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Sample records for ozone nitrogen dioxide

  1. Ozone and nitrogen dioxide above the northern Tien Shan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arefev, Vladimir N.; Volkovitsky, Oleg A.; Kamenogradsky, Nikita E.; Semyonov, Vladimir K.; Sinyakov, Valery P.

    1994-01-01

    The results of systematic perennial measurements of the total ozone (since 1979) and nitrogen dioxide column (since 1983) in the atmosphere in the European-Asian continent center above the mountainmass of the Tien Shan are given. This region is distinguished by a great number of sunny days during a year. The observation station is at the Northern shore of Issyk Kul Lake (42.56 N 77.04 E 1650 m above the sea level). The measurement results are presented as the monthly averaged atmospheric total ozone and NO2 stratospheric column abundances (morning and evening). The peculiarities of seasonal variations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide atmospheric contents, their regular variances with a quasi-biennial cycles and trends have been noticed. Irregular variances of ozone and nitrogen dioxide atmospheric contents, i.e. their positive and negative anomalies in the monthly averaged contents relative to the perennial averaged monthly means, have been analyzed. The synchronous and opposite in phase anomalies in variations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide atmospheric contents were explained by the transport and zonal circulation in the stratosphere (Kamenogradsky et al., 1990).

  2. Pretreatment with nitrogen dioxide modifies plant response to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runeckles, V. C.; Palmer, K.

    Plant growth inhibition by ozone is significantly affected by previous exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Experiments on the early growth of four crop species showed that daily pretreatment with NO 2 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 3 h) immediately prior to exposure to O 3 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 6 h) increased the inhibition of radish and wheat growth, decreased the inhibition of bush bean growth, but had no effect on the growth of mint. The magnitudes of the interactive effects indicate that in regions where relatively high concentrations of O 3 are produced by photochemical processes, for example, downwind from urban centres, assessments of the impact of O 3 on vegetation based on knowledge of response to O 3 alone may be seriously flawed.

  3. Dosimetry of ozone and nitrogen dioxide in man and animals

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H. Jr.; Miller, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The health effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) and nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) are assessed from animal toxicological, controlled human, and epidemiological studies. These assessments will be strengthened when results of animal studies can be quantitatively extrapolated to man. To achieve quantitative extrapolation, improvements are needed in the areas of dosimetry and species sensitivity. And, of course, an adequate health effect data base must exist on which to make extrapolations. The focus of this paper is to review the regional dosimetry of O/sub 3/ and NO/sub 2/ in the respiratory tract of man and animals. Dosimetry relates to estimating the amount of pollutant reaching a specific target region of the respiratory tract as a function of exposure concentration. At present, there are two approaches to dosimetry, experimental and mathematical modeling, which are discussed.

  4. Observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide profiles in TROICA experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postylyakov, O. V.; Elokhov, A. S.; Belikov, I. B.; Igaev, A. I.; Elansky, N. F.

    Several expeditions TROICA on atmosphere investigation over continental Russian has been carried out using mobile railway carriage-laboratory in zonal (between Moscow and Khabarovsk) and meridional (between Murmansk and Kislovodsk) directions. The first measurements of gas profiles aboard a carriage-laboratory were performed in the scientific expeditions TROICA-4 (April 1997) along way Moscow-Khabarovsk-Moscow. To determine the ozone and nitrogen dioxide profiles, the express Umkehr method and zenith sky twilight measurements were used, respectively. The UV and visible spectra was recorded with an MDR-23 spectrophotometer aboard the moving carriage-laboratory coupled just behind an electric locomotive of a passenger train. Data on the total content and vertical profiles of impurities are obtained. These data reflect mainly the large-scale impurity distribution influenced by planetary waves. Significant variations in the total content and vertical distribution of impurities in the cross-section of a deep low representing a part of a circumpolar vortex are analyzed. The results of measurements are compared with the data obtained by TOMS, GOME and ground-based stations. A new carriage-laboratory has been equipped by optical remote sensing system based on image spectrometer Oriel MS257. It is capable to measure UV and visual spectral radiance incoming from several directions to determine the slant columns of ozone, nitrogen dioxide and other small gases. Using observations at a few wavelengths and several solar zenith angles vertical distribution of gases is retrieved. The first expedition (TROICA-8) of a new carriage-laboratory with the new optical remote sensing system is scheduled for February-March 2004. Results of previous expeditions as well as the first results of TROICA-8 will be presented. Effectiveness of using a moving laboratory of such a kind for validation of network and space observational data is discussed.

  5. Monitoring of nitrogen dioxide, ozone and halogens radicals in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Costa, Maria J.; Genco, Silvia; Kulkarni, Pavan K.; Mendes, Rui; Domingues, Ana Filipa; Anton, Manuel; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Silva, Ana Maria

    2013-10-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric compounds at high latitudes is a key factor for a better understanding of the processes driving the chemical cycles of ozone and related chemical species. In this frame, the GASCOD (Gas Analizer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) equipment is installed at the Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS - 74.69S, 164.12E) since December 1995, carrying out observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). The recent advances in sensor technologies and processor capabilities, suggested the setup of a new equipment, based on the same optical layout of the 'old' GASCOD , with enhanced performances and improved capabilities for the measurements of solar radiation in the UV-visible spectral range (300-700nm). The efforts accomplished, allowed for the increase of the investigated tracers. Actually, mainly due to the enlargement of the covered spectral range and to the adoption of a CCD sensor, in addition to the NO2 and O3 compounds, others species can be monitored with the new instrumental setup such as bromine, chlorine and iodine oxides (BrO, OClO and IO). The innovative equipment called GASCODNG (GASCOD New Generation) was installed at MZS during the 2012/2013 Italian Antarctic expedition, in the framework of the research projects SAMOA (Automatic Station Monitoring Antarctic Ozonosphere) and MATAGRO (Monitoring Atmospheric Tracers in Antarctica with Ground Based Observations) funded by the Italian and Portuguese Antarctic programs respectively. In this paper a brief description of the new equipment is provided, highlighting the main improvements with regard to the 'old' one. Furthermore the full dataset (1996 - 2012) of NO2 total columns, obtained with the GASCOD installed at MZS, is compared with the data obtained with satellite borne equipments (GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME2) and the main statistical parameters are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  6. INFLUENCE OF OZONE AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON HEPATIC MICROSOMAL ENZYMES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since ambient concentrations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide increase drug-induced sleeping time in female mice, potential mechanisms were sought by investigating the effects of these gases on hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxidases in female CD-1 mice. Exposure to ozone did not...

  7. MAPPING CRITICAL LEVELS OF OZONE, SULPHUR DIOXIDE AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE FOR CROPS, FORESTS AND NATURAL VEGETATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollution abatement strategies for controlling nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone emissions in the United States focus on a "Standards-based" approach. his approach places limits on air pollution by maintaining a baseline value for air quality, no matter what the eco...

  8. Response of radish to nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone, alone and in combination

    SciTech Connect

    Reinert, R.A.; Gray, T.N.

    1981-04-01

    Effects on radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cv. Cherry Belle of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), and ozone (O/sub 3/) alone and in combination at 0.2 and 0.4 ppM of each pollutant were studied. There was no difference in foilage or root weight of radish between exposure durations of 3 to 6 hours, and no significant interaction of hours with air pollutant and concentration. Ozone reduced root dry weight more at 0.4 ppM than at 0.2 ppM. Sulfur dioxide depressed the root/shoot ratio at both 0.2 and 0.4 ppM; however, when NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ were both present there was synergistic depression of the root/shoot ratio at 0.4 ppM. The average O/sub 3/-induced reduction in root weight of radish (1.75 g fresh and 101 mg dry, per plant) was additive in the presence of NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/. The weight of the root was reduced even though the foilage was the direct receptor of the pollutant stress.

  9. The interaction of ozone and nitrogen dioxide in the stratosphere of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchkouski, Ilya; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Dziomin, Victar; Svetashev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    At the Russian Antarctic station "Progress" (S69°23´, E76°23´) simultaneous measurements of trace gases using the MARS-B (Multi-Axis Recorder of Spectra) instrument and PION-UV spectro-radiometer for the time period from 05.01.2014 to 28.02.2014 have been performed. Both instruments were located outdoors. The aim of the measurements was to retrieve the vertical distribution of ozone and nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere and to study their variability during the period of measurements. The MARS-B instrument, developed at the National Ozone Monitoring Research and Education Centre of the Belarusian State University (NOMREC BSU), successfully passed the procedure of international inter-comparison campaign MAD-CAT 2013 in Mainz, Germany. The instrument is able to record the spectra of scattered sunlight at different elevation angles within a maximum aperture of 1.3°. 12 elevation angles have been used in this study, including the zenith direction. Approximately 7000 spectra per day were registered in the range of 403-486 nm, which were then processed by DOAS technique aiming to retrieve differential slant columns of ozone, nitrogen dioxide and oxygen dimer. Furthermore, total nitrogen dioxide column values have been retrieved employing the Libradtran radiative transfer model. The PION-UV spectro-radiometer, also developed at NOMREC BSU, is able to record the spectra of scattered sunlight from the hemisphere in the range of 280-430 nm. The registered spectra have been used to retrieve the total ozone column values employing the Stamnes method. In this study observational data from both instruments is presented and analyzed. Furthermore, by combining analysis of this data with model simulations it is shown that decreases in nitrogen dioxide content in the upper atmosphere can be associated with increases in total ozone column values and rising of the ozone layer upper boundary. Finally, the time delay between changes in nitrogen dioxide and ozone values is

  10. HEALTH EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM INHALATION OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE AND OZONE MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of single and multiple daily 3-hour exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) mixtures on the resistance to streptococcal pneumonia were investigated. The concentrations of NO2 ranged from 1.5 to 5.0 ppm, and those of O3, from 0.05 to 0.5 ppm. The effect of a...

  11. Growth of radish and marigold following repeated exposure to nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Reinert, R.A.; Sanders, J.S.

    1982-02-01

    Radish and marigold plants were exposed to 0.3 ppm of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), and/or ozone (O/sub 3/) nine times during a 3-wk period. No interactions among NO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, and O/sub 3/ were detected in measurement of radish foliage and root dry weight. Treatments containing O/sub 3/ reduced radish foliage and root (hypocotyl) dry weight 356 and 531 mg/plant, respectively. Interactions among NO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, and O/sub 3/ occurred in shoots and roots of marigold. SO/sub 2/ alone reduced marigold shoot and root dry weight, but this effect was reversed in the presence of O/sub 3/. The suppressive effect of SO/sub 2/ on root weight was also reversed by NO/sub 3/. Treatments containing SO/sub 2/ reduced dry flower weight 0.17 g/plant, but effects of the pollutant interactions observed in shoots and roots were not present.

  12. Growth of radish and marigold following repeated exposure to nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Reinert, R.A.; Sanders, J.S.

    1982-02-01

    Radish and marigold plants were exposed to 0.3 ppM of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), and /or ozone (O/sub 3/) nine times during a 3-wk period. No interactions among NO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, and O/sub 3/ were detected in measurement of radish foliage and root dry weight. Treatments containing O/sub 3/ reduced radish foliage and root (hypocotyl) dry weight 356 and 531 mg/plant, respectively. Interactions among NO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ occurred in shoots and roots of marigold. SO/sub 2/ alone reduced marigold shoot and root dry weight, but this effect was reversed in the presence of O/sub 3/. The suppressive effect of SO/sub 2/ on root weight was also reversed by NO/sub 2/. Treatments containing SO/sub 2/ reduced dry flower weight 0.17 g/plant, but effects of the pollutant interactions observed in shoots and roots were not present. 8 references, 2 tables.

  13. Ozone and nitrogen dioxide changes in the stratosphere during 1979-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, Linwood B.; Natarajan, Murali

    1986-01-01

    Analyses of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide distributions as measured by four different satellite experiments indicate midlatitude increases of up to 75 percent during the 1979-84 period. These increases are attributed to enhanced upper atmospheric formation of odd nitrogen during solar cycle 21 with downward transport to the stratosphere. The increases in NO2 provide an explanation for the recently observed dramatic springtime minima in the Antarctic ozone and suggest the reason for the reported midlatitude stratospheric ozone decreases observed by satellite and ground-based stations since the mid 1970s.

  14. The Response of Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide to the Eruption of Mt. Pinatubo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, R.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Observations have shown that the global mass of nitrogen dioxide decreased in both hemispheres in the year following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. In contrast, the observed ozone response was largely asymmetrical with respect to the equator, with a decrease in the northern hemisphere and little change and even a small increase in the southern hemisphere. Simulations including enhanced heterogeneous chemistry due to the presence of the volcanic aerosol reproduce a decrease of ozone in the northern hemisphere, but also produce a comparable ozone decrease in the southern hemisphere, contrary to observations. Our simulations show that the heating due to the volcanic aerosol enhanced both the tropical upwelling and the extratropical downwelling. The enhanced extratropical downwelling, combined with the time of the eruption relative to the phase of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, increased the ozone in the southern hemisphere and counteracted the ozone depletion due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic aerosol.

  15. The Chemical and Dynamical Responses of Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide to the Eruption of Mt. Pinatubo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, V.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R.; Douglass, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Observations have shown that the concentration of nitrogen dioxide decreased in both hemispheres in the years following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. In contrast, the observed ozone response was largely asymmetrical with respect to the equator, with a decrease in the northern hemisphere and little or no change in the southern hemisphere. Simulations including enhanced heterogeneous chemistry due to the presence of the volcanic aerosol reproduce a decrease of ozone in the northern hemisphere, but also produce a comparable ozone decrease in the southern hemisphere contrary to observations. Our simulations show that the heating due to the volcanic aerosol enhanced both the tropical upwelling and the extratropical downwelling. The enhanced extratropical downwelling, combined with the time of the eruption relative to the seasonal phase of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, increased the ozone in the southern hemisphere and counteracted the ozone depletion due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic aerosol.

  16. The Response of Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide to the Eruption of Mount Pinatubo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila. Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarsk, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Observations have shown that the global mass of nitrogen dioxide decreased in both hemispheres in the year following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, indicating an enhanced heterogeneous chemistry. In contrast, the observed ozone response was largely asymmetrical with respect to the equator, with a decrease in the northern hemisphere and little change in the southern hemisphere. Simulations including enhanced heterogeneous chemistry due to the presence of the volcanic aerosol reproduce a decrease of ozone in the northern hemisphere, but also produce a comparable ozone decrease in the southern hemisphere, contrary to observations. Our simulations show that the heating due to the volcanic aerosol enhanced both the tropical upwelling and the extratropical downwelling. The enhanced extratropical downwelling, combined with the time of the eruption relative to the phase of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, increased the ozone in the southern hemisphere and counteracted the ozone depletion due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic aerosol.

  17. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M. )

    1993-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the two common oxidant air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm)* of ozone or 15 ppm of nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. Ozone delayed the appearance of tracheal tumors and reduced the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. A suspected neuroendocrine differentiation of those lung tumors could not be established by immunocytochemistry due to overfixation of tissues. On the other hand, ozone seemed to mitigate development of hepatotoxic lesions mediated by diethylnitrosamine. In animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and exposed to nitrogen dioxide, fewer tracheal tumors and no lung tumors were found. Only a few lung tumors were produced in animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in an atmosphere of 65% oxygen. The previously observed neuroendocrine nature of tumors induced by simultaneous exposure to diethylnitrosamine and hyperoxia could not be established because the long fixation of tissues precluded immunocytochemical stains. Animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in filtered air while being housed in wire-mesh cages developed fewer lung tumors than animals given the same treatment and kept on conventional bedding in shoebox cages. Although all inhalants tested are known to produce substantial cell proliferation in the respiratory tract, it was not possible to document whether this would enhance lung tumor development. The role of the two common air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  18. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters. Research report, January 1989-March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M.

    1993-09-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that ozone and nitrogen dioxide modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors, in particular neuroendocrine cell tumors, in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen N-diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm) of ozone or 15 ppm nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. For positive controls, animals were treated with N-diethylnitrosamine and exposed to 65% oxygen. Ozone delayed the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. Ozone also seemed to mitigate development of hepatoxic lesions mediated by N-diethylnitrosamine. The role of ozone and nitrogen dioxide as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  19. Formation of strong airway irritants in mixtures of isoprene/ozone and isoprene/ozone/nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, C K; Clausen, P A; Wolkoff, P; Larsen, S T; Hammer, M; Larsen, K; Hansen, V; Nielsen, G D

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the airway irritation of isoprene, isoprene/ozone, and isoprene/ozone/nitrogen dioxide mixtures using a mouse bioassay, from which we calculated sensory irritation, bronchial constriction, and pulmonary irritation. We observed significant sensory irritation (approximately 50% reduction of mean respiratory rate) by dynamically exposing the mice, over 30 min, to mixtures of isoprene and O3 or isoprene, O3, and NO2. The starting concentrations were approximately 4 ppm O3 and 500 ppm isoprene (+ approximately 4 ppm NO2. The reaction mixtures after approximately 30 sec contained < 0.2 ppm O3. Addition of the effects of the residual reactants and the identified stable irritant products (formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, methacrolein, and methylvinyl ketone) could explain only partially the observed sensory irritation. This suggests that one or more strong airway irritants were formed. It is thus possible that oxidation reactions of common unsaturated compounds may be relevant for indoor air quality. PMID:11673123

  20. Total Column Observation of Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone in the Four Corners Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, Z.; Dubey, M.; Lindenmaier, R.; Herman, J. R.; Disterhoft, P.; Minschwaner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) is a pollutant created by the burning of fossil fuels, which is intricately related to levels of ozone (O3), a tropospheric pollutant and greenhouse gas. Observing and understanding the behavior of these two chemicals in the atmosphere is essential to monitoring and verifying power plant emissions. In the Four Corners region, the San Juan and Four Corners power plants produce a total of 0.3 kilotonnes of NOX (combined Nitric Oxide (NO) and NO2) per day from burning fossil fuels. We compare NO2 column measurements from a ground-based solar spectrometer (Pandora) and from the satellite-based Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). We also compare O3 column measurements obtained from Pandora and a Brewer Ozone Spectrophotometer. Using O3 profiles obtained with ozonesondes and by separating long and short time scale changes in total column measurements we isolate tropospheric ozone columns and explore their relationship with the troposphere-dominated total column measurements of NO2.

  1. The Response of Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide to the Eruption of Mount Pinatubo at Southern and Northern Midlatitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Observations have shown that the mass of nitrogen dioxide decreased at both southern and northern midlatitudes in the year following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, indicating that the volcanic aerosol had enhanced nitrogen dioxide depletion via heterogeneous chemistry. In contrast, the observed ozone response showed a northern midlatitude decrease and a small southern midlatitude increase. Previous simulations that included an enhancement of heterogeneous chemistry by the volcanic aerosol but no other effect of this aerosol produce ozone decreases in both hemispheres, contrary to observations. The authors simulations show that the heating due to the volcanic aerosol enhanced both the tropical upwelling and Southern Hemisphere extratropical downwelling. This enhanced extratropical downwelling, combined with the time of the eruption relative to the phase of the Brewer Dobson circulation, increased Southern Hemisphere ozone via advection, counteracting the ozone depletion due to heterogeneous chemistry on the Pinatubo aerosol.

  2. Role of photoexcited nitrogen dioxide chemistry on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new hydroxyl radical formation pathway via photo-excited nitrogen dioxide chemistry is incorporated into a chemistry-only box model as well as a 3D air quality model to examine its potential role on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta region...

  3. Effect of Same-day Sequential Exposure to Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone on Cardiac and Ventilatory Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the cardiac and ventilatory effects of sequential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and then ozone. The data show that mice exposed to both gases have increased arrhythmia and breathing changes not observed in the other groups. Although the mechanisms underlying ai...

  4. EFFECTS OF DEPLETION OF ASCORBIC ACID OR NONPROTEIN SULFYDRYLS ON THE ACUTE INHALATION TOXICITY OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE, OZONE, AND PHOSGENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of depleting lung ascorbic acid (AH2) and nonprotein sulfhydryls (NPSH) on the acute inhalation toxicity of nitrogen dioxide (N02), ozone (03), and phosgene (C0Cl2) was investigated in guinea pigs. he increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid protein (an indicator...

  5. COMPARISON OF BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE, OZONE AND THEIR COMBINATION IN MOUSE LUNG. 1. INTERMITTENT EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swiss Webster mice were exposed to either 4.8 ppm (9024 micrograms/cu.m.) nitrogen dioxide (NO2), 0.45 ppm (882 micrograms/cu.m.) ozone (O3), or their combination intermittently (8 hr daily) for 7 days, and the effects were studied in the lung by a series of physical and biochemi...

  6. Signature of tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide from space: A case study for Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, C.; Christodoulakis, J.; Tzanis, C.; Cracknell, A. P.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the variability of the tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns over mainland Greece, by using observations carried out by satellite-borne instrumentation and Multi Sensor Reanalysis. The results obtained show that the tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) dispersed farther away than the tropospheric NO2 column (TNO), due to the longer TOR's lifetime in respect to that of TNO. This results in the influence of the air quality of the nearby southern islands from the air pollution of the greater Athens basin. Furthermore, the TOR and TNO columns over Athens, for the period October 2004 to December 2011 were found to be negatively correlated with a correlation coefficient -0.85, in contrast to recent findings which suggested strong positive correlation. Interestingly, this strong negative correlation into a slight positive correlation when the TNO concentration becomes higher than around 4 × 1015 molec cm-2, thus being best fitted by a quadratic relationship. In addition, the temporal evolution of TOR during 1979-1993 showed a decline of 0.2% per decade and just after 1993 it seems to obey a positive trend of 0.1% per decade, thus recovering during the period 1993-2011 almost 63% of the lost TOR amounts through the years 1979-1993. Finally, the association between TOR, the total ozone column (TOZ), the tropopause height and the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) is presented by analysing observations during 1979-2011. An unexpected positive correlation between OLR and TOR was found, which may probably be attributed to the fact that enhanced abundance in tropospheric water vapor reduces the summertime TOR maximum by destructing ozone in the lower and middle troposphere through uptake mechanisms, thus emitting higher amounts of longwave radiation upwards.

  7. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  8. The impact of the choice of radiative transfer model and inversion method on the OSIRIS ozone and nitrogen dioxide retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Craig; McLinden, Chris; Sioris, Christopher; Brohede, Samuel

    Key to the retrieval of stratospheric minor species information from limb-scatter measurements are the selections of a radiative transfer model (RTM) and inversion method (solver). Here we assess the impact of choice of RTM and solver on the retrievals of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide from the OSIRIS instrument using the ‘Ozone Triplet' and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) techniques that are used in the operational Level 2 processing algorithms. The RTMs assessed are LIMBTRAN, VECTOR, SCIARAYS, and SASKTRAN. The solvers studied include the Maximum A Posteriori (MAP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), Iterative Least Squares (ILS), and Chahine methods.

  9. Revising the slant column density retrieval of nitrogen dioxide observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L. N.; Celarier, E. A.; Swartz, W. H.; Bucsela, E. J.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen dioxide retrievals from the Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) have been used extensively over the past decade, particularly in the study of tropospheric air quality. Recent comparisons of OMI NO2 with independent data sets and models suggested that the OMI values of slant column density (SCD) and stratospheric vertical column density (VCD) in both the NASA OMNO2 and Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute DOMINO products are too large, by around 10-40%. We describe a substantially revised spectral fitting algorithm, optimized for the OMI visible light spectrometer channel. The most important changes comprise a flexible adjustment of the instrumental wavelength shifts combined with iterative removal of the ring spectral features; the multistep removal of instrumental noise; iterative, sequential estimates of SCDs of the trace gases in the 402-465 nm range. These changes reduce OMI SCD(NO2) by 10-35%, bringing them much closer to SCDs retrieved from independent measurements and models. The revised SCDs, submitted to the stratosphere-troposphere separation algorithm, give tropospheric VCDs ˜10-15% smaller in polluted regions, and up to ˜30% smaller in unpolluted areas. Although the revised algorithm has been optimized specifically for the OMI NO2 retrieval, our approach could be more broadly applicable.

  10. Ozone and nitrogen dioxide ground based monitoring by zenith sky visible spectrometry in Arctic and Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pommereau, J. P.; Goutail, F.

    1988-01-01

    Unattended diode array spectrometers have been designed for ground based stratospheric trace species monitoring by zenith sky visible spectrometry. Measurements are performed with a 1.0 nm resolution between 290 nm and 590 nm in order to allow simultaneous evaluations of column densities of ozone, nitrogen dioxide. Field tests have shown that the species can be monitored with a precision of + or - 2 Dobson for the first and + or - 2.10 to the 15th mol/sq cm for the second, although the absolute accuracy of the method is limited by the error of the estimation of the atmospheric optical path of the scattered light. Two identical instruments were set up in January 1988, one in Antarctica at Dumont d'Urville (66 S, 140 E) to be operated all year and another one in the Arctic at ESRANGE at Kiruna (68 N; 22 E) which will operate to the final warming of spring 1988. The data are processed in real time at both stations. O3 and NO2 columns are transmitted together with surface and stratospheric temperature and winds. They are also recorded for further treatment and search for OClO and BrO. Only one month of data from Antarctica is available at the moment. Obtained during polar summer, they cannot show more than stable columns of O3 and NO2 and for the last species, the buildup of its diurnal variation.

  11. Associations between daily mortality in London and combined oxidant capacity, ozone and nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Williams, M L; Atkinson, R W; Anderson, H R; Kelly, F J

    2014-01-01

    Both nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) are powerful oxidants in ambient air that are intimately linked through atmospheric chemistry and which continuously interchange over very short timescales. Based upon atmospheric chemistry alone, there is a strong, a priori, reason for considering O3 and NO2 together in epidemiological studies, rather than either of the two pollutants separately in single-pollutant models. This paper compares two approaches to this, using Ox, defined as O3 + NO2, as a single metric and also using O3 and NO2 together in two-pollutant models. We hypothesised that the magnitude of the association between Ox and daily mortality would be greater than for NO2 and O3 individually. Using collocated hourly measurements for O3 and NO2 in London, from 2000 to 2005, we carried out a time series analysis of daily mortality. We investigated O3, NO2 and Ox individually in single-pollutant Poisson regression models and NO2 and O3 jointly in two-pollutant models in both all-year and season-specific analyses. We observed larger associations for mean 24-h concentrations of Ox (1.30 % increase in mortality per 10 ppb) than for O3 (0.87 %) and NO2 (0 %) individually. However, when analysed jointly in two-pollutant models, associations for O3 (1.54 %) and NO2 (1.07 %) were comparable to the Ox association. Season-specific analyses broadly followed this pattern irrespective of whether the Ox concentrations were driven by O3 production (summer) or depletion (winter). This novel approach in air pollution epidemiology captures the simultaneous impact of both oxidants whilst avoiding many of the statistical issues associated with two-pollutant models and potentially simplifies health impact calculations. PMID:25431629

  12. Effect of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and peroxyacetyl nitrate on metabolic and pulmonary function

    SciTech Connect

    Drechsler-Parks, D.M. )

    1987-04-01

    The metabolic and pulmonary function responses were investigated in 32 non-smoking men and women (8 men and 8 women 18-26 years of age, and 8 men and 8 women 51-76 years of age) who were exposed for 2 hours to each of 8 conditions: (1) filtered air (FA), (2) 0.13 ppm peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), (3) 0.45 ppm ozone (O3), (4) 0.60 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2), (5) 0.13 ppm PAN + 0.45 ppm O3 (PAN/O3), (6) 0.13 ppm PAN + 0.60 ppm NO2 (PAN/NO2), (7) 0.60 ppm NO2 + 0.45 ppm O3 (NO2/O3), and (8) 0.13 ppm PAN + 0.60 ppm NO2 + 0.45 ppm O3 (PAN/NO2/O3). The subjects alternated 20-min periods of rest (n = 3) and cycle ergometer exercise (n = 3) at a work load predetermined to elicit a ventilatory minute volume (VE) of approximately 25 L/min (BTPS). Functional residual capacity (FRC) was determined pre- and post-exposure. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was determined before and after exposure, and 5 min after each exercise period. Heart rate was monitored throughout each exposure, and VE was measured during the last 2 min of each exercise period. Exposure to FA, PAN, NO2, and PAN/NO2 had no effect on any measure of pulmonary or metabolic function. Ozone was primarily responsible for the pulmonary function effects observed. There was no significant difference between the responses to O3 exposure and the responses to the three O3 mixtures, indicating no interactions between the pollutants. The results suggest that women may be somewhat more responsive to O3 exposure than men, and that older people (51-76 years of age) may be less responsive to O3 than younger people (18-26 years of age).

  13. The Odin-OSIRIS Data Sets - Twelve Years of Ozone, Bromine Monoxide, Nitrogen Dioxide and Stratospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, N. D.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.; McLinden, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Canadian built OSIRIS instrument has just finished its twelfth full year of operation on-board the Swedish led spacecraft Odin. During these twelve years OSIRIS has measured the limb radiance profile of spectrally dispersed scattered sunlight in the wavelength range from 280 nm to 810 nm with approximately 1 nm spectral resolution. These measurements have been used to retrieve vertical number density profiles of ozone, nitrogen dioxide and bromine monoxide as well as vertical profiles of the stratospheric aerosol extinction at 750 nm. The OSIRIS data sets have been extensively used for process studies and have been included in many international initiatives including the SPARC DI, SPIN, the ozone_cci, the aerosol_cci and the SI2N. This paper details the data products and their availability as well as presenting OSIRIS related scientific highlights and contributions to the above mentioned initiatives

  14. Evaluation of nitrogen dioxide photolysis rates in an urban area using data from the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuilleumier, Laurent; Bamer, Jeffrey T.; Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    The photolysis of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde are two of the most influential reactions in the formation of photochemical air pollution, and their rates are computed using actinic flux determined from a radiative transfer model. In this study, we compare predicted and measured nitrogen dioxide photolysis rate coefficients ( jNO 2). We used the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) radiation transfer model to predict jNO 2 values corresponding to measurements performed in Riverside, California as part of the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study (SCOS'97). Spectrally resolved irradiance measured at the same site allowed us to determine atmospheric optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth and total ozone column, that are needed as inputs for the radiative transfer model. Matching measurements of aerosol optical depth, ozone column, and jNO 2 were obtained for 14 days during SCOS'97. By using collocated measurements of the light extinction caused by aerosols and ozone over the full height of the atmosphere as model input, it was possible to predict sudden changes in jNO 2 resulting from atmospheric variability. While the diurnal profile of the rate coefficient was readily reproduced, jNO 2 model predicted values were found to be consistently higher than measured values. The bias between measured and predicted values was 17-36%, depending on the assumed single scattering albedo. By statistical analysis, we restricted the most likely values of the single scattering albedo to a range that produced bias on the order of 20-25%. It is likely that measurement error is responsible for a significant part of the bias. The aerosol single scattering albedo was found to be a major source of uncertainty in radiative transfer model predictions. Our best estimate indicates its average value at UV-wavelengths for the period of interest is between 0.77 and 0.85.

  15. Long term changes of tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide over Pakistan derived from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) during the time period of October 2004 to December 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Rabbia; Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Urban air pollution is causing huge number of diseases and deaths annually. Nitrogen dioxide is an important component of urban air pollution and a precursor to particulate matter, ground level ozone, and acid rain. The satellite based measurements of nitrogen dioxide from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) can help in analyzing spatio temporal variability in ground level concentrations within a large urban area. In this study, the spatial and temporal distributions of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide Vertical Column Densities (VCDs) over Pakistan are presented from 2004 to 2014. The results showed that the winter season is having high nitrogen dioxide levels as compared to summers. The increase can be attributed to the anthropogenic activities especially thermal power generation and traffic count. Punjab is one of the major provinces with high nitrogen dioxide levels followed by Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan. Six hotspots have been examined in the present study such as Lahore, Islamabad, Karachi, Faisalabad, Okara and Multan. Emissions of nitrogen compounds from thermal power plants and transportation sector represent a significant fraction of the total nitrogen dioxide emissions to the atmosphere.

  16. Ozone and nitrogen dioxide total columns and vertical distributions at the Italian Antarctic station during 1996-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoli, D.; Ravegnani, F.; Giovanelli, G.; Kostadinov, Iv.; Petritoli, A.; Masieri, S.; Premuda, M.; Martins, H. T.; Silva, A. M.

    2009-09-01

    The GASCOD (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) has been installed at the 'Mario Zucchelli' Antarctic station since 1996. It measures the zenith sky radiation in the 405-465 nm spectral range in unattended and automatic mode. The application to the spectral data of the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) algorithms coupled with a Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) for the computation of the Air Mass Factor (AMF), allows for the retrieval of the total content of the main absorber in this spectral range, namely nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Moreover, the application of sophisticated inversion schemes to the output of the DOAS program, using the AMF matrix as the kernel of the inversion algorithm, permits the determination of the vertical distribution of the above mentioned compound. The full dataset of the spectral data obtained with GASCOD during the period 1996-2008, was re-analyzed with a modified version of the software tool previously utilized. Even if the spectral range examined with GASCOD is not the most favorable for the ozone total column and vertical profile retrieval, the re-processing of the spectral data allowed for the determination of the total ozone columns (TOC). The uncertainties range from 4% to 8% for ozone and 3% to 6% for NO2. The peculiar features of the seasonal variation of NO2 total columns (i.e. the normal decreasing during the austral fall and the irregular growing towards the summer month) are presented and discussed. The confirmations of the significant declining of the ozone total columns during the 'Ozone Hole' periods (mid-August to mid-October) are reported. The vertical distributions obtained for the preceding atmospheric compounds are shown and examined.

  17. Airborne Measurements of Nitric Oxide, Nitrogen Dioxide, Ozone, and Total Reactive Nitrogen During the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Mary Anne

    2000-01-01

    Fabrication of the University of Michigan Multichannel Chemiluminescence Instrument (UMMCI) was completed in early 1996 and the instrument participated in test flights on the NASA P3B at Wallops Island prior to integration and deployment for the PEM- Tropics A Mission. The UMMCI consists of 4 channels for simultaneous measurements of ozone and NO with the option for measurements of NO2 and NOy (total reactive nitrogen) when converters are placed upstream of the NO channels. Each NO channel consists of a zeroing volume and reaction vessel, while the ozone channel consists of an ozone catalyst (or scrubber) trap that is not in line with the reaction vessel. The detectors in all for channels are Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes, which are followed by pulse amplifier discriminators on the NO channels and an electrometer on the ozone channel. Schematics of the Detector Module and NOx/03 Probe Insert and Diagrams of the Control and Data System, the Power and Ground System, the Gas Flow System, and the Calibration System Flow are attached. Intercomparisons were conducted with G. Gregory, NASA/Langley, during the test flights (following prior calibration of the ozone generator/calibrators at the Wallops Long-Path Absorption facility). Initial test results appeared to be reasonable, and instrument characterization studies proceeded for the ozone channel and the 3 NO channels until deployment for integration for the PEM-Tropics Mission. Ozone data was obtained for Flights #4, and 6-2 1, and finalized data was submitted to the PEM-Tropics Data Archive and to the Science Team during the April 1997 Data Workshop. Although it initially appeared that the instrument sensitivity varied, subsequent tests showed that this was the fault of a leak in the ozone calibrator. In fact; the instrument sensitivity has not been observed to vary in a large number of tests over the years since the PEM-Tropics mission. We have, therefore, a very high degree of confidence in the O3 data that we

  18. Tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide measurements in urban and rural regions as seen by IASI and GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safieddine, S.; Clerbaux, C.; George, M.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.; Wespes, C.; Loyola, D.; Valks, P.; Hao, N.

    2013-09-01

    ozone (O3) columns in urban and rural regions as seen by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) are analyzed along with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Results over nine cities of the Northern Hemisphere for the period 2008-2011 show a typical seasonal behavior of tropospheric O3, with a first maximum reached in late spring because of stratospheric intrusion mainly and a continuous rise till the summer because of the anthropogenic-based ozone production. Over the East Asian cities, a decrease in the O3 tropospheric column is detected during the monsoon period. Seasonal cycling of tropospheric NO2 shows consistent higher values during winter because of the higher anthropogenic sources and longer lifetime. In rural regions, a complex relation between the O3 and NO2 columns is found, with good correlation in summer and winter. O3 concentrations in rural sites are found to be comparable to those closest to the anthropogenic emission sources, with peak values in spring and summer. Furthermore, the effect of the reduction of pollutant emissions in the Beijing region during the Olympic Games of 2008 compared to the same summer period in the following 3 years is studied. GOME-2 NO2 measurements show a reduction up to 54% above Beijing during this period compared to the following 3 years. IASI O3 measurements show an increase of 12% during July 2008 followed by a decrease of 5-6% during the months of August and September.

  19. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  20. Mutagenic activity of the products of ozone reaction with propylene in the presence and absence of nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shepson, P.B.; Kleindienst, T.E.; Edney, E.O.; Cuplitt, L.T.; Claxton, L.D.

    1985-11-01

    This study was performed to determine if propylene reaction with ozone could account for the large mutagenic activity we have observed in irradiated propylene/NO/sub x/ mixtures. In a 22.7-m/sup 3/ flow mode smog chamber, 5.4 ppm of propylene was allowed to react with 0.9 ppm of ozone either in the presence or in the absence of 0.2 ppm of nitrogen dioxide (at 25 /sup 0/C in the dark). The steady-state reactant and product distribution was then tested for total mutagenic activity by exposing Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 to the gas-phase chamber effluent. The total product dosage in the test plates was varied by exposing them for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 h. Salmonella typhimurium survivor levels were obtained at each length of exposure. The number of revertants per plate increased at a rate of approx. 4-5 per hour, while the survivor level decreased throughout the exposure. Most of the total mutagenic activity can be accounted for by the presence of formaldehyde. The total mutagenic activity observed was, however, much smaller than that observed in the irradiated propylene/NO/sub x/ system, for comparable amounts of propylene consumed.

  1. The effects of rapid urbanization on the levels in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide and ozone over East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianping; Zhou, Chenhong; Lee, Xuhui; Bao, Yunxuan; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Fung, Jimmy; Richter, Andreas; Liu, Xiong; Zheng, Yiqi

    2013-10-01

    Over the past few decades, China has experienced a rapid increase in urbanization. The urban built-up areas (population) in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou increased by 197% (87%), 148% (65%), and 273% (25%), respectively, from 1996 to 2011. We use satellite retrieval data to quantify the effects of rapid urbanization on the yearly and seasonal changes in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) over East China. The results show that rapid urbanization has a profound effect on tropospheric columns of NO2. During 1996-2011, the tropospheric columns of NO2 over the surrounding areas of Guangzhou, Shanghai, and Beijing increased by 82%, 292%, and 307%, respectively. The tropospheric columns of NO2 reach their maximum in winter and minimum in spring. The anthropogenic emissions related to urbanization are a dominant factor in the long-term changes in the yearly and seasonal mean tropospheric columns of NO2, whereas meteorological conditions such as the prevailing winds and precipitation account for the unique spatial patterns. Around the time of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, the tropospheric columns of NO2 over Beijing urban area significantly reduced by 48% in July, 35% in August, and 49% in September, relative to the same monthly averages over 2005-2007. However, this trend was reversed after the Games, and the increased rate was even larger than before. Our results show that the tropospheric NO2 above the three regions increased at rates 1.3-8 times faster than the rates in a recent inventory estimate of NOx emissions for 2000-2010. We also discuss the influence of urbanization on tropospheric ozone and find that the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) retrieval tropospheric column shows that ozone levels are relatively insensitive to urbanization and changes in tropospheric NO2.

  2. Surface exchange of nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone at a cattle pasture in Rondônia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkman, G. A.; Gut, A.; Ammann, C.; Gatti, L. V.; Cordova, A. M.; Moura, M. A. L.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2002-10-01

    Measurements of NO-NO2-O3 trace gas exchange were performed for two transition season periods during the La Niña year 1999 (30 April to 17 May, "wet-dry," and 24 September to 27 October, "dry-wet") over a cattle pasture in Rondônia. A dynamic chamber system (applied during the dry-wet season) was used to directly measure emission fluxes of nitric oxide (NO) and surface resistances for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) deposition. A companion study was simultaneously performed in an old-growth forest. In order to determine ecosystem-representative NO2 and O3 deposition fluxes for both measurement periods, an inferential method (multiresistance model) was applied to measure ambient NO2 and O3 concentrations using observed quantities of turbulent transport. Supplementary measurements included soil NO diffusivity and soil nutrient analysis. The observed NO soil emission fluxes were nine times lower than old-growth rain forest emissions under similar soil moisture and temperature conditions and were attributed to the combination of a reduced soil N cycle and lower effective soil NO diffusion at the pasture. Canopy resistances (Rc) of both gases controlled the deposition processes during the day for both measurement periods. Day and night NO2 canopy resistances were significantly similar (α = 0.05) during the dry-wet period. Ozone canopy resistances revealed significantly higher daytime resistances of 106 s m-1 versus 65 s m-1 at night because of plant, soil, and wet skin uptake processes, enhanced by stomatal activity at night and aqueous phase chemistry on vegetative and soil surfaces. The surface of the pasture was a net NOx sink during 1999, removing seven times more NO2 from the atmosphere than was emitted as NO.

  3. Tropospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide measurements in urban and rural regions as seen by IASI and GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safieddine, S.; Clerbaux, C.; George, M.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.; Wespes, C.; Layola, D.; Valks, P.; Hao, N.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) columns in urban and rural regions as seen by the infrared sounder IASI are analyzed along with GOME-2 tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Results over nine cities of the Northern Hemisphere for the period 2008-2011 show a typical seasonal behavior of tropospheric O3, with a first maximum reached in late spring because of stratospheric intrusion mainly, and a continuous rise till the summer because of the anthropogenic based ozone production. Over the East Asian cities, a decrease in the O3 tropospheric column is detected during monsoon period. Seasonal cycling of tropospheric NO2 shows consistent higher values during winter because of the higher anthropogenic sources and longer lifetime. In rural regions, a complex relation between the O3 and NO2 column is found, with higher linearity in summer. O3 concentrations in rural sites are found to be comparable to those found closest to the anthropogenic emission sources, with peak values in spring and summer. Furthermore, the effect of the reduction of pollutant emissions in China during the Olympic games of 2008 is studied. GOME-2 NO2 measurements show a reduction up to 54% above Beijing during this period compared to the following three years. IASI O3 measurements show an increase of 12% during July 2008 followed by a decrease of 5-6% during the months of August and September. A significant reduction in O3 tropospheric column values is also detected in the area downwind, few hundreds of kilometers to the south of Beijing.

  4. Application of the joint multifractal analysis for describing the influence of nitrogen dioxide on ground-level ozone concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariza-Villaverde, Ana B.; Pavon-Dominguez, Pablo; Jimenez-Hornero, Francisco J.; Gutierrez de Rave, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    High concentrations of ground-level ozone have a negative impact on human health and the environment. Detailed knowledge on the effects of nitrogen dioxide on the ozone seasonal pattern is convenient to prevent these undesirable effects. Thus, the joint multifractal approach has been used to complete the information provided by descriptive statistics. The joint multifractal spectra were obtained for 10-minute [O3] and [NO2] time series, recorded at Córdoba (southern Spain) in 2007, revealing the presence of two main seasonal patterns: autumn-winter and spring-summer. It could be verified that the joint multifractal spectra were convex surfaces confirming the presence of the multifractal nature in the time series. There was similitude in the shapes of the joint multifractal spectra corresponding to spring-summer months. A comparable looking was also found for the spectra of the autumn-winter months. This fact evidenced the influence of [NO2] on the [O3] seasonal pattern. According to the recorded data, the concentrations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide were negatively correlated. This circumstance was caused by the presence of high and low [O3] at low and high [NO2] values, respectively. In all the cases, the spectra exhibited a clear orientation from top left region, where high [NO2] and low [O3] values were found, to bottom right part, corresponding to low [NO2] and high [O3]. The single multifractal spectra exhibited a longer tail to the right of the maximum value for all the months indicating that there was a greater heterogeneity in the lower values in the ozone concentration time series. This heterogeneity was lower for autumn-winter months, especially for January due to the shorter lengths shown by their spectra right tails, compared to those obtained for the spring-summer season. The left tails of the spectra corresponding to the spring-summer and autumn-winter months tended to be overlapped, confirming that there was a seasonal similarity in scaling

  5. Mutagenic activity of the products of ozone reaction with propylene in the presence and absence of nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shepson, P.B.; Kleindienst, T.E.; Edney, E.O.; Cupitt, L.T.; Claxton, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    In a 22.7 cu.m. flow mode smog chamber, 5.4 ppm proylene was allowed to react with 0.9 ppm ozone either in the presence or absence of 0.2 ppm nitrogen dioxide. The steady-state reactant and product distribution was then tested for total mutagenic activity by exposing Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 to the gasphase chamber effluent. The total product dosage in the test plates was varied by exposing them for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 h. Salmonella typhimurium survivor levels were obtained at each length of exposure. The number of revertants/plate increased at a rate of approx. 4-5 per hour, while the survivor level decreased throughout the exposure. Most of the total mutagenic activity can be accounted for by the presence of formaldehyde. This work clearly demonstrates that a gas-phase exposure of Salmonella typhimurium can be effectively employed as an alternative to the standard plate incorporation test for volatile species and for complex gas phase mixtures.

  6. Effects of depletion of ascorbic acid or nonprotein sulfhydryls on the acute inhalation toxicity of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and phosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, R.; Highfill, J.W.; Hatch, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of depleting lung ascorbic acid (AH{sub 2}) and nonprotein sulfhydryls (NPSH) on the acute inhalation toxicity of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), ozone (O{sub 3}), and phosgene (COCl{sub 2}) was investigated in guinea pigs. The increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid protein (an indicator of alveolar-capillary damage leading to increased permeability) was measured 16 to 18 hr following a 4 hr exposure to the gas in animals deficient in (AH{sub 2}) or NPSH. Gas concentrations were chosen which produced low but significant increases in BAL protein. Lung (AH{sub 2}) was lowered to about 20% of control by feeding rabbit chow for 2 weeks. Lung NPSH was lowered to about 50% of control by injecting a mixture of buthionine S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) and diethylmaleate (DEM) (2.7 and 1.2 mmol/kg respectively). BSO/DEM did not affect the lung concentrations of (AH{sub 2}) or alpha-tocopherol. AH{sub 2} depletion caused a 6 fold and a 3 fold enhancement in the toxicity of 5 ppm and 10 ppm (NO{sub 2}), and a 6 fold enhancement in the toxicity of 0.5 ppm (O{sub 3}), but did not affect toxicity of 1.0 ppm (O{sub 3}). AH{sub 2} depletion did not affect phosgene toxicity (at 0.25 ppm and 0.5 ppm).

  7. EFFECTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE AND OZONE ON NITROGEN RETRANSLOCATION IN PONDEROSA PINE NEEDLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in leaf N concentration can be an important response to air pollutants in trees, with implications both for tree growth and N cycling through forest ecosystems. Ozone causes premature leaf senescence, which may be associated with a shift in N from the senescing leaves to...

  8. Monitoring of atmospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide over the south of Portugal by ground-based and satellite observations.

    PubMed

    Bortoli, Daniele; Silva, Ana Maria; Costa, Maria João; Domingues, Ana Filipa; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2009-07-20

    The SPATRAM (Spectrometer for Atmospheric TRAcers Monitoring) instrument has been developed as a result of the collaboration between CGE-UE, ISAC-CNR and Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA). SPATRAM is a multi-purpose UV-Vis-scanning spectrometer (250 - 950 nm) and it is installed at the Observatory of the CGE, in Evora, since April 2004. A brief description of the instrument is given, highlighting the technological innovations with respect to the previous version of similar equipment. The need for such measurements automatically taken on a routine basis in south-western European regions, specifically in Portugal, has encouraged the development and installation of the equipment and constitutes a major driving force for the present work. The main features and some improvements introduced in the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) algorithms are discussed. The results obtained applying DOAS methodology to the SPATRAM spectrometer measurements of diffused spectral sky radiation are presented in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ozone (O(3)). NO(2) confirms the typical seasonal cycle reaching the maximum of (6.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(+15) molecules cm(-2) for the sunset values (PM), during the summer season, and the minimum of (1.55 +/- 0.07) x 10(+15) molecules cm(-2) for the sunrise values (AM) in winter. O(3) presents the maximum total column of (433 +/- 5) Dobson Unit (DU) in the spring season and the minimum of (284 +/- 3) DU during the fall period. The huge daily variations of the O(3) total column during the spring season are analyzed and discussed. The ground-based results obtained for NO(2) and O(3) column contents are compared with data from satellite-borne equipment (GOME - Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment; SCIAMACHY - Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY; TOMS - Total Ozone Monitoring Spectrometer) and it is shown that the two data

  9. Long-term effects of ozone and nitrogen dioxide on the metabolism and population of alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mochitate, K.; Ishida, K.; Ohsumi, T.; Miura, T. )

    1992-04-01

    To investigate how alveolar macrophages adapt themselves to oxidative pollutants in the long term, rats were exposed to a strong oxidant, ozone (O3), or a weak oxidant, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), for a maximum duration of 12 wk. After exposures, alveolar macrophages were collected by pulmonary lavage. Throughout 11 wk of exposure to 0.2 ppm O3, the specific activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glutathione peroxidase of the peroxidative metabolic pathway and pyruvate kinase and hexokinase of the glycolytic pathway were 40-70% elevated over the controls in alveolar macrophages. The population of alveolar macrophages was consistently 60% higher than the controls. The small-sized macrophages, immature macrophages, preferentially increased. To the contrary, the thymidine incorporation per cell was always 20-30% lower than in the controls, although the total incorporation remained unchanged. No infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes occurred. By 12 wk of exposures to 1.2 and 4.0 ppm NO2, the population of alveolar macrophages increased 30% over the control. Among the enzymes examined, however, only the G6PDH activity increased 10% for 4.0 ppm NO2. No increase in the enzyme activities occurred for 1.2 ppm NO2. Based on these results, alveolar macrophages adapt themselves to the long-term exposure of O3 or NO2 by recruiting immature macrophages through an apparent influx of monocytes. During the exposure to O3, the peroxidative metabolic and glycolytic pathways are enhanced persistently in alveolar macrophages, whereas both pathways were not enhanced by the exposures to NO2.

  10. Retrieval of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide profiles from Odin Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System (OSIRIS) limb-scattered sunlight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Craig Stuart

    2009-12-01

    Key to understanding and predicting the effects of global environmental problems such as ozone depletion and global warming is a detailed understanding of the atmospheric processes, both dynamical and chemical. Essential to this understanding are accurate global data sets of atmospheric constituents with adequate temporal and spatial (vertical and horizontal) resolutions. For this purpose the Canadian satellite instrument OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System) was launched on the Odin satellite in 2001. OSIRIS is primarily designed to measure minor stratospheric constituents, including ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), employing the novel limb-scattered sunlight technique, which can provide both good vertical resolution and near global coverage. This dissertation presents a method to retrieve stratospheric O 3 and NO2 from the OSIRIS limb-scatter observations. The retrieval method incorporates an a posteriori optimal estimator combined with an intermediate spectral analysis, specifically differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). A detailed description of the retrieval method is presented along with the results of a thorough error analysis and a geophysical validation exercise. It is shown that OSIRIS limb-scatter observations successfully produce accurate stratospheric O3 and NO2 number density profiles throughout the stratosphere, clearly demonstrating the strength of the limb-scatter technique. The OSIRIS observations provide an extremely useful data set that is of particular importance for studies of the chemistry of the middle atmosphere. The long OSIRIS record of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide may also prove useful for investigating variability and trends.

  11. Stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide amount obtained with GASCOD-type DOAS spectrometer at Terra Nova Bay Station (Antarctica) during December 2000 - January 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Kostadinov, Ivan K.; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Petritoli, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    GASCODs are UV-Visible ground-based spectrometers developed at the ISAO Institute and used to detect stratospheric trace gases involved in the ozone cycle such as NO2, OClO, BrO, by application of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) methodology to the zenith scattered light collected data. After several tests both in laboratory and in Antarctic region, one of the spectrometers was modified for unattended and continuous measurement in extreme high-latitude environment. The instrument was installed in December 1995 in the Italian Station at Terra Nova Bay (74 degree(s)26'S, 164 degree(s)03E', Ross Sea). The GASCOD is still working and causing very interesting data for the study of the denitrification processes during the formation of the so-called ozone hole over the Antarctic region. When the station is unmanned, to allow for the continuous NO2 monitoring for whole the year without mechanical problems, the fixed [407 - 460] nm spectral region is investigated. The results for Nitrogen Dioxide, obtained by application of DOAS algorithms to the data recorded during the year 2000, are presented. During a leg (December 2000 - January 2001) of the 16th Italian Antarctic Expedition, after the usual instrument check, many measurements were carried out in other spectral regions, with the aim to obtain information about the stratospheric tracers contents. The results obtained for Ozone, Nitrogen dioxide and Formaldehyde at different Solar Zenith Angle are presented.

  12. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE PATTERNS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE AND MODIFICATIONS BY OZONE ON SUSCEPTIBILITY TO BACTERIAL INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nitrogen dioxide (NO2) diurnal cycle found in urban communities usually consists of a low basal concentration upon which are superimposed higher concentration peaks or spikes of short duration. Various components of the environmental exposure mode were examined to assess effe...

  13. The photolysis of chlorine in the presence of ozone, nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuper, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    The following three systems were investigated: the Cl2-O3 system, the Cl2-O2-NO system and the Cl2-NO2-M system. In the first system, the reaction between ClO and O3, the reaction between OClO and O3, and the mechanism of the Cl2-O3 system were studied. In the second system, the reaction between ClOO and NO was investigated. In the last system, the reaction between Cl and NO2 was investigated as well as the kinetics of the chemiluminescence of the Cl-NO2-O3 reaction. In the first system, Cl2 was photolyzed at 366 nm in the presence of O3 within the temperature range 254-297 K. O3 was removed with quantum yields of 5.8 + or - 0.5, 4.0 + or - 0.3, 2.9 + or - 0.3 and 1.9 + or - 0.2 at 297, 283, 273, and 252 K respectively, invariant to changes in the initial O3 or Cl2 concentration, the extent of conversion or the absorbed intensity, I sub a. The addition of nitrogen had no effect on -phi(03). The Cl2 removal quantum yields were 0.11 + or - 0.02 at 297 K for Cl2 conversions of about 30%, much higher than expected from mass balance considerations based on the initial quantum yield of 0.089 + or - 0.013 for OClO formation at 297 K. The final chlorine-containing product was Cl2O7. It was produced at least in part through the formation of OClO as an intermediate which was also observed with an initial quantum yield of phi sub i(OClO) = 2500 exp(-(3025 + or - 625)/T) independent of (O3) or I sub a.

  14. An Overview of Striking Scientific Applications of Nitrogen Dioxide Retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument Between 2004 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides are involved in many atmospheric processes relevant to air pollution, climate change, and environmental stress. Gaseous nitrogen oxides are toxic, regulated by regional authorities and the WHO, and their emissions and chemistry are important for the formation of ozone and aerosols. Nitrogen oxides are thought to act as a net climate cooler, mostly via enhancing the oxidative capacity of the global troposphere resulting in CH4 lifetime reductions, and via the formation of light-scattering particles. In this paper I will discuss how tropospheric NO2 column retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on board EOS-Aura have pushed the envelope in various scientific applications over the last decade. A categorization of these applications shows that OMI NO2 data have been used for (1) high-resolution monitoring of NOx emissions, (2) monitoring trends in NO2 air pollution levels, (3) evaluating mid-day NOx chemistry, (4) evaluating secondary pollutant formation, (5) estimating surface NO2 concentrations, (6) improving forecasting skills of air quality and chemistry transport models, (7) estimating nitrogen deposition to ecosystems, and (8) outreach activities to the general public. I will show some intriguing examples of the above applications, and pay close attention to the steps necessary to arrive at these successful applications. These steps include advanced filtering of the data for e.g. wind direction or speed, spatial pattern recognition to isolate specific emission categories, and more generally improving the description of NOx emission categories and chemistry in models at spatial and temporal scales relevant to OMI and upcoming TROPOMI and geostationary sensors.

  15. PERSONAL MONITOR FOR NITROGEN DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An attempt was made to develop a personal monitor to measure nitrogen dioxide. Sampling of nitrogen dioxide is accomplished by permeation through a silicone membrane into a alkaline thymol blue solution. The nitrogen dioxide is converted to nitrite and is then quantitated by colo...

  16. Subalpine grassland carbon dioxide fluxes indicate substantial carbon losses under increased nitrogen deposition, but not at elevated ozone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Matthias; Obrist, Daniel; Novak, Kris; Giger, Robin; Bassin, Seraina; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition affect plant carbon (C) dynamics and may thus change ecosystem C-sink/-source properties. We studied effects of increased background O3 concentrations (up to ambient x 2) and increased N deposition (up to +50 kg ha-1 a-1) on mature, subalpine grassland during the third treatment year. During ten days and 13 nights, covering the vegetation period of 2006, we measured ecosystem-level CO2 exchange using a steady state cuvette. Light dependency of gross primary production (GPP) and temperature dependency of ecosystem respiration rates (Reco) were established. Soil temperature, soil water content, and solar radiation were monitored. Using Reco and GPP values, we calculated seasonal net ecosystem production (NEP), based on hourly averages of global radiation and soil temperature. Differences in NEP were compared to differences in soil organic C after five years of treatment. Under high O3 and with unchanged aboveground biomass, both mean Reco and GPP decreased throughout the season. Thus, NEP indicated an unaltered growing season CO2-C balance. Under high N treatment, with a +31% increase in aboveground productivity, mean Reco, but not GPP increased. Consequently, seasonal NEP yielded a 53.9 g C m-2 (± 22.05) C loss compared to control. Independent of treatment, we observed a negative NEP of 146.4 g C m-2 (±15.3). This C loss was likely due to a transient management effect, equivalent to a shift from pasture to hay meadow and a drought effect, specific to the 2006 summer climate. We argue that this resulted from strongly intensified soil microbial respiration, following mitigation of nutrient limitation. There was no interaction between O3 and N treatments. Thus, during the 2006 growing season, the subalpine grassland lost >2% of total topsoil organic C as respired CO2, with increased N deposition responsible for one-third of that loss.

  17. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Nitrogen Dioxide to Surface Monitor Nitrogen Dioxide Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; Pippin, Margaret R.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Neil, Doreen O.; Lingenfelser, Gretchen; Szykman, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is one of the U. S. EPA s criteria pollutants, and one of the main ingredients needed for the production of ground-level ozone. Both ozone and nitrogen dioxide cause severe public health problems. Existing satellites have begun to produce observational data sets for nitrogen dioxide. Under NASAs Earth Science Applications Program, we examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitor observations of this air pollutant to examine if the satellite data can be used to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite tropospheric column nitrogen dioxide to surface monitor nitrogen dioxide concentration for the period from September 1996 through August 1997 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. We found that the spatial resolution and observation time of the satellite did not capture the variability of this pollutant as measured at ground level. The tools and processes developed to conduct this study will be applied to the analysis of advanced satellite observations. One advanced instrument has significantly better spatial resolution than the measurements studied here and operates with an afternoon overpass time, providing a more representative distribution for once-per-day sampling of this photochemically active atmospheric constituent.

  18. Oxidative damage by ozone and nitrogen dioxide: synergistic toxicity in vivo but no evidence of synergistic oxidative damage in an extracellular fluid.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, C A; van der Vliet, A; Eiserich, J P; Last, J A; Halliwell, B; Cross, C E

    1995-01-01

    Inhalation of ozone (O3) and/or nitrogen dioxide (.NO2) is associated with the development of inflammation in the respiratory tract and various alterations in pulmonary functions. Respiratory tract lining fluids (RTLFs) represent the first biological fluids coming into contact with these inhaled toxicants. Using plasma as a surrogate for RTLFs, we have previously shown that O3 [Cross, Motchnik, Bruener, Jones, Kaur, Ames and Halliwell (1992) FEBS Lett. 298, 269-272] and .NO2 [Halliwell, Hu, Louie, Duvall, Tarkington, Motchnik and Cross (1992) FEBS Lett. 313, 62-66] are both capable of depleting antioxidants and damaging proteins and lipids. O3 particularly damages proteins, whereas .NO2 induces the peroxidation of lipids and nitrates aromatic amino acids. It has been reported that O3 and .NO2 cause synergistic toxicity in rodents [Gielzleichter, Witschi and Last (1992) Tox. Appl. Pharmacol. 116, 1-9]. In the present chapter, we review evidence showing that combined exposure of these two oxidant gases to human plasma fails to exert synergistic oxidative damage to plasma constituents, and in fact, O3 and .NO2 antagonize each other's actions. We conclude that the potentiating effect of these two gases on morbidity and mortality in rodents represents a complex interactive biological effect rather than a simple synergistic oxidative effect in extracellular fluids. PMID:8660391

  19. NITROGEN DIOXIDE PHOTOLYTIC, RADIOMETRIC, AND METEOROLOGICAL FIELD DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photolysis of nitrogen dioxide is a major reaction resulting in the formation of ozone in the troposphere. The rate constant, k1, for the photodissociation of NO2 is, under ambient conditions, a function of latitude, solar zenith angle, and cloud cover; therefore, k1 is highly va...

  20. Exposure assessment of air pollutants: a review on spatial heterogeneity and indoor/outdoor/personal exposure to suspended particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monn, Christian

    This review describes databases of small-scale spatial variations and indoor, outdoor and personal measurements of air pollutants with the main focus on suspended particulate matter, and to a lesser extent, nitrogen dioxide and photochemical pollutants. The basic definitions and concepts of an exposure measurement are introduced as well as some study design considerations and implications of imprecise exposure measurements. Suspended particulate matter is complex with respect to particle size distributions, the chemical composition and its sources. With respect to small-scale spatial variations in urban areas, largest variations occur in the ultrafine (<0.1 μm) and the coarse mode (PM 10-2.5, resuspended dust). Secondary aerosols which contribute to the accumulation mode (0.1-2 μm) show quite homogenous spatial distribution. In general, small-scale spatial variations of PM 2.5 were described to be smaller than the spatial variations of PM 10. Recent studies in outdoor air show that ultrafine particle number counts have large spatial variations and that they are not well correlated to mass data. Sources of indoor particles are from outdoors and some specific indoor sources such as smoking and cooking for fine particles or moving of people (resuspension of dust) for coarse particles. The relationships between indoor, outdoor and personal levels are complex. The finer the particle size, the better becomes the correlation between indoor, outdoor and personal levels. Furthermore, correlations between these parameters are better in longitudinal analyses than in cross-sectional analyses. For NO 2 and O 3, the air chemistry is important. Both have considerable small-scale spatial variations within urban areas. In the absence of indoor sources such as gas appliances, NO 2 indoor/outdoor relationships are strong. For ozone, indoor levels are quite small. The study hypothesis largely determines the choice of a specific concept in exposure assessment, i.e. whether personal

  1. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  2. Sensitivity of ginseng to ozone and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, J.T.A.; Ormrod, D.P.

    1981-10-01

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.), was injured by exposure to 20 pphm ozone and/or 50 pphm (v/v) sulfur dioxide for 6 hr daily for 4 days. Ozone induced upper surface leaflet stippling along the veins and interveinally, and sulfur dioxide induced mild chlorosis to irregular necrotic areas. Ginseng was less sensitive to ozone and as sensitive to sulfur dioxide as 'Cherry Belle' radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and 'Bel W-3' tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

  3. The Development of a Nitrogen Dioxide Sonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluis, Wesley; Allaart, Marc; Piters, Ankie; Gast, Lou

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is an important pollutant in the atmosphere, it is toxic for living species, it forms photochemical tropospheric ozone, and acid rain. There is a growing number of space-borne instruments to measure nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere, but validation of these instruments is hampered by lack of ground-based and in-situ profile measurements. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) has developed a working NO2 sonde. The sonde is attached to a small meteorological balloon and measures a tropospheric NO2 profile. The NO2 sonde has a vertical resolution of 5 meter, and a measurement range between 1 and 100 ppbv. The instrument is light in weight (±300 gram), cheap (disposable), energy efficient and not harmful to the environment or the person who finds the package after use. Therefore the popular molybdenum catalytic converter or a photomultiplier tube can not be used. Instead the sonde uses the chemiluminescent reaction of NO2 in an aqueous luminol solution. The NO2- luminol reaction produces a faint blue/purple light (± 425 nm), which is detected by an array of silicon photodiodes. The instrument is equipped with a reservoir filled with luminol solution. A small piezoelectric diaphragm pump, pumps the luminol solution into a reaction vessel. A Teflon air pump forces the ambient air into the reaction vessel. The NO2 in the ambient air reacts with the luminol solution, and the emitted light is detected by an array of silicon photodiodes which are mounted on the reaction vessel. The generated current in the photodiodes is amplified and relayed to the ground by a Vaisala (RS92) radiosonde. The reaction vessel and the amplifiers are mounted in a tin can, to shield against electrostatic and radio interference, and stray light. All the air tubes used for the instrument are made of Teflon. The luminol solution is optimised to be specific to NO2. Sodium sulphate, sodium EDTA and Triton X-100 are added to the luminol solution to

  4. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Increase in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide over China observed from space.

    PubMed

    Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P; Nüss, Hendrik; Granier, Claire; Niemeier, Ulrike

    2005-09-01

    Emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning reduce local air quality and affect global tropospheric chemistry. Nitrogen oxides are emitted by all combustion processes and play a key part in the photochemically induced catalytic production of ozone, which results in summer smog and has increased levels of tropospheric ozone globally. Release of nitrogen oxide also results in nitric acid deposition, and--at least locally--increases radiative forcing effects due to the absorption of downward propagating visible light. Nitrogen oxide concentrations in many industrialized countries are expected to decrease, but rapid economic development has the potential to increase significantly the emissions of nitrogen oxides in parts of Asia. Here we present the tropospheric column amounts of nitrogen dioxide retrieved from two satellite instruments GOME and SCIAMACHY over the years 1996-2004. We find substantial reductions in nitrogen dioxide concentrations over some areas of Europe and the USA, but a highly significant increase of about 50 per cent-with an accelerating trend in annual growth rate-over the industrial areas of China, more than recent bottom-up inventories suggest. PMID:16136141

  6. Nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone - Latitudinal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Capone, L. A.; Riegel, C. A.; Turco, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    Substantial increases in atmospheric N2O resulting from the increased use of nitrogen fertilizers might cause large (to 10%) decreases in the stratospheric ozone content. Such ozone decreases would be caused by catalytic reaction cycles involving odd-nitrogen that is formed by N2O decomposition in the upper stratosphere. Turco et al. (1978), using a background chlorine level of 2 ppbv, have shown that if the measured values of specified reactions are used a 50% increase in N2O would lead to a 2.7% increase in the stratospheric column density, although the ozone content above 30 km would be reduced by more than 5%; they also estimated (unpublished data) that the change in the ozone column density caused by doubling the N2O abundance would be very close to zero (within about 0.1%). The present paper extends these calculations of N2O/ozone effects to two dimensions, thereby identifying the latitude dependence expected for such ozone perturbations. The effects of changes in stratospheric chlorine levels on predicted ozone changes are also discussed.

  7. Monitoring of Occupational Exposure of Mild Steel Welders to Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Morteza; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Salehpour, Sousan

    2011-01-01

    Background Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding are widely used for mild steel segments in basic metal industries. Pulmonary problems such as asthma, pulmonary inflammation, hyper-responsiveness of airways and higher susceptibility to infections are reported as the result of occupational exposure of welders to ozone and nitrogen oxides. Potent oxidizing agents like ozone and nitrogen oxides are also reported to be a precursor for respiratory problems and cause lipid peroxidation of membranes. Materials and Methods A total of 43 nonsmoking MIG and TIG welders and 41 nonsmoking workers without appreciable exposure to any chemicals as the control population were chosen to participate in this study. Occupational exposure to ozone was monitored according to the validated methods. Malondialdehyde (MDA) of blood serum as a biomarker for lipid peroxidation was analyzed using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results A total of 88.4% and 74.4% of welders had exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide higher than the permissible limit of occupational exposure, respectively. Generally, exposure of MIG welders to ozone was significantly higher than TIG welders (P = 0.006). However, exposure to nitrogen dioxide gas was comparable in both groups. Serum MDA of welders was significantly higher than that of the control group (P = 0.001). A significant correlation was detected between ozone exposure and level of serum malondialdehyde. Such correlation was not observed for nitrogen dioxide exposure. Conclusion Considering the high exposure of welders to ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and higher level of serum malondialdehyde in them compared to controls, risk management is recommended for this group of workers. PMID:25191389

  8. Carbon and nitrogen co-dependence of soil microbial responses to elevated carbon dioxide and ozone in a wheat-soybean agroecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change factors such as elevated atmospheric CO2 and ozone can exert significant impacts on soil microbes and microbially-mediated ecosystem processes. However, the underlying mechanisms through which soil microbes respond to these environmental changes remain poorly understood. The current ...

  9. Characteristics of total column ozone and nitrogen dioxide amount over Korea during the 2015 MAPS campaign: Pandora spectrometer, satellite and in-situ measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Chong, H. S.; Kim, W.; Kim, J.; Lee, H.; Kim, J. H.; KIM, J.; Herman, J. R.; Abuhassan, N.; Park, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    To improve the performances of satellite retrieval of surface pollution and air quality models, NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research) and NASA are planning the KORUS-AQ campaign over the Korean Peninsula in May-June, 2016. As a pre-campaign of the KORUS-AQ, MAPS (Megacity Air Pollution Studies)-Seoul was conducted from May to July, 2015. During this campaign, six Pandora instruments continuously provided total column density of O3 and NO2 over Korea. These measurements will be continued until the end of 2016 covering the KORUS-AQ campaign period and beyond for the initial validation of TROPOMI measurements. To assess the variation of O3 and NO2, data were collected from Pandora, Dobson spectrophotometer, Brewer spectrophotometer, other ground-based in situ measurements and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Ozone column density from Pandora exhibited significantly high correlation (R2 > 0.8) with the ground-based Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers. Due to the detector anomaly and wide spatial pixel coverage, O3 values from OMI showed lower correlation (R2 > 0.6) with the Pandora. Even though six Pandoras were scattered across the country, O3 data showed similar distribution, in accordance with the low spatial variability of ozone. On the contrary, NO2 distribution pattern showed large difference at each site, which showed peak at around 10 a.m., with larger diurnal variability in urban area than that in rural area by more than 5 times. As most of Pandora sites do not have on-site in situ NO2 measurements, other in situ data from the nearest Air Korea stations were used for the comparison. The comparison result showed significant correlation, although, the correlation coefficient was relatively lower than that of O3. Pandora measurements agreed well with the ground based instruments and OMI satellite data with averaged residuals less than 2% in O3. In case of NO2 Pandora measurements showed similar trend with in situ measurements.

  10. NITROGEN DIOXIDE AND RESPIRATORY ILLNESS IN CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drs. Jonathan M. Samet, John D. Spengler, and colleagues conducted a prospective investigation of 1,205 health infants living in homes with gas or electric stoves in Albuquerque, NM. Nitrogen dioxide exposures were carefully estimated from repeated measurements in multiple ...

  11. Synergistic effects of exposure to concentrated ambient fine pollution particles and nitrogen dioxide in humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to single pollutants such as ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects. It is unclear, however, if simultaneous exposure to multiple air pollutants (e.g. PM and ozone or nitrogen dioxide), a more real world scenario, results in non-additiv...

  12. 21 CFR 868.2385 - Nitrogen dioxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. 868.2385 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2385 Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitrogen dioxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2385 - Nitrogen dioxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. 868.2385 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2385 Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitrogen dioxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2385 - Nitrogen dioxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. 868.2385 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2385 Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitrogen dioxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2385 - Nitrogen dioxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. 868.2385 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2385 Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitrogen dioxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2385 - Nitrogen dioxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. 868.2385 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2385 Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitrogen dioxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  17. 40 CFR 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    1998-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 1998-07-01 1998-07-01 false 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. Section 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. AIR PROGRAMS-(CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois § 52.728Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  18. 21 CFR § 868.2385 - Nitrogen dioxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2015-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2015-04-01 2015-04-01 false Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. § 868.2385 Section Â... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2385 Nitrogen dioxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitrogen dioxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the...

  19. 40 CFR 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1997-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 1997-07-01 1997-07-01 false 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. Section 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. AIR PROGRAMS-(CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois § 52.728Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  20. 40 CFR 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    1996-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 1996-07-01 1996-07-01 false 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. Section 52.728 Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois § 52.728Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  1. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  2. The Impact of Increasing Carbon Dioxide on Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.; Douglass, Anne R.; Considine, David B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have used the GSFC coupled two-dimensional (2D) model to study the impact of increasing carbon dioxide from 1980 to 2050 on the recovery of ozone to its pre-1980 amounts. We find that the changes in temperature and circulation arising from increasing CO2 affect ozone recovery in a manner which varies greatly with latitude, altitude, and time of year. Middle and upper stratospheric ozone recovers faster at all latitudes due to a slowing of the ozone catalytic loss cycles. In the lower stratosphere, the recovery of tropical ozone is delayed due to a decrease in production and a speed up in the overturning circulation. The recovery of high northern latitude lower stratospheric ozone is delayed in spring and summer due to an increase in springtime heterogeneous chemical loss, and is speeded up in fall and winter due to increased downwelling. The net effect on the higher northern latitude column ozone is to slow down the recovery from late March to late July, while making it faster at other times. In the high southern latitudes, the impact of CO2 cooling is negligible. Annual mean column ozone is predicted to recover faster at all latitudes, and globally averaged ozone is predicted to recover approximately ten years faster as a result of increasing CO2.

  3. The effect of increased carbon dioxide concentrations on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughner, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence on ozone of an increased carbon dioxide concentration, for which a measurable growth has been observed in the recent past. Increased carbon dioxide can indirectly affect ozone by perturbing atmospheric temperatures, which will alter ozone production, whose rate displays a fairly strong temperature dependence. This paper presents one-dimensional model results for the steady state ozone behavior when the CO2 concentration is twice its ambient level; the results account for coupling between chemistry and temperature. When the CO2 level doubled, the total ozone burden increased in relation to the ambient burden by 1.2-2.5%, depending on the vertical diffusion coefficient used. Above 30 km, ozone concentrations were larger than the ambient values, a maximum increase of 16% being reached at 43 km. In this region the relative variations were insensitive to the choice of diffusion coefficient. Below 30 km, ozone concentrations were smaller than the unperturbed values and were sensitive to the vertical diffusion profile in this region (10-30 km).

  4. IMPACT OF OZONE AND SULPHUR DIOXIDE ON SOYBEAM YIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little dose-response information exists on the effects of chronic ozone (O3) and intermittent sulfur dioxide (SO2) exposures on the yield of important agricultural crops. Such information is needed for refinement of estimates of air pollution induced crop losses. Field-grown plan...

  5. Hemispherical Scanning Imaging DOAS: Resolving nitrogen dioxide in the urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Graves, R. R.; Lawrence, J.; Faloon, K.; Monks, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    over Bologna is an instrumented Zepplin measuring NO2 and ozone among other species. A hemispherical panorama of nitrogen dioxide concentrations, as measured by the HSI-DOAS instrument in Bologna.

  6. 40 CFR 52.1876 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The condition to EPA's approval of the oxides of nitrogen State Implementation Plan (SIP) codified at 40 CFR 52.1870(c)(128) is satisfied by Ohio's November 26, 2003, submittal of the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  7. 40 CFR 52.1576 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52... strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter as of May 8, 1974 (39 FR 16346), are not met since the plan does not provide for the degree of nitrogen oxides emission...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1876 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The condition to EPA's approval of the oxides of nitrogen State Implementation Plan (SIP) codified at 40 CFR 52.1870(c)(128) is satisfied by Ohio's November 26, 2003, submittal of the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  9. 40 CFR 52.1876 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The condition to EPA's approval of the oxides of nitrogen State Implementation Plan (SIP) codified at 40 CFR 52.1870(c)(128) is satisfied by Ohio's November 26, 2003, submittal of the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  10. 40 CFR 52.1876 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The condition to EPA's approval of the oxides of nitrogen State Implementation Plan (SIP) codified at 40 CFR 52.1870(c)(128) is satisfied by Ohio's November 26, 2003, submittal of the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  11. 40 CFR 52.1876 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The condition to EPA's approval of the oxides of nitrogen State Implementation Plan (SIP) codified at 40 CFR 52.1870(c)(128) is satisfied by Ohio's November 26, 2003, submittal of the... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide....

  12. Total nitrogen dioxide at the Arctic polar circle since 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Goutail, F.; Pommereau, J.P.; Sarkissian, A. ); Kyro, E. ); Dorokhov, V.

    1994-06-22

    This article presents results of nitrogen dioxide measurements from a station in northern Finland (67.3[degrees]N) since January 1990, and stations in Greenland, northern Atlantic, and eastern Siberia, during EASOE. The nitrogen dioxide levels are seen to have fallen at least 30 % since the arrival of the volcanic aerosols from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. The winter results are not supportive of strong denitrification, or of the expected level of vapor nitrogen dioxide during winter months.

  13. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the 'associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  14. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  15. Novel nighttime free radical chemistry in severe nitrogen dioxide pollution episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Roy M.; Shi, Ji Ping; Grenfell, J. Lee.

    During winter air pollution episodes, nitrogen dioxide concentrations can far exceed health based guidelines, but to date, there has been no wholly adequate explanation of the atmospheric chemical production of very high concentrations of nitrogen dioxide during such episodes, despite inclusion of the thermal oxidation of nitric oxide with dioxygen, as well as the well known reaction with ozone. In laboratory studies we have shown that both petrol engine exhaust and petrol vapour catalyse the thermal oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide and have identified certain dialkenes as the chemical agent responsible ( Shi and Harrison, 1997). It is postulated that addition of nitrogen dioxide to the dialkene forms a reactive free radical species which initiates a chain reaction during which peroxy species are formed which convert NO to NO 2. A numerical box model including explicit hydrocarbon chemistry and incorporating this mechanism, shows that rates of nitrogen dioxide production observed in London in December 1991 and hitherto unexplained, are explicable by the presence of conjugate dialkenes at concentrations comparable with those which have been observed in polluted urban atmospheres.

  16. 40 CFR 52.1676 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... August 10, 1979, is disapproved because it is inconsistent with 40 CFR Subpart G, Control strategy... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter as of May 8, 1974 (39 FR...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1676 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... August 10, 1979, is disapproved because it is inconsistent with 40 CFR Subpart G, Control strategy... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter as of May 8, 1974 (39 FR...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1676 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... August 10, 1979, is disapproved because it is inconsistent with 40 CFR Subpart G, Control strategy... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter as of May 8, 1974 (39 FR...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1676 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... August 10, 1979, is disapproved because it is inconsistent with 40 CFR Subpart G, Control strategy... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter as of May 8, 1974 (39 FR...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1676 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... August 10, 1979, is disapproved because it is inconsistent with 40 CFR Subpart G, Control strategy... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52...: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter as of May 8, 1974 (39 FR...

  1. Purification of crude hexafluoroacetone containing nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfield, J. H.; Karsay, B. I.

    1984-09-25

    Crude hexafluoroacetone containing as impurities nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide is purified by admixing with water to form an aqueous solution, admixing the aqueous solution with concentrated sulfuric acid or oleum to form a vapor and scrubbing the vapor with liquid concentrated sulfuric acid to produce purified anhydrous hexafluoroacetone. The sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides interact with the aqueous solution and conc

  2. Current nitrogen dioxide exposures among railroad workers

    SciTech Connect

    Woskie, S.R.; Hammond, S.K.; Smith, T.J.; Schenker, M.B. )

    1989-07-01

    As part of a series of epidemiologic studies of the mortality patterns of railroad workers, various air contaminants were measured to characterize the workers' current exposures to diesel exhaust. Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), which is a constituent of diesel exhaust, was examined as one possible marker of diesel exposure. An adaptation of the Palmes personal passive sampler was used to measure the NO{sub 2} exposures of 477 U.S. railroad workers at four railroads. The range of NO{sub 2} exposures expressed as the arithmetic average +/- two standard errors for the five career job groups were as follows: signal maintainers, 16-24 parts per billion (ppb); clerks/dispatchers/station agents, 23-43 ppb; engineers/firers, 26-38 ppb; brakers/conductors, 50-74 ppb; and locomotive shop workers, 95-127 ppb. Variations among railroads and across seasons were not significant for most job groups.

  3. The development of a nitrogen dioxide sonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluis, W. W.; Allaart, M. A. F.; Piters, A. J. M.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2010-12-01

    A growing number of space-borne instruments measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations in the troposphere, but validation of these instruments is hampered by the lack of ground-based and in situ profile measurements. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) has developed a working NO2 sonde. The sonde is attached to a small meteorological balloon and measures a tropospheric NO2 profile. The NO2 sonde has a vertical resolution of 5 m and a measurement range between 1 and 100 ppbv. The instrument is light in weight (0.7 kg), cheap (disposable), energy efficient and not harmful to the environment or the person who finds the package after use. The sonde uses the chemiluminescent reaction of NO2 in an aqueous luminol solution. The NO2-luminol reaction produces faint blue/purple light (at about 425 nm), which is detected by an array of silicon photodiodes. The luminol solution is optimised to be specific to NO2. An on-ground comparison with measurements from a Photolytic Analyser of The National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) shows that both instruments measure similar NO2 variations in ambient air. During the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring instruments (CINDI) in June/July 2009, six vertical profiles of NO2 from the ground to a 5 km altitude were measured, which clearly show that the largest amount of NO2 is measured in the boundary layer. The measured boundary layer heights of the NO2 sonde are in good agreement with boundary layer heights determined by a LD40 Ceilometer at Cabauw.

  4. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. xcystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. zone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine an...

  5. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. )

    1993-11-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is an oxidant gas that contaminates outdoor air and indoor air in homes with unvented gas appliances. A prospective cohort study was carried out to test the hypothesis that residential exposure to NO2 increases incidence and severity of respiratory illnesses during the first 18 months of life. A cohort of 1,205 healthy infants from homes without smokers was enrolled. The daily occurrence of respiratory symptoms and illnesses was reported by the mothers every 2 wk. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as lower respiratory tract. Indoor NO2 concentrations were serially measured with passive samplers place in the subjects' bedrooms. In stratified analyses, illness incidence rates did not consistently increase with exposure to NO2 or stove type. In multivariate analyses that adjusted for potential confounding factors, odds ratios were not significantly elevated for current or lagged NO2 exposures, or stove type. Illness duration, a measure of illness severity, was not associated with NO2 exposure. The findings can be extended to homes with gas stoves in regions of the United States where the outdoor air is not heavily polluted by NO2.

  6. Ambient Pressure LIF Instrument for Nitrogen Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, J.; George, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Concerns about the health effects of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and its role in forming deleterious atmospheric species have made it desirable to have low-cost, sensitive ambient measurements of NO2. A continuous-wave laser-diode Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system for NO2 that operates at ambient pressure has been developed, thereby eliminating the need for an expensive pumping system. The use of high quality optical filters has facilitated low-concentration detection of NO2 using atmospheric pressure LIF by providing substantial discrimination against scattered laser photons without the use of time-gated electronics, which add complexity and cost to the LIF instrumentation. This improvement allows operation at atmospheric pressure with a low-cost diaphragm sampling pump. The current prototype system has achieved sensitivity several orders of magnitude beyond previous efforts at ambient pressure (LOD of 2 ppb, 60 s averaging time). Ambient measurements of NO2 were made in Portland, OR using both the standard NO2 chemiluminescence method (CL-NO2) and the LIF instrument and showed good agreement (r2 = 0.92). Our instrument is currently being developed as a “back-end” detector for a more field portable NOy system. In addition, we are currently utilizing this instrument to study surface chemistry involving NO2 at atmospherically relevant concentrations and pressures.

  7. SAGE observations of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The global distribution of nitrogen dioxide in the middle to upper stratosphere (25-45 km altitude) for the period February 1979 to November 1981 has been determined from observations of attenuated solar radiation in the visible region 0.385-0.45 micron by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) satellite instrument. The SAGE-derived NO2 vertical profiles compare well with observations by balloon- and aircraft-borne sensors. The global SAGE NO2 distributions generally show a maximum in mixing ratio of 8 parts per billion by volume at about 35 km altitude near the equatorial latitudes at local sunset. The location of the mixing ratio peak moves synchronously with the overhead sun for the four different seasons. High-latitude NO2 column content shows strong seasonal variation, with a maximum in local summer and a minimum in local winter. Selected data at high-latitude winter seasons are presented, suggesting that the large variation shown could be explained by the coupling of both dynamics and photochemistry of the NO(x) species. Finally, profiles of the ratio of sunset to sunrise NO2 mixing ratios, peaking at about a factor of two at 30 km, are shown.

  8. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  9. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  10. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  11. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  12. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  13. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  14. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AMONG FORMALDEHYDE, CHLORINE, AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical reactions among chlorine, nitrogen dioxide, and formaldehyde were studied, using parts-per-million concentrations in 1 atm of air. The reactant mixtures were irradiated by ultraviolet fluorescent lamps and simultaneously analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared te...

  15. Study of solar variability impact on nitrogen dioxide: 2004-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Voiculescu, Mirela; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) locally plays an important role in the radiation budget by absorbing solar radiation at ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelengths. The influence of solar variability on the inter-annual variability and trends in nitrogen dioxide is evaluated for a period of 10 years (2004-2013) using monthly mean tropospheric NO2 measurements of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) version 2.0. Possible signatures of solar variability on nitrogen dioxide time series of NO2 over several cities were analyzed using various statistical methods. Various solar proxies were selected, in order to separate between possible links to solar irradiance and to solar wind. Several locations with different levels of pollution, located in different places of the world (Athens, Jungfraujoch, Lauder, Lisbon, Moscow, and Uccle), were selected. Observations show a clear 27 day period of the NO2 tropospheric Vertical Column Density (VCD) or total Slant Column Density (SCD). NO2 content decreases with increasing activity above polluted areas (e.g. Athens, Moscow) while for unpolluted areas there is no evident correlation (e.g. Lauder, Jungfraujoch). Possible effects of solar wind on NO2 content are observed as well, but the relationship is less clear, since polluted areas seem to respond differently to solar wind variations. The mechanism by which NO2 content can be affected by solar variations relate mainly to ozone production but other paths by which solar energy may be transferred to the lower atmosphere are investigated.

  16. 49 CFR 173.336 - Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen....336 Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied. (a) Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied... with nitrogen dioxide. Each valve opening must be closed by a solid metal plug with tapered...

  17. 49 CFR 173.336 - Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen....336 Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied. (a) Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied... with nitrogen dioxide. Each valve opening must be closed by a solid metal plug with tapered...

  18. 49 CFR 173.336 - Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen....336 Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied. (a) Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied... with nitrogen dioxide. Each valve opening must be closed by a solid metal plug with tapered...

  19. 49 CFR 173.336 - Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen....336 Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied, or dinitrogen tetroxide, liquefied. (a) Nitrogen dioxide, liquefied... with nitrogen dioxide. Each valve opening must be closed by a solid metal plug with tapered...

  20. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  1. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  2. Low Energy, Low Emissions: Sulfur Dioxide; Nitrogen Oxides, and Carbon Dioxide in Western Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcamo, Joseph; De Vries, Bert

    1992-01-01

    Links proposed low-energy scenarios for different Western European countries with the amount of pollutants that may result from these scenarios. Sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions are calculated for the 10 countries for which low-energy scenarios are available, resulting in reductions of 54%, 37%, and 40%, respectively.…

  3. INFLUENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ON INSECT DENSITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    DELUCIA, E.; DERMODY, O.; O'NEILL, B.; ALDEA, M.; HAMILTON, J.; ZANGERL, A.; ROGER, A.; BERENBAUM, M.

    2005-01-05

    The combustion of fossil fuels is profoundly altering the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Beginning with the Industrial Revolution, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has increased from approximately 280 to 370 {micro}l l{sup -1} in 2004, and it is expected to exceed 550 {micro}l l{sup -1} by 2050. Tropospheric ozone has risen even more rapidly than CO{sub 2} and average summer concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere are expected to continue to increase by 0.5-2.5% per year over the next 30 years. Although elevated CO{sub 2} stimulates photosynthesis and productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, ozone (O{sub 3}) is deleterious. In addition to directly affecting the physiology and productivity of crops, increased concentrations of tropospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} are predicted to lower the nutritional quality of leaves, which has the potential to increase herbivory as insects eat more to meet their nutritional demands. We tested the hypothesis that changes in tropospheric chemistry affect the relationship between plants and insect herbivores by changing leaf quality. The susceptibility to herbivory of soybean grown in elevated CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3} was examined using free air gas concentration enrichment (SoyFACE). FACE technology has the advantage that plants are cultivated under realistic field conditions with no unwanted alteration of microclimate or artificial constraints on the insect community.

  4. Abrupt recent trend changes in atmospheric nitrogen dioxide over the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Jos; Beirle, Steffen; Hörmann, Christoph; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen oxides, released from fossil fuel use and other combustion processes, affect air quality and climate. From the mid-1990s onward, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been monitored from space, and since 2004 with relatively high spatial resolution by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument. Strong upward NO2 trends have been observed over South and East Asia and the Middle East, in particular over major cities. We show, however, that a combination of air quality control and political factors, including economical crisis and armed conflict, has drastically altered the emission landscape of nitrogen oxides in the Middle East. Large changes, including trend reversals, have occurred since about 2010 that could not have been predicted and therefore are at odds with emission scenarios used in projections of air pollution and climate change in the early 21st century. PMID:26601240

  5. Abrupt recent trend changes in atmospheric nitrogen dioxide over the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Jos; Beirle, Steffen; Hörmann, Christoph; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides, released from fossil fuel use and other combustion processes, affect air quality and climate. From the mid-1990s onward, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been monitored from space, and since 2004 with relatively high spatial resolution by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument. Strong upward NO2 trends have been observed over South and East Asia and the Middle East, in particular over major cities. We show, however, that a combination of air quality control and political factors, including economical crisis and armed conflict, has drastically altered the emission landscape of nitrogen oxides in the Middle East. Large changes, including trend reversals, have occurred since about 2010 that could not have been predicted and therefore are at odds with emission scenarios used in projections of air pollution and climate change in the early 21st century. PMID:26601240

  6. Interactions of nitrogenous air pollutants and ozone with California forests

    SciTech Connect

    Bytnerowicz, A.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone has been blamed for the decline of ponderosa and Jeffrey pines in Sierra Nevada and the San Bernardino Mountains. However, also other components of photochemical smog, and especially various nitrogenous compounds, play an important role in the observed changes in California forests. Gaseous nitric acid and peroxyacetyl nitrate may directly effects plants (development of foliar injury) or may predispose foliage to the deleterious effects of acidic wet deposition, elevated levels of the UV-B radiation or other stresses. In addition, the long-term deposition of nitrate and ammonium in wet precipitation, dry deposition of gaseous nitric acid, ammonia, nitrogen oxides, particulate nitrate and ammonium can significantly change nitrogen status of forests in California. Initially, changes in phenology of plants, higher rates of physiological processes, changed plant chemical composition, altered biochemical processes and improved growth can be observed. These changes may lead to increased susceptibility of plants to various abiotic and biotic stresses. After long periods of increased nitrogen deposition, deficiencies of calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, and other nutrients may develop. As a consequence of the elevated N deposition interacting with ozone phytotoxicity, perturbations in normal growth of plants and changes in species composition in forest stands may be taking place. Oversaturating forests with nitrogen may also result in increased nitrate content in ground water of the affected watersheds.

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  9. NITROGEN DIOXIDE, PULMONARY FUNCTION, AND RESPIRATORY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern as to the toxicity of the oxides of nitrogen has been frequently expressed in clinical and toxicological literature. Oxides of nitrogen are highly reactive compounds and suggest toxic effects on biological systems. The earliest evidence for potential damage to man occurre...

  10. High-resolution measurements from the airborne Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. P.; Anand, J. S.; Vande Hey, J. D.; Leigh, R. R.; Monks, P. S.; Leigh, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen Dioxide is both a primary pollutant with direct health effects and a key precursor of the secondary pollutant ozone. This paper reports on the development, characterisation and test flight of the Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI) remote sensing system. The ANDI system includes an imaging (UV)-vis grating spectrometer able to capture scattered sunlight spectra for the determination of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations by way of DOAS slant column density and vertical column density measurements. Results are shown for an ANDI test flight over Leicester City in the UK. Retrieved NO2 columns at a surface resolution of 80 m x 20 m revealed hot spots in a series of locations around Leicester City, including road junctions, the train station, major car parks, areas of heavy industry, a nearby airport (East Midlands) and a power station (Ratcliffe-on-Soar). In the city centre the dominant source of NO2 emissions was identified as road traffic, contributing to a background concentration as well as producing localised hot spots. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant urban increment over the city centre which increased throughout the flight.

  11. High-resolution measurements from the airborne Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. P.; Anand, J. S.; Vande Hey, J. D.; White, J.; Leigh, R. R.; Monks, P. S.; Leigh, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is both a primary pollutant with direct health effects and a key precursor of the secondary pollutant ozone. This paper reports on the development, characterisation and test flight of the Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI) remote sensing system. The ANDI system includes an imaging UV/Vis grating spectrometer able to capture scattered sunlight spectra for the determination of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations by way of DOAS slant column density and vertical column density measurements. Results are shown for an ANDI test flight over Leicester City in the UK on a cloud-free winter day in February 2013. Retrieved NO2 columns gridded to a surface resolution of 80 m × 20 m revealed hotspots in a series of locations around Leicester City, including road junctions, the train station, major car parks, areas of heavy industry, a nearby airport (East Midlands) and a power station (Ratcliffe-on-Soar). In the city centre the dominant source of NO2 emissions was identified as road traffic, contributing to a background concentration as well as producing localised hotspots. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant urban increment over the city centre which increased throughout the flight.

  12. An Improved Retrieval of Tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide from GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly; Jacob, Daniel J.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Bucsela, Eric; Gleason, James F.; Palmer, Paul I.; Bey, Isabelle; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a retrieval of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument that improves in several ways over previous retrievals, especially in the accounting of Rayleigh and cloud scattering. Slant columns, which are directly fitted without low-pass filtering or spectral smoothing, are corrected for an artificial offset likely induced by spectral structure on the diffuser plate of the GOME instrument. The stratospheric column is determined from NO2 columns over the remote Pacific Ocean to minimize contamination from tropospheric NO2. The air mass factor (AMF) used to convert slant columns to vertical columns is calculated from the integral of the relative vertical NO2 distribution from a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry driven by assimilated meteorological data (Global Earth Observing System (GEOS)-CHEM), weighted by altitude dependent scattering weights computed with a radiative transfer model (Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer), using local surface albedos determined from GOME observations at NO2 wavelengths. The AMF calculation accounts for cloud scattering using cloud fraction, cloud top pressure, and cloud optical thickness from a cloud retrieval algorithm (GOME Cloud Retrieval Algorithm). Over continental regions with high surface emissions, clouds decrease the AMT by 20- 30% relative to clear sky. GOME is almost twice as sensitive to tropospheric NO2 columns over ocean than over land. Comparison of the retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns for July 1996 with GEOS-CHEM values tests both the retrieval and the nitrogen oxide radical (NOx) emissions inventories used in GEOS-CHEM. Retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns over the United States, where NOx emissions are particularly well known, are within 18% of GEOS-CHEM columns and are strongly spatially correlated (r = 0.78, n = 288, p less than 0.005). Retrieved columns show more NO2 than GEOS-CHEM columns over the Transvaal

  13. A satellite-based analysis of temporal dynamics in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide levels over large urban agglomerations worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; van der A, Ronald; Valdebenito, Alvaro

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations allow for a consistent perspective on tropospheric nitrogen dioxide at a global scale and their operational status facilitates studies on multi-annual to decadal temporal dynamics. Utilizing close to a decade of data from the SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) sensors, we present in this contribution a global analysis of the temporal dynamics in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide over the worlds' major urban agglomerations during the last 10 years. The results indicate that while levels of nitrogen dioxide have been slowly declining in most areas of the United States and Europe over the last decade, very rapid increases in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide can be observed over many megacities and other large urban agglomerations throughout most of Asia, often with highly significant trends. Particularly in Eastern China, increases of 10 to 20 percent per year are quite widespread. Some of the large urban agglomerations with the most rapid increase in nitrogen dioxide pollution are Dhaka in Bangladesh, Kabul in Afghanistan, and Tianjin in China, and these are investigated in more detail. An inter-comparison of trends derived separately from SCIAMACHY and OMI shows that in terms of spatial patterns the resulting trends agree quite well between the two instruments, particularly in the more polluted areas. However, at the individual grid cell level substantial differences can be found. In addition, the satellite-based trends in tropospheric nitrogen dioxide levels were compared to those obtained from the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) chemical transport model over the same time period, and furthermore sampling the model at the same time of day as the satellite overpass, thus eliminating the impact of the distinct diurnal cycle of nitrogen dioxide. While generally a good correspondence in the trends has been found between the two data sources

  14. Global Ozone and Reactive Nitrogen : Composition, Chemistry and Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sing, Hanwant B.; Bradshaw, J.; Davis, D.; Gregory, G.; Talbot, R.

    1994-01-01

    Ozone plays a central role in the chemistry of the atmosphere both as an ultraviolet shield and as a source of hydroxyl radicals (OH), a potent initiator of atmospheric chemistry. There is evidence to suggest that the ozone abundance in the troposphere (0-10 km) has doubled since the industrial revolution and continues to increase to date. The principle reason for this increase is thought to be the increasing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) from anthropogenic activities. Although NO(x) is highly reactive and its products such as HN03 are easily removed by deposition, it now appears that its chemistry is quite complex and it can be transported over long distances via its conversion to a variety of nitrates and penetrates. The sources of atmospheric NO(x) include free tropospheric sources such as lightning and subsonic aircraft, as well as surface emissions which are transported to the free troposphere via convective processes. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have tried to unravel the chemistry of reactive nitrogen species, its sources, and their role in ozone formation. In this presentation we shall describe the results from these studies.

  15. 40 CFR 52.728 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.728 Section 52.728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.728 Control strategy:...

  16. 40 CFR 52.728 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.728 Section 52.728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.728 Control strategy:...

  17. 40 CFR 52.728 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.728 Section 52.728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.728 Control strategy:...

  18. 40 CFR 52.728 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.728 Section 52.728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.728 Control strategy:...

  19. 40 CFR 52.728 - Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.728 Section 52.728 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.728 Control strategy:...

  20. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE DOCUMENT FOR THE CHEMILUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENT OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas phase chemiluminescence has been designated as the reference measurement principle for the measurement of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the ambient atmosphere. Continuous analyzers based on this measurement principle may be calibrated with NO2 either from the gas phase titration ...

  1. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON PULMONARY FUNCTION IN HUMAN SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty human subjects with asthma and chronic bronchitis and ten normal, healthy adults were exposed to 0.5 ppm of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for two hours in an environmental chamber. They engaged in one 15-minute, light to medium-exercise stint on a bicycle ergometer during this pe...

  2. Continuous analysis of nitrogen dioxide in gas streams of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, W. T.; Kispert, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Analyzer and sampling system continuously monitors nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the feed and tail gas streams of a facility recovering nitric acid. The system, using a direct calorimetric approach, makes use of readily available equipment and is flexible and reliable in operation.

  3. INFLUENCE OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM IN ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential extrapulmonary effects of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on hepatic xenobiotic metabolism were examined. Initial studies were conducted using pentobarbital (PEN) induced sleeping time (S.T.) in mice as an indicator of integrated mechanisms of xenobiotic clearance. A 3 hr. expos...

  4. Nitrogen Dioxide Trend over the United States: the View from the Ground, the View from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) are decreasing over the US due to environmental policies and technological change. We use observations of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite instrument and surface NO2 in-situ measurements from the air quality system (AQS) to quantify the trends, and to establish the relationship between the trends in tropospheric column and surface concentration. Both observations show substantial downward trends from 2005 to 2013, with an average reduction of 35 percent according to OMI and 38 percent according to AQS. The annual reduction rates are largest in 2005-2009: -6.2 percent per year and -7 percent per year observed by OMI and AQS, respectively. We examine various factors affecting the estimated trend in OMI NO2 columns and in-situ NO2 observations. An improved understanding of trend offers valuable insights about effectiveness of emission reduction regulations on state and federal level.

  5. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. 77.6 Section 77.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. (a)(1) If excess emissions of sulfur dioxide occur at the affected source or nitrogen oxide occur at an affected unit during any year, the owners and operators...

  6. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. 77.6 Section 77.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. (a)(1) If excess emissions of sulfur dioxide occur at the affected source or nitrogen oxide occur at an affected unit during any year, the owners and operators...

  7. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. 77.6 Section 77.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. (a)(1) If excess emissions of sulfur dioxide occur at the affected source or nitrogen oxide occur at an affected unit during any year, the owners and operators...

  8. 40 CFR 52.136 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the State of Arizona on April 13, 1994 for the Maricopa County ozone nonattainment area from the NOX RACT...

  9. 40 CFR 52.235 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District on April 26, 1994 for the Monterey Bay ozone nonattainment...

  10. Evidence of Entrainment Impacting Surface Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haman, C.; Lefer, B. L.; Morris, G. A.; Flynn, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary boundary layer dynamics, such as entrainment of the residual layer, can have profound impacts on gaseous species due to changes in turbulent mixing. The lifetime of sulfur dioxide permits us to measure downward mixing of gases from the residual layer into the mixing layer after sunrise. During the 2009 SHARP campaign, elevated levels of sulfur dioxide were found during the morning hours at the Moody Tower (29.92°, -95.34°, 75 m AGL) measurement site on 19 May (22.9 ppbv), 20 May (35.7 ppbv), and 30 May (double peak: 18.7 and 13.8 ppbv). Easterly to east-southeasterly winds persisted between 1.8 and 3.2 ms-1 during these sulfur dioxide events. The Moody Tower site is west-southwest of the Houston Ship Channel Industrial Complex, a major source of sulfur dioxide. Dual ozone and sulfur dioxide balloon sonde profiles show a peak in sulfur dioxide just above the stable nocturnal inversion on days with similar meteorological conditions (e.g. 64 ppbv at 430 m on 30 May). As the nocturnal inversion begins to erode after sunrise, turbulent mixing increases and entrainment from the residual layer begins. An aerosol lidar used to determine mixing heights indicated the surface inversion breakup at approximately 1000 CDT on 19 May and 0845 CDT on 20 May. Corresponding peaks in sulfur dioxide immediately follow inversion erosion. The entrainment rate of sulfur dioxide can often be used to differentiate between increases in surface ozone due to photochemistry and downward mixing. Twenty-nine morning ozonesondes were launched between 2004 and 2010, fifteen of which were coincident with continuous mixing height measurements. The median integrated morning residual layer ozone was 57.5 ppbv*km for all sondes, which is substantial when compared to 81.0 ppbv*km of integrated afternoon fully developed boundary layer ozone. To reduce the importance of the horizontal ozone advection and ozone production terms, this study focused on the data between 0300 and 1000 CDT. Similarly

  11. 40 CFR 52.136 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. 52.136 Section 52.136 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the State of...

  12. 40 CFR 52.136 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. 52.136 Section 52.136 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the State of...

  13. 40 CFR 52.136 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. 52.136 Section 52.136 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the State of...

  14. 40 CFR 52.136 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. 52.136 Section 52.136 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the State of...

  15. Effect of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on ICR mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC(50) values were determined for male ICR mice exposed to different concentration of carbon monoxide for 30 min and of nitrogen dioxide for 10 min in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The data indicate that ICR mice are more resistant to these two toxicants than Swiss albino mice. The carbon monoxide LC(50) for a 30-min exposure was about 8,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to 3,570 ppm for Swiss albino mice. The nitrogen dioxide LC(50) for a 10-min exposure was above 2,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to about 1,000 ppm for Swiss albino mice.

  16. Uptake rate of nitrogen dioxide by potato plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sinn, J.P.; Pell, E.J.; Kabel, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Greenhouse-grown potato plants were exposed to nitrogen dioxide in an exposure chamber to determine the rate of NO/sub 2/ uptake at concentrations from 228 to 817 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ (0.12-0.43 ppm). Results show that a consistent increase in uptake rate accompanied an increase in NO/sub 2/ exposure concentrations. Exposure in the range of concentration had no significant effect on leaf diffusive resistance.

  17. Curing preceramic polymers by exposure to nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabe, James A. (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Lu, Paul P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A rapid method of infusibilizing (curing) preceramic polymers comprising treatment said polymers with gaseous nitrogen dioxide. The infusibilized polymers may be pyrolyzed to temperatures in excess of about 800.degree. C. to yield ceramic materials with low oxygen content and, thus, good thermal stability. The methods are especially useful for the production of ceramic fibers and, more specifically, to the on-line production of ceramic fibers.

  18. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on virus growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, G A

    1977-01-01

    Inhalation of ozone and sulfur dioxide inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose of mice. Ozone inhalation caused the more pronounced inhibition of influenza virus growth: 0.6 ppm ozone for 3 hours post-virus exposure almost completely inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose, whereas sulfur dioxide (6 ppm for 7 days) causes only partial inhibition of influenza growth in the nose. Neither gas altered the propagation of influenza virus in the lungs of mice. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) growth was either unaffected by exposure to ozone (0.9 ppm for 3 hours) or, when ozone exposure preceeded VSV exposure, the virus may have grown to slightly higher titer. The inhibitory effect of ozone and sulfur dioxide on influenza virus growth in nasal epithelium suggests a competitive interaction between the chemical inhalant, the virus, and host tissues, with net consequences for the pathogenesis of this disease. If the effcts of these inhalants are to be properly interpreted, they should be determined for all major regions of virus growth and inhalant deposition. PMID:189703

  19. Total reactive nitrogen, N[sub 2]O, and ozone in the winter Arctic stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Y.; Sugita, T.; Ziereis, H.; Iwasaka, Y. ); Schmidt, U. ); Aimedieu, P. )

    1994-06-22

    This paper presents results of measurements of reactive nitrogen, N[sub 2]O, and ozone as a function of altitude above Kiruna, Sweden, on January 31, 1992. The measurements below 20 km were outside the polar vertex, and above 23 km were inside the polar vertex. There was a strong positive correlation between ozone and reactive nitrogen, and a negative correlation between nitrous oxide and reactive nitrogen below 22 km.

  20. Nitrogen dioxide monitoring with an automatic DOAS station at Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Kostadinov, Ivan K.; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    1998-08-01

    During the last few years UV-Vis spectrometers were developed at the FISBAT Institute and are used for application of differential optical absorption spectroscopy method to detect many atmospheric trace gases playing important roles in the stratospheric chemistry. After several test both in laboratory and in Antarctic region, one of the spectrometers, called GASCOD2/2, was modified in collaboration with ENEA for unattended and automatic measurement in extreme high-latitude environment. The instrument was installed in December 1995 in the Italian Station at Terra Nova Bay. The aim of this research is to study the dentrification processes during the formation of the so-called ozone hole over the Antarctic region. The preliminary results for the first year of nitrogen dioxide measurement are presented and discussed.

  1. Nitrogen Dioxide Total Column Over Terra Nova Bay Station - Antarctica - During 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoli, D.; Ravegnani, F.; Giovanelli, G.; Petritoli, A.; Kostadinov, I.

    GASCOD (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences), installed at the Italian Antarctic Station of Terra Nova Bay (TNB) - 74.69S, 164.12E - since 1995, carried out a full dataset of zenith scattered light measurements for the year 2001. The application of DOAS methodology to the collected data gave as final results, the slant column values for nitrogen dioxide. The seasonal variation shows a maxi- mum in the summer and it is in good agreement with the results obtained by other authors. The data analysis is performed by using different parameters like the po- tential vorticity (PV) at 500 K and the atmospheric temperatures at the same level. After the verification of the linear dependency between the NO2 slant column values and the temperature of NO2 cross section utilized in the DOAS algorithm, the actual stratospheric temperatures (from ECMWF) over TNB are applied to the results. The sensible changes in the nitrogen dioxide slant column values allow to highlight the good matching between the NO2 AM/PM ratio and the potential vorticity at 500 K. The NO2 slant column values follow the variations of the stratospheric temperature mainly during the spring season, when the lowest temperatures are observed and the ozone-hole phenomena mainly occur. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: The author Daniele Bortoli was financially supported by the "Subprograma Ciência e Tecnologia do Ter- ceiro Quadro Comunitário de Apoio". The National Program for Antarctic Research (PNRA) supported this research.

  2. 40 CFR 52.230 - Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.230 Section 52.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter... nitrogen oxides emission reduction attainable through application of reasonably available...

  3. 40 CFR 52.230 - Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.230 Section 52.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter... nitrogen oxides emission reduction attainable through application of reasonably available...

  4. 40 CFR 52.230 - Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.230 Section 52.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter... nitrogen oxides emission reduction attainable through application of reasonably available...

  5. 40 CFR 52.230 - Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Nitrogen dioxide. 52.230 Section 52.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Control strategy and regulations: Nitrogen dioxide. (a) The requirements of § 52.14(c)(3) of this chapter... nitrogen oxides emission reduction attainable through application of reasonably available...

  6. Ozone production using dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontiga, Francisco; Abidat, Roukia; Moreno, Helena; Agustín, Fernández-Rueda; Rebiaï, Saida

    2015-09-01

    The generation of ozone in oxygen and carbon dioxide using a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been experimentally investigated. The DBD reactor was operated at moderate voltages (4.2 to 5.6 kV) and frequencies (50 to 500 Hz) and the gas flow rate was varied in the range 50 to 200 cm3/min. The averaged consumed power (<1 W) was evaluated using a monitor capacitor of known capacitance (1 μF). The effluent gas from the DBD reactor was diverted to a gas cell situated inside the sample compartment of a UV spectrophotometer. Therefore, ozone concentration was determined from the measurement of absorbance using Beer-Lambert law. The results have shown that ozone concentration in oxygen grows very linearly with the input power. In contrast, the production of ozone in carbon dioxide is less regular, which may be due to the deposition of a thin layer over the stainless steel electrode during the application of the electrical discharge. Moreover, the rate of ozone production with the injected energy density was found to be 500 times weaker in carbon dioxide than in pure oxygen. This work was supported by the Spanish Government Agency ``Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación'' under Contract No. FIS2011-25161.

  7. 40 CFR 52.235 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nitrogen. 52.235 Section 52.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the Monterey Bay... the area from implementing the oxides of nitrogen (NOX) requirements for reasonably available...

  8. 40 CFR 52.235 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nitrogen. 52.235 Section 52.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the Monterey Bay... the area from implementing the oxides of nitrogen (NOX) requirements for reasonably available...

  9. 40 CFR 52.235 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nitrogen. 52.235 Section 52.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the Monterey Bay... the area from implementing the oxides of nitrogen (NOX) requirements for reasonably available...

  10. 40 CFR 52.235 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nitrogen. 52.235 Section 52.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the Monterey Bay... the area from implementing the oxides of nitrogen (NOX) requirements for reasonably available...

  11. COMBINED EFFECTS OF ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE AND OZONE ON SOYBEAN WHOLE-PLANT WATER USE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing atmospheric concentrations of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and ozone, a critical issue is how these changes will affect agricultural hydrologic cycles. To address an important part of this question, a study was undertaken to test the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon diox...

  12. COMBINED EFFECT OF SULFUR DIOXIDE AND OZONE ON BEAN AND TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plants of two cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris and one cultivar of Nicotiana tabacum were exposed to a replicated series of concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (03), and combinations of these two air pollutants for single four-hour periods. Experiments were performed in ...

  13. Reactive nitrogen oxides and ozone above a taiga woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakwin, Peter S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Munger, J. William; Daube, Bruce C.; Bradshaw, John D.; Sandholm, Scott T.; Talbot, Robert W.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Blake, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of reactive nitrogen oxides (NOx and NOy) and ozone (O3) were made in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) above a taiga woodland in northern Quebec, Canada, during June-August, 1990, as part of NASA Artie Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B. Levels of nitrogen oxides and O3 were strongly modulated by the synoptic scale meteorology that brought air from various source regions to the site. Industrial pollution from the Great Lakes region of the U.S. and Canada appears to be a major source for periodic elevation of NOx, NOy and O3. We find that NO/NO2 ratios at this site at midday were approximately 50% those expected from a simple photochemical steady state between NOx and O3, in contrast to our earlier results from the ABLE 3A tundra site. The difference between the taiga and tundra sites is likely due to much larger emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons (particularly isoprene) from the taiga vegetation. Hydrocarbon photooxidation leads to relatively rapid production of peroxy radicals, which convert NO to NO2, at the taiga site. Ratios of NOx to NOy were typically 2-3 times higher in the PBL during ABLE 3B than during ABLE 3 A. This is probably the result of high PAN levels and suppressed formation of HNO3 from NO2 due to high levels of biogenic hydrocarbons at the ABLE 3B site.

  14. Reactive nitrogen oxides and ozone above a taiga woodland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakwin, Peter S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Munger, J. William; Daube, Bruce C.; Bradshaw, John D.; Sandholm, Scott T.; Talbot, Robert W.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Gregory, Gerald L.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of reactive nitrogen oxides (NO(x) and NO(y)) and ozone (O3) were made in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) above a taiga woodland in northern Quebec, Canada, during June-August, 1990, as part of NASA Artic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B. Levels of nitrogen oxides and O3 were strongly modulated by the synoptic scale meteorology that brought air from various source regions to the site. Industrial pollution from the Great Lakes region of the U.S. and Canada appears to be a major source for periodic elevation of NO(x), and NO(y) and O3. We find that NO/NO2 ratios at this site at midday were approximately 50% those expected from a simple photochemical steady state between NO(x) and O3, in contrast to our earlier results from the ABLE 3A tundra site. The difference between the taiga and tundra sites is likely due to much larger emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons (particularly isoprene) from the taiga vegetation. Hydrocarbon photooxidation leads to relatively rapid production of peroxy radicals, which convert NO to NO2, at the taiga site. Ratios of NO(x) to NO(y) were typically 2-3 times higher in the PBL during ABLE 3B than during ABLE 3A. This is probably the result of high PAN levels and suppressed formation of HNO3 from NO2 due to high levels of biogenic hydrocarbons at the ABLE 3B site.

  15. Passive samplers for ambient ozone, formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide: Indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Grosjean, E.

    1994-12-31

    Time-integrated measurements of air pollutants have many applications in the context of regulations pertaining to indoor air quality, outdoor (ambient) monitoring, and personal exposure assessment. For several years, the passive samplers developed at DGA have been applied to cost-effective measurements of parts per billion levels of ozone, formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide. Examples of applications will be described. These include (a) formaldehyde measurements in indoor settings including museums, public buildings and personal exposure; (b) ozone measurements indoor (museums, cultural heritage buildings) and outdoor (Class 1 Wilderness areas; air quality surveys in Europe, Canada and Latin America, long-term monitoring of ozone exposure in forests) and (c) surveys of ambient levels of sulfur dioxide in several eastern European countries.

  16. Ozone flow visualization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Stedman, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques using ozone for tracing gas flows are proposed whereby ozone is detected through its strong absorption of ultraviolet light, which is easily made visible with fluorescent materials, or through its reaction with nitric oxide to form excited nitrogen dioxide, which in relaxing emits detectable light. It is shown that response speeds in the kHz range are possible with an ultraviolet detection system for initial ozone concentrations of about 1%.

  17. Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores with supercritical steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ken Oglesby

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores at various depths and with various hole sizes, tubing, fluids and rates showed theoretical feasibility. WELLFLO SIMULATIONS REPORT STEP 4: DRILLING 10,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 5: DRILLING 20,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 6: DRILLING 30,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE Mehmet Karaaslan, MSI

  18. Vertical distribution of ozone and nitrogenous pollutants in an air quality class I area, the San Gorgonio wilderness, southern California.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Rocío; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Information about spatial and temporal distribution of air pollutants is essential for better understanding of environmental stresses affecting forests and estimation of potential risks associated with air pollutants. Ozone and nitrogenous air pollutants were monitored along an elevation gradient in the Class I San Gorgonio Wilderness area (San Bernardino Mountains, California, U.S.) during the summer of 2000 (mid-June to mid-October). Passive samplers were exposed for 2-week periods at six sampling sites located at 300 m intervals ranging from 1200 to 2700 m elevation. Elevated concentrations of ozone were found in this area with summer 24-h hourly means ranging from 53 to 59 ppb. The highest ozone concentrations were detected in the period July 25-August 8, reaching values of 64 to 72 ppb expressed as 2-week mean. Passive-sampler ozone data did not show a clear relationship with elevation, although during the periods with higher ozone levels, ozone concentrations were higher at those sites below 2000 m than at sites located above that elevation. All nitrogenous pollutants studied showed a consistent decrease of concentrations with elevation. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels were low, decreasing with increasing elevation from 6.4 to 1.5 ppb summer means. Nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were around 1 to 2 ppb, which is within the range of the detection levels of the devices used. Nitric acid (HNO3) vapor concentrations were lower at higher elevations (summer means 1.9-2.5 microg m(-3) than at lower elevations (summer means 4.3-5.1 microg m(-3). Summer concentrations of ammonia (NH3) were slightly higher than nitric acid ranging from 6 microg m(-3) at the lowest site to 2.5 microg m(-3) registered at the highest elevation. Since complex interactions between ozone and nitrogenous air pollutants have already been described for forests, simultaneous information about the distribution of these pollutants is needed. This is particularly important in mountain terrain where

  19. Three air quality studies: Great Lakes ozone formation and nitrogen dry deposition; and Tucson aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 was promulgated after thousands of lives were lost in four catastrophic air pollution events. It authorized the establishment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards or (NAAQS) for six pollutants that are harmful to human health and welfare: carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, ozone and sulfur dioxide. The Clean Air Act also led to the establishment of the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to set and enforce regulations. The first paper in this dissertation studies ozone in the Lake Michigan region (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Jacko, R., Hillery, J., 2011. Lake Michigan air quality: The 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP). Atmospheric Environment 45, 3192-3202.) The Chicago-Milwaukee-Gary metropolitan area has been unable to meet the ozone NAAQS since the Clean Air Act was implemented. The Lake Michigan Air Directors' Consortium (LADCO) hypothesized that land breezes transport ozone precursor compounds over the lake, where a large air/water temperature difference creates a shallow conduction layer, which is an efficient reaction chamber for ozone formation. In the afternoon, lake breezes and prevailing synoptic winds then transport ozone back over the land. To further evaluate this hypothesis, LADCO sponsored the 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP) to measure the air quality over Lake Michigan and the surrounding areas. This study has found that the LAP data supports this hypothesis of ozone formation, which has strong implications for ozone control strategies in the Lake Michigan region. The second paper is this dissertation (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Wolf, A.M.A., 2012. Ambient PM10 and metal concentrations measured in the Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, Arizona. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 43, 67-76) evaluated the airborne concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 microns or less) and eight metalloids and metals

  20. Developmental and hematological responses to low level continuous exposure of nitrogen dioxide in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.

    1977-01-01

    Young healthy mice were continuously exposed to 0ppm, 0.5ppm, 1.0ppm and 5ppm nitrogen dioxide gas for eight weeks. Nitrogen dioxide exposure for eight weeks decreased the average weight of mice, increased the average weight of lungs, heart, and brain and decreased the average weight of liver. Nitrogen dioxide exposure did not have any effects on the WBC and RBC in mice blood but it increased the HCT and HGB in mice blood. Nitrogen dioxide exposure increased the MCV and decreased the MCH and MCHC in mice blood.

  1. Oxidation of Reactive Nitrogen and Ozone Production in Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Morino, Y.; Takegawa, N.; Miyakawa, T.; Komazaki, Y.; Tanimoto, H.; Yokouchi, Y.; Kanaya, Y.; McKenzie, R.; Johnston, P.

    2005-12-01

    Ground based measurements of NOx (NO + NO2), nitric acid (HNO3), particulate nitrate (NO3-), peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs), and total reactive nitrogen (NOy) were conducted in Tokyo in winter (January-February 2004), summer (July-August 2003 and 2004), and fall (October 2003). Carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and actinic flux were also measured during these periods. Average mixing ratios of these species and the NOx/NOy, HNO3/NOy, NO3-/NOy, and PANs/NOy ratios showed distinct diurnal-seasonal variations. The NOx/NOy ratios were 0.63-0.95 on high J(O1D) days, and 0.77-0.94 on low J(O1D) days. In summer and winter, total nitrate (TN = HNO3 + NO3-) was the dominant form of the NOx oxidation products (NOz = NOy - NOx) during the daytime on high J(O1D) days, and PANs were minor component species. The partitioning of TN was controlled mainly by temperature and the shit of the partitioning to NO3- at low temperature suppressed removal of NOy by dry deposition of HNO3. Removal rate of NOy is estimated using CO as a tracer. The estimated loss of NOy (LNOy) was largest during the daytime in summer (35%), while smallest (0%) in winter. The corrected ozone production efficiency (OPEx), which is defined as the linear regression slope of the observed Ox (= O3 + NO2) versus NOz* (= NOz + LNOy), is estimated to be 2.5. The estimated OPEx is slightly lower than those obtained in the U.S. urban air, which is probably due to lower ratios of NMHCs to NOx in this study. Possible factors controlling the OPEx will be discussed in detail.

  2. Impact of titanium dioxide nanomaterials on nitrogen fixation rate and intracellular nitrogen storage in Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Gu, April Z

    2010-11-01

    This study comprehensively investigated the impact of titanium dioxide nanomaterials (nTiO(2)) exposure on cell growth, nitrogen fixation activity, and nitrogen storage dynamics in the primary producer cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis at various dose concentrations and exposure time lengths. The results indicated that both growth rate (EC(50)-96 h of 0.62 mgTiO(2)/L) and nitrogen fixation activity (EC(50)-96 h of 0.4 mgTiO(2)/L) were inhibited by nTiO(2) exposure. The Hom's law (C(n)T(m)) was used as inactivation model to predict the concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of growth and nitrogen fixation activity. The kinetic parameters determined suggested that the time of exposure has a greater influence than the nTiO(2) concentration in toxicity. We observed, for the first time, that nTiO(2) induced a dose (concentration and time)-dependent increase in both the occurrence and intracellular levels of the nitrogen-rich cyanophycin grana proteins (CGPs). The results implied that CGPs may play an important role in the stress response mechanisms of nTiO(2) exposure and can serve as a toxicity assessment endpoint indicator. This study demonstrated that nitrogen-fixing activity could be hampered by the release of nTiO(2) in aquatic environments; therefore it potentially impacts important biogeochemical processes, such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. PMID:20853867

  3. Reactive nitrogen oxides and ozone above a taiga woodland

    SciTech Connect

    Bakwin, P.S.; Jacob, D.J.; Wofsy, S.C.; Munger, J.W.; Daube, B.C.; Bradshaw, J.D.; Sandholm, S.T.; Talbot, R.W.; Singh, H.B.; Gregory, G.L.

    1994-01-20

    Measurements of reactive nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and NO{sub y}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were made in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) above a taiga woodland in northern Quebec, Canada, during June-August, 1990, as part of NASA Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B. Levels of nitrogen oxides and O{sub 3} were strongly modulated by the synoptic scale meteorology that brought air from various regions to the site. Industrial pollution from the Great Lakes region of the US and Canada appears to be a major source for periodic elevation of NO{sub x}, NO{sub y} and O{sub 3}. We find that NO/NO{sub 2} ratios at this site at midday were approximately 50% those expected from a simple photochemical steady state between NO{sub x} and O{sub 3}, in contrast to our earlier results from the ABLE 3A tundra site. The difference between the taiga and tundra sites is likely due to much larger emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons (particularly isoprene) from the taiga vegetation. Hydrocarbon photooxidation leads to relatively rapid production of peroxy radicals, which convert NO to NO{sub 2}, at the taiga site. Ratios of NO{sub x} to NO{sub y} were typically 2-3 times higher in the PBL during ABLE 3B than during ABLE 3A. This is probably the result of high PAN levels and suppressed formation of HNO{sub 3} from NO{sub 2} due to high levels of biogenic hydrocarbons at the ABLE 3B site. 36 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ammonia detector for remote sensing of vehicle emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgard, Daniel A.; Dalton, Thomas R.; Bishop, Gary A.; Starkey, John R.; Stedman, Donald H.

    2006-01-01

    A remote sensor for measuring on-road vehicles passing the sensor in real time is described. This sensor expands upon previous technology that measured carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and exhaust hydrocarbons in the IR and nitric oxide in the UV. The design adds the capability to measure nitrogen dioxide in the UV with one spectrometer and to measure SO2 and NH3 along with NO in a second UV spectrometer. With these units operating side by side, the major mobile source precursors to secondary aerosol production can be measured simultaneously and in real time. Detection limits for NO2, SO2, and NH3 are 1.2, 0.72, and 0.78 g pollutant per kilogram of fuel, respectively.

  5. Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Ozone Concentrations Alter Soybean Antioxidant Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One important mechanism by which plants sense and respond to their environment is through redox control. Oxidative damage at the cellular level can feed forward to decrease leaf photosynthesis and therefore canopy and ecosystem productivity. How rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospher...

  6. Nitrogen fixation rate and chlorophyll content of the lichen Peltigera canina exposed to sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksson, E.; Pearson, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    In general, the rate of nitrogen fixation decreased when the lichen Peltigera canina (L.) Willd. was exposed to sulfur dioxide gas at levels from 0.1 to 500 ppm; at 30 ppm, however, nitrogen fixation was stimulated. The chlorophyll content decreased as the level of sulfur dioxide increased.

  7. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. 77.6 Section 77.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) EXCESS EMISSIONS § 77.6 Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. (a)(1)...

  8. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-08-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and tropospheric ozone (O3 ) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3 . Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r(2) = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m(-2) ) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (∆NPP/∆N) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2 . Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content. PMID:24604779

  9. Atmosphere-Biosphere Exchange of Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Song-Miao

    1991-02-01

    The atmosphere-biosphere exchange was measured for CO_2 and O_3 in a tropical rain forest in the wet season of 1987, and for CO_2, CH_4 , and O_3 in a subarctic tundra in summer 1988. Photosynthesis and respiration were found to be in approximate balance in the rain forest. Net ecosystem uptake of CO_2 in the forest increased with intensity of light in the range of measurements. It is suggested that photosynthesis of a well-watered forest is primarily controlled by photosynthetically active radiation. Changes in the distribution of cloud cover, associated for example with El Nino, might induce globally significant changes in primary productivity and carbon storage. Soil moisture controls in tundra the distribution and association of vegetation types and the atmosphere -biosphere exchange of CO_2, although light intensity also influences the daily and seasonal net exchange of CO_2. Methane fluxes from the subarctic tundra averaged 25 +/- 1 (SE) mgCH_4/m ^2/d, representing 6 percent the net uptake of carbon for the 30 days of measurement. Wet meadow tundra emitted CH_4 at rates substantially higher than upland tundra. Lakes and lake margins are important sources of methane; lake emissions were dependent on surface wind speed. A global methane emission from tundra ecosystems is estimated to be ~ 11 megatons CH_4 per year based on this measurement, a small fraction (~ 3%) of the global source. Ozone deposition fluxes averaged ~ 1.0 times 10^ {11} molecules cm^{ -2}s^{-1} in the tropical forest and in the arctic tundra, similar in magnitude to the estimated mean stratospheric input. Ozone deposition fluxes were proportional to O_3 concentrations in the surface layer and regulated by turbulent transport and stomatal activity. Day-time ozone concentrations and deposition velocities measured at ~10 m above canopy averaged ~5 ppb and 1.8 cm s^ {-1} over the tropical forest and ~25 ppb and 0.25 cm s^{ -1} over the subarctic tundra, respectively. These results imply that

  10. OZONE MULTI-YEAR PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tropospheric ozone research program addresses not only ozone, but other criteria pollutants such as SO2, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and lead. It focuses on developing tools to help with implementation of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), such as improvin...

  11. Impact of cement renders on airborne ozone and carbon dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C.; Juenger, Maria C. G.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The uptake of pollutants by building surfaces can potentially improve both indoor and outdoor air quality. Cement renders provide a unique opportunity for passive pollutant removal because they can cover large surface areas. This study investigated the passive removal of carbon dioxide and ozone by cement renders having varied binder compositions and curing durations. The results from this study demonstrated shorter curing durations resulted in greater pollutant uptake. However, the use of the supplementary cementitious material, metakaolin, in the cement render increased the carbon dioxide ingress while decreasing the ozone uptake. Therefore, the adaptation of the render composition for the best effective application may result in valuable indoor air quality or carbon savings consequences.

  12. High resolution nitrogen dioxide observations: retrieval, evaluation, and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsal, L. N.; Janz, S. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Pickering, K. E.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Loughner, C.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) deployed during the DISCOVER-AQ Maryland field campaign made hyperspectral remote sensing measurements in the 304-910 nm range allowing observations of several tropospheric pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 1.5x0.75 km2. We apply the DOAS method, include high resolution information for surface reflectivity and vertical distributions of NO2 and aerosols, and account for temporal variation in atmospheric NO2 to retrieve lower tropospheric NO2 column. We compare NO2 from ACAM with observations from in-situ aircraft, ground-based PANDORA, and space-based OMI, and NO2 simulation from air quality models. The high resolution ACAM measurements offer not only new insights into our understanding of atmospheric composition and chemistry through observation of sub-sampling variability in typical satellite and model resolutions, but also opportunities for algorithm improvements for upcoming geostationary air quality missions.

  13. Remote sensing of ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide emissions from cars and trucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgard, Daniel Alexander

    This document describes the development of a remote sensor for mobile source ammonia (NH3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) based on an instrument previously developed at the University of Denver. Significant optical upgrades allow for the detection of three new species. Detection and quantification of NH3 and SO 2 use wavelengths deeper into the ultraviolet region than previously possible. Currently NH3 is quantified from three peaks at 209 nm, 213 nm, and 217 nm; SO2 from three peaks at 219 nm, 221 nm, and 222 nm; NO2 using the spectral window 430--446 nm. The instrument was demonstrated in the measurement of emissions from both gasoline and diesel light duty vehicles and heavy duty diesel trucks (HDDT). The remote sensor was used for over 20,000 measurements of NH3 and SO2 emissions from motor vehicles in Denver and Tulsa in the summer of 2005. Nitrogen dioxide emissions were measured at the Denver site only. For the first time, on-road vehicle NH3 and SO2 emission trends versus model year were observed. Ammonia is a larger percentage of the exhaust than previously predicted for newer vehicles and its production reaches a maximum with approximately the 1996 model year. NH3 is the first pollutant observed to have lower emissions from the oldest model year. Sulfur dioxide emissions decrease with newer model year vehicles. Nearly 1200 NH3, SO2, and NO2 emission measurements with valid vehicle identification numbers were collected from in-use HDDTs in Golden and Dumont, CO. The Dumont weigh station site allowed emissions to be correlated with gross vehicle weight. No trends were apparent. The Golden site allowed emissions to be correlated with odometer and a trend of increasing oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions was apparent even near one million miles, when some vehicles should show lower emissions due to engine rebuild and computer reflash. For the first time HDDT on-road NO x emissions were shown versus vehicle model year and found to reach a

  14. Reactive nitrogen partitioning and its relationship to winter ozone events in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, R. J.; Edwards, P. M.; Bates, T. S.; Cohen, R. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Gilman, J. B.; Holloway, J.; Kercher, J.; Koss, A. R.; Lee, L.; Lerner, B. M.; McLaren, R.; Quinn, P. K.; Roberts, J. M.; Stutz, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Williams, E.; Young, C. J.; Yuan, B.; Zarzana, K. J.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    High wintertime ozone levels have been observed in the Uintah Basin, Utah, a sparsely populated rural region with intensive oil and gas operations. The reactive nitrogen budget plays an important role in tropospheric ozone formation. Measurements were taken during three field campaigns in the winters of 2012, 2013 and 2014, which experienced varying climatic conditions. Average concentrations of ozone and total reactive nitrogen were observed to be 2.5 times higher in 2013 than 2012, with 2014 an intermediate year in most respects. However, photochemically active NOx (NO + NO2) remained remarkably similar all three years. Nitric acid comprised roughly half of NOz ( ≡ NOy - NOx) in 2013, with nighttime nitric acid formation through heterogeneous uptake of N2O5 contributing approximately 6 times more than daytime formation. In 2012, N2O5 and ClNO2 were larger components of NOz relative to HNO3. The nighttime N2O5 lifetime between the high-ozone year 2013 and the low-ozone year 2012 is lower by a factor of 2.6, and much of this is due to higher aerosol surface area in the high-ozone year of 2013. A box-model simulation supports the importance of nighttime chemistry on the reactive nitrogen budget, showing a large sensitivity of NOx and ozone concentrations to nighttime processes.

  15. Nitrogen Dioxide long term trends at mid and high latitudes by means of ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoli, D.; Petritoli, A.; Giovanelli, G.; Kostadinov, I.; Ravegnani, F.

    2003-04-01

    The interactions between mid- and high latitudes atmospheric changes are going to be one of the main issue for the future of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry research. A more detailed study of the ozone trends as well as a wider comprehension of the interactions with lower and higher latitudes are maybe the main arguments to which scientist should address their works in order to build-up a more detailed picture of what scenarios we have to face in the near future. GASCODs type spectrometers (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) are installed at the "Ottavio Vittori" research station (44.11N, 10.42E, 2165 m asl) since June 1993, at the Italian Antarctic Station (74.69S, 164.12E) since December 1995 and at the STIL-BAS station (42.42N, 25.63E) since 1999. The instruments measure zenith scattered solar radiation between 407 and 464 nm. Nitrogen dioxide total column is retrieved with DOAS methodology. The seasonal trend of NO2 vc values is reported and it shows the expected behaviour: maximum values during the summer period while the minimum occur in the winter season in both the hemispheres. A typical behaviour of the AMPM ratio at high latitudes is highlight. A Fourier analysis is proposed as a tool to investigate the long-term components of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric amount. Results are presented and the NO2 trend is evidenced and commented. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: The author Daniele Bortoli was financially supported by the Subprograma Ciência e Tecnologia do 3° Quadro Comunitário de Apoio. The National Antarctic Research Program (PNRA) and the Quantification and Interpretation of Long-Term UV-Vis Observations of the Stratosphere (QUILT) project supported this research.

  16. Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children

    SciTech Connect

    Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. )

    1991-07-15

    The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

  17. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2014-01-15

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

  18. Reactive Nitrogen Partitioning and its Relationship to Winter Ozone Events in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, R. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P. M.; Holloway, J.; Kercher, J. P.; Lee, L.; McLaren, R.; Roberts, J. M.; Stutz, J.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Williams, E. J.; Yuan, B.; Brown, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent air quality measurements have shown anomalously large concentrations of wintertime ozone in Utah's Uintah Basin, host to intensive oil and gas operations. As part of the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies (UBWOS) in January-February of 2012 and 2013, a variety of instruments were deployed to measure speciated reactive nitrogen and ozone. Here we present an analysis and comparison of reactive nitrogen data for the two years. We also describe a recently developed measurement of total reactive nitrogen (NOy) by cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which was deployed for the first time in 2013. Compared to 2012, which had very different meteorological conditions, ozone production rates in 2013 were roughly three times faster, leading to numerous and substantial exceedances of national air quality standards. Furthermore, despite considerably higher NOy levels in 2013 compared to 2012, levels of photochemically active NOx was remarkably similar between the two years. Much of the reactive nitrogen oxidation occurred at night, suggesting that nighttime processes played an important role in defining the conditions for daytime photochemistry. Our findings regarding the reactive nitrogen budget help us understand the role different NOx oxidation processes in O3 photochemistry, as well as the overall sensitivity of O3 production to nitrogen oxides in this environment.

  19. Ozone and sulfur dioxide effects on tall fescue. II. Alteration of quality constituents. [Festuca arundinacea

    SciTech Connect

    Flagler, R.B.; Youngner, V.B.

    1985-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine whether ozone (O/sub 3/) and sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) might alter forage quality parameters of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. Alta). Plants were exposed weekly to four O/sub 3/ treatments, 0, 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 ..mu..L L/sup -1/; with or without 0.10 ..mu..L L/sup -1/ SO/sub 2/, 6 h d/sup -1/ for 12 weeks. Ozone had a much greater impact on forage quality than did SO/sub 2/. Ozone increased protein content on a g kg/sup -1/ basis and decreased protein on a weight per plant basis. Ozone reduced crude fat, crude fiber, and total nonstructural carbohydrate contents of the forage. Crude ash content increased due to O/sub 3/ exposure. On a weight per plant basis, O/sub 3/ decreased the forage concentration of Ca, Mg, and P. Ozone increased Ca concentration of herbage. Sulfur dioxide increased ash content of the forage. Phosphorus concentration and weight per plant of Mg and P were all reduced by SO/sub 2/ Significant pollutant interactions occurred for crude fiber, crude ash, total Mg, and total P contents of forage. While treatments resulted in some apparent increases in forage quality, these were at the expense of yield. The most adverse effects on forage quality were an increase in ash content which resulted from an interaction of SO/sub 2/ with O/sub 3/, and a reduction in soluble carbohydrate content of shoots due to O/sub 3/.

  20. Treatment of Ammonia Nitrogen Wastewater in Low Concentration by Two-Stage Ozonization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xianping; Yan, Qun; Wang, Chunying; Luo, Caigui; Zhou, Nana; Jian, Chensheng

    2015-09-01

    Ammonia nitrogen wastewater (about 100 mg/L) was treated by two-stage ozone oxidation method. The effects of ozone flow rate and initial pH on ammonia removal were studied, and the mechanism of ammonia nitrogen removal by ozone oxidation was discussed. After the primary stage of ozone oxidation, the ammonia removal efficiency reached 59.32% and pH decreased to 6.63 under conditions of 1 L/min ozone flow rate and initial pH 11. Then, the removal efficiency could be over 85% (the left ammonia concentration was lower than 15 mg/L) after the second stage, which means the wastewater could have met the national discharge standards of China. Besides, the mechanism of ammonia removal by ozone oxidation was proposed by detecting the products of the oxidation: ozone oxidation directly and ·OH oxidation; ammonia was mainly transformed into NO₃(-)-N, less into NO₂(-)-N, not into N₂. PMID:26404353

  1. Treatment of Ammonia Nitrogen Wastewater in Low Concentration by Two-Stage Ozonization

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xianping; Yan, Qun; Wang, Chunying; Luo, Caigui; Zhou, Nana; Jian, Chensheng

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia nitrogen wastewater (about 100 mg/L) was treated by two-stage ozone oxidation method. The effects of ozone flow rate and initial pH on ammonia removal were studied, and the mechanism of ammonia nitrogen removal by ozone oxidation was discussed. After the primary stage of ozone oxidation, the ammonia removal efficiency reached 59.32% and pH decreased to 6.63 under conditions of 1 L/min ozone flow rate and initial pH 11. Then, the removal efficiency could be over 85% (the left ammonia concentration was lower than 15 mg/L) after the second stage, which means the wastewater could have met the national discharge standards of China. Besides, the mechanism of ammonia removal by ozone oxidation was proposed by detecting the products of the oxidation: ozone oxidation directly and ·OH oxidation; ammonia was mainly transformed into NO3−-N, less into NO2−-N, not into N2. PMID:26404353

  2. Simultaneous sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide removal by calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate solids.

    PubMed

    Nelli, C H; Rochelle, G T

    1998-09-01

    At conditions typical of a bag filter exposed to a coal-fired flue gas that has been adiabatically cooled with water, calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate solids were exposed to a dilute, humidified gas stream of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a packed-bed reactor. A prior study found that NO2 reacted readily with surface water of alkaline and non-alkaline solids to produce nitrate, nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO). With SO2 present in the gas stream, NO2 also reacted with S(IV), a product of SO2 removal, on the exterior of an alkaline solid. The oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by oxygen reduced the availability of S(IV) and lowered removal of NO2. Subsequent acidification of the sorbent by the removal of NO2 and SO2 facilitated the production of NO. However, the conversion of nitrous acid to sulfur-nitrogen compounds reduced NO production and enhanced SO2 removal. A reactor model based on empirical and semi-empirical rate expressions predicted rates of SO2 removal, NO2 removal, and NO production by calcium silicate solids. Rate expressions from the reactor model were inserted into a second program, which predicted the removal of SO2 and NOx by a continuous process, such as the collection of alkaline solids in a baghouse. The continuous process model, depending upon inlet conditions, predicted 30-40% removal for NOx and 50-90% removal for SO2. These results are relevant to dry scrubbing technology for combined SO2 and NOx removal that first oxidizes NO to NO2 by the addition of methanol into the flue duct. PMID:9775761

  3. Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide and Sulphur Dioxide in Lima, Peru: Trends and Seasonal Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacsi, S.; Rappenglueck, B.

    2007-12-01

    This research was carried out to show a general analysis of the monthly and yearly variation (1996-2002) and the tendency of the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) for the 5 stations of the air quality network of Lima. The SO2 and NO2 concentrations were measured by the Dirección General de Salud Ambiental (DIGESA), using the active sampling method and the chemical analysis has been determined by Turbidimetry and Colorimetry for the SO2 and NO2 respectively. The monthly average variation (1996-2001) of SO2 in the Lima Center station has a small annual range (32,4 mikrograms/m3) with maximum values in autumn (April) and minimum in winter (June). The NO2 presents a higher annual range (128,2 mikrograms/m3) and its minimum values occur in the summer and the maximum in spring. The annual averages analysis (2000-2002) of the air quality monitoring network of Lima shows that the SO2 and NO2 values are maximum in the Lima Center station and exceed the Peruvian air quality standard (ECAs) in 30% and 75% respectively. The yearly variation (1996-2001) in the Lima Center station show an increasing tendency in the SO2 (significant) and NO2 (not significant) values, which indicates the critical level of the air quality in Lima, therefore the implementation of the air pollution control programs is urgent.

  4. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM: 1979 PROFICIENCY SURVEYS FOR SULFUR DIOXIDE, NITROGEN DIOXIDE, CARBON MONOXIDE, SULFATE, NITRATE, LEAD AND HIGH VOLUME FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Quality Assurance Division of the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, administers semiannual Surveys of Analytical Proficiency for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfate, nitrate and lead. Sample material, s...

  5. Stratospheric nitrogen dioxide in Antarctic regions from ground based and satellite observations during 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoli, Daniele; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Kostadinov, Ivan K.; Petritoli, Andrea; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Costa, Maria J.; Silva, Ana M.

    2003-04-01

    The application of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) methodology to the zenith scattered light data collected with the GASCOD spectrometer developed at the ISAC Institute allow for the detection of stratospheric trace gases involved in the ozone cycle such as NO2, OClO, BrO. The instrument was installed in December 1995 in the Italian Antarctic station at Terra Nova Bay (74°26'S, 164°03E', Ross Sea), after several tests both in laboratory and in Antarctic region, for unattended and continuous measurement in extreme high-latitude environment. The GASCOD is still working and producing very interesting data for the study of the denitrification processes during the formation of the so-called ozone hole over the Antarctic region. For the continuous NO2 monitoring for whole the year, also during winter when the station is unmanned, the [407 - 460] nm spectral region is investigated. The results for Nitrogen Dioxide, obtained by application of DOAS algorithms to the data recorded during the year 2001, are presented. ERS-2 was launched in April 1995 into a near-polar sun-synchronous orbit at a mean altitude of 795 km. The descending node crosses the equator at 10:30 local time. GOME is a nadir-scanning double monochromator covering the 237 nm to 794 nm wavelength range with a spectral resolution of 0.17-0.33 nm. The spectrum is split into four spectral channels, each recorded quasi-simultaneously by a 1024-pixel photodiode array. The global spatial coverage is obtained within 3 days at the equator by a 960 km across-track swath (4.5 s forward scan, 1.5 s back scan). The ground pixel size of the measurements is 320 X 40 km2. A comparison of GASCOD and GOME results for NO2 total column is performed.

  6. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  7. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, L. M.; Diette, G. B.; Scott, M.; McCormack, M. C.; Matsui, E. C.; Curtin-Brosnan, J.; Williams, D. L.; Kidd-Taylor, A.; Shea, M.; Breysse, P. N.; Hansel, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placement of air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and carbon filters. Home inspection and NO2 monitoring were conducted at 1 week pre-intervention and at 1 week and 3 months post-intervention. Stove replacement resulted in a 51% and 42% decrease in median NO2 concentration at 3 months of follow-up in the kitchen and bedroom, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.01); air purifier placement resulted in an immediate decrease in median NO2 concentration in the kitchen (27%, P < 0.01) and bedroom (22%, P = 0.02), but at 3 months, a significant reduction was seen only in the kitchen (20%, P = 0.05). NO2 concentrations in the kitchen and bedroom did not significantly change following ventilation hood installation. Replacing unvented gas stoves with electric stoves or placement of air purifiers with HEPA and carbon filters can decrease indoor NO2 concentrations in urban homes. PMID:24329966

  8. Low-energy positron and electron scattering from nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Luca; Zecca, Antonio; García, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco; Brunger, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Total cross section (TCS) measurements for positron scattering from nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are presented in the energy range 0.2-40 eV. The TCS, the elastic integral and differential cross sections, and the integral cross section accounting of all the inelastic processes (including positronium formation) have also been computed using the independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) for incident energies from 1 to 1000 eV. A qualitative level of agreement is found between the present TCS experiment and theory at the common energies. As no previous measurements or calculations for positron-NO2 scattering exist in the literature, we also computed the TCS for electron collisions with NO2 employing the IAM-SCAR method. A comparison of those results to the present positron cross sections and the earlier electron-impact data and calculations is provided. To investigate the role that chemical substitution plays in positron scattering phenomena, we also compare the present positron-NO2 data with the TCSs measured at the University of Trento for positron scattering from N2O and CO2.

  9. Mechanisms of Nitrogen Dioxide Reactions: Initiation of Lipid Peroxidation and the Production of Nitrous Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, William A.; Lightsey, John W.

    1981-10-01

    The reactions of nitrogen dioxide with cyclohexene have been studied as a model for the reactions that occur between nitrogen dioxide in smoggy air and unsaturated fatty acids in pulmonary lipids. As predicted from earlier studies at high nitrogen dioxide concentrations, this gas reacts with cyclohexene predominantly by addition to the double bond at nitrogen dioxide concentrations of I percent (10,000 parts per million) to 40 percent in nitrogen; in the presence of air or oxygen, this reaction initiates the autoxidation of the alkene. However, at concentrations below 100 parts per million in nitrogen, nitrogen dioxide reacts with cyclohexene almost exclusively by abstraction of allylic hydrogen; this unexpected reaction also initiates the autoxidation of the alkene in the presence of oxygen or air, but it leads to the production of nitrous acid rather than of a product containing a nitro group attached to a carbon atom. The nitrous acid can react with amines to produce nitrosamines. Moreover, the nitrite ion produced by the hydrogen abstraction mechanism would be expected to diffuse throughout the body, unlike nitrated lipids that would be confined to the pulmonary cavity. These findings have been confirmed with methyl oleate, linoleate, and linolenate; some of the kinetic features of the nitrogen dioxideinitiated autoxidation of these unsaturated fatty acids have been studied.

  10. Ecosystem-scale trade-offs between impacts of ozone and reactive nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Ed; Hayes, Felicity; Sawicka, Kasia; Mills, Gina; Jones, Laurence; Moldan, Filip; Sereina, Bassin; van Dijk, Netty; Evans, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition stimulates plant productivity in many terrestrial ecosystems. This is clearly beneficial for production agriculture and forestry, but increased litterfall and decreased ground-level light availability reduce the suitability of habitats for many biota (Jones et al., 2014). This mechanism (Hautier et al., 2009), together with the acidifying effects of N (Stevens et al., 2010), has caused considerable biodiversity loss at global scale. Ozone, by contrast, has the effect of reducing plant production, and a simple assessment would suggest that this might mitigate the effects of N pollution. We explored the interactions between ozone and nitrogen at mechanistic level using a version of the MADOC model (Rowe et al., 2014) modified to include effects of ozone. The model was tested against data from long-term monitoring and experimental sites with a focus on nitrogen and/or ozone effects. Effects on biodiversity were assessed by coupling the MADOC model to the MultiMOVE plant species model. We used this model-chain to explore trade-offs and synergies between the impacts of nitrogen and ozone on biodiversity and ecosystem biogeochemistry. In a review of the effects of ozone on ecosystem processes, two consistent effects were found: decreased net primary production due to damage to photosynthetic mechanisms; and an increase in litter nitrogen apparently caused by interference of ozone with the retranslocation process (Mills, in prep.). Insufficient evidence was found to justify inclusion of posited interactive mechanisms such as increased ozone susceptibility with greater nitrogen supply. However, the MADOC model illustrated emergent ozone-nitrogen interactions at ecosystem scale, for example an increase in N leaching due to decreased plant demand and greater litter N content. Empirical evidence for interactive effects of nitrogen and ozone at ecosystem scale is severely lacking, but simulated results were consistent with soil and soil solution

  11. Modeling of recovery mechanism of ozone zero phenomenaby adding small amount of nitrogen in atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2013-09-01

    Ozone zero phenomena in an atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges have been one of the major problems during a long time operation of ozone generators. But it is also known that the adding a small amount of nitrogen makes the recover from the ozone zero phenomena. To make clear the mechanism of recovery, authors have been simulated the discharges with using the results of Ref. 3. As a result, the recovery process can be seen and ozone density increased. It is found that the most important species would be nitrogen atoms. The reaction of nitrogen atoms and oxygen molecules makes oxygen atoms which is main precursor species of ozone. This generation of oxygen atoms is effective to increase ozone. The dependence of oxygen atom density (nO) and nitrogen atom density (nN) ratio was examined in this paper. In the condition of low nN/nO ratio case, generation of nitrogen oxide is low, and the quenching of ozone by the nitrogen oxide would be low. But in the high ratio condition, the quenching of ozone by nitrogen oxide would significant. This work was supported by KAKENHI(23560352).

  12. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D.; Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions were studied with the aid of a mass spectrometer. A pinhole bleed system provided continuous sampling of the gas mixture in the cell during the reaction. It was found that the homogeneous reactions of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide with hydrogen peroxide are too slow to be of any significance in the upper atmosphere. However, the heterogeneous reactions may be important in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide in the case of polluted urban atmospheres.

  13. Infrared spectrum of the complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide in argon and nitrogen matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Baas, F.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide has been studied by infrared spectroscopy in argon and nitrogen matrices. The shifts relative to the free species show that the complex is weak and similar in argon and nitrogen. The results give evidence for T-shaped complexes, which are isolated in several configurations. Some evidence is also presented which indicates that, in addition to the two well-known sites in argon, carbon dioxide can be trapped in a third site.

  14. Reactive nitrogen, ozone, and nitrate aerosols observed in the Arctic stratosphere in January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Y.; Koike, M.; Iwasaka, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Aimedieu, P.; Newman, P.A.; Matthews, W.A.; Sheldon, W.R.

    1992-08-20

    This paper reports balloon borne measurements on two days in January 1990, from Sweden, of stratospheric densities of reactive nitrogen, nitrate aerosols, and ozone. On one days the measurements were inside the polar vortex, and on the second outside. Reactive nitrogen levels were depressed inside the vortex, which is interpreted in terms of the cold temperatures during December and early January which other measurements support. Denitrification is observed inside the vortex, relative to typical number densities observed when outside the vortex.

  15. A Passive Sampler for Determination of Nitrogen Dioxide in Ambient Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Dan; Lin, Lianzhi; Yuan, Hongyan; Choi, Martin M. F.; Chan, Winghong

    2005-01-01

    A passive sampler that provides a convenient, simple, and fast method for nitrogen dioxide determination is proposed. The experiment can be modified for determinations of other air pollutants like formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide for hands-on experience for students studying environmental pollution problems.

  16. Study of ozone and sulfur dioxide using Thailand based Brewer Spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumharn, Wilawan; Sudhibrabha, Sumrid

    2014-03-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a vertical column of the atmosphere in Thailand were obtained from the Brewers#121 and #120. There are similarities between the O3 patterns obtained from the two sites, which are higher in the summer and rainy season compared with winter, although the magnitude of the change in Bangkok is greater than that in Songkhla. SO2 values showed the summer months provide the higher SO2 values in Bangkok, in contrast to Songkhla where the summer months give lower SO2 values.

  17. Nitrogen dioxide pollution in the Po basin: a quantitative analysis based on ground-based and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petritoli, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Weiss, A.; Schaub, D.; Fortezza, F.

    2003-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an active nitrogen constituent playing a key role in tropospheric chemistry leading the photochemical production of ozone and influencing the concentration of the primary tropospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). The main source of tropospheric NO2 is the human activity so that it could be considered a pollutant for the atmosphere that is its concentration should be monitored and kept lower than threshold values. The use of measurements carried out from satellite platform could provide significant improvements to study and check the environmental pollution in a regional scale but an assessment of the quality of such measurements for tropospheric application is required. In this work we report in situ and tropospheric column measurements of NO2 in the Po-valley (the basin of the Po river in the northern Italy) region. The aim of the work was to provide a quantitative intercomparison between ground-based and satellite measurements and study the seasonal behaviour of the NO2 hot spot detected in the Po-valley. The study is carried out using in-situ chemiluminescent instrumentation installed in the Po-valley, a Uv/vis spectrometer installed at Mt. Cimone (44N, 11E) and tropospheric column measurements obtained from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) spectrometer. Results are presented and discussed.

  18. Leaf nitrogen dioxide uptake coupling apoplastic chemistry, carbon/sulfur assimilation, and plant nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanbo; Sun, Guangyu

    2010-10-01

    Emission and plant uptake of atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO + NO(2)) significantly influence regional climate change by regulating the oxidative chemistry of the lower atmosphere, species composition and the recycling of carbon and nutrients, etc. Plant uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) is concentration-dependent and species-specific, and covaries with environmental factors. An important factor determining NO(2) influx into leaves is the replenishment of the substomatal cavity. The apoplastic chemistry of the substomatal cavity plays crucial roles in NO(2) deposition rates and the tolerance to NO(2), involving the reactions between NO(2) and apoplastic antioxidants, NO(2)-responsive germin-like proteins, apoplastic acidification, and nitrite-dependent NO synthesis, etc. Moreover, leaf apoplast is a favorable site for the colonization by microbes, which disturbs nitrogen metabolism of host plants. For most plant species, NO(2) assimilation in a leaf primarily depends on the nitrate (NO(3) (-)) assimilation pathway. NO(2)-N assimilation is coupled with carbon and sulfur (sulfate and SO(2)) assimilation as indicated by the mutual needs for metabolic intermediates (or metabolites) and the NO(2)-caused changes of key metabolic enzymes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase, organic acids, and photorespiration. Moreover, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization improves the tolerance of host plants to NO(2) by enhancing the efficiency of nutrient absorption and translocation and influencing foliar chemistry. Further progress is proposed to gain a better understanding of the coordination between NO(2)-N, S and C assimilation, especially the investigation of metabolic checkpoints, and the effects of photorespiratory nitrogen cycle, diverse PEPc and the metabolites such as cysteine, O-acetylserine (OAS) and glutathione. PMID:20628880

  19. Nitrogen dioxide exposure and development of pulmonary emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Stavert, D.M.; Archuleta, D.C.; Holland, L.M.; Lehnert, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    Lungs of adult Fischer-344 rats were evaluated for emphysematous changes after (1) a single intratracheal instillation of elastase (E), (2) a 25-d exposure to 35 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), and (3) elastase instillation followed by 25-d exposure to 35 ppm NO/sub 2/ (E + NO/sub 2/). Residual volumes (RV) of the NO/sub 2/ and NS groups were virtually identical, whereas the RV of the E and E + NO/sub 2/ lungs were significantly greater than those of the NS and NO/sub 2/ lungs. Directionally similar changes in the excised lung volumes and total lung capacities were obtained with the E and E + NO/sub 2/ groups; NO/sub 2/ alone, however, did not alter these volumetric parameters. No differences in arterial blood gases and pH values, minute ventilation, or breathing frequencies were found among the experimental groups. The mean linear intercept values (MLI) obtained with the NS and NO/sub 2/ exposed lungs were essentially identical with average values of approx. 62 ..mu..m. This morphometric parameter was substantially increased in the E- and E + NO/sub 2/-exposed lungs; no significant differences, however, were found between the MLI values obtained with the E and E + NO/sub 2/ lungs. From these data as well as histologic examinations of lung sections for evidence of emphysema, it was concluded that (1) a subchronic, moderately high level of NO/sub 2/ exposure does not produce an irreversible emphysematous lesion in the rat model and (2) exposure of rats to 35 ppm for 25 d after elastase instillation into the lungs does not potentiate protease-induced emphysema or bring about a progression in preexisting emphysema.

  20. Household levels of nitrogen dioxide and pediatric asthma severity

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, Kathleen; Holford, Theodore R.; Gent, Janneane F.; Hill, Melissa E.; Kezik, Julie M.; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse respiratory effects in children with asthma are associated with exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Levels indoors can be much higher than outdoors. Primary indoor sources of NO2 are gas stoves, which are used for cooking by one-third of US households. We investigated effects of indoor NO2 exposure on asthma severity among an ethnically and economically diverse sample of children, controlling for season and indoor allergen exposure. Methods Children aged 5–10 years with active asthma (n=1,342), were recruited through schools in urban and suburban Connecticut and Massachusetts (2006–2009) for a prospective, year-long study with seasonal measurements of NO2 and asthma severity. Exposure to NO2 was measured passively for four, month-long, periods with Palmes tubes. Asthma morbidity was concurrently measured by a severity score and frequency of wheeze, night symptoms and use of rescue medication. We used adjusted, hierarchical ordered logistic regression models to examine associations between household NO2 exposure and health outcomes. Results Every 5 ppb increase in NO2 exposure above a threshold of 6 ppb was associated with a dose-dependent increase in risk of higher asthma severity score (odds ratio= 1.37 [95% confidence interval= 1.01 – 1.89]), wheeze (1.49 [1.09 – 2.03]), night symptoms (1.52 [1.16 – 2.00]) and rescue medication use (1.78 [1.33 – 2.38]). Conclusions Asthmatic children exposed to NO2 indoors, at levels well below the US Environmental Protection Agency outdoor standard (53 ppb), are at risk for increased asthma morbidity. Risks are not confined to inner-city children, but occur at NO2 concentrations common in urban and suburban homes. PMID:23337243

  1. Pulmonary response to threshold levels of sulfur dioxide (1. 0 ppm) and ozone (0. 3 ppm) (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Bedi, J.F.; Horvath, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors exposed 22 healthy adult non-smoking men for 2 hours to either filtered air, 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide, 0.30 ppm ozone, or the combination of 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide plus 0.30 ppm ozone. It was hypothesized that exposure to near-threshold concentrations of these pollutants would show any interaction between the two pollutants that might have been masked by the more-obvious response to the higher concentrations of ozone used in previous studies. Each subject alternated 30-minute treadmill exercise with 10-minute rest periods for the 2 hours. Following ozone exposure alone, forced expiratory measurements (FVC, FEV-1, and FEF25-75%) were significantly decreased. The combined exposure to SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/ produced similar but smaller decreases in these measures. There were small but significant differences between the ozone and the ozone plus sulfur dioxide exposure for FVC, FEV-1,-2,-3, and FEF25-75% at the end of the 2-hour exposure. It was concluded that, with these pollutant concentrations, there is no additive or synergistic effect of the two pollutants on pulmonary function.

  2. Highly accurate nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in nitrogen standards based on permeation.

    PubMed

    Flores, Edgar; Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Idrees, Faraz; Wielgosz, Robert Ian

    2012-12-01

    The development and operation of a highly accurate primary gas facility for the dynamic production of mixtures of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) in nitrogen (N(2)) based on continuous weighing of a permeation tube and accurate impurity quantification and correction of the gas mixtures using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is described. NO(2) gas mixtures in the range of 5 μmol mol(-1) to 15 μmol mol(-1) with a standard relative uncertainty of 0.4% can be produced with this facility. To achieve an uncertainty at this level, significant efforts were made to reduce, identify and quantify potential impurities present in the gas mixtures, such as nitric acid (HNO(3)). A complete uncertainty budget, based on the analysis of the performance of the facility, including the use of a FT-IR spectrometer and a nondispersive UV analyzer as analytical techniques, is presented in this work. The mixtures produced by this facility were validated and then selected to provide reference values for an international comparison of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM), number CCQM-K74, (1) which was designed to evaluate the consistency of primary NO(2) gas standards from 17 National Metrology Institutes. PMID:23148702

  3. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere: isotopic exchange with ozone and its use as a tracer in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Lee, A. Y.; Irion, F. W.; DeMore, W. B.; Wen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric heavy ozone is enriched in the isotopes 18O and 17O. The magnitude of this enhancement, of the order of 100%, is very large compared with that commonly known in atmospheric chemistry and geochemistry. The heavy oxygen atom in heavy ozone is therefore useful as a tracer of chemical species and pathways that involve ozone or its derived products. As a test of the isotopic exchange reactions, we successfully carry out a series of numerical experiments to simulate the results of the laboratory experiments performed by Wen and Thiemens [1993] on ozone and CO2. A small discrepancy between the experimental and the model values for 17O exchange is also revealed. The results are used to compute the magnitude of isotopic exchange between ozone and carbon dioxide via the excited atom O(1D) in the middle atmosphere. The model for 18O is in good agreement with the observed values.

  4. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Bolun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Lin, Yangming; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Qingfeng; Centi, Gabriele; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-05-23

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst's activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90 % current efficiency for CO formation and stability over 60 hours. The Tafel analyses and density functional theory calculations suggest that the reduction of CO2 proceeds through an initial rate-determining transfer of one electron to CO2 , which leads to the formation of carbon dioxide radical anion (CO2 (.-) ). The initial reduction barrier is too high on pristine CNTs, resulting in a very high overpotentials at which the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates over CO2 reduction. The doped nitrogen atoms stabilize the radical anion, thereby lowering the initial reduction barrier and improving the intrinsic activity. The most efficient nitrogen chemical state for this reaction is quaternary nitrogen, followed by pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen. PMID:27100272

  5. Sub-ambient carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Tamilarasan, P.; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2015-04-14

    Carbon dioxide adsorption on carbon surface can be enhanced by doping the surface with heterogeneous atoms, which can increase local surface affinity. This study presents the carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene at low pressures (<100 kPa). Graphene was exposed to nitrogen plasma, which dopes nitrogen atoms into carbon hexagonal lattice, mainly in pyridinic and pyrrolic forms. It is found that nitrogen doping significantly improves the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at all temperatures, due to the enrichment of local Lewis basic sites. In general, isotherm and thermodynamic parameters suggest that doped nitrogen sites have nearly same adsorption energy of surface defects and residual functional groups. The isosteric heat of adsorption remains in physisorption range, which falls with surface coverage, suggesting the distribution of magnitude of adsorption energy. The absolute values of isosteric heat and entropy of adsorption are slightly increased upon nitrogen doping.

  6. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval based on ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Frederik; Hendrick, Francois; Goutail, Florence; Fayt, Caroline; Merlaud, Alexis; Pinardi, Gaia; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the most important chemically active trace gases in the troposphere. Listed as primary pollutant, it is also a key precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and acid rain, and can contribute locally to radiative forcing. The long-term monitoring of this species is therefore of great relevance. Here we present a new method to retrieve tropospheric NO2 vertical column amounts from ground-based zenith-sky measurements of scattered sunlight. It is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the DOAS analysis of zenith radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low tropospheric NO2 content, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total slant column using stratospheric vertical columns measured at twilight and simulated stratospheric NO2 diurnal variation, (4) estimation of the tropospheric vertical columns by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors. The retrieval algorithm is tested on a 2 month dataset acquired from June to July 2009 by the BIRA MAX-DOAS instrument in the framework of the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). The tropospheric vertical column amounts derived from zenith-sky observations are compared to the vertical columns retrieved from the off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to data of a co-located SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales) spectrometer operated by LATMOS. First results show a good agreement between the different data sets with correlation coefficients and slopes close to or larger than 0.85. We observe that the main error sources arise from the uncertainties in the determination of the residual NO2 amount in the reference spectrum, the stratospheric NO2 abundance and

  7. Effects of sulfur dioxide and ozone on yield and quality of potatoes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pell, E.J.; Pearson, N.S.; Vinten-Johansen, C.; McGruer, G.; Yang, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop an outdoor fumigation facility designed to expose plants to ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) and to conduct experiments that would examine the impact of the two gases alone and in combination on field grown potato plants. Two systems of dispensing and monitoring pollutants were contrasted, one using miniature solenoid valves and the other using critical orifices. Both systems provided excellent pollutant control. The orifices were relatively inexpensive and required less maintenance than did the solenoid valve system. Two field experiments were conducted, one in 1985 and and the other in 1986. Potato plants were exposed to charcoal filtered air, nonfiltered air, nonfiltered air supplemented with O3 at levels which resulted in 1.33, 1.66 or 1.99 times ambient O3 concentrations or charcoal filtered air plus 0.14, 0.28 or 0.56 ppM SO2. There were additional treatments combining the two pollutant regimes. Ozone induced a linear reduction in yield reflected by decreases in weight and number of tubers > 6.35 cm in diameter. In general effects on number and weight of smaller tubers were not detected. Ozone also induced a decrease in the percent dry matter and reducing sugar content of potato tubers. Sulfur dioxide affected number of Grade One tubers in both years and percent dry matter and sucrose content in 1986 only. While dose-response curves for all SO2 effects fit quadratic curves the impact of SO2 doses used in these experiments were stimulatory. No important interactions were observed between O3 and SO2. 36 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. Herbivore-mediated material fluxes in a northern deciduous forest under elevated carbon dioxide and ozone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Timothy D; Couture, John J; Bennett, Alison E; Lindroth, Richard L

    2014-10-01

    Anthropogenic changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and ozone (O3 ) are known to alter tree physiology and growth, but the cascading effects on herbivore communities and herbivore-mediated nutrient cycling are poorly understood. We sampled herbivore frass, herbivore-mediated greenfall, and leaf-litter deposition in temperate forest stands under elevated CO2 (c. 560 ppm) and O3 (c. 1.5× ambient), analyzed substrate chemical composition, and compared the quality and quantity of fluxes under multiple atmospheric treatments. Leaf-chewing herbivores fluxed 6.2 g m(-2)  yr(-1) of frass and greenfall from the canopy to the forest floor, with a carbon : nitrogen (C : N) ratio 32% lower than that of leaf litter. Herbivore fluxes of dry matter, C, condensed tannins, and N increased under elevated CO2 (35, 32, 63 and 39%, respectively), while fluxes of N decreased (18%) under elevated O3 . Herbivore-mediated dry matter inputs scaled across atmospheric treatments as a constant proportion of leaf-litter inputs. Increased fluxes under elevated CO2 were consistent with increased herbivore consumption and abundance, and with increased plant growth and soil respiration, previously reported for this experimental site. Results suggest that insect herbivory will reinforce other factors, such as photosynthetic rate and fine-root production, impacting C sequestration by forests in future environments. PMID:25078062

  9. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  10. Spring leaf flush in aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones is altered by growth at elevated carbon dioxide and elevated ozone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early spring leaf out is important to the success of trees competing for light and space in dense forest plantation canopies. In this study, we investigated spring leaf flush and how elevated carbon dioxide concentration and elevated ozone concentration altered leaf area index development in a clos...

  11. FLUX DETERMINATION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN THE EXPOSURE OF RED SPRUCE TO GASEOUS HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, OZONE, AND SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on the 3-week exposure of a branch of a forest-grown red spruce (Picea rubens) sapling to the combination of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. ozone, and sulfur dioxide. he exposure was conducted continuously using concentrations of H2O2, O3, and SO2 that have been observed du...

  12. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  13. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING...

  14. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING...

  15. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  16. UTILIZATION OF A RESPONSE-SURFACE TECHNIQUE IN THE STUDY OF PLANT RESPONSES TO OZONE AND SULFUR DIOXIDE MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A second order rotatable design was used to obtain polynomial equations describing the effects of combinations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) on foliar injury and plant growth. The response surfaces derived from these equations were displayed as contour or isometric (3-di...

  17. Measurement and modeling of ozone and nitrogen oxides produced by laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gornushkin, Igor B; Stevenson, Chris L; Galbács, Gábor; Smith, Ben W; Winefordner, James D

    2003-11-01

    The production of ozone nad nitrogen oxides was studied during multiple laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen mixtures at atmospheric pressure. About 2000 laser shots at 10(10) W cm-2 were delivered into a sealed reaction chamber. The chamber with a long capillary was designed to measure absorption of O3, NO, and NO2 as a function of the number of laser shots. The light source for absorption measurements was the continuum radiation emitted by the plasma during the first 0.2 microsecond of its evolution. A kinetic model was developed that encompassed the principal chemical reactions between the major atmospheric components and the products of laser breakdown. In the model, the laser plasma was treated as a source of nitric oxide and atomic oxygen, whose rates of production were calculated using measured absorption by NO, NO2, and O3. The calculated concentration profiles for NO, NO2, and O3 were in good agreement with measured profiles over a time scale of 0-200 s. The steady-state concentration of ozone was measured in a flow cell in air. For a single breakdown in air, the estimated steady-state yield of ozone was 2 x 10(12) molecules, which agreed with the model prediction. This study can be of importance for general understanding of laser plasma chemistry and for elucidating the nature of spectral interferences and matrix effects that may take place in applied spectrochemical analysis. PMID:14658160

  18. Summary of aircraft results for 1978 southeastern Virginia urban plume measurement study of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Wornom, D. E.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone production was determined from aircraft and surface in situ measurements, as well as from an airborne laser absorption spectrometer. Three aircraft and approximately 10 surface stations provided air-quality data. Extensive meteorological, mixing-layer-height, and ozone-precursor data were also measured. Approximately 50 hrs (9 flight days) of data from the aircraft equipped to monitor ozone, nitrogen oxides, dewpoint temperature, and temperature are presented. In addition, each experiment conducted is discussed.

  19. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide and ozone on the phytochemistry of aspen and performance of an herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kopper, Brian J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the independent and interactive effects of CO(2), O(3), and plant genotype on the foliar quality of a deciduous tree and the performance of a herbivorous insect. Two trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michaux) genotypes differing in response to CO(2) and O(3) were grown at the Aspen FACE (Free Air CO(2) Enrichment) site located in northern Wisconsin, USA. Trees were exposed to one of four atmospheric treatments: ambient air (control), elevated carbon dioxide (+CO(2); 560 microl/l), elevated ozone (+O(3); ambient x1.5), and elevated CO(2)+O(3). We measured the effects of CO(2) and O(3) on aspen phytochemistry and on performance of forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hübner) larvae. CO(2) and O(3) treatments influenced foliar quality for both genotypes, with the most notable effects being that elevated CO(2) reduced nitrogen and increased tremulacin levels, whereas elevated O(3) increased early season nitrogen and reduced tremulacin levels, relative to controls. With respect to insects, the +CO(2) treatment had little or no effect on larval performance. Larval performance improved in the +O(3) treatment, but this response was negated by the addition of elevated CO(2) (i.e., +CO(2)+O(3) treatment). We conclude that tent caterpillars will have the greatest impact on aspen under current CO(2) and high O(3) levels, due to increases in insect performance and decreases in tree growth, whereas tent caterpillars will have the least impact on aspen under high CO(2) and low O(3) levels, due to moderate changes in insect performance and increases in tree growth. PMID:12647186

  20. ASSESSMENT OF CROP LOSS FROM OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past research has shown that ozone (O3) alone or in combination with sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is responsible for up to 90% of the crop losses in the U.S. caused by air pollution. The National Crop Loss Assessment Network (NCLAN) was set up to determine mor...

  1. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide mixtures on forest vegetation of the southern Sierra Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, O.C.; Miller, P.R.; Page, A.L.; Lund, L.J.

    1986-03-01

    In 1981 and 1982, a multidisciplinary study was conducted within a 32-mile zone from Oildale, CA eastward to points in the southern Sierra Nevada. Concentrations of sulfur in pine needles and lichens along transects tended to decrease with increasing elevation. Stable isotope ratios in soils and plant tissue ran counter to expectations because natural isotopic composition at greater distances is similiar to the source area. Recently germinated pine seedlings exposed to ozone and sulfur dioxide mixtures showed significant differences in root dry weight, suggesting that pollutant mixtures may affect seedling establishment. Surveys of the study area showed increased ozone damage to pines between 1977 and 1981. Sulfur dioxide did not appear to be acting jointly with ozone to cause existing injury.

  2. Product selectivity of visible-light photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide using titanium dioxide doped by different nitrogen-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoguo; Huang, Zhengfeng; Cheng, Xudong; Wang, Qingli; Chen, Yi; Dong, Peimei; Zhang, Xiwen

    2015-11-01

    The influence of nitrogen-source on the photocatalytic properties of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide is herein first investigated from the perspective of the chemical bond form of the nitrogen element in the nitrogen-source. The definitive role of groups such as Nsbnd N from the nitrogen-source on the surface of as-prepared samples in the selectivity of the dominant product of photocatalytic reduction is demonstrated. Well-crystallized one-dimensional Nsbnd TiO2 nanorod arrays with a preferred orientation of the rutile (3 1 0) facet are manufactured via a hydrothermal treatment using hydrazine and ammonia variously as the source of nitrogen. Significant selectivity of the dominant reduced products has been exhibited for Nsbnd TiO2 prepared from different nitrogen-sources in carbon dioxide photocatalytic reduction under visible light illumination. CH4 is the main product with N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2, while CO is the main product with NH3-doped Nsbnd TiO2, which can be attributed to the existence of the reducing Nsbnd N groups in the N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2 surfaces after the hydrothermal treatment. Compared with the approaches previously reported, the facile one-step route utilized here accomplishes the fabrication of Nsbnd TiO2 possessing visible-light activity and attainment of selectivity of dominant photocatalytic reduction product simultaneously by choosing a nitrogen-source with appropriate chemical bond form, which provides a completely new approach to understanding the effects of doping treatment on photocatalytic properties.

  3. The effect of nitrogen dioxide on particle formation during ozonolysis of two abundant monoterpenes indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nøjgaard, Jacob Klenø; Bilde, Merete; Stenby, Charlotte; Nielsen, Ole John; Wolkoff, Peder

    The effect of the nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) concentration on particle formation during ozonolysis of two abundant monoterpenes indoors, α-pinene and d-limonene, was studied in dry air in 1000 l Tedlar bags at 21±2 °C and ambient pressure. Particle size distributions were measured during 1 h after the reaction was initiated. In mixtures of 50 parts per billion volume (ppbv) of monoterpene and 50 ppbv of ozone (O 3), d-limonene produced about five times as many particles (10-350 nm) as α-pinene after 60 min. The presence of NO 2 introduced an additional loss term for O 3, resulting in formation of the nitrate radical. This affected particle formation, since the nucleation potential of NO 3 is much lower than O 3. Modeling showed that the observed decrease in particle concentration from d-limonene/O 3/NO 2 mixtures was likely to be ascribed to the O 3/NO 2 reaction at NO 2 concentrations <150 ppb, above which unknown mechanisms additionally reduced the particle formation. In similar experiments with α-pinene, the particle concentration and volume were substantially reduced in the presence of NO 2, e.g. 162 ppbv NO 2 reduced the particle number concentration by a factor of 10. In addition, the detection of particle formation was delayed as the NO 2 concentration increased, but the additional loss of O 3 in the O 3/NO 2 reaction could not explain the observation. The particle mode progressively increased with the NO 2 concentration for both monoterpenes. Oxidation of d-limonene may be highly relevant for new particle formation in indoor air, whereas ozonolysis products of α-pinene seem less likely to nucleate in indoor environments.

  4. Nitrogen Dioxide and Allergic Sensitization in the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Charles H.; Yeatts, Karin B.; Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Vizuete, William; Salo, Päivi M.; Jaramillo, Renee; Cohn, Richard D.; Chu, Haitao; Zeldin, Darryl C.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic sensitization is a risk factor for asthma and allergic diseases. The relationship between ambient air pollution and allergic sensitization is unclear. Objective To investigate the relationship between ambient air pollution and allergic sensitization in a nationally representative sample of the US population. Methods We linked annual average concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter ≤ 10 µm (PM10), particulate matter ≤ 2.5 µm (PM25), and summer concentrations of ozone (O3), to allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) data for participants in the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In addition to the monitor-based air pollution estimates, we used the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to increase the representation of rural participants in our sample. Logistic regression with population-based sampling weights was used to calculate adjusted prevalence odds ratios per 10 ppb increase in O3 and NO2, per 10 µg/m3 increase in PM10, and per 5 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 adjusting for race, gender, age, socioeconomic status, smoking, and urban/rural status. Results Using CMAQ data, increased levels of NO2 were associated with positive IgE to any (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04, 1.27), inhalant (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02, 1.33), and outdoor (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03, 1.31) allergens. Higher PM2.5 levels were associated with positivity to indoor allergen-specific IgE (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13, 1.36). Effect estimates were similar using monitored data. Conclusions Increased ambient NO2 was consistently associated with increased prevalence of allergic sensitization. PMID:24045117

  5. Improved spectral fitting of nitrogen dioxide from OMI in the 405-465 nm window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, J. H. G. M.; Boersma, K. F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; De Smedt, I.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2014-10-01

    An improved nitrogen dioxide (NO2) slant column density retrieval for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in the 405-465 nm spectral region is presented. Since the launch of OMI on board NASA's EOS-Aura satellite in 2004, DOAS retrievals of NO2 slant column densities have been the starting point for the KNMI DOMINO (v2.0) and NASA SP (v2.1) retrievals. However, recent intercomparisons between NO2 retrievals from OMI and other UV/Vis and limb spectrometers, as well as ground-based measurements, clearly suggested that OMI stratospheric NO2 is biased high. This study revises the OMI NO2 retrieval in detail. The representation of the OMI slit function to convolve high-resolution reference spectra onto the relevant spectral grid is improved. The window used for the wavelength calibration is optimised, leading to much-reduced fitting errors. Ozone and water vapour spectra used in the fit are updated, reflecting the recently improved knowledge on their absorption cross section as documented in the literature. The improved spectral fit also accounts for absorption by the O2-O2 collision complex and by liquid water over clear-water areas. The main changes in the improved spectral fitting result from the updates related to the wavelength calibration: the RMS error of the fit is reduced by 23% and the NO2 slant column by 0.85 × 1015 molec cm-2, independent of latitude, solar zenith angle and NO2 value. Including O2-O2 and liquid water absorption and updating the O3 and water vapour cross-section spectra further reduces NO2 slant columns on average by 0.35 × 1015 molec cm-2, accompanied with a further 9% reduction in the RMS error of the fit. The improved OMI NO2 slant columns are consistent with independent NO2 retrievals to within a range that can be explained by photo-chemically driven diurnal increases in stratospheric NO2 and by small differences in fitting window and fitting approach. The revisions indicate that current OMI NO2 slant columns suffered mostly from an

  6. Improved spectral fitting of nitrogen dioxide from OMI in the 405-465 nm window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, J. H. G. M.; Boersma, K. F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; De Smedt, I.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2015-04-01

    An improved nitrogen dioxide (NO2) slant column density retrieval for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in the 405-465 nm spectral region is presented. Since the launch of OMI on board NASA's EOS-Aura satellite in 2004, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) retrievals of NO2 slant column densities have been the starting point for the KNMI DOMINO and NASA SP NO2 vertical column data as well as the OMI NO2 data of some other institutes. However, recent intercomparisons between NO2 retrievals from OMI and other UV/Vis and limb spectrometers, as well as ground-based measurements, suggest that OMI stratospheric NO2 is biased high. This study revises and, for the first time, fully documents the OMI NO2 retrieval in detail. The representation of the OMI slit function to convolve high-resolution reference spectra onto the relevant spectral grid is improved. The window used for the wavelength calibration is optimised, leading to much-reduced fitting errors. Ozone and water vapour spectra used in the fit are updated, reflecting the recently improved knowledge of their absorption cross section in the literature. The improved spectral fit also accounts for absorption by the O2-O2 collision complex and by liquid water over clear-water areas. The main changes in the improved spectral fitting result from the updates related to the wavelength calibration: the RMS error of the fit is reduced by 23% and the NO2 slant column by 0.85 × 1015 molec cm-2, independent of latitude, solar zenith angle and NO2 value. Including O2-O2 and liquid water absorption and updating the O3 and water vapour cross-section spectra further reduces NO2 slant columns on average by 0.35 × 1015 molec cm-2, accompanied by a further 9% reduction in the RMS error of the fit. The improved OMI NO2 slant columns are consistent with independent NO2 retrievals from other instruments to within a range that can be explained by photochemically driven diurnal increases in stratospheric NO2 and by

  7. The importance of ozone in the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in nonurban tropospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    In studies of the various possible mechanisms which contribute to the conversion of atmospheric sulfur dioxide to sulfate aerosol in the atmosphere, oxidation within the aqueous, droplet phase of tropospheric clouds has been identified as a major contributor. It has appeared that possibly much of this oxidation is by hydrogen peroxide, with the contribution from ozone being only minimal. The present investigation is concerned with the relative importance of O3 and H2O2 oxidation as a function of pH. The results of a new experimental study of the O3-S(IV) reaction in aqueous solution are presented, and potential S(IV) oxidation rates by O3 in cloud water are compared with those predicted for H2O2. The investigation indicates the potential importance of O3 as a contributor to the overall oxidative conversion of SO2 within typical nonpolluted tropospheric clouds.

  8. Destruction of cyanide waste solutions using chlorine dioxide, ozone and titania sol

    SciTech Connect

    Parga, J.R.; Shukla, S.S.; Carrillo-Pedroza, F.R

    2003-07-01

    Increasingly, there are severe environmental controls in the mining industry. Because of lack of technological advances, waste management practices are severely limited. Most of the wastes in the milling industrial effluents are known to contain cyanides and it is recognized that after extraction and recovery of precious metals, substantial amounts of cyanide are delivered to tailings ponds. The toxicity of cyanide creates serious environmental problems. In this paper we describe several methods for the treatment of cyanide solutions. These include: (1) cyanide destruction by oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) in a Gas-Sparged Hydrocyclone (GSH) reactor; (2) destruction of cyanide by ozone (O{sub 3}) using a stirred batch reactor, and finally, (3) the photolysis of cyanide with UV light in presence of titania sol. In all cases excellent performance were observed as measured by the extent and of the destruction.

  9. Nitrogen Dioxide Variations Caused by Penetration of Solar Protons into the High-Latitude Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkina, E. A.; Shumilov, O. I.; Kyro, E.; Fadel, K.; Turyansky, V. A.; Kivi, R.

    2003-03-01

    The results of spectroscopic measurements of the NO2 total content during the solar proton event of the GLE (Ground Level Event) type on May 2, 1998, at the Murmansk (Φ" = 64.5°) and Sodankyla (Φ" = 63.7°) stations are presented. The vertical profiles of the nitrogen oxide (NO) distribution in the stratosphere according to the UARS satellite data during another GLE event on July 14, 2000, are also presented. It is shown that the high-energy solar protons penetrating into the atmosphere lead to a considerable increase in the nitrogen oxide concentration and the GLE on May 2, 1998, resulted in an increase of the NO2 total content according to the ground-based observations at high latitudes. It is worth noting that no decrease of the total ozone content (TOC) was recorded during these proton events according to the ground-based measurements at high latitudes. The corresponding calculations of the nitrogen oxide changes during proton events based on the homogeneous photochemical theory are presented. The interrelation between all the quantities measured, as well as their relation to the calculated values, is considered. It is shown that a considerable increase of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere does not always result in an ozone concentration depletion. The results presented indicate a need to provide simultaneous ground-based and satellite measurements of nitrogen oxides and ozone at high latitudes.

  10. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part I: Health outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. )

    1993-06-01

    We have carried out a prospective cohort study to test the hypothesis that exposure to nitrogen dioxide increases the incidence and severity of respiratory infections during the first 18 months of life. Between January 1988 and June 1990, 1,315 infants were enrolled into the study at birth and followed with prospective surveillance for the occurrence of respiratory infections and monitoring of nitrogen dioxide concentrations in their homes. The subjects were healthy infants from homes without smokers; they were selected with stratification by type of cooking stove at a ratio of four to one for gas and electric stoves. Illness experience was monitored by a daily diary of symptoms completed by the mother and a telephone interview conducted every two weeks. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as involving the lower respiratory tract; all other respiratory illnesses were designated as involving the upper respiratory tract. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide was estimated by two-week average concentrations measured in the subjects' bedrooms with passive samplers. This analysis is limited to the 1,205 subjects completing at least one month of observation; of these, 823 completed the full protocol, contributing 82.8% of the total number of days during which the subjects were under observation. Incidence rates for all respiratory illnesses, all upper respiratory illness, all lower respiratory illnesses, and lower respiratory illness further divided into those with any wheezing, or wet cough without wheezing, were examined within strata of nitrogen dioxide exposure at the time of the illness, nitrogen dioxide exposure during the prior month, and type of cooking stove. Consistent trends of increasing illness incidence rates with increasing exposure to nitrogen dioxide were not evident for either the lagged or unlagged exposure variables.