sondes and binned by zone and total ozone. Because profile shape varies with total column ozone, this climatology better captures the ozone variations than the previously used seasonal climatologies, especially near the tropopause. This is significantly different than ozone climatologies used in the past as there is no time component. The MLS instrument on Aura has excellent latitude coverage and measures ozone profiles daily from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere at ~3.5 km resolution. Almost a million individual MLS ozone measurements are merged with data from over 55,000 ozonesondes which are then binned as a function of total ozone. The climatology consists of average ozone profiles as a function of total ozone for six 30 degree latitude bands covering altitudes from 0-75 km (in Z* pressure altitude coordinates). This new climatology better represents the profile shape as a function of total ozone than previous climatologies and shows some remarkable and somewhat unexpected correlations between total ozone and ozone in the lower altitudes, particularly in the lower and middle troposphere. These data can also be used to infer biases and errors in either the MLS retrievals or ozone sondes.

  16. Ozone - plant surface reactions an important ozone loss term?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Canaval, Eva; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billions dollar per year. Plant injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: How much ozone enters the plant through open stomata and how much ozone is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? Until now surface losses are estimated from measured total ozone deposition fluxes and calculated stomatal conductance values. While stomatal conductance of CO2 and H2O is well understood and extensively used in describing plant atmosphere gas exchange, stomatal conductance of ozone is not well known. Here we use different Nicotiana tabacum varieties and find that surface reactions of ozone with diterpenoids synthesized by glandular trichomes reduce ozone flux through open stomata. Our measurements reveal that fast ozone loss at the plant surface is accompanied with prompt release of oxygenated volatile compounds. In the ozone fumigation experiments of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties the release of specific volatile oxy-VOCs allowed to identify the semi volatile precursor compounds at the plant surface. Ozone fumigation experiments with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), two common species in the Northern Hemisphere, show also a significant ozone loss at the plant surface for Picea abies. Fluid dynamic calculations of ozone transport in the diffusive leaf boundary layer reveal a vertical but no horizontal ozone gradient thus reducing ozone fluxes through the pores in case of efficient ozone scavenging plant surfaces. We explain this efficient ozone protection mechanism by the porous surface architecture of plants in combination with unsaturated semi-volatile compounds deposited at the plant surface. These results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at

  17. Low density solid ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Teolis, B. D.; Fama, M.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2007-08-21

    We report a very low density ({approx}0.5 g/cm{sup 3}) structure of solid ozone. It is produced by irradiation of solid oxygen with 100 keV protons at 20 K followed by heating to sublime unconverted oxygen. Upon heating to 47 K the porous ozone compacts to a density of {approx}1.6 g/cm{sup 3} and crystallizes. We use a detailed analysis of the main infrared absorption band of the porous ozone to interpret previous research, where solid oxygen was irradiated by UV light and keV electrons.

  18. Depletion in Antarctic ozone and associated climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, M.

    1992-03-01

    Perhaps the most significant discovery in the atmospheric sciences in the last decade has been the observation of large decreases in ozone. These losses in ozone occur during austral spring, and from 1979 the severity of the depletion increased non-monotonically until September of 1987 when the lowest column ozone amounts ever recorded were observed in Antarctica. While the surprising ozone hole in the remote icy continent of Antarctica emphasizes the potential importance and complexity of processes in the high latitude stratosphere, it also motivated this study on the nature of greenhouse effect on polar climate due to perturbations in column ozone amount in association with observed increases in other trace gases in the Antarctic atmosphere. The authors have examined the potential climatic effects of changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases on thermal structure of the Antarctic atmosphere using both steady-state and time-dependent climate models. When they incorporate the greenhouse effect of increases in methane, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons in association with decrease in ozone at the levels of maximum concentration in the radiative flux computations for the Antarctic region, the net result is a surface warming which is in fair agreement with that inferred from mean Antarctic temperature series.

  19. Ozone depletion and climate change: impacts on UV radiation.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R L; Aucamp, P J; Bais, A F; Björn, L O; Ilyas, M; Madronich, S

    2011-02-01

    The Montreal Protocol is working, but it will take several decades for ozone to return to 1980 levels. The atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are decreasing, and ozone column amounts are no longer decreasing. Mid-latitude ozone is expected to return to 1980 levels before mid-century, slightly earlier than predicted previously. However, the recovery rate will be slower at high latitudes. Springtime ozone depletion is expected to continue to occur at polar latitudes, especially in Antarctica, in the next few decades. Because of the success of the Protocol, increases in UV-B radiation have been small outside regions affected by the Antarctic ozone hole, and have been difficult to detect. There is a large variability in UV-B radiation due to factors other than ozone, such as clouds and aerosols. There are few long-term measurements available to confirm the increases that would have occurred as a result of ozone depletion. At mid-latitudes UV-B irradiances are currently only slightly greater than in 1980 (increases less than ~5%), but increases have been substantial at high and polar latitudes where ozone depletion has been larger. Without the Montreal Protocol, peak values of sunburning UV radiation could have been tripled by 2065 at mid-northern latitudes. This would have had serious consequences for the environment and for human health. There are strong interactions between ozone depletion and changes in climate induced by increasing greenhouse gases (GHGs). Ozone depletion affects climate, and climate change affects ozone. The successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol has had a marked effect on climate change. The calculated reduction in radiative forcing due to the phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) far exceeds that from the measures taken under the Kyoto protocol for the reduction of GHGs. Thus the phase-out of CFCs is currently tending to counteract the increases in surface temperature due to increased GHGs. The amount of

  20. Stratospheric ozone depletion and future levels of atmospheric chlorine and bromine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Watson, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    The rise in atmospheric chlorine levels caused by the emission of chlorofluorocarbons and other halocarbons is thought to be the main cause of the appearance of the Antarctic ozone 'hole' in the late 1970s, and the more modest ozone depletion observed over parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Atmospheric bromine, also associated with halocarbon emissions, is believed to contribute to ozone depletion. Over the next decade, further increases in these compounds are inevitable. Model calculations show that by the end of the next century, atmospheric chlorine and bromine levels may return to those prevalent before the onset of the ozone hole, but only if more stringent regulations are applied to halocarbon production than those currently proposed.

  1. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  2. An Estimation of the Climatic Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Losses during the 1980s. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Robert M.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Shia, Run-Lie; Yang, Yajaing; Zhou, Shuntai; Molnar, Gyula

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the potential climatic effects of the ozone hole more directly and to assess the validity of previous lower resolution model results, the latest high spatial resolution version of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., seasonal radiative dynamical climate model is used to simulate the climatic effects of ozone changes relative to the other greenhouse gases. The steady-state climatic effect of a sustained decrease in lower stratospheric ozone, similar in magnitude to the observed 1979-90 decrease, is estimated by comparing three steady-state climate simulations: 1) 1979 greenhouse gas concentrations and 1979 ozone, II) 1990 greenhouse gas concentrations with 1979 ozone, and III) 1990 greenhouse gas concentrations with 1990 ozone. The simulated increase in surface air temperature resulting from nonozone greenhouse gases is 0.272 K. When changes in lower stratospheric ozone are included, the greenhouse warming is 0.165 K, which is approximately 39% lower than when ozone is fixed at the 1979 concentrations. Ozone perturbations at high latitudes result in a cooling of the surface-troposphere system that is greater (by a factor of 2.8) than that estimated from the change in radiative forcing resulting from ozone depiction and the model's 2 x CO, climate sensitivity. The results suggest that changes in meridional heat transport from low to high latitudes combined with the decrease in the infrared opacity of the lower stratosphere are very important in determining the steady-state response to high latitude ozone losses. The 39% compensation in greenhouse warming resulting from lower stratospheric ozone losses is also larger than the 28% compensation simulated previously by the lower resolution model. The higher resolution model is able to resolve the high latitude features of the assumed ozone perturbation, which are important in determining the overall climate sensitivity to these perturbations.

  3. Analysis of the Suitability of OMPS LP Ozone Profile Dataset for Extending the Aura MLS Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarova, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Stolarski, R. S.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    The new Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), launched on 28 October 2011 on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, represents the next generation of the US ozone monitoring system. The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) sensor measures solar radiances scattered from the atmospheric limb in the UV and visible spectral ranges and reconstruct the vertical ozone profiles from the cloud top up to 60 km. The regular LP observations started in early 2012, and now the LP data record exceeds 2.5 years. In this presentation we will demonstrate capability of the new LP sensor to characterize the vertical ozone distribution in different atmospheric regions that are most sensitive to the changes in the stratospheric composition and dynamics. We will consider: a) the seasonal ozone patterns in the lower stratosphere - upper troposphere; b) the vertical ozone distribution inside the Antarctic ozone hole; c) the ozone patterns forced by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillations in the lower tropical stratosphere. The main focus of this study is to perform a comprehensive analysis of ozone patterns obtained from OMPS LP with those observed by Aura MLS to isolate similarities and differences between two sensors in characterizing these processes. We will examine how well LP reproduces the named above natural signals in comparison with MLS in terms of amplitude, phase and vertical structure. One of the key issues is that two instruments measure ozone in different coordinate systems: the LP measures ozone profiles as number density on a regular altitude scale, while Aura MLS retrieves ozone profiles as mixing ratios on pressure vertical grids. The comparison of two measurements requires unit conversion that in turn involves temperature profiles. Thus, the uncertainties related to the unit conversion should be accounted during the analysis. This scientific validation is critical for the further LP algorithm improvement and continuation of the Aura MLS ozone record in the future.

  4. Impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander

    ozone layer here. The mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the polar ozone by means of modification of sulphate aerosol distribution in the atmosphere has been revealed and investigated, too. Numerical experiments show that enhancement of the surface area density of sulphate aerosol in the stratosphere caused by the growth of the greenhouse gases will reduce significantly the ozone depletion during the Antarctic ozone hole.

  5. Stratospheric ozone: a major (long neglected) anthropogenic forcing of the climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvani, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    As a consequence of the Montreal Protocol, the depletion stratospheric ozone by CFCs, which occurred primarily in the last decades of the 20th Century, has noticeably slowed down in recent years. For instance, the ozone hole in 2012 has been measured to be the smallest in 20 years. In view of this, it has long been thought that the ozone hole is a ``solved problem.'' What has not been appreciated until very recently is that the large man-made perturbation of stratospheric ozone has had profound consequences on the climate system in the Southern Hemisphere. In fact, a lot of evidence is now at hand strongly suggesting that ozone depletion, not increasing greenhouse gases, have been been the major driver of observed atmospheric circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere in the second half of the 20th Century. Furthermore, climate models robustly show that the closing of the ozone hole in the next half century will actually oppose the impact of increasing greenhouse gases, and project large cancellations between these two anthropogenic forcings resulting in greatly reduced future trends in the Southern Hemisphere.

  6. Comparison of CCM3 simulations using two climatological ozone data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.S.

    1997-02-01

    A comparison of two six year simulations with the CCM3 using different monthly mean, zonally symmetric ozone climatologies is presented. Each run was identical except for the ozone specification. The climatological SSTs supplied with CCM3 were cycled for the extent of the simulation. The ozone data sets were used were the data distributed with the CCM3 code and that compiled at SUNY Albany. The SUNYA data set reflects contemporary ozone measurements extensively using remote sensing data. The CCM3 data were produced from measurements prior to 1974. A brief comparison of the two ozone climatologies is presented. The monthly mean difference fields were computed for the six years of the simulations. A t-test was applied to the monthly mean difference to judge if the changes between the integrations were significant. The significant changes in temperature were for the most part confined to the levels above 200 hPa. In the zonal mean the patterns of differences were largely consistent with regions of the ozone variations, deeper tropospheric penetration of temperature difference occurred in October near the South Pole in the region of the `ozone hole`. The significant temperature changes at the lowest model level (approximately 992 hPa) were confined to very small areas. The 200 hPa zonal wind differences demonstrated that the stationary wave structure was evidently altered by the ozone difference. Although the ozone specifications were zonally symmetric, the zonal wind differences were zonally asymmetric at 200 hPa.

  7. Ozone profile measurements at McMurdo Station Antarctica during the spring of 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Harder, J. W.; Rosen, J. M.; Hereford, J.; Carpenter, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    During the Antarctic spring of 1986, 33 ozone soundings were conducted from McMurdo Station. These data indicated that the springtime decrease in ozone occurred rapidly between the altitudes of 12 and 20 km. During 1987, these measurements were repeated with 50 soundings between 29 August and 9 November. Digital conversions of standard electrochemical cell ozonesondes were again employed. The ozonesonde pumps were individually calibrated for flow rate as the high altitude performance of these pumps have been in question. While these uncertainties are not large in the region of the ozone hole, they are significant at high altitude and apparently resulted in an underestimate of total ozone of about 7 percent (average) as compared to the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) in 1986, when the flow rate recommended by the manufacturer was used. At the upper altitudes (approx. 30 km) the flow rate may be overestimated by as much as 15 percent using recommended values (see Harder et al., The UW Digital Ozonesonde: Characteristics and Flow Rate Calibration, poster paper, this workshop). These upper level values are used in the extrapolation, at constant mixing ratio, required to complete the sounding for total ozone. The first sounding was on 29 August, prior to major ozone depletion, when 274 DU total ozone (25 DU extrapolated) was observed. By early October total ozone had decreased to the 150 DU range; it then increased during mid-October owing to motion of the vortex and returned to a value of 148 DU (29 DU extrapolated) on 27 October.

  8. Industrial emissions cause extreme urban ozone diurnal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Lei, Wenfang; Tie, Xuexi; Hess, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Simulations with a regional chemical transport model show that anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) lead to a dramatic diurnal variation of surface ozone (O3) in Houston, Texas. During the daytime, photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds catalyzed by NOx results in episodes of elevated ambient O3 levels significantly exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. The O3 production rate in Houston is significantly higher than those found in other cities over the United States. At night, a surface NOx maximum occurs because of continuous NO emission from industrial sources, and, consequently, an extensive urban-scale "hole" of surface ozone (<10 parts per billion by volume in the entire Houston area) is formed as a result of O3 removal by NO. The results suggest that consideration of regulatory control of O3 precursor emissions from the industrial sources is essential to formulate ozone abatement strategies in this region.

  9. A general circulation model simulation of the springtime Antarctic ozone decrease and its impact on mid-latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Cariolle, D.; Lasserre-Bigorry, A.; Royer, J.F. ); Geleyn, J.F. )

    1990-02-20

    Ozone is treated as an interactive variable calculated by means of a continuity equation which takes account of advection and photochemical production and loss. The ozone concentration is also used to compute the heating and cooling rates due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, and the infrared emission in the stratosphere. The daytime ozone decrease due to the perturbed chlorine chemistry found at high southern latitudes is introduced as an extra loss in the ozone continuity equation. Results of the perturbed simulation show a very good agreement with the ozone measurements made during spring 1987. The simulation also shows the development of a high-latitude anomalous circulation, with a warming of the upper stratosphere resulting mainly from dynamical heating. In addition, a substantial ozone decrease is found at mid-latitudes in a thin stratospheric layer located between the 390 and the 470 K {theta} surfaces. A significant residual ozone decrease is found at the end of the model integration, 7 months after the final warming and the vortex breakdown. If there is a significant residual ozone decrease in the atmosphere, the ozone trends predicted by photochemical models which do not take into account the high-latitude perturbed chemistry are clearly inadequate. Finally, it is concluded that further model simulations at higher horizontal resolution, possibly with a better representation of the heterogeneous chemistry, will be needed to evaluate with more confidence the magnitude of the mid-latitudinal ozone depletion induced by the ozone hole formation.

  10. MULTIPOLLUTANT METHODS - METHODS FOR OZONE AND OZONE PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task involves the development and testing of methods for monitoring ozone and compounds associated with the atmospheric chemistry of ozone production both as precursors and reaction products. Although atmospheric gases are the primary interest, separation of gas and particl...

  11. Ozone response to a CO2 doubling - Results from a stratospheric circulation model with heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitari, G.; Palermi, S.; Visconti, G.; Prinn, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral 3D model of the stratosphere has been used to study the sensitivity of polar ozone with respect to a carbon dioxide increase. The lower stratospheric cooling associated with an imposed CO2 doubling may increase the probability of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and this affect ozone. The ozone perturbation obtained with the inclusion of a simple parameterization for heterogeneous chemistry on PSCs is compared to that relative to a pure homogeneous chemistry. In both cases the temperature perturbation is determined by a CO2 doubling, while the total chlorine content is kept at the present level. It is shown that the lower temperature may increase the depth and the extension of the ozone hole by extending the area amenable to PSC formation. It may be argued that this effect, coupled with an increasing amount of chlorine, may produce a positive feedback on the ozone destruction.

  12. The effect of ozone depletion on the Southern Annular Mode and stratosphere-troposphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Fraser W.; McDonald, Adrian J.; Morgenstern, Olaf

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of ozone depletion and recovery on the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Using the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research-United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols chemistry-climate model, we compare reference runs that include forcing due to greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting substances to sensitivity simulations in which ozone-depleting substances are fixed at their 1960 levels. We find that ozone depletion leads to an increased frequency of extreme anomalies and increased persistence of the SAM in the stratosphere as well as stronger, more persistent stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Currently, the stratosphere provides an appreciable amount of predictability to the troposphere on timescales of 1 or 2 months; however, we find that this effect reduces over time as stratospheric ozone recovers to preozone hole levels toward the latter part of this century.

  13. An estimate of the Antarctic ozone modulation by the QBO. [Quasi-Biennial Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.; Visconti, G.; Pitari, G.; Verdecchia, M. )

    1991-02-01

    The possible effects of the QBO on the ozone distribution have been studied including in a 2D model a parameterization of Kelvin and Rossby-gravity wave forcing in the lower equatorial stratosphere. A chemical code complete with heterogeneous reactions allows a simulation of the ozone depletion due to the increase of stratospheric chlorine. With this model, the authors study the possible modulation of the secular trend in the Antarctic ozone hole by the QBO. When heterogeneous chemistry is not included, the model shows a polar ozone oscillation ({plus minus}6 Dobson Units) comparable to that deduced from early measurements (1970-1975). When heterogeneous reactions are taken into account, the model predicts a larger ozone oscillation in the Southern Hemisphere ({plus minus}12 Dobson Units) comparable to that obtained from recent observations. This behavior seems to point out a QBO induced temperature effect and its feedback on PSC with activation of heterogeneous chemistry.

  14. US scientists continue ozone depletion studies during the 1987-1988 austral summer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Working at Palmer Station and along the Antarctic Peninsula aboard the research ship Polar Duke, two teams of marine biologists will measure how increased exposure to ultraviolet light may be affecting the antarctic marine ecosystem. The projects are part of the US study of the annual spring depletion of ozone over Antarctica and the effects of decreased ozone levels on the environment. Data show that staring 1979 a dramatic decrease in stratospheric ozone over the southern continent occurring each austral spring. In late August or early September, a hole about the size of the United States, begins to form; the decline continues through September and October, with a recovery during November. Scientists compared contemporary measurements of the total amount of ozone above Antarctica during October to amounts measured between 1950 and the 1970s. They found that the contemporary data showed that ozone abundance had decreased by as much as about 50 percent.

  15. Ozonation of Canadian Athabasca asphaltene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Zhixiong

    Application of ozonation in the petrochemical industry for heavy hydrocarbon upgrading has not been sufficiently explored. Among heavy hydrocarbons, asphaltenes are the heaviest and the most difficult fractions for analysis and treatment. Therefore, ozonation of asphaltenes presents an interesting application in the petrochemical industry. Commercial application of ozonation in the petrochemical industry has three obstacles: availability of an ozone-resistant and environmentally friendly solvent, the precipitation of ozonation intermediates during reaction, and recovery of the solvent and separation of the ozonation products. Preliminary ozonation of Athabasca oil sands asphaltene in nonparticipating solvents encountered serious precipitation of the ozonation intermediates. The precipitated intermediates could be polymeric ozonides and intermolecular ozonides or polymeric peroxides. Because the inhomogeneous reaction medium caused low ozone efficiency, various participating solvents such as methanol and acetic acid were added to form more soluble hydroperoxides. The mass balance results showed that on average, one asphaltene molecule reacted with 12 ozone molecules through the electrophilic reaction and the subsequent decomposition of ozonation intermediates generated acetone extractable products. GC/MS analysis of these compounds indicated that the free radical reactions could be important for generation of volatile products. The extensively ozonated asphaltene in the presence of participating solvents were refluxed with methanol to generate more volatile products. GC/MS analysis of the methanol-esterified ozonation products indicated that most volatile products were aliphatic carboxylic acid esters generated through cleavage of substituents. Reaction kinetics study showed that asphaltene ozonation was initially a diffusion rate-controlled reaction and later developed to a chemical reaction rate-controlled reaction after depletion of the reactive aromatic sites

  16. Latest tendency in the Antarctic ozone longitudinal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Grytsai, Asen; Klekociuk, Andrew; Evtushevsky, Olexander

    2014-05-01

    Significant ozone depletion was observed within the southern polar vortex during spring in the 1980s - early 1990s. Later, a stabilization in total ozone levels and ozone hole area has been observed. Atmosphere models predict a consequent recovery of the Antarctic ozone. Nevertheless, identification of the long-term processes is complicated by high interannual variability hiding their general regularities. In particular, a large stratosphere warming in 2002 resulted in significant increase in total ozone levels. The Antarctic ozone hole is formed inside polar stratospheric vortex, which is under influence of large-scale planetary waves. The components of the quasi-stationary wave (QSW) in the spring Southern Hemisphere (SH) stratosphere is mainly contributed by zonal wave number 1 which in turn determines the location of the total ozone extremes in spring: QSW minimum (maximum) is located in the South Atlantic (Australian) sector. In our work the satellite data of TOMS/Nimbus-7, TOMS/Earth Probe and OMI/Aura (http://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/) have been used to investigate longitudinal distribution of the total ozone in Antarctic region. The gap in these satellite observations (1993-1995) was filled by the Multi-Sensor Reanalysis data (http://www.temis.nl/). Ozone distribution in the SH high and mid latitudes 80-50S were analyzed for southern spring season including months from September to November. The zonal distribution is considered along seven latitude circles from 80S to 50S with step of five degrees. To distinguish long-term processes and to obtain a quasi-stationary pattern, daily September - November ozone was averaged. Our previous study demonstrated a systematic eastward shift of the QSW minimum region. In this study, we extended the analysis to 2013 and obtained new results that exhibited a probable cessation in that eastward shift. Polynomial fit for all chosen latitudes is even evidence of a change in the tendency to opposite. It more time needs to

  17. Influence of polar stratospheric clouds on the depletion of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1988-01-01

    Precipitation of nitrate in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can provide a significant sink for Antarctic stratospheric odd nitrogen. It is argued that the depth of the Ozone Hole is sensitive to the occurrence of temperatures below about 196 K. An increase in the prevalence of temperatures below 196 K would enhance ozone loss by increasing the spatial extent and persistence of PSCs, and by decreasing the level of HNO3 that remains following PSC evaporation. Concentrations of halogen gases in the 1960s and earlier were insufficient to support major ozone loss, even if thermal conditions were favorable.

  18. Simulations of Arctic ozone depletion with current and doubled levels of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butchart, Neal; Austin, John; Shine, Keith P.

    1994-01-01

    Results from idealized 3-D simulations of a dynamical-radiative-photochemical model of the stratosphere are presented for the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring. For a simulation of a quiescent winter, it is found that with current levels of CO2 only modest polar ozone depletion occurs, consistent with observations. For a second simulation with the same planetary wave amplitudes in the upper troposphere but with doubled CO2, the model predicts a northern hemisphere ozone hole comparable to that observed in Antarctica with almost complete ozone destruction at 20 km. Reasons for the marked difference between the simulations are identified.

  19. Bias in Dobson total ozone measurements at high latitudes due to approximations in calculations of ozone absorption coefficients and air mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, G.; Evans, R. D.; Labow, G. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Dobson spectrophotometer is the primary standard instrument for ground-based measurements of total column ozone. The accuracy of its data depends on the knowledge of ozone absorption coefficients used for data reduction. We document an error in the calculations that led to the set of absorption coefficients currently recommended by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). This error has little effect because an empirical adjustment was applied to the original calculations before the coefficients were adopted by WMO. We provide evidence that this adjustment was physically sound. The coefficients recommended by WMO are applied in the Dobson network without correction for the temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross sections. On the basis of data measured by Dobson numbers 80 and 82, which were operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory at the South Pole, we find that omission of temperature corrections may lead to systematic errors in Dobson ozone data of up to 4%. The standard Dobson ozone retrieval method further assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height. This approximation leads to errors in air mass calculations, which are particularly relevant at high latitudes where ozone measurements are performed at large solar zenith angles (SZA). At the South Pole, systematic errors caused by this approximation may exceed 2% for SZAs larger than 80°. The bias is largest when the vertical ozone distribution is distorted by the "ozone hole" and may lead to underestimation of total ozone by 4% at SZA = 85° (air mass 9). Dobson measurements at the South Pole were compared with ozone data from a collocated SUV-100 UV spectroradiometer and Version 8 overpass data from NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Uncorrected Dobson ozone values tend to be lower than data from the two other instruments when total ozone is below 170 Dobson units or SZAs are larger than

  20. Ultraviolet-ozone-treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer for organic solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet-ozone-treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)was used as the anode buffer layer in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene-based solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of the cells with appropriated UV-ozone treatment was found to increase about 20% compared to the reference cell. The improved performance is attributed to the increased work function of the PEDOT:PSS layer, which improves the contact condition between PEDOT:PSS and CuPc, hence increasing the extraction efficiency of the photogenerated holes and decreasing the recombination probability of holes and electrons in the active organic layers. PMID:22901365

  1. Dynamical component of seasonal and year-to-year changes in Antarctic and global ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, Ka Kit; Yang, HU

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of the ozone concetration components of the Antarctic ozone hole as related to seasonal and year-to-year temperature changes in August, September, October, and November during the 1979-1985 period is studied using a zonally averaged model in which all transport fields are fixed by input temperature data. The results suggest that, prior to 1984, both the seasonal and year-to year variability of the zonal-mean Antarctic ozone minimum and the surrounding maximum can be accounted for by temperature dynamics without invoking changes in chemical composition (e.g., chlorine content) or special chemistry. The same dynamical mechanism also accounts for the good simulation of the observed seasonal and latitudinal structure of column ozone in other parts of the world. However, chemical depletion of ozone may have become more important after 1984. The model also appears to underpredict the September ozone decline in years, leading to an underprediction of the recent minimum values in the Antarctic ozone hole.

  2. Ozone Contamination in Aircraft Cabins. Appendix A: Ozone toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The recommendation that at various altitudes the amount of air with which ozone has mixed changes, thus changing the volume per volume relationship is discussed. The biological effects of ozone on human health and the amount of ozone necessary to produce symptoms were investigated.

  3. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  4. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  5. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  6. "OZONE SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN CMAQ'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone source attribution has been used to support various policy purposes including interstate transport (Cross State Air Pollution Rule) by U.S. EPA and ozone nonattainment area designations by State agencies. Common scientific applications include tracking intercontinental tran...

  7. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part 1: Application of extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Peter, T.; Ribatet, M.; Davison, A. C.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this study ideas from extreme value theory are for the first time applied in the field of stratospheric ozone research, because statistical analysis showed that previously used concepts assuming a Gaussian distribution (e.g. fixed deviations from mean values) of total ozone data do not adequately address the structure of the extremes. We show that statistical extreme value methods are appropriate to identify ozone extremes and to describe the tails of the Arosa (Switzerland) total ozone time series. In order to accommodate the seasonal cycle in total ozone, a daily moving threshold was determined and used, with tools from extreme value theory, to analyse the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone at Arosa. The analysis shows that the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) provides an appropriate model for the frequency distribution of total ozone above or below a mathematically well-defined threshold, thus providing a statistical description of ELOs and EHOs. The results show an increase in ELOs and a decrease in EHOs during the last decades. The fitted model represents the tails of the total ozone data set with high accuracy over the entire range (including absolute monthly minima and maxima), and enables a precise computation of the frequency distribution of ozone mini-holes (using constant thresholds). Analyzing the tails instead of a small fraction of days below constant thresholds provides deeper insight into the time series properties. Fingerprints of dynamical (e.g. ENSO, NAO) and chemical features (e.g. strong polar vortex ozone loss), and major volcanic eruptions, can be identified in the observed frequency of extreme events throughout the time series. Overall the new approach to analysis of extremes provides more information on time series properties and variability than previous approaches that use only monthly averages and/or mini-holes and mini-highs.

  8. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa - Part 1: Application of extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Peter, T.; Ribatet, M.; Davison, A. C.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.

    2010-10-01

    In this study ideas from extreme value theory are for the first time applied in the field of stratospheric ozone research, because statistical analysis showed that previously used concepts assuming a Gaussian distribution (e.g. fixed deviations from mean values) of total ozone data do not adequately address the structure of the extremes. We show that statistical extreme value methods are appropriate to identify ozone extremes and to describe the tails of the Arosa (Switzerland) total ozone time series. In order to accommodate the seasonal cycle in total ozone, a daily moving threshold was determined and used, with tools from extreme value theory, to analyse the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone at Arosa. The analysis shows that the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) provides an appropriate model for the frequency distribution of total ozone above or below a mathematically well-defined threshold, thus providing a statistical description of ELOs and EHOs. The results show an increase in ELOs and a decrease in EHOs during the last decades. The fitted model represents the tails of the total ozone data set with high accuracy over the entire range (including absolute monthly minima and maxima), and enables a precise computation of the frequency distribution of ozone mini-holes (using constant thresholds). Analyzing the tails instead of a small fraction of days below constant thresholds provides deeper insight into the time series properties. Fingerprints of dynamical (e.g. ENSO, NAO) and chemical features (e.g. strong polar vortex ozone loss), and major volcanic eruptions, can be identified in the observed frequency of extreme events throughout the time series. Overall the new approach to analysis of extremes provides more information on time series properties and variability than previous approaches that use only monthly averages and/or mini-holes and mini-highs.

  9. A New Linearized Photochemistry Parameterization for Operational Ozone Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, J. P.; Allen, D. R.; Coy, L.; Eckermann, S. D.; Stajner, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) will deliver real-time ozone data for assimilation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. This information will benefit forecasts by improving the modeled stratospheric heating rates and providing better first-guess temperature profiles needed for infrared satellite radiance retrieval algorithms. Operational ozone data assimilation for NWP requires a fast, accurate treatment of stratospheric ozone photochemistry. We present results from the new NRL CHEM2D Ozone Photochemistry Parameterization (CHEM2D-OPP), which is based on output from the zonally averaged NRL-CHEM2D middle atmosphere photochemical-transport model. CHEM2D-OPP is a linearized parameterization of gas-phase stratospheric ozone photochemistry developed for NOGAPS-ALPHA, the Navy's prototype global high altitude NWP model. A recent study of NOGAPS-ALPHA ozone simulations found that a preliminary version of the CHEM2D-based photochemistry parameterization generally performed better than other current photochemistry schemes that are now widely used in operational NWP and data assimilation systems. A new, improved version of CHEM2D-OPP is now available. Here we report the first quantitative performance assessments of the updated CHEM2D-OPP package in the NRL Global Ozone Assimilation Testing System (GOATS). This study compares the mean differences between GOATS ozone analyses and SBUV/2 ozone measurements (both vertical profile and total column) during September 2002 using several different ozone photochemistry schemes. We find that CHEM2D-OPP generally delivers the best performance out of all the photochemistry schemes we tested. Future development plans for CHEM2D-OPP, such as interfacing it with a "cold tracer" parameterization for heterogeneous ozone-hole chemistry, will also be presented.

  10. Airborne measurements of stratospheric constituents over Antarctica in the austral spring 1987. I - Method and ozone observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankin, William G.; Coffey, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer was flown aboard a DC-8 on 10 flights over Antarctica during August and September, 1987, as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE). Observing the sun at infrared wavelengths, it was possible to determine the integrated column amount above the flight altitude for ozone and a number of other chemical species that are believed to be important in the perturbed chemistry of the 'ozone hole'. The paper describes the method, the observations, the data analysis procedure, and the ozone results. During the observation period, ozone developed a steep gradient near the edge of the polar vortex; deep within the vortex, the average ozone column decreased by about 1.6 percent per day during September.

  11. Ames ER-2 ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R., Jr.; Vedder, James F.; Starr, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study ozone (O3) in the stratosphere. Measurements of the ozone mixing ratio at 1 s intervals are obtained with an ultraviolet photometer which flies on the ER-2 aircraft. The photometer determines the amount of ozone in air by measuring the transmission of ultraviolet light through a fixed path with and without ambient O3 present.

  12. Ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Fleming, Eric L.; Newman, Paul A.; Li, Feng; Mlawer, Eli; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Bailey, Roshelle

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase considerably in the coming decades. Chemistry climate model simulations forced by current projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere increasingly through 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs increase tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, thereby enhancing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and modifying the atmospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to HFC-related atmospheric change in 2050; its effects are comparable to the combined impacts of HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 0.39 × 10-3 to 30.0 × 10-3, approximately 100 times larger than previous ODP estimates which were based solely on chemical effects.

  13. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  14. Stratospheric ozone in the 21st Century: The chlorofluorocarbon problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S. )

    1991-04-01

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) exists in a dynamic equilibrium in the stratosphere, balanced between formation by solar ultraviolet photolysis ({lambda} < 242 nm) of molecular O{sub 2} (O + O{sub 2} {yields} O{sub 3}) and destruction by various chemical processes including several chain reaction sequences triggered by HO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and ClO{sub x} radicals. The ozone dissipates over Antarctica by November through northward mixing, only to begin reappearing in late August of the following year. Substantial ozone losses have also appeared, although not as spectacularly as over Antarctica, in the Northern Hemisphere's temperate and polar regions. The primary cause for the Antarctic ozone loss, and the probable cause for the northern losses, is the increasing concentration in the stratosphere of anthropogenic chlorine, especially chlorine released by solar UV photolysis from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds such as CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} (CFC-12), CCl{sub 3}F (CFC-11) and CCl{sub 2}FCClF{sub 2} (CFC-113). Because these molecules have average atmospheric lifetimes of many decades, excess anthropogenic chlorine will persist in the stratosphere for comparable time periods, and the Antarctic ozone hole will be an important atmospheric phenomenon throughout the 21st century.

  15. Fundamental differences between Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Haskins, Jessica; Ivy, Diane J; Min, Flora

    2014-04-29

    Antarctic ozone depletion is associated with enhanced chlorine from anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry under cold conditions. The deep Antarctic "hole" contrasts with the generally weaker depletions observed in the warmer Arctic. An unusually cold Arctic stratospheric season occurred in 2011, raising the question of how the Arctic ozone chemistry in that year compares with others. We show that the averaged depletions near 20 km across the cold part of each pole are deeper in Antarctica than in the Arctic for all years, although 2011 Arctic values do rival those seen in less-depleted years in Antarctica. We focus not only on averages but also on extremes, to address whether or not Arctic ozone depletion can be as extreme as that observed in the Antarctic. This information provides unique insights into the contrasts between Arctic and Antarctic ozone chemistry. We show that extreme Antarctic ozone minima fall to or below 0.1 parts per million by volume (ppmv) at 18 and 20 km (about 70 and 50 mbar) whereas the lowest Arctic ozone values are about 0.5 ppmv at these altitudes. At a higher altitude of 24 km (30-mbar level), no Arctic data below about 2 ppmv have been observed, including in 2011, in contrast to values more than an order of magnitude lower in Antarctica. The data show that the lowest ozone values are associated with temperatures below -80 °C to -85 °C depending upon altitude, and are closely associated with reduced gaseous nitric acid concentrations due to uptake and/or sedimentation in polar stratospheric cloud particles. PMID:24733920

  16. Inorganic chlorine variability in the Antarctic vortex and implications for ozone recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahan, S. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.; Steenrod, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We infer the interannual variability of inorganic chlorine in the Antarctic lower stratospheric vortex using 9 years of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) nitrous oxide (N2O) measurements and a previously measured compact correlation. Inorganic chlorine (Cly) is the sum of the destruction products of long-lived chlorine-containing source gases. Its correlation with N2O, derived from observations in the year 2000, is scaled to the years 2004-2012 to account for subsequent N2O growth and chlorofluorocarbon decline. The expected annual Cly change due to the Montreal Protocol is -20 ppt/yr, but the MLS-inferred Cly varies year-to-year from -200 to +150 ppt. Because of this large variability, attributing Antarctic ozone recovery to a statistically significant chlorine trend requires 10 years of chlorine decline. We examine the relationship between equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC) and ozone hole area. Temperature variations driven by dynamics are a primary contributor to area variability, but we find a clear linear relationship between EESC and area during years when Antarctic collar temperatures are 1σ or more below the mean. This relationship suggests that smaller ozone hole areas in recent cold years 2008 and 2011 are responding to decreased chlorine loading. Using ozone hole areas from 1979 to 2013, the projected EESC decline, and the inferred interannual Cly variability, we expect ozone hole areas greater than 20 million km2 will occur during very cold years until 2040. After that time, all ozone hole areas are likely to be below that size due to reduced EESC levels.

  17. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR

  18. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  19. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  20. Total Ozone Prediction: Stratospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Ramdy; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The correct prediction of total ozone as a function of latitude and season is extremely important for global models. This exercise tests the ability of a particular model to simulate ozone. The ozone production (P) and loss (L) will be specified from a well- established global model and will be used in all GCMs for subsequent prediction of ozone. This is the "B-3 Constrained Run" from M&MII. The exercise mostly tests a model stratospheric dynamics in the prediction of total ozone. The GCM predictions will be compared and contrasted with TOMS measurements.

  1. Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Winslow, N.; Wargan, K.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Rood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will discuss assimilation of ozone data from satellite-borne instruments. Satellite observations of ozone total columns and profiles have been measured by a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instruments, and more recently by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. Additional profile data are provided by instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by occultation instruments on other platforms. Instruments on Envisat' and future EOS Aura satellite will supply even more comprehensive data about the ozone distribution. Satellite data contain a wealth of information, but they do not provide synoptic global maps of ozone fields. These maps can be obtained through assimilation of satellite data into global chemistry and transport models. In the ozone system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) any combination of TOMS, SBUV, and Microwave Limb sounder (MLS) data can be assimilated. We found that the addition of MLS to SBUV and TOMS data in the system helps to constrain the ozone distribution, especially in the polar night region and in the tropics. The assimilated ozone distribution in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is sensitive also to finer changes in the SBUV and TOMS data selection and to changes in error covariance models. All results are established by comparisons of assimilated ozone with independent profiles from ozone sondes and occultation instruments.

  2. Observations of Ozone-aerosol Correlated Behaviour in the Lower Stratosphere During the EASOE Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digirolamo, P.; Cacciani, M.; Disarra, A.; Fiocco, G.; Fua, D.; Joergensen, T. S.; Knudsen, B.; Larsen, N.

    1992-01-01

    The question of possible interactions between ozone and stratospheric aerosol has been open for a long time. Measurements carried out after the Mt. Agung and El Chicon eruptions showed evidence of negative correlations between the presence of volcanic stratospheric aerosols and ozone concentration. Evidence for negative correlations in the polar winter has been also found. It is only after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole that catalytic effects related to low temperature heterogeneous chemistry have become the object of much investigation, now extended to the role of volcanic aerosol in the ozone reduction. These phenomena can be the object of various interpretations, not mutually exclusive, including the effect of transport, diffuse radiation as well as heterogeneous chemistry. The present paper provides preliminary results of simultaneous measurements of ozone and aerosol, carried out at Thule, Greenland, during the winter 1991-92. The European Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) was aimed at monitoring the winter Arctic stratosphere in order to obtain a deeper insight of the ozone destruction processes taking place in the polar regions. A large amount of aerosol was injected into the lower stratosphere by the recent eruption of Volcano Pinatubo. A lidar system, already operational in Thule since November 1990, has provided detailed measurements of the stratospheric aerosol concentration during EASOE. In the same period, a large number of ozonesondes were launched. Although no PSC formation was detected over Thule, the simultaneous measurement of the stratospheric aerosol and ozone profiles give the possibility to study interactions occurring in the stratosphere between these two constituents.

  3. Severe chemical ozone loss in the Arctic during the winter of 1995-96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Rolf; Crutzen, Paul J.; Grooβ, Jens-Uwe; Bürhl, Christoph; Russell, James M.; Gernandt, Hartwig; McKenna, Daniel S.; Tuck, Adrian F.

    1997-10-01

    Severe stratospheric ozone depletion is the result of perturbations of chlorine chemistry owing to the presence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during periods of limited exchange of air between the polar vortex and midlatitudes and partial exposure of the vortex to sunlight. These conditions are consistently encountered over Antarctica during the austral spring. In the Arctic, extensive PSC formation occurs only during the coldest winters, when temperatures fall as low as those regularly found in the Antarctic,,. Moreover, ozone levels in late winter and early spring are significantly higher than in the corresponding austral season,,, and usually strongly perturbed by atmospheric dynamics. For these reasons, chemical ozone loss in the Arctic is difficult to quantify. Here we use the correlation between CH4 and O3 in the Arctic polar vortex to discriminate between changes in ozone concentration due to chemical and dynamical effects. Our results indicate that 120-160 Dobson units (DU) of ozone were chemically destroyed between January and March 1996-a loss greater than observed in Antarctica in 1985, when the `ozone hole' was first reported,. This loss outweighs the expected increase in total ozone over the same period through dynamical effects, leading to an observed net decrease of about 50DU. This ozone loss arises through the simultaneous occurrence of extremely low Arctic stratospheric temperatures, and large stratospheric chlorine loadings. Comparable depletion is likely to recur because stratospheric cooling, and elevated chlorine concentrations, are expected to persist for several decades.

  4. The evolution of the ozone collar in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during early August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mariotti, A.; Mechoso, C.R.; Legras, B.; Daniel, V.

    2000-02-01

    The ozone evolution in the lower stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere during the period 5--10 August 1994 is analyzed. The analysis focuses on the ozone collar (the band of maximum values in ozone mixing ratio around the Antarctic ozone hole at these altitudes) and the development of collar filaments. Ozone mixing ratios provided by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by an ER-2 aircraft participating in the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of stratospheric Aircraft campaign are compared with values at corresponding locations in high-resolution isentropic maps obtained by using the numerical scheme of contour advection with surgery (CAS). The CAS reconstructed ozone maps provide a view of the way in which air masses are exported from the outskirts of the collar to form the tongues of higher mixing ratios observed at lower latitudes on MLS synoptic maps. There is an overall consistency between the datasets insofar as the collar location is concerned. This location seems to be primarily defined by the local properties of the flow. Nevertheless the CAS reconstructed collar tends to become weaker than that depicted by MLS data. By means of radioactive calculation estimates, it is argued that diabatic descent may be responsible for maintaining the ozone concentration approximately constant in the collar while filaments isentropically disperse collarlike mixing ratios from this region toward lower latitudes.

  5. Simulating the impact of emissions of brominated very short lived substances on past stratospheric ozone trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Meul, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    Bromine from very short lived substances (VSLS), primarily from natural oceanic sources, contributes substantially to the stratospheric bromine loading. This source of stratospheric bromine has so far been ignored in most chemistry climate model calculations of stratospheric ozone trends. Here we present a transient simulation with the chemistry climate model EMAC for the period 1960-2005 including emissions of the five brominated VSLS CHBr3, CH2Br2, CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2, and CHBr2Cl. The emissions lead to a realistic stratospheric bromine loading of about 20 pptv for present-day conditions. Comparison with a standard model simulation without VSLS shows large differences in modeled ozone in the extratropical lowermost stratosphere and in the troposphere. Differences in ozone maximize in the Antarctic Ozone Hole, resulting in more than 20% less ozone when VSLS are included. Even though the emissions of VSLS are assumed to be constant in time, the model simulation with VSLS included shows a much larger ozone decrease in the lowermost stratosphere during the 1979-1995 period and a faster ozone increase during 1996-2005, in better agreement with observed ozone trends than the standard simulation without VSLS emissions.

  6. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  7. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labitzke, K.; Miller, A. J.; Angell, J.; Deluisi, J.; Frederick, J.; Logan, J.; Mateer, C.; Naujokat, B.; Reinsel, G.; Tiao, G.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of temporal changes in ozone and temperature are discussed. The data are examined within the context of natural atmospheric variability and data problems. The results are compared to numerical model calculations. The major issues are defined in terms of goal achievement. Each parameter is considered in terms of instrument type, long term effects, and altitude.

  8. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  9. Ozone Layer Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide has been developed through a collaborative effort involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the results of scientific research on ozone depletion are…

  10. Dobson ozone spectrophotometer modification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a modified version of the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer in which several outdated electronic design features have been replaced by circuitry embodying more modern design concepts. The resulting improvement in performance characteristics has been obtained without changing the principle of operation of the original instrument.

  11. Revisiting Antarctic Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Tritscher, Ines; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic ozone depletion is known for almost three decades and it has been well settled that it is caused by chlorine catalysed ozone depletion inside the polar vortex. However, there are still some details, which need to be clarified. In particular, there is a current debate on the relative importance of liquid aerosol and crystalline NAT and ice particles for chlorine activation. Particles have a threefold impact on polar chlorine chemistry, temporary removal of HNO3 from the gas-phase (uptake), permanent removal of HNO3 from the atmosphere (denitrification), and chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions. We have performed simulations with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) employing a recently developed algorithm for saturation-dependent NAT nucleation for the Antarctic winters 2011 and 2012. The simulation results are compared with different satellite observations. With the help of these simulations, we investigate the role of the different processes responsible for chlorine activation and ozone depletion. Especially the sensitivity with respect to the particle type has been investigated. If temperatures are artificially forced to only allow cold binary liquid aerosol, the simulation still shows significant chlorine activation and ozone depletion. The results of the 3-D Chemical Transport Model CLaMS simulations differ from purely Lagrangian longtime trajectory box model simulations which indicates the importance of mixing processes.

  12. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  13. Simulation of Stratospheric Ozone in the KIAPSGM NWP model using linear photochemistry parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. R.; Monge-Sanz, B.; Cariolle, D.; Lee, E. H.; Jin, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone plays important roles in the Earth's weather and climate systems due to its physiochemical properties and a wide range of spectral absorption. Because of complicated chemical equations and expensive computational cost, NWP community has introduced a linear photochemistry parameterization (LPP) that Cariolle and Déqué suggested in 1986 with an insight of ozone-temperature relationships, to weather forecasting system. In this study, we simulated stratospheric ozone using recent LPP coefficients in a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, the KIAPS-GM (Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems - Global Model), and evaluated model results with observations. The KIAPS-GM uses three dimensional hydrostatic dynamical core based on the High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) in cubed sphere with a horizontal resolution of ne30np4 and 70 vertical layers up to 85km. LPP scheme was fully implemented into the KIAPS-GM including the ozone tracer advection. Prognostic ozone was estimated through interaction with local ozone field, temperature field, and radiation field as those physics fields were updated while climatological ozone (Fortuin and Kelder, 1998) was constantly fed into radiation fields in every month. ERA-interim ozone and meteorological data (Dee et al., 2011) were used as initial data. Simulation period was year 2008 when larger ozone hole events occurred than usual. We compared interactive ozone case with climatological ozone case. For the sensitivity studies to initial ozone fields and LPP coefficients, ERA-interim hourly and monthly ozone data were used; and LPP coefficients such as Cariolle and Teyssadre (2007) and Monge-Sanz et al. (2011) were interpolated into instantaneous pressure levels, respectively. Preliminary results show that the ozone concentration in interactive ozone case is higher than climatological one in the lower stratosphere and troposphere while the former is lower than the latter in the upper

  14. Infrared measurements in the spring 1987 ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Goldman, Aaron; Keys, J. G.; Matthews, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    Solar spectra were recorded from Arrival Heights (McMurdo), Antartica, with a FTIR system during the austral spring of 1987. Spectra were recorded on 22 days from September 13 through October 28. The instrument was setup with 2 detectors for simultaneous operation in 2 wavelength regions. Several stratospheric gases have measurable absorptions in these regions including HCl, HNO3, O3, ClONO2, and NO2. The system is equipped with an automatic solar tracking system and records data on tape cartridges. A portable personal computer allows Fourier transforming and initial processing of some of the data. The HNO3 gas column amount shows large variations, but no apparent correlation with stratospheric temperature. The HCl column shows a steady increase from 0.9 x 10 to the 15th power molecules/sq.cm. on September 13 to 1.5 x 10 to the 15th power on October 6. McMurdo moved out of the polar vortex for a few days, and the HCl column jumped to 2.9 x 10 to the 15th power by October 11. Although McMurdo moved back under the vortex, the HCl continued to increase, reaching 3.4 x 10 to the 15th power at the end of the period.

  15. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  16. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  17. Particle Events as a Possible Source of Large Ozone Loss during Magnetic Polarity Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonKoenig, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Jackman, C. H.; Kallenrode, M.-B.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Quack, M.

    2002-01-01

    The energy deposition in the mesosphere and stratosphere during large extraterrestrial charged particle precipitation events has been known for some time to contribute to ozone losses due to the formation of potential ozone destroying species like NO(sub x), and HO(sub x). These impacts have been measured and can be reproduced with chemistry models fairly well. In the recent past, however, even the impact of the largest solar proton events on the total amount of ozone has been small compared to the dynamical variability of ozone, and to the anthropogenic induced impacts like the Antarctic 'ozone hole'. This is due to the shielding effect of the magnetic field. However, there is evidence that the earth's magnetic field may approach a reversal. This could lead to a decrease of magnetic field strength to less than 25% of its usual value over a period of several centuries . We show that with realistic estimates of very large solar proton events, scenarios similar to the Antarctic ozone hole of the 1990s may occur during a magnetic polarity transition.

  18. Solving the Tulsa ozone problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, K.K.; Wilson, J.D.; Gibeau, E.

    1998-12-31

    Local governments and interested parties in Tulsa, Oklahoma are planning actions to keep Tulsa in compliance with the ozone ambient air quality standard. Based on recent data Tulsa exceeds the new eight hour average national ambient air quality standard for ozone and occasionally exceeds the previous one hour standard. Currently, Tulsa is in attainment of the former one-hour ozone standard. The first planning step is to integrate the existing information about Tulsa`s ozone problem. Prior studies of Tulsa ozone are reviewed. Tulsa`s recent air quality and meteorological monitoring are evaluated. Emission inventory estimates are assessed. Factors identified with Tulsa`s ozone problem are the transport of ozone and precursor gases, a possible role for biogenic emissions, and a simplistic ozone forecasting method. The integration of information found that current air quality and meteorological monitoring is meager. Observations of volatile organic compounds and NO{sub y} are absent. Prior intensive studies in 1977 and 1985 are more than ten years old and lack relevance to today`s problem. Emission inventory estimates are scarce and uncertain. The current knowledge base was judged inadequate to properly characterize the present ozone problem. Actions are recommended to enlarge the information base to address Tulsa`s ozone problem.

  19. CFCS and the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Hayman, G D

    1997-05-01

    Ozone is an important constituent of the atmosphere. Ozone forms a distinct layer in the lower stratosphere known as the ozone layer. The ozone layer acts as a fragile shield because it protects man and other life forms from exposure to harmful short-wavelength ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The agents, particularly chemical, which affect the amount of ozone present in the atmosphere have been a source of concern for more than 20 years. This has been reinforced by the dramatic decline of stratospheric ozone levels first measured in Antarctica and now apparent worldwide. The combination of routine measurements of ozone depletion, careful laboratory studies and mathematical modelling of ozone in the atmosphere, has demonstrated that the reactive fragments produced when chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other halogenated compounds break down in the stratosphere are responsible for the ozone loss. As CFCs have widespread and sometimes apparently essential uses in modern society, there has been an intense effort to develop safe, effective replacements which have a negligible or much smaller impact on the environment. The Montreal Protocol, signed by over 140 nations, has been implemented to control and phase out the chemical compounds responsible for ozone loss. PMID:9519506

  20. Precision ozone calibration system based on vapor pressures of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1987-01-01

    A precision ozone calibration system for stratospheric research has been developed and evaluated. Vapor pressures above solid ozone are mixed with a carrier gas (N2) to produce stratospheric ozone mixing ratios at total pressures of 1 to cover 20 torr. The uncertainty in the ozone mixing ratios is approximately + or - 1.5 percent, the stability of ozone is + or - 0.3 percent. Experiments to be calibrated may sample the gas mixture over a wide range of flow rates; the maximum throughput of gas with corrections of less than 1 percent to ozone is about 200 torr 1/min. A mass spectrometer system continuously monitors the purity and stability of the N2-O3 gas mixture.

  1. Ozone and ozone byproducts in the cabins of commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Clifford; Weschler, Charles J; Mohan, Kris; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John D

    2013-05-01

    The aircraft cabin represents a unique indoor environment due to its high surface-to-volume ratio, high occupant density, and the potential for high ozone concentrations at cruising altitudes. Ozone was continuously measured and air was sampled on sorbent traps, targeting carbonyl compounds, on 52 transcontinental U.S. or international flights between 2008 and 2010. The sampling was predominantly on planes that did not have ozone scrubbers (catalytic converters). Peak ozone levels on aircraft without catalytic convertors exceeded 100 ppb, with some flights having periods of more than an hour when the ozone levels were >75 ppb. Ozone was greatly reduced on relatively new aircraft with catalytic convertors, but ozone levels on two flights whose aircraft had older convertors were similar to those on planes without catalytic convertors. Hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO) were detected in the aircraft cabin at sub- to low ppb levels. Linear regression models that included the log transformed mean ozone concentration, percent occupancy, and plane type were statistically significant and explained between 18 and 25% of the variance in the mixing ratio of these carbonyls. Occupancy was also a significant factor for 6-MHO, but not the linear aldehydes, consistent with 6-MHO's formation from the reaction between ozone and squalene, which is present in human skin oils. PMID:23517299

  2. Ozone assimilation in the UTLS: Value of limb-viewing sounders and resolution-dependent analysis of nadir data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, Valery; Pawson, Steven; Reinecker, Michele; Xu, Philippe; Sienkiewicz, Meta; Gille, John; Kinnison, Douglas; Livesey, Nathaniel

    2010-05-01

    The paper discusses aspects of the resolution-dependent analysis of ozone satellite data in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) region. In this region the sharp positive and negative vertical ozone gradients are frequently observed by insitu measurements and simulated by chemistry-climate models, showing so-called ozone laminas. With sufficient vertical resolution of limb-viewing sensors, such as MLS and HIRDLS on Aura/NASA spacecraft, this information on ozone dynamics in thin vertical layers can be accepted by data assimilation systems constraining layered vertical ozone structures across the tropopause. For these scenes, the ozone-sensitive information from the nadir sensors (SBUV, GOME, TES, AIRS, OMI, IASI) characterized by restricted vertical resolution should be properly projected from the data space to the analysis grid preserving the non-observable (but forecasted) ozone vertical structures. Several illustrations for analysis of nadir-only ozone data (SBUV-2) that can "diffuse" ozone laminas in the extra-tropical UTLS are discussed. To overcome this negative impact of analysis of nadir data, the resolution-dependent analysis schemes (RDAS) of retrievals (characterized by kernels) or/and radiances are suggested. The vertical inverse mapping performed by RDAS ensures constraining only scales observable by data preserving the non-observable short-scale vertical structures of ozone. As illustrated by comparisons of MLS and HIRDLS data with analyzed ozone fields (GEOS-5 and ECMWF), the other geophysical scenes influenced by inadequate assimilation of nadir retrievals may include: a) the high-latitude ozone hole and mini-holes; b) seasonal and quasi-biennial ozone oscillations in the tropical stratosphere; c) movements of high and low ozone air masses across the transport barriers. These comparisons demonstrate the value of MLS and HIRDLS limb data in constraining of ozone for monitoring atmospheric composition and climate. The current plans for

  3. Antarctic ozone variability inside the polar vortex estimated from balloon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrondo, M. C.; Gil, M.; Yela, M.; Johnson, B. J.; Ochoa, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    greater at the South Pole after the spring equinox. According to the variability of the ozone hole recovery, a clear connection between the timing of the breakup of the vortex and the monthly ozone content was found. Minimum ozone concentration of 57 DU in the 12-24 km layer remained in November, when the vortex is more persistent, while in years when the final stratospheric warming took place "very early", mean integrated ozone rose by up to 160-180 DU.

  4. The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John; Armour, Kyle C; Scott, Jeffery R; Kostov, Yavor; Hausmann, Ute; Ferreira, David; Shepherd, Theodore G; Bitz, Cecilia M

    2014-07-13

    In recent decades, the Arctic has been warming and sea ice disappearing. By contrast, the Southern Ocean around Antarctica has been (mainly) cooling and sea-ice extent growing. We argue here that interhemispheric asymmetries in the mean ocean circulation, with sinking in the northern North Atlantic and upwelling around Antarctica, strongly influence the sea-surface temperature (SST) response to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing, accelerating warming in the Arctic while delaying it in the Antarctic. Furthermore, while the amplitude of GHG forcing has been similar at the poles, significant ozone depletion only occurs over Antarctica. We suggest that the initial response of SST around Antarctica to ozone depletion is one of cooling and only later adds to the GHG-induced warming trend as upwelling of sub-surface warm water associated with stronger surface westerlies impacts surface properties. We organize our discussion around 'climate response functions' (CRFs), i.e. the response of the climate to 'step' changes in anthropogenic forcing in which GHG and/or ozone-hole forcing is abruptly turned on and the transient response of the climate revealed and studied. Convolutions of known or postulated GHG and ozone-hole forcing functions with their respective CRFs then yield the transient forced SST response (implied by linear response theory), providing a context for discussion of the differing warming/cooling trends in the Arctic and Antarctic. We speculate that the period through which we are now passing may be one in which the delayed warming of SST associated with GHG forcing around Antarctica is largely cancelled by the cooling effects associated with the ozone hole. By mid-century, however, ozone-hole effects may instead be adding to GHG warming around Antarctica but with diminished amplitude as the ozone hole heals. The Arctic, meanwhile, responding to GHG forcing but in a manner amplified by ocean heat transport, may continue to warm at an accelerating rate

  5. The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, John; Armour, Kyle C.; Scott, Jeffery R.; Kostov, Yavor; Hausmann, Ute; Ferreira, David; Shepherd, Theodore G.; Bitz, Cecilia M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the Arctic has been warming and sea ice disappearing. By contrast, the Southern Ocean around Antarctica has been (mainly) cooling and sea-ice extent growing. We argue here that interhemispheric asymmetries in the mean ocean circulation, with sinking in the northern North Atlantic and upwelling around Antarctica, strongly influence the sea-surface temperature (SST) response to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing, accelerating warming in the Arctic while delaying it in the Antarctic. Furthermore, while the amplitude of GHG forcing has been similar at the poles, significant ozone depletion only occurs over Antarctica. We suggest that the initial response of SST around Antarctica to ozone depletion is one of cooling and only later adds to the GHG-induced warming trend as upwelling of sub-surface warm water associated with stronger surface westerlies impacts surface properties. We organize our discussion around ‘climate response functions’ (CRFs), i.e. the response of the climate to ‘step’ changes in anthropogenic forcing in which GHG and/or ozone-hole forcing is abruptly turned on and the transient response of the climate revealed and studied. Convolutions of known or postulated GHG and ozone-hole forcing functions with their respective CRFs then yield the transient forced SST response (implied by linear response theory), providing a context for discussion of the differing warming/cooling trends in the Arctic and Antarctic. We speculate that the period through which we are now passing may be one in which the delayed warming of SST associated with GHG forcing around Antarctica is largely cancelled by the cooling effects associated with the ozone hole. By mid-century, however, ozone-hole effects may instead be adding to GHG warming around Antarctica but with diminished amplitude as the ozone hole heals. The Arctic, meanwhile, responding to GHG forcing but in a manner amplified by ocean heat transport, may continue to warm at an

  6. Climatology, trends and ENSO impacts in the wave forcing of the stratospheric zonal-mean flow and ozone transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, Erwan

    The wave forcing of the stratospheric zonal-mean flow and ozone transport is investigated through the calculation of the momentum and ozone transport budgets in the Transformed Eulerian-Mean (TEM) framework using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40). The climatology of the wave forcing is first validated then the long-term trends and El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) impacts are analyzed. This study reveals that a significant decrease in planetary wave activity in February in the Northern Hemisphere and in November in the Southern Hemisphere leads to a delay in the polar vortex breakdown one month later. Since the trends in the winds follow that of the wave activity, this study disproves the theory whereby an intensification of the polar vortex caused by ozone depletion induces a reduction in the high latitudes wave activity. The analysis of the dynamical transport of ozone reveals the fundamental role of ozone eddy transport in the ozone hole recovery. As the ozone hole grows larger, so does the ozone eddy transport thus balancing the largest trends in the ozone chemical destruction. This study underlines the fact that without an intensification of the ozone eddy transport over the 1980-2001 time period, the ozone hole over Antarctica would be drastically more severe. Finally, the response of the stratospheric dynamics to ENSO proves to be complex, only moderately statistically significant, and to vary greatly from month to month. Its temporal evolution resembles that of a Stratospheric Sudden Warming. ENSO composite differences (warm minus cold ENSO) show an increase in the vertical propagation of stationary planetary waves in January results in a brief weakening of the polar vortex in February. This is followed by a recovery in March, due to less propagation of stationary and transient planetary waves into the stratosphere. The ozone response to ENSO presents a dipole pattern, with negative anomalies in the

  7. Ozone Risk Assessment Utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-08-10

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates aremore » based on the EPA''s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.« less

  8. Design of a vehicle based system to prevent ozone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Sean R.; Bunker, Deborah; Hesbach, Thomas D., Jr.; Howerton, Everett B.; Hreinsson, G.; Mistr, E. Kirk; Palmer, Matthew E.; Rogers, Claiborne; Tischler, Dayna S.; Wrona, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Reduced quantities of ozone in the atmosphere allow greater levels of ultraviolet light (UV) radiation to reach the earth's surface. This is known to cause skin cancer and mutations. Chlorine liberated from Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and natural sources initiate the destruction of stratospheric ozone through a free radical chain reaction. The project goals are to understand the processes which contribute to stratospheric ozone loss, examine ways to prevent ozone loss, and design a vehicle-based system to carry out the prevention scheme. The 1992/1993 design objectives were to accomplish the first two goals and define the requirements for an implementation vehicle to be designed in detail starting next year. Many different ozone intervention schemes have been proposed though few have been researched and none have been tested. A scheme proposed by R.J. Cicerone, Scott Elliot and R.P.Turco late in 1991 was selected because of its research support and economic feasibility. This scheme uses hydrocarbon injected into the Antarctic ozone hole to form stable compounds with free chlorine, thus reducing ozone depletion. Because most polar ozone depletion takes place during a 3-4 week period each year, the hydrocarbon must be injected during this time window. A study of the hydrocarbon injection requirements determined that 100 aircraft traveling Mach 2.4 at a maximum altitude of 66,000 ft. would provide the most economic approach to preventing ozone loss. Each aircraft would require an 8,000 nm. range and be able to carry 35,000 lbs. of propane. The propane would be stored in a three-tank high pressure system. Missions would be based from airport regions located in South America and Australia. To best provide the requirements of mission analysis, an aircraft with L/D(sub cruise) = 10.5, SFC = 0.65 (the faculty advisor suggested that this number is too low) and a 250,000 lb TOGW was selected as a baseline. Modularity and multi-role functionality were selected to be key

  9. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the 'associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  10. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  11. Ozone and other trace gases in the Arctic and Antarctic regions: Three-dimensional model simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, C.; Brasseur, G. )

    1991-02-20

    A three-dimensional mechanistic model of the middle atmosphere with calculated dynamics and chemistry is used to study the behavior of chemically active trace gases at high latitudes in winter and spring, and to simulate the formation of an ozone hole in Antarctica. The dynamics of both hemispheres is simulated by applying at the lower boundary of the model (8.5 km) a wavelike perturbation representing qualitatively a climatological tropospheric forcing. The chemical heterogeneous processes converting chlorine reservoirs into active chlorine in cold air masses are parameterized. The model simulates the behavior of nitrogen oxides, nitric acid, water vapor, methane, hydrogen radicals, chlorine compounds, and ozone. It reproduces important features observed during different Antarctic and Arctic observation campaigns. The ozone hole in the southern hemisphere can only be simulated when the heterogeneous polar chemistry is taken into account. The springtime ozone depletion over Antarctica calculated in the model is thus mostly the result of chemical removal although the dynamics is responsible for the low temperature that triggers the large ozone loss rates. Unresolved questions are related to the strength of the vertical exchanges inside the vortex, the preconditioning of trace gases before and during the winter season, the behavior of the different trace gases as the vortex breaks down (dilution effects), accurate determination of the ozone sink inside the vortex, and a better quantitative estimation of the role of polar stratospheric clouds. Despite elevated concentrations of active chlorine at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere in late winter, no ozone hole is produced by the model, even with chlorine levels as high as 6 ppbv. This conclusion could, however, be modified for very stable and cold winters with delayed final warming.

  12. Ozonated olive oils and the troubles.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    One of the commonly used methods for ozone therapy is ozonated oils. Most prominent type of used oils is extra virgin olive oil. But still, each type of unsaturated oils may be used for ozonation. There are a lot of wrong knowledge on the internet about ozonated oils and its use as well. Just like other ozone therapy studies, also the studies about ozone oils are inadequate to avoid incorrect knowledge. Current data about ozone oil and its benefits are produced by supplier who oversees financial interests and make misinformation. Despite the rapidly increasing ozone oil sales through the internet, its quality and efficacy is still controversial. Dozens of companies and web sites may be easily found to buy ozonated oil. But, very few of these products are reliable, and contain sufficiently ozonated oil. This article aimed to introduce the troubles about ozonated oils and so to inform ozonated oil users. PMID:26401346

  13. Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in both the Earth's upper and lower atmospheres. The protective ozone in the upper atmosphere is very different from the harmful ozone in the lower atmosphere. Ozone that exists naturally 10 to 30 miles ( ...

  14. Ozonated olive oils and the troubles

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    One of the commonly used methods for ozone therapy is ozonated oils. Most prominent type of used oils is extra virgin olive oil. But still, each type of unsaturated oils may be used for ozonation. There are a lot of wrong knowledge on the internet about ozonated oils and its use as well. Just like other ozone therapy studies, also the studies about ozone oils are inadequate to avoid incorrect knowledge. Current data about ozone oil and its benefits are produced by supplier who oversees financial interests and make misinformation. Despite the rapidly increasing ozone oil sales through the internet, its quality and efficacy is still controversial. Dozens of companies and web sites may be easily found to buy ozonated oil. But, very few of these products are reliable, and contain sufficiently ozonated oil. This article aimed to introduce the troubles about ozonated oils and so to inform ozonated oil users. PMID:26401346

  15. Protecting beans from ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    1983-03-01

    A chemical treatment to protect navy beans from ozone damage increased yields by an average of more than 20% in 3 years of tests. An experimental antioxidant chemical, EDU, made by the DuPont company was tested as soil applications and sprays on several varieties and under a variety of soil and planting conditions. The average yield increases were between 16 and 24%. Chemical treatment also increased snap bean pod production by 12%.

  16. Ozone attainment: A different perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, W.B. )

    1988-01-01

    Recent attention on the ozone non-attainment issue has been focused on Washington. Both Congress and the EPA have made efforts at addressing the post-1987 crisis in the many non-attainment areas. In contrast to the political activity, this paper presents some interesting technical perspectives on ozone attainment for many areas of the U.S.. Issues such as transport, climate and natural ozone sources are discussed in the context of exceedance frequency for several geographical areas of the country.

  17. Black Hole Syndrome 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-08-01

    A black hole falling into the Earth would syndrome toward the center, while it would shine through mass accretion. The author has re-examined the dynamics of such a black hole in the Earth. In the case of a non-radiating black hole, the timescale of the syndrome is inversely proportional to the initial mass of the black hole. In the case of a radiating black hole, on the other hand, the syndrome time is of the order of the Eddington time. The radiating black hole in the Earth would act as a strong heat source.

  18. Early signatures of ozone trend reversal over the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Rolf; Varai, Anita; Homonnai, Viktoria; Janosi, Imre M.

    2015-04-01

    We report on a detailed time series analysis of long total column ozone (TO) records based on multi-satellite observations of daily resolution. We concentrate on three geographic latitudes over and around the Antarctic area, specifically on three circles at 58.5°S, 59.5°S, and 79.5°S. Almost continuous observations are available at the two former latitudes, however data are missing during the polar winter periods at 79.5°S, because the measurement technique requires sunlight. The methodology is motivated by level crossing statistics, where subsets of the records above or below particular threshold levels are evaluated. Long term trend reversal at around the turn of the century is detectable for low TO levels already in the raw time series in the 'ozone hole' region (79.5°S). In order to overcome the apparent non-stationarities of the time series, we determined daily TO differences (ΔTO) belonging to the same geographic longitudes between the different latitudinal circles. The result is a stable, stationary behavior for small (absolute) ΔTO values in the period January-February-March without any significant detectable trends. The high absolute value ΔTO subsets (September-October-November) indicate a robust trend reversal already in the middle of nineteen-nineties. The observed trend reversal in the total column ozone time series is consistent with the temporal development of the stratospheric halogen loading. However, a close correspondence of ozone and halogen turn-around years is not expected because of the statistical uncertainties in the determination of the ozone turn-around, and the many contributing factors to ozone depletion processes.

  19. Early signatures of ozone trend reversal over the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várai, Anita; Homonnai, Viktória; Jánosi, Imre M.; Müller, Rolf

    2015-03-01

    We report on a detailed time series analysis of long total column ozone (TO) records based on multi-satellite observations of daily resolution. We concentrate on three geographic latitudes over and around the Antarctic area, specifically on three circles at 58.5°S, 59.5°S, and 79.5°S. Almost continuous observations are available at the two former latitudes; however, data are lacking during the polar winter periods at 79.5°S, because the measurement technique requires sunlight. The methodology is motivated by level-crossing statistics, where subsets of the records above or below particular threshold levels are evaluated. Long-term trend reversal at around the turn of the century is already detectable for low TO levels in the raw time series in the "ozone-hole" region (79.5°S). In order to overcome the apparent non-stationarities of the time series, we determined daily TO differences (ΔTO) belonging to the same geographic longitudes between the different latitudinal circles. The result is a stable, stationary behavior for small (absolute) ΔTO values in the period January-February-March without any significant detectable trends. The high absolute value ΔTO subsets (September-October-November) indicate a robust trend reversal in the middle of the 1990s. The observed trend reversal in the total column ozone time series is consistent with the temporal development of the stratospheric halogen loading. However, a close correspondence of ozone and halogen turnaround years is not expected because of the statistical uncertainties in the determination of the ozone turnaround, and the many factors contributing to ozone depletion processes.

  20. Ozone transport commission developments

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    On September 27, 1994, the states of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) signed an important memorandum of understanding (MOU) agreeing to develop a regional strategy for controlling stationary sources of nitrogen oxide emissions. Specifically, the states of the Ozone Transport Region, OTR, agreed to propose regulations for the control of NOx emissions from boilers and other indirect heat exchangers with a maximum gross heat input rate of at least 250 million BTU per hour. The Ozone Transport Region was divided into Inner, Outer and Northern Zones. States in the Outer Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions by 55%. States in the Inner Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions 65%. Facilities in both zones have the option to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million Btu by May 1, 1999. This option provides fairness for the gas-fired plants which already have relatively low NOx emissions. Additionally, States in the Inner and Outer Zones agreed to reduce their NOx emissions by 75% or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.15 pounds per million BTU by May 1, 2003. The Northern Zone States agree to reduce their rate of NOx emissions by 55% from base year levels by May 1, 2003, or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million BTU. As part of this MOU, States also agreed to develop a regionwide trading mechanism to provide a cost-effective mechanism for implementing the reductions.

  1. An analysis of the oxidation potential of the South Pole boundary layer and the influence of stratospheric ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anna E.; Wolff, Eric W.

    2003-09-01

    The summertime atmospheric boundary layer over the South Pole has recently been shown to be highly oxidizing, with greater concentrations of NO and OH than previously expected. The source of NO has been attributed to photolysis of nitrate impurities in the snowpack, with elevated OH from the reaction NO + HO2. However, the Antarctic troposphere is not currently in a "natural" state, being subject nowadays to greatly increased incidences of ultraviolet (UV) radiation each spring. Here we analyze the long-term record of surface ozone at the South Pole (1975-2001), to look for evidence of a changing oxidation potential. Daily averaged surface ozone concentrations during spring and early summer now regularly exceed the maximum concentration of the previous winter, while in the 1970s and 1980s this was not the case. This suggests that the proposed springtime ozone source is greater nowadays than before. Such a feature is consistent with increases in UV radiation accompanying the springtime stratospheric ozone hole. Model calculations show that the rate of nitrate photolysis in the South Pole snowpack has increased significantly since the onset of the ozone hole, such that production of NO2 in November has increased by 43% between the late 1960s and the late 1990s. It thus appears that the South Pole boundary layer is more highly oxidizing nowadays than under conditions before the onset of the ozone hole.

  2. Ozone measurement systems improvements studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W.; Guard, K.; Holland, A. C.; Spurling, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Results are summarized of an initial study of techniques for measuring atmospheric ozone, carried out as the first phase of a program to improve ozone measurement techniques. The study concentrated on two measurement systems, the electro chemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde and the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer, and consisted of two tasks. The first task consisted of error modeling and system error analysis of the two measurement systems. Under the second task a Monte-Carlo model of the Dobson ozone measurement technique was developed and programmed for computer operation.

  3. Application of a modified DOAS method for total ozone retrieval from GOME data at high polar latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldewey-Egbers, M.; Weber, M.; Buchwitz, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) on board the second European Remote Sensing satellite provides information about spatial distribution and temporal variation of total ozone. Current operational data products are generated using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. Various validation exercises indicate shortcomings in the current retrieval using the standard DOAS approach. Especially under ozone hole conditions at high polar latitudes GOME tends to overestimate total ozone as compared to ground-based measurements. In this study, we introduce a modified DOAS method for ozone retrieval from GOME which fits directly the vertical columns rather than slant columns. We present preliminary results which demonstrate the advantage of the new approach. It will be shown that not only the differences to ground-based data are reduced but also the fit residuals are improved in comparison with the operational retrieval.

  4. [The retrieval of ozone column densities by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy during summer at Zhongshan Station, Antarctic].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-Han; Liu, Wen-Qing; Bian, Lin-Gen; Lu, Chang-Gui; Xie, Pin-Hua; Si, Fu-Qi; Sun, Li-Guang

    2011-02-01

    Daily ozone column densities were monitored by Passive DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) from December 10th, 2008 to Feb 19th, 2009 at Zhongshan Station, Antarctic (69 degrees 22'24" S, 76 degrees 22'14" E). Considering the absorption of O3, OClO, NO2, O4, BrO and the Ring effect, ozone slant column densities were retrieved using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source. The results showed that there was no obvious "ozone hole" during the monitoring period, but ozone VCD (vertical column density) had greatly changed within short time scale, especially in middle December and early February. The analysis of passive DOAS and Brewer measurements of ozone VCD showed good agreement with the correlative coefficient of 0.863, while satellite board OMI measurements with the correlative coefficient of 0.840, which confirmed the validity of the monitoring of Passive DOAS. PMID:21510403

  5. Ozone over McMurdo Station, Antarctica, austral spring 1986 - Altitude profiles for the middle and upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Brian J.; Barrett, J. W.; Parrish, A.; Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    In the austral spring of 1986, a program of measurements of the ozone altitude profile (for the z values between 25 and 55 km), relevant to an understanding of the ozone hole, was conducted at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The measurements were performed using ground-based millimeter-wave spectrometry. It was found that the ozone mixing ratio peaked at altitudes ranging from 28 to 34 km, with peak values between 5 and 9 ppm by volume. During the period between September 12 and October 29, the ozone mixing ratio decreased, with great variability, by about 15 percent at 25 km, with no significant decrease at higher altitudes. The observation of the depletion occurring only below 25 km is consistent with ozone-sonde observations during previous years.

  6. Persistent Polar Depletion of Stratospheric Ozone and Emergent Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Mediated Health Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Dugo, Mark A.; Han, Fengxiang

    2013-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone “hole” in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiological stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared to the Antarctic region, increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biological rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter the fitness and condition, while circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR induced modulations of phase I and phase II transcription factors, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. While concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR mediated dysregulations of rhymicity

  7. Evolution of ozone depletion on Antarctic and sub-Antarctic regions (1979-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, S. B.; Paladini, A. A.; Deferrari, G. A.; Vrsalovic, J.

    2013-08-01

    At the middle eighties, strong stratospheric ozone depletion during spring was discovered over Antarctica. Since then, the scientific community has put large efforts in performing studies directed to evaluate the magnitude and consequences of this depletion and to take the necessary measures to revert the situation to the scenarios before 1970. In 1987, the Montreal Protocol established a list of ozone depleting products and faced out policies. As consequence of these restrictions on ozone depleting substances, the ozone layer should start to recover in the 21st century. In order to study the evolution of the Antarctic ozone depletion, we analyzed the ozone hole area and mass deficit and seasonal total ozone column (TOC) minimum. We also performed a seasonal and bi-monthly analysis for TOC time series (1979-2012), at twenty Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic stations. The number of days inside the vortex (TOC below 220DU) per season (September-December) and for September-October and November-December were analyzed, fitting the time series with a second degree polynomial According to this study, ozone hole area would have peaked between 2001 and 2002 (R=0.91, p<0.01), while the minimum TOC would have occurred between 2000 and 2001(R=0.91, p<0.01). Mass deficit is only provided since 2005 and it showed a decrease since then, although ot statistically significant as consequence of the short time series. From the 20 analyzed stations, 80% showed that the number of days per season inside the vortex peaked between 2000 and 2003 and for 55% of the stations the number of days inside the vortex for September-October peaked between 1999 and 2004.

  8. Ozone depletion and UVB radiation: Impact on plant DNA damage in southern South America

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, M. Cecilia; Ballaré, Carlos L.; Giordano, Carla V.; Scopel, Ana L.; Zima, Ana M.; Szwarcberg-Bracchitta, Mariela; Searles, Peter S.; Caldwell, Martyn M.; Díaz, Susana B.

    1999-01-01

    The primary motivation behind the considerable effort in studying stratospheric ozone depletion is the potential for biological consequences of increased solar UVB (280–315 nm) radiation. Yet, direct links between ozone depletion and biological impacts have been established only for organisms of Antarctic waters under the influence of the ozonehole;” no direct evidence exists that ozone-related variations in UVB affect ecosystems of temperate latitudes. Indeed, calculations based on laboratory studies with plants suggest that the biological impact of ozone depletion (measured by the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA) is likely to be less marked than previously thought, because UVA quanta (315–400 nm) may also cause significant damage, and UVA is unaffected by ozone depletion. Herein, we show that the temperate ecosystems of southern South America have been subjected to increasingly high levels of ozone depletion during the last decade. We found that in the spring of 1997, despite frequent cloud cover, the passages of the ozone hole over Tierra del Fuego (55° S) caused concomitant increases in solar UV and that the enhanced ground-level UV led to significant increases in DNA damage in the native plant Gunnera magellanica. The fluctuations in solar UV explained a large proportion of the variation in DNA damage (up to 68%), particularly when the solar UV was weighted for biological effectiveness according to action spectra that assume a sharp decline in quantum efficiency with increasing wavelength from the UVB into the UVA regions of the spectrum. PMID:10611381

  9. Observations of deformation and mixing of the total ozone field in the Antaractic Polar Vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.P. ); Mangus, N.J. )

    1993-09-01

    Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) images of the springtime Southern Hemisphere commonly show concentric layers in the total ozone field outside the Antarctic polar vortex. The layering appears to result from horizontal folding and stretching of regions on the equatorward flank of the polar vortex near the midlatitude ozone maximum. This folding and stretching interleaves low and high ozone air from the subtropics and midlatitudes, respectively. Occasional large amplitude wave events can extract very low ozone air from the interior of the polar vortex (the Antarctic ozone hole), but the folding and stretching results in relatively rapid horizontal mixing of the atmosphere on the equatorward flank of the jet. This type of lagrangian behavior may be common in the atmosphere, but is only visible when local tracer gradients are large and observations with high spatial resolution are available. Also, experimentation has shown that gray-scale images of TOMS data show the details of the spatial distribution of ozone much more clearly than contour maps of false-color images. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of DNA dosimetry to assess ozone-mediated variability of biologically harmful radiation in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    George, Alison L; Peat, Helen J; Buma, Anita G J

    2002-09-01

    In this study we investigated the use of a DNA dosimeter to accurately measure changes in ultraviolet B radiation (UVBR; 280-315 nm) under Antarctic ozone hole conditions. Naked DNA solution in quartz tubes was exposed to ambient solar radiation at Rothera Research Station, Antarctica, between October and December 1998 for 3 h during UVBR peak hours (1200-1500 h). Trends in UVBR-mediated DNA damage (formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers [CPD]) were related to cloud cover, ozone-column depth and spectroradiometric measurements of ambient radiation. Ozone-column depths ranged from 130 to 375 DU during the study period, resulting in highly variable UVBR doses, from 1.6 to 137 kJ m(-2) over the 3 h exposure, as measured by spectroradiometry. There was a strong positive correlation (86%) between dosimeter CPD concentrations and DNA-weighted UVBR doses. Ozone depth was a strong predictor of DNA damage (63%), and there was no significant relationship between CPD formation and cloud cover. Subtle changes in spectral characteristics caused by ozone depletion were detected by the biodosimeter; the highest CPD concentrations were observed in October when ozone-mediated shifts favored shorter wavelengths of UVBR. We conclude that the DNA biodosimeter is an accurate indicator of biologically effective UVBR, even under highly variable ozone conditions. PMID:12403448

  11. An Investigation of Polar Ozone Recovery in the 1997 Southern Hemisphere Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, J. M.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A chemical transport model is used to investigate the processes that control the depth and duration of the ozone 'hole' in the lower stratosphere through comparisons of model output with measurements from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), both on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). This study extends previous model comparisons with observations into October and November and examine levels in (greater than 31 hPa) and above (less than 31 hPa) the chemical loss region. Averages of column ozone in the model decrease through mid-October below 31 hPa but begin to increase in mid-September above 31 hPa. An investigation of model-tracer data comparisons and other meteorological parameters indicate that the model presents a consistent picture of top-down recovery and tracer transport. An O03budget study at 500 K (below 31 hPa) and 840 K (above 31 hPa) is carried out to investigate the processes that control the timing of the transition of ozone from a chemical to dynamically driven regime. The model ozone decrease at 500 K is due to chemical loss in August and September but is due to upward motion in October. The ozone increase at 840 K is primarily due to photochemical production, with a smaller contribution from transport. These results show that chemistry and dynamics can play different roles in polar vortex ozone recovery at different levels.

  12. The world ozone dilemma; Research and results with remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtak, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in order to study the chemically perturbed region of the Antarctic and the Arctic, NASA initiated airborne and satellite imaging of the ozone depletion through the specialized ER-2 plane (at {approximately}18 km) and the modified DC-8-72 aircraft (at {approximately}12.5 km) with remote sensing systems onboard. Instruments onboard the ER-2 and DC-8 NASA research aircraft surveyed the atmosphere from various altitudes and instruments on the Nimbus-7 satellite analyzed reflected sunlight. Measurements were designed to gauge not only the extent of ozone depletion over the Antarctic/Arctic, but other chemical changes in the stratosphere. Activities carried out within programs of remote sensing and in situ measurements by aircraft are compared to TOMS onboard the Nimbus-7, as well as Dobson network ground stations. Through these methods, scientists have been extremely successful in mapping the huge hole in the ozone layer that appeared over Antarctica, which is particularly extensive for about two months of each year and to confirm ozone loss in the Arctic area.

  13. The Antarctic ozone depletion caused by Erebus volcano gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, V. V.; Zueva, N. E.; Savelieva, E. S.; Gerasimov, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous chemical reactions releasing photochemically active molecular chlorine play a key role in Antarctic stratospheric ozone destruction, resulting in the Antarctic ozone hole. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) is one of the principal components in these reactions on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). PSCs form during polar nights at extremely low temperatures (lower than -78 °C) mainly on sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosols, acting as condensation nuclei and formed from sulfur dioxide (SO2). However, the cause of HCl and H2SO4 high concentrations in the Antarctic stratosphere, leading to considerable springtime ozone depletion, is still not clear. Based on the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data over the last 35 years and by using the NOAA HYSPLIT trajectory model, we show that Erebus volcano gas emissions (including HCl and SO2) can reach the Antarctic stratosphere via high-latitude cyclones with the annual average probability Pbarann. of at least ∼0.235 (23.5%). Depending on Erebus activity, this corresponds to additional annual stratospheric HCl mass of 1.0-14.3 kilotons (kt) and SO2 mass of 1.4-19.7 kt. Thus, Erebus volcano is the natural and powerful source of additional stratospheric HCl and SO2, and hence, the cause of the Antarctic ozone depletion, together with man-made chlorofluorocarbons.

  14. NASA Now: Black Holes

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now episode, Dr. Daniel Patnaude talks about how his team discovered a baby black hole, why this is important and how black holes create tidal forces. Throughout his discussion, Patnau...

  15. Comparison of satellite measurements of ozone and ozone trends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusch, D.W.; Clancy, R.T.; Bhartia, P.K. |

    1994-10-01

    Measurements of ozone retrieved from satellite instruments over the 1979-1991 period are compared. The instruments used are the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS), the solar backscattered ultraviolet experiment (SBUV), and stratospheric aerosol and gas experiments (SAGE) I and II. Although there is good agreement between the absolute densities of ozone as measured by the various instruments, the long-term changes (1979-1990) disagree sharply as a function of pressure and in the integrated ozone amount. In the upper stratosphere, SBUV trends are negative with maximum values of about -1.5%/year at high latitudes. Combined SAGE I and II trends are slightly positive in this region and peak near 0.5%/year at equatorial latitudes. In the lower stratosphere, SBUV trends reflect small decreases in ozone, generally less than -0.4%/year except at high southern latitudes where the trends rearch values of approximately -1.5%/year. SAGE ozone trends exhibit large decreases particularly in the equatorial regions where decreases of 3-6%/year are seen at pressures between 60 and 90 mbar. At higher latitudes, SAGE trends are more comparable to SBUV trends in the lower stratosphere. Total ozone trends from TOMS and SBUV agree within their uncertainties. Near-zero trends are indicated at low latitudes, and larger, negative trends (approximately -0.5%/year) are indicated near the poles. The SAGE column ozone trends depend upon the base level altitude of integration but do not exhibit a strong latitude dependence.

  16. Table Mountain ozone intercomparison: Brewer ozone spectrophotometer Umkehr observations

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, C.T.; Kerr, J.B.

    1995-05-20

    The authors present the result of ozone column measurements, and vertical profiles, derived from Brewer ozone spectrophotometer measurements, in conjunction with the Umkehr technique. The Umkehr results agreed within 15% with the average measurments of this campaign between 20 and 40 km altitude. When restricted to the altitude range of 24 to 40 km the agreement was within about 5%.

  17. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  18. Antarctic ozone variability inside the Polar Vortex estimated from balloon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrondo, M. C.; Gil, M.; Yela, M.; Johnson, B. J.; Ochoa, H. A.

    2013-06-01

    13 yr of ozonesoundings at the Antarctic Belgrano II station (78° S, 34.6° W) have been analyzed to establish a climatology of stratospheric ozone and temperature over the area. The station is inside the polar vortex during the period of development of chemical ozone depletion. Weekly periodic profiles provide a suitable database for seasonal characterization of the evolution of stratospheric ozone, especially valuable during winter time when satellites and ground-based instruments based on solar radiation are lacking. The work is focused on ozone loss rate variability (August-October) and its recovery (November-December) at different layers identified according to the severity of ozone loss. The time window selected for the calculations covers the phase of a quasi-linear ozone reduction, about day 220 (mid August) to day 273 (end of September). Decrease of the total ozone column over Belgrano during spring is highly dependent on the meteorological conditions. Largest depletions (up to 59%) are reached in coldest years while warms winters exhibit significantly lower ozone loss (20%). It has been found that about 11% of the total O3 loss in the layer where maximum depletion occurs takes place before the sun has arrived as a result of transport of lower latitude air masses, providing evidence of mixing inside the vortex. Spatial homogeneity of the vortex has been examined by comparing Belgrano results with those previously obtained for South Pole Station (SPS) for the same altitude range and for 9 yr of overlapping data. Unexpected results show more than 25% larger ozone loss rate at SPS than at Belgrano. It has been found that the accumulated hours of sunlight are the dominant factor driving the ozone loss rate. According to the variability of the ozone-hole recovery, a clear connection between the timing of the breakup of the vortex and the monthly ozone content was found. Minimum ozone concentration of 57 DU in the 12-24 km layer remained in November for the

  19. IMPACT OF OZONE ON VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Visible injury on vegetation is one of the earliest and most obvious manifestations of ozone injury. However, ozone effects are not limited to visible injury; impacts range from reduced plant growth, decreased yield, changes in crop quality and alterations in susceptibility to ab...

  20. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  1. IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR RESIDUAL OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight analytical methods for the determination of residual ozone in water are evaluated. Four are iodometric methods based on the reduction of ozone by iodide ion: the iodometric method, the amperometric method, the arsenic (III) back titration method, and the N, N-diethyl-p-phen...

  2. Simplified ozone detection by chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Rogowski, R. S.; Richards, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ozone is detected by film coated with solid, such as rubrene, that reacts with ozone to degree proportional to concentration in sample gas. Gas flow is stopped, and film is heated to produce light (chemiluminescence) in proportion to amount of reacted material on sensor.

  3. Plant responses to tropospheric ozone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropospheric ozone is the second most abundant air pollutant and an important component of the global climate change. Over five decades of research on the phytotoxicity of ozone in model plants systems, crop plants and forest trees have provided some insight into the physiological, biochemical and m...

  4. OZONE MULTI-YEAR PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tropospheric ozone research program addresses not only ozone, but other criteria pollutants such as SO2, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and lead. It focuses on developing tools to help with implementation of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), such as improvin...

  5. Ozone Modeling Using Neural Networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Ramesh; Keller, Joleen; Subramaniam, Ganesh; Raasch, Eric; Croley, Brandon; Duncan, Kathleen; Potter, William T.

    2000-03-01

    Ozone models for the city of Tulsa were developed using neural network modeling techniques. The neural models were developed using meteorological data from the Oklahoma Mesonet and ozone, nitric oxide, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) data from Environmental Protection Agency monitoring sites in the Tulsa area. An initial model trained with only eight surface meteorological input variables and NO2 was able to simulate ozone concentrations with a correlation coefficient of 0.77. The trained model was then used to evaluate the sensitivity to the primary variables that affect ozone concentrations. The most important variables (NO2, temperature, solar radiation, and relative humidity) showed response curves with strong nonlinear codependencies. Incorporation of ozone concentrations from the previous 3 days into the model increased the correlation coefficient to 0.82. As expected, the ozone concentrations correlated best with the most recent (1-day previous) values. The model's correlation coefficient was increased to 0.88 by the incorporation of upper-air data from the National Weather Service's Nested Grid Model. Sensitivity analysis for the upper-air variables indicated unusual positive correlations between ozone and the relative humidity from 500 hPa to the tropopause in addition to the other expected correlations with upper-air temperatures, vertical wind velocity, and 1000-500-hPa layer thickness. The neural model results are encouraging for the further use of these systems to evaluate complex parameter cosensitivities, and for the use of these systems in automated ozone forecast systems.

  6. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    During the period March 1977 through May 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center and three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at the Churchill Research Range. One additional flight was conducted at Wallops Flight Center in support of Nimbus 4 SBUV. Data results and flight profiles for the period covered are presented.

  7. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  8. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  9. Source attribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a harmful pollutant with adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. As well as these effects, tropospheric ozone is also a powerful greenhouse gas, with an anthropogenic radiative forcing one quarter of that of CO2. Along with methane and atmospheric aerosol, tropospheric ozone belongs to the so-called Short Lived Climate forcing Pollutants, or SLCP. Recent work has shown that efforts to reduce concentrations of SLCP in the atmosphere have the potential to slow the rate of near-term climate change, while simultaneously improving public health and reducing crop losses. Unlike many other SLCP, tropospehric ozone is not directly emitted, but is instead influenced by two distinct sources: transport of air from the ozone-rich stratosphere; and photochemical production in the troposphere from the emitted precursors NOx (oxides of nitrogen), CO (Carbon Monoxide), and VOC (volatile organic compounds, including methane). Better understanding of the relationship between ozone production and the emissions of its precursors is essential for the development of targeted emission reduction strategies. Several modeling methods have been employed to relate the production of tropospheric ozone to emissions of its precursors; emissions perturbation, tagging, and adjoint sensitivity methods all deliver complementary information about modelled ozone production. Most studies using tagging methods have focused on attribution of tropospheric ozone production to emissions of NOx, even though perturbation methods have suggested that tropospheric ozone is also sensitive to VOC, particularly methane. In this study we describe the implementation into a global chemistry-climate model of a scheme for tagging emissions of NOx and VOC with an arbitrary number of labels, which are followed through the chemical reactions of tropospheric ozone production in order to perform attribution of tropospehric ozone to its emitted precursors. Attribution is performed to both

  10. Clathrate hydrates for ozone preservation.

    PubMed

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Ohmura, Ryo; Takeya, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuhiko H

    2010-09-01

    We report the experimental evidence for the preservation of ozone (O(3)) encaged in a clathrate hydrate. Although ozone is an unstable substance and is apt to decay to oxygen (O(2)), it may be preserved for a prolonged time if it is encaged in hydrate cavities in the form of isolated molecules. This possibility was assessed using a hydrate formed from an ozone + oxygen gas mixture coexisting with carbon tetrachloride or xenon. Each hydrate sample was stored in an air-filled container at atmospheric pressure and a constant temperature in the range between -20 and 2 degrees C and was continually subjected to iodometric measurements of its fractional ozone content. Such chronological measurements and structure analysis using powder X-ray diffraction have revealed that ozone can be preserved in a hydrate-lattice structure for more than 20 days at a concentration on the order of 0.1% (hydrate-mass basis). PMID:20707330

  11. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  12. Black Hole Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Janna; D'Orazio, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Black holes are dark dead stars. Neutron stars are giant magnets. As the neutron star orbits the black hole, an electronic circuit forms that generates a blast of power just before the black hole absorbs the neutron star whole. The black hole battery conceivably would be observable at cosmological distances. Possible channels for luminosity include synchro-curvature radiation, a blazing fireball, or even an unstable, short-lived black hole pulsar. As suggested by Mingarelli, Levin, and Lazio, some fraction of the battery power could also be reprocessed into coherent radio emission to populate a subclass of fast radio bursts.

  13. 35 state ozone transport region (OTAG) & ozone & PM NAAQS & regional HAZE FACA

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, B.

    1996-11-01

    The activities of the 35 state ozone transport regions (OTAG) are summarized. Topics discussed include: the Chicago 15 percent plan; federal measures; VOC reduction goals; daily maximum ozone concentrations; ozone attainment demonstration policy; OTAG`s progress to date; significant upcoming activities; ozone transport assessment; model sensitivity analysis; FACA processes; and ozone, particulate matter, and regional haze implementation programs.

  14. Options to accelerate ozone recovery: ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-08-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and N2O are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact on ozone depletion that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS and N2O emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional restrictions. Direct radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower from the elimination of anthropogenic N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower from the destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. Due to the potential impact of N2O on future ozone levels, we provide an approach to incorporate it into the EESC formulation, which is used extensively in ozone depletion analyses. The ability of EESC to describe total ozone changes arising from additional ODS and N2O controls is also quantified.

  15. Nitroaromatic hydrocarbon ozonation in water. 1: Single ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Encinar, J.M.; Alonso, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Single ozonation of two nitroaromatic hydrocarbons (nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene) under different experimental conditions (ozone feed rate, pH, temperature, hydroxyl radical scavengers) has been studied. The absence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, pHs 7--9, and temperatures below 30 C are optimum conditions for nitroaromatic removal. Due to the importance of hydroxyl radical reactions, removal rates in natural water are much lower than those observed in laboratory ultrapure water. Rate constants of the direct reaction between ozone and nitroaromatic hydrocarbons at 20 C have been found to be lower than 6 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. More than 99% of nitroaromatic removal is due to hydroxyl radical oxidation. Single ozonation of nitroaromatics can then be classified as a real advanced oxidation technology. Nitrophenols, compounds very reactive toward ozone and hydroxyl radicals, and 2,6-dinitrobenzaldehyde, identified in the single ozonation of nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, respectively, are some of the first intermediates of single ozonation.

  16. Global ozone observations from the UARS MLS: An overview of zonal-mean results

    SciTech Connect

    Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Read, W.G.; Elson, L.S.; Flower, D.A.; Jarnot, R.F.

    1994-10-15

    Global ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented, in both vertically resolved and column abundance formats. The authors review the zonal-mean ozone variations measured over the two and a half years since launch in September 1991. Well-known features such as the annual and semiannual variations are ubiquitous. In the equatorial regions, longer-term changes are believed to be related to the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), with a strong semiannual signal above 20 hPa. Ozone values near 50 hPa exhibit an equatorial low from October 1991 to June 1992, after which the low ozone pattern splits into two subtropical lows (possibly in connection with residual circulation changes tied to the QBO) and returns to an equatorial low in September 1993. The ozone hole development at high southern latitudes is apparent in MLS column data integrated down to 100 hPa, with a pattern generally consistent with Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measurements of total column; the MLS data reinforce current knowledge of this lower-stratospheric phenomenon by providing a height-dependent view of the variations. The region from 30{degrees}S to 30{degrees}N (an area equal to half the global area) shows very little change in the ozone column from year to year and within each year. Finally, residual ozone values extracted from TOMS-minus-MLS column data are briefly presented as a preliminary view into the potential usefulness of such studies, with information on tropospheric ozone as an ultimate goal. 99 refs., 13 figs.

  17. Copernicus atmospheric service for stratospheric ozone: validation and intercomparison of four near real-time analyses, 2009-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefever, K.; van der A, R.; Baier, F.; Christophe, Y.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H.; Flemming, J.; Inness, A.; Jones, L.; Lambert, J.-C.; Langerock, B.; Schultz, M. G.; Stein, O.; Wagner, A.; Chabrillat, S.

    2014-05-01

    polar lower stratosphere during ozone depletion events. The assimilation of near real-time (NRT) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) profiles which only go down to 68 hPa is not able to correct for the deficiency of the underlying MOZART model, which may be related to the applied meteorological fields. Biases of BASCOE compared to ozonesonde or ACE-FTS ozone profiles do not exceed 10% over the entire vertical stratospheric range, thanks to the good performance of the model in ozone hole conditions and the assimilation of offline MLS profiles going down to 215 hPa. TM3DAM provides very realistic total ozone columns, but is not designed to provide information on the vertical distribution of ozone. Compared to ozonesondes and ACE-FTS satellite data, SACADA performs best in the Arctic, but shows large biases (>50%) for ozone in the lower stratosphere in the Tropics and in the Antarctic, especially during ozone hole conditions. This study shows that ozone analyses with realistic total ozone column densities do not necessarily yield good agreement with the observed ozone profiles. It also shows the large benefit obtained from the assimilation of a single limb-scanning instrument (Aura MLS) with a high density of observations. Hence even state-of-the-art models of stratospheric chemistry still require the assimilation of limb observations for a correct representation of the vertical distribution of ozone in the stratosphere.

  18. Corona discharge influences ozone concentrations near rats.

    PubMed

    Goheen, Steven C; Gaither, Kari; Anantatmula, Shantha M; Mong, Gary M; Sasser, Lyle B; Lessor, Delbert

    2004-02-01

    Ozone can be produced by corona discharge either in dry air or when one electrode is submerged in water. Since ozone is toxic, we examined whether ozone production by corona near laboratory animals could reach levels of concern. Male rats were exposed to a corona discharge and the concentration of ozone produced was measured. The resulting concentration of ozone ranged from ambient levels to 250 ppb when animals were located 1 cm from a 10 kV source. Similar ozone concentrations were observed when a grounded water source was present. Possible explanations for, as well as concerns regarding, ozone production under these conditions are discussed. PMID:14735560

  19. When will Antarctic ozone begin to recover?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of ozone-depleting substances have declined over recent decades, but it takes time for the ozone layer to recover. Regular measurements of ozone levels above the South Pole now stretch back 25 years. Hassler et al. analyzed these recorded ozone data to assess changes in ozone loss rates. Consistent with previous studies, they found that ozone loss rates have been stable over the past 15 years, neither increasing nor decreasing. However, they predict that, assuming future atmospheric dynamics are similar to today's, ozone loss rates will begin to decline noticeably between 2017 and 2021. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2011JD016353, 2011)

  20. Mechanisms of impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    the expected recovery of the ozone layer here. The difference in the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer at the southern and northern polar latitudes through PCS modification is determined by the difference in temperature regimes of the Polar Regions. The mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the polar ozone by means of modification of sulphate aerosol distribution in the atmosphere has been revealed and investigated, too. Numerical experiments show that enhancement of the surface area density of sulphate aerosol in the stratosphere caused by the growth of the greenhouse gases will reduce significantly the ozone depletion during the Antarctic ozone hole.

  1. Delayed climate change in the Southern Hemisphere induced by stratospheric ozone recovery, as projected by the CMIP5 models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvani, L. M.; Barnes, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone is expected to recover in the second half of this century, due to the regulation of ozone depleting substances by the Montreal Protocol. Targeted modeling studies have suggested that the climate response to ozone recovery will greatly oppose the climate response to increasing greenhouse-gases (GHG); owever, the extent of this cancellation remains unclear, as few such studies are available. Here, we analyze the much larger set of models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5), all of which include stratospheric ozone depletion and recovery. We show that the closing of the ozone hole will cause a delay in summer-time (DJF) Southern Hemisphere climate change, between now and mid-century. Specifically, we find that the position of the jet stream, the width of the subtropical dry-zones, the seasonality of surface temperatures, and sea ice concentrations all exhibit significantly reduced summer-time trends over the first half of the 21st Century as a consequence of ozone recovery. Beyond mid-century, forcing from GHG emissions begins to dominate the climate response. We also compare the relative influences of future GHG emissions and historic ozone depletion, and find that the simulated DJF tropospheric circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere between 1965-2005 -- driven primarily by ozone depletion -- are larger than the projected changes in any future scenario over the entire 21st Century.

  2. Brewer Umkehr ozone profile retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Disterhoft, P.; Lantz, K. O.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Flynn, L. E.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Stanek, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Dobson Umkehr network has been a key data set for stratospheric ozone trend calculations (WMO Ozone assessments) and has earned its place as a benchmark network for stratospheric ozone profile observations. The Umkehr data has also been used to provide a long-term reference to the merging of the satellite ozone records (MOD), estimate the seasonal influence of an 11-year solar signal in the vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone, and to assess the ability of several remote and in-situ sensing systems in capturing ozone variability. It was found that Dobson Umkehr measurement errors were often comparable to errors derived for satellite and ozone-sounding methods. The Umkehr measurements are also available from the Brewer spectrophotometers [McElroy et al., 1995]. In 2005, the Dobson Umkehr algorithm (UMK04) was modified to retrieve ozone profile data from Brewer Umkehr measurements taken at two spectral channels [Petropavlovskikh et al, 2011]. The PC version of the Brewer algorithm was developed by M. Stanek (IOC, Canada and Czech Republic Meteorological Institute) in close collaboration with I. Petropavlovskikh. It was implemented at the NEUBrew network for operational processing of Umkehr data retrieved daily for all operational sites. The most recently developed Brewer ozone retrieval algorithm (MSBU) utilizes measurements that are currently available from the operational Brewer instruments. Umkehr measurements at multiple wavelength channels (similar to the satellite BUV method) and significantly reduced range of solar zenith angle are used for the twice a day operational ozone profile retrievals. Intercomparisons against ozone climatology, sounding, satellite overpasses and Dobson ozone datasets for NOASA/Goddard, Boulder, CO and MLO, HI sites are presented in this paper. The MSBU algorithm reduces noise in the intra-annual variability of the Brewer retrieved ozone as compared to the single pair ozone retrieval. Tropospheric ozone retrievals also

  3. UV-ozone-treated ultra-thin NaF film as anode buffer layer on organic light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Kao, Po-Ching; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2010-06-21

    An ultra-thin NaF film was thermally deposited between ITO and NPB as the buffer layer and then treated with the ultraviolet (UV) ozone, in the fabrication of organic light emitting diodes (ITO/NaF/NPB/Alq(3)/LiF/Al) to study its effect on hole-injection properties. The treatment drastically transforms the role of NaF film from hole-blocking to hole-injecting. This transformation is elucidated using hole-only devices, energy band measurement, surface energy, surface polarity, and X-ray photoelectron spectra. With the optimal thickness (3 nm) of the UV-ozone-treated NaF layer, the device performance is significantly improved, with a turn-on voltage, maximum luminance, and maximum current efficiency of 2.5 V, 15700 cd/m(2), and 4.9 cd/A, respectively. Results show that NaF film is not only a hole-blocking layer, but also a promising hole-injecting layer after UV-ozone treatment. PMID:20588585

  4. Ozone is mutagenic in Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, D.; Combes, R.; McConville, M.; Zeiger, E. )

    1992-01-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive gas that has been tested for genotoxicity in a number of systems. Induced genetic damage resulting from ozone treatment may not be readily observed because of the high toxicity of the chemical and difficulties in generating and administering controlled concentrations. The mutagenicity of ozone was investigated in Salmonella typhimurium using a plate test protocol designed for reactive vapours and gases. Ozone, at two to three consecutive doses, induced weak, albeit statistically significant, mutagenic responses in tester strain TA102 with and without Aroclor-induced rat liver S9 (lowest effective mean concentration of 0.019 ppm; 35 min total exposure). However, dose-related responses were not always obtained. No mutagenicity was detected in strains TA98, TA100, or TA1535, with or without S9. In strain TA104, ozone induced a weak response only at a single dose with S9; this response was not reproducible. Mutagenicity was dependent on the ozone flow rate and total exposure time, with variations in the optimum dose-time regimen leading to toxicity or complete inactivity. The data show that ozone is a very weak bacterial mutagen and only when tested under narrowly prescribed, subtoxic dosing conditions.

  5. Total ozone trend over Cairo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, G. K. Y.

    1994-01-01

    A world wide interest in protecting ozone layer against manmade effects is now increasing. Assessment of the ozone depletion due to these activities depends on how successfully we can separate the natural variabilities from the data. The monthly mean values of total ozone over Cairo (30 05N) for the period 1968-1988, have been analyzed using the power spectral analysis technique. The technique used in this analysis does not depend on a pre-understanding of the natural fluctuations in the ozone data. The method depends on increasing the resolution of the spectral peaks in order to obtain the more accurate sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. Also it handles the possible sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. The results show that it is possible to detect some of the well known national fluctuations in the ozone record such as annual, semiannual, quasi-biennial and quasi-quadrennial oscillations. After separating the natural fluctuations from the ozone record, the trend analysis of total ozone over Cairo showed that a decrease of about -1.2% per decade has occurred since 1979.

  6. Trends in ozone profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, H.; Aikin, A.; Barnes, R.; Chandra, S.; Cunnold, D.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1989-01-01

    From an examination of the agreements and differences between different satellite instruments, it is difficult to believe that existing satellite instruments determine upper stratospheric ozone much better than 4 pct.; by extension, it probably would require at least a 4 pct. change to be reliably detected as a change. The best estimates of the vertical profiles of ozone change in the upper stratosphere between 1979 and 1986 are judged to be those given by the two SAGE satellite instruments. SAGE-2 minus SAGE-1 gives a much lower ozone reduction than that given by the archived Solar Backscatter UV data. The average SAGE profiles of ozone changes between 20 and 50 degs north and between 20 and 50 degs south are given. The SAGE-1 and SAGE-2 comparison gives an ozone reduction of about 4 pct. at 25 km over temperate latitudes. Five ground based Umkehr stations between 36 and 52 degs north, corrected for the effects of volcanic aerosols, report an ozone reduction between 1979 and 1987 at Umkehr layer 8 of 9 + or - 5 pct. The central estimate of upper stratospheric ozone reduction given by SAGE at 40 km is less than the central value estimated by the Umkehr method at layer 8.

  7. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  8. How sensitive is the recovery of stratospheric ozone to changes in concentrations of very short-lived bromocarbons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Braesicke, P.; Keeble, J.; Telford, P. J.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Naturally produced very short-lived substances (VSLS) account for almost a quarter of the current stratospheric inorganic bromine, Bry. Following VSLS oxidation, bromine radicals (Br and BrO) can catalytically destroy ozone. The extent to which possible increases in surface emissions or transport of these VSLS bromocarbons to the stratosphere could counteract the effect of halogen reductions under the Montreal Protocol is an important policy question. Here, by using a chemistry-climate model, UM-UKCA, we investigate the impact of a hypothetical doubling (an increase of 5 ppt Bry) of VSLS bromocarbons on ozone and how the resulting ozone changes depend on the background concentrations of chlorine and bromine. Our model experiments indicate that for the 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the ozone decrease in the lowermost stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) may reach up to 10% in the annual mean; the ozone decrease in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is smaller (4-6%). The largest impact on the ozone column is found in the Antarctic spring. There is a significantly larger ozone decrease following the doubling of the VSLS burden under a high stratospheric chlorine background than under a low chlorine background, indicating the importance of the inter-halogen reactions. For example, the decline in the high-latitude, lower-stratospheric ozone concentration as a function of Bry is higher by about 30-40% when stratospheric Cly is ~ 3 ppb (present day), compared with Cly of ~ 0.8 ppb (a pre-industrial or projected future situation). Bromine will play an important role in the future ozone layer. However, even if bromine levels from natural VSLS were to increase significantly later this century, changes in the concentration of ozone will likely be dominated by the decrease in anthropogenic chlorine. Our calculation suggests that for a 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the Antarctic ozone hole recovery date could be delayed by approximately 6-8 years, depending on Cly

  9. Ozone and ozonated oils in skin diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Travagli, V; Zanardi, I; Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics. PMID:20671923

  10. Ozone and Ozonated Oils in Skin Diseases: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Travagli, V.; Zanardi, I.; Valacchi, G.; Bocci, V.

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics. PMID:20671923

  11. Dobson spectrophotometer ozone measurements during international ozone rocketsonde intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the total ozone content of the atmosphere, made with seven ground based instruments at a site near Wallops Island, Virginia, are discussed in terms for serving as control values with which the rocketborne sensor data products can be compared. These products are profiles of O3 concentration with altitude. By integrating over the range of altitudes from the surface to the rocket apogee and by appropriately estimating the residual ozone amount from apogee to the top of the atmosphere, a total ozone amount can be computed from the profiles that can be directly compared with the ground based instrumentation results. Dobson spectrophotometers were used for two of the ground-based instruments. Preliminary data collected during the IORI from Dobson spectrophotometers 72 and 38 are presented. The agreement between the two and the variability of total ozone overburden through the experiment period are discussed.

  12. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  13. CPT-hole closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noce, T.E.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of deep holes 1.75 inches. (4.4 cm) in diameter by 98.4 feet (30 m) created by cone penetration testing (CPT) was monitored at a site in California underlain by Holocene and Pleistocene age alluvial fan deposits. Portions of the holes remained open both below and above the 28.6-foot (8.7 m)-deep water table for approximately three years, when the experiment was terminated. Hole closure appears to be a very slow process that may take decades in the stiff soils studied here. Other experience suggests holes in softer soils may also remain open. Thus, despite their small diameter, CPT holes may remain open for years and provide paths for rapid migration of contaminants. The observations confirm the need to grout holes created by CPT soundings as well as other direct-push techniques in areas where protection of shallow ground water is important.

  14. Quantization of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    We show that black holes can be quantized in an intuitive and elegant way with results in agreement with conventional knowledge of black holes by using Bohr's idea of quantizing the motion of an electron inside the atom in quantum mechanics. We find that properties of black holes can also be derived from an ansatz of quantized entropy Δ S = 4π k Δ R/{{-{λ }}}, which was suggested in a previous work to unify the black hole entropy formula and Verlinde's conjecture to explain gravity as an entropic force. Such an Ansatz also explains gravity as an entropic force from quantum effect. This suggests a way to unify gravity with quantum theory. Several interesting and surprising results of black holes are given from which we predict the existence of primordial black holes ranging from Planck scale both in size and energy to big ones in size but with low energy behaviors.

  15. Black hole explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciama, D. W.

    A physical account of the processes of black hole explosions is presented. Black holes form when the degeneracy pressure in a neutron star can no longer balance gravitational forces because the mass of the star is too large. Although black holes absorb surrounding matter through the action of a gravitational field, quantum fluctuations have been theoretically demonstrated to occur in the vacuum, and feature a thermal character. The temperature field decreases outwards, in accordance with the nonuniformity of the gravitational field, but does allow thermal radiation, i.e., Hawking radiation, to escape the black hole. The time scale for the radiation shortens as the mass of the black hole decreases, until a time scale is reached which is short enough for the process to be called an explosion. Observations of electron-positron Hawking radiation are suggested to offer proof of a black hole explosion.

  16. Exploring Black Hole Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hyeyoun

    2015-10-01

    This thesis explores the evolution of different types of black holes, and the ways in which black hole dynamics can be used to answer questions about other physical systems. We first investigate the differences in observable gravitational effects between a four-dimensional Randall-Sundrum (RS) braneworld universe compared to a universe without the extra dimension, by considering a black hole solution to the braneworld model that is localized on the brane. When the brane has a negative cosmological constant, then for a certain range of parameters for the black hole, the intersection of the black hole with the brane approximates a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole on the brane with corrections that fall off exponentially outside the horizon. We compute the quasinormal modes of the braneworld black hole, and compare them to the known quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole. We find that there are two distinct regions for the braneworld black hole solutions that are reflected in the dependence of the quasinormal modes on the black hole mass. The imaginary parts of the quasinormal modes display phenomenological similarities to the quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole, indicating that nonlinear gravitational effects may not be enough to distinguish between a lower-dimensional theory and a theory derived from a higher-dimensional braneworld. Secondly, we consider the evolution of non-extremal black holes in N=4, d=2 supergravity, and investigate how such black holes might evolve over time if perturbed away from extremality. We study this problem in the probe limit by finding tunneling amplitudes for a Dirac field in a single-centered background, which gives the decay rates for the emission of charged probe black holes from the central black hole. We find that there is no minimum to the potential for the probe particles at a finite distance from the central black hole, so any probes that are emitted escape to infinity. If

  17. Design of a Vehicle-Based Intervention System to Prevent Ozone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, William H.; Kirchbaum, Nathan; Kay, Jacob; Benoliel, Alexander M.; Lynn, Sean R.; Bunker, Deborah; Hesbach, Thomas D., Jr.; Howerton, Everett B.; Hreinsson, Gudbjoern; Mistr, E. Kirk

    1993-01-01

    Reduced quantities of ozone in the atmosphere allow greater levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation to reach the earth's surface. The 1992/1993 project goals for the Virginia Tech Senior Design Team were to 1) understand the processes which contribute to stratospheric ozone loss, 2) examine ways to prevent ozone loss, and 3) define the requirements for an implementation vehicle to carry out the prevention scheme. A scheme proposed by R.J. Cicerone, el al late in 1991 was selected because of its supporting research and economic feasibility. This scheme uses hydrocarbon injected into the Antarctic ozone hole to form stable compounds with free chlorine, thus reducing ozone depletion. A study of the hydrocarbon injection requirements determined that 130 aircraft traveling Mach 2.4 at a maximum altitude of 66,000 ft. would provide the most economic approach to preventing ozone loss. Each aircraft would require an 8,000 nm. range and be able to carry 35,000 lbs. of propane. The propane would be stored in a three-tank high pressure system. Modularity and multi-role functionality were selected to be key design features. Missions originate from airports located in South America and Australia.

  18. Near-real-time TOMS, telecommunications and meteorological support for the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardanuy, P.; Victorine, J.; Sechrist, F.; Feiner, A.; Penn, L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole. Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the experiment. During the experiment, the near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were supplied within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile. The final report summarizes the role which Research and Data Systems (RDS) Corporation played in the support of the experiment. The RDS provided telecommunications to support the science and operations efforts for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, and supplied near real-time weather information to ensure flight and crew safety; designed and installed the telecommunications network to link NASA-GSFC, the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO), Palmer Station, the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to the operation at Punta Arenas; engineered and installed stations and other stand-alone systems to collect data from designated low-orbiting polar satellites and beacons; provided analyses of Nimbus-7 TOMS data and backup data products to Punta Arenas; and provided synoptic meteorological data analysis and reduction.

  19. Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Johan

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument is a trace gas monitoring instrument in the line of GOME (ERS-2) and Sciamachy (ENVISAT). Following these instruments, OMI provides UV-visible spectroscopy with a resolution sufficient to separate out the various absorbing trace gases (using DOAS or `Full' retrieval), but shaped as an imaging spectrometer. This means that a two dimensional detector is used where one dimension records the spectrum and the other images the swath. The scanning mechanism from the GOME and Sciamachy is not required anymore and there are considerable advantages with respect to simultaneous measurement of swath pixels, polarisation and obtainable swath width. The OMI consortium for a phase B is formed by Fokker Space & Systems and TPD in the Netherlands and VTT in Finland. In the presentation UV-visible atmospheric remote sensing will be placed in perspective and the OMI will be explaned.

  20. The photolysis of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    Ozone was photolyzed at 25 C with steady illumination at several wavelengths from 2288 to 2850 A, at O3 pressures from 0.1 to 2.7 torr, and at absorbed intensities from 0.15 to 65 microns/min. Experiments were done in pure dry O3, and in the presence of He, CO2, N2, H2O, H2, N2O, He-CO2, He-H2O, CO2-H2O, O2-N2O, CO2-O2, and N2O5-O2-CO2 mixtures. The results show that in the absence of added gases or in the presence of He, the quantum yield of O3 consumption is 5.5 independent of conditions, except at pressures below 0.4 torr. In the presence of CO2 or N2, ozone consumption falls toward 4.0. The primary photolytic act produces O(1 D) and siglet O2, presumably O2(1 delta), at all wavelengths below 3000 A. Relative quenching constants O(1 D) removal by various gases were measured at 2288, 2537, and 2800 A. For O3, CO2, and N2, the relative rates are 1.0/0.4 to 0.5/0.08 to 0.11 at all wavelengths. For H2O the constant at 2537 A is 1.5 relative to that for O3. With N2O, a noticeable wavelength effect is observed and the relative rate constants are 1.5, 2 to 3, 4.0 for O3 compared to N2O at 2800, 2537, and 2288 A, respectively.

  1. Evidence for black holes.

    PubMed

    Begelman, Mitchell C

    2003-06-20

    Black holes are common objects in the universe. Each galaxy contains large numbers-perhaps millions-of stellar-mass black holes, each the remnant of a massive star. In addition, nearly every galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center, with a mass ranging from millions to billions of solar masses. This review discusses the demographics of black holes, the ways in which they interact with their environment, factors that may regulate their formation and growth, and progress toward determining whether these objects really warp spacetime as predicted by the general theory of relativity. PMID:12817138

  2. Effect of ozone exposure on the electrical characteristics of high-purity, large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2014-06-14

    In this study, we have elucidated the interactions between ozone and carbon nanotubes by monitoring the characteristics of field-effect transistors based on polymer-sorted, large-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotubes. The drain-source current of these transistors initially increases with ozone exposure and then it progressively decreases with increasing exposure beyond 3 min. This non-monotonic dependence of the drain-source current can be ascribed to two competing processes. At short ozone exposure, p-doping of carbon nanotubes dominates; the drain-source current thus increases as a result of increasing hole concentration. This effect is most evidenced in a progressive threshold voltage shift towards positive voltages with increasing exposure to ozone. At extended ozone exposure, chemical oxidation of carbon nanotubes instead dominates. The drain-source current decreases as a result of decreasing hole mobility. This effect manifests itself in a monotonic decrease in the mobility of these devices as a function of ozone exposure. PMID:24760174

  3. Stratospheric ozone: Impact of human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Michael B.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    1989-12-01

    Current knowledge of the chemistry of the stratosphere is reviewed using measurements from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment to test the accuracy of our treatment of processes at mid-latitudes, and results from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) to examine our understanding of processes for the polar environment. It is shown that, except for some difficulties with N 2O 5 and possibly ClNO 3, gas phase models for nitrogen and chlorine species at 30°N in spring are in excellent agreement with the data from ATMOS. Heterogeneous processes may have an influence on the concentrations of NO 2, N 2O 5, HNO 3, and ClNO 3 for the lower stratosphere at 48°S in fall. Comparison of model and observed concentrations of O 3 indicate good agreement at 30°N, with less satisfactory results at 48°S. The discrepancy between the loss rate of O 3 observed over the course of the AAOE mission in 1987 and loss rates calculated using measured concentrations of ClO and BrO is found to be even larger than that reported by Anderson et al. (1989, J. geophys. Res.94, 11480). There appear to be loss processes for removal of O 3 additional to the HOC1 mechanism proposed by Solomon et al. (1986, Nature321, 755), the ClO-BrO scheme favored by McElroy et al. (1986, Nature321, 759), and the ClO dimer mechanism introduced by Molina and Molina (1987, J. phys. Chem.91, 433). There is little doubt that industrial halocarbons have a significant impact on stratospheric O 3. Controls on emissions more stringent than those defined by the Montreal Protocol will be required if the Antarctic Ozone Hole is not to persist as a permanent feature of the stratosphere.

  4. Ozonation of cooling tower waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.; Howe, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Continuous ozone injection into water circulating between a cooling tower and heat exchanger with heavy scale deposits inhibits formation of further deposits, promotes flaking of existing deposits, inhibits chemical corrosion and controls algae and bacteria.

  5. Air Quality Guide for Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of our nation’s most common air pollutants. Use the chart below to help reduce your ... human health. Ozone forms when two types of pollutants (VOCs and NOx) react in sunlight. These pollutants ...

  6. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... reducing exposure to extremely high levels of particle pollution is available here . Fires: Current Conditions Click to ... Air Quality Basics Air Quality Index | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke from fires | What You Can Do Health ...

  7. Monsoon circulation and atmospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrgian, A. Kh.; Nguyen, Van Thang

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the Indonesian-Australian winter monsoon, proceeding from the Asian continent to the south, on the atmospheric ozone is examined. It is shown that large-scale atmospheric circulation phenomena caused by monsoons in the tropical regions of Australia and in south-eastern Asia can cause significant falls in atmospheric ozone concentrations. The common occurrence of such phenomena might explain the higher-than-average incidence of skin cancer in Australia.

  8. Method of sterilization using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize, organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganism and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  9. Ozone Treatment For Cooling Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwelder, Rick; Baldwin, Leroy V.; Feeney, Ellen S.

    1990-01-01

    Report presents results of study of cooling tower in which water treated with ozone instead of usual chemical agents. Bacteria and scale reduced without pollution and at low cost. Operating and maintenance costs with treatment about 30 percent of those of treatment by other chemicals. Corrosion rates no greater than with other chemicals. Advantage of ozone, even though poisonous, quickly detected by smell in very low concentrations.

  10. Using ozone to treat cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, L.

    1995-07-01

    Ozone is a controversial but promising alternative to chemicals for treating water in cooling towers. A powerful disinfectant, ozone can prevent biofouling of heat exchange surfaces, and may mitigate scale and corrosion. Ozone treatment of cooling towers can cut costs for energy, water, sewage, and regulatory compliance. Ozone treatment is an electrotechnology, but ozone equipment represents only a small electric load. Although ozone has provided excellent results in some cooling tower applications, its effectiveness has not been proven conclusively. Less than 1,000 cooling towers use ozone water treatment in the United States. Acceptance of this technology is increasing, however, as indicated by its use by such large firms as IBM, AT and T, DuPont, and Xerox, and by its adoption by some chemical water treatment suppliers. The energy efficiency implications of ozone treatment are being researched. Southern California Edison found that in some systems, ozone treatment improved chiller efficiency up to 20 percent due to cleaner heat exchange surfaces.

  11. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  12. Ground-level ozone in Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, H.S.

    1999-11-01

    This literature review on ground-level ozone in Alberta begins with introductory sections on the precursors and products of ozone formation, the chemistry and meteorology of ozone, and atmospheric ozone models. The subsequent section reviews ozone data from ambient air quality monitoring stations in Alberta. The final section discusses trends in ozone concentrations in urban and rural areas of Alberta, human and environmental health effects of ozone, proposed national ambient objectives and Canada-wide standards for ground-level ozone, and options for an ozone concentration standard for Alberta. Appendices include an outline of air pollutant monitoring methods used in Alberta, lists of monitoring stations, and tables of monitoring results for nitrogen oxides, total hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds at Calgary and Edmonton sites.

  13. Ground-level ozone in Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    This literature review on ground-level ozone in Alberta begins with introductory sections on the precursors and products of ozone formation, the chemistry and meteorology of ozone, and atmospheric ozone models. The subsequent section reviews ozone data from ambient air quality monitoring stations in Alberta. The final section discusses trends in ozone concentrations in urban and rural areas of Alberta, human and environmental health effects of ozone, proposed national ambient objectives and Canada-wide standards for ground-level ozone, and options for an ozone concentration standard for Alberta. Appendices include an outline of air pollutant monitoring methods used in Alberta, lists of monitoring stations, and tables of monitoring results for nitrogen oxides, total hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds at Calgary and Edmonton sites.

  14. Wave-Like Ozone Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Nikulin, G. N.; Henriksen, K.

    The wave-like character of the total ozone variations is examined from the Aral Sea and Karaganda observatories in Middle Asia, and from Tromsø and Murmansk in the Arctic. The waves have a period of 10-20 days and an amplitude of about 20-50 DU. They are seen practically every year when the ozone data do not contain too many gaps. In Middle Asia waves with the same periods are found in geopotential height and tropopause pressure variations. The ozone waves are caused by dynamic meteorological disturbances near the tropopause. The passing of a wave crest in the pressure field causes the convergence of ozone poor air under the tropopause and the divergence of ozone rich air above the tropopause giving rise to a total ozone content decrease. The passing of a wave trough stimulates the opposite process. By crosscorrelation analysis the wave-like movement was determined as eastward for both pairs of stations with a velocity of 11-15 °/day.

  15. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  16. New challenges threatening the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Babagana

    Since the beginning of the 1990's when the importation of fairly used Refrigerators, Airconditioners and propellants that can easily go broken containing chlorofluorocarbon substances that is capable of destroying the Ozone layer started in commercial quantity in Africa, the African refuse mountains began metamorphosing into mountains of dumped broken Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants which are collectively becoming a threat to the Ozone layer, because of the continuous discharging of the Chlorofluorocarbon gases by the refuse in to the atmosphere in each passing second.. Nobody can actually quantify the numbers of Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants imported and disposed in Africa over the last fifteen years, but the facts still remains that the numbers of metamorphosing mountains keeps on increasing in both size and numbers in each passing day. They have even become sources of raw materials for the local blacksmiths, children and refrigerators repairers who use parts of the dumped refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants for their constructions, toys and repairs respectively. This explains the reason why despite the global efforts toward protecting the Ozone layer by the United Nations (UN), governments, International Organizations and climatologist among many others, but yet the hole in the Ozone layer keeps on expanding and the global temperature keeps on rising which resulted in the unusual phenomenon like the hurricanes "Katrina" and "Rita" the unusual floods in China, Thailand, Mozambique and to some extent even the Tsunami disaster that claims millions of lives in 2004.The Rapid rising in temperature of the Tropical world countries and increase in the cases of cancer patients among many other unusual happenings over the last eight years. It was in review of the above situation that this research work was conducted and came up with the under listed suggestions/Recommendations: 1. The UN should use its capacity to discourage

  17. NewChallengesThreateningtheOzoneLayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, B.

    2007-05-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990's when the importation of fairly used Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and propellants that can easily go broken containing chlorofluorocarbon substances that is capable of destroying the Ozone layer started in commercial quantity in Africa, the African refuse mountains began metamorphosing into mountains of dumped broken Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants which are collectively becoming a threat to the Ozone layer, because of the continuous discharging of the Chlorofluorocarbon gases by the refuse in to the atmosphere in each passing second.. Nobody can actually quantify the numbers of Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants imported and disposed in Africa over the last fifteen years, but the facts still remains that the numbers of metamorphosing mountains keeps on increasing in both size and numbers in each passing day. They have even become sources of raw materials for the local blacksmiths, children and refrigerators repairers who use parts of the dumped refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants for their constructions, toys and repairs respectively. This explains the reason why despite the global efforts toward protecting the Ozone layer by the United Nations (UN), governments, International Organizations and climatologist among many others, but yet the hole in the Ozone layer keeps on expanding and the global temperature keeps on rising which resulted in the unusual phenomenon like the hurricanes "Katrina" and "Rita" the unusual floods in China, Thailand, Mozambique and to some extent even the Tsunami disaster that claims millions of lives in 2004.The Rapid rising in temperature of the Tropical world countries and increase in the cases of cancer patients among many other unusual happenings over the last eight years. It was in review of the above situation that this research work was conducted and came up with the under listed suggestions/Recommendations: 1. The UN should use its capacity to discourage

  18. New dynamic NNORSY ozone profile climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaifel, A. K.; Felder, M.; Declercq, C.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Climatological ozone profile data are widely used as a-priori information for total ozone using DOAS type retrievals as well as for ozone profile retrieval using optimal estimation, for data assimilation or evaluation of 3-D chemistry-transport models and a lot of other applications in atmospheric sciences and remote sensing. For most applications it is important that the climatology represents not only long term mean values but also the links between ozone and dynamic input parameters. These dynamic input parameters should be easily accessible from auxiliary datasets or easily measureable, and obviously should have a high correlation with ozone. For ozone profile these parameters are mainly total ozone column and temperature profile data. This was the outcome of a user consultation carried out in the framework of developing a new, dynamic ozone profile climatology. The new ozone profile climatology is based on the Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) widely used for ozone profile retrieval from UV and IR satellite sounder data. NNORSY allows implicit modelling of any non-linear correspondence between input parameters (predictors) and ozone profile target vector. This paper presents the approach, setup and validation of a new family of ozone profile climatologies with static as well as dynamic input parameters (total ozone and temperature profile). The neural network training relies on ozone profile measurement data of well known quality provided by ground based (ozonesondes) and satellite based (SAGE II, HALOE, and POAM-III) measurements over the years 1995-2007. In total, four different combinations (modes) for input parameters (date, geolocation, total ozone column and temperature profile) are available. The geophysical validation spans from pole to pole using independent ozonesonde, lidar and satellite data (ACE-FTS, AURA-MLS) for individual and time series comparisons as well as for analysing the vertical and meridian structure of different modes of

  19. Noncommutative Singular Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid Mehdipour, S.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, applying the method of coordinate coherent states to describe a noncommutative model of Vaidya black holes leads to an exact (t — r) dependence of solution in terms of the noncommutative parameter σ. In this setup, there is no black hole remnant at long times.

  20. Black holes in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, R.; Hawking, S. W.

    1997-08-01

    We summarise recent work on the quantum production of black holes in the inflationary era. We describe, in simple terms, the Euclidean approach used, and the results obtained both for the pair creation rate and for the evolution of the black holes.

  1. Newborn Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  2. Seasonal variability of surface ozone in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wie, J.; Moon, B. K.; Choi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone around East Asia include Korea impacts on air quality and climate, and has been increased with rapid economic growth. To better understanding, we analyzed seasonal variability of tropospheric ozone simulated by using GEOS-Chem. Surface ozone concentration in Korea has double peaks in April and September. Tropospheric ozone increases primarily associated with westerly wind anomaly in spring, with warming in summer and autumn, and with cloud depletion in winter. Surface ozone in spring elevated after mature-phase El Niño winters. Key words: surface ozone, seasonal variability, Korea, East Asia Acknowledgements This work was supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "Climate Change Correspondence Program."

  3. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  4. Tropospheric Ozone Over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Cooper, O. R.; Merrill, J. T.; Tarasick, D. W.; Newchurch, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    Ozone in the troposphere plays a significant role as an absorber of infrared radiation (greenhouse gas), in the cleansing capacity of the atmosphere as a precursor of hydroxol radical formation, and a regulated air pollutant capable of deleterious health and ecosystem effects. Knowledge of the ozone budget in the troposphere over North America (NA) is required to properly understand the various mechanisms that contribute to the measured distribution and to develop and test models capable of simulating and predicting this key player in atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Recent field campaigns including the 2004 and 2006 INTEX Ozone Network Studies (IONS) http:croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/intexb/ions06.html that have included intensive ozone profile measurements from ozonesondes provide a unique data set for describing tropospheric ozone over a significant portion of the North American continent. These campaigns have focused on the spring and summer seasons when tropospheric ozone over NA is particularly influenced by long-range transport processes, significant photochemical ozone production resulting from both anthropogenic and natural (lightning) precursor emissions, and exchange with the stratosphere. This study uses ozone profiles measured over NA in the latitude band from approximately 12-60N, extending from the tropics to the high mid latitudes, to describe the seasonal behavior of tropospheric ozone over NA with an emphasis on the spring and summer. This includes the variability within seasons at a particular site as well as the contrasts between the seasons. Emphasis is placed on the variations among the sites including latitudinal and longitudinal gradients and how these differ through the seasons and with altitude in the troposphere. Regional differences are most pronounced during the summer season likely reflecting the influence of a wider variation in processes influencing the tropospheric ozone distribution including lightning NOX production in the upper

  5. Fluctuating black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jianwei

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we treat the black hole horizon as a physical boundary to the spacetime and study its dynamics following from the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term. Using the Kerr black hole as an example we derive an effective action that describes, in the large wave number limit, a massless Klein-Gordon field living on the average location of the boundary. Complete solutions can be found in the small rotation limit of the black hole. The formulation suggests that the boundary can be treated in the same way as any other matter contributions. In particular, the angular momentum of the boundary matches exactly with that of the black hole, suggesting an interesting possibility that all charges (including the entropy) of the black hole are carried by the boundary. Using this as input, we derive predictions on the Planck scale properties of the boundary.

  6. Overview for the reanalysis of Mariner 9 UV spectrometer data for ozone, cloud, and dust abundances, and their interaction over climate timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    Mariner 9 UV spectrometer data were reinverted for the ozone abundance, cloud abundance, dust abundance, and polar-cap albedo. The original reduction of the spectra ignored the presence of atmospheric dust and clouds, even though their abundance is substantial and can mask appreciable amounts of ozone if not accounted for (Lindner, 1988). The Mariner 9 ozone data has been used as a benchmark in all theoretical models of atmospheric composition, escape, and photochemistry. A second objective is to examine the data for the interrelationship of the ozone cycle, dust cycle, and cloud cycle, on an annual, inter-annual, and climatic basis, testing predictions by Lindner (1988). This also has implications for many terrestrial ozone studies, such as the ozone hole, acid rain, and ozone-smog. A third objective is to evaluate the efficacy of the reflectance spectroscopy technique at retrieving the ozone abundance on Mars. This would be useful for planning ozone observations on future Mars missions or the terrestrial troposphere.

  7. The dynamics of the stratospheric polar vortex and its relation to springtime ozone depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Recent aircraft observations have determined the structure of polar vortices during winter and their relationship to polar ozone depletions, based on high dynamical isolation and the extremely low temperatures required for stratospheric cloud formation. The aircraft data reveal large gradients of potential vorticity and concentrations of conservative trace species at the transition from high-latitude to polar air, implying that the inward mixing of heat and constituents is strongly inhibited, and that the perturbed polar stratospheric chemistry associated with the ozone hole is isolated from the rest of the stratosphere until the vortex breaks up in late spring. It is therefore the overall polar vortex which limits the annual polar ozone depletions' maximum area-coverage.

  8. The effect of UV ozone treatment on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Greiner, M. T.; Liu, Z. W.; Lian, K.; Lu, Z. H.

    2009-10-01

    The interface between ultraviolet (UV) ozone treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis-(1-naphthyl)-1-1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (α-NPD) was investigated using single carrier hole-only devices and in situ ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the implications for device applications. It is found that although the work function of PEDOT:PSS is increased by UV ozone treatment, the injection barrier to α-NPD is in fact increased, resulting in lower current density in devices. The apparent increase in work function is attributed to a metastable surface dipole as a result of UV ozone treatment, which does not significantly influence the energy-level alignment.

  9. Global tropospheric ozone investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.

    1998-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is one of the most important trace gases in the troposphere, and it is responsible for influencing many critical chemical and radiative processes. Ozone contributes to the formation of the hydroxyl radical (OH), which is central to most chemical reactions in the lower atmosphere, and it absorbs UV, visible, and infrared radiation which affects the energy budget and atmospheric temperatures. In addition, O3 can be used as a tracer of atmospheric pollution and stratosphere troposphere exchange. At elevated concentrations, O3 can also produce detrimental biological and human health effects. The US National Research Council (NRC) Board on Sustainable Development reviewed the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) [NRC, 1995], and it identified tropospheric chemistry as one of the high priority areas for the USGCRP in the next decade. The NRC identified the following specific challenges in tropospheric chemistry. Although we understand the reason for the high levels of 03 over several regions of the world, we need to better establish the distribution of O3 in the troposphere in order to document and understand the changes in the abundance of global tropospheric O3. This information is needed to quantify the contribution of O3 to the Earth' s radiative balance and to understand potential impacts on the health of the biosphere. Having recognized the importance of particles in the chemistry of the stratosphere, we must determine how aerosols and clouds affect the chemical processes in the troposphere. This understanding is essential to predict the chemical composition of the atmosphere and to assess the resulting forcing effects in the climate system. We must determine if the self-cleansing chemistry of the atmosphere is changing as a result of human activities. This information is required to predict the rate at which pollutants are removed from the atmosphere. Over nearly two decades, airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems have been used in

  10. A revised linear ozone photochemistry parameterization for use in transport and general circulation models: multi-annual simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariolle, D.; Teyssèdre, H.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the validation of a linear parameterization of the ozone photochemistry for use in upper tropospheric and stratospheric studies. The present work extends a previously developed scheme by improving the 2D model used to derive the coefficients of the parameterization. The chemical reaction rates are updated from a compilation that includes recent laboratory works. Furthermore, the polar ozone destruction due to heterogeneous reactions at the surface of the polar stratospheric clouds is taken into account as a function of the stratospheric temperature and the total chlorine content. Two versions of the parameterization are tested. The first one only requires the resolution of a continuity equation for the time evolution of the ozone mixing ratio, the second one uses one additional equation for a cold tracer. The parameterization has been introduced into the chemical transport model MOCAGE. The model is integrated with wind and temperature fields from the ECMWF operational analyses over the period 2000-2004. Overall, the results show a very good agreement between the modelled ozone distribution and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite data and the "in-situ" vertical soundings. During the course of the integration the model does not show any drift and the biases are generally small. The model also reproduces fairly well the polar ozone variability, with notably the formation of "ozone holes" in the southern hemisphere with amplitudes and seasonal evolutions that follow the dynamics and time evolution of the polar vortex. The introduction of the cold tracer further improves the model simulation by allowing additional ozone destruction inside air masses exported from the high to the mid-latitudes, and by maintaining low ozone contents inside the polar vortex of the southern hemisphere over longer periods in spring time. It is concluded that for the study of climatic scenarios or the assimilation of ozone data, the present

  11. Evidence of Stratosphere-to-Troposphere Transport Within a Mesoscale Model and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Total Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Stanford, John L.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluate evidence for stratospheric mass transport into, and mass remaining in, the troposphere during an intense midlatitude cyclone. Mesoscale forecast model analysis fields from the Mesoscale Analysis and Prediction System were matched with total ozone observations from the Total Ozone Measurement Spectrometer. Combined with parcel back trajectory calculations, the analyses imply that two mechanisms contributed to the mass exchange: (1) An area of dynamically induced exchange was observed on the cyclone's southern edge. Parcels originally in the stratosphere crossed the jet core and were diluted through turbulent mixing with tropospheric air; (2) Diabetic effects reduced parcel potential vorticity (PC) for trajectories traversing precipitation regions, creating a 'PV hole' signature in the center of the cyclone. Air with characteristics of ozone and water vapor found in the lower stratosphere remained in the troposphere. The strength of the latter process may be unusual. Combined with other research, these results suggest that precipitation-induced diabetic effects can significantly modify (either decreasing or increasing) parcel potential vorticity, depending on parcel trajectory configuration with respect to maximum heating regions and jet core. The diabetic heating effect on stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) is more important to tropopause erosion than to altering parcel trajectories. In addition, these results underline the importance of using not only PC but also chemical constituents for diagnoses of STE.

  12. Distribution of total ozone and stratospheric ozone in the tropics - Implications for the distribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack; Larsen, Jack C.

    1987-01-01

    Climatologies of total columnar ozone and integrated stratospheric ozone amounts at low latitudes (15 deg N to 15 deg S), derived from satellite observations, are presented. A significant longitudinal variability in total ozone is present, with highest values generally located between 60 deg W and 60 deg E. The integrated stratospheric component of total ozone, on the other hand, does not exhibit a longitudinal preference for high values. Therefore it is hypothesized that the climatological longitudinal distribution of total ozone reflects the variability of the abundance of tropospheric ozone at low latitudes. Furthermore, it is speculated that in situ photochemical production of ozone resulting from biomass burning may be responsible for the observed enhancement of total ozone at these longitudes.

  13. A Study on Generation Ice Containing Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Koyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiromi

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it changes back into oxygen. Recently, ice containing ozone is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ice containing ozone seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to effects of cooling and sterilization of ice containing ozone. In the present study, we investigated the influence of temperatures of water dissolving ozone on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in water. We also investigated the influence of cooling temperature, ice diameter, initial temperatures of water dissolving ozone and container internal pressure of the water dissolving ozone on ozone concentration in the ice. In addition, we investigated the influence of the ice diameter on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in the ice. It was confirmed that the solidification experimental data can be adjusted by a correlation between ozone concentration in the ice and solidification time.

  14. Observing Tropospheric Ozone From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The importance of tropospheric ozone embraces a spectrum of relevant scientific issues ranging from local environmental concerns, such as damage to the biosphere and human health, to those that impact global change questions, Such is climate warming. From an observational perspective, the challenge is to determine the tropospheric ozone global distribution. Because its lifetime is short compared with other important greenhouse gases that have been monitored over the past several decades, the distribution of tropospheric ozone cannot be inferred from a relatively small set of monitoring stations. Therefore, the best way to obtain a true global picture is from the use of space-based instrumentation where important spatial gradients over vast ocean expanses and other uninhabited areas can be properly characterized. In this paper, the development of the capability to measure tropospheric ozone from space over the past 15 years is summarized. Research in the late 1980s successfully led to the determination of the climatology of tropospheric ozone as a function of season; more recently, the methodology has improved to the extent where regional air pollution episodes can be characterized. The most recent modifications now provide quasi-global (50 N) to 50 S) maps on a daily basis. Such a data set would allow for the study of long-range (intercontinental) transport of air pollution and the quantification of how regional emissions feed into the global tropospheric ozone budget. Future measurement capabilities within this decade promise to offer the ability to provide Concurrent maps of the precursors to the in situ formation of tropospheric ozone from which the scientific community will gain unprecedented insight into the processes that control global tropospheric chemistry

  15. Overview of Infectious Disease Surveillance System in Japan, 1999-2005

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Hashimoto, Shuji; Kawado, Miyuki; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Izumida, Michiko; Ohta, Akiko; Tada, Yuki; Shigematsu, Mika; Yasui, Yoshinori; Nagai, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 1999 the Communicable Disease Prevention Law of Japan was completely revised into the "New" Infectious Disease Control Law, which reiterated the importance of surveillance and information dissemination and re-organized the surveillance system. This paper is an attempt to illustrate the potential impact of the new surveillance system through a description of the existing surveillance system and data before and after the revision. METHODS After a historical review of surveillance system in Japan, the current surveillance system is described. Data sets of actual case numbers reported and incidence rate per 1,000,000 population are compared before and after the revision. RESULTS Comparison of the data between the 2 periods revealed that most of the diseases have had declining trends after the new law was enacted with several exceptions. However, although no major break in continuity is observed in seriously perceived disease, in milder diseases there are striking gaps between the numbers reported in the mandatory and sentinel reporting framework. Sentinel reporting framework maintained the continuity of data without major gaps. CONCLUSIONS From this perspective, the new surveillance system with two different frameworks of mandatory reporting for severe diseases and sentinel reporting for milder diseases seems to be working well. But continuous efforts should be made for evaluation and improvement of surveillance system and risk communication through the research on data analysis and effective communication method. PMID:18239339

  16. Pathology and causes of death of stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands (1999-2005).

    PubMed

    Arbelo, Manuel; Los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa de; Herráez, Pedro; Andrada, Marisa; Sierra, Eva; Rodríguez, Francisco; Jepson, Paul D; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-03-26

    Between 1999 and 2005, 233 stranded cetaceans (comprising 19 species) were reported in the waters of the Canary Islands. Of these, 138/233 (59.2%) were subjected to a complete or partial standardized necropsy, including 4 Balaenopteridae, 9 Physeteridae, 8 Kogiidae, 27 Ziphiidae and 90 Delphinidae. Of these, 46/138 (33.3%) cetaceans were diagnosed with anthropogenic pathological categories (i.e. the cause of death was anthropogenic). These included fishing interaction (bycatch) (19 individuals), 'atypical' mass stranding events linked to naval exercises (13), ship collisions (8) and other anthropogenic-related pathology (6). 'Natural' (i.e. non-anthropogenic) causes of death accounted for another 82/138 (59.4%) cases, including infectious and non-infectious diseases (63), neonatal pathology (8), intra- and interspecific interactions (6) and mass strandings (5). The cause(s) of death could not be determined in 10/138 (7.3%) necropsied animals. The most common causes of death were ship collisions in 6/9 (66.6%) Physeteridae, 'atypical' mass stranding linked to naval exercises in 13/27 (48.1%) Ziphiidae, and 'natural' infectious and non-infectious diseases in 55/90 (61.1%) Delphinidae. Interaction with fishing activities was established as cause of death in 15/90 (16.7%) Delphinidae. These data show that a range of anthropogenic and natural single and mass mortality events occur in multiple cetacean species stranded in the Canary Islands. PMID:23548359

  17. Geothermal activity in the subglacial Katla caldera, Iceland, 1999-2005, studied with radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guđmundsson, Magnús T.; Höganadóttir, Pórdís; Kristinsson, Arnór Bergur; Guđbjörnsson, Snaebjörn

    The Katla caldera is located under the Mýrdalsjökull ice cap and is one of the most hazardous volcanoes in Iceland due to major jökulhlaups that accompany eruptions. Subglacial geothermal activity is manifested in several 10-50 m deep depressions (ice cauldrons) within and at the caldera rim and the total geothermal heat output is of the order of a few hundred megawatts. A shortlived but powerful pulse in geothermal heat output took place in 1999, probably including a minor subglacial eruption, when new ice cauldrons formed in three places and an unexpected jökulhlaup occurred. Following these events, a comprehensive monitoring program was set up for Katla, including ice surface elevation profiling from aircraft, to monitor variations in geothermal heat and detect signs of subglacial water accumulation. A radar altimeter coupled with a kinematic GPS is used, achieving an absolute elevation accuracy of 3 m and internal consistency of 1-2 m. Profiles across the caldera are flown twice a year. An annual accumulation-ablation cycle in surface elevation with amplitude of 5-10 m is observed. By removing this cycle from the data, changes due to subglacial geothermal activity are obtained. After the events in 1999, a decline in geothermal activity was observed. In 2001-03 some ice cauldrons expanded and deepened by 10-15 m, indicating renewed increase in geothermal activity. This trend is also apparent for 2003-05. The increase in geothermal poweramounts to a few tens of megawatts. It is likely that the increased thermal output is related to increased seismicity and caused by magma inflow.

  18. Pesticides and nitrate in groundwater underlying citrus croplands, Lake Wales Ridge, central Florida, 1999-2005.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choquette, Anne F.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes pesticide and nitrate (as nitrogen) results from quarterly sampling of 31 surficial-aquifer wells in the Lake Wales Ridge Monitoring Network during April 1999 through January 2005. The wells, located adjacent to citrus orchards and used for monitoring only, were generally screened (sampled) within 5 to 40 feet of the water table. Of the 44 citrus pesticides and pesticide degradates analyzed, 17 were detected in groundwater samples. Parent pesticides and degradates detected in quarterly groundwater samples, ordered by frequency of detection, included norflurazon, demethyl norflurazon, simazine, diuron, bromacil, aldicarb sulfone, aldicarb sulfoxide, deisopropylatrazine (DIA), imidacloprid, metalaxyl, thiazopyr monoacid, oxamyl, and aldicarb. Reconnaissance sampling of five Network wells yielded detection of four additional pesticide degradates (hydroxysimazine, didealkylatrazine, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, and hydroxyatrazine). The highest median concentration values per well, based on samples collected during the 1999–2005 period (n=14 to 24 samples per well), included 3.05 µg/L (micrograms per liter) (simazine), 3.90 µg/L (diuron), 6.30 µg/L (aldicarb sulfone), 6.85 µg/L (aldicarb sulfoxide), 22.0 µg/L (demethyl norflurazon), 25.0 µg/ (norflurazon), 89 µg/ (bromacil), and 25.5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) (nitrate). Nitrate concentrations exceeded the 10 mg/L (as nitrogen) drinking water standard in one or more groundwater samples from 28 of the wells, and the median nitrate concentration among these wells was 14 mg/L. Sampled groundwater pesticide concentrations exceeded Florida’s health-guidance benchmarks for aldicarb sulfoxide and aldicarb sulfone (4 wells), the sum of aldicarb and its degradates (6 wells), simazine (2 wells), the sum of simazine and DIA (3 wells), diuron (2 wells), bromacil (1 well), and the sum of norflurazon and demethyl norflurazon (1 well). The magnitude of fluctuations in groundwater pesticide concentrations varied between wells and between pesticide compounds. Of the 10 pesticide compounds detected at sufficient frequency to assess temporal variability in quarterly sampling records, median values of the relative interquartile range (ratio of the interquartile range to the median) among wells typically ranged from about 100 to 150 percent. The relative interquartile range of pesticide concentrations at individual wells could be much higher, sometimes exceeding 200 to 500 percent. No distinct spatial patterns were apparent among median pesticide concentrations in sampled wells; nitrate concentrations tended to be greater in samples from wells in the northern part of the study area.

  19. Temporal analysis of the incidence of meningitis in the Tehran metropolitan area, 1999-2005

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the temporal determinants of meningitis incidence in the population living in the Tehran metropolis. Methods All cases of meningitis reported to health districts throughout the Tehran metropolis from 1999 to 2005 were abstracted from patient files. Referral cases (patients who did not reside in the Tehran metropolis) were excluded. For each year, sex- and age-specific incidences were estimated. Temporality and its determinants were analyzed using Poisson regression. Results Age-specific incidence is highest among males younger than 5 years of age at 10.2 cases per 100,000 population per year. The lowest incidence was among females aged 30 to 40 years at 0.72 cases per 100,000 population per year, with an overall male-to-female incidence ratio of 2.1. The temporal analysis showed seasonality, with a higher risk of meningitis in spring at a rate ratio of 1.31 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.20 to 1.41 and in autumn (rate ratio = 1.16, 95% CI 1.06, 1.27). For periodicity, we found a peak of occurrence around the years 2000 and 2003. Conclusion The epidemiology of meningitis in Iran follows similar patterns of age, sex, and seasonality distribution as found in other countries and populations. PMID:20030846

  20. Extreme black hole holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Thomas Edward

    The connection between black holes in four dimensions and conformal field theories (CFTs) in two dimensions is explored, focusing on zero temperature (extreme) black holes and their low-temperature cousins. It is shown that extreme black holes in a theory of quantum gravity are holographically dual to field theories living in two dimensions without gravity, and that the field theory reproduces a variety of black hole phenomena in detail. The extreme black hole/CFT correspondence is derived from a symmetry analysis near the horizon of a Kerr black hole with mass M and maximal angular momentum J=M 2. The asymptotic symmetry generators form one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge c=12J, which implies that the near-horizon quantum states are identical to those of a two-dimensional CFT. We discuss extensions of this result to near-extreme black holes and cosmological horizons. Astrophysical black holes are never exactly extremal, but the black hole GRS1915+105 observed through X-ray and radio telescopy is likely within 1% of the extremal spin, suggesting that this extraordinary and well studied object is approximately dual to a two-dimensional CFT with c˜1079. As evidence for the correspondence, microstate counting in the CFT is used to derive the Bekenstein-Hawking area law for the Kerr entropy, S=Horizon area/4. Furthermore, the correlators in the dual CFT are shown to reproduce the scattering amplitudes of a charged scalar or spin-½ field by a near-extreme Kerr-Newman black hole, and a neutral spin-1 or spin-2 field by a near-extreme Kerr black hole. Scattering amplitudes probe the vacuum of fields living on the black hole background. For scalars, bound superradiant modes lead to an instability, while for fermions, it is shown that the bound superradiant modes condense and form a Fermi sea which extends well outside the ergosphere. Assuming no further instabilities, the low energy effective theory near the black hole is described by ripples in the

  1. Abiotic Buildup of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Meadows, V. S.

    2010-10-01

    Two of the best biosignature gases for remote detection of life on extrasolar planets are oxygen (O2) and its photochemical byproduct, ozone (O3). The main reason for their prominence as biosignatures is that large abiotic fluxes of O2 and O3 are not considered sustainable on geological and astronomical timescales. We show here how buildup of O3 can occur on planets orbiting M stars, even in the absence of the large biological fluxes. This is possible because the destruction of O2 and O3 is driven by UV photochemistry. This chemistry is much slower on planets around these stars, due to the smaller incident UV flux. Because the destruction of these gases is slower, O3 can build up to detectable levels even if the O3 source is small. We will present atmospheric profiles of these gases for planets around AD Leo (an M dwarf) as well as spectra that show the implications for missions such as Darwin and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF).

  2. SPARC Data Initiative: A comparison of ozone climatologies from international satellite limb sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Hegglin, M. I.; Anderson, J.; Bourassa, A.; Brohede, S.; Degenstein, D.; Froidevaux, L.; Fuller, R.; Funke, B.; Gille, J.; Jones, A.; Kasai, Y.; Krüger, K.; Kyrölä, E.; Lingenfelser, G.; Lumpe, J.; Nardi, B.; Neu, J.; Pendlebury, D.; Remsberg, E.; Rozanov, A.; Smith, L.; Toohey, M.; Urban, J.; Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.; Wang, R. H. J.

    2013-11-01

    comprehensive quality assessment of the ozone products from 18 limb-viewing satellite instruments is provided by means of a detailed intercomparison. The ozone climatologies in form of monthly zonal mean time series covering the upper troposphere to lower mesosphere are obtained from LIMS, SAGE I/II/III, UARS-MLS, HALOE, POAM II/III, SMR, OSIRIS, MIPAS, GOMOS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS, ACE-MAESTRO, Aura-MLS, HIRDLS, and SMILES within 1978-2010. The intercomparisons focus on mean biases of annual zonal mean fields, interannual variability, and seasonal cycles. Additionally, the physical consistency of the data is tested through diagnostics of the quasi-biennial oscillation and Antarctic ozone hole. The comprehensive evaluations reveal that the uncertainty in our knowledge of the atmospheric ozone mean state is smallest in the tropical and midlatitude middle stratosphere with a 1σ multi-instrument spread of less than ±5%. While the overall agreement among the climatological data sets is very good for large parts of the stratosphere, individual discrepancies have been identified, including unrealistic month-to-month fluctuations, large biases in particular atmospheric regions, or inconsistencies in the seasonal cycle. Notable differences between the data sets exist in the tropical lower stratosphere (with a spread of ±30%) and at high latitudes (±15%). In particular, large relative differences are identified in the Antarctic during the time of the ozone hole, with a spread between the monthly zonal mean fields of ±50%. The evaluations provide guidance on what data sets are the most reliable for applications such as studies of ozone variability, model-measurement comparisons, detection of long-term trends, and data-merging activities.

  3. Environmental, health, and CFC (chlorofluorocarbons) substitution aspects of the ozone depletion issue

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R.I.; Fairchild, P.D.; Fulkerson, W.; Perry, A.M.; Regan, J.D.; Taylor, G.E.

    1989-11-01

    In 1974 chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were identified as playing a major role in depleting the stratospheric ozone layer, a process which could potentially result in increasing levels of UV(B) radiation. Substantial progress has been made in the ensuing years, especially after the surprising discovery of the ozone hole in Antarctica in 1984. Investigation of this hole's development has led to improved understanding of heterogeneous gas-solid phase reaction kinetics occurring in the stratosphere, but there are still uncertainties in the developing theory of ozone depletion. The connection betwen global CFC production and stratospheric ozone depletion is plainly evident. It is also evident that the long atmospheric lifetimes of these synthetic organic chemicals lead to decadal time frames between the response on CFC emissions and the reaction of chlorine with stratospheric ozone molecules. It is generally accepted that complete CFC phaseout is required to alleviate this situation; however, even if emissions could be reduced to zero immediately, ozone depletion would continue for many decades although at a declining rate. A critical question to be addressed is that of the actual timing of the CFC phaseout. It appears to us that the decision to phase out CFCs completely (i.e., a 90% or 100% phaseout vs 50% phaseout as called for in the Montreal Protocol) is much more important than whether the phaseout occurs within the next 5 years or the next 10 years. This question is particularly important relative to the availability of tested chemical and nonchemical CFC substitutes for refrigeration and insulation purposes. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Researcher and Educator Long Term Collaboration with NOAA ESRL Regarding Atmospheric Ozone Changes at the South Pole Through the NSF PolarTREC Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergholz, E.; Johnson, B.; Hofmann, D.

    2008-12-01

    The NOAA/ESRL team at South Pole has been monitoring the development of the annual ozone hole over two decades using balloon-borne and ground-based instruments. Collaboration with educators has become an important aspect of NOAA/ESRL to educate the public about ozone loss and ozone hole formation. Researcher Bryan Johnson and educator Elke Bergholz worked together at South Pole in 1998/1999 as part of the NSF teacher outreach program called Teachers Experiencing Antarctica (TEA). It has been almost a decade when they collaborated again concerning the ozone changes at South Pole as part of the International Polar Year (IPY) and the PolarTREC (http://www.polartrec.com) teacher outreach program sponsored by NSF. The TEA and PolarTREC programs selected teachers to travel to polar locations to work with research scientists collecting data and running experiments at various Arctic and Antarctic field sites. While in the field, daily contact with classrooms and students around the globe was done through internet journals, answering emails from students, and webinars. This will be followed up with presentations to schools and the public relating Ms Bergholz's experience and new "hands-on" understanding of ozone measurements and ozone depletion over Antarctica, and discussing what changes in ozone we have seen at South Pole since the first outreach program nearly a decade ago.

  5. ULTRAMASSIVE BLACK HOLE COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Berczik, Peter E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2015-01-10

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC 1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC 1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gravitational wave emission dominates, and the black holes coalesce in a mere few Myr. Curiously, these extremely massive binaries appear to nearly bypass the three-body scattering evolutionary phase. Our study suggests that in this extreme case, SMBH coalescence is governed by dynamical friction followed nearly directly by gravitational wave emission, resulting in a rapid and efficient SMBH coalescence timescale. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave event rates and hypervelocity star production.

  6. Entropy of quasiblack holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2010-03-15

    We trace the origin of the black hole entropy S, replacing a black hole by a quasiblack hole. Let the boundary of a static body approach its own gravitational radius, in such a way that a quasihorizon forms. We show that if the body is thermal with the temperature taking the Hawking value at the quasihorizon limit, it follows, in the nonextremal case, from the first law of thermodynamics that the entropy approaches the Bekenstein-Hawking value S=A/4. In this setup, the key role is played by the surface stresses on the quasihorizon and one finds that the entropy comes from the quasihorizon surface. Any distribution of matter inside the surface leads to the same universal value for the entropy in the quasihorizon limit. This can be of some help in the understanding of black hole entropy. Other similarities between black holes and quasiblack holes such as the mass formulas for both objects had been found previously. We also discuss the entropy for extremal quasiblack holes, a more subtle issue.

  7. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    PubMed

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm). PMID:14770335

  8. INTERACTION OF OZONE AND HERBICIDES IN SOYBEANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify potentially damaging herbicide-ozone interactions on soybean so that injury could be reduced by judicious selection of herbicides and tolerant cultivars. The involvement of herbicide influence on stomatal aperture affecting ozone ...

  9. NASA satellite helps airliners avoid ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Results from a test to determine the effectiveness of satellite data for helping airlines avoid heavy concentrations of ozone are reported. Information from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, aboard the Nimbus-7 was transmitted, for use in meteorological forecast activities. The results show: (1) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer profile of total ozone in the atmosphere accurately represents upper air patterns and can be used to locate meteorological activity; (2) route forecasting of highly concentrated ozone is feasible; (3) five research aircraft flights were flown in jet stream regions located by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer to determine winds, temperatures, and air composition. It is shown that the jet stream is coincides with the area of highest total ozone gradient, and low total ozone amounts are found where tropospheric air has been carried along above the tropopause on the anticyclonic side of the subtropical jet stream.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONAL OZONE SAMPLERS: THREE APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigators funded under the HEI ozone sampler program, Drs. Hackney, Yanagisawa, and Koutrakis, and their collaborators used different approaches to develop personal ozone samples that would be sensitive, accurate, and amenable to use in epidemiological studies.

  11. OZONE GENERATORS IN INDOOR AIR SETTINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on home/office ozone generators. It discusses their current uses as amelioratives for environmental tobacco smoke, biocontaminants, volatile organic compounds, and odors and details the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ozone appears to work well ...

  12. Twenty Years of Ozone Profile Measurements Above McMurdo Station, Antarctica During Austral Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, J. L.; Deshler, T.; Kroger, C.; Nardi, B.; Johnson, B. J.

    2005-12-01

    Balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements from 0 to ~35 km above McMurdo Station, Antarctica (78°S) have provided vertical profiles of the development of the ozone hole between late August and late October each year since 1986. Here, we present the twenty-year history of these measurements and discuss long-term trends occurring in the periods prior to the onset of major ozone loss and during major depletion. In late August, prior to significant ozone loss, column ozone averaged ~250 DU from 1986 to 1998, dropped below 230 DU from 1999-2001, and has stayed above 250 DU since 2002. During the same period, column ozone minima as well as ozone between 12-20 km, the region of maximum loss, show a similar trend. During the period of major depletion above McMurdo (15 Sept-15 Oct), maximums, minimums and averages of total and 12-20 km column ozone show a steady decline from 1986 until the mid-1990s. Record minimums were observed in 1993, two years after the eruption of Pinatubo, and again in 2001. In the 12-20 km region, minima reached zero in the mid 1990s. The thickness of the region of complete ozone destruction grew from 4 km, in 1995-1997, to over 6 km, in 1998-2001, and persisted for over a week, suggesting a vortex-wide feature. These observations are consistent with predictions and observations of peaking halogen abundance in the lower stratosphere around 2000. Similarly large ozone depletion was thus expected for another five years with a slow decline thereafter. Ozonesonde measurements in 2003 and 2004, however, do not support this. Averages of total and 12-20 km column ozone in late August and between 15 September-15 October show less depletion than in the late 1990s, and are approaching values observed in the early 1990s. The cause of this lessening in ozone loss during the last few years is puzzling. Is it a result of extended anomalous stratospheric dynamics, or indicative of a larger scale trend? These observations, including the 2005 measurements (currently in

  13. Ozone concentration in the cabin of a Gates Learjet measured simultaneously with atmospheric ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Perkins, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Gates Learjet Model 23 was instrumented with monitors to measure simultaneously the atmospheric and the cabin concentrations of ozone at altitudes up to 13 kilometers. Six data flights were made in February 1978. Results indicated that only a small amount of the atmospheric ozone is destroyed in the cabin pressurization system. Ozone concentrations measured in the cabin near the conditioned-air outlets were only slightly lower than the atmospheric ozone concentration. For the two cabin configurations tested, the ozone retention in the cabin was 63 and 41 percent of the atmospheric ozone concentration. Maximum cabin ozone concentration measured during these flights was 410 parts per billion by volume.

  14. Total ozone, ozone vertical distributions, and stratospheric temperatures at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986 and 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.; Reitelbach, P. J.; Franchois, P. R.; Kuester, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-six electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesondes were flown at South Pole, Antarctica, during 1987 in a continuing program to document year-round changes in Antarctica ozone that are dynamically and photochemically induced. Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone observations were also made. For the twilight months of March and September when Dobson instrument observations cannot be made at South Pole, total ozone amounts were deduced from the ECC ozonesonde soundings. ECC sonde total ozone data obtained during the polar night (April to August), supplemented the sparse total ozone data obtained from Dobson instrument moon observations. Similar ozone profile and total ozone observations were made at South Pole in 1986.

  15. Tropospheric Ozone from the TOMS TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) Technique During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Frolov, A. D.; Hudson, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There are a number of published residual-type methods for deriving tropospheric ozone from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer). The basic concept of these methods is that within a zone of constant stratospheric ozone, the tropospheric ozone column can be computed by subtracting stratospheric ozone from the TOMS Level 2 total ozone column, We used the modified-residual method for retrieving tropospheric ozone during SAFARI-2000 and found disagreements with in-situ ozone data over Africa in September 2000. Using the newly developed TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) method that uses TOMS radiances and a modified lookup table based on actual profiles during high ozone pollution periods, new maps were prepared and found to compare better to soundings over Lusaka, Zambia (15.5 S, 28 E), Nairobi and several African cities where MOZAIC aircraft operated in September 2000. The TDOT technique and comparisons are described in detail.

  16. Ozone exposure : Areas of potential ozone risk for selected tree species in Austria.

    PubMed

    Loibl, W; Smidt, S

    1996-12-01

    Increased tropospheric ozone concentrations cause damage to both human health and the environment. To assess the exposure of forest areas and selected tree species to ozone, it is necessary to calculate the ozone exposure distribution. The present article describes the application of an ozone interpolation model to the calculation of the ozone exposure distribution in combination with forest inventory data.The exposure of forest regions to ozone was assessed by means of an AOT40 map (accumulated ozone exposure over a threshold of 40 ppb). The calculation was performed by hourly running of the model during the summer term and accumulation of the patterns that exceeded 40 ppb.The exposure of the primary Austrian tree species to ozone can be assessed due to the spatial relation of ozone exposure and tree species patterns. This spatial relation also allows the verification of assumptions concerning ozone-related tree damage. PMID:24233419

  17. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  18. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    The question of air quality in polluted regions represents one of the issues of geochemistry with direct implications for human well-being. Human health and well-being, along with the well-being of plants, animals, and agricultural crops, are dependent on the quality of air we breathe. Since the start of the industrial era, air quality has become a matter of major importance, especially in large cities or urbanized regions with heavy automobile traffic and industrial activity.Concern over air quality existed as far back as the 1600s. Originally, polluted air in cities resulted from the burning of wood or coal, largely as a source of heat. The industrial revolution in England saw a great increase in the use of coal in rapidly growing cities, both for industrial use and domestic heating. London suffered from devastating pollution events during the late 1800s and early 1900s, with thousands of excess deaths attributed to air pollution (Brimblecombe, 1987). With increasing use of coal, other instances also occurred in continental Europe and the USA. These events were caused by directly emitted pollutants (primary pollutants), including sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulates. They were especially acute in cities with northerly locations during fall and winter when sunlight is at a minimum. These original pollution events gave rise to the term "smog" (a combination of smoke and fog). Events of this type have become much less severe since the 1950s in Western Europe and the US, as natural gas replaced coal as the primary source of home heating, industrial smokestacks were designed to emit at higher altitudes (where dispersion is more rapid), and industries were required to install pollution control equipment.Beginning in the 1950s, a new type of pollution, photochemical smog, became a major concern. Photochemical smog consists of ozone (O3) and other closely related species ("secondary pollutants") that are produced photochemically from directly

  19. A Chemiluminescence Detector for Ozone Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H.; And Others

    An ozone detector was built and evaluated for its applicability in smog chamber studies. The detection method is based on reaction of ozone with ethylene and measurement of resultant chemiluminescence. In the first phase of evaluation, the detector's response to ozone was studied as a function of several instrument parameters, and optimum…

  20. KINETICS MODEL AND OZONE ISOPLETH PLOTTING PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kinetics Model and Ozone Isopleth Plotting Package (OZIPP) computer program can be used to simulate ozone formation in urban atmospheres. OZIPP calculates maximum one-hour average ozone concentrations given a set of input assumptions about initial precursor concentrations, li...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS IN OZONATED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because ozonation is becoming a popular alternative to chlorination for disinfection of drinking water and because little is known about the potential adverse effects of ozonation disinfection by-products (DBPs), we have sought to identify ozone DBPs, particularly brominated orga...

  2. Ozone, Climate, and Global Atmospheric Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Joel S.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of global atmospheric problems relating to ozone depletion and global warming. Provides background information on the composition of the earth's atmosphere and origin of atmospheric ozone. Describes causes, effects, and evidence of ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect. A vignette provides a summary of a 1991 assessment of…

  3. Generation and delivery device for ozone gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides an ozone generation and delivery system that lends itself to small scale applications and requires very low maintenance. The system preferably includes an anode reservoir and a cathode phase separator each having a hydrophobic membrane to allow phase separation of produced gases from water. The hydrogen gas, ozone gas and water containing ozone may be delivered under pressure.

  4. Introducing the Black Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffini, Remo; Wheeler, John A.

    1971-01-01

    discusses the cosmology theory of a black hole, a region where an object loses its identity, but mass, charge, and momentum are conserved. Include are three possible formation processes, theorized properties, and three way they might eventually be detected. (DS)

  5. Illuminating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Ian A.; Bull, Anne; O’Brien, Eileen; Drillsma-Milgrom, Katy A.; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional shadows formed by illuminating vortices are shown to be visually analogous to the gravitational action of black holes on light and surrounding matter. They could be useful teaching aids demonstrating some of the consequences of general relativity.

  6. Black holes and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-15

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

  7. Antarctic Ozone: Theory and Observation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salawitch, Ross Jay

    The amount of ozone observed in October over Antarctica has fallen steadily and precipitously in the last decade. Observational data describing the phenomenology of the Antarctic ozone reduction are reviewed, followed by the presentation of theories that seek to account for the observed ozone reductions while satisfying other available constraints. We begin with a discussion of the thermodynamic properties of solid phases containing HCl and HNO_3. The presence of clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere, caused be extremely low temperatures during spring, leads to condensation and precipitation of HNO_3, and condensation and reaction of HCl. Both processes lead to the conversion of unreactive forms of chlorine to chlorine oxides, which participate in a sequence of chemical reactions that consume ozone. A chemical model that incorporates the influence of cloud catalyzed heterogeneous reactions is compared in detail to the interferometric measurements of HCl, ClNO_3, HNO_3 , NO_2, and NO obtained over Antarctica during the spring of 1986 (Farmer et al., 1987). Model results are consistent with observed temporal trends of these species and with trends for total column ozone reported by Stolarski et al. (1986). Loss of ozone is attributed to the catalytic influence of chlorine and bromine radicals, in cycles suggested by McElroy et al. (1986b) and Molina and Molina (1987). Constraints are then placed on the abundance of stratospheric bromine by analysis of observations of OClO over Antarctica during the spring of 1986 (Solomon et al., 1987a). The diurnal variation of OClO is consistent with 16 +/- 4 ppt of stratospheric bromine if a fraction of the overall ClO + BrO reaction proceeds through a channel resulting in the production of BrCl. Bromine levels in this range would contribute approximately 20% of the total ozone loss. Finally, it is shown that the production of reactive chlorine oxides by heterogeneous processes depends on the initial concentration of HCl relative

  8. The relationship between solar UV irradiance and total ozone from observations over southern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkov, Rumen D.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Diaz, Susana B.

    1995-05-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation at 300 and 305 nm, measured by a Biospherical Instruments high resolution scanning spectroradiometer at Ushuaia, southern Argentina (55 deg S, 68 deg W), as a part of the US National Science Foundation network for Polar Regions, was compared with total ozone satellite measurements. A statistical relationship between UV and total ozone was derived. On the basis of this relationship, the differences in 300 and 305 nm irradiance between 1979-1983 and 1989-1993 intervals are estimated; for October, the 15% observed decline of total ozone has led to irradiance increases of 80% at 300 nm and 35% at 305 nm. During the days with 'ozone hole' conditions, the 300 nm irradiance is as high as it would be at the summer solstice three months later, and is approximately 4 times higher than the UV irradiance corresponding to the 'normal ozone condition for early October, as further illustrated for October 1994. Inclusion of the 340 nm cloudy-dependent predictor is discussed.

  9. Charged Galileon black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  10. Searching for Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M.

    1998-01-01

    Our UV/VIS work concentrates on black hole X-ray nova. These objects consist of two stars in close orbit, one of which we believe is a black hole - our goal is to SHOW that one is a black hole. In order to reach this goal we carry out observations in the Optical, UV, IR and X-ray bands, and compare the observations to theoretical models. In the past year, our UV/VIS grant has provided partial support (mainly travel funds and page charges) for work we have done on X-ray nova containing black holes and neutron stars. We have been very successful in obtaining telescope time to support our project - we have completed approximately a dozen separate observing runs averaging 3 days each, using the MMT (5M), Lick 3M, KPNO 2.1M, CTIO 4M, CTIO 1.5M, and the SAO/WO 1.2M telescopes. These observations have allowed the identification of one new black hole (Nova Oph 1977), and allowed the mass of another to be measured (GS2000+25). Perhaps our most exciting new result is the evidence we have gathered for the existence of 'event horizons' in black hole X-ray nova.

  11. Options to accelerate ozone recovery:ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), including N2O, are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2{%} during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower due to the elimination of N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower due to destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. The ability of EESC to be a suitable metric for total ozone is also quantified. Responding to the recent suggestion that N2O should be considered an ODS, we provide an approach to incorporate N2O into the EESC formulation.

  12. Options to Accelerate Ozone Recovery: Ozone and Climate Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, E. L.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone primarily originated from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine). Representatives from governments have met periodically over the years to establish international regulations starting with the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which greatly limited the release of these ozone-depleting substances (DDSs). Two global models have been used to investigate the impact of hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ODSs on total column ozone. The investigations primarily focused on chlorine- and bromine-containing gases, but some computations also included nitrous oxide (N2O). The Montreal Protocol with ODS controls have been so successful that further regulations of chlorine- and bromine-containing gases could have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. if all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Chlorine- and bromine-containing gases and nitrous oxide are also greenhouse gases and lead to warming of the troposphere. Elimination of N 20 emissions would result in a reduction of radiative forcing of 0.23 W/sq m in 2100 than presently computed and destruction of the CFC bank would produce a reduction in radiative forcing of 0.005 W/sq m in 2100. This paper provides a quantitative way to consider future regulations of the CFC bank and N 20 emissions

  13. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high-latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with > 75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a > 12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of > 6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased short-wave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~ 2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux, Fz and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In November and December, increased westerly winds and a delay in the breakup of the polar vortex lead to increases in Fz, indicating increased wave activity entering the stratosphere and propagating to higher altitudes. The resulting increase in wave breaking, diagnosed by decreases to the EP flux divergence, drives enhanced downwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  14. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with >75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a >12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of >6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased shortwave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the EP flux, Fz, and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In December and January, increased westerly winds lead to increases in Fz, associated with an increase in tropopause height. The resulting increase in wavebreaking leads to enhanced downwelling/reduced upwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  15. Effect of column ozone on the variability of biologically effective UV radiation at high southern latitudes.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, I

    2000-12-01

    Solar irradiance measurements from Ushuaia (Argentina) and Palmer and McMurdo Stations in Antarctica covering four seasons from mid-1993 through early 1997 have been analyzed and their variations compared with column ozone changes. UV irradiances were weighted for biological effectiveness using a published biological weighting function for dose-dependent inhibition of photosynthesis by phytoplankton from the Weddell Sea. All calculations involved integrated daily UV doses and visible exposures (weighted UV and unweighted visible irradiances, respectively). The results show that daily biologically effective total UV doses underwent large short-term variations at all three sites, with day-to-day increases up to 236% at Ushuaia, 285% at Palmer and 99% at McMurdo. Parallel changes in visible exposure indicated that the total UV changes were preponderantly due to variations in cloudiness. On a 12-month basis, daily biologically effective UV doses correlated strongly with visible exposures (R > or = 0.99). Anticorrelations of total UV with ozone, on the other hand, were poor (R > -0.11). The largest daily biologically effective UV doses, and their day-to-day increases, occurred as part of the normal variability related to cloud cover and were seldom associated with significant ozone depletion. UV dose/visible exposure ratios tended to reflect ozone depletion events somewhat more consistently than UV doses alone. With the Weddell Sea phytoplankton weighting function used in this study, antarctic ozone hole events were seldom readily discernible in the biologically effective UV record. The results suggest that, where the UV sensitivity of organisms was similar to that of the Weddell Sea phytoplankton, seasonal ozone depletion had no appreciable effect on annual primary productivity during the 1993-1997 period. Additional data on the geographical and seasonal variation of biological weighting functions are desirable for more comprehensive assessments of ozone depletion

  16. Ozone heating in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard L.

    1991-01-01

    In addition to establishing that ozone constitutes a nonnegligible but only minor heat source in the Martian atmosphere, it is presently shown that the ozone abundance's hemispherical asymmetry is an improbable factor in the establishment of the polar caps' observed hemispherical asymmetry, since ozone absorbs less than 1 percent of the total solar flux incident on the polar caps. In the remaining hypothesized roles for Martian atmospheric ozone considered, namely those of cloud formation and snowfall, ozone heating remains nonnegligible but appears overstated by previous studies.

  17. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  18. How sensitive is the recovery of stratospheric ozone to changes in concentrations of very short lived bromocarbons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Braesicke, P.; Keeble, J.; Telford, P.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Naturally produced very short-lived substances (VSLS), like bromocarbons, account for almost a quarter of the current stratospheric inorganic bromine, Bry. Following VSLS oxidation, bromine radicals (Br and BrO) can catalytically destroy ozone. The extent to which possible increases in surface emissions or transport of these VSLS bromocarbons to the stratosphere could counteract the effect of halogen reductions under the Montreal Protocol is an important policy question. Here by using a chemistry-climate model, UM-UKCA, we investigate the impact of a hypothetical increase in VSLS on ozone and how that impact depends on the background concentrations of chlorine and bromine. Our model experiments indicate that for a ~5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the local ozone loss in the lowermost stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) may reach up to 10% in the annual mean; the ozone loss in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is smaller (4-6%). There is more ozone loss following an increase in VSLS burden under a high stratospheric chlorine background than under a low chlorine background indicating the importance of the inter-halogen reactions. For example, the rate of decline of the stratospheric ozone concentration as a function of Bry is higher by about 30-40% when stratospheric Cly is ~3 ppb (present day) compared with Cly of ~0.8 ppb (apre-industrial or projected future situation). Although bromine plays an important role in destroying ozone, inorganic chlorine is the dominant halogen compound. Even if bromine levels from natural VSLS were to increase significantly later this century, changes in the concentration of ozone will be dominated by the recovery of anthropogenic chlorine. Our calculation suggests that for a 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the Antarctic ozone hole recover date could be delayed by approximately 7 years.

  19. Tropospheric Enhancement of Ozone over the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Naveed Ali; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Kaminski, Jacek; Struzewska, Joanna; Durka, Pawel; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    We use the Global Environmental Multiscale - Air Quality (GEM-AQ) model to interpret the vertical profiles of ozone acquired with ozone sounding experiments at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi airport. The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the chemical and dynamical structures in the atmosphere of this unique subtropical location (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E). Ozone observations for years 2012 - 2013 reveal elevated ozone abundances in the range from 70 ppbv to 120 ppbv near 500-400 hPa during summer. The ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than these values. The preliminary results indicate that summertime enhancement in ozone is associated with the Arabian anticyclones centered over the Zagros Mountains in Iran and the Asir and Hijaz Mountain ranges in Saudi Arabia, and is consistent with TES observations of deuterated water. The model also shows considerable seasonal variation in the tropospheric ozone which is transported from the stratosphere by dynamical processes. The domestic production of ozone in the middle troposphere is estimated and compared GEM-AQ model. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in the UAE is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries in the Gulf region. We will present ozone sounding data and GEM-AQ results including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  20. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.