Science.gov

Sample records for ozone-triggered rapid stomatial

  1. VIRAL STRATEGIES TO STUDY THE BRAIN, INCLUDING A REPLICATION-RESTRICTED SELF-AMPLIFYING DELTA-G VESICULAR STOMATIS VIRUS THAT RAPIDLY EXPRESSES TRANSGENES IN BRAIN AND CAN GENERATE A MULTICOLOR GOLGI-LIKE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    van den Pol, Anthony N.; Ozduman, Koray; Wollmann, Guido; Ho, Winson; Simon, Ian; Yao, Yang; Rose, John K.; Ghosh, Prabhat

    2010-01-01

    Viruses have substantial value as vehicles to transport transgenes into neurons. Each virus has its own set of attributes for addressing neuroscience-related questions. Here we review some of the advantages and limitations of herpes, pseudorabies, rabies, adeno-associated, lentivirus, and others to study the brain. We then explore a novel recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (dG-VSV) with the G-gene deleted and transgenes engineered into the first position of the RNA genome which replicates only in the first brain cell infected, as corroborated with ultrastructural analysis, eliminating spread of virus. Due to its ability to rapidly replicate and express multiple mRNA copies and additional templates for more copies, reporter gene expression is amplified substantially, over 500-fold in 6 hours, allowing detailed imaging of dendrites, dendritic spines, axons, and axon terminal fields within a few hours to a few days after inoculation. GFP expression is first detected within one hour of inoculation. The virus generates a Golgi-like appearance in all neuron or glia of regions of the brain tested. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology, calcium digital imaging with fura-2, and time-lapse digital imaging showed that neurons appeared physiologically normal after expressing viral transgenes. The virus has a wide range of species applicability, including mouse, rat, hamster, human, and drosophila cells. Using dG-VSV, we show efferent projections from the suprachiasmatic nucleus terminating in the periventricular region immediately dorsal to the nucleus. DG-VSVs with genes coding for different color reporters allow multicolor visualization of neurons wherever applied. PMID:19672982

  2. Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  3. Rapid weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss-rapid weight loss; Overweight-rapid weight loss; Obesity-rapid weight loss; Diet-rapid weight loss ... for people who have health problems because of obesity. For these people, losing a lot of weight ...

  4. Rapid shallow breathing

    MedlinePlus

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  5. PUBLISHER'S NOTE: Rapid Communications Rapid Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Tom

    2009-09-01

    As part of a general review of Superconductor Science and Technology, we have been examining the scope for Rapid Communications (RAPs). We recognize these articles make up an important part of the journal representing the latest state-of-the-art research in superconductivity. To reflect this, we have devised a new scope for this article type: 'Rapid Communications. The journal offers open access to outstanding short articles (no longer than 5 journal pages or 4500 words including figures) reporting new and timely developments in superconductivity and its applications. These articles should report very substantial new advances in superconductivity to the readers of Superconductor Science and Technology, but are not expected to meet any requirement of 'general interest'. RAPs will be processed quickly (average receipt to online publication for RAPs is around 60 days) and are permanently free to read in the electronic journal. Authors submitting a RAP should provide reasons why the work is urgent and requires rapid publication. Each RAP will be assessed for suitability by our Reviews and Rapid Communications Editor before full peer review takes place.' The essential points are: They should report very substantial new advances in superconductivity and its application; They must be no longer than 5 journal pages long (approx. 4500 words); Average publication time for a Rapid Communication is 60 days; They are free to read. As mentioned in the previous publisher's announcement (2009 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 22 010101), each submitted Rapid Communication must come with a letter justifying why it should be prioritized over regular papers and will be pre-assessed by our Reviews and Rapid Communications Editor. In addition, we will work with the authors of any Rapid Communication to promote and raise the visibility of the work presented in it. We will be making further changes to the journal in the near future and we write to you accordingly. Thank you for your kind

  6. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  7. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  8. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  9. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  10. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  11. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be rapid, ultra-rapid or ultradian cycling. Biological rhythm disturbances: This theory proposes that people with rapid cycling have daily biological rhythms that are out of sync with typical “ ...

  12. Navigate the Digital Rapids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Julie; Davis, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    How can teachers teach digital citizenship when the digital landscape is changing so rapidly? How can teachers teach proper online social interactions when the students are outside their classroom and thus outside their control? Will encouraging students to engage in global collaborative environments land teachers in hot water? These are the…

  13. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  14. AFRPL Rapid Indexing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltran, Alfred A.

    A modified Keyword Out of Context (KWOC) system was developed to gain rapid control over more than 8,000 scattered, unindexed documents. This was the first step in providing the technical information support required by Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory scientists and engineers. Implementation of the KWOC system, computer routines, and…

  15. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  16. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  17. Rapid climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Morantine, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Interactions between insolation changes due to orbital parameter variations, carbon dioxide concentration variations, the rate of deep water formation in the North Atlantic and the evolution of the northern hemisphere ice sheets during the most recent glacial cycle will be investigated. In order to investigate this period, a climate model is being developed to evaluate the physical mechanisms thought to be most significant during this period. The description of the model sub-components will be presented. The more one knows about the interactions between the sub-components of the climate system during periods of documented rapid climate change, the better equipped one will be to make rational decisions on issues related to impacts on the environment. This will be an effort to gauge the feedback processes thought to be instrumental in rapid climate shifts documented in the past, and their potential to influence the current climate. 53 refs.

  18. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Joy, R.W.

    1982-09-20

    A rapidly refuelable dual cell of an electrochemical type is described wherein a single anode cooperates with two cathodes and wherein the anode has a fixed position and the cathodes are urged toward opposite faces of the anodes at constant and uniform force. The associated cathodes are automatically retractable to permit the consumed anode remains to be removed from the housing and a new anode inserted between the two cathodes.

  19. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  20. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents a practical and informative approach to the evaluation of a patient with a rapidly progressive dementia (RPD). Recent Findings Prion diseases are the prototypical causes of RPD, but reversible causes of RPD might mimic prion disease and should always be considered in a differential diagnosis. Aside from prion diseases, the most common causes of RPD are atypical presentations of other neurodegenerative disorders, curable disorders including autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as some infections, and neoplasms. Numerous recent case reports suggest dural arterial venous fistulas sometimes cause RPDs. Summary RPDs, in which patients typically develop dementia over weeks to months, require an alternative differential than the slowly progressive dementias that occur over a few years. Because of their rapid decline, patients with RPDs necessitate urgent evaluation and often require an extensive workup, typically with multiple tests being sent or performed concurrently. Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, perhaps the prototypical RPD, is often the first diagnosis many neurologists consider when treating a patient with rapid cognitive decline. Many conditions other than prion disease, however, including numerous reversible or curable conditions, can present as an RPD. This chapter discusses some of the major etiologies for RPDs and offers an algorithm for diagnosis. PMID:27042906

  1. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  2. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  3. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  4. Right-Rapid-Rough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Craig

    2003-01-01

    IDEO (pronounced 'eye-dee-oh') is an international design, engineering, and innovation firm that has developed thousands of products and services for clients across a wide range of industries. Its process and culture attracted the attention of academics, businesses, and journalists around the world, and are the subject of a bestselling book, The Art of Innovation by Tom Kelley. One of the keys to IDEO's success is its use of prototyping as a tool for rapid innovation. This story covers some of IDEO's projects, and gives reasons for why they were successful.

  5. Rapidly Progressing Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hollowed, John; McCullough, Matthew; Sanchez, Daniel; Traina, Mahmoud; Hernandez, Salvador; Murillo, Efrain

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasiteTrypanosoma cruzi, can cause a potentially life-threatening cardiomyopathy in approximately 10-40% of afflicted individuals. The decline in cardiac function characteristically progresses over the course of many years. We report a case of Chagas disease in which the patient experienced an atypical rapid deterioration to severe cardiomyopathy over the course of 16 months. This case argues the need for increased routine surveillance for patients with confirmedT. cruziinfection, who are determined to be at high-risk for worsening cardiomyopathy. PMID:26856912

  6. Rapid and Quiet Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2007-01-01

    This describes aspects of the rapid and quiet drill (RAQD), which is a prototype apparatus for drilling concrete or bricks. The design and basic principle of operation of the RAQD overlap, in several respects, with those of ultrasonic/ sonic drilling and coring apparatuses described in a number of previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The main difference is that whereas the actuation scheme of the prior apparatuses is partly ultrasonic and partly sonic, the actuation scheme of the RAQD is purely ultrasonic. Hence, even though the RAQD generates considerable sound, it is characterized as quiet because most or all of the sound is above the frequency range of human hearing.

  7. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  8. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. PMID:24252381

  9. Rapid Decisions From Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zeigenfuse, Matthew D.; Pleskac, Timothy J.; Liu, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    In many everyday decisions, people quickly integrate noisy samples of information to form a preference among alternatives that offer uncertain rewards. Here, we investigated this decision process using the Flash Gambling Task (FGT), in which participants made a series of choices between a certain payoff and an uncertain alternative that produced a normal distribution of payoffs. For each choice, participants experienced the distribution of payoffs via rapid samples updated every 50 ms. We show that people can make these rapid decisions from experience and that the decision process is consistent with a sequential sampling process. Results also reveal a dissociation between these preferential decisions and equivalent perceptual decisions where participants had to determine which alternatives contained more dots on average. To account for this dissociation, we developed a sequential sampling rank-dependent utility model, which showed that participants in the FGT attended more to larger potential payoffs than participants in the perceptual task despite being given equivalent information. We discuss the implications of these findings in terms of computational models of preferential choice and a more complete understanding of experience-based decision making. PMID:24549141

  10. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, W.D.; Waddell, W.L.

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  11. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  12. rapidMCR

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-04

    rapidMCR is a user friendly software package that includes automatic preprocessing, analysis, and viewing of hyperspectral image data sets. Currently, this software package specifically preprocesses and analyzes hyperspectral fluorescence image data sets that have been created on Sandia hyperspectral imaging microscopes; however, this software can be modified to include spectroscopic image data sets from other (non-Sandia developed) instruments as well. This software relies on using prior information about the spectroscopic image data sets by conducting a rigorous characterization of the instrument. By characterizing the instrument for noise and artifacts, we can implement our algorithms to account for the effects specific to a particular instrument. This allows us to automate the data preprocessing while improving the analysis results.

  13. rapidMCR

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-11-04

    rapidMCR is a user friendly software package that includes automatic preprocessing, analysis, and viewing of hyperspectral image data sets. Currently, this software package specifically preprocesses and analyzes hyperspectral fluorescence image data sets that have been created on Sandia hyperspectral imaging microscopes; however, this software can be modified to include spectroscopic image data sets from other (non-Sandia developed) instruments as well. This software relies on using prior information about the spectroscopic image data sets by conductingmore » a rigorous characterization of the instrument. By characterizing the instrument for noise and artifacts, we can implement our algorithms to account for the effects specific to a particular instrument. This allows us to automate the data preprocessing while improving the analysis results.« less

  14. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  15. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Mathew W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal or transverse direction at the tip, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip. Each measured change in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference signals, with each reference signal identified with a polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component. The tip preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  16. Rapid mercury assays

    SciTech Connect

    Szurdoki, S.; Kido, H.; Hammock, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    We have developed rapid assays with the potential of detecting mercury in environmental samples. our methods combine the simple ELISA-format with the selective, high affinity complexation of mercuric ions by sulfur-containing ligands. The first assay is based on a sandwich chelate formed by a protein-bound ligand immobilized on the wells of a microliter plate, mercuric ion of the analyzed sample, and another ligand conjugated to a reporter enzyme. The second assay involves competition between mercuric ions and an organomercury-conjugate to bind to a chelating conjugate. Several sulfur containing chelators (e.g., dithiocarbamates) and organomercurials linked to macromolecular carriers have been investigated in these assay formats. The assays detect mercuric ions in ppb/high ppt concentrations with high selectivity.

  17. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  18. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  19. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  20. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  1. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and < 0.16″ in the near infrared leading to an increase of the infrared point-source sensitivity against the sky background by a factor of ~9, crucial for efficient near-infrared spectroscopy.RTS will allow us to map the dark matter distribution in the z < 0.1 local universe with ten times better accuracy and precision than previous experiments. ATLAS will discover several thousand SNIae per year, measuring SNIa peak brightness, and decline rates, while RTS will measure reddening by dust, confirm SN type and

  2. Rapid Evaporation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2008-11-01

    When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized rapidly. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a growing interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.

  3. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  4. Problems of rapid growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, T D

    1980-01-01

    South Korea's export-oriented development strategy has achieved a remarkable growth record, but it has also brought 2 different problems: 1) since the country's exports accounted for about 1% of total world export volume, the 1st world has become fearful about Korea's aggressive export drive; and 2) the fact that exports account for over 30% of its total gross national product (GNP) exposes the vulnerability of South Korea's economy itself. South Korea continues to be a poor nation, although it is rated as 1 of the most rapidly growing middle income economies. A World Bank 1978 report shows Korea to be 28th of 58 middle income countries in terms of per capita GNP in 1976. Of 11 newly industrializing countries (NIC), 5 in the European continent are more advanced than the others. A recent emphasis on the basic human needs approach has tended to downgrade the concept of GNP. Korea has only an abundant labor force and is without any natural resources. Consequently, Korea utilized an export-oriented development strategy. Oil requirements are met with imports, and almost all raw materials to be processed into exportable products must be imported. To pay import bills Korea must export and earn foreign exchange. It must be emphasized that foreign trade must always be 2-way traffic. In order to export more to middle income countries like Korea, the countries of the 1st world need to ease their protectionist measures against imports from developing countries. PMID:12336527

  5. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution. PMID:23729251

  6. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  7. Can China afford rapid aging?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quanbao; Yang, Shucai; Sánchez-Barricarte, Jesús J

    2016-01-01

    China's rapid aging has caused widespread concern, but it seems that the situations and consequences of rapid aging are not adequately acknowledged. This study analyzed the problem of ageing in China from the aspects of elderly people's health status, income source, daily care, suicide, the weak social security system in terms of pension, health expenses, and long-term care costs as well as incoming accelerating ageing process in China. All these factors indicate that it is difficult for China to afford the issue of a rapidly aging population. PMID:27478724

  8. [Rapid PCR authentication Lonicera japanica].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Hou, Jing-Yi; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan

    2014-10-01

    To simply and rapid authenticate Lonicera japanica. Rapid allele-specific PCR primer was designed base on trnL-trnF 625 G/T Single nucleotide polymorphism and the PCR reaction systems including annealing temperature was optimized; optimized results were performed to authenticate L. japanica and its 9 adulterants. When 100 x SYBR Green I was added in the PCR product of 87 degrees C initial denatured 1 min; 87 degrees C denatured 5 s, 68 degrees C annealing 5 s, 30 cycle; L. japanica visualize strong green fluorescence under 365 nm UV lamp whereas adulterants without. The results indicate rapid allele-specific PCR could authenticate L. japanica and its adulterants rapidly and simply. PMID:25612418

  9. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them. PMID:26668438

  10. Rapidly Deployed Modular Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a telemetry system, and more specifically is a rapidly deployed modular telemetry apparatus which utilizes of SDR technology and the FPGA programming capability to reduce the number of hardware components and programming required to deploy a telemetry system.

  11. Rapid Prototyping Enters Mainstream Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winek, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Explains rapid prototyping, a process that uses computer-assisted design files to create a three-dimensional object automatically, speeding the industrial design process. Five commercially available systems and two emerging types--the 3-D printing process and repetitive masking and depositing--are described. (SK)

  12. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  13. Evolution of rapid nerve conduction.

    PubMed

    Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2016-06-15

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses is a priority for organisms needing to react quickly to events in their environment. While myelin may be viewed as the crowning innovation bringing about rapid conduction, the evolution of rapid communication mechanisms, including those refined and enhanced in the evolution of myelin, has much deeper roots. In this review, a sequence is traced starting with diffusional communication, followed by transport-facilitated communication, the rise of electrical signaling modalities, the invention of voltage-gated channels and "all-or-none" impulses, the emergence of elongate nerve axons specialized for communication and their fine-tuning to enhance impulse conduction speeds. Finally within the evolution of myelin itself, several innovations have arisen and have been interactively refined for speed enhancement, including the addition and sealing of layers, their limitation by space availability, and the optimization of key parameters: channel density, lengths of exposed nodes and lengths of internodes. We finish by suggesting several design principles that appear to govern the evolution of rapid conduction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26879248

  14. Rapid diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    White, A.; Kohler, R. B.; Wheat, L. J.; Sathapatayavongs, B.; Winn, W. C.; Girod, J. C.; Edelstein, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed to detect urinary antigen excreted by patients with Legionnaires' disease. Of 47 patients tested, antigen was detected in 39. Antigen was not detected in any of 178 urine specimens from patients with other pulmonary, bacteremic, or urinary tract infections after performance of a quick and simple confirmatory test. The assay required more time to perform than a previously described radioimmunoassay but was of equivalent sensitivity and specificity and did not require expensive equipment of contact with radioactive reagents. We conclude that enzyme linked immunosorbent assay is a rapid, sensitive, and specific means for rapidly diagnosing Legionnaires' disease which can be performed in clinical laboratories unwilling or unable to use radioisotopes. PMID:7048694

  15. A rapidly growing lid lump

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Su-Yin; Lee, Richard M H; Hugkulstone, Charles; Rodrigues, Ian Aureliano Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A 97-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of a rapidly growing, painless, left upper eyelid lesion. Examination revealed a large vascularised, ulcerated nodule on the left upper lid, causing significant ptosis. Wide local excision of the lesion was performed and the wound was left to heal by secondary intention. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the lesion confirmed a diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare primary malignancy of the eyelid which has significant morbidity and mortality. Although uncommon, this diagnosis should always be considered in any patient with a rapidly growing lid lump. In view of the patient's age, known dementia and family wishes, the patient was managed conservatively, with no further investigations performed. She was due to be followed up in clinic on a regular basis, but has since died from other causes. PMID:25123568

  16. Rapid SAW Sensor Development Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    The lack of integrated design tools for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices has led us to develop tools for the design, modeling, analysis, and automatic layout generation of SAW devices. These tools enable rapid development of wireless SAW sensors. The tools developed have been designed to integrate into existing Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools to take advantage of existing 3D modeling, and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). This paper presents the SAW design, modeling, analysis, and automated layout generation tools.

  17. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  18. Rapid Sampling from Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.; Garcia, A.R.E.; Martinez, R.K.; Baca, E.T.

    1999-02-28

    The authors have developed several different types of tools for sampling from sealed containers. These tools allow the user to rapidly drill into a closed container, extract a sample of its contents (gas, liquid, or free-flowing powder), and permanently reseal the point of entry. This is accomplished without exposing the user or the environment to the container contents, even while drilling. The entire process is completed in less than 15 seconds for a 55 gallon drum. Almost any kind of container can be sampled (regardless of the materials) with wall thicknesses up to 1.3 cm and internal pressures up to 8 atm. Samples can be taken from the top, sides, or bottom of a container. The sampling tools are inexpensive, small, and easy to use. They work with any battery-powered hand drill. This allows considerable safety, speed, flexibility, and maneuverability. The tools also permit the user to rapidly attach plumbing, a pressure relief valve, alarms, or other instrumentation to a container. Possible applications include drum venting, liquid transfer, container flushing, waste characterization, monitoring, sampling for archival or quality control purposes, emergency sampling by rapid response teams, counter-terrorism, non-proliferation and treaty verification, and use by law enforcement personnel during drug or environmental raids.

  19. Rapid thermal processing by stamping

    DOEpatents

    Stradins, Pauls; Wang, Qi

    2013-03-05

    A rapid thermal processing device and methods are provided for thermal processing of samples such as semiconductor wafers. The device has components including a stamp (35) having a stamping surface and a heater or cooler (40) to bring it to a selected processing temperature, a sample holder (20) for holding a sample (10) in position for intimate contact with the stamping surface; and positioning components (25) for moving the stamping surface and the stamp (35) in and away from intimate, substantially non-pressured contact. Methods for using and making such devices are also provided. These devices and methods allow inexpensive, efficient, easily controllable thermal processing.

  20. Rapidly Adaptable Instrumentation Tester (RAIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, Timothy D.

    1999-06-07

    Emerging technologies in the field of "Test & Measurement" have recently enabled the development of the Rapidly Adaptable Instrumentation Tester (RAIT). Based on software developed with LabVIEW®, the RAIT design enables quick reconfiguration to test and calibrate a wide variety of telemetry systems. The consequences of inadequate testing could be devastating if a telemetry system were to fail during an expensive flight mission. Supporting both open-bench testing as well as automated test sequences, the RAIT has significantly lowered total time required to test and calibrate a system. This has resulted in an overall lower per unit testing cost than has been achievable in the past.

  1. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  2. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Kuranov, A. G.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Popov, S. B.; Porayko, N. K.

    2016-08-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In the present paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, τc. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations of the evolution of a rotating 15 M⊙ star. From comparison of the calculated spin distribution of young neutron stars with the observed one, reported by Popov and Turolla, we infer the value τc ≃ 5 × 105 years. We show that merging of stellar cores in common envelopes can lead to collapses with dynamically unstable proto-neutron stars, with their formation rate being ˜0.1 - 1% of the total core collapses, depending on the common envelope efficiency.

  3. Rapid actinide-separation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III

    1997-12-31

    New high-speed actinide-separation methods have been developed by the Savannah River Site Central Laboratory that can be applied to nuclear materials process samples, waste solutions and environmental samples. As part of a reengineering effort to improve efficiencies and reduce operating costs, solvent extraction methods (TTA, Hexone, TBP and TIOA) used for over thirty years in the SRS Central Laboratory were replaced with new rapid extraction column methods able to handle a variety of difficult sample matrices and actinide levels. Significant costs savings were realized and costly mixed-waste controls were avoided by using applied vacuum and 50-100 micron particle-size resins from Eichrom Industries. TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, UTEVA Resin{reg_sign}, and TRU Resin{reg_sign} columns are used with flow rates of approximately two to three milliliters per minute to minimize sample turnaround times. Single-column, dual-column and sequential-cartridge methods for plutonium, uranium, neptunium, americium and curium were developed that enable rapid, cost-effective separations prior to alpha-particle counting, thermal ionization and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and laser phosphorescence measurements.

  4. Rapid ISS Power Availability Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) Power Resource Officers (PROs) needed a tool to automate the calculation of thousands of ISS power availability simulations used to generate power constraint matrices. Each matrix contains 864 cells, and each cell represents a single power simulation that must be run. The tools available to the flight controllers were very operator intensive and not conducive to rapidly running the thousands of simulations necessary to generate the power constraint data. SOLAR is a Java-based tool that leverages commercial-off-the-shelf software (Satellite Toolkit) and an existing in-house ISS EPS model (SPEED) to rapidly perform thousands of power availability simulations. SOLAR has a very modular architecture and consists of a series of plug-ins that are loosely coupled. The modular architecture of the software allows for the easy replacement of the ISS power system model simulator, re-use of the Satellite Toolkit integration code, and separation of the user interface from the core logic. Satellite Toolkit (STK) is used to generate ISS eclipse and insulation times, solar beta angle, position of the solar arrays over time, and the amount of shadowing on the solar arrays, which is then provided to SPEED to calculate power generation forecasts. The power planning turn-around time is reduced from three months to two weeks (83-percent decrease) using SOLAR, and the amount of PRO power planning support effort is reduced by an estimated 30 percent.

  5. Rapid learning: a breakthrough agenda.

    PubMed

    Etheredge, Lynn M

    2014-07-01

    A "rapid-learning health system" was proposed in a 2007 thematic issue of Health Affairs. The system was envisioned as one that uses evidence-based medicine to quickly determine the best possible treatments for patients. It does so by drawing on electronic health records and the power of big data to access large volumes of information from a variety of sources at high speed. The foundation for a rapid-learning health system was laid during 2007-13 by workshops, policy papers, large public investments in databases and research programs, and developing learning systems. Challenges now include implementing a new clinical research system with several hundred million patients, modernizing clinical trials and registries, devising and funding research on national priorities, and analyzing genetic and other factors that influence diseases and responses to treatment. Next steps also should aim to improve comparative effectiveness research; build on investments in health information technology to standardize handling of genetic information and support information exchange through apps and software modules; and develop new tools, data, and information for clinical decision support. Further advances will require commitment, leadership, and public-private and global collaboration. PMID:25006141

  6. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hydrogel network with flexible-pendant side chains carrying an optimal balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that allows the side chains to mediate hydrogen bonds across the hydrogel interfaces with minimal steric hindrance and hydrophobic collapse. The self-healing reported here is rapid, occurring within seconds of the insertion of a crack into the hydrogel or juxtaposition of two separate hydrogel pieces. The healing is reversible and can be switched on and off via changes in pH, allowing external control over the healing process. Moreover, the hydrogels can sustain multiple cycles of healing and separation without compromising their mechanical properties and healing kinetics. Beyond revealing how secondary interactions could be harnessed to introduce new functions to chemically cross-linked polymeric systems, we also demonstrate various potential applications of such easy-to-synthesize, smart, self-healing hydrogels. PMID:22392977

  7. Rapid solidification of metallic particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to maximize the heat transfer coefficient the most important variable in rapid solidification is the powder particle size. The finer the particle size, the higher the solidification rate. Efforts to decrease the particle size diameter offer the greatest payoff in attained quench rate. The velocity of the liquid droplet in the atmosphere is the second most important variable. Unfortunately the choices of gas atmospheres are sharply limited both because of conductivity and cost. Nitrogen and argon stand out as the preferred gases, nitrogen where reactions are unimportant and argon where reaction with nitrogen may be important. In gas atomization, helium offers up to an order of magnitude increase in solidification rate over argon and nitrogen. By contrast, atomization in vacuum drops the quench rate several orders of magnitude.

  8. Rapid facial mimicry in geladas.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Giada; Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Rapid facial mimicry (RFM) is an automatic response, in which individuals mimic others' expressions. RFM, only demonstrated in humans and apes, is grounded in the automatic perception-action coupling of sensorimotor information occurring in the mirror neuron system. In humans, RFM seems to reflect the capacity of individuals to empathize with others. Here, we demonstrated that, during play, RFM is also present in a cercopithecoid species (Theropithecus gelada). Mother-infant play sessions were not only characterized by the highest levels of RFM, but also by the fastest responses. Our findings suggest that RFM in humans have homologous not only in apes, but also in cercopitecoids. Moreover, data point to similarities in the modality in which mother-infant synchronous behaviours are expressed among primates, suggesting a common evolutionary root in the basic elements of mother-infant affective exchanges. PMID:23538990

  9. Rapid adaptation to climate change.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Angela M

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, amid growing concerns that changing climate is affecting species distributions and ecosystems, predicting responses to rapid environmental change has become a major goal. In this issue, Franks and colleagues take a first step towards this objective (Franks et al. 2016). They examine genomewide signatures of selection in populations of Brassica rapa after a severe multiyear drought. Together with other authors, Franks had previously shown that flowering time was reduced after this particular drought and that the reduction was genetically encoded. Now, the authors have sequenced previously stored samples to compare allele frequencies before and after the drought and identify the loci with the most extreme shifts in frequencies. The loci they identify largely differ between populations, suggesting that different genetic variants may be responsible for reduction in flowering time in the two populations. PMID:27463237

  10. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  11. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, R; Kaur, I; Singh, R P; Gupta, H C

    1998-01-01

    A Reverse Passive Haemagglutination Test (RPHA) was designed for the detection of Salmonella typhi antigen and rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever. Two per cent fresh sheep RBC's were coated with 32 micrograms/ml of immunoglobulin. The minimal detectable level of the antigen was 1250 micrograms/ml. Cross reactions were observed with the samples of patients suffering from Salmonella paratyphi A and pseudomonas infections. The RPHA established was used for the detection of S. typhi antigen in culture broths from 100 patients with clinically suspected typhoid fever with culture and/or widal positive, 50 patients with septicemia caused by bacteria other than S. typhi and 50 normal, afebrile healthy controls. It was found that the sensitivity and specificity of this assay was 70% and 92% respectively. PMID:10773905

  12. Rapid world modelling for robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Littile, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1996-04-01

    The ability to use an interactive world model, whether it is for robotics simulation or most other virtual graphical environments, relies on the users ability to create an accurate world model. Typically this is a tedious process, requiring many hours to create 3-D CAD models of the surfaces within a workspace. The goal of this ongoing project is to develop usable methods to rapidly build world models of real world workspaces. This brings structure to an unstructured environment and allows graphical based robotics control to be accomplished in a reasonable time frame when traditional CAD modelling is not enough. To accomplish this, 3D range sensors are deployed to capture surface data within the workspace. This data is then transformed into surface maps, or models. A 3D world model of the workspace is built quickly and accurately, without ever having to put people in the environment.

  13. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This progress report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12" by 12" by 6". Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the progress

  14. Moved by a Rapid Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueter, C.

    2013-04-01

    Enticing by virtue of its predictability, historical utility, and spectacle, the transit of Venus is a niche event among astronomical phenomena. Though the value of a transit for scientific purposes is now diminished, the brief appearance of Venus silhouetted against the background of the Sun in 2004 moved the artistic community to celebrate the rare alignment. Artists of all ages combined old traditions with fresh technology to create a 21st-century tapestry of music, sculpture, paintings, glasswork, quilts, sky shows, and digital imagery. A full catalog of transit-related art generated over the centuries would feature the sampling of entries presented here and at the Moved by a Rapid Transit website.

  15. Rapid Tooling via Investment Casting and Rapid Prototype Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael D.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this work to develop the materials processing and design technologies required to reduce the die development time for metal mold processes from 12 months to 3 months, using die casting of Al and Mg as the example process. Sandia demonstrated that investment casting, using rapid prototype patterns produced from Stereo lithography or Selective laser Sintering, was a viable alternative/supplement to the current technology of machining form wrought stock. A demonstration die insert (ejector halt) was investment cast and subsequently tested in the die casting environment. The stationary half of the die insert was machined from wrought material to benchmark the cast half. The two inserts were run in a die casting machine for 3,100 shots of aluminum and at the end of the run no visible difference could be detected between the cast and machined inserts. Inspection concluded that the cast insert performed identically to the machined insert. Both inserts had no indications of heat checking or degradation.

  16. Cyberinfrastructure for Rapid Prototyping Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, T. A.; Kalyanasundaram, A.; Zhuk, I.; Goli, V.

    2007-12-01

    The overall goal of the NASA Rapid Prototyping Capability is to speed the evaluation of potential uses of NASA research products and technologies to improve future operational systems by reducing the time to access, configure, and assess the effectiveness of NASA products and technologies. The infrastructure to support the RPC is thus expected to provide the capability to rapidly evaluate innovative methods of linking science observations. The RPC infrastructure supports two major categories of experiments (and subsequent analysis): comparing results of a particular model as fed with data coming from different sources, and comparing different models using the data coming from the same source. In spite of being conceptually simple, two use cases in fact entail a significant technical challenge. Enabling RPC experiments requires thus a radical simplification of access to both actual and simulated data, as well as tools for data pre- and post-processing. The tools must be interoperable, allowing the user to create computational workflows with the data seamlessly transferred as needed, including third-party transfers to high-performance computing platforms. In addition, the provenance of the data must be preserved in order to document results of different what-if scenarios and to enable collaboration and data sharing between users. The functionality of the RPC splits into several independent modules such as interactive Web site, data server, tool's interfaces, or monitoring service. Each such module is implemented as an independent portlet. The RPC Portal aggregates the different contents provided by the portlets into a single interface employing a popular GridSphere portlet container. The RPC data access is based on Unidata's THREDDS Data server (TDS) extended to support, among others, interactive creation of containers for new data collections and uploading new data sets, downloading the data either to the user desktop or transferring it to a remote location using

  17. Rapid Typing of Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Georgia, Shalamar M.; Kachur, Sergey; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Hilsabeck, Remy; Gates, Lauren T.; Samuel, James E.; Heinzen, Robert A.; Kersh, Gilbert J.; Keim, Paul; Massung, Robert F.; Pearson, Talima

    2011-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii has the potential to cause serious disease and is highly prevalent in the environment. Despite this, epidemiological data are sparse and isolate collections are typically small, rare, and difficult to share among laboratories as this pathogen is governed by select agent rules and fastidious to culture. With the advent of whole genome sequencing, some of this knowledge gap has been overcome by the development of genotyping schemes, however many of these methods are cumbersome and not readily transferable between institutions. As comparisons of the few existing collections can dramatically increase our knowledge of the evolution and phylogeography of the species, we aimed to facilitate such comparisons by extracting SNP signatures from past genotyping efforts and then incorporated these signatures into assays that quickly and easily define genotypes and phylogenetic groups. We found 91 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) among multispacer sequence typing (MST) loci and designed 14 SNP-based assays that could be used to type samples based on previously established phylogenetic groups. These assays are rapid, inexpensive, real-time PCR assays whose results are unambiguous. Data from these assays allowed us to assign 43 previously untyped isolates to established genotypes and genomic groups. Furthermore, genotyping results based on assays from the signatures provided here are easily transferred between institutions, readily interpreted phylogenetically and simple to adapt to new genotyping technologies. PMID:22073151

  18. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  19. Rapid sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas M.

    2012-11-01

    Several global and regional factors contribute to observed sea-level change along any particular coast. Global processes include changes in ocean mass (glacio-eustasy from ice melt), ocean volume (steric effects), viscoelastic land movements (glacioisostatic adjustment GIA), and changes in terrestrial water storage. Regional processes, often connected to steric and glacial changes, include changes in ocean circulation (Meridional Overturning Circulation [MOC]), glacial melting, local GIA, regional subsidence and others. Paleoclimate, instrumental and modeling studies show that combinations of these factors can cause relatively rapid rates of sea-level rise exceeding 3 mm yr-1 over various timescales along particular coasts. This paper discusses patterns and causes of sea-level rise with emphasis on paleoclimatological records. It then addresses the hypothesis of late Holocene (pre-20th century) sea-level stability in light of paleoclimatic evidence, notably from reconstructions of sea-surface temperature and glacial activity, for significant climate and sea-level variability during this time. The practical difficulties of assessing regional sea-level (SL) patterns at submillennial timescales will be discussed using an example from the eastern United States.

  20. Rapid Response Flood Water Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Policelli, Fritz; Brakenridge, G. R.; Coplin, A.; Bunnell, M.; Wu, L.; Habib, Shahid; Farah, H.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of operation of the MODIS instrument on the NASA Terra satellite at the end of 1999, an exceptionally useful sensor and public data stream have been available for many applications including the rapid and precise characterization of terrestrial surface water changes. One practical application of such capability is the near-real time mapping of river flood inundation. We have developed a surface water mapping methodology based on using only bands 1 (620-672 nm) and 2 (841-890 nm). These are the two bands at 250 m, and the use of only these bands maximizes the resulting map detail. In this regard, most water bodies are strong absorbers of incoming solar radiation at the band 2 wavelength: it could be used alone, via a thresholding procedure, to separate water (dark, low radiance or reflectance pixels) from land (much brighter pixels) (1, 2). Some previous water mapping procedures have in fact used such single band data from this and other sensors that include similar wavelength channels. Adding the second channel of data (band 1), however, allows a band ratio approach which permits sediment-laden water, often relatively light at band 2 wavelengths, to still be discriminated, and, as well, provides some removal of error by reducing the number of cloud shadow pixels that would otherwise be misclassified as water.

  1. Early detection and rapid response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Eplee, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Prevention is the first line of defense against introduced invasive species - it is always preferable to prevent the introduction of new invaders into a region or country. However, it is not always possible to detect all alien hitchhikers imported in cargo, or to predict with any degree of certainty which introduced species will become invasive over time. Fortunately, the majority of introduced plants and animals don't become invasive. But, according to scientists at Cornell University, costs and losses due to species that do become invasive are now estimated to be over $137 billion/year in the United States. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) is the second line of defense against introduced invasive species - EDRR is the preferred management strategy for preventing the establishment and spread of invasive species. Over the past 50 years, there has been a gradual shift away from large and medium scale federal/state single-agency-led weed eradication programs in the United States, to smaller interagency-led projects involving impacted and potential stakeholders. The importance of volunteer weed spotters in detecting and reporting suspected new invasive species has also been recognized in recent years.

  2. Rapidly advancing invasive endomyocardial aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Davutoglu, Vedat; Soydinc, Serdar; Aydin, Abdullah; Karakok, Metin

    2005-02-01

    The exposure to Aspergillus organisms/spores is likely common, but disease caused by tissue invasion with these fungi is uncommon and occurs primarily in the setting of immunosuppression. We report a case of rapidly advancing invasive endomyocardial aspergillosis secondary to prolonged usage of multiple broad-spectrum antibiotics in a nonimmunocompromised host. A 36-year-old cotton textile worker presented to our institution with a 3-month history of weight loss and fatigue. He reported receiving prolonged use of multiple broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. The echocardiogram demonstrated multiple endomyocardial vegetations and a mass in the left atrium. Myocardial biopsy specimen revealed an invasive endomyocardial aspergillosis. The patient was investigated for immune deficiency including HIV, and this workup was negative. Treatment was started with amphotericin B and heparin for presumed left atrial thrombus. The patient died because of a rupture of mycotic aneurysm that resulted in cerebral hemorrhage. This case illustrates the risk of an invasive fungal infection in a nonimmunocompromised host who is a prolonged user of antibiotics in the setting of environmental exposure of opportunistic invasive fungal infections. PMID:15682058

  3. A rapid DNA digestion system.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lung-Ming; Lin, Che-Hsin

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic DNA digestion system incorporating a high performance micro-mixer. Through the appropriate control of fixed and periodic switching DC electric fields, electrokinetic forces are established to mix the DNA and restriction enzyme samples and to drive them through the reaction column of the device. The experimental and numerical results show that a mixing performance of 98% can be achieved within a mixing channel of length 1.6 mm when a 150 V/cm driving voltage and a 5 Hz switching frequency are applied. The relationship between the mixing performance, switching frequency, and main applied electric field is derived. It is found that the optimal switching frequency depends upon the magnitude of the main applied electric field. The successful digestion of lambda-DNA using Eco RI restriction enzyme is demonstrated. The DNA-enzyme reaction is completed within 15 min in the proposed microfluidic system, compared to 50 min in a conventional large-scale system. Hence, the current device provides a valuable tool for rapid lambda-DNA digestion, while its mixer system delivers a simple yet effective solution for mixing problems in the micro-total-analysis-systems field. PMID:17195107

  4. 77 FR 11575 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Grand Rapids Public Museum has completed an... Rapids Public Museum. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the...

  5. Rapid Syndrome Validation Project (RSVP)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-26

    RSVP facilitates the two-way communication between physicians (who are the “sensors” for disease in a community) and public health officials (who are the true “experts” in determining whether or not disease outbreaks are taking place in community). Currently, there is no software product that enables real-time on line reporting to local public health officials, nor timely feedback to clinicians taking care of ill patients. RSVP takes into consideration the cultural differences in the practice ofmore » medicine across the US and internationally, and provides for automated alerting of public health officials in the setting of a potentially serious disease outbreak. In addition, clinicians’ parficipation is immediately rewarded by providing information that is meaningful for the management of their patients. We envision the addition to RSVP of automated statistical analysis of data (currentty being done on a case-by-case basis by hand), including SNL technology based on neural network analysis. Integration of other SNL technology into RSVP will provide added-value, and will dramatically assist public health officials in their quest to identify disease outbreaks as early as possible in an epidemic (even before the actual level of known cases exceeds historical background) based on other parameters such as rapidity of spread of symptoms in a population. In addition, we are developing a parallel system of syndrome surveillance in animals (called "RSVP-A"), in collaboration with Kansas State University. Data from animal disease outbreaks will also be made available to physicians caring for human patients as zoonotic disease may be important in human epidemics.« less

  6. Rapid Syndrome Validation Project (RSVP)

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, Susan; Ross, Troy

    2004-03-26

    RSVP facilitates the two-way communication between physicians (who are the “sensors” for disease in a community) and public health officials (who are the true “experts” in determining whether or not disease outbreaks are taking place in community). Currently, there is no software product that enables real-time on line reporting to local public health officials, nor timely feedback to clinicians taking care of ill patients. RSVP takes into consideration the cultural differences in the practice of medicine across the US and internationally, and provides for automated alerting of public health officials in the setting of a potentially serious disease outbreak. In addition, clinicians’ parficipation is immediately rewarded by providing information that is meaningful for the management of their patients. We envision the addition to RSVP of automated statistical analysis of data (currentty being done on a case-by-case basis by hand), including SNL technology based on neural network analysis. Integration of other SNL technology into RSVP will provide added-value, and will dramatically assist public health officials in their quest to identify disease outbreaks as early as possible in an epidemic (even before the actual level of known cases exceeds historical background) based on other parameters such as rapidity of spread of symptoms in a population. In addition, we are developing a parallel system of syndrome surveillance in animals (called "RSVP-A"), in collaboration with Kansas State University. Data from animal disease outbreaks will also be made available to physicians caring for human patients as zoonotic disease may be important in human epidemics.

  7. Rapid DOTS expansion in India.

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, G. R.; Frieden, Thomas R.

    2002-01-01

    Since late 1998 the coverage of the DOTS strategy in India has been expanded rapidly. In both 2000 and 2001 the country probably accounted for more than half the global increase in the number of patients treated under DOTS and by early 2002 more than a million patients were being treated in this way in India. As a result, nearly 200 000 lives were saved. The lessons learnt relate to the importance of the following elements of the programme: (1) getting the science right and ensuring technical excellence; (2) building commitment and ensuring the provision of funds and flexibility in their utilization; (3) maintaining focus and priorities; (4) systematically appraising each area before starting service delivery; (5) ensuring an uninterrupted drug supply; (6) strengthening the established infrastructure and providing support for staff; (7) supporting the infrastructure required in urban areas; (8) ensuring full-time independent technical support and supervision, particularly during the initial phases of implementation; (9) monitoring intensively and giving timely feedback; and (10) continuous supervision. Tuberculosis (TB) control still faces major challenges in India. To reach its potential, the control programme needs to: continue to expand so as to cover the remaining half of the country, much of which has a weaker health infrastructure than the areas already covered; increase its reach in the areas already covered so that a greater proportion of patients is treated; ensure sustainability; improve the patient-friendliness of services; confront TB associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is expected that HIV will increase the number of TB cases by at least 10% and by a considerably higher percentage if HIV becomes much more widespread. India's experience shows that DOTS can achieve high case-detection and cure rates even with imperfect technology and often with an inadequate public health infrastructure. However, this can only happen if the

  8. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed. PMID:27597250

  9. Rapid Prototyping of Mobile Learning Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federley, Maija; Sorsa, Timo; Paavilainen, Janne; Boissonnier, Kimo; Seisto, Anu

    2014-01-01

    This position paper presents the first results of an on-going project, in which we explore rapid prototyping method to efficiently produce digital learning solutions that are commercially viable. In this first phase, rapid game prototyping and an iterative approach was tested as a quick and efficient way to create learning games and to evaluate…

  10. SEARCHING FOR RAPID METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL BACTERIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The search for rapid methods in sanitary bacteriology is more urgent today than ever before because of increased necessity for processing poorer quality source waters and controlling quality of sewage effluent discharges. Selection of criteria for rapid tests involving either mod...

  11. Set point calculations for RAPID project

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-10-18

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  12. Rapid Detection of Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Poirel, Laurent; Dortet, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    To rapidly identify carbapenemase producers in Enterobacteriaceae, we developed the Carba NP test. The test uses isolated bacterial colonies and is based on in vitro hydrolysis of a carbapenem, imipenem. It was 100% sensitive and specific compared with molecular-based techniques. This rapid (<2 hours), inexpensive technique may be implemented in any laboratory. PMID:22932472

  13. Deconvolution of sinusoidal rapid EPR scans.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-02-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow-scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow-scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  14. Deconvolution of Sinusoidal Rapid EPR Scans

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid scan EPR the magnetic field is scanned through the signal in a time that is short relative to electron spin relaxation times. Previously it was shown that the slow scan lineshape could be recovered from triangular rapid scans by Fourier deconvolution. In this paper a general Fourier deconvolution method is described and demonstrated to recover the slow scan lineshape from sinusoidal rapid scans. Since an analytical expression for the Fourier transform of the driving function for a sinusoidal scan was not readily apparent, a numerical method was developed to do the deconvolution. The slow scan EPR lineshapes recovered from rapid triangular and sinusoidal scans are in excellent agreement for lithium phthalocyanine, a trityl radical, and the nitroxyl radical, tempone. The availability of a method to deconvolute sinusoidal rapid scans makes it possible to scan faster than is feasible for triangular scans because of hardware limitations on triangular scans. PMID:21163677

  15. Risks and Benefits of Rapid Clozapine Titration

    PubMed Central

    Lochhead, Jeannie D.; Nelson, Michele A.; Schneider, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Clozapine is often considered the gold standard for the treatment of schizophrenia. Clinical guidelines suggest a gradual titration over 2 weeks to reduce the risks of adverse events such as seizures, hypotension, agranulocytosis, and myocarditis. The slow titration often delays time to therapeutic response. This raises the question of whether, in some patients, it may be safe to use a more rapid clozapine titration. The following case illustrates the potential risks associated with the use of multiple antipsychotics and rapid clozapine titration. We present the case of a young man with schizophrenia who developed life threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during rapid clozapine titration and treatment with multiple antipsychotics. We were unable to find another case in the literature of NMS associated with rapid clozapine titration. This case is meant to urge clinicians to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of rapid clozapine titration, and to encourage researchers to further evaluate the safety of rapid clozapine titration. Rapid clozapine titration has implications for decreasing health care costs associated with prolonged hospitalizations, and decreasing the emotional suffering associated with uncontrolled symptoms of psychosis. Clozapine is considered the most effective antipsychotic available thus efforts should focus on developing strategies that would allow for safest and most efficient use of clozapine to encourage its utilization for treatment resistance schizophrenia. PMID:27403276

  16. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  17. A rapid-learning health system.

    PubMed

    Etheredge, Lynn M

    2007-01-01

    Private- and public-sector initiatives, using electronic health record (EHR) databases from millions of people, could rapidly advance the U.S. evidence base for clinical care. Rapid learning could fill major knowledge gaps about health care costs, the benefits and risks of drugs and procedures, geographic variations, environmental health influences, the health of special populations, and personalized medicine. Policymakers could use rapid learning to revitalize value-based competition, redesign Medicare's payments, advance Medicaid into national health care leadership, foster national collaborative research initiatives, and design a national technology assessment system. PMID:17259191

  18. Rapidly solidified metal coatings by peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, H. P.

    1987-01-01

    Specimens of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were peen plated with rapidly solidified tin-lead and aluminum powders, and the cross-sections of the coated specimens were examined by light and electron microscopy. The properties of the peen plated specimens were also compared with those of shot peened specimens without any coating. It is found that peen plating with rapidly solidified metals improves the fatigue properties of the coated samples to a greater extent than shot peening alone. Specimens of 7075-T6 alloy peen plated with rapidly solidified tin-lead and aluminum exhibited better fatigue resistance than shot peened specimens in both air and salt water.

  19. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-02-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Zika Spreading Rapidly Through Puerto Rico: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159430.html Zika Spreading Rapidly Through Puerto Rico: CDC Possibly hundreds ... 2016 FRIDAY, June 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus is spreading fast through Puerto Rico, placing ...

  1. A feedforward architecture accounts for rapid categorization

    PubMed Central

    Serre, Thomas; Oliva, Aude; Poggio, Tomaso

    2007-01-01

    Primates are remarkably good at recognizing objects. The level of performance of their visual system and its robustness to image degradations still surpasses the best computer vision systems despite decades of engineering effort. In particular, the high accuracy of primates in ultra rapid object categorization and rapid serial visual presentation tasks is remarkable. Given the number of processing stages involved and typical neural latencies, such rapid visual processing is likely to be mostly feedforward. Here we show that a specific implementation of a class of feedforward theories of object recognition (that extend the Hubel and Wiesel simple-to-complex cell hierarchy and account for many anatomical and physiological constraints) can predict the level and the pattern of performance achieved by humans on a rapid masked animal vs. non-animal categorization task. PMID:17404214

  2. RAPID INFILTRATION WASTEWATER TREATMENT FOR SMALL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid infiltration treatment performance of three infiltration basins receiving primary treated municipal wastewater is evaluated for optimum total nitrogen control using a series of manual operational techniques and by remote control computer operation of a sprinkler system. Thr...

  3. Rapid methods for identification of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, M; Harper, G; Sun, S H; Delanerolle, V

    1975-01-01

    Opportunistic infections by yeasts have been implicated as one of the major causes of complications in the compromised patient. Rapid recognition and identification of these yeasts is essential for patient management, but conventional liquid medium methods for completing identification tests are cumbersome and time consuming. Rapid tests have been devised based on modifications of methods commonly used in bacteriology. These rapid methods included tests for carbohydrate and nitrate assimilation, fermentation, and urease production. These were compared with several current methods for accuracy of results, for time to final identification, and for economy of time and reagents. In addition, the usual tests for pseudogerm tube formation, for production of hyphae or pseudohyphae, and for growth temperatures were included. The rapid tests achieved 96% or better accuracy compared with expected results, and 46 species of yeasts were identified in 1 to 2 days compared with the 10 to 14 days required by conventional liquid culture methods. Images PMID:1241586

  4. Preliminary Component Integration Using Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Salvail, Pat; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rapid prototyping is a very important tool that should be used by both design and manufacturing disciplines during the development of elements for the aerospace industry. It helps prevent lack of adequate communication between design and manufacturing engineers (which could lead to costly errors) through mutual consideration of functional models generated from drawings. Rapid prototyping techniques are used to test hardware for design and material compatibility at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Rapid assays for environmental and biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Szurdoki, F; Jaeger, L; Harris, A; Kido, H; Wengatz, I; Goodrow, M H; Székács, A; Wortberg, M; Zheng, J; Stoutamire, D W; Sanborn, J R; Gilman, S D; Jones, A D; Gee, S J; Choudary, P V; Hammock, B D

    1996-05-01

    Rapid, inexpensive, sensitive, and selective enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) now are utilized in environmental science. In this laboratory, many ELISAs have been developed for pesticides and other toxic substances and also for their metabolites. Compounds for which ELISAs have recently been devised include insecticides (organophosphates, carbaryl, pyrethroids, and fenoxycarb), herbicides (s-triazines, arylureas, triclopyr, and bromacil), fungicides (myclobutanil), TCDD, and metabolites of naphthalene and toluene. New rapid assays have been developed for mercury. PMID:8642182

  6. Review on CNC-Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z, M. Nafis O.; Y, Nafrizuan M.; A, Munira M.; J, Kartina

    2012-09-01

    This article reviewed developments of Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) technology in rapid prototyping process. Rapid prototyping (RP) can be classified into three major groups; subtractive, additive and virtual. CNC rapid prototyping is grouped under the subtractive category which involves material removal from the workpiece that is larger than the final part. Richard Wysk established the use of CNC machines for rapid prototyping using sets of 2½-D tool paths from various orientations about a rotary axis to machine parts without refixturing. Since then, there are few developments on this process mainly aimed to optimized the operation and increase the process capabilities to stand equal with common additive type of RP. These developments include the integration between machining and deposition process (hybrid RP), adoption of RP to the conventional machine and optimization of the CNC rapid prototyping process based on controlled parameters. The article ended by concluding that the CNC rapid prototyping research area has a vast space for improvement as in the conventional machining processes. Further developments and findings will enhance the usage of this method and minimize the limitation of current approach in building a prototype.

  7. Modified TB rapid test by proteinase K for rapid diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yari, Shamsi; Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Alireza; Ghanei, Mostafa; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Fateh, Abolfazl; Yari, Fatemeh; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis continues to be a challenge due to the low sensitivity of traditional diagnostic methods. Better and more rapid tests are needed for diagnosis of pleural TB. In this study, pleural fluids were tested with rapid test to determine Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB antigen). Affinity chromatography was used to purify specific polyclonal antibodies against MTB antigen. Pleural samples after decontamination were treated with proteinase K. Rapid test for pleural fluids was prepared by specific antibody. Rapid test was performed on 85 pleural fluid patients. The patients had a mean age of 46.55 ± 15.96 years and 38 were men. The performance of rapid test, using proteinase K, was found to be the most impressive: sensitivity 93%, specificity 94%, PPV 90%, and NPV 96% compared with adenosine deaminase test (ADA), PCR, smear, and culture. The present study did demonstrate that modified TB rapid test can substantially improve the diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB. PMID:26693840

  8. Open architecture for rapid deployment of capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Modern warfare has drastically changed from conventional to non-conventional and from fixed threats to dynamic ones over the past several decades. This unprecedented fundamental shift has now made our adversaries and their weapons more nebulous and ever changing. Our current acquisition system however is not suited to develop, test and deploy essential capability to counter these dynamic threats in time to combat them. This environment requires a new infrastructure in our system design to rapidly adopt capabilities that we do not currently plan for or even know about. The key to enabling this rapid implementation is Open Architecture in acquisition. The DoD has shown it can rapidly prototype capabilities such as unmanned vehicles but has severely struggled in moving from the prototyping to deployment. A major driver of this disconnect is the lack of established infrastructure to employ said capability such as launch and recovery systems and command and control. If we are to be successful in transitioning our rapid capability to the warfighter we must implement established well defined interfaces and enabling technologies to facilitate the rapid adoption of capability so the warfighter has the tools to effectively counter the threat.

  9. Rapid steroid hormone actions via membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Nofrat; Verma, Anjali; Bivens, Caroline B; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2016-09-01

    Steroid hormones regulate a wide variety of physiological and developmental functions. Traditional steroid hormone signaling acts through nuclear and cytosolic receptors, altering gene transcription and subsequently regulating cellular activity. This is particularly important in hormonally-responsive cancers, where therapies that target classical steroid hormone receptors have become clinical staples in the treatment and management of disease. Much progress has been made in the last decade in detecting novel receptors and elucidating their mechanisms, particularly their rapid signaling effects and subsequent impact on tumorigenesis. Many of these receptors are membrane-bound and lack DNA-binding sites, functionally separating them from their classical cytosolic receptor counterparts. Membrane-bound receptors have been implicated in a number of pathways that disrupt the cell cycle and impact tumorigenesis. Among these are pathways that involve phospholipase D, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide-3 kinase. The crosstalk between these pathways has been shown to affect apoptosis and proliferation in cardiac cells, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes as well as cancer cells. This review focuses on rapid signaling by 17β-estradiol and 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 to examine the integrated actions of classical and rapid steroid signaling pathways both in contrast to each other and in concert with other rapid signaling pathways. This new approach lends insight into rapid signaling by steroid hormones and its potential for use in targeted drug therapies that maximize the benefits of traditional steroid hormone-directed therapies while mitigating their less desirable effects. PMID:27288742

  10. Rapid, generalized adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech

    PubMed Central

    Van der Burg, Erik; Goodbourn, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    The brain is adaptive. The speed of propagation through air, and of low-level sensory processing, differs markedly between auditory and visual stimuli; yet the brain can adapt to compensate for the resulting cross-modal delays. Studies investigating temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech have used prolonged adaptation procedures, suggesting that adaptation is sluggish. Here, we show that adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech occurs rapidly. Participants viewed a brief clip of an actor pronouncing a single syllable. The voice was either advanced or delayed relative to the corresponding lip movements, and participants were asked to make a synchrony judgement. Although we did not use an explicit adaptation procedure, we demonstrate rapid recalibration based on a single audiovisual event. We find that the point of subjective simultaneity on each trial is highly contingent upon the modality order of the preceding trial. We find compelling evidence that rapid recalibration generalizes across different stimuli, and different actors. Finally, we demonstrate that rapid recalibration occurs even when auditory and visual events clearly belong to different actors. These results suggest that rapid temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech is primarily mediated by basic temporal factors, rather than higher-order factors such as perceived simultaneity and source identity. PMID:25716790

  11. Rapid Assessment of Marine Pollution (RAMP).

    PubMed

    Bowen, Robert E; Depledge, Michael H

    2006-01-01

    RAMP embraces the integrated use of methods for the rapid measurement, assessment and access to information on the nature, sources and influences of coastal environmental change. It embraces approaches held in the literature, research and programs of RAMP (Rapid Assessment of Marine Pollution) and the emerging work described as RASE (Rapid Assessment of Socio-Economic Indicators). To protect coastal ecosystems and the health of communities effectively, management infrastructure requires the tools and resources necessary to detect damage to coastal ecosystems and their components, identify causative agents, impose remedial action, and demonstrate that measures have been effective. Pragmatic monitoring and prediction capabilities must also be built to provide further confidence that human impacts are being minimized and that threats to human health have been contained. For most of the world, however, the ability to build such capability is a technical challenge and often cost prohibitive. These constraints point to the need to develop and expand the integrated use of simple, robust, cost-effective environmental assessment procedures. This paper suggests that a system built around the Rapid Assessment of Marine Pollution (RAMP) and the Rapid Assessment of Socio-Economic Indicators (RASE) can, should and in some cases already has been effective in meeting such informational and management needs. PMID:17070861

  12. Rapid, generalized adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech.

    PubMed

    Van der Burg, Erik; Goodbourn, Patrick T

    2015-04-01

    The brain is adaptive. The speed of propagation through air, and of low-level sensory processing, differs markedly between auditory and visual stimuli; yet the brain can adapt to compensate for the resulting cross-modal delays. Studies investigating temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech have used prolonged adaptation procedures, suggesting that adaptation is sluggish. Here, we show that adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech occurs rapidly. Participants viewed a brief clip of an actor pronouncing a single syllable. The voice was either advanced or delayed relative to the corresponding lip movements, and participants were asked to make a synchrony judgement. Although we did not use an explicit adaptation procedure, we demonstrate rapid recalibration based on a single audiovisual event. We find that the point of subjective simultaneity on each trial is highly contingent upon the modality order of the preceding trial. We find compelling evidence that rapid recalibration generalizes across different stimuli, and different actors. Finally, we demonstrate that rapid recalibration occurs even when auditory and visual events clearly belong to different actors. These results suggest that rapid temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech is primarily mediated by basic temporal factors, rather than higher-order factors such as perceived simultaneity and source identity. PMID:25716790

  13. Rapid-Scan EPR of Immobilized Nitroxides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Tseitlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Clouston, Laura J.; Boratyński, Przemysław J.; Rajca, Andrzej; Stein, Richard; Mchaourab, Hassane; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of immobilized nitroxides were obtained by rapid scan at 293 K. Scan widths were 155 G with 13.4 kHz scan frequency for 14N-perdeuterated tempone and for T4 lysozyme doubly spin labeled with an iodoacetamide spirocyclohexyl nitroxide and 100 G with 20.9 kHz scan frequency for 15N-perdeuterated tempone. These wide scans were made possible by modifications to our rapid-scan driver, scan coils made of Litz wire, and the placement of highly conducting aluminum plates on the poles of a Bruker 10" magnet to reduce resistive losses in the magnet pole faces. For the same data acquisition time, the signal-to-noise for the rapid-scan absorption spectra was about an order of magnitude higher than for continuous wave first-derivative spectra recorded with modulation amplitudes that do not broaden the lineshapes. PMID:25240151

  14. Rapid Quench in an Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Matson, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The ESL laboratory’s main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy, as a quench medium. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to eight quench vessels can be loaded into a wheel inside the chamber that is indexed with control software. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, iron-chromium-nickel, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and a silicon-cobalt alloy. This new rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. The system is described and some initial results are presented.

  15. Library reuse in a rapid development environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde, JO; Weed, Daniel; Gottlieb, Robert; Neal, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    The Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division (AFMD) established a Rapid Development Laboratory (RDL) to investigate and improve new 'rapid development' software production processes and refine the use of commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) tools. These tools and processes take an avionics design project from initial inception through high fidelity, real-time, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing. One central theme of a rapid development process is the use and integration of a variety of COTS tools: This paper discusses the RDL MATRIX(sub x)(R) libraries, as well as the techniques for managing and documenting these libraries. This paper also shows the methods used for building simulations with the Advanced Simulation Development System (ASDS) libraries, and provides metrics to illustrate the amount of reuse for five complete simulations. Combining ASDS libraries with MATRIX(sub x)(R) libraries is discussed.

  16. Library reuse in a rapid development environment

    SciTech Connect

    Uhde, J.; Weed, D.; Gottlieb, R.; Neal, D.

    1995-09-01

    The Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division (AFMD) established a Rapid Development Laboratory (RDL) to investigate and improve new `rapid development` software production processes and refine the use of commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) tools. These tools and processes take an avionics design project from initial inception through high fidelity, real-time, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing. One central theme of a rapid development process is the use and integration of a variety of COTS tools: This paper discusses the RDL MATRIX(sub x)(R) libraries, as well as the techniques for managing and documenting these libraries. This paper also shows the methods used for building simulations with the Advanced Simulation Development System (ASDS) libraries, and provides metrics to illustrate the amount of reuse for five complete simulations. Combining ASDS libraries with MATRIX(sub x)(R) libraries is discussed.

  17. Rapid Business Process Discovery (R-BPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Aditya; Koliadis, George; Chueng, Arthur

    Modeling is an important and time consuming part of the Business Process Management life-cycle. An analyst reviews existing documentation and queries relevant domain experts to construct both mental and concrete models of the domain. To aid this exercise, we propose the Rapid Business Process Discovery (R-BPD) framework and prototype tool that can query heterogeneous information resources (e.g. corporate documentation, web-content, code e.t.c.) and rapidly construct proto-models to be incrementally adjusted to correctness by an analyst. This constitutes a departure from building and constructing models toward just editing them. We believe this rapid mixed-initiative modeling will increase analyst productivity by significant orders of magnitude over traditional approaches. Furthermore, the possibility of using the approach in distributed and real-time settings seems appealing and may help in significantly improving the quality of the models being developed w.r.t. being consistent, complete, and concise.

  18. Can Population Genetics Adapt to Rapid Evolution?

    PubMed

    Messer, Philipp W; Ellner, Stephen P; Hairston, Nelson G

    2016-07-01

    Population genetics largely rests on a 'standard model' in which random genetic drift is the dominant force, selective sweeps occur infrequently, and deleterious mutations are purged from the population by purifying selection. Studies of phenotypic evolution in nature reveal a very different picture, with strong selection and rapid heritable trait changes being common. The time-rate scaling of phenotypic evolution suggests that selection on phenotypes is often fluctuating in direction, allowing phenotypes to respond rapidly to environmental fluctuations while remaining within relatively constant bounds over longer periods. Whether such rapid phenotypic evolution undermines the standard model will depend on how many genomic loci typically contribute to strongly selected traits and how phenotypic evolution impacts the dynamics of genetic variation in a population. Population-level sequencing will allow us to dissect the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution and study the evolutionary dynamics of genetic variation through direct measurement of polymorphism trajectories over time. PMID:27185237

  19. Rapid Quench in an Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Matson, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The ESL laboratory's main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy, as a quench medium. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to eight quench vessels can be loaded into a wheel inside the chamber that is indexed with control software. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and a silicon-cobalt alloy. This new rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  20. Rapid-scan EPR of immobilized nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Tseitlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Clouston, Laura J; Boratyński, Przemysław J; Rajca, Andrzej; Stein, Richard; Mchaourab, Hassane; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of immobilized nitroxides were obtained by rapid scan at 293 K. Scan widths were 155 G with 13.4 kHz scan frequency for (14)N-perdeuterated tempone and for T4 lysozyme doubly spin labeled with an iodoacetamide spirocyclohexyl nitroxide and 100 G with 20.9 kHz scan frequency for (15)N-perdeuterated tempone. These wide scans were made possible by modifications to our rapid-scan driver, scan coils made of Litz wire, and the placement of highly conducting aluminum plates on the poles of a Bruker 10″ magnet to reduce resistive losses in the magnet pole faces. For the same data acquisition time, the signal-to-noise for the rapid-scan absorption spectra was about an order of magnitude higher than for continuous wave first-derivative spectra recorded with modulation amplitudes that do not broaden the lineshapes. PMID:25240151

  1. Precise autofocusing microscope with rapid response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Jiang, Sheng-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The rapid on-line or off-line automated vision inspection is a critical operation in the manufacturing fields. Accordingly, this present study designs and characterizes a novel precise optics-based autofocusing microscope with a rapid response and no reduction in the focusing accuracy. In contrast to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes with centroid method, the proposed microscope comprises a high-speed rotating optical diffuser in which the variation of the image centroid position is reduced and consequently the focusing response is improved. The proposed microscope is characterized and verified experimentally using a laboratory-built prototype. The experimental results show that compared to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes, the proposed microscope achieves a more rapid response with no reduction in the focusing accuracy. Consequently, the proposed microscope represents another solution for both existing and emerging industrial applications of automated vision inspection.

  2. Rapid auditory learning of temporal gap detection.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Panda, Manasa R

    2016-07-01

    The rapid initial phase of training-induced improvement has been shown to reflect a genuine sensory change in perception. Several features of early and rapid learning, such as generalization and stability, remain to be characterized. The present study demonstrated that learning effects from brief training on a temporal gap detection task using spectrally similar narrowband noise markers defining the gap (within-channel task), transfer across ears, however, not across spectrally dissimilar markers (between-channel task). The learning effects associated with brief training on a gap detection task were found to be stable for at least a day. These initial findings have significant implications for characterizing early and rapid learning effects. PMID:27475211

  3. Rapid Annealing Of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of rapid annealing on films of amorphous hydrogenated carbon. Study represents first efforts to provide information for applications of a-C:H films where rapid thermal processing required. Major finding, annealing causes abrupt increase in absorption and concomitant decrease in optical band gap. Most of change occurs during first 20 s, continues during longer annealing times. Extend of change increases with annealing temperature. Researchers hypothesize abrupt initial change caused by loss of hydrogen, while gradual subsequent change due to polymerization of remaining carbon into crystallites or sheets of graphite. Optical band gaps of unannealed specimens on silicon substrates lower than those of specimens on quartz substrates.

  4. RAPID REMOVAL OF A GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT PLUME.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefkoff, L. Jeff; Gorelick, Steven M.

    1985-01-01

    A groundwater management model is used to design an aquifer restoration system that removes a contaminant plume from a hypothetical aquifer in four years. The design model utilizes groundwater flow simulation and mathematical optimization. Optimal pumping and injection strategies achieve rapid restoration for a minimum total pumping cost. Rapid restoration is accomplished by maintaining specified groundwater velocities around the plume perimeter towards a group of pumping wells located near the plume center. The model does not account for hydrodynamic dispersion. Results show that pumping costs are particularly sensitive to injection capacity. An 8 percent decrease in the maximum allowable injection rate may lead to a 29 percent increase in total pumping costs.

  5. A STUDY OF RAPID CAVITY TUNING.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2001-07-12

    An FFAG moot likely requires rapid cavity tuning. The cavity must also have a very high gradient. To satisfy both the high power and rapid tuning requirements is a big challenge. Detailed investigation of the possibility is addressed. Included are general thoughts, dual-loop and simple loop analyses, and a study of using ferrite or PIN diodes. Also proposed is a phase control scheme, which may be a better solution if the needed components can be developed. Finally, an energy analysis reveals the difficult of high power tuning.

  6. Rapid web development using AJAX and Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgert, A.; Gibbons, L.; Kuznetsov, V.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the rapid development of a large scale data discovery service for the CMS experiment using modern AJAX techniques and the Python language. To implement a flexible interface capable of accommodating several different versions of the DBS database, we used a 'stack' approach. Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) together with an SQL abstraction layer, template engine, code generation tool and dynamic queries provide powerful tools for constructing interactive interfaces to large amounts of data. We show how the use of these tools, with rapid development in a modern scripting language, improved the scalability and usability of the the search interface for different user communities.

  7. Virtual environment architecture for rapid application development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstein, Georges G.; Southard, David A.; Lee, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the MITRE Virtual Environment Architecture (VEA), a product of nearly two years of investigations and prototypes of virtual environment technology. This paper discusses the requirements for rapid prototyping, and an architecture we are developing to support virtual environment construction. VEA supports rapid application development by providing a variety of pre-built modules that can be reconfigured for each application session. The modules supply interfaces for several types of interactive I/O devices, in addition to large-screen or head-mounted displays.

  8. Cast Process Simulation for the Rapid Tooling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renji; Jiang, Rui; Liu, Yuan; Yan, Yongnian

    1997-03-01

    A major use for RP (Rapid Prototyping) now is in the foundry industry. It is so called RT (Rapid Tooling). Models are used as patterns for sand and plaster casting or used as sacrificial models in investment casting in the RT. In order to improve casting quality, a cast process simulation program for the RT has been made. This simulation depends on analysis of size accuracy parameters. The result could be came back into the CAD forming program. After that a new CAD data have been adopted in RT process. Then the RT technology could have sufficient accuracy in fabrication. Work supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC).

  9. API rapid bioassay procedures for drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluates the applicability of existing rapid toxicity test methods (duration of 2 hours or less) using the sea urchin sperm test and marine luminescent bacteria assay system for testing the toxicity of drilling fluids. The correlation between the results of these two test and the results of 96-hour static acute toxicity tests conducted with mysids was also evaluated, and it was determined that it may be possible to use rapid assays to conservatively predict compliance of drilling fluid with a mysid toxicity limitation.

  10. Instructional authoring by direct manipulation of simulations: Exploratory applications of RAPIDS. RAPIDS 2 authoring manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    RAPIDS II is a simulation-based intelligent tutoring system environment. It is a system for producing computer-based training courses that are built on the foundation of graphical simulations. RAPIDS II simulations can be animated and they can have continuously updating elements.

  11. Integrating Rapid Prototyping into Graphic Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Renmei; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Integrating different science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas can help students learn and leverage both the equipment and expertise at a single school. In comparing graphic communications classes with classes that involve rapid prototyping (RP) technologies like 3D printing, there are sufficient similarities between goals,…

  12. Rapid radiative clearing of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Owen, James E.

    2016-04-01

    The lack of observed transition discs with inner gas holes of radii greater than ˜50 au implies that protoplanetary discs dispersed from the inside out must remove gas from the outer regions rapidly. We investigate the role of photoevaporation in the final clearing of gas from low mass discs with inner holes. In particular, we study the so-called `thermal sweeping' mechanism which results in rapid clearing of the disc. Thermal sweeping was originally thought to arise when the radial and vertical pressure scalelengths at the X-ray heated inner edge of the disc match. We demonstrate that this criterion is not fundamental. Rather, thermal sweeping occurs when the pressure maximum at the inner edge of the dust heated disc falls below the maximum possible pressure of X-ray heated gas (which depends on the local X-ray flux). We derive new critical peak volume and surface density estimates for rapid radiative clearing which, in general, result in rapid dispersal happening less readily than in previous estimates. This less efficient clearing of discs by X-ray driven thermal sweeping leaves open the issue of what mechanism (e.g. far-ultraviolet heating) can clear gas from the outer disc sufficiently quickly to explain the non-detection of cold gas around weak line T Tauri stars.

  13. DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR RAPID KINETIC EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A data acquisition system has been developed to collect, analyze and store large volumes of rapid kinetic data measured from a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. A digital minicomputer, with an A/D converter, tape drive unit and formatter, analog recorder, oscilloscope, and input/ou...

  14. Rapid purification of fluorescent enzymes by ultrafiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjaminson, M. A.; Satyanarayana, T.

    1983-01-01

    In order to expedite the preparation of fluorescently tagged enzymes for histo-cyctochemistry, a previously developed method employing gel column purification was compared with a more rapid modern technique using the Millipore Immersible CX-ultrafilter. Microscopic evaluation of the resulting conjugates showed comparable products. Much time and effort is saved using the new technique.

  15. Rapid purification of fluorescent enzymes by ultrafiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjaminson, M. A.; Satyanarayana, T.

    1983-01-01

    In order to expedite the preparation of fluorescently tagged enzymes for histo/cytochemistry, a previously developed method employing gel column purification was compared with a more rapid modern technique using the Millipore Immersible CX-ultrafilter. Microscopic evaluation of the resulting conjugates showed comparable products. Much time and effort is saved using the new technique.

  16. Rapid Development of Bioinformatics Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Jian; Zhang, Liang

    2003-01-01

    As the Human Genome Project experiences remarkable success and a flood of biological data is produced, bioinformatics becomes a very "hot" cross-disciplinary field, yet experienced bioinformaticians are urgently needed worldwide. This paper summarises the rapid development of bioinformatics education in China, especially related undergraduate…

  17. Utilizing Rapid Prototyping for Architectural Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirton, E. F.; Lavoie, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss our approach to, success with and future direction in rapid prototyping for architectural modeling. The premise that this emerging technology has broad and exciting applications in the building design and construction industry will be supported by visual and physical evidence. This evidence will be presented in the form of…

  18. A Rapid and Quantitative Recombinase Activity Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present here a comparison between the recombinase systems FLP-FRT and Cre-loxP. A transient excision based dual luciferase expression assay is used for its rapid and repeatable nature. The detection system was designed within an intron to remove the remaining recombinase recognition site and no...

  19. Evolution: a rapid flight towards birds.

    PubMed

    Ksepka, Daniel T

    2014-11-01

    Remarkable feathered dinosaur fossils have blurred the lines between early birds and their non-avian dinosaur relatives. Rapid skeletal evolution and decreasing body size along one particular lineage of theropod dinosaurs paved the way for the spectacular radiation of birds. PMID:25517372

  20. Nonglacial rapid climate events: past and future.

    PubMed

    Overpeck, J; Webb, R

    2000-02-15

    The paleoclimate record makes it clear that rapid climate shifts of the 20th century are only a subset of possible climate system behavior that might occur in the absence of glacial conditions, and that climatic surprises could be a challenge for society even in the absence of significant greenhouse warming. PMID:10677461

  1. Rapid visco analysis of food protein pastes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) powders are used in many formulations to boost nutrients. To predict the pasting behavior of proteins, WPI was tested under varying temperatures, using the Rapid-Visco-Analyzer (RVA), under pasting temperatures from 65 to 75 degrees'C, RVA speeds from 100 to 500 rpm, and ...

  2. Rapid molecular diagnostic tools for avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accurate and early diagnosis of a foreign animal disease is crucial for rapid control and eradication of an outbreak in a country previously free of the disease. Historically many animal diseases have been controlled based solely on clinical signs of disease. However with avian influenza virus ...

  3. Rapid Antibiotic Resistance Evolution of GASP Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Kim, Hyunsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The GASP phenotype in bacteria is due to a mutation which enables the bacteria to grow under high stress conditions where other bacteria stop growing. We probe using our Death Galaxy microenvironment how rapidly the GASP mutant can evolve resistance to mutagenic antibiotics compared to wild-type bacteria, and explore the genomic landscape changes due to the evolution of resistance.

  4. PyTrilinos Rapid Prototyping Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-01

    PyTrilinos provides access to selected Trilinos packages from the python scripting language. This allows interactive and dynamic creation of Trilinos objects, rapid prototyping that does not require compilation, and "gluing" Trilinos scripts to other python modules, such as plotting, etc. The currently supported packages are Epetra, EpetraExt, and NOX.

  5. Rapid detection and identification of infectious agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsbury, D.T.; Falkow, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among five sections. Some of the paper titles are: Aspects of Using Nucleic Acid Filter Hybridization to Characterize and Detect Enteroviral RNAs; Rapid Identification of Lesihmania Species using Specific Hybridization of Kinetoplast DNA Sequences; Selection of DNA Probes for use in the Diagnosis of Infectious Disease; and Summary of DNA Probes.

  6. Nonglacial rapid climate events: Past and future

    PubMed Central

    Overpeck, Jonathan; Webb, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The paleoclimate record makes it clear that rapid climate shifts of the 20th century are only a subset of possible climate system behavior that might occur in the absence of glacial conditions, and that climatic surprises could be a challenge for society even in the absence of significant greenhouse warming. PMID:10677461

  7. Chemical fragment arrays for rapid druggability assessment.

    PubMed

    Aretz, J; Kondoh, Y; Honda, K; Anumala, U R; Nazaré, M; Watanabe, N; Osada, H; Rademacher, C

    2016-07-12

    Incorporation of early druggability assessment in the drug discovery process provides a means to prioritize target proteins for high-throughput screening. We present chemical fragment arrays as a method that is capable of determining the druggability of a given target with low protein and compound consumption, enabling rapid decision making during early phases of drug discovery. PMID:26890187

  8. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  9. Cognitive Predictors of Rapid Picture Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Scott L.; Roberts, Alycia M.; Englund, Julia A.

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in rapid automatized naming (RAN) have been found to be a sensitive cognitive marker for children with dyslexia. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding the construct validity and theoretical neuro-cognitive processes involved in RAN. Additionally, most studies investigating RAN include a narrow range of cognitive measures. The…

  10. Rapid Cognitive Assessment of Learners' Knowledge Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyuga, Slava

    2006-01-01

    Traditional assessment methods are not always suitable for diagnosing learners' knowledge structures at different levels of their expertise. This paper describes an alternative schema-based rapid assessment technique and its application in the area of arithmetic word problem solving. The technique is based on an assessment of the extent to which…

  11. Rapid Naming Speed and Chinese Character Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Chen-Huei; Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between rapid naming speed (RAN) and Chinese character recognition accuracy and fluency. Sixty-three grade 2 and 54 grade 4 Taiwanese children were administered four RAN tasks (colors, digits, Zhu-Yin-Fu-Hao, characters), and two character recognition tasks. RAN tasks accounted for more reading variance in grade 4 than…

  12. Rapid cycling with true potato seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid generation cycling via true seed production can increase the efficiency of potato breeding programs and genetics studies. This study was carried out to determine the fruit ripening and seed treatment conditions needed for generating true potato seed (TPS) with a high germination rate in a shor...

  13. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  14. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  15. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  16. NARSTO EPA SS HOUSTON RAPID SPMS DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    NARSTO EPA SS HOUSTON RAPID SPMS DATA Project Title:  NARSTO ... Single-particle Mass Spectrometer Location:  Houston, Texas Spatial Resolution:  Point Measurements ...   Order Data Guide Documents:  Houston SPMS Guide Houston Project Plan  (PDF) Houston ...

  17. Rapid ductile afterslip from coseismic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Meade, B. J.; Savage, H. M.; Rowe, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes are typically followed by months of afterslip, the total of which is generally an order of magnitude smaller than the seismic slip. The classic model for afterslip envisions seismic slip transferring stress to adjacent regions, driving accelerated stable sliding that expands the rupture area. However, a small proportion of earthquakes exhibit unusually large and rapid afterslip in the hours immediately following rupture. Here we present a new model that bridges the transition from seismic to postseismic deformation and may explain these observations of rapid afterslip. Seismic slip produces a significant temperature rise that slowly diffuses into the surrounding material following the cessation of seismic slip. Any process with strong temperature dependence is more sensitive to this heat transient than to the ambient temperatures present during the interseismic period. Coupling the temperature evolution of a fault to a ductile flow law we model postseismic deformation during the heat transient. Our idea of coseismic heating enhancing ductile flow is supported by field observations of micro-shear zones adjacent to psuedotachylyte veins. Enhanced ductility is largely confined to the zone that deformed seismically, making our model equivalent to rapid afterslip. Combining analytic and numerical methods we solve for the total afterslip in terms of the slip rate and fault strength during seismic slip and the ductile flow parameters. Our results are sensitive to the assumed rheology and deforming zone thickness, and while total afterslip is generally small some plausible parameter ranges predict afterslip comparable to or greater than the seismic slip developing over timescales shorter than an hour. We demonstrate that rapid afterslip can drive significant frictional heating, leading to a thermal runaway instability that produces a near total postseismic stress drop. To conclude we investigate the tsunami magnitude that rapid afterslip could produce.

  18. JPSS CGS Tools For Rapid Algorithm Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.; Grant, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will contribute the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the restructured National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). As such, JPSS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the ground processing component of both POES and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) replacement known as the Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS), managed by the Department of Defense (DoD). The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS), and consists of a Command, Control, and Communications Segment (C3S) and the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). Both are developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS). The Interface Data Processing Segment will process NPOESS Preparatory Project, Joint Polar Satellite System and Defense Weather Satellite System satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. Under NPOESS, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Algorithms and Data Products (A&DP) organization was responsible for the algorithms that produce the EDRs, including their quality aspects. For JPSS, that responsibility has transferred to NOAA's Center for Satellite Applications & Research (STAR). As the Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) activities move forward following both the NPP launch and subsequent JPSS and DWSS launches, rapid algorithm updates may be required. Raytheon and

  19. Superconductivity and magnetism in rapidly solidified perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    O'Handley, R.C.; Kalonji, G.

    1991-01-01

    The report is divided into six parts, reflecting major thrusts of our work since 1987. The six areas are: molecular orbital theory of high {Tc} superconductivity; rapid solidification processing of oxide superconductors; time dependent magnetic and superconducting properties of these inhomogeneous materials; excess Gd in Gd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2-x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} perovskites; rapid solidification and directional annealing to achieve high Jc; and Mossbauer studies of T = Fe, Co and Ni site selection in YBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and GdBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}.

  20. Rapid scanning system for fuel drawers

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, John T.; Fehlau, Paul E.; France, Stephen W.

    1981-01-01

    A nondestructive method for uniqely distinguishing among and quantifying the mass of individual fuel plates in situ in fuel drawers utilized in nuclear reactors is described. The method is both rapid and passive, eliminating the personnel hazard of the commonly used irradiation techniques which require that the analysis be performed in proximity to an intense neutron source such as a reactor. In the present technique, only normally decaying nuclei are observed. This allows the analysis to be performed anywhere. This feature, combined with rapid scanning of a given fuel drawer (in approximately 30 s), and the computer data analysis allows the processing of large numbers of fuel drawers efficiently in the event of a loss alert.

  1. Rapid scanning system for fuel drawers

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Fehlau, P.E.; France, S.W.

    A nondestructive method for uniquely distinguishing among and quantifying the mass of individual fuel plates in situ in fuel drawers utilized in nuclear reactors is described. The method is both rapid and passive, eliminating the personnel hazard of the commonly used irradiation techniques which require that the analysis be performed in proximity to an intense neutron source such as a reactor. In the present technique, only normally decaying nuclei are observed. This allows the analysis to be performed anywhere. This feature, combined with rapid scanning of a given fuel drawer (in approximately 30 s), and the computer data analysis allows the processing of large numbers of fuel drawers efficiently in the event of a loss alert.

  2. Rapid Sampling for Visualizations with Ordering Guarantees

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert; Blais, Eric; Parameswaran, Aditya; Indyk, Piotr; Madden, Sam; Rubinfeld, Ronitt

    2015-01-01

    Visualizations are frequently used as a means to understand trends and gather insights from datasets, but often take a long time to generate. In this paper, we focus on the problem of rapidly generating approximate visualizations while preserving crucial visual properties of interest to analysts. Our primary focus will be on sampling algorithms that preserve the visual property of ordering; our techniques will also apply to some other visual properties. For instance, our algorithms can be used to generate an approximate visualization of a bar chart very rapidly, where the comparisons between any two bars are correct. We formally show that our sampling algorithms are generally applicable and provably optimal in theory, in that they do not take more samples than necessary to generate the visualizations with ordering guarantees. They also work well in practice, correctly ordering output groups while taking orders of magnitude fewer samples and much less time than conventional sampling schemes. PMID:26779380

  3. IFSAR for the Rapid Terrain Visualization Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    BURNS,BRYAN L.; EICHEL,PAUL H.; HENSLEY JR.,WILLIAM H.; KIM,THEODORE J.

    2000-10-31

    The Rapid Terrain Visualization Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (RTV-ACTD) is designed to demonstrate the technologies and infrastructure to meet the Army requirement for rapid generation of digital topographic data to support emerging crisis or contingencies. The primary sensor for this mission is an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) designed at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper will outline the design of the system and its performance, and show some recent flight test results. The RTV IFSAR will meet DTED level III and IV specifications by using a multiple-baseline design and high-accuracy differential and carrier-phase GPS navigation. It includes innovative near-real-time DEM production on-board the aircraft. The system is being flown on a deHavilland DHC-7 Army aircraft.

  4. RAPID MAPPING TOOL: AN ARCMAP EXTENSION

    SciTech Connect

    STEVE P. LINGER; PAUL M. RICH; DOUG WALTHER; MARC S. WITKOWSKI; MARCIA A. JONES; HARI S. KHALSA

    2002-06-18

    Cartographic production laboratories produce large volumes of maps for diverse customers. Turnaround time and consistency are key concerns. The Rapid Mapping Tool is an ArcMap based tool that enables rapid creation of maps to meet customer needs. This tool was constructed using VB/VBA, ArcObjects, and ArcGIS templates. The core capability of ArcMap is extended for custom map production by storing specifications associated with a map or template in a companion XML document. These specifications include settings and preferences used to create custom maps. The tool was developed as a component of an enterprise GIS, which enables spatial data management and delivery using ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Oracle, and a web-based request tracking system.

  5. Rapid, Transient Synaptic Plasticity in Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kupchik, Yonatan M.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic use of addictive drugs produces enduring neuroadaptations in the corticostriatal glutamatergic brain circuitry. The nucleus accumbens (NAc), which integrates cortical information and regulates goal-directed behavior, undergoes long-term morphological and electrophysiological changes that may underlie the increased susceptibility for relapse in drug-experienced individuals even after long periods of withdrawal. Additionally, it has recently been shown that exposure to cues associated with drug use elicits rapid and transient morphological and electrophysiological changes in glutamatergic synapses in the NAc. This review highlights these dynamic drug-induced changes in this pathway that are specific to a drug seeking neuropathology, as well as how these changes impair normal information processing and thereby contribute to the uncontrollable motivation to relapse. Future directions for relapse prevention and pharmacotherapeutic targeting of the rapid, transient synaptic plasticity in relapse are discussed. PMID:23639436

  6. Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion in adults.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M A; Kaban, L B; Vargervik, K; Baumrind, S

    1992-01-01

    Twelve adults with maxillary width discrepancy of greater than 5 mm were treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. The procedure consisted of bilateral zygomatic buttress and midpalatal osteotomies combined with the use of a tooth-borne orthopedic device postoperatively. Mean palatal expansion of 7.5 mm (range of 6 to 13 mm), measured in the first molar region, was achieved within 3 weeks in all patients. Expansion remained stable during the 12-month study period, with a mean relapse for the entire group of 0.88 +/- 0.48 mm. Morbidity was limited to mild postoperative discomfort. The results of this preliminary study indicated that surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion is a safe, simple, and reliable procedure for achieving a permanent increase in skeletal maxillary width in adults. Further study is necessary to document the three-dimensional movements of the maxillary segments and long-term stability of the skeletal and dental changes. PMID:1453038

  7. Relatively Inexpensive Rapid Prototyping of Small Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Parts with complex three-dimensional shapes and with dimensions up to 8 by 8 by 10 in. (20.3 by 20.3 by 25.4 cm) can be made as unitary pieces of a room-temperature-curing polymer, with relatively little investment in time and money, by a process now in use at Johnson Space Center. The process is one of a growing number of processes and techniques that are known collectively as the art of rapid prototyping. The main advantages of this process over other rapid-prototyping processes are greater speed and lower cost: There is no need to make paper drawings and take them to a shop for fabrication, and thus no need for the attendant paperwork and organizational delays. Instead, molds for desired parts are made automatically on a machine that is guided by data from a computer-aided design (CAD) system and can reside in an engineering office.

  8. Microstructures in rapidly solidified niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Locci, Ivan E.

    1988-01-01

    The microstructures of niobium aluminides produced by chill block melt spinning were compared to those of niobium aluminides produced by conventional casting. The rapidly solidified alloys were rapidly solidified by melt spinning in an argon atmosphere, and the melt-spun ribbons were examined by optical, X-ray, and TEM techniques. Microstructures were found to range from single-phase for Nb-75 at. pct Al (NbAl3) to two phase for Nb-46 at. pct Al (NbAl3 + Nb2Al). It was found that the melt spinning of Nb-aluminides produced finer grained microstructures than those produced in induction-melted ingots or in powders produced by the rotating electrode process. Ternary additions such as Cr, Ti, and Si tended to form intermetallic phases along the grain boundaries.

  9. Rapid oligonucleotide-templated fluorogenic tetrazine ligations

    PubMed Central

    Šečkutė, Jolita; Yang, Jun; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2013-01-01

    Template driven chemical ligation of fluorogenic probes represents a powerful method for DNA and RNA detection and imaging. Unfortunately, previous techniques have been hampered by requiring chemistry with sluggish kinetics and background side reactions. We have developed fluorescent DNA probes containing quenched fluorophore-tetrazine and methyl-cyclopropene groups that rapidly react by bioorthogonal cycloaddition in the presence of complementary DNA or RNA templates. Ligation increases fluorescence with negligible background signal in the absence of hybridization template. Reaction kinetics depend heavily on template length and linker structure. Using this technique, we demonstrate rapid discrimination between single template mismatches both in buffer and cell media. Fluorogenic bioorthogonal ligations offer a promising route towards the fast and robust fluorescent detection of specific DNA or RNA sequences. PMID:23775794

  10. Rapid quenching effects in glassy polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Using a specially constructed microbalance for hydrostatic weighing, density changes in PVC thin film due to rapid quenching through the glass transition temperature were observed. The more severe the quench, the greater the free volume content. Isobaric volume recovery of PVC was also studied by volume dilatometry. Both show aging of relaxing molecular rearrangements taking place as a linear function of logarithmic aging time at room temperature. Distribution of retardation times and Primak's distributed activation energy spectra were applied to the volume recovery data. The concomitant changes in mechanical properties of PVC after quenching were monitored by tensile creep stress-stran to failure rates. All reflect the presence of excess free volume content due to rapid quenching.

  11. Rapid quenching effects in PVC films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. D.; Mandell, J. F.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    Using a specially constructed microbalance for hydrostatic weighing, density changes in PVC thin films (with no additives, 30-100 micrometers thick), due to rapid quenching (approximately 300 C/sec) through the glass transition temperature, have been observed. The more severe the quench, the greater is the free volume content. Isobaric volume recovery of PVC has also been studied by volume dilatometry. Both show aging of relaxing molecular rearrangements takes place as a linear function of logarithmic aging time at room temperature. Distribution of retardation times and Primak's distributed activation energy spectra have been applied to the volume recovery data. The concomitant changes in mechanical properties of PVC after quenching have been monitored by tensile creep and stress-strain to failure. All reflect the presence of excess free volume content, due to rapid quenching.

  12. GRAT--genome-scale rapid alignment tool.

    PubMed

    Kindlund, Ellen; Tammi, Martti T; Arner, Erik; Nilsson, Daniel; Andersson, Björn

    2007-04-01

    Modern alignment methods designed to work rapidly and efficiently with large datasets often do so at the cost of method sensitivity. To overcome this, we have developed a novel alignment program, GRAT, built to accurately align short, highly similar DNA sequences. The program runs rapidly and requires no more memory and CPU power than a desktop computer. In addition, specificity is ensured by statistically separating the true alignments from spurious matches using phred quality values. An efficient separation is especially important when searching large datasets and whenever there are repeats present in the dataset. Results are superior in comparison to widely used existing software, and analysis of two large genomic datasets show the usefulness and scalability of the algorithm. PMID:17292508

  13. Methods of Recording Rapid Wind Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnan, A

    1932-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to determine the rapid changes of air currents which impose varying stresses on the wings of airplanes. We attempted to express in figures the turbulence of the air, which perhaps plays some role in the behavior of airplanes in flight, as well as in the realization of certain methods of gliding flight. This is the reason which led us to conceive and develop the experimental equipment (hot-wire anemometer) described herein.

  14. Uav Data Processing for Rapid Mapping Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampubolon, W.; Reinhardt, W.

    2015-08-01

    During disaster and emergency situations, geospatial data plays an important role to serve as a framework for decision support system. As one component of basic geospatial data, large scale topographical maps are mandatory in order to enable geospatial analysis within quite a number of societal challenges. The increasing role of geo-information in disaster management nowadays consequently needs to include geospatial aspects on its analysis. Therefore different geospatial datasets can be combined in order to produce reliable geospatial analysis especially in the context of disaster preparedness and emergency response. A very well-known issue in this context is the fast delivery of geospatial relevant data which is expressed by the term "Rapid Mapping". Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is the rising geospatial data platform nowadays that can be attractive for modelling and monitoring the disaster area with a low cost and timely acquisition in such critical period of time. Disaster-related object extraction is of special interest for many applications. In this paper, UAV-borne data has been used for supporting rapid mapping activities in combination with high resolution airborne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) data. A real disaster instance from 2013 in conjunction with Mount Sinabung eruption, Northern Sumatra, Indonesia, is used as the benchmark test for the rapid mapping activities presented in this paper. On this context, the reliable IFSAR dataset from airborne data acquisition in 2011 has been used as a comparable dataset for accuracy investigation and assessment purpose in 3 D reconstructions. After all, this paper presents a proper geo-referencing and feature extraction method of UAV data to support rapid mapping activities.

  15. Circumstellar ring formation in rapidly rotating protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, H.A.; Tohline, J.E.

    1988-11-01

    Rapidly rotating, self-gravitating polytropes with polytropic indices n = 0.8 and n = 1.8 are studied using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic computer program. The two models are shown as they evolve to extremely nonlinear amplitudes, ending in a type of fission. It is found that the low-mass, roughly axisymmetric ring appears to be dynamically stable, but capable of condensing into planets over a much longer time scale. 34 references.

  16. RAPID FORMATION OF SATURN AFTER JUPITER COMPLETION

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ormel, Chris W.; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ormel@astro.berkeley.edu

    2012-09-01

    We have investigated Saturn's core formation at a radial pressure maximum in a protoplanetary disk, which is created by gap opening by Jupiter. A core formed via planetesimal accretion induces the fragmentation of surrounding planetesimals, which generally inhibits further growth of the core by removal of the resulting fragments due to radial drift caused by gas drag. However, the emergence of the pressure maximum halts the drift of the fragments, while their orbital eccentricities and inclinations are efficiently damped by gas drag. As a result, the core of Saturn rapidly grows via accretion of the fragments near the pressure maximum. We have found that in the minimum-mass solar nebula, kilometer-sized planetesimals can produce a core exceeding 10 Earth masses within two million years. Since Jupiter may not have undergone significant type II inward migration, it is likely that Jupiter's formation was completed when the local disk mass has already decayed to a value comparable to or less than Jovian mass. The expected rapid growth of Saturn's core on a timescale comparable to or shorter than the observationally inferred disk lifetime enables Saturn to acquire the current amount of envelope gas before the disk gas is completely depleted. The high heat energy release rate onto the core surface due to the rapid accretion of the fragments delays onset of runaway gas accretion until the core mass becomes somewhat larger than that of Jupiter, which is consistent with the estimate based on interior modeling. Therefore, the rapid formation of Saturn induced by gap opening of Jupiter can account for the formation of multiple gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) without significant inward migration and larger core mass of Saturn than that of Jupiter.

  17. Rapid GRB Afterglow Response With SARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, K. V.; Homewood, A. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Riddle, C.; Fuller, S.; Manning, A.; McIntyre, T.; Henson, G.

    2006-05-01

    The Clemson GRB Follow-Up program utilizes the SARA 0.9-m telescope to observe optical afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts. SARA is not yet robotic; it operates under direct and Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) interrupt modes. To facilitate rapid response and timely reporting of data analysis results, we developed a software suite that operates in two phases: first, to notify observers of a burst and assist in data collection, and second, to quickly analyze the images.

  18. Rapid determination of actinides in seawater samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2014-03-09

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The actinides can be measured by alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The new method employs novel pre-concentration steps to collect the actinide isotopes quickly from 80 L or more of seawater. Actinides are co-precipitated using an iron hydroxide co-precipitation step enhanced with Ti+3 reductant, followed by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Stacked TEVA Resin and TRU Resin cartridges are used to rapidly separate Pu, U, and Np isotopes from seawater samples. TEVA Resin and DGA Resin were used tomore » separate and measure Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in seawater volumes up to 80 L. This robust method is ideal for emergency seawater samples following a radiological incident. It can also be used, however, for the routine analysis of seawater samples for oceanographic studies to enhance efficiency and productivity. In contrast, many current methods to determine actinides in seawater can take 1–2 weeks and provide chemical yields of ~30–60 %. This new sample preparation method can be performed in 4–8 h with tracer yields of ~85–95 %. By employing a rapid, robust sample preparation method with high chemical yields, less seawater is needed to achieve lower or comparable detection limits for actinide isotopes with less time and effort.« less

  19. NPOESS Tools for Rapid Algorithm Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Route, G.; Grant, K. D.; Hughes, B.; Reed, B.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes both NPP and NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Algorithms and Data Products (A&DP) organization is responsible for the algorithms that produce the EDRs, including their quality aspects. As the Calibration and Validation activities move forward following both the NPP launch and subsequent NPOESS launches, rapid algorithm updates may be required. Raytheon and Northrop Grumman have developed tools and processes to enable changes to be evaluated, tested, and moved into the operational baseline in a rapid and efficient manner. This presentation will provide an overview of the tools available to the Cal/Val teams to ensure rapid and accurate assessment of algorithm changes, along with the processes in place to ensure baseline integrity.

  20. Rapid Expectation Adaptation during Syntactic Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Alex B.; Jaeger, T. Florian; Farmer, Thomas A.; Qian, Ting

    2013-01-01

    When we read or listen to language, we are faced with the challenge of inferring intended messages from noisy input. This challenge is exacerbated by considerable variability between and within speakers. Focusing on syntactic processing (parsing), we test the hypothesis that language comprehenders rapidly adapt to the syntactic statistics of novel linguistic environments (e.g., speakers or genres). Two self-paced reading experiments investigate changes in readers’ syntactic expectations based on repeated exposure to sentences with temporary syntactic ambiguities (so-called “garden path sentences”). These sentences typically lead to a clear expectation violation signature when the temporary ambiguity is resolved to an a priori less expected structure (e.g., based on the statistics of the lexical context). We find that comprehenders rapidly adapt their syntactic expectations to converge towards the local statistics of novel environments. Specifically, repeated exposure to a priori unexpected structures can reduce, and even completely undo, their processing disadvantage (Experiment 1). The opposite is also observed: a priori expected structures become less expected (even eliciting garden paths) in environments where they are hardly ever observed (Experiment 2). Our findings suggest that, when changes in syntactic statistics are to be expected (e.g., when entering a novel environment), comprehenders can rapidly adapt their expectations, thereby overcoming the processing disadvantage that mistaken expectations would otherwise cause. Our findings take a step towards unifying insights from research in expectation-based models of language processing, syntactic priming, and statistical learning. PMID:24204909

  1. Rapid prototyping applications at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, C. L.; McCarty, G. D.; Pardo, B. T.; Bryce, E. A.

    In an effort to reduce the cycle time for producing prototypical mechanical and electro-mechanical components, Sandia National Laboratories has integrated rapid prototyping processes into the design and manufacturing process. The processes currently in operation within the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory are Stereolithography (SL), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), and Direct Shell Production Casting (DSPC). These emerging technologies have proven to be valuable tools for reducing lead times and fabrication costs. Sandia uses the SL and SLS processes to support internal product development efforts. Their primary use is to fabricate patterns for investment casting in support of a Sandia-managed program called FASTCAST that integrates computational technologies and experimental data into the investment casting process. These processes are also used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. The DSPC process is currently being developed as a method of fabricating ceramic investment casting molds directly from a CAD solid model. Sandia is an Alpha machine test site for this process. This presentation will provide an overview of the SL and SLS processes and an update of our experience and success in integrating these technologies into the product development cycle. It will also provide a lead-in for a tour of the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory, where these processes will be demonstrated.

  2. Rapidly fading supernovae from massive star explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiser, Io K. W.; Kasen, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Transient surveys have recently discovered a class of supernovae (SNe) with extremely rapidly declining light curves. These events are also often relatively faint, especially compared to Type Ia SNe. The common explanation for these events involves a weak explosion, producing a radioactive outflow with small ejected mass and kinetic energy (M ˜ 0.1 M⊙ and E ˜ 0.1 B, respectively), perhaps from the detonation of a helium shell on a white dwarf. We argue, in contrast, that these events may be Type Ib/c SNe with typical masses and energies (M ˜ 3 M⊙, E ˜ 1 B), but which ejected very little radioactive material. In our picture, the light curve is powered by the diffusion of thermal energy deposited by the explosion shock wave, and the rapid evolution is due to recombination, which reduces the opacity and results in an `oxygen-plateau' light curve. Using a radiative transfer code and simple 1D ejecta profiles, we generate synthetic spectra and light curves and demonstrate that this model can reasonably fit the observations of one event, SN 2010X. Similar models may explain the features of other rapidly evolving SNe such as SN 2002bj and SN 2005ek. SNe such as these may require stripped-envelope progenitors with rather large radii (R ˜ 20 R⊙), which may originate from a mass-loss episode occurring just prior to explosion.

  3. Aerodynamics inside a rapid compression machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Gaurav; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2006-04-15

    The aerodynamics inside a rapid compression machine after the end of compression is investigated using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone. To study the effect of reaction chamber configuration on the resulting aerodynamics and temperature field, experiments are conducted and compared using a creviced piston and a flat piston under varying conditions. Results show that the flat piston design leads to significant mixing of the cold vortex with the hot core region, which causes alternate hot and cold regions inside the combustion chamber. At higher pressures, the effect of the vortex is reduced. The creviced piston head configuration is demonstrated to result in drastic reduction of the effect of the vortex. Experimental conditions are also simulated using the Star-CD computational fluid dynamics package. Computed results closely match with experimental observation. Numerical results indicate that with a flat piston design, gas velocity after compression is very high and the core region shrinks quickly due to rapid entrainment of cold gases. Whereas, for a creviced piston head design, gas velocity after compression is significantly lower and the core region remains unaffected for a long duration. As a consequence, for the flat piston, adiabatic core assumption can significantly overpredict the maximum temperature after the end of compression. For the creviced piston, the adiabatic core assumption is found to be valid even up to 100 ms after compression. This work therefore experimentally and numerically substantiates the importance of piston head design for achieving a homogeneous core region inside a rapid compression machine. (author)

  4. Effective rapid airframe suppression evaluation (ERASE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Michel

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents an analytical method to effectively and rapidly evaluate the impact of airframe suppression on electro-optical/infrared (E-O/IR) system lock-on range. This method is known as the Effective Rapid Airframe Suppression Evaluation (ERASE). It can be used to perform tradeoff analyses with respect to IR suppression systems and evaluate the impact of these systems on E-O/IR systems. This paper discusses a new set of dimensionless equations and how these equations are used to evaluate changes in airframe area, temperature, emissivity, and reflectivity (as a function of earthshine, solar reflections, and skyshine). Since the ERASE code has been formulated as a rapid computational tool (capable of generating over 1000 design variations in minutes), it is ideal for performing design tradeoffs against airframe shaping, thermal control systems, and diffuse reflectivity/emissivity control. Results from the ERASE code are presented using Grumman's System for IR Evaluation/Contrast Generator Code (SIRE/CONGEN) as input.

  5. Recognition system rapid application prototyping tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stuart A.; Karins, James P.; Dydyk, Robert B.

    1997-03-01

    The recognition system rapid application prototyping tool (RSRAPT) was developed to evaluate various potential configurations of miniature ruggedized optical correlator (MROC) modules and to rapidly assess the feasibility of their use within systems such as missile seekers. RSRAPT is a simulation environment for rapidly prototyping, developing, and evaluating recognition systems that incorporate MROC technology. It is designed to interface to OLE compliant Windows applications using standard OLE interfaces. The system consists of nine key functional elements: sensor, detection, segmentation, pre-processor, filter selection, correlator, post-processor, identifier, and controller. The RSRAPT is a collection of object oriented server components, a client user interface and a recognitions system image and image sensor database. The server components are implemented to encapsulate processes that are typical to any optical-correlator based pattern recognition system. All the servers are implemented as Microsoft component object model objects. In addition to the system servers there are two key 'helper servers.' The first is the image server, which encapsulates all 'images'. This includes gray scale images and even complex images. The other supporting server is the filter generation server. This server trains the system on user data by calculating filters for user selected image types. The system hosts a library of standard image processing routines such as convolution, edge operators, clustering algorithms, median filtering, morphological operators such as erosion and dilation, connected components, region growing, and adaptive thresholding. In this paper we describe the simulator and show sample results from diverse applications.

  6. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  7. CMOS-controlled rapidly tunable photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ray

    With rapidly increasing data bandwidth demands, wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical access networks seem unavoidable in the near future. To operate WDM optical networks in an efficient scheme, wavelength reconfigurability and scalability of the network are crucial. Unfortunately, most of the existing wavelength tunable technologies are neither rapidly tunable nor spectrally programmable. This dissertation presents a tunable photodetector that is designed for dynamic-wavelength allocation WDM network environments. The wavelength tuning mechanism is completely different from existing technologies. The spectrum of this detector is programmable through low-voltage digital patterns. Since the wavelength selection is achieved by electronic means, the device wavelength reconfiguration time is as fast as the electronic switching time. In this dissertation work, we have demonstrated a tunable detector that is hybridly integrated with its customized CMOS driver and receiver with nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time. In addition to its nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time, the spectrum of this detector is digitally programmable, which means that it can adapt to system changes without re-fabrication. We have theoretically developed and experimentally demonstrated two device operating algorithms based on the same orthogonal device-optics basis. Both the rapid wavelength tuning time and the scalability make this novel device very viable for new reconfigurable WDM networks. By taking advantage of CMOS circuit design, this detector concept can be further extended for simultaneous multiple wavelength detection. We have developed one possible chip architecture and have designed a CMOS tunable optical demux for simultaneous controllable two-wavelength detection.

  8. Rapid methods and automation in dairy microbiology.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, P C

    1993-10-01

    The importance of microbiology to the dairy industry has been demonstrated by recent outbreaks of foodborne illness associated with consumption of milk and dairy products that had been contaminated with pathogenic organisms or toxins. Undesirable microorganisms constitute the primary hazard to safety, quality, and wholesomeness of milk and dairy foods. Consequently, increased emphasis has been placed on the microbiological analysis of milk and dairy products designed to evaluate quality and to ensure safety and regulatory compliance. The focus of dairy microbiology, however, remains largely on conventional methods: plate counts, most probable numbers, and dye reduction tests. These methods are slow, tedious, intensive in their requirements for material and labor, and often not suitable for assessing the quality and shelf-life of perishable dairy foods. With the exception of coliforms, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus, isolation and characterization of various organisms occurring in milk and milk products are seldom a part of the routine microbiological analysis in the dairy industry. Recent emphasis on the programs based on HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) for total quality management in the dairy industry and increased demand for microbiological surveillance of products, process, and environment have led to increased interest in rapid methods and automation in microbiology. Several methods for rapid detection, isolation, enumeration, and characterization of microorganisms are being adapted by the dairy industry. This presentation reviews rapid methods and automation in microbiology for microbiological analysis of milk and dairy products. PMID:8227634

  9. Rapid Progression of Coronary Atherosclerosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bajaj, Sharad; Virk, Hartaj; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, the prevalence of which has increased steadily as the population ages. Vascular injury is believed to be critical initiating event in pathogenesis of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis has been classically described in patients undergoing heart transplantation, coronary artery bypass graft, and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. In contrast to spontaneous atherosclerosis, denuding endothelial injury followed by thrombus formation and initial predominant smooth muscle cell proliferation is believed to be playing a significant role in accelerated atherosclerosis. There is no universal definition of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. However most studies describing the phenomenon have used the following definition: (i) > or = 10% diameter reduction of at least one preexisting stenosis > or = 50%, (ii) > or = 30% diameter reduction of a preexisting stenosis <50%, and (iii) progression of a lesion to total occlusion within few months. Recent studies have described the role of coronary vasospasm, human immunodeficiency virus, various inflammatory markers, and some genetic mutations as predictors of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. As research in the field of vascular biology continues, more factors are likely to be implicated in the pathogenesis of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26823982

  10. MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Laboratory is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified, all without the interference of a container or data-gathering instrument. The ESL main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to 8 quench vessels can be loaded into the quench wheel, which is indexed with LabVIEW control software. This allows up to 8 samples to be rapidly quenched before having to open the chamber. The system has been tested successfully on several zirconium samples. Future work will be done with other materials using different quench mediums. Microstructural analysis will also be done on successfully quench samples.

  11. Rapid analysis of pharmacology for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Andrew L; Bickerton, G Richard; Carruthers, Ian M; Boyer, Stephen K; Rubin, Harvey; Overington, John P

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic, epidemic and endemic infectious diseases are united by a common problem: how do we rapidly and cost-effectively identify potential pharmacological interventions to treat infections? Given the large number of emerging and neglected infectious diseases and the fact that they disproportionately afflict the poorest members of the global society, new ways of thinking are required to developed high productivity discovery systems that can be applied to a larger number of pathogens. The growing availability of parasite genome data provides the basis for developing methods to prioritize, a priori, the potential drug target and pharmacological landscape of an infectious disease. Thus the overall objective of infectious disease informatics is to enable the rapid generation of plausible, novel medical hypotheses of testable pharmacological experiments, by uncovering undiscovered relationships in the wealth of biomedical literature and databases that were collected for other purposes. In particular our goal is to identify potential drug targets present in a pathogen genome and prioritize which pharmacological experiments are most likely to discover drug-like lead compounds rapidly against a pathogen (i.e. which specific compounds and drug targets should be screened, in which assays and where they can be sourced). An integral part of the challenge is the development and integration of methods to predict druggability, essentiality, synthetic lethality and polypharmacology in pathogen genomes, while simultaneously integrating the inevitable issues of chemical tractability and the potential for acquired drug resistance from the start. PMID:21401504

  12. Rapid determination of actinides in seawater samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2014-03-09

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The actinides can be measured by alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The new method employs novel pre-concentration steps to collect the actinide isotopes quickly from 80 L or more of seawater. Actinides are co-precipitated using an iron hydroxide co-precipitation step enhanced with Ti+3 reductant, followed by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Stacked TEVA Resin and TRU Resin cartridges are used to rapidly separate Pu, U, and Np isotopes from seawater samples. TEVA Resin and DGA Resin were used to separate and measure Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in seawater volumes up to 80 L. This robust method is ideal for emergency seawater samples following a radiological incident. It can also be used, however, for the routine analysis of seawater samples for oceanographic studies to enhance efficiency and productivity. In contrast, many current methods to determine actinides in seawater can take 1–2 weeks and provide chemical yields of ~30–60 %. This new sample preparation method can be performed in 4–8 h with tracer yields of ~85–95 %. By employing a rapid, robust sample preparation method with high chemical yields, less seawater is needed to achieve lower or comparable detection limits for actinide isotopes with less time and effort.

  13. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore » present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  14. Rapid Column Extraction method for SoilRapid Column Extraction method for Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III; Culligan, Brian K.

    2005-11-07

    The analysis of actinides in environmental soil and sediment samples is very important for environmental monitoring as well as for emergency preparedness. A new, rapid actinide separation method has been developed and implemented that provides total dissolution of large soil samples, high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and DGA-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu) neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. The method combines a rapid fusion step for total dissolution to dissolve refractory analytes and matrix removal using cerium fluoride precipitation to remove the difficult soil matrix. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  15. Ultra-rapid EOP determination with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Rüdiger; Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro; Hobiger, Thomas; Lovell, Jim; McCallum, Jamie; Quick, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    In 2007 the Geospatial information Authority of Japan (GSI) and the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) started a project aiming at determining the earth rotation angle, usually expressed as dUT1, in near real-time. In the beginning of this project dedicated one hour long one-baseline experiments were observed periodically using the VLBI stations Onsala (Sweden) and Tsukuba (Japan). The strategy is that the observed VLBI-data are sent in real-time via the international optical fibre backbone to the VLBI-correlator at Tsukuba where the data are correlated and analyzed in near-real time, producing ultra-rapid dUT1 results. An offline version of this strategy has been adopted in 2009 for the regular VLBI intensive series INT-2 involving Wettzell (Germany) and Tsukuba. Since March 2010 the INT-2 is using real-time e-transfer, too, and since June 2010 also automated analysis. Starting in 2009 the ultra-rapid approach was applied to regular 24 hour long VLBI-sessions that involve Tsukuba and Onsala, so that ultra-rapid dUT1 results can be produced already during ongoing VLBI-sessions. This strategy was successfully operated during the 15 days long CONT11 campaign. In 2011 the ultra-rapid strategy was extended to involve a network of VLBI-stations, so that not only dUT1 but also the polar motion components can be determined in near real-time. Initially, in November 2011 a dedicated three-station session was observed involving Onsala, Tsukuba and Hobart (Tasmania, Australia). In 2012 several regular 24 hour long IVS-sessions that involved Onsala, Tsukuba and HartRAO (South Africa) were operated with the ultra-rapid strategy, and in several cases also Hobart was added as a fourth station. For this project we use the new analysis software c5++ developed by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). In this presentation we give an overview of the UREOP-project, describe the recent developments, and discuss the obtained results.

  16. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  17. Rapid Prototyping of Patterned Multifunctional Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    FAN,HONGYOU; LU,YUNFENG; LOPEZ,GABRIEL P.; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

    2000-07-18

    The ability to engineer ordered arrays of objects on multiple length scales has potential for applications such as microelectronics, sensors, wave guides, and photonic lattices with tunable band gaps. Since the invention of surfactant templated mesoporous sieves in 1992, great progress has been made in controlling different mesophases in the form of powders, particles, fibers, and films. To date, although there have been several reports of patterned mesostructures, materials prepared have been limited to metal oxides with no specific functionality. For many of the envisioned applications of hierarchical materials in micro-systems, sensors, waveguides, photonics, and electronics, it is necessary to define both form and function on several length scales. In addition, the patterning strategies utilized so far require hours or even days for completion. Such slow processes are inherently difficult to implement in commercial environments. The authors present a series of new methods of producing patterns within seconds. Combining sol-gel chemistry, Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly (EISA), and rapid prototyping techniques like pen lithography, ink-jet printing, and dip-coating on micro-contact printed substrates, they form hierarchically organized silica structures that exhibit order and function on multiple scales: on the molecular scale, functional organic moieties are positioned on pore surfaces, on the mesoscale, mono-sized pores are organized into 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional networks, providing size-selective accessibility from the gas or liquid phase, and on the macroscale, 2-dimensional arrays and fluidic or photonic systems may be defined. These rapid patterning techniques establish for the first time a link between computer-aided design and rapid processing of self-assembled nanostructures.

  18. Rapid Characterization of Large Earthquakes in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, S. E.; Team, C.

    2015-12-01

    Chile, along 3000 km of it 4200 km long coast, is regularly affected by very large earthquakes (up to magnitude 9.5) resulting from the convergence and subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate. These megathrust earthquakes exhibit long rupture regions reaching several hundreds of km with fault displacements of several tens of meters. Minimum delay characterization of these giant events to establish their rupture extent and slip distribution is of the utmost importance for rapid estimations of the shaking area and their corresponding tsunami-genic potential evaluation, particularly when there are only few minutes to warn the coastal population for immediate actions. The task of a rapid evaluation of large earthquakes is accomplished in Chile through a network of sensors being implemented by the National Seismological Center of the University of Chile. The network is mainly composed approximately by one hundred broad-band and strong motion instruments and 130 GNSS devices; all will be connected in real time. Forty units present an optional RTX capability, where satellite orbits and clock corrections are sent to the field device producing a 1-Hz stream at 4-cm level. Tests are being conducted to stream the real-time raw data to be later processed at the central facility. Hypocentral locations and magnitudes are estimated after few minutes by automatic processing software based on wave arrival; for magnitudes less than 7.0 the rapid estimation works within acceptable bounds. For larger events, we are currently developing automatic detectors and amplitude estimators of displacement coming out from the real time GNSS streams. This software has been tested for several cases showing that, for plate interface events, the minimum magnitude threshold detectability reaches values within 6.2 and 6.5 (1-2 cm coastal displacement), providing an excellent tool for earthquake early characterization from a tsunamigenic perspective.

  19. Global Landslides on Rapidly Spinning Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, Daniel J.; Sanchez, P.

    2013-10-01

    The angle of repose and conditions for global landslides on the surfaces of small, rapidly spinning, spheroidal asteroids are studied. Applying techniques of soil mechanics, we develop a theory for, and examples of, how regolith will fail and flow in this microgravity environment. Our motivation is to develop an understanding of the "top-shaped" class of asteroids based on analytical soil mechanics. Our analysis transforms the entire asteroid surface into a local frame where we can model it as a conventional granular pile with a surface slope, acceleration and height variations as a function of the body's spin rate, shape and density. A general finding is that the lowest point on a rapidly spinning spheroid is at the equator with the effective height of surface material monotonically increasing towards the polar regions, where the height can be larger than the physical radius of the body. We study the failure conditions of both cohesionless and cohesive regolith, and develop specific predictions of the surface profile as a function of the regolith angle of friction and the maximum spin rate experienced by the body. The theory also provides simple guidelines on what the shape may look like, although we do not analyze gravitationally self-consistent evolution of the body shape. The theory is tested with soft-sphere discrete element method granular mechanics simulations to better understand the dynamical aspects of global asteroid landslides. We find significant differences between failure conditions for cohesive and cohesionless regolith. In the case of cohesive regolith, we show that extremely small values of strength (much less than that found in lunar regolith) can stabilize a surface even at very rapid spin rates. Cohesionless surfaces, as expected, fail whenever their surface slopes exceed the angle of friction. Based on our analysis we propose that global landslides and the flow of material towards the equator on spheroidal bodies are precipitated by exogenous

  20. Rapid Reconnection and Field Line Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. N.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    Rapid reconnection of magnetic fields arises where the magnetic stresses push the plasma and field so as to increase the field gradient without limit. The intent of the present writing is to show the larger topological context in which this commonly occurs. Consider an interlaced field line topology as commonly occurs in the bipolar magnetic regions on the Sun. A simple model is constructed starting with a strong uniform magnetic field B 0 in the z-direction through an infinitely conducting fluid from the end plate z = 0 to z = L with the field lines tied at both end plates. Field line interlacing is introduced by smooth continuous random turbulent mixing of the footpoints at the end plates. This configuration is well suited to be modeled with the reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with the equilibria given by the solutions of the 2D vorticity equation in this case. The set of continuous solutions to the "vorticity" equation have greatly restricted topologies, so almost all interlaced field topologies do not have continuous solutions. That infinite set represents the "weak" solutions of the vorticity equation, wherein there are surfaces of tangential discontinuity (current sheets) in the field dividing regions of smooth continuous field. It follows then that current sheets are to be found throughout interlaced fields, providing potential sites for rapid reconnection. That is to say, rapid reconnection and nanoflaring are expected throughout the bipolar magnetic fields in the solar corona, providing substantial heating to the ambient gas. Numerical simulations provide a direct illustration of the process, showing that current sheets thin on fast ideal Alfvén timescales down to the smallest numerically resolved scales. The asymmetric structure of the equilibria and the interlacing threshold for the onset of singularities are discussed. Current sheet formation and dynamics are further analyzed with dissipative and ideal numerical simulations.

  1. A rapid diagnostic test for schistosomiasis mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Mello-Silva, Clélia Christina; João, Roberto Carlos; Augusto, Ronaldo de Carvalho; Santos, Claudia Portes

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an improvement to the Kato-Katz (KK) method, making it faster and more efficient for the visualisation of fertile eggs in stool samples. This modified KK method uses sodium acetate formalin as a fixative and reveals the intensity of infection in less than 1 h, reducing the diagnostic time without increasing the cost. This modified method may contribute to future epidemiological studies in both hospitals and the field due to its rapid and precise diagnostic, which allow for immediate treatment. PMID:24402146

  2. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas A.; Bruce, Thomas J., Jr.; Hackman, Lloyd E.; Brasmer, Susan E.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Baeslack, William A., III

    1989-01-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  3. Rapid Cycling Synchrotron Option for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Weiren

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an 8 GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) option for Project X. It has several advantages over an 8 GeV SC linac. In particular, the cost could be lower. With a 2 GeV 10 mA pulsed linac as injector, the RCS would be able to deliver 4 MW beam power for a muon collider. If, instead, a 2 GeV 1 mA CW linac is used, the RCS would still be able to meet the Project X requirements but it would be difficult for it to serve a muon collider due to the very long injection time.

  4. The treatment of rapidly growing mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Kasperbauer, Shannon H; De Groote, Mary Ann

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) include a diverse group of species. We address the treatment of the most commonly isolated RGM-M abscessus complex, M fortuitum, and M chelonae. The M abscessus complex is composed of 3 closely related species: M abscessus senso stricto (hereafter M abscessus), M massiliense, and M bolletii. Most studies address treatment of M abscessus complex, which accounts for 80% of lung disease caused by RGM and is the second most common RGM to cause extrapulmonary disease (after M fortuitum). The M abscessus complex represent the most drug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria and are the most difficult to treat. PMID:25676520

  5. Plant MAPK cascades: Just rapid signaling modules?

    PubMed Central

    Boudsocq, Marie; Danquah, Agyemang; de Zélicourt, Axel; Hirt, Heribert; Colcombet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone mediating important stress-related processes. We recently unveiled an ABA-activated MAPK signaling module constituted of MAP3K17/18-MKK3-MPK1/2/7/14. Unlike classical rapid MAPK activation, we showed that the activation of the new MAPK module is delayed and relies on the MAP3K protein synthesis. In this addendum, we discuss the role of this original and unexpected activation mechanism of MAPK cascades which suggests that MAPKs can regulate both early and long-term plant stress responses. PMID:26313321

  6. Preliminary Component Integration Utilizing Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K.; Salvail, P.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most costly errors committed during the development of an element to be used in the space industry is the lack of communication between design and manufacturing engineers. A very important tool that should be utilized in the development stages by both design and manufacturing disciplines is rapid prototyping. Communication levels are intensified with the injection of functional models that are generated from a drawing. At the Marshall Space Flight Center, this discipline is utilized on a more frequent basis as a manner by which hardware may be tested for design and material compatibility.

  7. CFD Script for Rapid TPS Damage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This grid generation script creates unstructured CFD grids for rapid thermal protection system (TPS) damage aeroheating assessments. The existing manual solution is cumbersome, open to errors, and slow. The invention takes a large-scale geometry grid and its large-scale CFD solution, and creates a unstructured patch grid that models the TPS damage. The flow field boundary condition for the patch grid is then interpolated from the large-scale CFD solution. It speeds up the generation of CFD grids and solutions in the modeling of TPS damages and their aeroheating assessment. This process was successfully utilized during STS-134.

  8. Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  9. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.A.; Bruce, T.J. Jr.; Hackman, L.E.; Brasmer, S.E.; Dantzig, J.A.; Baeslack, W.A. III.

    1989-09-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  10. Deformation of rapidly rotating compact stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, J. C. N.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Cattani, M.; Horvath, J. E.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a numerical code to study the deformation (ɛ=(I_zz_-I_xx_)/I_zz_ where I_ii_ are the moments of inertia) of neutron stars in rapidly rotation in a fully general relativistic calculation. We have found that the deformation is larger, depending on the angular velocity, than is generally assumed for gravitational wave estimations. Calculations were performed by employing the Bethe-Johnson I EOS (equation of state) and a new set of models by the Frankfurt group including {LAMBDA} hyperons for several choices of their coupling constants to ordinary nucleons. Possible implications for gravitational wave searches are briefly discussed.

  11. Rapid Cellular Identification by Dynamic Electromechanical Response

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Reukov, Vladimir V; Vertegel, Alexey; Thompson, Gary L

    2009-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is ubiquitous in living systems. Here, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Principal component analysis of the dynamic electromechanical response spectra bundled with neural network based recognition provides a robust identification algorithm based on their electromechanical signature, and allows unambiguous differentiation of model Micrococcus Lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas Fluorescens system. This methodology provides a universal pathway for biological identification obviating the need for well-defined analytical models of Scanning Probe Microscopy response.

  12. Rapid multi-flexible-body maneuvering experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1988-01-01

    Progress at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of rapid multiple-flexible-body maneuvering experiments is described. The experiments are designed to verify theoretical analyses using control theory for the control of flexible structures. The objective of the maneuvering experiments is to demonstrate slewing of flexible structures in multiple axes while simultaneously suppressing vibration to have acceptable motion at the end of the maneuver. The status of some research activities oriented primarily to the experimental methods for control of flexible structures is presented.

  13. Power Supply Systems for Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Toshikazu; Someya, Hirohiko; Koseki, Shoichiro; Ogawa, Shinichi

    JAEA and KEK are jointly constructing a high intensity proton accelerator project J-PARC. Its main accelerator is 3GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). Two types of resonant excitation systems, parallel and cascade, are introduced to excite DC biased 25Hz AC currents through its main magnets. The parallel excitation is adopted for dipole magnets power supply system, and the cascade excitations are adopted for seven family quadrupole magnets systems. In this paper, two systems are investigated and analyzed, and it is explained why different types are adopted to each system. Authors believe that such hybrid exciting systems are most suitable for high power RCS.

  14. Rapid disturbances in Arctic permafrost regions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, G.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost thaw is often perceived as a slow process dominated by press disturbances such as gradual active layer thickening. However, various pulse disturbances such as thermokarst formation can substantially increase the rate of permafrost thaw and result in rapid landscape change on sub-decadal to decadal time scales. Other disturbances associated with permafrost thaw are even more dynamic and unfold on sub-annual timescales, such as catastrophic thermokarst lake drainage. The diversity of processes results in complex feedbacks with soil carbon pools, biogeochemical cycles, hydrology, and flora and fauna, and requires a differentiated approach when quantifying how these ecosystem componentsare affected,how vulnerablethey are to rapid change, and what regional to global scale impacts result. Here we show quantitative measurements for three examples of rapid pulse disturbances in permafrost regions as observed with remote sensing data time series: The formation of a mega thaw slump (>50 ha) in syngenetic permafrost in Siberia, the formation of new thermokarst ponds in ice-rich permafrost regions in Alaska and Siberia, and the drainage of thermokarst lakes along a gradient of permafrost extent in Western Alaska. The surprising setting and unabated growth of the mega thaw slump during the last 40 years indicates that limited information on panarctic ground ice distribution, abundance, and vulnerability remains a key gap for reliable projections of thermokarst and thermo-erosion impacts, and that the natural limits on the growth and size of thaw slumps are still poorly understood. Observed thermokarst pond formation and expansion in our study regions was closely tied to ice-rich permafrost terrain, such as syngenetic Yedoma uplands, but was also found in old drained thermokarst lake basins with epigenetic permafrost and shallow drained thermokarst lake basins whose ground ice had not been depleted by the prior lake phase. The very different substrates in which new

  15. Achievement of Bevalac rapid mode switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lothrop, F.; Stevenson, R.; Miller, R.; Alonso, J.

    1985-05-01

    Rapid changes of ion, intensity, beam line, and output energy between two modes have been achieved. The techniques for switching among the Bevalac's several injectors are described. Energy level limits at the output (for q/A = 1/2) are 470 to 2100 MeV/n (high power) or 50 to 1050 MeV/n (low power). Depending on specific field value differences, the total time required for a mode change is less than one minute. This mode of operation greatly improves program efficiency in interleaving medical and nuclear science programs at the Bevalac.

  16. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOEpatents

    Keicher, David M.; Atwood, Clinton L.; Greene, Donald L.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Harwell, Lane D.; Jeantette, Francisco P.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.; Schmale, David T.

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  17. Articulatory events are imitated under rapid shadowing

    PubMed Central

    Honorof, Douglas N.; Weihing, Jeffrey; Fowler, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that rapid shadowers imitate the articulatory gestures that structure acoustic speech signals—not just acoustic patterns in the signals themselves—overcoming highly practiced motor routines and phonological conditioning in the process. In a first experiment, acoustic evidence indicated that participants reproduced allophonic differences between American English /l/ types (light and dark) in the absence of the positional variation cues more typically present with lateral allophony. However, imitative effects were small. In a second experiment, varieties of /l/ with exaggerated light/dark differences were presented by ear. Acoustic measures indicated that all participants reproduced differences between /l/ types; larger average imitative effects obtained. Finally, we examined evidence for imitation in articulation. Participants ranged in behavior from one who did not imitate to another who reproduced distinctions among light laterals, dark laterals and /w/, but displayed a slight but inconsistent tendency toward enhancing imitation of lingual gestures through a slight lip protrusion. Overall, results indicated that most rapid shadowers need not substitute familiar allophones as they imitate reorganized gestural constellations even in the absence of explicit instruction to imitate, but that the extent of the imitation is small. Implications for theories of speech perception are discussed. PMID:23418398

  18. Frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, G.-W.; Douglass, K. O.; Maxwell, S. E.; van Zee, R. D.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Hodges, J. T.; Long, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    Challenging applications in trace gas measurements require low uncertainty and high acquisition rates. Many cavity-enhanced spectroscopies exhibit significant sensitivity and potential, but their scanning rates are limited by reliance on either mechanical or thermal frequency tuning. Here, we present frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy (FARS) in which a high-bandwidth electro-optic modulator steps a selected laser sideband to successive optical cavity modes. This approach involves no mechanical motion and allows for a scanning rate of 8 kHz per cavity mode, a rate that is limited only by the cavity response time itself. Unlike rapidly frequency-swept techniques, FARS does not reduce the measurement duty cycle, degrade the spectrum's frequency axis or require an unusual cavity configuration. FARS allows for a sensitivity of ~2 × 10-12 cm-1 Hz-1/2 and a tuning range exceeding 70 GHz. This technique shows promise for fast and sensitive trace gas measurements and studies of chemical kinetics.

  19. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  20. Rapid neural discrimination of communicative gestures.

    PubMed

    Redcay, Elizabeth; Carlson, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    Humans are biased toward social interaction. Behaviorally, this bias is evident in the rapid effects that self-relevant communicative signals have on attention and perceptual systems. The processing of communicative cues recruits a wide network of brain regions, including mentalizing systems. Relatively less work, however, has examined the timing of the processing of self-relevant communicative cues. In the present study, we used multivariate pattern analysis (decoding) approach to the analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the processing dynamics of social-communicative actions. Twenty-four participants viewed images of a woman performing actions that varied on a continuum of communicative factors including self-relevance (to the participant) and emotional valence, while their brain activity was recorded using MEG. Controlling for low-level visual factors, we found early discrimination of emotional valence (70 ms) and self-relevant communicative signals (100 ms). These data offer neural support for the robust and rapid effects of self-relevant communicative cues on behavior. PMID:24958087

  1. Rapid speciation and chromosomal evolution in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, G L; Case, S M; Wilson, A C; Patton, J L

    1977-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that population subdivision into small demes promotes both rapid speciation and evolutionary changes in gene arrangement by inbreeding and drift, we estimated rates of speciation and rates of chromosomal evolution in 225 genera of vertebrates. Rates of speciation were estimated by considering the number of living species in each genus and the fossil record of each genus as well as information about extinction rates. Speciation rate was strongly correlated with rate of chromosomal evolution and average rates of speciation in lower vertebrate genera were one-fifth those in mammalian genera. Genera with high karyotypic diversity and rapid speciation rates may generally have small effective population size (Ne), whereas large Ne values may be associated with karyotypically uniform genera and slow rates of speciation. Speciation and chromosomal evolution seem fastest in those genera with species organized into clans or harems (e.g., some primates and horses) or with limited adult vagility and juvenile dispersal, patchy distribution, and strong individual territoriality (e.g., some rodents). This is consistent with the above hypothesis regarding the evolutionary importance of demes. PMID:269445

  2. Rapid animal welfare assessment: an archaeological approach.

    PubMed

    Schork, Ivana Gabriela; Young, Robert John

    2014-09-01

    The welfare of an individual depends on its capacity to overcome suboptimal conditions in its environment; otherwise, its physical and psychological health becomes compromised. A situation that clearly indicates lack of control of the environment is the expression of abnormal behaviours, such as stereotypies. This study aimed to verify the well-being of police horses using a new rapid form of welfare assessment: an archaeological approach. To this end, we sampled and quantified marks found on the stables, deposited as a result of abnormal behaviour. We cross-referenced these physical marks with veterinary records of diseases, such as colic, known to be associated with stress. A total of 46 horses were sampled and the results showed a significant medium-strength, positive correlation between bite mark frequency on stable doors and the incidence of colic. A weak significant positive correlation was found between length of scratch marks (from pawing) and the incidence of lameness. We conclude that these marks reflect the accumulated expression of abnormal behaviour and can provide rapid insight into the welfare of individual animals. PMID:25209197

  3. Rapid animal welfare assessment: an archaeological approach

    PubMed Central

    Schork, Ivana Gabriela; Young, Robert John

    2014-01-01

    The welfare of an individual depends on its capacity to overcome suboptimal conditions in its environment; otherwise, its physical and psychological health becomes compromised. A situation that clearly indicates lack of control of the environment is the expression of abnormal behaviours, such as stereotypies. This study aimed to verify the well-being of police horses using a new rapid form of welfare assessment: an archaeological approach. To this end, we sampled and quantified marks found on the stables, deposited as a result of abnormal behaviour. We cross-referenced these physical marks with veterinary records of diseases, such as colic, known to be associated with stress. A total of 46 horses were sampled and the results showed a significant medium-strength, positive correlation between bite mark frequency on stable doors and the incidence of colic. A weak significant positive correlation was found between length of scratch marks (from pawing) and the incidence of lameness. We conclude that these marks reflect the accumulated expression of abnormal behaviour and can provide rapid insight into the welfare of individual animals. PMID:25209197

  4. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants. PMID:18593217

  5. Rapid Glass Refiner Development Program, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    A rapid glass refiner (RGR) technology which could be applied to both conventional and advanced class melting systems would significantly enhance the productivity and the competitiveness of the glass industry in the United States. Therefore, Vortec Corporation, with the support of the US Department of Energy (US DOE) under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-90ID12911, conducted a research and development program for a unique and innovative approach to rapid glass refining. To provide focus for this research effort, container glass was the primary target from among the principal glass types based on its market size and potential for significant energy savings. Container glass products represent the largest segment of the total glass industry accounting for 60% of the tonnage produced and over 40% of the annual energy consumption of 232 trillion Btu/yr. Projections of energy consumption and the market penetration of advanced melting and fining into the container glass industry yield a potential energy savings of 7.9 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020.

  6. Rapid Rebuilding of the Outer Radiation Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A.; Fok, M.-C.; Nagai, T.; Toth, G.; Guild, T.; Bkake, J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations by the radiation monitor (RDM) on the spacecraft Akebono have shown several cases of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. Similar enhancements are also seen in detectors on board the NOAA/POES and TWINS 1 satellites. These intervals are shorter than typical radial diffusion or wave-particle interactions can account for. We choose two so-called "rapid rebuilding" events that occur during high speed streams (4 September 2008 and 22 July 2009) and simulated them with the Space Weather Modeling Framework configured with global magnetosphere, radiation belt, ring current, and ionosphere electrodynamics model. Our simulations produce a weaker and delayed dipolarization as compared to observations, but the associated inductive electric field in the simulations is still strong enough to rapidly transport and accelerate MeV electrons resulting in an energetic electron flux enhancement that is somewhat weaker than is observed. Nevertheless, the calculated flux enhancement and dipolarization is found to be qualitatively consistent with the observations. Taken together, the modeling results and observations support the conclusion that storm-time dipolarization events in the magnetospheric magnetic field result in strong radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons.

  7. Rapid carbon cycling in the oligotrophic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, C. M.; Agustí, S.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamics of organic carbon production, release and bacterial use was examined across a range of communities spanning from highly oligotrophic ones in the Subtropical Atlantic Ocean, mesotrophic ones in the Mediterranean Sea and productive ones in the Northern African upwelling and the Southern Ocean. A comparative analysis of experiments examining total and particulate organic carbon production across a range of time scales (15 min to 24 h) for 20 communities with contrasting phytoplankton cell status, as assessed by cell lysis rates, and the use of a simple inverse model was used to resolve patterns of carbon flow in the microbial food web. Communities in productive ocean waters accumulated organic carbon over hourly time scales, whereas only a small fraction of net primary production accumulated in communities from oligotrophic waters. These communities supported high phytoplankton cell lysis rates leading to a rapid flux of organic carbon to bacteria, which had high affinity for phytoplankton-derived carbon, much of which was rapidly respired. Conventional assessments of primary production in the oligotrophic ocean severely underestimate net phytoplankton production, as carbon flow in microbial communities from oligotrophic ocean waters occurs within short (minutes) time scales. This explains difficulties to reconcile estimates of primary production with independent estimates of carbon use by bacteria in oligotrophic marine ecosystems.

  8. Rapid evolution of quantitative traits: theoretical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Michael; Matuszewski, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate phenotypic and genetic changes in natural populations that are subject to climate change, and there is hope that some of these changes will contribute to avoiding species extinctions (‘evolutionary rescue’). Here, we review theoretical models of rapid evolution in quantitative traits that can shed light on the potential for adaptation to a changing climate. Our focus is on quantitative-genetic models with selection for a moving phenotypic optimum. We point out that there is no one-to-one relationship between the rate of adaptation and population survival, because the former depends on relative fitness and the latter on absolute fitness. Nevertheless, previous estimates that sustainable rates of genetically based change usually do not exceed 0.1 haldanes (i.e., phenotypic standard deviations per generation) are probably correct. Survival can be greatly facilitated by phenotypic plasticity, and heritable variation in plasticity can further speed up genetic evolution. Multivariate selection and genetic correlations are frequently assumed to constrain adaptation, but this is not necessarily the case and depends on the geometric relationship between the fitness landscape and the structure of genetic variation. Similar conclusions hold for adaptation to shifting spatial gradients. Recent models of adaptation in multispecies communities indicate that the potential for rapid evolution is strongly influenced by interspecific competition. PMID:24454555

  9. Rapid-melt Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Janssen, G.; Leggett, J.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has re-emerged as a means to ameliorate the inherent problem of low sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here, we present a novel approach to DNP enhanced liquid-state NMR based on rapid melting of a solid hyperpolarized sample followed by 'in situ' NMR detection. This method is applicable to small (10 nl to 1 μl) sized samples in a microfluidic setup. The method combines generic DNP enhancement in the solid state with the high sensitivity of stripline 1 H NMR detection in the liquid state. Fast cycling facilitates options for signal averaging or 2D structural analysis. Preliminary tests show solid-state 1 H enhancement factors of up to 500 for H2O/D2O/d6-glycerol samples doped with TEMPOL radicals. Fast paramagnetic relaxation with nitroxide radicals, In nonpolar solvents such as toluene, we find proton enhancement factors up to 400 with negligible relaxation losses in the liquid state, using commercially available BDPA radicals. A total recycling delay (including sample freezing, DNP polarization and melting) of about 5 s can be used. The present setup allows for a fast determination of the hyper-polarization as function of the microwave frequency and power. Even at the relatively low field of 3.4 T, the method of rapid melting DNP can facilitate the detection of small quantities of molecules in the picomole regime.

  10. BLOOD TRIGGERED RAPID RELEASE POROUS NANOCAPSULES

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Tiffany P.; Dergunov, Sergey A.; Akers, Walter J.; Cao, Qian; Magalotti, Selena; Achilefu, Samuel; Pinkhassik, Eugene; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid-release drug delivery systems present a new paradigm in emergency care treatments. Such systems combine a long shelf life with the ability to provide a significant dose of the drug to the bloodstream in the shortest period of time. Until now, development of delivery formulations has concentrated on slow release systems to ensure a steady concentration of the drug. To address the need for quick release system, we created hollow polyacrylate nanocapsules with nanometer-thin porous walls. Burst release occurs upon interaction with blood components that leads to escape of the cargo. The likely mechanism of release involves a conformational change of the polymer shell caused by binding albumin. To demonstrate this concept, a near-infrared fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) was incorporated inside the nanocapsules. ICG-loaded nanocapsules demonstrated remarkable shelf life in aqueous buffers with no release of ICG for twelve months. Rapid release of the dye was demonstrated first in vitro using albumin solution and serum. SEM and light scattering analysis demonstrated the retention of the nanocapsule architecture after the release of the dye upon contact with albumin. In vivo studies using fluorescence lifetime imaging confirmed quick discharge of ICG from the nanocapsules following intravenous injection. PMID:23606942

  11. Rapid identification of microorganisms by intrinsic fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hemant; Goldys, Ewa M.; Learmonth, Robert

    2005-03-01

    Microbial contamination has serious consequences for the industries that use fermentation processes. Common contaminants such as faster growing lactic acid bacteria or wild yeast can rapidly outnumber inoculated culture yeast and produce undesirable end products. Our study focuses on a rapid method of identification of such contaminants based on autofluorescence spectroscopy of bacterial and yeast species. Lactic acid bacteria (Lac-tobacillus casei), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were cultured under controlled conditions and studied for variations in their autofluorescence. We observed spectral differences in the spectral range representative of tryptophan residues of proteins, with excitation at 290 nm and emission scanned in the 300 nm - 440 nm range. Excitation scans between 240 nm and 310 nm were also performed for the emission at 340 nm. Moreover, we observed clearly pronounced differences in the excitation and emission in the visible range, with 410 nm excitation. These results demonstrate that bacterial and yeast species can be differentiated using their intrinsic fluorescence both in UV and in the visible region. The comparative spectroscopic study of selected strains of Saccharomyces yeast showed clear differences between strains. Spectrally-resolved laser scanning microscopy was carried out to link the results obtained using ensembles of cells with spectral properties of individual cells. Strongly fluorescent subpopulation were observed for all yeast strains with excitation at 405 nm. The fluorescence spectra showed variations correlated with cell brightness. The presented results demonstrate that using autofluorescence, it is possible to differentiate between yeast and lactic acid bacteria and between different yeast species.

  12. Rapid transport of polyacrylates in dextran matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sasaki, S.

    1993-12-31

    The authors have observed the rapid transport of polyacrylate(PA) in the matrix of dextran. (1) In the salt-free media, the transport of PA depended on the kind of its couterions. The rates were in the following order: tetramethylammonium > Li+ > tetrabutylammonium > Na+ > NH{sub 4}+ > Cs+. (2) The transport rate of PAA in buffer solutions of about 30mM ionic strength increased with the degree of ionization {alpha} but remained constant in the range of {alpha} greater than about 0.4. The effect of the counterion condensation on the transport rate was thus clearly demonstrated. (3) The transport rate of NaPA was nearly identical in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl and no added salt. It decreased to less than half in 0.2 M NaCl and in 0.5 M NaCl no rapid transport was observed any more and ordinary diffusion behavior was observed instead.

  13. Ultra-Rapid Vision in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Jannika E.; Dimitrova, Marina; Canton, Cindy; Håstad, Olle; Qvarnström, Anna; Ödeen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Flying animals need to accurately detect, identify and track fast-moving objects and these behavioral requirements are likely to strongly select for abilities to resolve visual detail in time. However, evidence of highly elevated temporal acuity relative to non-flying animals has so far been confined to insects while it has been missing in birds. With behavioral experiments on three wild passerine species, blue tits, collared and pied flycatchers, we demonstrate temporal acuities of vision far exceeding predictions based on the sizes and metabolic rates of these birds. This implies a history of strong natural selection on temporal resolution. These birds can resolve alternating light-dark cycles at up to 145 Hz (average: 129, 127 and 137, respectively), which is ca. 50 Hz over the highest frequency shown in any other vertebrate. We argue that rapid vision should confer a selective advantage in many bird species that are ecologically similar to the three species examined in our study. Thus, rapid vision may be a more typical avian trait than the famously sharp vision found in birds of prey. PMID:26990087

  14. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS.

    PubMed

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  15. Forward jets and large rapidity gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Hadronic jets are extremely abundant at the LHC, and testing QCD in various corners of phase-space is important to understand backgrounds and some specific signatures of new physics. In this article, various measurements aiming at probing QCD in configurations where the theory modelling becomes challenging are presented. Azimuthal angle de-correlations are sensitive to hard as well as soft QCD emission, and in most of the events jets are produced in a back-to-back configuration. Events where jets have a large rapidity separation are also rare, and those without additional radiation between the jets are exponentially suppressed. The modelling of radiation between very forward and backward jets is complicated, and may require theoretical tools different with respect to those normally used for central, high-pT events. Observables can be constructed that are sensitive to all these effects, such as the study of azimuthal angle de-correlations in events where the two leading jets have large rapidity separations. The two general-purpose detectors of the LHC have measured these observables, and for some of them interesting deviations with respect to the most commonly used theoretical models are observed.

  16. Rapid roll inflation with conformal coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, Lev; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2008-02-01

    Usual inflation is realized with a slow rolling scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. In contrast, we consider dynamics of a scalar with a flat effective potential, conformally coupled to gravity. Surprisingly, it contains an attractor inflationary solution with the rapidly rolling inflaton field. We discuss models with the conformal inflaton with a flat potential (including hybrid inflation). There is no generation of cosmological fluctuations from the conformally coupled inflaton. We consider realizations of modulated (inhomogeneous reheating) or curvaton cosmological fluctuations in these models. We also implement these unusual features for the popular string-theoretic warped inflationary scenario, based on the interacting D3-D¯3 branes. The original warped brane inflation suffers a large inflaton mass due to conformal coupling to 4-dimensional gravity. Instead of considering this as a problem and trying to cure it with extra engineering, we show that warped inflation with the conformally coupled, rapidly rolling inflaton is yet possible with N=37 efoldings, which requires low-energy scales 1 100 TeV of inflation. Coincidentally, the same warping numerology can be responsible for the hierarchy. It is shown that the scalars associated with angular isometries of the warped geometry of compact manifold (e.g. S3 of Klebanov-Strassler (KS) geometry) have solutions identical to conformally coupled modes and also cannot be responsible for cosmological fluctuations. We discuss other possibilities.

  17. Rapid roll inflation with conformal coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kofman, Lev; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2008-02-15

    Usual inflation is realized with a slow rolling scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. In contrast, we consider dynamics of a scalar with a flat effective potential, conformally coupled to gravity. Surprisingly, it contains an attractor inflationary solution with the rapidly rolling inflaton field. We discuss models with the conformal inflaton with a flat potential (including hybrid inflation). There is no generation of cosmological fluctuations from the conformally coupled inflaton. We consider realizations of modulated (inhomogeneous reheating) or curvaton cosmological fluctuations in these models. We also implement these unusual features for the popular string-theoretic warped inflationary scenario, based on the interacting D3-D3 branes. The original warped brane inflation suffers a large inflaton mass due to conformal coupling to 4-dimensional gravity. Instead of considering this as a problem and trying to cure it with extra engineering, we show that warped inflation with the conformally coupled, rapidly rolling inflaton is yet possible with N=37 efoldings, which requires low-energy scales 1-100 TeV of inflation. Coincidentally, the same warping numerology can be responsible for the hierarchy. It is shown that the scalars associated with angular isometries of the warped geometry of compact manifold (e.g. S{sup 3} of Klebanov-Strassler (KS) geometry) have solutions identical to conformally coupled modes and also cannot be responsible for cosmological fluctuations. We discuss other possibilities.

  18. Rapid Quantitative Pharmacodynamic Imaging with Bayesian Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Jonathan M.; Vachon, M. Jonathan; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We recently described rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging, a novel method for estimating sensitivity of a biological system to a drug. We tested its accuracy in simulated biological signals with varying receptor sensitivity and varying levels of random noise, and presented initial proof-of-concept data from functional MRI (fMRI) studies in primate brain. However, the initial simulation testing used a simple iterative approach to estimate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) parameters, an approach that was computationally efficient but returned parameters only from a small, discrete set of values chosen a priori. Here we revisit the simulation testing using a Bayesian method to estimate the PKPD parameters. This improved accuracy compared to our previous method, and noise without intentional signal was never interpreted as signal. We also reanalyze the fMRI proof-of-concept data. The success with the simulated data, and with the limited fMRI data, is a necessary first step toward further testing of rapid quantitative pharmacodynamic imaging. PMID:27092045

  19. Rapid weight loss decreases serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Karila, T A M; Sarkkinen, P; Marttinen, M; Seppälä, T; Mero, A; Tallroth, K

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a rapid weight reduction program under authentic pre-competition conditions, eighteen elite wrestlers were studied with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after two to three weeks' weight reduction regimens. In order to establish the degree of dehydration and hormonal status, blood samples were collected to obtain blood chemistry, electrolytes and endocrinological parameters after both DXA measurements. The mean weight loss was 8.2 +/- 2.3 % and it was constituted by the mean reductions of fat mass of 16 +/- 6.9 % (p < or = 0.001) and lean body mass of 7.9 +/- 2.5 %. The rapid weight reduction caused significant dehydration which was noticed as increased blood hemoglobin (7.8 +/- 5.9 %, p < or = 0.001), hematocrit (11.3 +/- 6.8 %, p < or = 0.001), and serum creatinine (35 +/- 23 %, p < or = 0.001). There was a significant decrease in serum testosterone (63 +/- 33 %, p < or = 0.001) and luteinizing hormone (54 +/- 47 %, p < or = 0.001) concentrations. A reduced body weight correlated with decreased serum testosterone concentration (r = 0.53, p < or = 0.024). Serum sex hormone binding globulin concentration increased significantly (40 +/- 21 %, p < or = 0.001). The results suggest that even short-term weight reduction may have marked effects on body composition, blood chemistry and hormonal parameters. It may constitute a possible health risk at least in a growing adolescent athlete. PMID:18516767

  20. Rapid-melt Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Janssen, G; Leggett, J; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has re-emerged as a means to ameliorate the inherent problem of low sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here, we present a novel approach to DNP enhanced liquid-state NMR based on rapid melting of a solid hyperpolarized sample followed by 'in situ' NMR detection. This method is applicable to small (10nl to 1μl) sized samples in a microfluidic setup. The method combines generic DNP enhancement in the solid state with the high sensitivity of stripline (1)H NMR detection in the liquid state. Fast cycling facilitates options for signal averaging or 2D structural analysis. Preliminary tests show solid-state (1)H enhancement factors of up to 500 for H2O/D2O/d6-glycerol samples doped with TEMPOL radicals. Fast paramagnetic relaxation with nitroxide radicals, In nonpolar solvents such as toluene, we find proton enhancement factors up to 400 with negligible relaxation losses in the liquid state, using commercially available BDPA radicals. A total recycling delay (including sample freezing, DNP polarization and melting) of about 5s can be used. The present setup allows for a fast determination of the hyper-polarization as function of the microwave frequency and power. Even at the relatively low field of 3.4T, the method of rapid melting DNP can facilitate the detection of small quantities of molecules in the picomole regime. PMID:26225439

  1. Ada and the rapid development lifecycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deforrest, Lloyd; Gref, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    JPL is under contract, through NASA, with the US Army to develop a state-of-the-art Command Center System for the US European Command (USEUCOM). The Command Center System will receive, process, and integrate force status information from various sources and provide this integrated information to staff officers and decision makers in a format designed to enhance user comprehension and utility. The system is based on distributed workstation class microcomputers, VAX- and SUN-based data servers, and interfaces to existing military mainframe systems and communication networks. JPL is developing the Command Center System utilizing an incremental delivery methodology called the Rapid Development Methodology with adherence to government and industry standards including the UNIX operating system, X Windows, OSF/Motif, and the Ada programming language. Through a combination of software engineering techniques specific to the Ada programming language and the Rapid Development Approach, JPL was able to deliver capability to the military user incrementally, with comparable quality and improved economies of projects developed under more traditional software intensive system implementation methodologies.

  2. Rapid detection of bacteria in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deininger, Rolf A.; Lee, Ji Y.

    2002-06-01

    A rapid detection of bacteria in water is essential for a timely response. This applies primarily to drinking water, be it bottled water or water from a public supply system, but is equally important for the analysis of water from swimming pools and beaches, and ballast water from oceangoing ships discharging into coastal or inland waters of the US. There are several methods available today for a rapid test including PCR based methods, flow cytometry, and electro chemiluminescence, to name a few. All of the above methods work, but are complicated and/or require expensive equipment and highly trained analysts in a laboratory. The method described here is based on lysing the bacteria after capture on a membrane filter, and measuring the ATP in a luminometer after the addition of luciferin/luciferase. This bioluminescence test can be done onsite, in less than 5 minutes, with equipment that fits onto a clipboard. It is a fast screening test that indicates if there is enough biologically active material in the same to pose a threat to the consumer. If this is the case, an additional step using immunomagnetic separation may be used to identify the responsible organisms. Tests have been done with E. coli 0157:H7, pseudomonas, and logionella. These tests take about 30 minutes each, and allow a quick determination of bacterial threats in a field situation.

  3. Rapids configuration and flow dynamics at Warm Springs Rapid on the Yampa River, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, L.A.; Wohl, E.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Debris flows from the mouths of tributaries form the majority of the rapids in the Green and Colorado River systems. On June 10, 1965, a large debris flow dammed the Yampa River at Warm Springs Draw in Dinosaur National Monument, depositing nearly 10,000 metric tons of gravel and boulders in the river channel and forming Warm Springs Rapid. The Yampa River is the only river in the Colorado River system that is unregulated, and thus provides one of the few opportunities to study a canyon system under natural flow conditions. Kieffer (1985) has proposed that the configuration of a debris fan-rapid represents the interactions between the sediment characteristics (grain size, cementation) of the debris flow, the hydraulic conditions within the construction (roughness, velocities, channel dimensions), and the discharge history of the river since its modification. Warm Springs Rapid currently exhibits a constriction width to upstream channel width ratio of 0.59. Discharges on the Yampa River for June of 1965 averaged 420 m[sup 3]/sec. Estimates of the mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) through the initial channel constriction show that critical threshold velocities for sediment transport were reached for the range of boulder sizes contained in the debris fan (intermediate axis = 20--200 cm). However, the width and configuration of the present channel constriction could not have been formed by these flows. A discharge of 940 m[sup 3]/sec was recorded on the Yampa River on May 18, 1984. Mean flow velocities (10--20 m/sec) associated with a discharge of this magnitude may have been competent to erode the channel into its present configuration. Step-backwater modeling will be used to simulate the modification of Warm Springs Rapid through time and to quantify the exact relationship between the morphologic and hydraulic conditions in the evolution of a debris fan-rapid.

  4. Autonomous, rapid classifiers for hyperspectral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M. S.; Bornstein, B.; Castano, R.; Greenwood, J.

    2006-05-01

    Hyperspectral systems collect huge volumes of multidimensional data that require time consuming, expert analysis. The data analysis costs of global datasets restrict rapid classification to only a subset of an entire mission dataset, reducing mission science return. Data downlink restrictions from planetary missions also highlight the need for robust mineral detection algorithms. For example, both OMEGA and CRISM will map only approximately 5% of the Mars surface at full spatial and spectral resolution. While some targets are preselected for full resolution study, other high priority targets on Mars will be selected in response to observations made by the instruments in a multispectral survey mode. The challenge is to create mineral detection algorithms that can be utilized to analyze any and all image cubes (x, y, λ) for a selected system to help ensure that priority targets are not overlooked in these datasets. This goal is critical both for onboard, real time processing to direct target acquisition and for the mining of returned data. While an ultimate goal would be to accurately classify the composition of every pixel on a planet's surface, this is made difficult by the fact that most pixels are complex mixtures of n materials, which may or may not be represented in library (training) data. We instead focus on the identification of specific important mineral compositions within pixels in the data. For Mars, high priority targets include minerals associated with the presence of water. We have developed highly accurate artificial neural network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) based detectors capable of identifying calcite (CaCO3) and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) in the visible/NIR (350 to 2500 nm) spectra of both laboratory specimens and rocks in Mars analogue field environments. The detectors are trained using a generative model to create 1000s of linear mixtures of library end-member spectra in geologically realistic percentages. Here we will discuss

  5. Rapid Detection of the Varicella Zoster Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michelle P.; Harding, Robert

    2011-01-01

    1.Technology Description-Researchers discovered that when the Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) reactivates from latency in the body, the virus is consistently present in saliva before the appearance of skin lesions. A small saliva sample is mixed with a specialized reagent in a test kit. If the virus is present in the saliva sample, the mixture turns a red color. The sensitivity and specificity emanates from an antibody-antigen reaction. This technology is a rapid, non-invasive, point of-of-care testing kit for detecting the virus from a saliva sample. The device is easy to use and can be used in clinics and in remote locations to quickly detect VZV and begin treatment with antiviral drugs. 2.Market Opportunity- RST Bioscience will be the first and only company to market a rapid, same day test kit for the detection of VZV in saliva. The RST detection test kit will have several advantages over existing, competitive technology. The test kit is self contained and laboratory equipment is not required for analysis of the sample. Only a single saliva sample is required to be taken instead of blood or cerebral spinal fluid. The test kit is portable, sterile and disposable after use. RST detection test kits require no electrical power or expensive storage equipment and can be used in remote locations. 3.Market Analysis- According to the CDC, it is estimated that 1 million cases of shingles occur each year in the U.S. with more than half over the age of sixty. There is a high demand for rapid diagnostics by the public. The point-of-care testing (POCT) market is growing faster than other segments of in vitro diagnostics. According to a July 2007 InteLab Corporation industry report the overall market for POCT was forecast to increase from $10.3 billion in 2005 to $18.7 billion by 2011. The market value of this test kit has not been determined. 4.Competition- The VZV vaccine prevents 50% of cases and reduces neuralgia by 66%. The most popular test detects VZV-specific IgM antibody

  6. RAPID DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN SEAWATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-01-16

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes in seawater samples for measurement. The new SRNL method employs a novel and effective pre-concentration step that utilizes a blend of calcium phosphate with iron hydroxide to collect both strontium and yttrium rapidly from the seawater matrix with enhanced chemical yields. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with rapid Sr Resin and DGA Resin cartridge separation options using vacuum box technology, allow seawater samples up to 10 liters to be analyzed. The total {sup 89}Sr + {sup 90}Sr activity may be determined by gas flow proportional counting and recounted after ingrowth of {sup 90}Y to differentiate {sup 89}Sr from {sup 90}Sr. Gas flow proportional counting provides a lower method detection limit than liquid scintillation or Cerenkov counting and allows simultaneous counting of samples. Simultaneous counting allows for longer count times and lower method detection limits without handling very large aliquots of seawater. Seawater samples up to 6 liters may be analyzed using Sr Resin for {sup 89}Sr and {sup 90}Sr with a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of 1-10 mBq/L, depending on count times. Seawater samples up to 10 liters may be analyzed for {sup 90}Sr using a DGA Resin method via collection and purification of {sup 90}Y only. If {sup 89}Sr and other fission products are present, then {sup 91}Y (beta energy 1.55 MeV, 58.5 day half-life) is also likely to be present. {sup 91}Y interferes with attempts to collect {sup 90}Y directly from the seawater sample without initial purification of Sr isotopes first and {sup 90}Y ingrowth. The DGA Resin option can be used to determine {sup 90}Sr, and if {sup 91}Y is also present, an ingrowth option with using DGA Resin again to collect {sup 90}Y can be performed. An MDA for {sup 90}Sr of <1 m

  7. 10. Shaker Rapid Transit Tracks on Cleveland city streets, East ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Shaker Rapid Transit Tracks on Cleveland city streets, East Side, prior to opening of sub-grade tracks into Terminal Tower project, 1927. - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. Rapid induction of false memory for pictures.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yana; Shanks, David R

    2010-07-01

    Recognition of pictures is typically extremely accurate, and it is thus unclear whether the reconstructive nature of memory can yield substantial false recognition of highly individuated stimuli. A procedure for the rapid induction of false memories for distinctive colour photographs is proposed. Participants studied a set of object pictures followed by a list of words naming those objects, but embedded in the list were names of unseen objects. When subsequently shown full colour pictures of these unseen objects, participants consistently claimed that they had seen them, while discriminating with high accuracy between studied pictures and new pictures whose names did not appear in the misleading word list. These false memories can be reported with high confidence as well as the feeling of recollection. This new procedure allows the investigation of factors that influence false memory reports with ecologically valid stimuli and of the similarities and differences between true and false memories. PMID:20623419

  9. Rapid response team for behavioral emergencies.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Jeannine; Rutledge, Dana N; Hatch, Beverly; Morrison, Victoria

    2010-03-01

    Behaviors of patients with psychiatric illness who are hospitalized on nonbehavioral health units can be difficult to address by staff members. Instituting a rapid response team to proactively de-escalate potential volatile situations on nonpsychiatric units in a hospital allows earlier treatment of behavioral issues with these patients. The behavioral emergency response team (BERT) consists of staff members (registered nurses, social workers) from behavioral health services who have experience in caring for patients with acute psychiatric disorders as well as competence in management of assaultive behavior. BERT services were trialed on a medical pulmonary unit; gradual housewide implementation occurred over 2 years. Tools developed for BERT include an activation algorithm, educational cue cards for staff, and a staff survey. Results of a performance improvement survey reveal that staff nurses have had positive experiences with BERT but that many nurses are still not comfortable caring for psychiatric patients on their units. PMID:21659266

  10. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  11. Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    A new study using results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provides one of the best pieces of evidence yet that many supermassive black holes are spinning extremely rapidly. The whirling of these giant black holes drives powerful jets that pump huge amounts of energy into their environment and affects galaxy growth. A team of scientists compared leading theories of jets produced by rotating supermassive black holes with Chandra data. A sampling of nine giant galaxies that exhibit large disturbances in their gaseous atmospheres showed that the central black holes in these galaxies must be spinning at near their maximum rates. People Who Read This Also Read... NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself "We think these monster black holes are spinning close to the limit set by Einstein's theory of relativity, which means that they can drag material around them at close to the speed of light," said Rodrigo Nemmen, a visiting graduate student at Penn State University, and lead author of a paper on the new results presented at American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas. The research reinforces other, less direct methods previously used which have indicated that some stellar and supermassive black holes are spinning rapidly. According to Einstein's theory, a rapidly spinning black hole makes space itself rotate. This effect, coupled with gas spiraling toward the black hole, can produce a rotating, tightly wound vertical tower of magnetic field that flings a large fraction of the inflowing gas away from the vicinity of the black hole in an energetic, high-speed jet. Computer simulations by other authors have suggested that black holes may acquire their rapid spins when galaxies merge, and through the accretion of gas from their surroundings. "Extremely fast spin might be very common for large

  12. Rapid nanopore discrimination between single polynucleotide molecules

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Amit; Nivon, Lucas; Brandin, Eric; Golovchenko, Jene; Branton, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A variety of different DNA polymers were electrophoretically driven through the nanopore of an α-hemolysin channel in a lipid bilayer. Single-channel recording of the translocation duration and current flow during traversal of individual polynucleotides yielded a unique pattern of events for each of the several polymers tested. Statistical data derived from this pattern of events demonstrate that in several cases a nanopore can distinguish between polynucleotides of similar length and composition that differ only in sequence. Studies of temperature effects on the translocation process show that translocation duration scales as ∼T−2. A strong correlation exists between the temperature dependence of the event characteristics and the tendency of some polymers to form secondary structure. Because nanopores can rapidly discriminate and characterize unlabeled DNA molecules at low copy number, refinements of the experimental approach demonstrated here could eventually provide a low-cost high-throughput method of analyzing DNA polynucleotides. PMID:10655487

  13. Plant fitness in a rapidly changing world.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jill T

    2016-04-01

    81 I. 81 II. 82 III. 84 IV. 84 V. 85 85 References 85 SUMMARY: Modern reliance on fossil fuels has ushered in extreme temperatures globally and abnormal precipitation patterns in many regions. Although the climate is changing rapidly, other agents of natural selection such as photoperiod remain constant. This decoupling of previously reliable environmental cues shifts adaptive landscapes, favors novel suites of traits and likely increases the extinction risk of local populations. Here, I examine the fitness consequences of changing climates. Meta-analyses demonstrate that simulated future climates depress viability and fecundity components of fitness for native plant species in the short term, which could reduce population growth rates. Contracting populations that cannot adapt or adjust plastically to new climates might not be capable of producing sufficient migrants to track changing conditions. PMID:26445400

  14. Robot Engine: rapid product development path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Buelent

    1993-05-01

    Using the Robot Engine framework Denning has developed four new products in four distinctly different markets in less than three years. The Robot Engine concept reduced development time by more than half and assured a better chance of success in developing these new products. Similar to the personal computer industry, the mobile robotic industry has the potential to make it possible for a number of independent payload developers to design and sell useful devices compatible with the navigation system by utilizing the Robot Engine concept. This paper will review the basic modular mechanical, hardware, and software components, and the basic integration challenges for rapid prototyping of robotic products. Human interface, vehicle control, navigation, and sensory data fusion/arbitration will be discussed within this framework.

  15. Rapid Column Extraction Methods for Urine

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III

    2000-06-09

    A new fecal analysis method that dissolves plutonium oxide was developed at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site. Diphonix Resin (Eichrom Industries), is used to pre-concentrate the actinides from digested fecal samples. A rapid microwave digestion technique is used to remove the actinides from the Diphonix Resin, which effectively extracts plutonium and americium from acidic solutions containing hydrofluoric acid. After resin digestion, the plutonium and americium are recovered in a small volume of nitric acid that is loaded onto small extraction chromatography columns, TEVA Resin and TRU Resin (Eichrom Industries). The method enables complete dissolution of plutonium oxide and provides high recovery of plutonium and americium with good removal of thorium isotopes such as thorium-228.

  16. USDC based rapid penetrator of packed soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea

    2006-01-01

    Environment protection requires more testing and analysis tools. To detect buried chemical containers or other objects embedded in soil and avoid possible damages of them, a penetrator of packed soil operated using low pushing force was developed. The design was based on a novel driving mechanism of the ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer (USDC) device developed in the NDEAA lab at JPL [Bar-Cohen et al 2001, Bao et al 2003]. In the penetrator, a small free-flying mass is energized by a piezoelectric transducer and impacts a rod probe on its shoulder at frequencies of hundreds times per second. The impacts help the probe to penetrate the packed soil rapidly. A great reduction of the needed pushing force for penetration was achieved. The details of the design of the prototype penetrator and the results of performance tests are presented.

  17. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  18. Negative Priming Under Rapid Serial Visual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Fai Ellick

    2012-01-01

    Negative priming (NP) was examined under a new paradigm wherein a target and distractors were temporally separated using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). The results from the two experiments revealed that (a) NP was robust under RSVP, such that the responses to a target were slower when the target served as a distractor in a previous trial than when it did not; (b) NP was found regardless of whether the distractors appeared before or after the targets; and (c) NP was stronger when the distractor was more distinctive. These findings are generally similar to those on NP in the spatial search task. The implications for the processes causing NP under RSVP are discussed in the current paper. PMID:22629351

  19. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  20. Rapid control of phase growth by nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian-Yi; Xu, Jia-Quan; Choi, Hongseok; Konishi, Hiromi; Jin, Song; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Effective control of phase growth under harsh conditions (such as high temperature, highly conductive liquids or high growth rate), where surfactants are unstable or ineffective, is still a long-standing challenge. Here we show a general approach for rapid control of diffusional growth through nanoparticle self-assembly on the fast-growing phase during cooling. After phase nucleation, the nanoparticles spontaneously assemble, within a few milliseconds, as a thin coating on the growing phase to block/limit diffusion, resulting in a uniformly dispersed phase orders of magnitude smaller than samples without nanoparticles. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in both inorganic (immiscible alloy and eutectic alloy) and organic materials. Our approach overcomes the microstructure refinement limit set by the fast phase growth during cooling and breaks the inherent limitations of surfactants for growth control. Considering the growing availability of numerous types and sizes of nanoparticles, the nanoparticle-enabled growth control will find broad applications. PMID:24809454

  1. Rapid DNA Idetification by Dielectrophoresis of Nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Zachary; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Gordon, Jason; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2008-03-01

    Due to their size and number, dispersed oligo-functionalized nanocolloids can reduce the diffusion length/docking time and increase the sensitivity of ssDNA hybridization reactions by orders of magnitude compared to immobilized probes. We find that, for long target ssDNAs, their docked conformation is a sensitive function of the nanocolloid size, surface charge, functionalized probe density and number of docked DNAs per bead. Three distinct conformations (collapsed, stretched and condensed) are detected via independent light scattering, Zeta potential, dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electron micrograph techniques. By optimizing the hybridization conditions to produce a stretched conformation, we are able to significantly change the DEP cross-over frequency of hybridized beads, thus allowing rapid label-free detection of hybridization by simple impedance techniques down to pM concentrations.

  2. Oscillations of rapidly rotating relativistic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertig, Erich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2008-09-15

    Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of rapidly rotating relativistic stars are studied using the Cowling approximation. The oscillation spectra have been estimated by Fourier transforming the evolution equations describing the perturbations. This is the first study of its kind and provides information on the effect of fast rotation on the oscillation spectra while it offers the possibility of studying the complete problem by including space-time perturbations. Our study includes both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations and provides limits for the onset of the secular bar mode rotational instability. We also present approximate formulas for the dependence of the oscillation spectrum from rotation. The results suggest that it is possible to extract the relativistic star's parameters from the observed gravitational wave spectrum.

  3. Rapid prototyping-assisted maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Tang, Zhangui; Liu, Ousheng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-05-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) technologies have found many uses in dentistry, and especially oral and maxillofacial surgery, due to its ability to promote product development while at the same time reducing cost and depositing a part of any degree of complexity theoretically. This paper provides an overview of RP technologies for maxillofacial reconstruction covering both fundamentals and applications of the technologies. Key fundamentals of RP technologies involving the history, characteristics, and principles are reviewed. A number of RP applications to the main fields of oral and maxillofacial surgery, including restoration of maxillofacial deformities and defects, reduction of functional bone tissues, correction of dento-maxillofacial deformities, and fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses, are discussed. The most remarkable challenges for development of RP-assisted maxillofacial surgery and promising solutions are also elaborated. PMID:25873231

  4. Simple rapid method for gene transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Cockburn, A.F.; Meier, H.

    1990-01-30

    The object of the present invention is to provide methods for gene transfer that reduce or eliminate cellular pretreatment steps, e.g., the removal of cell wall by chemical or enzymatic methods, is rapid and can be practiced without the need of additional expensive equipment. Cells, embryos or tissues selected for genetic manipulation are suspended in an Eppendorf tube in an aliquot of the desired genetic material to be transferred to which the resulting mixture is added and is agitated by vortexing from about 30 to about 90 seconds. The cells, embryos or tissue are sedimented and the DNA supernatant removed. After sedimentation, the injected material is resuspended in or on a growth medium to assay for expression.

  5. Rapid assessment of dietary calcium intake.

    PubMed

    Nordblad, Mikaela; Graham, Fiona; Mughal, M Zulf; Padidela, Raja

    2016-07-01

    A five-food item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a 3-day food diary (3DFD) were used to estimate daily dietary calcium (Ca) intake in 32 patients aged 1-17 years. Median and IQR of Ca intake from 3DFD was 840 mg and 438 mg while from FFQ it was 700 mg and 987 mg, respectively. The non-parametrical Bland-Altman limits of agreement plot between two methods showed that most of the values fell between the limits of agreement at +794 mg and -388 mg. The FFQ had a specificity of 93% in identifying children who consumed inadequate amount of dietary Ca and a sensitivity of 78% in identifying children whose dietary Ca intake exceeded UK's Reference Nutrient Intake. Thus the FFQ allows rapid estimation of children with low daily dietary Ca intake in the clinic setting; however it does not replace 3DFD. PMID:26662924

  6. Design of a rapidly cooled cryogenic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Ron; Hsu, Ike

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the design, analysis, and testing of a rapidly cooled beryllium cryogenic mirror, which is the primary mirror in the four-element optical system for the Long Wavelength Infrared Advanced Technology Seeker. The mirror is shown to meet the requirement of five minutes for cooling to cryogenic operating temperature; it also maintains its optical figure and vacuum integrity and meets the nuclear specification. Results of a detailed thermal analysis on the mirror showed that, using nitrogen gas at 80 K as coolant, the front face of the mirror can be cooled from an initial temperature of 300 K to less than 90 K within five minutes. In a vacuum chamber, using liquid nitrogen as coolant, the mirror can be cooled to 80 K within 1.5 min. The mirror is well thermally insulated, so that it can be maintained at less than its operating temperature for a long time without active cooling.

  7. Methods and compositions for rapid thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Benett, William J.; Frank, James M.; Deotte, Joshua R.; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2015-10-27

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A microfluidic heat exchanger with an internal porous medium is coupled to tanks containing cold fluid and hot fluid. Fluid flows alternately from the cold tank and the hot tank into the porous medium, cooling and heating samples contained in the microfluidic heat exchanger's sample wells. A valve may be coupled to the tanks and a pump, and switching the position of the valve may switch the source and direction of fluid flowing through the porous medium. A controller may control the switching of valve positions based on the temperature of the samples and determined temperature thresholds. A sample tray for containing samples to be thermally cycled may be used in conjunction with the thermal cycling system. A surface or internal electrical heater may aid in heating the samples, or may replace the necessity for the hot tank.

  8. On the shape of rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, J.-P.; Ranc, C.; Morel, P.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: The critical surface of a rapidly rotating star is determined, assuming that the rotation is either uniform or shellular (angular velocity constant on level surfaces, but increasing with depth). Methods: A step beyond the classical Roche model, where the entire mass is assumed to be gathered at the center of the star, here the quadrupolar moment of the mass distribution is taken into account through a linear perturbation method. Results: The flattening (defined here as the ratio between the equatorial and the polar radius) can somewhat exceed the 3/2 value of the Roche model, depending on the strength of the interior rotation. The result is applied to a star of 7 solar masses, which is the mass of Achernar, the star with the largest flattening detected so far through optical interferometry.

  9. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  10. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  11. Rapid Parameterization Schemes for Aircraft Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    A rapid shape parameterization tool called PROTEUS is developed for aircraft shape optimization. This tool can be applied directly to any aircraft geometry that has been defined in PLOT3D format, with the restriction that each aircraft component must be defined by only one data block. PROTEUS has eight types of parameterization schemes: planform, wing surface, twist, body surface, body scaling, body camber line, shifting/scaling, and linear morphing. These parametric schemes can be applied to two types of components: wing-type surfaces (e.g., wing, canard, horizontal tail, vertical tail, and pylon) and body-type surfaces (e.g., fuselage, pod, and nacelle). These schemes permit the easy setup of commonly used shape modification methods, and each customized parametric scheme can be applied to the same type of component for any configuration. This paper explains the mathematics for these parametric schemes and uses two supersonic configurations to demonstrate the application of these schemes.

  12. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  13. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  14. Rapid prototyping of ossicular replacement prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsianikov, A.; Chichkov, B.; Adunka, O.; Pillsbury, H.; Doraiswamy, A.; Narayan, R. J.

    2007-05-01

    Materials used in ossicular replacement prostheses must demonstrate appropriate biological compatibility, acoustic transmission, stability, and stiffness properties. Prostheses prepared using Teflon ®, titanium, Ceravital and other conventional materials have demonstrated several problems, including migration, perforation of the tympanic membrane, difficulty in shaping the prostheses, and reactivity with the surrounding tissues. We have used two-photon polymerization for rapid prototyping of Ormocer ® middle-ear bone replacement prostheses. Ormocer ® surfaces fabricated using two-photon polymerization exhibited acceptable cell viability and cell growth profiles. The Ormocer ® prosthesis was able to be inserted and removed from the site of use in the frozen human head without fracture. Our results demonstrate that two-photon polymerization is able to create ossicular replacement prostheses and other medical devices with a larger range of sizes, shapes and materials than other microfabrication techniques.

  15. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  16. Rapid chemiluminescence biosensing of microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Petra; Molz, Ramona; Yacoub-George, Erwin; Wolf, Hans

    2009-03-23

    A rapid immunoassay for sensitive detection of microcystin-LR using a portable chemiluminescence multichannel immunosensor (CL-MADAG) was developed. The sensor device is based on a capillary ELISA technique in combination with a miniaturized fluidics system and uses chemiluminescence as the detection principle. Minimum concentrations of at least 0.2 microgL(-1) microcystin-LR could be unambiguously measured in a spiked buffer system as well as in spiked real water samples. A single sample analysis for detection of microcystin-LR could be accomplished in just 13 min on the CL-MADAG. Besides providing a highly reproducible, fast and easy to perform test format, one major advantage of the newly established capillary immunoassay is represented by the feasibility of an internal retrospective quality control mechanism. Finally, simultaneous CL-MADAG measurements employing our inhibition immunoassay and a sandwich ELISA could be successfully demonstrated. PMID:19264171

  17. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  18. Rapid infectious diseases diagnostics using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The “Smartphone” is an almost universal possession in high-income populations, and is rapidly becoming so in lower-income regions, particularly among urban populations, and serves social networking and a quest for information and knowledge. The field of infectious disease diagnostics is at a potential watershed moment, with the essential building blocks for the development of diagnostic assays being ever more available and affordable, which is leading to creative innovative approaches to developing much-needed accurate and simple point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tools for high disease burden, low-income settings. We review the importance and implications of a paper published in Science Translational Medicine on the development of a smartphone-powered and -controlled multiplex immunological assay that tests for HIV and syphilis simultaneously. This is reviewed in the context of other prototype smartphone-enabled/assisted diagnostic devices, and how such developments might shape the future of the POC diagnostics field. PMID:26488011

  19. Operations analysis of gravity assisted rapid transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Gravity assisted rapid transit (GART) with 6 percent grades before and after each station are compared with conventional systems in terms of energy consumption, run time, line capacity and schedule stability under abnormal circumstances. Parametric analyses of run times and energy consumption include the impact of alternate accelerating and braking levels. The capcity analysis uses a network simulation program to determine the location and severity of all signal delays. Based on results of initial simulations, the block design was revised to eliminate bottlenecks in normal operations. The systems are then compared at headways of 80 to 180 seconds. One month of incidence reports of a modern operating transit system are reviewed to determine the failures to be simulated. The impact of failures resulting in station delays (30 to 360 seconds), speed limit reduction (20 mph and 30 mph to one or more trains), vehicle performance (75 percent acceleration) are compared at scheduled headway of 90 to 180 seconds.

  20. Obliquity Variations of a Rapidly Rotating Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy L.; Barnes, Jason W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John E.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    Venus clearly differs from Earth in terms of its spin and atmospheric composition, where the former is controlled by solid-body and atmospheric thermal tides. However, this may have been different during earlier stages of planetary evolution, when the Sun was fainter and the Venusian atmosphere was less massive. We investigate how the axial tilt, or obliquity, would have varied during this epoch considering a rapidly rotating Venus. Through numerical simulation of an ensemble of hypothetical Early Venuses, we find the obliquity variation to be simpler than a Moonless Earth (Lissauer et al., 2012). Most low-obliquity Venuses show very low total obliquity variability comparable to that of the real Moon-influenced Earth.

  1. Rapid surface sampling and archival record system

    SciTech Connect

    Barren, E.; Penney, C.M.; Sheldon, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    A number of contamination sites exist in this country where the area and volume of material to be remediated is very large, approaching or exceeding 10{sup 6} m{sup 2} and 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}. Typically, only a small fraction of this material is actually contaminated. In such cases there is a strong economic motivation to test the material with a sufficient density of measurements to identify which portions are uncontaminated, so extensively they be left in place or be disposed of as uncontaminated waste. Unfortunately, since contamination often varies rapidly from position to position, this procedure can involve upwards of one million measurements per site. The situation is complicated further in many cases by the difficulties of sampling porous surfaces, such as concrete. This report describes a method for sampling concretes in which an immediate distinction can be made between contaminated and uncontaminated surfaces. Sample acquisition and analysis will be automated.

  2. Rapid and precise measurement of flatband voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. P.; Ryan, M.; Bates, E. T.

    1976-01-01

    The paper outlines the design, principles of operation, and calibration of a five-IC network intended to give a rapid, precise, and automatic determination of the flatband voltage of MOS capacitors. The basic principle of measurement is to compare the analog output voltage of a capacitance meter - which is directly proportional to the capacitance being measured - with a preset or dialed-in voltage proportional to the calculated flatband capacitance by means of a comparator circuit. The bias to the MOS capacitor supplied through the capacitance meter is provided by a ramp voltage going from a negative toward a positive voltage level and vice versa. The network employs two monostable multivibrators for reading and recording the flatband voltage and for resetting the initial conditions and restarting the ramp. The flatband voltage can be held and read on a digital voltmeter.

  3. Rapid Detection of Polymyxin Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Jayol, Aurélie; Poirel, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    For identification of polymyxin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, we developed a rapid test that detects glucose metabolization associated with bacterial growth in the presence of a defined concentration of colistin or polymyxin B. Formation of acid metabolites is evidenced by a color change (orange to yellow) of a pH indicator (red phenol). To evaluate the test, we used bacterial colonies of 135 isolates expressing various mechanisms of colistin resistance (intrinsic, chromosomally encoded, and plasmid-mediated MCR-1) and 65 colistin-susceptible isolates. Sensitivity and specificity were 99.3% and 95.4%, respectively, compared with the standard broth microdilution method. This new test is inexpensive, easy to perform, sensitive, specific, and can be completed in <2 hours. It could be useful in countries facing endemic spread of carbapenemase producers and for which polymyxins are last-resort drugs. PMID:27191712

  4. Rapid Detection of Polymyxin Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Patrice; Jayol, Aurélie; Poirel, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    For identification of polymyxin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, we developed a rapid test that detects glucose metabolization associated with bacterial growth in the presence of a defined concentration of colistin or polymyxin B. Formation of acid metabolites is evidenced by a color change (orange to yellow) of a pH indicator (red phenol). To evaluate the test, we used bacterial colonies of 135 isolates expressing various mechanisms of colistin resistance (intrinsic, chromosomally encoded, and plasmid-mediated MCR-1) and 65 colistin-susceptible isolates. Sensitivity and specificity were 99.3% and 95.4%, respectively, compared with the standard broth microdilution method. This new test is inexpensive, easy to perform, sensitive, specific, and can be completed in <2 hours. It could be useful in countries facing endemic spread of carbapenemase producers and for which polymyxins are last-resort drugs. PMID:27191712

  5. Translational research on rapid steroid actions.

    PubMed

    Wendler, Alexandra; Wehling, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Translational research is a burgeoning science that shows potential to improve the transition of research from bench to bedside. This novel science explores all major aspects of preclinical and clinical issues which are relevant for the success of translational pharmaceutical or medical device/diagnostic innovations. This includes target risk assessment, biomarker evaluation and predictivity grading both for efficacy and toxicity, early human trial design adequate to guide stop/go decisions on grounds of biomarker panels, and biostatistical methods to analyze multiple readout situations and quantify risk projections. Representing a comparably novel science, rapid steroid actions have been recognized to carry potential clinical implications in various fields. Findings in this field have not yet been successfully translated into clinically relevant new medicines except for neurosteroids. A promising compound is the membrane estrogen receptor agonist STX, which may be applicable for estrogen withdrawal symptoms. Nongenomic vitamin D analogs may be useful as antiinflammatory, anticancer or diabetes preventing agents. Further the membrane thyroid receptor agonist tetrac may be useful in cancer treatment. Unfortunately lazaroids (membrane-only active glucocorticoids), which have been clinically tested as neuroprotective agents, had to be abandoned because of lacking clinical efficacy. Yet, the hierarchy of antirheumatic glucocorticoid action in regard to their clinical potency may better correlate with their membrane effects than their ability to bind to the classic glucocorticoid receptor. To improve the translational success of the rapid actions of steroids research, scientists should become familiar with major aspects of translational work and always seek for translational dimensions in their research. PMID:19782096

  6. Rapid lithography: Photopolymerization characterizations and initiation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Michael Paul

    In order to improve upon the resolution of photolithography, a technique that is used to produce features for today's micro and nanodevices, techniques must move beyond e-beam and deep-UV sources. Multiphoton absorption polymerization (MAP) uses near-infrared light for the creation of complex, three-dimensional features on the sub-100 nm scale. The resolution of MAP can be enhanced further using a two-beam technique called resolution augmentation through photo-induced deactivation (RAPID) to the reach feature sizes as small as 40 nm. The mechanism and kinetics of photo-induced deactivation are not well understood. To better understand these processes, studies of different photoinitiators have been performed. We find that some photoinitiators are so efficient at deactivation that they are capable of undergoing self-deactivation by addition of another photon from the excitation source. This phenomenon is manifested in a polymerization trend in which feature size has a proportional velocity (PROVE) dependence, the opposite of the conventional velocity dependence. We also demonstrate that the velocity dependence can also be tuned between PROVE and conventional dependences. Kinetic models have been formulated to account for the observed deactivation. By reconciling experimental data for some sample photoinitiators with the kinetic model through the use of simulations, kinetic rate constants are determined. The self-deactivation efficiency of each photoinitiator was determined. The lifetimes of intermediates in the radical photopolymerization process were also determined. The kinetic rate constants associated with photoinitiators should allow for the customization of photoinitiators for specific applications and make RAPID a more efficient process capable of reaching resolution on the level of 30 nm and below.

  7. Diamond grooving of rapidly solidified optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Ghobashy, Sameh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Mkoko, Zwelinzima

    2015-10-01

    Traditional optical aluminium grades such as Al 6061 are intensively used for making optical components for applications ranging from mould insert fabrication to laser machine making. However, because of their irregular microstructure and relative inhomogeneity of material properties at micro scale, traditional optical aluminium may exhibit some difficulties when ultra-high precision diamond turned. Inhomogeneity and micro-variation in the material properties combined with uneven and coarse microstructure may cause unacceptable surface finish and accelerated tool wear, especially in grooving operation when the diamond tool edge is fully immersed in the material surface. Recently, new grades of optical aluminium that are featured by their ultra-fine microstructure and improved material properties have been developed to overcome the problem of high tool wear rates. The new aluminium grades have been developed using rapid solidification process which results in extremely small grain sizes combined with improved mechanical properties. The current study is concerned with investigating the performance of single-point diamond turning when grooving two grades of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades: RSA905 which is a high-alloyed aluminium grade and RSA443 which has a high silicon content. In this study, two series of experiments employed to create radial microgrooves on the two RSA grades. The surface roughness obtained on the groove surface is measured when different combinations of cutting parameters are used. Cutting speed is varied while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant. The results show that groove surface roughness produced on RSA443 is higher than that obtained on RSA905. Also, the paper reports on the effect of cutting speed on surface roughness for each RSA grade.

  8. Rapid Acoustic Survey for Biodiversity Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Sueur, Jérôme; Pavoine, Sandrine; Hamerlynck, Olivier; Duvail, Stéphanie

    2008-01-01

    Biodiversity assessment remains one of the most difficult challenges encountered by ecologists and conservation biologists. This task is becoming even more urgent with the current increase of habitat loss. Many methods–from rapid biodiversity assessments (RBA) to all-taxa biodiversity inventories (ATBI)–have been developed for decades to estimate local species richness. However, these methods are costly and invasive. Several animals–birds, mammals, amphibians, fishes and arthropods–produce sounds when moving, communicating or sensing their environment. Here we propose a new concept and method to describe biodiversity. We suggest to forego species or morphospecies identification used by ATBI and RBA respectively but rather to tackle the problem at another evolutionary unit, the community level. We also propose that a part of diversity can be estimated and compared through a rapid acoustic analysis of the sound produced by animal communities. We produced α and β diversity indexes that we first tested with 540 simulated acoustic communities. The α index, which measures acoustic entropy, shows a logarithmic correlation with the number of species within the acoustic community. The β index, which estimates both temporal and spectral dissimilarities, is linearly linked to the number of unshared species between acoustic communities. We then applied both indexes to two closely spaced Tanzanian dry lowland coastal forests. Indexes reveal for this small sample a lower acoustic diversity for the most disturbed forest and acoustic dissimilarities between the two forests suggest that degradation could have significantly decreased and modified community composition. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an indicator of biological diversity can be reliably obtained in a non-invasive way and with a limited sampling effort. This new approach may facilitate the appraisal of animal diversity at large spatial and temporal scales. PMID:19115006

  9. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  10. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  11. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  12. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05

  13. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, J.M.; Braga, J.C.; Clague, D.A.; Gallup, C.; Hein, J.R.; Potts, D.C.; Renema, W.; Riding, R.; Riker-Coleman, K.; Silver, E.; Wallace, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of well-developed submerged coral reefs are preserved in the Huon Gulf (Papua New Guinea) and around Hawaii. Despite different tectonics settings, both regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2-6??m/ka) over the last 500??ka. Rapid subsidence, combined with eustatic sea-level changes, is responsible for repeated drowning and backstepping of coral reefs over this period. Because we can place quantitative constraints on these systems (i.e., reef drowning age, eustatic sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry), these areas represent unique natural laboratories for exploring the roles of tectonics, reef accretion, and eustatic sea-level changes in controlling the evolution of individual reefs, as well as backstepping of the entire system. A review of new and existing bathymetric, radiometric, sedimentary facies and numerical modeling data indicate that these reefs have had long, complex growth histories and that they are highly sensitive, recording drowning not only during major deglaciations, but also during high-frequency, small-amplitude interstadial and deglacial meltwater pulse events. Analysis of five generalized sedimentary facies shows that reef drowning is characterized by a distinct biological and sedimentary sequence. Observational and numerical modeling data indicate that on precessional (20??ka) and sub-orbital timescales, the rate and amplitude of eustatic sea-level changes are critical in controlling initiation, growth, drowning or sub-aerial exposure, subsequent re-initiation, and final drowning. However, over longer timescales (> 100-500??ka) continued tectonic subsidence and basement substrate morphology influence broad scale reef morphology and backstepping geometries. Drilling of these reefs will yield greatly expanded stratigraphic sections compared with similar reefs on slowly subsiding, stable and uplifting margins, and thus they represent a unique archive of sea-level and climate

  14. 78 FR 11678 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... consultation with representatives of the Chickasaw Nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. By letter to the Grand Rapids Public Museum in 2010, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma deferred...

  15. Rapid E-Learning Simulation Training and User Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackler, Angeline

    2011-01-01

    A new trend in e-learning development is to have subject matter experts use rapid development tools to create training simulations. This type of training is called rapid e-learning simulation training. Though companies are using rapid development tools to create training quickly and cost effectively, there is little empirical research to indicate…

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Knauz, Robert O.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the application of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Between 10% and 24% of bipolar patients experience a rapid cycling course, with 4 or more mood episodes occurring per year. Characterized by nonresponse to standard mood-stabilizing medications, rapid cyclers are…

  17. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  18. Mars rapid round trip mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzi Amade', Nicola

    The present research is divided in two parts. The first part is a well defined mathematical problem, with exact rules and results, in which the basic constraints for interplanetary round trip travels are used to calculate an interplanetary train schedule (ITS) of missions to Mars, in the general case of orbits with non-zero eccentricity and non-zero inclination. Several possible options for round trip travels to Mars are considered. In particular, options at high energy, which allow rapid round trip missions, are discussed. These options have important applications for human travels to Mars. The second part of the research is about systems engineering aspects, which are intrinsically less exact, since they can change with time due, for example, to technology development or economic and political factors. For the case of a selected human rapid round trip mission to Mars, the development of a mission architecture, an assessment of the masses involved in the mission (such as the initial masses required in LEO), an estimate of the necessary number of launches, and a preliminary analysis of the radiation protection requirements, are performed. The main problem that justifies the existence of basic constraints for round trip missions is that by increasing the DeltaV of a mission, in general the total round trip time does not vary much, because a higher DeltaV can only reduce the transfer time and it simply increases the stay-time on the target planet. However, if the DeltaV is increased beyond a well-defined level, the total round trip time has a sudden drop in duration that makes fast round trips possible. This is due to the fact that the traveler can go back before the home planet makes one extra revolution around the Sun. For a sufficiently high DeltaV, a round trip to Mars can change in duration from 2.7 years to about 5 months. For Mars missions, the round trip times are calculated for different DeltaV's and for different transfer trajectories (T1, T2, etc.). An

  19. Urban flood risk warning under rapid urbanization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangbo; Zhou, Haolan; Zhang, Hui; Du, Guoming; Zhou, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    In the past decades, China has observed rapid urbanization, the nation's urban population reached 50% in 2000, and is still in steady increase. Rapid urbanization in China has an adverse impact on urban hydrological processes, particularly in increasing the urban flood risks and causing serious urban flooding losses. Urban flooding also increases health risks such as causing epidemic disease break out, polluting drinking water and damaging the living environment. In the highly urbanized area, non-engineering measurement is the main way for managing urban flood risk, such as flood risk warning. There is no mature method and pilot study for urban flood risk warning, the purpose of this study is to propose the urban flood risk warning method for the rapidly urbanized Chinese cities. This paper first presented an urban flood forecasting model, which produces urban flood inundation index for urban flood risk warning. The model has 5 modules. The drainage system and grid dividing module divides the whole city terrain into drainage systems according to its first-order river system, and delineates the drainage system into grids based on the spatial structure with irregular gridding technique; the precipitation assimilation module assimilates precipitation for every grids which is used as the model input, which could either be the radar based precipitation estimation or interpolated one from rain gauges; runoff production module classifies the surface into pervious and impervious surface, and employs different methods to calculate the runoff respectively; surface runoff routing module routes the surface runoff and determines the inundation index. The routing on surface grid is calculated according to the two dimensional shallow water unsteady flow algorithm, the routing on land channel and special channel is calculated according to the one dimensional unsteady flow algorithm. This paper then proposed the urban flood risk warning method that is called DPSIR model based

  20. Rapid Map Updating Procedures Using Orthophotos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrajhi, M.

    2009-04-01

    The General Directorate of Surveying and Mapping (GDSM) of the Ministry for Municipal and Rural Affairs (MOMRA) of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has the mandate for large scale mapping of 220 Saudi Arabian cities. During the last 30 years all of these cities have been mapped in 3D at least once using stereo photogrammetric procedures. The output of these maps is in digital vector files with more than 300 types of features coded. Mapping at the required scales of 1:10,000 for the urban and suburban areas and at 1:1,000 for the urban areas proper has been a lengthy and costly process, which did not lend itself to regular updating procedures. For this reason the major cities, where most of the developments took place, have been newly mapped at about 10 year intervals. To record the changes of urban landscapes more rapidly orthophotomapping has recently been introduced. Rather than waiting for about 5 years for the line mapping of a large city after the inception of a mapping project, orthophotos could be produced a few months after a new aerial flight was made. While new, but slow stereomapping in 3D provides accurate results in conformity with the usual urban mapping specifications, the geocoded superposition of outdated maps with the more recent orthophotos provided a very useful monitoring of the urban changes. At the same time the use of orthophotos opens up a new possibility for urban map updating by on-screen digitizing in 2D. This can at least be done for the most relevant features, such as buildings, walls, roads and vegetation. As this is a faster method than 3D stereo plotting a lesser geometric accuracy is to be expected for the on-screen digitization. There is a need to investigate and to compare the two methods with respect to accuracy and speed of operation as a basis for a decision, whether to continue with new 3D stereomapping every 10 years or to introduce rapid map updating in 2D via on-screen digitization every 3 to 5 years. This presentation is about

  1. Connecting Network Properties of Rapidly Disseminating Epizoonotics

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Ariel L.; Fasina, Folorunso O.; Hoogesteyn, Almira L.; Konah, Steven N.; Febles, José L.; Perkins, Douglas J.; Hyman, James M.; Fair, Jeanne M.; Hittner, James B.; Smith, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Background To effectively control the geographical dissemination of infectious diseases, their properties need to be determined. To test that rapid microbial dispersal requires not only susceptible hosts but also a pre-existing, connecting network, we explored constructs meant to reveal the network properties associated with disease spread, which included the road structure. Methods Using geo-temporal data collected from epizoonotics in which all hosts were susceptible (mammals infected by Foot-and-mouth disease virus, Uruguay, 2001; birds infected by Avian Influenza virus H5N1, Nigeria, 2006), two models were compared: 1) ‘connectivity’, a model that integrated bio-physical concepts (the agent’s transmission cycle, road topology) into indicators designed to measure networks (‘nodes’ or infected sites with short- and long-range links), and 2) ‘contacts’, which focused on infected individuals but did not assess connectivity. Results The connectivity model showed five network properties: 1) spatial aggregation of cases (disease clusters), 2) links among similar ‘nodes’ (assortativity), 3) simultaneous activation of similar nodes (synchronicity), 4) disease flows moving from highly to poorly connected nodes (directionality), and 5) a few nodes accounting for most cases (a “20∶80″ pattern). In both epizoonotics, 1) not all primary cases were connected but at least one primary case was connected, 2) highly connected, small areas (nodes) accounted for most cases, 3) several classes of nodes were distinguished, and 4) the contact model, which assumed all primary cases were identical, captured half the number of cases identified by the connectivity model. When assessed together, the synchronicity and directionality properties explained when and where an infectious disease spreads. Conclusions Geo-temporal constructs of Network Theory’s nodes and links were retrospectively validated in rapidly disseminating infectious diseases. They distinguished

  2. Rapid fabrication of custom patient biopsy guides.

    PubMed

    Rajon, Didier A; Bova, Frank J; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Friedman, William A

    2009-01-01

    Image guided surgery is currently performed using frame-based as well as frameless approaches. In order to reduce the invasive nature of stereotactic guidance as well as to reduce the cost in both equipment and time required within the operating room we investigated the use of rapid prototyping (RP) technology. In our approach we fabricated custom patient specific face-masks and guides that can be applied to the patient during surgery. These guides provide a stereotactic reference for the accurate placement of surgical tools to a pre-planned target along a pre-planned trajectory. While the use of RP machines has previously been shown to be satisfactory for the accuracy standpoint, one of our design criteria, completing the entire built and introduction into the sterile field in less than 120 minutes, was unobtainable. Our primary problems were the fabrication time and the non-resistance of the built material to high-temperature sterilization. In the current study, we have investigated the use of subtractive rapid prototyping (SRP) machines to perform the same quality of surgical guidance while improving the fabrication time and allowing for choosing materials suitable for sterilization. Because SRP technology does not offer the same flexibility as RP in term of prototype shape and complexity, our software program was adapted to provide new guide designs suitable for SRP fabrication. The biopsy guide was subdivided for a more efficient built with the parts being uniquely assembled to form the final guide. The accuracy of the assembly was then assessed using a modified Brown-Roberts-Wells phantom base that allows measuring the position of a biopsy needle introduced into the guide and comparing it with the actual planned target. These tests showed that 1) SRP machines provide an average accuracy of 0.77 mm with a standard deviation of 0.05 mm (plus or minus one image pixel) and 2) SRP allows for fabrication and sterilization within three and a half hours after

  3. Rapid Assimilation Platform for Insight and Discovery (RAPID) with Application to Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, I. A.; Bilitza, D.; Reinisch, B. W.; Grinstein, G.; Huang, X.

    2010-12-01

    Classic tasks of sensor data retrieval and assimilation into forecast models do not come easy in the Space Weather arena - the world of great distances, sparse and sporadic observations, system latencies, exigent data quality issues, and complex, cutting-edge instrumentation requiring expert operational and data analysis support. Success of the space weather endeavor critically depends on collaborative, low-latency global observations and their rapid integration with global assimilative models to provide an hour-by-hour specification of the Earth environment. The proposed Rapid Assimilation Platform for Insight and Discovery (RAPID) will make an important step forward by integrating near real-time sensor data from the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) and total electron content products from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver network with a global climatological model of the electron density distribution, the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). GIRO sites are equipped with high frequency Digisonde ionospheric sounders, remote sounding instruments that specify the vertical profile of plasma density in the ionosphere at nominal 15 minute cadence. Integration of the low latency sensor data from 40+ worldwide GIRO locations and 100+ GNSS sites with the IRI model will be accomplished via a novel assimilation process and an open source Web-based Analysis and Visualization Environment (WEAVE) developed for collaborative data presentation to large audiences. Such integration accomplishes an important task of abstracting from the GIRO/GNSS observations, whose complexity requires an expert interpretation, an intuitive, global, rapid insight into the space weather conditions facilitating discovery of events in Earth’s ionospheric plasma environment. We will discuss expected challenges of assimilating GIRO and GNSS data into IRI and automated techniques suitable for RAPID applications. The topics will include development of an intelligent

  4. The Rapid Geodetic Survey System (RGSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddle, J. R.

    1989-06-01

    The Rapid Geodetic Survey System (RGSS) is a system employing a high-accuracy gimbaled inertial platform. It provides a cost-effective capability for accurate direct measurement of the change in position, elevation, gravity intensity and deflection of the vertical from an initial point. The RGSS is an adaptation of the production version of the U.S. Army Position and Azimuth Determining System (PADS). Several hardware and software enhancements to improve the performance of the system, primarily for gravity vector survey, have occurred over the last few years. The basic principles for the control of error in the survey measurements due to noise and systematic error are discussed below. Actual acceptance test results for the RGSS which indicate an inherent capability of the system to measure change in the deflection of the vertical to a few-tenths of an arcsecond over survey periods of one to two hours using careful survey techniques are also presented. Finally a simple method to extend the capability of the system for longer duration surveys is indicated.

  5. Rapid lithification masks the Venus sedimentary cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghail, R.

    2015-10-01

    Venera lander data are usually assumed to indicate basaltic lavas but a significant fraction of the rock material must be volatiles, such as sulphur, implying at least strongly weathered basalts. The lander images most closely resemble sedimentary material, with layered strata (which may be pyroclastic in origin)that are sometimes broken into cobbles and fine grained sediment. The Magellan SAR was relatively insensitive to loose fine-grained material under Venus surface conditions but the reprocessed data reveal a range of weathering processes, particularly at higher elevations, and mass wasting of steep slopes. Mean wind speeds are strongly altitude dependent and are able to erode and transport material throughout the highland regions. In some areas, this material is deposited on adjacent plains where, under the extreme Venus surface conditions, lithification is an apparently rapid process. Thus the largely featureless plains may not be igneous at all but sedimentary in origin. The settling out and lithification of sedimentary material is consistent with observed crater degradation, in which low-lying crater floors are infilled first.

  6. A rapid method for airborne tritium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Wilson, H.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Tritium is one of the principal radionuclides released to the environment from nuclear fuel and target reprocessing, heavy-water production, and other nuclear industry operations. For example, the majority of the off-site dose to the public at the Savannah River site (SRS) in 1988 was from tritium oxide (HTO). The absorbed dose is highly dependent on chemical form; HTO is 10,000 more hazardous than the elemental form (HT). Commercially available tritium monitors do not discriminate between chemical form and have high detection limits. Consequently, tedious laboratory methods must be used to analyze HTO in air. Desiccants are used to remove all the water from an air sample. The tritiated water is then desorbed and analyzed by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The method is complex and takes several hours to complete. During an unplanned release, present-time atmospheric tritium concentrations are never available. To improve emergency response capabilities, a rapid sampling and analysis method was developed for measuring low-level HTO concentrations in air. Standard desiccant sampling and water desorption procedure was modified for use in the SRS mobile laboratory, which is equipped with a liquid scintillation counter. These tests indicate that an HTO concentration of 0.2% DCG (7 Bq/m{sup 3}) can be detected by this method with a 10-min sample collection time and a 10-min count.

  7. Nanostructured bioluminescent sensor for rapidly detecting thrombin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longyan; Bao, Yige; Denstedt, John; Zhang, Jin

    2016-03-15

    Thrombin plays a key role in thrombosis and hemostasis. The abnormal level of thrombin in body fluids may lead to different diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, etc. Detection of thrombin level in blood and/or urine is one of important methods for medical diagnosis. Here, a bioluminescent sensor is developed for non-invasively and rapidly detecting thrombin in urine. The sensor is assembled through conjugating gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and a recombinant protein containing Renilla luciferase (pRluc) by a peptide, which is thrombin specific substrate. The luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescence can be quenched by peptide-conjugating Au NPs. In the presence of thrombin, the short peptide conjugating luciferase and Au NPs is digested and cut off, which results in the recovery of bioluminescence due to the release of luciferase from Au NPs. The bioluminescence intensity at 470 nm is observed, and increases with increasing concentration of thrombin. The bioluminescence intensity of this designed sensor is significantly recovered when the thrombin digestion time lasts for 10 min. In addition, a similar linear relationship between luminescence intensity and the concentration of thrombin is found in the range of 8 nM to 8 μM in both buffer and human urine spiked samples. The limit of detection is as low as 80 pM. It is anticipated that our nanosensor could be a promising tool for clinical diagnosis of thrombin in human urine. PMID:26397418

  8. Rapid prototyping--when virtual meets reality.

    PubMed

    Beguma, Zubeda; Chhedat, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) describes the customized production of solid models using 3D computer data. Over the past decade, advances in RP have continued to evolve, resulting in the development of new techniques that have been applied to the fabrication of various prostheses. RP fabrication technologies include stereolithography (SLA), fused deposition modeling (FDM), computer numerical controlled (CNC) milling, and, more recently, selective laser sintering (SLS). The applications of RP techniques for dentistry include wax pattern fabrication for dental prostheses, dental (facial) prostheses mold (shell) fabrication, and removable dental prostheses framework fabrication. In the past, a physical plastic shape of the removable partial denture (RPD) framework was produced using an RP machine, and then used as a sacrificial pattern. Yet with the advent of the selective laser melting (SLM) technique, RPD metal frameworks can be directly fabricated, thereby omitting the casting stage. This new approach can also generate the wax pattern for facial prostheses directly, thereby reducing labor-intensive laboratory procedures. Many people stand to benefit from these new RP techniques for producing various forms of dental prostheses, which in the near future could transform traditional prosthodontic practices. PMID:25643461

  9. Rapid Distortion Theory in astrophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Sergey; Petrosyan, Arakel

    2016-04-01

    In this report, we study statistical properties of astrophysical turbulent plasma flows using Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT). The core assumption is that the turbulence responds to the external distortion so fast, that inertial and viscous forces result in a negligible change in velocity distribution. Thus it is assumed that the response to the external effect takes place in the time interval much smaller than turbulence decay time. This allows to linearize equations and to derive equations for second moments of turbulence. We apply RDT to incompressible turbulent MHD flows distorted with external magnetic field and linear velocity shear in cases of rotating and non-rotating plasma. It is shown that even with a strong nonlinearity many properties of turbulence can be qualitatively studied using a linear theory. A closed system of linear equations for velocity and magnetic field fluctuations is derived. Development of initially isotropic turbulence and transition to anisotropy are studied. Equations for fluid, current and cross helicity are derived. Differences in cases of rotating and non-rotating flows are discussed. Changes introduced by considering Hall effect are discussed.

  10. Rapid Decimation for Direct Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Jonathan; VanGelder, Allen; Verma, Vivek; Wilhelms, Jane

    1997-01-01

    An approach for eliminating unnecessary portions of a volume when producing a direct volume rendering is described. This reduction in volume size sacrifices some image quality in the interest of rendering speed. Since volume visualization is often used as an exploratory visualization technique, it is important to reduce rendering times, so the user can effectively explore the volume. The methods presented can speed up rendering by factors of 2 to 3 with minor image degradation. A family of decimation algorithms to reduce the number of primitives in the volume without altering the volume's grid in any way is introduced. This allows the decimation to be computed rapidly, making it easier to change decimation levels on the fly. Further, because very little extra space is required, this method is suitable for the very large volumes that are becoming common. The method is also grid-independent, so it is suitable for multiple overlapping curvilinear and unstructured, as well as regular, grids. The decimation process can proceed automatically, or can be guided by the user so that important regions of the volume are decimated less than unimportant regions. A formal error measure is described based on a three-dimensional analog of the Radon transform. Decimation methods are evaluated based on this metric and on direct comparison with reference images.

  11. Rapid Prototyping of Distributed User Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massó, José Pascual Molina; Vanderdonckt, Jean; López, Pascual González; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Pérez, María Dolores Lozano

    This paper introduces a software tool for rapid prototyping of interactive systems whose user interfaces could be distributed according to four axes defined in a design space: type of computing platform, amount of interaction surfaces, type of interaction surface, and type of user interface. This software is based on a virtual toolkit for rendering the user interfaces in a virtual world depicting the real world in which the distribution occurs. The virtual toolkit consists of a layer for rendering a concrete user interface specified in a user interface description language. This paper presents its extension to modeling the external environment in terms of the design space so as to render the context of use in which the user interfaces are distributed. For each axis, a pair of functions enables exploring the axis in decreasing and increasing order so as to explore various situations of distribution, axis by axis, or in a combined way. As the interfaces resulting from this rendering are truly executable ones, this system provides designers with an acceptable means for generating ideas about how a user interface can be distributed in a context of use, and helps to evaluate the quality of a solution at an early design stage. Four representative situations located on the design space are implemented and discussed: distribution in a multi-platform context, distribution of the workplace, ubiquitous computing, and ambient intelligence, thus proving the coverage of the design space and the capabilities of the whole system

  12. Simulation Model of Rapid TAE Chirping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Berk, H. L.

    2010-11-01

    Spontaneous nonlinear coherent frequency chirping structures can arise due to the resonant interaction of energetic particles with a discrete toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE). The initial development of a coherent structure is quantitatively described by a now standard hole-clump chirping theory. However, it is still unclear what conditions are needed for the TAE chirping frequency to deviate far from the bulk plasma eigenfrequency and enter the Alfven continuum. In our model, the linear TAE controlling equation is derived from the Berk-Mett quadratic form. The interaction is studied with the linear wave with the nonlinear response of energetic particles. For the present study we simplify the wave to a single symmetric couplet while a two-dimensional distribution is used to describe the energetic particles. In order to resolve the fine structure in the phase space, the numerical scheme integrates the Vlasov equation in the Fourier transformed phase space using a method developed by Breizman and Petviashvili. The simulation results show the saturated wave amplitude and square root law of the initial chirping are in accord with previous theory. We have found conditions where the chirping signal enters the Alfven continuum and a larger amplitude and more rapidly chirping signal then develops. Plots of the phase space structure can reproduce the shape of the separatrix structure that partitions the trapped and passing particles. We attempt to relate the portrait of the phase space structure with the measured wave amplitude and chirping frequency.

  13. Memory and learning with rapid audiovisual sequences

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Arielle S.; Sekuler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We examined short-term memory for sequences of visual stimuli embedded in varying multisensory contexts. In two experiments, subjects judged the structure of the visual sequences while disregarding concurrent, but task-irrelevant auditory sequences. Stimuli were eight-item sequences in which varying luminances and frequencies were presented concurrently and rapidly (at 8 Hz). Subjects judged whether the final four items in a visual sequence identically replicated the first four items. Luminances and frequencies in each sequence were either perceptually correlated (Congruent) or were unrelated to one another (Incongruent). Experiment 1 showed that, despite encouragement to ignore the auditory stream, subjects' categorization of visual sequences was strongly influenced by the accompanying auditory sequences. Moreover, this influence tracked the similarity between a stimulus's separate audio and visual sequences, demonstrating that task-irrelevant auditory sequences underwent a considerable degree of processing. Using a variant of Hebb's repetition design, Experiment 2 compared musically trained subjects and subjects who had little or no musical training on the same task as used in Experiment 1. Test sequences included some that intermittently and randomly recurred, which produced better performance than sequences that were generated anew for each trial. The auditory component of a recurring audiovisual sequence influenced musically trained subjects more than it did other subjects. This result demonstrates that stimulus-selective, task-irrelevant learning of sequences can occur even when such learning is an incidental by-product of the task being performed. PMID:26575193

  14. Lofexidine versus clonidine in rapid opiate detoxification.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Zaimovic, A; Giusti, F; Di Gennaro, C; Zambelli, U; Gardini, S; Delsignore, R

    2001-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate lofexidine and clonidine, in an accelerated opiate detoxification procedure (3 days), without anaesthesia. Forty heroin-dependent individuals were detoxified, evaluating withdrawal symptoms, craving levels, mood changes, urine toxicologic screens, and dropout during therapy with either (1) clonidine, oxazepam, baclofen, and ketoprofene, with naloxone and naltrexone for 3 days (20 subjects) or (2) lofexidine, oxazepam, baclofen, and ketoprofene with naloxone and naltrexone for 3 days (20 subjects). Both clonidine and lofexidine rapid detoxifications were found effective. The subjects treated with lofexidine showed significantly lower levels of withdrawal symptoms, fewer mood problems, less sedation and hypotension. No significant differences in craving levels, morphine metabolites in urine, or dropout rate were evidenced between the two groups. The early use of naltrexone during detoxification in combination with either alpha-2-agonist facilitated the acceptance for long-term naltrexone treatment. Lofexidine appeared to be more useful than clonidine in a 3-day accelerated opiate detoxification, not only to counteract withdrawal symptoms, but also in the treatment of dysphoria and mood changes. Because lofexidine does not produce hypotension, safe outpatient treatment, without hospital support, could be possible. PMID:11516922

  15. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  16. Rapid Mechanically Controlled Rewiring of Neuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Magdesian, Margaret H; Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Mori, Megumi; Boudreau, Dominic; Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Sanz, Ricardo; Miyahara, Yoichi; Barrett, Christopher J; Fournier, Alyson E; De Koninck, Yves; Grütter, Peter

    2016-01-20

    CNS injury may lead to permanent functional deficits because it is still not possible to regenerate axons over long distances and accurately reconnect them with an appropriate target. Using rat neurons, microtools, and nanotools, we show that new, functional neurites can be created and precisely positioned to directly (re)wire neuronal networks. We show that an adhesive contact made onto an axon or dendrite can be pulled to initiate a new neurite that can be mechanically guided to form new synapses at up to 0.8 mm distance in <1 h. Our findings challenge current understanding of the limits of neuronal growth and have direct implications for the development of new therapies and surgical techniques to achieve functional regeneration. Significance statement: Brain and spinal cord injury may lead to permanent disability and death because it is still not possible to regenerate neurons over long distances and accurately reconnect them with an appropriate target. Using microtools and nanotools we have developed a new method to rapidly initiate, elongate, and precisely connect new functional neuronal circuits over long distances. The extension rates achieved are ≥60 times faster than previously reported. Our findings have direct implications for the development of new therapies and surgical techniques to achieve functional regeneration after trauma and in neurodegenerative diseases. It also opens the door for the direct wiring of robust brain-machine interfaces as well as for investigations of fundamental aspects of neuronal signal processing and neuronal function. PMID:26791225

  17. Rapid flow-based peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Mark D; Heider, Patrick L; Adamo, Andrea; Vinogradov, Alexander A; Mong, Surin K; Li, Xiyuan; Berger, Tatiana; Policarpo, Rocco L; Zhang, Chi; Zou, Yekui; Liao, Xiaoli; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Jensen, Klavs F; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2014-03-21

    A flow-based solid-phase peptide synthesis methodology that enables the incorporation of an amino acid residue every 1.8 min under automatic control or every 3 min under manual control is described. This is accomplished by passing a stream of reagent through a heat exchanger into a low volume, low backpressure reaction vessel, and through a UV detector. These features enable continuous delivery of heated solvents and reagents to the solid support at high flow rate, thereby maintaining maximal concentration of reagents in the reaction vessel, quickly exchanging reagents, and eliminating the need to rapidly heat reagents after they have been added to the vessel. The UV detector enables continuous monitoring of the process. To demonstrate the broad applicability and reliability of this method, it was employed in the total synthesis of a small protein, as well as dozens of peptides. The quality of the material obtained with this method is comparable to that for traditional batch methods, and, in all cases, the desired material was readily purifiable by RP-HPLC. The application of this method to the synthesis of the 113-residue Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RNase and the 130-residue DARPin pE59 is described in the accompanying manuscript. PMID:24616230

  18. A Rapid Turnaround Cryogenic Detector Characterization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic j.; Dipirro, Michael J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Jackson, Clifton E.; Jackson, Michael L.; Kogut, Al; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shirron, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Upcoming major NASA missions such as the Einstein Inflation Probe and the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory require arrays of detectors with thousands of elements, operating at temperatures near l00 mK and sensitive to wavelengths from approx. 100 microns to approx. 3 mm. Such detectors represent a substantial enabling technology for these missions, and must be demonstrated soon in order for them to proceed. In order to make rapid progress on detector development, the cryogenic testing cycle must be made convenient and quick. We have developed a cryogenic detector characterization system capable of testing superconducting detector arrays in formats up to 8 x 32, read out by SQUID multiplexers. The system relies on the cooling of a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator immersed in a liquid helium bath. This approach permits a detector to be cooled from 300K to 50 mK in about 4 hours, so that a test cycle begun in the morning will be over by the end of the day. Tine system is modular, with two identical immersible units, so that while one unit is cooling, the second can be reconfigured for the next battery of tests. We describe the design, construction, and performance of this cryogenic detector testing facility.

  19. Rapid delivery of small payloads to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, T. R.; Mckay, C. P.; Mckenna, P. M.; Pryor, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    To sustain a continued human presence on the surface of Mars or to achieve critical mission objectives the rapid delivery of small payloads may be necessary. Consideration is given to the physics of delivering payloads of about 10 kg over a nominal distance of 1 AU (149.5 x 10 to the 6th km) in 10 days. It is proposed that the most effective method of delivery is the use of a laser lightsail vehicle. The lightsail would be accelerated by a high-power laser from the vicinity of earth to velocities of approximately 174 km/s. Coasting at this velocity for most of the trip the vehicle would be decelerated by a similar laser upon arrival at Mars. The continuous laser power required is calculated to be about 47-billion W and the total duty time of both lasers, determined by optimization of the total energy, is calculated to be 3.9 hours. The laser power scales approximately linearly with payload mass and as the inverse square of the trip time.

  20. Rapid Intraoperative Molecular Characterization of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ganesh M.; Francis, Joshua M.; Rinne, Mikael L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Huang, Franklin W.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Kang, Yun Jee; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Brown, Loreal E.; Charbonneau, Sarah K.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Hoang, Mai P.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Garraway, Levi A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Reardon, David A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Hahn, William C.; Nahed, Brian V.; Ligon, Keith L.; Louis, David N.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Conclusive intraoperative pathologic confirmation of diffuse infiltrative glioma guides the decision to pursue definitive neurosurgical resection. Establishing the intraoperative diagnosis by histologic analysis can be difficult in low-cellularity infiltrative gliomas. Therefore, we developed a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay to detect somatic single-nucleotide variants in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1). OBSERVATIONS This assay was applied to tissue samples from 190 patients with diffuse gliomas, including archived fixed and frozen specimens and tissue obtained intraoperatively. Results demonstrated 96% sensitivity (95% CI, 90%–99%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 95%–100%) for World Health Organization grades II and III gliomas. In a series of live cases, glioma-defining mutations could be identified within 60 minutes, which could facilitate the diagnosis in an intraoperative timeframe. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The genotyping method described herein can establish the diagnosis of low-cellularity tumors like glioma and could be adapted to the point-of-care diagnosis of other lesions that are similarly defined by highly recurrent somatic mutations. PMID:26181761

  1. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program rapid accident assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.

    1990-08-01

    This report develops a scheme for the rapid assessment of a release of toxic chemicals resulting from an accident in one of the most chemical weapon demilitarization plants or storage areas. The system uses such inputs as chemical and pressure sensors monitoring the plant and reports of accidents radioed to the Emergency Operations Center by work parties or monitoring personnel. A size of release can be estimated from previous calculations done in the risk analysis, from back calculation from an open-air chemical sensor measurement, or from an estimated percentage of the inventory of agent at the location of the release. Potential consequences of the estimated release are calculated from real-time meteorological data, surrounding population data, and properties of the agent. In addition to the estimated casualties, area coverage and no-death contours vs time would be calculated. Accidents are assigned to one of four categories: community emergencies, which are involve a threat to off-site personnel; on-post emergencies, which involve a threat only to on-site personnel; advisory, which involves a potential for threat to on-site personnel; and chemical occurrence, which can produce an abnormal operating condition for the plant but no immediate threat to on-site personnel. 9 refs., 20 tabs.

  2. Feasibility study on rapid thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karle, S. C.; Shaligram, A. D.

    2009-09-01

    The rapid thermal processing is widely used for heating of substrates in microelectronics. The use of radiation (UV/Visible/IR) as source of energy provides several advantages. Apart from thermal effects, photonic effects play a significant role in the RTP. Using array of tungsten halogen lamps as a continuous source of radiation, RTP covers a wide range of processing steps such as annealing, dielectric fabrication, metal alloying, diffusion and chemical vapor deposition. This paper reports an attempt made to use RTP in the field of thick film processing. Firing of thick films is an important high temperature step. The desirable physical and chemical properties of the films can be obtained through firing. A paste consisting of active chemicals, solvent, binder, glass powder is transferred on the substrate by means of screen-printing techniques. Further heating the substrates to about 600 °C fires this patterned thick film. This paper reports a novel technique for firing the paste in RTP system. The parameters viz. temperature and time were optimized for resistive paste of Cd-Cu-Cl. The thick films thus obtained were studied for their photosensitivity, I- V characteristics and microscopic structures.

  3. Memory and learning with rapid audiovisual sequences.

    PubMed

    Keller, Arielle S; Sekuler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We examined short-term memory for sequences of visual stimuli embedded in varying multisensory contexts. In two experiments, subjects judged the structure of the visual sequences while disregarding concurrent, but task-irrelevant auditory sequences. Stimuli were eight-item sequences in which varying luminances and frequencies were presented concurrently and rapidly (at 8 Hz). Subjects judged whether the final four items in a visual sequence identically replicated the first four items. Luminances and frequencies in each sequence were either perceptually correlated (Congruent) or were unrelated to one another (Incongruent). Experiment 1 showed that, despite encouragement to ignore the auditory stream, subjects' categorization of visual sequences was strongly influenced by the accompanying auditory sequences. Moreover, this influence tracked the similarity between a stimulus's separate audio and visual sequences, demonstrating that task-irrelevant auditory sequences underwent a considerable degree of processing. Using a variant of Hebb's repetition design, Experiment 2 compared musically trained subjects and subjects who had little or no musical training on the same task as used in Experiment 1. Test sequences included some that intermittently and randomly recurred, which produced better performance than sequences that were generated anew for each trial. The auditory component of a recurring audiovisual sequence influenced musically trained subjects more than it did other subjects. This result demonstrates that stimulus-selective, task-irrelevant learning of sequences can occur even when such learning is an incidental by-product of the task being performed. PMID:26575193

  4. Rapid aneuploidy detection or karyotyping? Ethical reflection

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Antina; Dondorp, Wybo J; Timmermans, Daniëlle RM; van Lith, Jan MM; de Wert, Guido MWR

    2011-01-01

    No consensus exists whether women at increased risk for trisomy 21, 13, and 18 should be offered stand-alone rapid aneuploidy detection (RAD) or karyotyping. In this paper, the ethical implications of a fast, relatively cheap and targeted RAD are examined. The advantages of RAD seem less robust than its proponents suggest. Fast test results only give a short-term psychological benefit. The cost advantage of RAD is apparent, but must be weighed against consequences like missed abnormalities, which are evaluated differently by professionals and pregnant women. Since pre-test information about RAD will have to include telling women about karyotyping as a possible alternative, the advantage of RAD in terms of the quantity of information that needs to be given may also be smaller than suggested. We conclude that none of the supposed arguments in favour of RAD is decisive in itself. Whether the case for RAD may still be regarded as convincing when taking these arguments together seems to depend on one's implicit view of what prenatal screening is about. Are we basically dealing with a test for trisomy 21 and a few conditions more? Or are there good grounds for also testing for the wider range of abnormalities that karyotyping can detect? As professionals and pregnant women may have different views about this, we suggest that the best approach is to offer women a choice between RAD and karyotyping. This approach is most in line with the general aim of prenatal screening: providing opportunities for autonomous reproductive choice. PMID:21629296

  5. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  6. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  7. YAM- A Framework for Rapid Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Biesiadecki, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    YAM is a software development framework with tools for facilitating the rapid development and integration of software in a concurrent software development environment. YAM provides solutions for thorny development challenges associated with software reuse, managing multiple software configurations, the development of software product-lines, multiple platform development and build management. YAM uses release-early, release-often development cycles to allow developers to incrementally integrate their changes into the system on a continual basis. YAM facilitates the creation and merging of branches to support the isolated development of immature software to avoid impacting the stability of the development effort. YAM uses modules and packages to organize and share software across multiple software products. It uses the concepts of link and work modules to reduce sandbox setup times even when the code-base is large. One side-benefit is the enforcement of a strong module-level encapsulation of a module s functionality and interface. This increases design transparency, system stability as well as software reuse. YAM is in use by several mid-size software development teams including ones developing mission-critical software.

  8. A Rapid Molecular Approach for Chromosomal Phasing

    PubMed Central

    Legler, Tina; Cooper, Samantha; Klitgord, Niels; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wong, Catherine; Hodges, Shawn; Koehler, Ryan; Tzonev, Svilen; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the chromosomal phase of pairs of sequence variants – the arrangement of specific alleles as haplotypes – is a routine challenge in molecular genetics. Here we describe Drop-Phase, a molecular method for quickly ascertaining the phase of pairs of DNA sequence variants (separated by 1-200 kb) without cloning or manual single-molecule dilution. In each Drop-Phase reaction, genomic DNA segments are isolated in tens of thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets together with allele-specific fluorescence probes, in a single reaction well. Physically linked alleles partition into the same droplets, revealing their chromosomal phase in the co-distribution of fluorophores across droplets. We demonstrated the accuracy of this method by phasing members of trios (revealing 100% concordance with inheritance information), and demonstrate a common clinical application by phasing CFTR alleles at genomic distances of 11–116 kb in the genomes of cystic fibrosis patients. Drop-Phase is rapid (requiring less than 4 hours), scalable (to hundreds of samples), and effective at long genomic distances (200 kb). PMID:25739099

  9. Rapid activation of gluconeogenesis after intracerebroventricular carbachol.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, R H; Garofalo, M A; Roselino, J E; Kettelhut, I C

    1989-10-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of carbachol (27 nmol in 5 microliters 0.15 M NaCl) produced marked hyperglycemia in 24-h fasted rats, despite the negligible amounts of preformed liver glycosyl residues. To investigate the possibility of a stimulation of gluconeogenesis, conscious unrestrained rats were continuously infused with [14C]bicarbonate (0.51 microliters, 0.18 muCi/min) and label incorporation into circulating glucose determined before and after intraventricular injection. The rate of 14C incorporation into blood glucose of fed rats was not affected by intraventricular injection of 0.15 M NaCl but increased significantly after carbachol administration. In both fed and 24-h fasted rats the hyperglycemia induced by intraventricular carbachol was accompanied by marked increases in plasma lactate. Previous adrenodemedullation prevented both the hyperglycemia and the hyperlactemia. Liver pyruvate kinase activity was reduced in carbachol-treated rats, when the enzyme was assayed with suboptimal concentrations of phosphoenolpyruvate and in the absence of fructose 1,6-biphosphate. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity was not affected. The data suggest that central chemical stimulation with cholinergic agents induces a rapid activation of liver gluconeogenesis, which probably results from an increased sympathetic outflow for epinephrine secretion by the adrenal medulla. PMID:2801933

  10. A mini-rapid-scan-spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Werner

    2004-02-27

    The mini-rapid-scan-spectrophotometer (Mini-RSS) is a scanning single-beam spectrophotometer that has been patented. It is based on a minimum of reflections and involves exclusively mirrors as beam-deflecting components. This way stray light is minimized, which results in an excellent light-throughput, high dynamics, low cost, compactness and rigidity. The Mini-RSS has been designed as a multi-purpose instrument that allows absorption, transmission, reflection, fluorescence and luminescence measurements in a single-beam mode. Its spectral range extends from the UV and visible spectrum to the IR. This provides for the possibility to measure even optically unfavorable, highly turbid or scattering samples that would be otherwise inaccessible to investigations with commercial spectrophotometers. A miniaturized and very sensitive photomultiplier-module (PM) of high dynamics allows in the visible spectral range absorbance measurements that cover up to four OD units. The Mini-RSS is capable of scanning up to 100 spectra per second with a resolution of 12 bit and 500 points. The linear dispersion is currently 5 nm and the stray light level <0.01%. PMID:14980786

  11. Rapid detection of irradiated frozen hamburgers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delincée, Henry

    2002-03-01

    DNA comet assay can be employed as a rapid and inexpensive screening test to check whether frozen ground beef patties (hamburgers) have been irradiated as a means to increase their safety by eliminating pathogenic bacteria, e.g. E. coli O157:H7. Such a detection procedure will provide an additional check on compliance with existing regulations, e.g. enforcement of labelling and rules in international trade. Frozen ready prepared hamburgers from the market place were `electron irradiated' with doses of 0, 1.3, 2.7, 4.5 and 7.2kGy covering the range of potential commercial irradiation. DNA fragmentation in the hamburgers was made visible within a few hours using the comet assay, and non-irradiated hamburgers could be easily discerned from the irradiated ones. Even after 9 months of frozen storage, irradiated hamburgers could be identified. Since DNA fragmentation may also occur with other food processes (e.g. temperature abuse), positive screening tests shall be confirmed using a validated method to specifically prove an irradiation treatment, e.g. EN 1784 or EN 1785.

  12. Polyploidy can drive rapid adaptation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Selmecki, Anna; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Richmond, Phillip A.; Guillet, Marie; Shoresh, Noam; Sorenson, Amber; De, Subhajyoti; Kishony, Roy; Michor, Franziska; Dowell, Robin; Pellman, David

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is observed across the tree of life, yet its influence on evolution remains incompletely understood1–4. Polyploidy, usually whole genome duplication (WGD), is proposed to alter the rate of evolutionary adaptation. This could occur through complex effects on the frequency or fitness of beneficial mutations 2,5–7. For example, in diverse cell types and organisms, immediately after a WGD, newly formed polyploids missegregate chromosomes and undergo genetic instability8–13. The instability following WGDs is thought to provide adaptive mutations in microorganisms13,14 and can promote tumorigenesis in mammalian cells11,15. Polyploidy may also affect adaptation independent of beneficial mutations through ploidy-specific changes in cell physiology16. Here, we performed in vitro evolution experiments to directly test whether polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation. Compared to haploids and diploids, tetraploids underwent significantly faster adaptation. Mathematical modeling suggested that rapid adaptation of tetraploids was driven by higher rates of beneficial mutations with stronger fitness effects, which was supported by whole-genome sequencing and phenotypic analyses of evolved clones. Chromosome aneuploidy, concerted chromosome loss, and point mutations all provided large fitness gains. We identified several mutations whose beneficial effects were manifest specifically in the tetraploid strains. Together, these results provide direct quantitative evidence that in some environments polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25731168

  13. [Rapid opiate detoxification under anesthesia (RODA)].

    PubMed

    Dubols, N; Hallet, C; Luppens, D; Ansseau, M; Charlier, C

    2013-01-01

    Rapid Opiate Detoxification under Anesthesia (RODA) involves the use of opiate antagonists combined with anesthesia and pharmacotherapy to reduce withdrawal symptoms. The aim of our study was to measure the plasma concentrations of heroin metabolites and methadone during anesthesia and patient stay at the hospital in order to assess the amount of active substances at each protocol step. Plasma concentrations of antagonists were also quantified and compared to the recommended target values. Blood samples were drawn in 10 patients undergoing RODA at different times of the procedure (during anesthesia, in post-anesthesia care unit and in psychiatry unit). The plasma concentrations of heroin metabolites, methadone and antagonists were measured using a previously described method. Heroin active metabolites were no longer detected in the patient blood when helshe left the hospital; by contrast, methadone was still present at significant concentrations 3 days after the beginning of the detoxification procedure. Naltrexone analysis allowed us to adjust doses to insure opiate receptor blockade during acute withdrawal, which is a critical period. PMID:23888580

  14. Rapid innovation diffusion in social networks

    PubMed Central

    Kreindler, Gabriel E.; Young, H. Peyton

    2014-01-01

    Social and technological innovations often spread through social networks as people respond to what their neighbors are doing. Previous research has identified specific network structures, such as local clustering, that promote rapid diffusion. Here we derive bounds that are independent of network structure and size, such that diffusion is fast whenever the payoff gain from the innovation is sufficiently high and the agents’ responses are sufficiently noisy. We also provide a simple method for computing an upper bound on the expected time it takes for the innovation to become established in any finite network. For example, if agents choose log-linear responses to what their neighbors are doing, it takes on average less than 80 revision periods for the innovation to diffuse widely in any network, provided that the error rate is at least 5% and the payoff gain (relative to the status quo) is at least 150%. Qualitatively similar results hold for other smoothed best-response functions and populations that experience heterogeneous payoff shocks. PMID:25024191

  15. Rapid learning in visual cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Dragoi, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Although changes in brain activity during learning have been extensively examined at the single neuron level, the coding strategies employed by cell populations remain mysterious. We examined cell populations in macaque area V4 during a rapid form of perceptual learning that emerges within tens of minutes. Multiple single units and LFP responses were recorded as monkeys improved their performance in an image discrimination task. We show that the increase in behavioral performance during learning is predicted by a tight coordination of spike timing with local population activity. More spike-LFP theta synchronization is correlated with higher learning performance, while high-frequency synchronization is unrelated with changes in performance, but these changes were absent once learning had stabilized and stimuli became familiar, or in the absence of learning. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of plasticity in visual cortex by which elevated low-frequency synchronization between individual neurons and local population activity accompanies the improvement in performance during learning. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08417.001 PMID:26308578

  16. Rapid crystallization from acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Ma, Xiao-Liang; He, Jin; Guo, Wei-Hong; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Zhou, Bo-Ru

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports on an ultrasonic levitation system developed for crystallization from solution in a containerless condition. The system has been proven to be able to levitate droplets stably and grow crystals rapidly and freely from a levitated droplet. Crystals of four samples, including NaCl, NH(4)Cl, lysozyme, and proteinase K, were obtained successfully utilizing the system. The studies showed that the crystals obtained from the acoustically levitated droplets all exhibited higher growth rates, larger sizes, better shapes, fewer crystals, as well as fewer twins and shards, compared with the control on a vessel wall. The results indicated that containerless ultrasonic levitation could play a key role in improving the crystallization of both inorganic salts and proteins. The ultrasonic levitation system could be used as a ground-based microgravity simulation platform, which could swiftly perform crystallization and screening of crystallization conditions for space crystallization and other ground-based containerless techniques. Moreover, the approach could also be conveniently applied to researching the dynamics and mechanism of crystallization. In addition, the device could be used for the preparation of high-purity materials, analysis of minute or poisonous samples, study of living cells, environmental monitoring, and so on. PMID:22501088

  17. Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Shankar; Lauer, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    When sudden catastrophic events occur, it becomes critical for coastal communities to detect and respond to environmental transformations because failure to do so may undermine overall ecosystem resilience and threaten people's livelihoods. We therefore asked how capable of detecting rapid ecological change following massive environmental disruptions local, indigenous people are. We assessed the direction and periodicity of experimental learning of people in the Western Solomon Islands after a tsunami in 2007. We compared the results of marine science surveys with local ecological knowledge of the benthos across 3 affected villages and 3 periods before and after the tsunami. We sought to determine how people recognize biophysical changes in the environment before and after catastrophic events such as earthquakes and tsunamis and whether people have the ability to detect ecological changes over short time scales or need longer time scales to recognize changes. Indigenous people were able to detect changes in the benthos over time. Detection levels differed between marine science surveys and local ecological knowledge sources over time, but overall patterns of statistically significant detection of change were evident for various habitats. Our findings have implications for marine conservation, coastal management policies, and disaster-relief efforts because when people are able to detect ecological changes, this, in turn, affects how they exploit and manage their marine resources. PMID:24528101

  18. Computationally designed libraries for rapid enzyme stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Wijma, Hein J.; Floor, Robert J.; Jekel, Peter A.; Baker, David; Marrink, Siewert J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to engineer enzymes and other proteins to any desired stability would have wide-ranging applications. Here, we demonstrate that computational design of a library with chemically diverse stabilizing mutations allows the engineering of drastically stabilized and fully functional variants of the mesostable enzyme limonene epoxide hydrolase. First, point mutations were selected if they significantly improved the predicted free energy of protein folding. Disulfide bonds were designed using sampling of backbone conformational space, which tripled the number of experimentally stabilizing disulfide bridges. Next, orthogonal in silico screening steps were used to remove chemically unreasonable mutations and mutations that are predicted to increase protein flexibility. The resulting library of 64 variants was experimentally screened, which revealed 21 (pairs of) stabilizing mutations located both in relatively rigid and in flexible areas of the enzyme. Finally, combining 10–12 of these confirmed mutations resulted in multi-site mutants with an increase in apparent melting temperature from 50 to 85°C, enhanced catalytic activity, preserved regioselectivity and a >250-fold longer half-life. The developed Framework for Rapid Enzyme Stabilization by Computational libraries (FRESCO) requires far less screening than conventional directed evolution. PMID:24402331

  19. Rapid Multiple Immunoenzyme Assay of Mycotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Urusov, Alexandr E.; Zherdev, Anatoly V.; Petrakova, Alina V.; Sadykhov, Elchin G.; Koroleva, Olga V.; Dzantiev, Boris B.

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins are low molecular weight fungal metabolites that pose a threat as toxic contaminants of food products, thereby necessitating their effective monitoring and control. Microplate ELISA can be used for this purpose, but this method is characteristically time consuming, with a duration extending to several hours. This report proposes a variant of the ELISA method for the detection and quantification of three mycotoxins, ochratoxin A, aflatoxin B1 and zearalenone, in the kinetic regime. The main requirement for the proposed kinetic protocol was to provide a rapid method that combined sensitivity and accuracy. The use of biotin with an extended spacer together with a streptavidin–polyperoxidase conjugate provided high signal levels, despite these interactions occurring under non-equilibrium conditions. Duration of the individual mycotoxin assays was 20 min, whereas the analysis of all three mycotoxins in parallel reached a maximum duration of 25 min. Recovery of at least 95% mycotoxins in water-organic extracts was shown. The developed assays were successfully validated using poultry processing products and corn samples spiked with known quantities of mycotoxins. The detection limits for aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A and zearalenone in these substances were 0.24, 1.2 and 3 ng/g, respectively. PMID:25633750

  20. Rapid whisker movements in sleeping newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Uitermarkt, Brandt D; Fanning, Alexander S; Sokoloff, Greta; Blumberg, Mark S

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous activity in the sensory periphery drives infant brain activity and is thought to contribute to the formation of retinotopic and somatotopic maps. In infant rats during active (or REM) sleep, brainstem-generated spontaneous activity triggers hundreds of thousands of skeletal muscle twitches each day; sensory feedback from the resulting limb movements is a primary activator of forebrain activity. The rodent whisker system, with its precise isomorphic mapping of individual whiskers to discrete brain areas, has been a key contributor to our understanding of somatotopic maps and developmental plasticity. But although whisker movements are controlled by dedicated skeletal muscles, spontaneous whisker activity has not been entertained as a contributing factor to the development of this system. Here we report in 3- to 6-day-old rats that whiskers twitch rapidly and asynchronously during active sleep; furthermore, neurons in whisker thalamus exhibit bursts of activity that are tightly associated with twitches but occur infrequently during waking. Finally, we observed barrel-specific cortical activity during periods of twitching. This is the first report of self-generated, sleep-related twitches in the developing whisker system, a sensorimotor system that is unique for the precision with which it can be experimentally manipulated. The discovery of whisker twitching will allow us to attain a better understanding of the contributions of peripheral sensory activity to somatosensory integration and plasticity in the developing nervous system. PMID:23084988

  1. Rapidly evolving microorganisms with high biofuel tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Zhang, Qiucen; Lang, Wendy; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Replacing non-renewable energy sources is one of the biggest and most exciting challenges of our generation. Algae and bacteria are poised to become major renewable biofuels if strains can be developed that provide a high,consistent and robust yield of oil. One major stumbling block towards this goal is the lack of tolerance to high concentrations of biofuels like isobutanol. Using traditional bioengineering techniques to remedy this face the hurdle of identifying the correct pathway or gene to modify. But the multiplicity of interactions inside a cell makes it very hard to determine what to modify a priori. Instead, we propose a technology that does not require prior knowledge of the genes or pathways to modify. In our approach that marries microfabrication and ecology, spatial heterogeneity is used as a knob to speed up evolution in the desired direction. Recently, we have successfully used this approach to demonstrate the rapid emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistance in as little as ten hours. Here, we describe our experimental results in developing new strains of micro-organisms with high oil tolerance. Besides biofuel production, our work is also relevant to oil spill clean-ups.

  2. Algorithm for Rapid Tomography of Gas Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Fischer, M.L.; Gadgil, A.J.; Sextro, R.G.

    2000-06-27

    We present a new computed tomography method, the low third derivative (LTD) method, that is particularly suited for reconstructing the spatial distribution of gas concentrations from path-integral data for a small number of optical paths. The method finds a spatial distribution of gas concentrations that (1) has path integrals that agree with measured path integrals, and (2) has a low third spatial derivative in each direction, at every point. The trade-off between (1) and (2) is controlled by an adjustable parameter, which can be set based on analysis of the path-integral data. The method produces a set of linear equations, which can be solved with a single matrix multiplication if the constraint that all concentrations must be positive is ignored; the method is therefore extremely rapid. Analysis of experimental data from thousands of concentration distributions shows that the method works nearly as well as Smooth Basis Function Minimization (the best method previously available), yet is 100 times faster.

  3. The Rapid Geodetic Survey System (RGSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddle, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    The Rapid Geodetic Survey System (RGSS) is a system employing a high-accuracy gimbaled inertial platform. It provides a cost-effective capability for accurate direct measurement of the change in position, elevation, gravity intensity and deflection of the vertical from an initial point. The RGSS is an adaptation of the production version of the U.S. Army Position and Azimuth Determining System (PADS). Several hardware and software enhancements to improve the performance of the system, primarily for gravity vector survey, have occurred over the last few years. The basic principles for the control of error in the survey measurements due to noise and systematic error are discussed below. Actual acceptance test results for the RGSS which indicate an inherent capability of the system to measure change in the deflection of the vertical to a few-tenths of an arcsecond over survey periods of one to two hours using careful survey techniques are also presented. Finally a simple method to extend the capability of the system for longer duration surveys is indicated.

  4. Rapid estimates of relative water content.

    PubMed

    Smart, R E

    1974-02-01

    Relative water content may be accurately estimated using the ratio of tissue fresh weight to tissue turgid weight, termed here relative tissue weight. That relative water content and relative tissue weight are linearly related is demonstrated algebraically. The mean value of r(2) for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) leaf tissue over eight separate sampling occasions was 0.993. Similarly high values were obtained for maize (Zea mays cv. Cornell M-3) (0.998) and apple (Malus sylvestris cv. Northern Spy) (0.997) using a range of leaf ages. The proposal by Downey and Miller (1971. Rapid measurements of relative turgidity in maize (Zea mays L.). New Phytol. 70: 555-560) that relative water content in maize may be estimated from water uptake was also investigated for grapevine leaves; this was found to be a less reliable estimate than that obtained with relative tissue weight. With either method, there is a need for calibration, although this could be achieved for relative tissue weight at least with only a few subsamples. PMID:16658686

  5. Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System (HERTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    A recent six month investigation focused on: "Determining the benefits of propelling a scientific spacecraft by an 'Electric Sail' propulsion system to the edge of our solar system (the Heliopause), a distance of 100 to 120 AU, in ten years or less" has recently been completed by the Advance Concepts Office at NASA's MSFC. The concept investigated has been named the Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System (HERTS) by the MSFC team. The HERTS is a revolutionary propellant-less propulsion concept that is ideal for deep space missions to the Outer Planets, Heliopause, and beyond. It is unique in that it uses momentum exchange from naturally occurring solar wind protons to propel a spacecraft within the heliosphere. The propulsion system consists of an array of electrically positively-biased wires that extend outward 20 km from a rotating (one revolution per hour) spacecraft. It was determined that the HERTS system can accelerate a spacecraft to velocities as much as two to three times that possible by any realistic extrapolation of current state-of-the-art propulsion technologies- including solar electric and solar sail propulsion systems. The data produced show that a scientific spacecraft could reach distances of 100AU in less than 10 years. Moreover, it can be reasonably expected that this system could be developed within a decade and provide meaningful Heliophysics Science and Outer Planetary Science returns in the 2025-2035 timeframe.

  6. Synthetic optical holography for rapid nanoimaging

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, M.; Carney, P. S.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2014-01-01

    Holography has paved the way for phase imaging in a variety of wide-field techniques, including electron, X-ray and optical microscopy. In scanning optical microscopy, however, the serial fashion of image acquisition seems to challenge a direct implementation of traditional holography. Here we introduce synthetic optical holography (SOH) for quantitative phase-resolved imaging in scanning optical microscopy. It uniquely combines fast phase imaging, technical simplicity and simultaneous operation at visible and infrared frequencies with a single reference arm. We demonstrate SOH with a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM) where it enables reliable quantitative phase-resolved near-field imaging with unprecedented speed. We apply these capabilities to nanoscale, non-invasive and rapid screening of grain boundaries in CVD-grown graphene, by recording 65 kilopixel near-field images in 26 s and 2.3 megapixel images in 13 min. Beyond s-SNOM, the SOH concept could boost the implementation of holography in other scanning imaging applications such as confocal microscopy. PMID:24651276

  7. The rapid deformation behaviour of various polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walley, S. M.; Field, J. E.; Pope, Rh.; Safford, N. A.

    1991-12-01

    Engineers are increasingly applying polymers in structures that have to withstand impact. However, compared to metals, relatively few studies of their mechanical properties at high rates of deformation have been carried out. Ibis paper describes an investigation of the high strain-rate behaviour in compression of a number of widely used polymeric materials. The necessity of proper materials characterization is discussed, as the variation of commercial grades bearing the same name is considerable. Also polymers are much more susceptible to change during storage than, for example, metals. A knowledge of thermal properties is important when considering rapid (and hence adiabatic) deformation, and tables of such properties are presented. Extensive use was made of high-speed photography (interframe time 7 μs) to study qualitatively the behaviour of solid discs of polymers at strain rates of 2.5 × 10^3 s^{-1} both at room temperature (300 K) and at 100 K. The framing speed was sufficiently fast to capture fracture initiation and subsequent failure of all the polymers studied, including polycarbonate (PC) which fails in an almost explosive manner at a natural strain of ca. 1.1. PC was also seen to fail at this level of strain at 100 K. Quantitatively, this technique was used to check the applicability of Avitzur's analysis of a deforming annulus to polymers. Agreement was found to be good and hence friction could be measured during deformation at high rates of strain. The best lubricant (i.e. the one that reduces friction closest to zero) was found to be petroleum jelly. Similar studies were also carried out at low strain rates using an Instron mechanical testing machine. Agreement with Avitzur's analysis was found to be poorer, and no lubricant was found to reduce friction below about 3-4%. Higher strain rates were achieved using two sizes of direct impact Hopkinson bars, both developed in this laboratory. Care was taken to eliminate sources of error, including

  8. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  9. RAPID DYNAMICAL CHAOS IN AN EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Katherine M.; Winn, Joshua N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Agol, Eric; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2012-08-10

    We report on the long-term dynamical evolution of the two-planet Kepler-36 system, which consists of a super-Earth and a sub-Neptune in a tightly packed orbital configuration. The orbits of the planets, which we studied through numerical integrations of initial conditions that are consistent with observations of the system, are chaotic with a Lyapunov time of only {approx}10 years. The chaos is a consequence of a particular set of orbital resonances, with the inner planet orbiting 34 times for every 29 orbits of the outer planet. The rapidity of the chaos is due to the interaction of the 29:34 resonance with the nearby first-order 6:7 resonance, in contrast to the usual case in which secular terms in the Hamiltonian play a dominant role. Only one contiguous region of phase space, accounting for {approx}4.5% of the sample of initial conditions studied, corresponds to planetary orbits that do not show large-scale orbital instabilities on the timescale of our integrations ({approx}200 million years). Restricting the orbits to this long-lived region allows a refinement of estimates of the masses and radii of the planets. We find that the long-lived region consists of the initial conditions that satisfy the Hill stability criterion by the largest margin. Any successful theory for the formation of this system will need to account for why its current state is so close to unstable regions of phase space.

  10. Final rapid reactivation project environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-10

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Rapid Reactivation Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to increase production of neutron generators from the current capability of 600 units per year up to 2,000 units per year. The project would use existing buildings and infrastructure to the maximum extent possible to meet the additional production needs. The increased production levels would necessitate modifications and additions involving a total area of approximately 26,290 gross square feet at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Technical Area 1. Additional production equipment would be procured and installed. The no-action alternative would be to continue production activities at the current capability of 600 units per year. The EA analyzes effects on health, safety, and air quality, resulting from construction and operation and associated cumulative effects. A detailed description of the proposed action and its environmental consequences is presented in the EA.

  11. Web tools for rapid experimental visualization prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Jonathan W.; Livingstion, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Quite often a researcher finds themselves looking at spreadsheets of high-dimensional data generated by experimental models and user studies. We can use analysis to challenge or confirm hypothesis, but unexpected results can easily be lost in the shuffle. For this reason, it would be useful to visualize the results so we can explore our data and make new discoveries. Web browsers have become increasingly capable for creating complex, multi-view applications. Javascript is quickly becoming a de facto standard for scripting, online and offline. This work demonstrates the use of web technologies as a powerful tool for rapid visualization prototyping. We have developed two prototypes: One for high-dimensional results of the abELICIT - multi-agent version of the ELICIT platform tasked with collaborating to identify the parameters of a pending attack. Another prototype displays responses to a user study on the effectiveness of multi-layer visualization techniques. We created coordinated multiple views prototypes in the Google Chrome web browser written in Javascript, CSS and HTML. We will discuss the benefits and shortcomings of this approach.

  12. A Rapid Process for Fabricating Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Luo, Li-Siang

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a low-toxicity and environmentally-friendly material applied on devices, sensors or actuators for “green” usage. A porous ZnO film deposited by a rapid process of aerosol deposition (AD) was employed as the gas-sensitive material in a CO gas sensor to reduce both manufacturing cost and time, and to further extend the AD application for a large-scale production. The relative resistance change (ΔR/R) of the ZnO gas sensor was used for gas measurement. The fabricated ZnO gas sensors were measured with operating temperatures ranging from 110 °C to 180 °C, and CO concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 1000 ppm. The sensitivity and the response time presented good performance at increasing operating temperatures and CO concentrations. AD was successfully for applied for making ZnO gas sensors with great potential for achieving high deposition rates at low deposition temperatures, large-scale production and low cost. PMID:25010696

  13. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (/sup 47/Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO/sub 3/. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the /sup 47/Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison.

  14. Integration of rapid prototyping into product development

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is a vertically multi-disciplined research and development laboratory with a long history of designing and developing d electro-mechanical products in the national interest. Integrating new technologies into the prototyping phase of our development cycle is necessary to reduce the cycle time from initial design to finished product. The introduction of rapid prototyping machines into the marketplace promises to revolutionize the process of producing prototype parts with relative speed and production-like quality. Issues of accuracy, feature definition, and surface finish continue to drive research and development of these processes. Sandia uses Stereolithography (SL) and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) capabilities to support internal product development efforts. The primary use of SL and SLS is to produce patterns for investment casting in support of a Sandia managed program called FASTCAST that integrates computational technologies and experimental data into the investment casting process. These processes are also used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. This presentation will provide an overview of the SL and SLS processes and an update of our experience and success in integrating these technologies into the product development cycle. Also presented will be several examples of prototype parts manufactured using SL and SLS with a focus on application, accuracy, surface and feature definition.

  15. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment: Work Plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Garman, Steven L.; Walters, Annika; Ray, Andrea; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wesner, Jeff S.; O’Donnell, Michael S.; Sherrill, Kirk R.; Babel, Nils C.; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) being conducted for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change, and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks. The REA also may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing the cumulative effects of a variety of land uses. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and partners for the ecoregion, identify the information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant aquatic and terrestrial species and communities that are to be conserved and (or) restored. The REA also will evaluate major drivers of ecosystem change (Change Agents) currently affecting or likely to affect the status of Conservation Elements. We selected 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages to be included as Conservation Elements. We will address the four primary Change Agents—development, fire, invasive species, and climate change—required for the REA. The purpose of the work plan for the Wyoming Basin REA is to document the selection process for, and final list of, Management Questions, Conservation Elements, and Change Agents. The work plan also presents the overall assessment framework that will be used to assess the status of Conservation Elements and answer Management Questions.

  16. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena. PMID:26015715

  17. Rapid Identification of Emerging Pathogens: Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Hofstadler, Steven A.; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Levene, Harold M.; Hannis, James C.; Harrell, Patina M.; Neuman, Benjamin; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Jiang, Yun; Ranken, Raymond; Drader, Jared J.; Samant, Vivek; Griffey, Richard H.; McNeil, John A.; Crooke, Stanley T.; Ecker, David J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new approach for infectious disease surveillance that facilitates rapid identification of known and emerging pathogens. The process uses broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify nucleic acid targets from large groupings of organisms, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for accurate mass measurements of PCR products, and base composition signature analysis to identify organisms in a sample. We demonstrate this principle by using 14 isolates of 9 diverse Coronavirus spp., including the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We show that this method could identify and distinguish between SARS and other known CoV, including the human CoV 229E and OC43, individually and in a mixture of all 3 human viruses. The sensitivity of detection, measured by using titered SARS-CoV spiked into human serum, was ≈1 PFU/mL. This approach, applicable to the surveillance of bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal pathogens, is capable of automated analysis of >900 PCR reactions per day. PMID:15757550

  18. Rapid electrochemical detection on a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Peter B; Huang, Ming-Chun; Truong, Newton; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2013-08-01

    We present a compact mobile phone platform for rapid, quantitative biomolecular detection. This system consists of an embedded circuit for signal processing and data analysis, and disposable microfluidic chips for fluidic handling and biosensing. Capillary flow is employed for sample loading, processing, and pumping to enhance operational portability and simplicity. Graphical step-by-step instructions displayed on the phone assists the operator through the detection process. After the completion of each measurement, the results are displayed on the screen for immediate assessment and the data is automatically saved to the phone's memory for future analysis and transmission. Validation of this device was carried out by detecting Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), an important biomarker for malaria, with a lower limit of detection of 16 ng mL(-1) in human serum. The simple detection process can be carried out with two loading steps and takes 15 min to complete each measurement. Due to its compact size and high performance, this device offers immense potential as a widely accessible, point-of-care diagnostic platform, especially in remote and rural areas. In addition to its impact on global healthcare, this technology is relevant to other important applications including food safety, environmental monitoring and biosecurity. PMID:23689554

  19. Morphological instability in rapid directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, G. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1990-01-01

    Mullins and Sekerka (1964) showed for fixed temperature gradient that the planar interface is linearly stable for all pulling speeds V above some critical value, the absolute stability limit. Near this limit, where solidification rates are rapid, the assumption of local equilibrium at the interface may be violated. Here, nonequilibrium effects are incorporated into a linear stability analysis of the planar front by allowing the segregation coefficient and interface temperature to depend on V in a thermodynamically consistent way. The absolute stability limit of the cellular mode is modified. A new oscillatory state is formed which, in the absence of latent heat, has a critical wavenumber of zero; by itself this instability would lead to the formation of solute bands in the solid. This mode has its own absolute-stability limit determined by solute trapping and kinetics. Under certain conditions, there exists a window of stability above the steady absolute-stability boundary and below the oscillatory-stability boundary; here the planar segregation-free state is restabilized.

  20. GMTSAR Software for Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Mellors, R. J.; Tong, X.; Wei, M.; Wessel, P.

    2010-12-01

    GMTSAR is an open source (GNU General Public License) InSAR processing system designed for users familiar with Generic Mapping Tools (GMT). The code is written in C and will compile on any computer where GMT and NETCDF are installed. The system has three main components: 1) a preprocessor for each satellite data type (e.g., ERS, Envisat, and ALOS) to convert the native format and orbital information into a generic format; 2) an InSAR processor to focus and align stacks of images, map topography into phase, and form the complex interferogram; 3) a postprocessor, mostly based on GMT, to filter the interferogram and construct interferometric products of phase, coherence, phase gradient, and line-of-sight displacement in both radar and geographic coordinates. GMT is used to display all the products as postscript files and kml-images for Google Earth to be shared rapidly with other investigators. A set of C-shell scripts has been developed for standard 2-pass processing as well as image alignment for stacking and time series. ScanSAR processing is also possible but requires a knowledgeable user. The code was used to quickly process and display mosaics of interferograms from the M8.8 Maule Chile Earthquake as well as the M7.2 El Major-Cucapah Earthquake. Software and test data are available at ftp://topex.ucsd.edu/pub/gmtsar.

  1. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena. PMID:26015715

  2. Polyploidy can drive rapid adaptation in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmecki, Anna M.; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Richmond, Phillip A.; Guillet, Marie; Shoresh, Noam; Sorenson, Amber L.; de, Subhajyoti; Kishony, Roy; Michor, Franziska; Dowell, Robin; Pellman, David

    2015-03-01

    Polyploidy is observed across the tree of life, yet its influence on evolution remains incompletely understood. Polyploidy, usually whole-genome duplication, is proposed to alter the rate of evolutionary adaptation. This could occur through complex effects on the frequency or fitness of beneficial mutations. For example, in diverse cell types and organisms, immediately after a whole-genome duplication, newly formed polyploids missegregate chromosomes and undergo genetic instability. The instability following whole-genome duplications is thought to provide adaptive mutations in microorganisms and can promote tumorigenesis in mammalian cells. Polyploidy may also affect adaptation independently of beneficial mutations through ploidy-specific changes in cell physiology. Here we perform in vitro evolution experiments to test directly whether polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation. Compared with haploids and diploids, tetraploids undergo significantly faster adaptation. Mathematical modelling suggests that rapid adaptation of tetraploids is driven by higher rates of beneficial mutations with stronger fitness effects, which is supported by whole-genome sequencing and phenotypic analyses of evolved clones. Chromosome aneuploidy, concerted chromosome loss, and point mutations all provide large fitness gains. We identify several mutations whose beneficial effects are manifest specifically in the tetraploid strains. Together, these results provide direct quantitative evidence that in some environments polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation.

  3. Computationally designed libraries for rapid enzyme stabilization.

    PubMed

    Wijma, Hein J; Floor, Robert J; Jekel, Peter A; Baker, David; Marrink, Siewert J; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-02-01

    The ability to engineer enzymes and other proteins to any desired stability would have wide-ranging applications. Here, we demonstrate that computational design of a library with chemically diverse stabilizing mutations allows the engineering of drastically stabilized and fully functional variants of the mesostable enzyme limonene epoxide hydrolase. First, point mutations were selected if they significantly improved the predicted free energy of protein folding. Disulfide bonds were designed using sampling of backbone conformational space, which tripled the number of experimentally stabilizing disulfide bridges. Next, orthogonal in silico screening steps were used to remove chemically unreasonable mutations and mutations that are predicted to increase protein flexibility. The resulting library of 64 variants was experimentally screened, which revealed 21 (pairs of) stabilizing mutations located both in relatively rigid and in flexible areas of the enzyme. Finally, combining 10-12 of these confirmed mutations resulted in multi-site mutants with an increase in apparent melting temperature from 50 to 85°C, enhanced catalytic activity, preserved regioselectivity and a >250-fold longer half-life. The developed Framework for Rapid Enzyme Stabilization by Computational libraries (FRESCO) requires far less screening than conventional directed evolution. PMID:24402331

  4. Rapid calibration of seven-hole probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericksen, A. L.; Gallington, R. W.; Rao, B. M.; Barankiewicz, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the major conclusions and some of the key supporting analyses resulting from the calibration and application of two small seven hole probes at NASA Lewis Research Center. These probes can produce reasonably accurate and rapid surveys of unknown steady flow fields which may include flow angles up to 70 degrees and Mach numbers up to 0.8. The probes were calibrated with both 'complete' and 'reduced' test matrices. Both types of test matrices produced similar results suggesting the the reduced matrices are adequate for most purposes. The average accuracy fo the calibration was about the same as that achieved in previous seven hole probe calibrations. At the higher Mach numbers, the calibration was sensitive to the diameter of the free jet in the calibration facility. Over a narrow angular range at the higher Mach numbers, the system had serious repeatability problems. This lack or repeatability apparently results from aliasing of high frequency (20 to 40 Hz) noise with the data acquisition system sampling frequency of 10 Hz. Analyses show that these noise frequencies are probably not related to airflow dynamics in the connecting tubing.

  5. Rapid world modelling from a mobile platform

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.E.; Jones, J.P.; Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-04-01

    The ability to successfully use and interact with a computerized world model is dependent on the ability to create an accurate world model. The goal of this project was to develop a prototype system to remotely deploy sensors into a workspace, collect surface information, and rapidly build an accurate world model of that workspace. A key consideration was that the workspace areas are typically hazardous environments, where it is difficult or impossible for humans to enter. Therefore, the system needed to be fully remote, with no external connections. To accomplish this goal, an electric, mobile platform with battery power sufficient for both the platform and sensor electronics was procured and 3D range sensors were deployed on the platform to capture surface data within the workspace. A radio Ethernet connection was used to provide communications to the vehicle and all on-board electronics. Video from on-board cameras was also transmitted to the base station and used to teleoperate the vehicle. Range data generated by the on-board 3D sensors was transformed into surface maps, or models. Registering the sensor location to a consistent reference frame as the platform moved through the workspace allowed construction of a detailed 3D world model of the extended workspace.

  6. A Rapid Method for Isolating Glandular Trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Yerger, Ellen H.; Grazzini, Richard A.; Hesk, David; Cox-Foster, Diana L.; Craig, Richard; Mumma, Ralph O.

    1992-01-01

    A physical method is described for the rapid isolation of plant trichomes, with emphasis on stalked glandular types. The technique involved breaking frozen trichomes with powdered dry ice and collection of glandular heads by sieving from larger tissue fragments. This method was applied to several plants that bear similar stalked trichomes: geranium (Pelargonium), potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), squash (Cucurbita pepo), and velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti). The tissue preparation was of sufficient quality without further purification for biochemical and molecular studies. The preparation maintained the biochemical integrity of the trichomes for active enzymes and usable nucleic acids. A large quantity of tissue can be harvested; for example, 351 milligrams dry weight of glandular trichomes were harvested from geranium pedicels in 12 hours. The utility of the technique was demonstrated by examining the fatty acid composition of tall glandular trichomes of geraniums, Pelargonium ×hortorum L.H. Bailey. These purified cells contained high concentrations of unusual ω5-unsaturated fatty acids, proportionally 23.4% of total fatty acids in the trichomes. When the trichomes were removed, the supporting tissue contained no ω5-fatty acids, thereby unequivocally localizing ω5-fatty acids to the trichomes. Because ω5-fatty acids are unique precursors for the biosynthesis of ω5-anacardic acids, we conclude that anacardic acid synthesis must occur in the glandular trichomes. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668834

  7. Rapid generation of fowl adenovirus 9 vectors.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Griffin, Bryan; de Jong, Jondavid; Krell, Peter J; Nagy, Éva

    2015-10-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) have the largest genomes of any fully sequenced adenovirus genome, and are widely considered as excellent platforms for vaccine development and gene therapy. As such, there is a strong need for stream-lined protocols/strategies for the generation of recombinant adenovirus genomes. Current genome engineering strategies rely upon plasmid based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli BJ5183. This process is time-consuming, involves multiple cloning steps, and low efficiency recombination. This report describes a novel system for the more rapid generation of recombinant fowl adenovirus genomes using the lambda Red recombinase system in E. coli DH10B. In this strategy, PCR based amplicons with around 50 nt long homologous arms, a unique SwaI site and a chloramphenicol resistance gene fragment (CAT cassette), are introduced into the FAdV-9 genome in a highly efficient and site-specific manner. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system we generated FAdV-9 ORF2, and FAdV-9 ORF11 deleted, CAT marked and unmarked FAdV-9 infectious clones (FAdmids), and replaced either ORF2 or ORF11, with an EGFP expression cassette or replaced ORF2 with an EGFP coding sequence via the unique SwaI sites, in approximately one month. All recombinant FAdmids expressed EGFP and were fully infectious in CH-SAH cells. PMID:26238923

  8. Rapid evolution of the human gut virome.

    PubMed

    Minot, Samuel; Bryson, Alexandra; Chehoud, Christel; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2013-07-23

    Humans are colonized by immense populations of viruses, which metagenomic analysis shows are mostly unique to each individual. To investigate the origin and evolution of the human gut virome, we analyzed the viral community of one adult individual over 2.5 y by extremely deep metagenomic sequencing (56 billion bases of purified viral sequence from 24 longitudinal fecal samples). After assembly, 478 well-determined contigs could be identified, which are inferred to correspond mostly to previously unstudied bacteriophage genomes. Fully 80% of these types persisted throughout the duration of the 2.5-y study, indicating long-term global stability. Mechanisms of base substitution, rates of accumulation, and the amount of variation varied among viral types. Temperate phages showed relatively lower mutation rates, consistent with replication by accurate bacterial DNA polymerases in the integrated prophage state. In contrast, Microviridae, which are lytic bacteriophages with single-stranded circular DNA genomes, showed high substitution rates (>10(-5) per nucleotide each day), so that sequence divergence over the 2.5-y period studied approached values sufficient to distinguish new viral species. Longitudinal changes also were associated with diversity-generating retroelements and virus-encoded Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats arrays. We infer that the extreme interpersonal diversity of human gut viruses derives from two sources, persistence of a small portion of the global virome within the gut of each individual and rapid evolution of some long-term virome members. PMID:23836644

  9. Rapid prototype modeling in a multimodality world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidaut, Luc; Madewell, John; Yasko, Alan

    2006-03-01

    Introduction: Rapid prototype modeling (RPM) has been used in medicine principally for bones - that are easily extracted from CT data sets - for planning orthopaedic, plastic or maxillo-facial interventions, and/or for designing custom prostheses and implants. Based on newly available technology, highly valuable multimodality approaches can now be applied to RPM, particularly for complex musculo-skeletal (MSK) tumors where multimodality often transcends CT alone. Methods: CT data sets are acquired for primary evaluation of MSK tumors in parallel with other modalities (e.g., MR, PET, SPECT). In our approach, CT is first segmented to provide bony anatomy for RPM and all other data sets are then registered to the CT reference. Parametric information relevant to the tumor's characterization is then extracted from the multimodality space and merged with the CT anatomy to produce a hybrid RPM-ready model. This model - that also accommodates digital multimodality visualization - is then produced on the latest generation of 3D printers, which permits both shapes and colors. Results: Multimodality models of complex MSK tumors have been physically produced on modern RPM equipment. This new approach has been found to be a clear improvement over the previously disconnected physical RPM and digital multimodality visualization. Conclusions: New technical developments keep opening doors to sophisticated medical applications that can directly impact the quality of patient care. Although this early work still deals with bones as base models for RPM, its use to encompass soft tissues is already envisioned for future approaches.

  10. Rapid-cycling bipolar disorder: cross-national community study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sing; Tsang, Adley; Kessler, Ronald C.; Jin, Robert; Sampson, Nancy; Andrade, Laura; Karam, Elie G.; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Merikangas, Kathleen; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Popovici, Daniela Georgeta; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Wells, J. Elisabeth; Zarkov, Zahari; Petukhova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in the community is largely unknown. Aims To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in a large cross-national community sample. Method The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI version 3.0) was used to examine the prevalence, severity, comorbidity, impairment, suicidality, sociodemographics, childhood adversity and treatment of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in ten countries (n = 54 257). Results The 12-month prevalence of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was 0.3%. Roughly a third and two-fifths of participants with lifetime and 12-month bipolar disorder respectively met criteria for rapid cycling. Compared with the non-rapid-cycling, rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was associated with younger age at onset, higher persistence, more severe depressive symptoms, greater impairment from depressive symptoms, more out-of-role days from mania/hypomania, more anxiety disorders and an increased likelihood of using health services. Associations regarding childhood, family and other sociodemographic correlates were less clear cut. Conclusions The community epidemiological profile of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder confirms most but not all current clinically based knowledge about the illness. PMID:20194545

  11. RAPID: Collaborative Commanding and Monitoring of Lunar Assets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Powell, Mark W.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Abramyan, Lucy; Shams, Khawaja S.; Wallick, Michael; Allan, Mark; Hirsh, Robert

    2011-01-01

    RAPID (Robot Application Programming Interface Delegate) software utilizes highly robust technology to facilitate commanding and monitoring of lunar assets. RAPID provides the ability for intercenter communication, since these assets are developed in multiple NASA centers. RAPID is targeted at the task of lunar operations; specifically, operations that deal with robotic assets, cranes, and astronaut spacesuits, often developed at different NASA centers. RAPID allows for a uniform way to command and monitor these assets. Commands can be issued to take images, and monitoring is done via telemetry data from the asset. There are two unique features to RAPID: First, it allows any operator from any NASA center to control any NASA lunar asset, regardless of location. Second, by abstracting the native language for specific assets to a common set of messages, an operator may control and monitor any NASA lunar asset by being trained only on the use of RAPID, rather than the specific asset. RAPID is easier to use and more powerful than its predecessor, the Astronaut Interface Device (AID). Utilizing the new robust middleware, DDS (Data Distribution System), developing in RAPID has increased significantly over the old middleware. The API is built upon the Java Eclipse Platform, which combined with DDS, provides platform-independent software architecture, simplifying development of RAPID components. As RAPID continues to evolve and new messages are being designed and implemented, operators for future lunar missions will have a rich environment for commanding and monitoring assets.

  12. Rapid determination of the energy magnitude Me

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giacomo, D.; Parolai, S.; Bormann, P.; Grosser, H.; Saul, J.; Wang, R.; Zschau, J.

    2009-12-01

    The magnitude of an earthquake is one of the most used parameters to evaluate the earthquake’s damage potential. Among the non-saturating magnitude scales, the energy magnitude Me is related to a well defined physical parameter of the seismic source, that is the radiated seismic energy Es (e.g. Bormann et al., 2002): Me = 2/3(log10 Es - 4.4). Me is more suitable than the moment magnitude Mw in describing an earthquake's shaking potential (Choy and Kirby, 2004). Indeed, Me is calculated over a wide frequency range of the source spectrum and represents a better measure of the shaking potential, whereas Mw is related to the low-frequency asymptote of the source spectrum and is a good measure of the fault size and hence of the static (tectonic) effect of an earthquake. We analyse teleseismic broadband P-waves signals in the distance range 20°-98° to calculate Es. To correct the frequency-dependent energy loss experienced by the P-waves during the propagation path, we use pre-calculated spectral amplitude decay functions for different frequencies obtained from numerical simulations of Green’s functions (Wang, 1999) given the reference Earth model AK135Q (Kennett et al., 1995; Montagner and Kennett, 1996). By means of these functions the correction for the various propagation effects of the recorded P-wave velocity spectra is performed in a rapid and robust way, and the calculation of ES, and hence of Me, can be computed at the single station. We show that our procedure is suitable for implementation in rapid response systems since it could provide stable Me determinations within 10-15 minutes after the earthquake’s origin time, even in case of great earthquakes. We tested our procedure for a large dataset composed by about 770 earthquakes globally distributed in the Mw range 5.5-9.3 recorded at the broadband stations managed by the IRIS, GEOFON, and GEOSCOPE global networks, as well as other regional seismic networks. Me and Mw express two different aspects of

  13. Rapid determination of the energy magnitude Me

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giacomo, D.; Parolai, S.; Bormann, P.; Saul, J.; Grosser, H.; Wang, R.; Zschau, J.

    2009-04-01

    The magnitude of an earthquake is one of the most used parameters to evaluate the earthquake's damage potential. However, many magnitude scales developed over the past years have different meanings. Among the non-saturating magnitude scales, the energy magnitude Me is related to a well defined physical parameter of the seismic source, that is the radiated seismic energy ES (e.g. Bormann et al., 2002): Me = 2/3(log10 ES - 4.4). Me is more suitable than the moment magnitude Mw in describing an earthquake's shaking potential (Choy and Kirby, 2004). Indeed, Me is calculated over a wide frequency range of the source spectrum and represents a better measure of the shaking potential, whereas Mw is related to the low-frequency asymptote of the source spectrum and is a good measure of the fault size and hence of the static (tectonic) effect of an earthquake. The calculation of ES requires the integration over frequency of the squared P-waves velocity spectrum corrected for the energy loss experienced by the seismic waves along the path from the source to the receivers. To accout for the frequency-dependent energy loss, we computed spectral amplitude decay functions for different frequenciesby using synthetic Green's functions (Wang, 1999) based on the reference Earth model AK135Q (Kennett et al., 1995; Montagner and Kennett, 1996). By means of these functions the correction for the various propagation effects of the recorded P-wave velocity spectra is performed in a rapid and robust way, and the calculation of ES, and hence of Me, can be computed at the single station. We analyse teleseismic broadband P-waves signals in the distance range 20°-98°. We show that our procedure is suitable for implementation in rapid response systems since it could provide stable Me determinations within 10-15 minutes after the earthquake's origin time. Indeed, we use time variable cumulative energy windows starting 4 s after the first P-wave arrival in order to include the earthquake rupture

  14. Rapid field application of hydraulic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauchler, R.; Hu, R.; Hu, L.; Parras, S. J.; Bayer, P.; Dietrich, P.; Ptak, T.

    2013-12-01

    The motivation of this field study is the need for investigation methods that are both rapid and well suited for resolving the spatial distribution of hydraulic properties in aquifers. Therefore, we propose a field strategy for hydraulic tomography that can be analyzed and performed with a similar speed as direct-push profiling. The field implementation is designed in a way that a suite of tomographic measurements can be recorded in one day. We utilize direct-push technology for the well installation and limit the pumping time to 300 s, which permits us to record 30 transient pressure response curves between two wells in one working day. For the inversion, we applied a computationally efficient inversion scheme which is based on the transformation of the ground water flow equation into a form of the eikonal equation. By exploiting the early part of a transient hydraulic pressure response recorded during cross-well tests only short-term pumping tests are required. The main advantages of the inversion scheme are the low computational requirements of eikonal solvers and that no information about the hydraulic boundaries is needed. The short pumping time in combination with the straightforward inversion technique allows for the reconstruction of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage distributions already in the field, which is particularly useful for an adaptive site investigation approach. Additionally, direct-push injection logging is performed at the field site, and the obtained field data is utilized for successful validation of the hydraulic tomograms. We also compare both methods with respect to the necessary requirements, time demand in the field and complexity of interpretation.

  15. Rapid effects of androgens in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Benten, W Peter M; Guo, Z; Krücken, J; Wunderlich, F

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the existence of membrane receptors for testosterone (mAR) in mouse macrophages of the cell lines IC-21 and RAW 264.7 as well as their roles in nongenomic pathways, gene expression and cell functioning. Both cell lines lack intracellular androgen receptors (iARs) and respond to testosterone with rapid rises in [Ca2+]i. These rises in [Ca2+]i can neither be inhibited by iAR- nor by iER blockers, but are rather mediated through mAR. Pharmacological approaches suggest that the mAR belongs to the class of membrane receptors which are coupled to phospholipase C via pertussis toxin (PTX) sensitive G-proteins. The mAR can be localized as specific surface binding sites for testosterone-BSA-FITC by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)and flow cytometry, and are characterized by their agonist-sequestrability. In order to examine a possible role of the testosterone-induced rise in [Ca2+]i on gene expression, a c-fos promoter reporter gene construct was transfected into RAW 264.7 macrophages. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by testosterone cannot significantly activate the c-fos promoter directly. Also, no significant activation of ERK1/2, JNK/SAPK and p38 can be observed following testosterone-stimulation alone. However, testosterone-induced rises in [Ca2+]i do have specific effects on gene expression in context with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced genotropic signaling: testosterone specifically down-regulates LPS-induced activation of c-fos promoter, p38 MAPK and NO production. In fetal calf serum (FCS)-induced genotropic signaling, the situation is reversed, i.e. testosterone augments the activation of c-fos promoter and ERK1/2. Our studies demonstrate a cross-talk between the testosterone-induced nongenomic Ca2+ signaling and the genotropic signaling induced by LPS and FCS in macrophages. PMID:15288774

  16. Rapid convergent evolution in wild crickets.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Sonia; Cezard, Timothee; Eik-Nes, Aasta; Gharbi, Karim; Majewska, Jagoda; Payne, Elizabeth; Ritchie, Michael G; Zuk, Marlene; Bailey, Nathan W

    2014-06-16

    The earliest stages of convergent evolution are difficult to observe in the wild, limiting our understanding of the incipient genomic architecture underlying convergent phenotypes. To address this, we capitalized on a novel trait, flatwing, that arose and proliferated at the start of the 21st century in a population of field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. Flatwing erases sound-producing structures on male forewings. Mutant males cannot sing to attract females, but they are protected from fatal attack by an acoustically orienting parasitoid fly (Ormia ochracea). Two years later, the silent morph appeared on the neighboring island of Oahu. We tested two hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of flatwings in Hawaii: (1) that the silent morph originated on Kauai and subsequently introgressed into Oahu and (2) that flatwing originated independently on each island. Morphometric analysis of male wings revealed that Kauai flatwings almost completely lack typical derived structures, whereas Oahu flatwings retain noticeably more wild-type wing venation. Using standard genetic crosses, we confirmed that the mutation segregates as a single-locus, sex-linked Mendelian trait on both islands. However, genome-wide scans using RAD-seq recovered almost completely distinct markers linked with flatwing on each island. The patterns of allelic association with flatwing on either island reveal different genomic architectures consistent with the timing of two mutational events on the X chromosome. Divergent wing morphologies linked to different loci thus cause identical behavioral outcomes--silence--illustrating the power of selection to rapidly shape convergent adaptations from distinct genomic starting points. PMID:24881880

  17. Licking Microstructure Reveals Rapid Attenuation of Neophobia

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Kevin J.; Rubin, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals hesitate when initially consuming a novel food and increase their consumption of that food between the first and second sessions of access—a process termed attenuation of neophobia (AN). AN has received attention as a model of learning and memory; it has been suggested that plasticity resulting from an association of the novel tastant with “safe outcome” results in a change in the neural response to the tastant during the second session, such that consumption increases. Most studies have reported that AN emerges only an hour or more after the end of the first exposure to the tastant, consistent with what is known of learning-related plasticity. But these studies have typically measured consumption, rather than real-time behavior, and thus the possibility exists that a more rapidly developing AN remains to be discovered. Here, we tested this possibility, examining both consumption and individual lick times in a novel variant of a brief-access task (BAT). When quantified in terms of consumption, data from the BAT accorded well with the results of a classic one-bottle task—both revealed neophobia/AN specific to higher concentrations (for instance, 28mM) of saccharin. An analysis of licking microstructure, however, additionally revealed a real-time correlate of neophobia—an explicit tendency, similarly specific for 28-mM saccharin, to cut short the initial bout of licks in a single trial (compared with water). This relative hesitancy (i.e., the shortness of the first lick bout to 28-mM saccharin compared with water) that constitutes neophobia not only disappeared between sessions but also gradually declined in magnitude across session 1. These data demonstrate that the BAT accurately measures AN, and that aspects of AN—and the processes underlying familiarization—begin within minutes of the very first taste. PMID:24363269

  18. Rapid diagnosis of medulloblastoma molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Schwalbe, Ed C.; Lindsey, Janet C.; Straughton, Debbie; Hogg, Twala L.; Cole, Michael; Megahed, Hisham; Ryan, Sarra L.; Lusher, Meryl E.; Taylor, Michael D.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Ellison, David W.; Bailey, Simon; Clifford, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Microarray studies indicate medulloblastoma comprises distinct molecular disease subgroups, which offer potential for improved clinical management. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Minimal mRNA expression signatures diagnostic for the Wnt/Wingless (WNT) and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) subgroups were developed, validated and used to assign subgroup affiliation in 173 tumours from four independent cohorts, alongside a systematic investigation of subgroup clinical and molecular characteristics. RESULTS WNT tumours (12% (21/173)) were diagnosed >5 years of age (peak, 10 years), displayed classic histology, CTNNB1 mutation (19/20), associated chromosome 6 loss and have previously been associated with favourable prognosis. SHH cases (24% (42/173)) predominated in infants (<3 years) and showed an age-dependent relationship to desmoplastic/nodular pathology; all infant desmoplastic/nodular cases (previously associated with a good outcome) were SHH-positive, but these relationships broke down in non-infants. PTCH1 mutations were common (34%; 11/32), but PTCH1 exon1c hypermethylation, chromosome 9q and REN (KCTD11) genetic loss were not SHH-associated, and SMO or SUFU mutation, PTCH1 exon1a or SUFU hypermethylation did not play a role, indicating novel activating mechanisms in the majority of SHH cases. SHH tumours were associated with an absence of COL1A2 methylation. WNT/SHH-independent medulloblastomas (64% (110/173)) showed all histologies, peaked at 3-6 years, and were exclusively associated with chromosome 17p loss. CONCLUSIONS Medulloblastoma subgroups are characterised by distinct genomic, epigenomic and clinico-pathological features, and clinical outcomes. Validated array-independent gene expression assays for the rapid assessment of subgroup affiliation in small biopsies, provide a basis for their routine clinical application, in strategies including molecular disease-risk stratification and delivery of targeted therapeutics. PMID:21325292

  19. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 Ω for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications

  20. Curvature effects in rapid alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Massimo

    2001-04-01

    The growth of a cylindrical or spherical crystal into its undercooled melt is a process whose description is complicated by the lack of a stationary regime. A simple approach to the problem, justified for low growth rates and widely used in the past for both pure substances and alloy solidification, is based on a quasistatic approximation which assumes an instantaneous adaptation of the diffusional field to the interface configuration. For alloy solidification, assuming isothermal conditions and local interface equilibrium, this simplified model predicts a diffusion controlled growth, with the radius of the crystal increasing asymptotically as ~t1/2. However, as pointed out by recent investigations, thermal diffusion and nonequilibrium effects enter as essential ingredients in rapid alloy solidification. In the present paper we use the phase-field model to simulate the cylindrical and spherical growth of a solid germ into a supersaturated alloy melt. The problem is treated in its full time-dependent characteristics, accounting for nonequilibrium effects as well as for the rejection of both heat and solute away from the advancing front. We observe a complex behavior and a rich variety of dynamic regimes: in different regions of parameter space the growth rate is limited by diffusion (either thermal or chemical) or is kinetic controlled. Traversing the boundaries which limit these regions, the process undergoes sharp transitions which leave a trace in the solidified alloy. For realistic values of the Lewis number, thermal effects drive the process into a a diffusive regime, in which the rate limiting mechanism is the rejection of solute.

  1. Rapid Sunspot Displacement Associated with Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, N.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    Many observational and modeling studies of solar eruptions merely treat photosphere as the lower boundary and assume no significant changes of magnetic fields anchoring there to occur during flares/CMEs. With increasing evidence of photospheric magnetic fields variations resulting from energy release in the upper atmosphere, Hudson, Fisher and Welsch (2008, ASP, 383, 221) proposed that the photosphere and even solar interior would respond in a back-reaction process to the coronal magnetic field restructuring. Inspired by this concept, we analyzed white-light images obtained with TRACE and report here rapid and permanent perturbation in the position of delta spot umbrae associated with five X-class flares. Our main results are the following: (1) The centroids of umbrae with opposite magnetic polarities undergo relative as well as overall displacement on the order of 1E3 km after flares/CMEs. (2) The estimated total kinetic energy associated with these motions (Ek) is on the order of 1E29 ergs and appears to correlate with the 6 mHZ seismic energy (Es) derived by the Monash group. (3) There appears correlation between both the Ek and Es corresponding to the velocity of CMEs. We suggest that: (1) sunspot displacement provides a direct observational evidence of the photospheric back-reaction and could potentially serve as an alternative excitation mechanism of seismic waves; (2) These could provide rational support to the back-reaction mechanism in the sense that its magnitude might be related to how violent the coronal magnetic field is disrupted. For selected events with good multiwavelength coverage, we also analyze in detail spatial as well as temporal relationship among the sunspot displacement, magnetic field changes, seismic sources, hard X-ray emissions, and overall flaring condition. This work is supported by NSF grants ATM 08-19662 and ATM 07-45744, and NASA grants NNX 08AQ90G, NNX 07AH78G, and NNX 08AQ32G.

  2. Rapid Chemometric Filtering of Spectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaman, Gregory; Pelletier, Michael; Seshadri, Suresh

    2004-01-01

    A method of rapid, programmable filtering of spectral transmittance, reflectance, or fluorescence data to measure the concentrations of chemical species has been proposed. By programmable is meant that a variety of spectral analyses can readily be performed and modified in software, firmware, and/or electronic hardware, without need to change optical filters or other optical hardware of the associated spectrometers. The method is intended to enable real-time identification of single or multiple target chemical species in applications that involve high-throughput screening of multiple samples. Examples of such applications include (but are not limited to) combinatorial chemistry, flow cytometry, bead assays, testing drugs, remote sensing, and identification of targets. The basic concept of the proposed method is to perform real-time crosscorrelations of a measured spectrum with one or more analytical function(s) of wavelength that could be, for example, the known spectra of target species. Assuming that measured spectral intensities are proportional to concentrations of target species plus background spectral intensities, then after subtraction of background levels, it should be possible to determine target species concentrations from cross-correlation values. Of course, the problem of determining the concentrations is more complex when spectra of different species overlap, but the problem can be solved by use of multiple analytical functions in combination with computational techniques that have been developed previously for analyses of this type. The method is applicable to the design and operation of a spectrometer in which spectrally dispersed light is measured by means of an active-pixel sensor (APS) array. The row or column dimension of such an array is generally chosen to be aligned along the spectral-dispersion dimension, so that each pixel intercepts light in a narrow spectral band centered on a wavelength that is a known function of the pixel position. The

  3. Fuel cladding behavior under rapid loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, K.; Karlsson, J.; Stjärnsäter, J.; Schrire, D.; Ledergerber, G.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Hallstadius, L.

    2016-02-01

    A modified burst test (MBT) was used in an extensive test program to characterize fuel cladding failure behavior under rapid loading conditions. The MBT differs from a normal burst test with the use of a driver tube to simulate the expansion of a fuel pellet, thereby producing a partial strain driven deformation condition similar to that of a fuel pellet expansion in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). A piston/cylinder assembly was used to pressurize the driver tube. By controlling the speed and distance the piston travels the loading rate and degree of sample deformation could be controlled. The use of a driver tube with a machined gauge section localizes deformation and allows for continuous monitoring of the test sample diameter change at the location of maximum hoop strain, during each test. Cladding samples from five irradiated fuel rods were tested between 296 and 553 K and loading rates from 1.5 to 3.5/s. The test rods included variations of Zircaloy-2 with different liners and ZIRLO, ranging in burn-up from 41 to 74 GWd/MTU. The test results show cladding ductility is strongly temperature and loading rate dependent. Zircaloy-2 cladding ductility degradation due to operational hydrogen pickup started to recover at approximately 358 K for test condition used in the study. This recovery temperature is strongly loading rate dependent. At 373 K, ductility recovery was small for loading rates less than 8 ms equivalent RIA pulse width, but longer than 8 ms the ductility recovery increased exponentially with increasing pulse width, consistent with literature observations of loading rate dependent brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition temperature. The cladding ductility was also observed to be strongly loading rate/pulse width dependent for BWR cladding below the BTD temperature and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cladding at both 296 and 553 K.

  4. Rapid Disaster Analysis based on SAR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Soergel, U.

    2015-03-01

    Due to all-day and all-weather capability spaceborne SAR is a valuable means for rapid mapping during and after disaster. In this paper, three change detection techniques based on SAR data are discussed: (1) initial coarse change detection, (2) flooded area detection, and (3) linear-feature change detection. The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami is used as case study, where earthquake and tsunami events provide a complex case for this study. In (1), pre- and post-event TerraSAR-X images are coregistered accurately to produce a false-color image. Such image provides a quick and rough overview of potential changes, which is useful for initial decision making and identifies areas worthwhile to be analysed further in more depth. In (2), the post-event TerraSAR-X image is used to extract the flooded area by morphological approaches. In (3), we are interested in detecting changes of linear shape as indicator for modified man-made objects. Morphological approaches, e.g. thresholding, simply extract pixel-based changes in the difference image. However, in this manner many irrelevant changes are highlighted, too (e.g., farming activity, speckle). In this study, Curvelet filtering is applied in the difference image not only to suppress false alarms but also to enhance the change signals of linear-feature form (e.g. buildings) in settlements. Afterwards, thresholding is conducted to extract linear-shaped changed areas. These three techniques mentioned above are designed to be simple and applicable in timely disaster analysis. They are all validated by comparing with the change map produced by Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information, DLR.

  5. THE DYNAMICS OF CATEGORIZATION: UNRAVELING RAPID CATEGORIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Michael L.; Palmeri, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We explore a puzzle of visual object categorization: Under normal viewing conditions, you spot something as a dog fastest, but at a glance, you spot it faster as an animal. During speeded category verification, a classic basic-level advantage is commonly observed (Rosch, Mervis, Gray, Johnson, & Boyes-Braem, 1976), with categorization as a dog faster than as an animal (superordinate) or Golden Retriever (subordinate). A different story emerges during ultra-rapid categorization with limited exposure duration (<30ms), with superordinate categorization faster than basic or subordinate categorization (Thorpe, Fize, & Marlot, 1996). These two widely cited findings paint contrary theoretical pictures about the time course of object categorization, yet no study has previously investigated them together. Over five experiments, we systematically examined two experimental factors that could explain the qualitative difference in categorization across the two paradigms: exposure duration and category trial context. Mapping out the time course of object categorization by manipulating exposure duration and the timing of a post-stimulus mask revealed that brief exposure durations favor superordinate-level categorization, but with more time a basic-level advantage emerges. But this superordinate advantage was modulated significantly by target category trial context. With randomized target categories, the superordinate advantage was eliminated; and with “blocks” of only four repetitions of superordinate categorization within an otherwise randomized context, the advantage for the basic-level was eliminated. Contrary to some theoretical accounts that dictate a fixed priority for certain levels of abstraction in visual processing and access to semantic knowledge, the dynamics of object categorization are flexible, depending jointly on the level of abstraction, time for perceptual encoding, and category context. PMID:25938178

  6. Cytoplasmic structure in rapid-frozen axons

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Turtle optic nerves were rapid-frozen from the living state, fractured, etched, and rotary shadowed. Stereo views of fractured axons show that axoplasm consists of three types of longitudinally oriented domains. One type consists of neurofilament bundles in which individual filaments are interconnected by a cross-bridging network. Contiguous to neurofilament domains are domains containing microtubules suspended in a loose, granular matrix. A third domain is confined to a zone, 80-100 nm wide, next to the axonal membrane and consists of a dense filamentous network connecting the longitudinal elements of the axonal cytoskeleton to particles on the inner surface of the axolemma. Three classes of membrane-limited organelles are distinguished: axoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and discrete vesicular organelles. The vesicular organelles must include lysosomes, multivesicular bodies, and vesicles which are retrogradely transported in axons, though some vesicular organelles may be components of the axoplasmic reticulum. Organelles in each class have a characteristic relationship to the axonal cytoskeleton. The axoplasmic reticulum enters all three domains of axoplasm, but mitochondria and vesicular organelles are excluded from the neurofilament bundles, a distribution confirmed in thin sections of cryoembedded axons. Vesicular organelles differ from mitochondria in at least three ways with respect to their relationships to adjacent axoplasm: (a) one, or sometimes both, of their ends are associated with a gap in the surrounding granular axoplasm; (b) an appendage is typically associated with one of their ends; and (c) they are not attached or closely apposed to microtubules. Mitochondria, on the other hand, are only rarely associated with gaps in the axoplasm, do not have an appendage, and are virtually always attached to one or more microtubules by an irregular array of side-arms. We propose that the longitudinally oriented microtubule domains are channels within which

  7. Rapid quantitative assay for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, J.R.; Morency, C.A.; Russian, K.O.

    1987-05-01

    Measuring the expression of exogenous genetic material in mammalian cells is commonly done by fusing the DNA of interest to a gene encoding an easily-detected enzyme. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase(CAT) is a convenient marker because it is not normally found in eukaryotes. CAT activity has usually been detected using a thin-layer chromatographic separation followed by autoradiography. An organic solvent extraction-based method for CAT detection has also been described, as well as a procedure utilizing HPLC analysis. Building on the extraction technique, they developed a rapid sensitive kinetic method for measuring CAT activity in cell homogenates. The method exploits the differential organic solubility of the substrate ((/sup 3/H) or (/sup 14/C)acetyl CoA) and the product (labeled acetylchloramphenicol). The assay is a simple one-vial, two-phase procedure and requires no tedious manipulations after the initial setup. Briefly, a 0.25 ml reaction with 100mM Tris-HCL, 1mM chloramphenicol, 0.1mM (/sup 14/C)acetyl CoA and variable amounts of cell homogenate is pipetted into a miniscintillation vial, overlaid with 5 ml of a water-immiscible fluor, and incubated at 37/sup 0/C. At suitable intervals the vial is counted and the CAT level is quantitatively determined as the rate of increase in counts/min of the labeled product as it diffuses into the fluor phase, compared to a standard curve. When used to measure CAT in transfected Balb 3T3 cells the method correlated well with the other techniques.

  8. Rapid online selection between multiple motor plans.

    PubMed

    Nashed, Joseph Y; Crevecoeur, Frédéric; Scott, Stephen H

    2014-01-29

    Recent theories of voluntary control predict that multiple motor strategies can be precomputed and expressed throughout movement. We examined online decisional processing in humans by asking them to make reaching movements with obstacles located just to the sides of a direct path between start and end targets. On random trials, the limb was perturbed with one of four mechanical loads that varied in direction and amplitude. Notably, we observed two different strategies when we applied a perturbation (left medium-sized) that deviated the participants' hand directly toward an obstacle. In some trials, subjects directed their hand between the obstacles and in other trials to the left of the obstacles. Importantly, changes in the muscle stretch response between these two strategies were observed in <60 ms after perturbation, during the R2 long-latency epoch (~45-75 ms). As predicted, the selected strategy depended on the estimated position of the limb when it was perturbed. In our second experiment, we presented either one or three potential goal targets. Movements initially directed to the closest target could be quickly redirected to other potential targets after a perturbation. Differences in muscle stretch responses for redirected movements were observed ~75 ms after perturbation during the R3 long-latency epoch (~75-105 ms). The results show that decisional processes are rapidly implemented during movement execution. In addition, our data suggest a hierarchical process with corrective responses on "how" to attain a behavioral goal expressed during the R2 epoch and responses on "what" goal to attain during the R3 epoch. PMID:24478359

  9. Rapid Bacterial Testing for Spacecraft Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, John T.; Pyle, Barry H.; McFeters, Gordon A.

    1996-01-01

    Evaluations of the fluorogenic stains and probes will continue. E. coli 0157:H7 will be used as the reference strain for optimizing protocols. We anticipate the continued use of the fluorescent antibodies (TRITC and FITC labeled) in conjunction with CTC, Rhl23, DiBAC4(3), DAPI and acridine orange. Chemunex, the manufacturer of the ChemScan analyzer system, also makes a fluorogenic probe, Chemchrome B, which will be incorporated into the suite of probes to evaluate once their system is on site. Regardless of the combination of stains and probes all will be evaluated on membrane filters. Development of a FISH protocol that will be applicable to our conditions will be continued. Complimentary 16s rRNA probes to Ps. aeruginosa and currently in our laboratory will be evaluated first. Once this protocol has been adequately optimized other probes will be ordered for u a select number of other species. Currently, protocols to evaluate the effects of disinfection and the resulting lethality, injury on stain and/or probe specificity and reliability are being developed. E. coli 0157:H7 is the reference strain and chlorine the disinfectant the reference protocol is being developed around. Upon completion of this work, the resulting protocol will be extended to other species and disinfectants (e.g., iodine). Similar disinfectant experiments will then be conducted on the same species after starvation to evaluate the effects of starvation on disinfection resistance and the applicability of the stains and probes. Development of the immunomagnetic separation system will continue. Combined with the rapid methods described above, with enumeration by the ChemScan, we anticipate that this will provide a highly sensitive technique for the detection of specific, active bacteria.

  10. Rapid separation of fresh fission products (draft)

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, D. E.; Bauer, E.; Petersen, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The fission of highly eruiched uranium by thermal neutrons creates dozens of isotopic products. The Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Group participates in programs that involve analysis of 'fiesh' fission products by beta counting following radiochemical separations. This is a laborious and time-consuming process that can take several days to generate results. Gamma spectroscopy can provide a more immediate path to isolopic activities, however short-lived, high-yield isotopes can swamp a gamma spectrum, making difficult the identification and quantification of isotopes on the wings and valley of the fission yield curve. The gamma spectrum of a sample of newly produced fission products is dominated by the many emissions of a very few high-yield isotopes. Specilkally, {sup 132}Te (3.2 d), its daughter, {sup 132}I(2 .28 h), {sup 140}Ba (12.75 d), and its daughter {sup 140}La (1.68 d) emit at least 18 gamma rays above 100 keV that are greater than 5% abundance. Additionally, the 1596 keV emission fiom I4'La imposes a Compton background that hinders the detection of isotopes that are neither subject to matrix dependent fractionation nor gaseous or volatile recursors. Some of these isotopes of interest are {sup 111}Ag, {sup 115}Cd, and the rare earths, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 156}Eu, and {sup 160}Tb. C-INC has performed an HEU irradiation and also 'cold' carrier analyses by ICP-AES to determine methods for rapid and reliable separations that may be used to detect and quantify low-yield fission products by gamma spectroscopy. Results and progress will be presented.

  11. Rapid onsite assessment of spore viability.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Gaucher, Sara P.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2005-12-01

    This one year LDRD addresses problems of threat assessment and restoration of facilities following a bioterror incident like the incident that closed down mail facilities in late 2001. Facilities that are contaminated with pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis spores must be shut down while they are treated with a sporicidal agent and the effectiveness of the treatment is ascertained. This process involves measuring the viability of spore test strips, laid out in a grid throughout the facility; the CDC accepted methodologies require transporting the samples to a laboratory and carrying out a 48 hr outgrowth experiment. We proposed developing a technique that will ultimately lead to a fieldable microfluidic device that can rapidly assess (ideally less than 30 min) spore viability and effectiveness of sporicidal treatment, returning facilities to use in hours not days. The proposed method will determine viability of spores by detecting early protein synthesis after chemical germination. During this year, we established the feasibility of this approach and gathered preliminary results that should fuel a future more comprehensive effort. Such a proposal is currently under review with the NIH. Proteomic signatures of Bacillus spores and vegetative cells were assessed by both slab gel electrophoresis as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection. The conditions for germination using a number of chemical germinants were evaluated and optimized and the time course of protein synthesis was ascertained. Microseparations were carried out using both viable spores and spores inactivated by two different methods. A select number of the early synthesis proteins were digested into peptides for analysis by mass spectrometry.

  12. Linear polarization of rapidly rotating ultracool dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles-Páez, P. A.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Pallé, E.; Peña Ramírez, K.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the near-infrared linear polarization signal of rapidly rotating ultracool dwarfs with spectral types ranging from M7 through T2 and projected rotational velocities of v sin i ≳ 30 km s-1. These dwarfs are believed to have dusty atmospheres and oblate shapes, which is an appropriate scenario to produce measurable linear polarization of the continuum light. Methods: Linear polarimetric images were collected in the J-band for a sample of 18 fast-rotating ultracool dwarfs, of which five were also observed in the Z-band using the Long-slit Intermediate Resolution Infrared Spectrograph (LIRIS) on the Cassegrain focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. The measured median uncertainty in the linear polarization degree is ±0.13% for our sample, which allowed us to detect polarization signatures above ~0.39% with a confidence interval of ≥3σ. Results: About 40 ± 15% of the sample is linearly polarized in the Z- and J-bands. All positive detections have linear polarization degrees ranging from 0.4% to 0.8% in both filters independent of spectral type and spectroscopic rotational velocity. However, simple statistics point at the fastest rotators (v sin i ≳ 60 km s-1) having a larger fraction of positive detections and a larger averaged linear polarization degree than the moderately rotating dwarfs (v sin i = 30-60 km s-1). Our data suggest little linear polarimetric variability on short timescales (i.e., observations separated by a few ten rotation periods), and significant variability on long timescales (i.e., hundred to thousand rotation cycles), supporting the presence of long-term weather in ultracool dwarf atmospheres.

  13. Rapid canyon formation by extreme floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, M. P.; Mackey, B. H.; Lapotre, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of river gorges generally occurs over geomorphic timescales, with rates of river incision into bedrock infrequently exceeding millimeters per year. This is in contrast to relatively rare examples of bedrock canyons that have been cut in a matter of days or weeks by catastrophic floods. Here we report on several case studies of canyons inferred to have been cut by large magnitude, short-lived flood events. Canyon Lake Gorge, Texas, was cut ~ 10 m into jointed bedrock during a three-day historic flood event, illustrating that short lived floods can efficiently mobilize and transport large quantities of rock. New cosmogenic exposure dating of multiple features at Malad Gorge, Idaho, indicates that it was formed ~ 48 ka, equivalent to the age of Box Canyon located 18 km to the south, suggesting that flooding there was regional in scale. In all cases, we attribute extremely rapid canyon erosion (i.e., meters per day) to the dominance of plucking and toppling of jointed rock rather than the relatively slow process of fluvial abrasion. Large magnitude flows are inferred from the threshold required to topple blocks and transport boulders. The lack of upstream drainage-network development and the lack of fluvial abrasion features indicate the floods must have been short-lived. Canyons cut into plateau terrain by large magnitude, short duration floods appear to have distinctive morphologies including steep canyon headwalls with semi-circular planforms, suggesting flow focusing and toppling at the headwall, despite the largely flat initial topography. In contrast, neighboring canyons undergoing active fluvial abrasion tend to show potholes, polished and fluted rock, headwalls that are pointed in planform, and more gradual knickzones extending into well-developed drainage networks upstream. Modeling suggests that the rate of canyon cutting by large-scale floods in jointed rock may be limited only by the sediment transport capacity of the flow.

  14. Decodeurs rapides pour codes topologiques quantiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos-Cianci, Guillaume

    L'encodage topologique de l'information quantique a attire beaucoup d'attention, car c'est un modele qui semble propice a resister aux erreurs locales. Tout d'abord, le modele du calcul topologique est base sur la statistique anyonique non-Abelienne universelle et sur son controle. Des anyons indesirables peuvent apparaitre soudainement, en raison de fluctuations thermiques ou de processus virtuels. La presence de ces anyons peut corrompre l'information encodee, il est necessaire de les eliminer: la correction consiste a fusionner les defauts tout en preservant la topologie du systeme. Ensuite, dans le cas des codes topologiques, on doit aussi proteger l'information encodee dans la topologie. En effet, dans ces systemes, on n'a acces qu'a une fraction de l'information decrivant l'erreur. Elle est recueillie par des mesures et peut etre interpretee en termes de particules. Ces defauts peuplent le code et doivent etre annihiles adequatement dans le but de preserver l'information encodee. Dans ce memoire, nous proposons un algorithme efficace, appele decodeur, pouvant etre utilise dans les deux contextes decrits ci-haut. Pour y parvenir, cet algorithme s'inspire de methodes de renormalisation et de propagation de croyance. Il est exponentiellement plus rapide que les methodes deja existantes, etant de complexite O (ℓ2 log ℓ) en serie et, si on parallelise, O (log ℓ) en temps, contre O (ℓ6) pour les autres decodeurs. Le temps etant le facteur limitant dans le probleme du decodage, cette caracteristique est primordiale. De plus, il tolere une plus grande amplitude de bruit que les methodes existantes; il possede un seuil de ˜ 16.5% sur le canal depolarisant surpassant le seuil deja etabli de ˜ 15.5%. Finalement, il est plus versatile. En effet, en etant limite au code de Kitaev, on ne savait pas decoder les codes topologiques de maniere generale (e.g. codes de couleur). Or, le decodeur propose dans ce memoire peut traiter la grande classe des codes

  15. Rapid PCR thermocycling using microscale thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Muddu, Radha; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    temperature distributions in microscale convective thermocyclers(12). Unexpectedly, we have discovered a subset of complex flow trajectories that are highly favorable for PCR due to a synergistic combination of (1) continuous exchange among flow paths that provides an enhanced opportunity for reagents to sample the full range of optimal temperature profiles, and (2) increased time spent within the extension temperature zone the rate limiting step of PCR. Extremely rapid DNA amplification times (under 10 min) are achievable in reactors designed to generate these flows. PMID:21403639

  16. Modeling Nitrogen Losses under Rapid Infiltration Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, M.; Imhoff, P. T.; Andres, A. S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid Infiltration Basin System (RIBS) is one of the major land treatment techniques used for wastewater treatment and reuse of recovered treated wastewater. In this system, wastewater that is treated using primary, secondary, or advanced treatment techniques is applied at high rates to shallow basins constructed in permeable deposits of soil or sand, with further treatment occurring in soil and the vadose zone before the water recharges groundwater. Because the influent wastewater is usually enriched in nitrogen (N) compounds, there is particular concern that RIBS may contaminant groundwater or nearby surface waters if not designed and operated properly. In most of the new sequenced batch reactor (SBR) wastewater treatment plants, N is found in the form of nitrate in the discharged wastewater, so denitrification (DNF) is the main reaction in N removal. The absence of molecular oxygen is one of the required conditions for DNF. During RIBS operation, application of wastewater is cyclic and typically consists of a flooding period followed by days or weeks of drying. Key operational parameters include the ratio of wetting to drying time and the hydraulic loading rate, which affect water saturation and air content in the vadose zone and as a result have an impact on DNF. Wastewater is typically distributed at a limited number of discharge points in RIBS and basins are not usually completely flooded which result in non-homogeneous distribution of wastewater and unusual surface water flow patterns. For this reason, we couple overland flow within RIBS with subsurface flow to investigate the influence of non-uniform application of wastewater on DNF. No modeling effort has been done for understanding this aspect of RIBS performance previously. TOUGH2/ iTOUGH2, a general-purpose numerical simulation program for multi-phase fluid flow in porous media, is used for modeling fluid movement. Water saturation is used as a surrogate parameter to evaluate oxygen limitations in the

  17. Rapid prototyping of patterned functional nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    FAN,HONGYOU; LU,YUNFENG; STUMP,AARON; REED,SCOTT T.; BAER,THOMAS A.; SCHUNK,P. RANDALL; PEREZ-LUNA,VICTOR; LOPEZ,GABRIEL P.; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY

    2000-02-09

    Living systems exhibit form and function on multiple length scales, and the prospect of imparting life-like qualities to man-made materials has inspired many recent efforts to devise hierarchical materials assembly strategies. For example, Yang et al. grew surfactant-templated mesoporous silica on hydrophobic patterns prepared by micro-contact printing {micro}CP{sup 3}. Trau et al. formed oriented mesoporous silica patterns, using a micro-molding in capillaries MIMIC technique, and Yang et al. combined MIMIC, polystyrene sphere templating, and surfactant-templating to create oxides with three levels of structural order. Overall, great progress has been made to date in controlling structure on scales ranging from several nanometers to several micrometers. However, materials prepared have been limited to oxides with no specific functionality, whereas for many of the envisioned applications of hierarchical materials in micro-systems, sensors, waveguides, photonics, and electronics, it is necessary to define both form and function on several length scales. In addition, the patterning strategies employed thus far require hours or even days for completion. Such slow processes are inherently difficult to implement in commercial environments. The authors have combined evaporation-induced (silica/surfactant) self-assembly EISA with rapid prototyping techniques like pen lithography, ink-jet printing, and dip-coating on micro-contact printed substrates to form hierarchically organized structures in seconds. In addition, by co-condensation of tetrafunctional silanes (Si(OR){sub 4}) with tri-functional organosilanes ((RO){sub 3}SiR{prime}){sup 12--14} or by inclusion of organic additives, the authors have selectively derivatized the silica framework with functional R{prime} ligands or molecules. The resulting materials exhibit form and function on multiple length scales: on the molecular scale, functional organic moieties are positioned on pore surfaces, on the mesoscale

  18. Rapid climate change: scientific challenges and the new NERC programme.

    PubMed

    Srokosz, M A

    2003-09-15

    In this paper the scientific challenges of observing, modelling, understanding and predicting rapid changes in climate are discussed, with a specific focus on the role of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. The palaeo and present-day observational and modelling studies being carried out to meet these challenges, under the aegis of a new NERC Rapid Climate Change thematic programme (RAPID), are outlined. In particular, the paper describes the work being done to monitor changes in the meridional overturning circulation of the North Atlantic. The paper concludes with some speculative comments about potential mechanisms for rapid changes. PMID:14558909

  19. Rapid preparation of functional polysaccharides from Pyropia yezoensis by microwave-assistant rapid enzyme digest system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Ko, Ju-Young; Jang, Jun-Ho; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Lee, Jung-Suck; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-11-20

    This study describes a simple preparation of functional polysaccharides from Pyropia yezoensis using a microwave-assistant rapid enzyme digest system (MAREDS) with various carbohydrases, and evaluates their antioxidative effects. Polysaccharide hydrolysates were prepared using MAREDS under different hydrolytic conditions of the carbohydrases and microwave powers. Polysaccharides less than 10kDa (Low molecular weight polysaccharides, LMWP, ≤10kDa) were efficiently obtained using an ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off of 10kDa). MAREDS increases AMG activation via an increased degree of hydrolysis; the best AMG hydrolysate was prepared using a 10:1 ratio of substrate to enzyme for 2h in MAREDS with 400W. LMWP consisted of galactose (27.3%), glucose (64.5%), and mannose (8.3%) from the AMG hydrolysate had stronger antioxidant effects than the high molecular weight polysaccharides (>10kDa). We rapidly prepared functional LMWPs by using MAREDS with carbohydrases, and suggest that LMWP might be potentially a valuable algal polysaccharide antioxidant. PMID:27561523

  20. Rapid telemetry and earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.; Bose, M.; Brown, H.; Cua, G.; Given, D.; Hauksson, E.; Heaton, T.; Hellweg, M.; Jordan, T.; Kireev, A.; Maechling, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Oppenheimer, D.; Solanki, K.; Zeleznik, M.

    2008-05-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) is currently testing algorithms for earthquake early warning on the realtime seismic systems in the state. An earthquake warning system rapidly detects the initiation of earthquakes and assesses the associated hazard. The goal is to provide warning of potentially damaging ground motion in a target region prior to the arrival of seismic waves. The network-based approach to early warning requires station data to be gathered at a central site for joint processing. ElarmS, one network-based approach being tested, currently runs 15 sec behind realtime in order to gather ~90% of station data before processing. Even with this delay the recent Mw 5.4 Alum Rock earthquake near San Jose was detected and an accurate hazard assessment was available before ground shaking in San Francisco. The Virtual Seismologist (VS) method, another network-based approach, is a Bayesian method that incorporates information such as network topology, previously observed seismicity, and the Gutenberg-Richter relationship in magnitude and location estimation. The VS method is currently being transitioned from off-line to real-time testing and will soon be running 15 sec behind real-time, as in the case of ElarmS. We are also testing an on-site warning approach, which is based on single-station observations. On-site systems can deliver earthquake information faster than regional systems, and the warning could possibly reach potential users at much closer epicentral distances before the damaging shaking starts. By definition, on-site systems do not require a central processing facility or delivery of data from a distant seismic station, but they are less robust that networked-based systems and need a fast and reliable telemetry to deliver warnings to local users. The range of possible warning times is typically seconds to tens of seconds and every second of data latency translates into an equal reduction in the available warning time. Minimal latency

  1. Rapid Scan Humidified Growth Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory L. Kok; Athanasios Nenes

    2013-03-13

    This research focused on enhancements to the streamwise thermal gradient cloud condensation nuclei counter to support the rapid scan mode and to enhance the capability for aerosol humidified growth measurements. The research identified the needs for flow system modifications and range of capability for operating the conventional instrument in the rapid scan and humidified growth modes.

  2. When the Creeks Rise: Disaster Recovery in Cedar Rapids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brousard, Dave

    2011-01-01

    On June 12, 2008, the local creek had flooded one-fifth of the city in Cedar Rapids. When schools buildings are flooded and the systems are in jeopardy, one has to act fast and learn from his/her mistakes. In this article, the author recounts his experience after the disaster in Cedar Rapids and shares what he learned from the disaster.

  3. 15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated rightofway of Shaker Rapid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated right-of-way of Shaker Rapid Transit through the east side of city of Cleveland, labelled: 'View Toward West Along Northerly Side Arches at E. 90th St. and Westerly.' 1914. - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. Librarian of the Year 2009: Team Cedar Rapids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    When flood came to Cedar Rapids city, the Cedar Rapids Public Library (CRPL), IA, lost 160,000 items including large parts of its adult and youth collections, magazines, newspapers, reference materials, CDs, and DVDs. Most of its public access computers were destroyed as was its computer lab and microfilm equipment. The automatic circulation and…

  5. A rapid, precise, reciprocating-movement color filter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillipps, P. G.; Epstein, P.; Donovan, G.; Lawhite, E.

    1972-01-01

    Unit was designed for moving color filters in and out of position in less than 46 ms. System may be used to record previously derived colors on photorecorder or to scan different color or wavelength components of rapidly passing scene, as in aerial reconnaissance. Rapid, precise reciprocating movement may be useful in purely mechanical and chemical applications.

  6. Implementation of Additive Rapid Prototyping on Retrofit CNC Mill

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freeform fabrication techniques are gaining popularity as a means of making parts. Layered additive methods are associated with rapid prototyping. Many rapid prototyping methods are commercially proprietary and may cost thousands of dollars. Using a retrofit CNC mill for layered fabrication and C...

  7. Rapid Consolidation of New Knowledge in Adulthood Via Fast Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Coutanche, Marc N.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid word learning, where words are “fast mapped” onto new concepts, may help build vocabulary during childhood. Recent evidence has suggested that fast mapping might help rapidly integrate information into memory networks of the adult neocortex. The neural basis for this learning-by-fast mapping determines key properties of the learned information. PMID:26139618

  8. Rapid Response to Treatment for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Wilson, Terence G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined rapid response among 108 patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 16-week treatments: fluoxetine, placebo, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus fluoxetine, or CBT plus placebo. Rapid response, defined as 65% or greater reduction in binge eating by the 4th treatment week, was determined…

  9. 9 CFR 147.2 - The rapid serum test. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The rapid serum test. 2 147.2 Section 147.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY PROVISIONS ON NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.2 The rapid serum test. 2 2...

  10. 9 CFR 147.2 - The rapid serum test. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The rapid serum test. 2 147.2 Section 147.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY PROVISIONS ON NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.2 The rapid serum test. 2 2...

  11. Nanostructured microfluidic digestion system for rapid high-performance proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gong; Hao, Si-Jie; Yu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    A novel microfluidic protein digestion system with nanostructured and bioactive inner surface was constructed by an easy biomimetic self-assembly strategy for rapid and effective proteolysis in 2 minutes, which is faster than the conventional overnight digestion methods. It is expected that this work would contribute to rapid online digestion in future high-throughput proteomics. PMID:25511010

  12. Rapid consolidation of new knowledge in adulthood via fast mapping.

    PubMed

    Coutanche, Marc N; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2015-09-01

    Rapid word learning, where words are 'fast mapped' onto new concepts, may help build vocabulary during childhood. Recent evidence has suggested that fast mapping might help to rapidly integrate information into memory networks of the adult neocortex. The neural basis for this learning by fast mapping determines key properties of the learned information. PMID:26139618

  13. Principles and Enactment of Rapid Collaborative Knowledge Building in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Patton, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors discuss the notion of Rapid Collaborative Knowledge Building (RCKB) in classroom settings. RCKB seeks to harness the collective intelligence of groups to learn faster, envision new possibilities, and to reveal latent knowledge in a dynamic live setting. It is characterized by the notion of rapid cycles of knowledge building activities…

  14. Nonaxisymmetric instability of rapidly rotating black hole in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Masaru; Yoshino, Hirotaka

    2010-01-15

    We present results from numerical solution of Einstein's equation in five dimensions describing evolution of rapidly rotating black holes. We show, for the first time, that the rapidly rotating black holes in higher dimensions are unstable against nonaxisymmetric deformation; for the five-dimensional case, the critical value of spin parameter for onset of the instability is {approx_equal}0.87.

  15. Rapid detection, characterization, and enrumeration of food-borne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been much research activity on the development of methodologies that are rapid, accurate, and ultrasensitive for detecting pathogenic microorganisms in food. Rapid methods include immunological systems such as the lateral flow assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays...

  16. Rapid prototyping and the human factors engineering process.

    PubMed

    Beevis, D; Denis, G S

    1992-06-01

    Rapid prototyping or 'virtual prototyping' of human-machine interfaces offers the possibility of putting the human operator 'in the loop' without the effort and cost associated with conventional man-in-the-loop simulation. Advocates suggest that rapid prototyping is compatible with conventional systems development techniques. It is not clear, however, exactly how rapid prototyping could be used in relation to conventional human factors engineering analyses. Therefore, an investigation of the use of the VAPS virtual prototyping system was carried out in five organizations. The results show that a variety of task analysis approaches can be used to initiate rapid prototyping. Overall, it appears that rapid prototyping facilitates an iterative approach to the development of the human-machine interface, and that is most applicable to the early stages of systems development, rather than to detailed design. PMID:15676861

  17. Rapid acceleration leads to rapid weakening in earthquake-like laboratory experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Jefferson C.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-01-01

    After nucleation, a large earthquake propagates as an expanding rupture front along a fault. This front activates countless fault patches that slip by consuming energy stored in Earth’s crust. We simulated the slip of a fault patch by rapidly loading an experimental fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The spontaneous evolution of strength, acceleration, and velocity indicates that our experiments are proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) = 4 to 8. We show that seismically determined earthquake parameters (e.g., displacement, velocity, magnitude, or fracture energy) can be used to estimate the intensity of the energy release during an earthquake. Our experiments further indicate that high acceleration imposed by the earthquake’s rupture front quickens dynamic weakening by intense wear of the fault zone.

  18. Rapid Acceleration Leads to Rapid Weakening in Earthquake-Like Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-10-01

    After nucleation, a large earthquake propagates as an expanding rupture front along a fault. This front activates countless fault patches that slip by consuming energy stored in Earth’s crust. We simulated the slip of a fault patch by rapidly loading an experimental fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The spontaneous evolution of strength, acceleration, and velocity indicates that our experiments are proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) = 4 to 8. We show that seismically determined earthquake parameters (e.g., displacement, velocity, magnitude, or fracture energy) can be used to estimate the intensity of the energy release during an earthquake. Our experiments further indicate that high acceleration imposed by the earthquake’s rupture front quickens dynamic weakening by intense wear of the fault zone.

  19. 78 FR 11680 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand... Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet... to be culturally affiliated ] with the cultural items may contact the Grand Rapids Public...

  20. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  1. Rapid mimicry and emotional contagion in domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Nicotra, Velia; Cordoni, Giada

    2015-12-01

    Emotional contagion is a basic form of empathy that makes individuals able to experience others' emotions. In human and non-human primates, emotional contagion can be linked to facial mimicry, an automatic and fast response (less than 1 s) in which individuals involuntary mimic others' expressions. Here, we tested whether body (play bow, PBOW) and facial (relaxed open-mouth, ROM) rapid mimicry is present in domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) during dyadic intraspecific play. During their free playful interactions, dogs showed a stronger and rapid mimicry response (less than 1 s) after perceiving PBOW and ROM (two signals typical of play in dogs) than after perceiving JUMP and BITE (two play patterns resembling PBOW and ROM in motor performance). Playful sessions punctuated by rapid mimicry lasted longer that those sessions punctuated only by signals. Moreover, the distribution of rapid mimicry was strongly affected by the familiarity linking the subjects involved: the stronger the social bonding, the higher the level of rapid mimicry. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the presence of rapid mimicry in dogs, the involvement of mimicry in sharing playful motivation and the social modulation of the phenomenon. All these findings concur in supporting the idea that a possible linkage between rapid mimicry and emotional contagion (a building-block of empathy) exists in dogs. PMID:27019737

  2. Rapid mimicry and emotional contagion in domestic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Nicotra, Velia; Cordoni, Giada

    2015-01-01

    Emotional contagion is a basic form of empathy that makes individuals able to experience others’ emotions. In human and non-human primates, emotional contagion can be linked to facial mimicry, an automatic and fast response (less than 1 s) in which individuals involuntary mimic others’ expressions. Here, we tested whether body (play bow, PBOW) and facial (relaxed open-mouth, ROM) rapid mimicry is present in domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) during dyadic intraspecific play. During their free playful interactions, dogs showed a stronger and rapid mimicry response (less than 1 s) after perceiving PBOW and ROM (two signals typical of play in dogs) than after perceiving JUMP and BITE (two play patterns resembling PBOW and ROM in motor performance). Playful sessions punctuated by rapid mimicry lasted longer that those sessions punctuated only by signals. Moreover, the distribution of rapid mimicry was strongly affected by the familiarity linking the subjects involved: the stronger the social bonding, the higher the level of rapid mimicry. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the presence of rapid mimicry in dogs, the involvement of mimicry in sharing playful motivation and the social modulation of the phenomenon. All these findings concur in supporting the idea that a possible linkage between rapid mimicry and emotional contagion (a building-block of empathy) exists in dogs. PMID:27019737

  3. [Rapid identification of Enterobacteriaceae: evaluation of 3 commercial systems].

    PubMed

    Sala, A; Dore, R; Raffaele, L; Cappello, P

    1985-06-01

    We have compared three rapid systems for the identification of Enterobacteriaceae: MS-2, Rapid 20E, Micro-ID. These methods allows to identifications of bacteria within 4-5 hours. We have chosen API 20E as reference system; because it is normally used in the clinical microbiology laboratories. We have noted good agreement of concordance for MS-2, Micro-ID and Rapid 20E towards API 20E, respectively 95, 90, 84%. We have, moreover, analysed significative difference about three systems biochemical tests in comparison with the same of API 20E. PMID:4080964

  4. A Corrosion Control Manual for Rail Rapid Transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. O.; Fitzgerald, J. H., III; Menke, J. T.; Lizak, R. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    This manual addresses corrosion problems in the design, contruction, and maintenance of rapid transit systems. Design and maintenance solutions are provided for each problem covered. The scope encompasses all facilities of urban rapid transit systems: structures and tracks, platforms and stations, power and signals, and cars. The types of corrosion and their causes as well as rapid transit properties are described. Corrosion control committees, and NASA, DOD, and ASTM specifications and design criteria to which reference is made in the manual are listed. A bibliography of papers and excerpts of reports is provided and a glossary of frequently used terms is included.

  5. Expediting systematic reviews: methods and implications of rapid reviews

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Policy makers and others often require synthesis of knowledge in an area within six months or less. Traditional systematic reviews typically take at least 12 months to conduct. Rapid reviews streamline traditional systematic review methods in order to synthesize evidence within a shortened timeframe. There is great variation in the process of conducting rapid reviews. This review sought to examine methods used for rapid reviews, as well as implications of methodological streamlining in terms of rigour, bias, and results. Methods A comprehensive search strategy--including five electronic databases, grey literature, hand searching of relevant journals, and contacting key informants--was undertaken. All titles and abstracts (n = 1,989) were reviewed independently by two reviewers. Relevance criteria included articles published between 1995 and 2009 about conducting rapid reviews or addressing comparisons of rapid reviews versus traditional reviews. Full articles were retrieved for any titles deemed relevant by either reviewer (n = 70). Data were extracted from all relevant methodological articles (n = 45) and from exemplars of rapid review methods (n = 25). Results Rapid reviews varied from three weeks to six months; various methods for speeding up the process were employed. Some limited searching by years, databases, language, and sources beyond electronic searches. Several employed one reviewer for title and abstract reviewing, full text review, methodological quality assessment, and/or data extraction phases. Within rapid review studies, accelerating the data extraction process may lead to missing some relevant information. Biases may be introduced due to shortened timeframes for literature searching, article retrieval, and appraisal. Conclusions This review examined the continuum between diverse rapid review methods and traditional systematic reviews. It also examines potential implications of streamlined review methods. More of these rapid reviews need

  6. Good's Syndrome Accompanied by Agranulocytosis Following a Rapid Clinical Course.

    PubMed

    Okusu, Takahiro; Sato, Taiki; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Nagata, Shinpei; Kozumi, Kazuhiro; Kim, Sung-Ho; Yamamoto, Suguru; Yamayoshi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Good's syndrome is an immunodeficiency disease involving thymoma accompanied by hypogammaglobulinemia. We encountered a case of Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis that followed a rapid clinical course. A 72-year-old man visited our hospital with a two-week history of a sore throat. Candida albicans was detected in the pharynx, and hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in addition to granulocytopenia. The patient subsequently developed septic shock and followed a rapid clinical course which ended in death. Good's syndrome with agranulocytosis was diagnosed at autopsy. Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis can follow a rapid clinical course and some cases remain asymptomatic until old age. Its prompt treatment is crucial. PMID:26935379

  7. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    SciTech Connect

    Balitsky, Ian; Tarasov, A.

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small $x \\ll 1$ to linear evolution at moderate $x \\sim 1$.

  8. Sensitivity and rapidity of vegetational response to abrupt climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peteet, D.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid climate change characterizes numerous terrestrial sediment records during and since the last glaciation. Vegetational response is best expressed in terrestrial records near ecotones, where sensitivity to climate change is greatest, and response times are as short as decades.

  9. Rapid authentication of Gastrodiae rhizoma by direct ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ho-Yi; Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Chan, Chi-On; Mok, Daniel Kam-Wah; Xin, Gui-Zhong; Li, Ping; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2016-09-28

    In this study, direct ionization mass spectrometry (DI-MS) for rapid authentication of Gastrodiae rhizoma (known as Tianma in Chinese), a popular herbal medicine, has been developed. This method is rapid, simple and allows direct generation of characteristic mass spectra from the raw herbal medicines with the application of some solvents and a high voltage. The acquired DI-MS spectra showed that gastrodin, parishin B/parishin C and parishin, the major active components of Gastrodiae rhizoma, could be found only in genuine Gastrodiae rhizoma samples, but not in counterfeit samples, thus allowing rapid authentication of Gastrodiae rhizoma. Moreover, wild and cultivated Gastrodiae rhizoma could be classified and Gastrodiae rhizoma from different geographical locations could be differentiated based on their different intensity ratios of characteristic ions or principal component analysis (PCA). This method is simple, rapid, reproducible, and can be extended to analyze other herbal medicines. PMID:27619090

  10. Rapid Model Fabrication and Testing for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced methods for rapid fabrication and instrumentation of hypersonic wind tunnel models are being developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center. Rapid aeroheating model fabrication and measurement techniques using investment casting of ceramic test models and thermographic phosphors are reviewed. More accurate model casting techniques for fabrication of benchmark metal and ceramic test models are being developed using a combination of rapid prototype patterns and investment casting. White light optical scanning is used for coordinate measurements to evaluate the fabrication process and verify model accuracy to +/- 0.002 inches. Higher-temperature (<210C) luminescent coatings are also being developed for simultaneous pressure and temperature mapping, providing global pressure as well as global aeroheating measurements. Together these techniques will provide a more rapid and complete experimental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic database for future aerospace vehicles.

  11. Basal forebrain neuronal inhibition enables rapid behavioral stopping

    PubMed Central

    Mayse, Jeffrey D.; Nelson, Geoffrey M.; Avila, Irene; Gallagher, Michela; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive inhibitory control, the ability to rapidly suppress responses inappropriate for the context, is essential for flexible and adaptive behavior. While most studies on inhibitory control have focused on the fronto-basal-ganglia circuit, here we explore a novel hypothesis and show that rapid behavioral stopping is enabled by neuronal inhibition in the basal forebrain (BF). In rats performing the stop signal task, putative noncholinergic BF neurons with phasic bursting responses to the go signal were inhibited nearly completely by the stop signal. The onset of BF neuronal inhibition was tightly coupled with and temporally preceded the latency to stop, the stop signal reaction time. Artificial inhibition of BF activity in the absence of the stop signal was sufficient to reproduce rapid behavioral stopping. These results reveal a novel subcortical mechanism of rapid inhibitory control by the BF, which provides bidirectional control over the speed of response generation and inhibition. PMID:26368943

  12. Terminal velocities of the winds from rapidly rotating OB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, David B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of terminal velocities of OB stars which are rapid rotators, based on archival high-dispersion IUE spectra of the C IV resonance doublet. The terminal velocities of the most rapidly rotating stars appear to be systematically lower than those of the less rapidly rotating stars (at least for the cooler stars), although the number of very rapid rotators is only three. The modified line-radiation driven wind model of Friend and Abbott, which takes into account the finite size of the star as well as its rotation, predicts that the terminal velocity should drop with increasing rotational velocity. However, when a smaller but very homogeneous subset of the data is used (BO giants only), the correlation between terminal velocity and rotational velocity disappears.

  13. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balitsky, Ian; Tarasov, A.

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at smallmore » $$x \\ll 1$$ to linear evolution at moderate $$x \\sim 1$$.« less

  14. ETV Tech Brief: Rapid Fungi and Bacteria Detection Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical brief that summarizes the results for Mycometer, Inc. Mycometer®-test and Bactiquant®-test, which are rapid detection technologies for fungi and bacteria. The brief summarizes the results of the verification report and statement.

  15. A corrosion control manual for rail rapid transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. O.; Fitzgerald, J. F., II; Menke, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    In 1979, during the planning stage of the Metropolitan Dade County Transit System, the need was expressed for a corrosion control manual oriented to urban rapid transit system use. This manual responds to that need. The objective of the manual is to aid rail rapid transit agencies by providing practical solutions to selected corrosion problems. The scope of the manual encompasses corrosion problems of the facilities of rapid transit systems: structures and tracks, platforms and stations, power and signals, and cars. It also discusses stray electric current corrosion. Both design and maintenance solutions are provided for each problem. Also included are descriptions of the types of corrosion and their causes, descriptions of rapid transit properties, a list of corrosion control committees and NASA, DOD, and ASTM specifications and design criteria to which reference is made in the manual. A bibliography of papers and excerpts of reports and a glossary of frequency used terms are provided.

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: RAPID OPTICAL SCREEN TOOL (ROST™) - LORAL CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Loral Rapid Optical Screen Tool (ROST™) is a tunable dye laser system used for the detection of petroleum, semi-volatile, and some volatile organic compounds in soils. The technology is used in conjunction with a cone penetrometer (CP).

  17. Amplatzer vascular plug for rapid vessel occlusion in interventional neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Jillian C; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report different uses of endovascular Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) treatment for rapid vessel occlusion in the field of interventional neuroradiology. We retrospectively reviewed our interventional neuroradiology database from November 2010 to July 2015 and found nine patients who were treated with endovascular AVP. AVP was used for rapid vessel occlusion of common carotid artery (1 patient), internal carotid artery (5 patients), vertebral artery (2 patients), and internal jugular vein (1 patient). A median of three AVPs were used with almost immediate occlusion and no thromboembolic complications. Use of AVP is feasible, safe, rapid, and potentially cost-effective method for rapid occlusion of larger size vessels in the head and neck region for different indications. PMID:26515699

  18. Rapid ray motions in barium plasma clouds and auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Swift, D. W.; Wallis, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    On two evenings in 1968, anomalous field-aligned brightenings or emission enhancements of up to 3X were observed to move rapidly through three different Ba(+) clouds over Andoya, Norway. Similar effects were observed in Ba(+) clouds released from rockets launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, on March 21, 1973 and on March 22, 1980. On these occasions, auroras on or near the Ba(+) L shell also exhibited active rapid ray motions, which prompts the assumption that the two phenomena are related and the expectation that an explanation of the rapid ray motions in the Ba(+) clouds would lead to a better understanding of the physics of auroral ray motions and the auroral atmosphere. Seven possible mechanisms to produce the observed moving emission enhancements are discussed. The observations provide strong evidence for the existence of transient electric fields of order 100 mV/m at altitudes as low as 200 km during active aurora with rapid ray motions.

  19. Hadron distributions at higher rapidity using the BRAHMS forward spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.

    1995-07-15

    Different conditions, and therefore different physics, are expected to exist over the range of rapidities at RHIC. The BRAHMS Forward Spectrometer will measure identified hadron distributions up to y=4, giving it a unique place in the RHIC experimental program.

  20. 78 FR 44090 - Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa AGENCY: Federal Communications... 73 Television, Television broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Hossein Hashemzadeh... freeze on the acceptance of full power television rulemaking petitions requesting channel...

  1. 48. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA., Photographer, Date unknown SECTION THROUGH BUILDING, LOOKING NORTH - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 50. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angleles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown ENTRANCE AND TYPICAL BAY ON FLOWER STREET - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 45. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown SECOND FLOOR PLAN - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 44. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown FIRST FLOOR PLAN - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 53. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown DETAILS OF CORRIDORS ON SECOND - TWELFTH FLOORS - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 47. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angleles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown WEST ELEVATION - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 51. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown EXTERIOR, ELEVATION DETAILS - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 52. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown DETAILS OF MAIN FLOOR ELEVATOR LOBBY - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 49. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown SECTION THROUGH BUILDING, LOOKING EAST - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 46. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of drawing (Source unknown, 1928) Rapid Blue Print Co., Los Angeles, CA, Photographer, Date unknown NORTH ELEVATION - Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Rapid detection of bacteria in foods and biological fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fealey, R. D.; Renner, W.

    1973-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive apparatus, called "redox monitoring cell," rapidly detects presence of bacteria. Bacteria is detected by measuring drop in oxygen content in test solution. Apparatus consists of vial with two specially designed electrodes connected to sensitive voltmeter.

  12. Hadron distributions at higher rapidity using the BRAHMS forward spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.

    1995-03-01

    Different conditions, and therefore different physics, are expected to exist over the range of rapidities at RHIC. The BRAHMS Forward Spectrometer will measure identified hadron distributions up to y = 4, giving it a unique place in the RHIC experimental program.

  13. #Nomoretextbooks? The impact of rapid communications technologies on medical education.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Ameer; White, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    This paper was selected as the 2013 student essay winner by the Canadian Undergraduate Surgical Education Committee. The essay was in response to the question "How does rapid communications technology affect learning?" PMID:25078936

  14. Rapid thinning of Pine Island Glacier in the early Holocene.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J S; Bentley, M J; Smith, J A; Finkel, R C; Rood, D H; Gohl, K; Balco, G; Larter, R D; Schaefer, J M

    2014-02-28

    Pine Island Glacier, a major outlet of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, has been undergoing rapid thinning and retreat for the past two decades. We demonstrate, using glacial-geological and geochronological data, that Pine Island Glacier (PIG) also experienced rapid thinning during the early Holocene, around 8000 years ago. Cosmogenic (10)Be concentrations in glacially transported rocks show that this thinning was sustained for decades to centuries at an average rate of more than 100 centimeters per year, which is comparable with contemporary thinning rates. The most likely mechanism was a reduction in ice shelf buttressing. Our findings reveal that PIG has experienced rapid thinning at least once in the past and that, once set in motion, rapid ice sheet changes in this region can persist for centuries. PMID:24557837

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however, a distinct phenotype with respect to other RBD patients and characterized also by absence of gender predominance, elementary rather than complex movements, less violent behavior and earlier age at onset of motor events, and strong association to narcolepsy with cataplexy/hypocretin deficiency. Patients with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic motor activities in REM sleep and dream-enacting behavior are mostly reported in presence of cataplexy. Narcolepsy without cataplexy is a condition rarely associated with hypocretin deficiency. We proposed that hypocretin neurons are centrally involved in motor control during wakefulness and sleep in humans, and that hypocretin deficiency causes a functional defect in the motor control involved in the development of cataplexy during wakefulness and RBD/RSWA/phasic motor activity during REM sleep. PMID:23219054

  16. Rapid sampling for rapid analysis: A new method for VOCs in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, B.D.; Johnson, J.A.; Holland, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Until recently, there has been only moderate emphasis placed on the time consumption of the sampling process in many gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses. Historically, the total analysis time has been primarily dependent upon the chromatographic separation and detection steps, and significant decreases in sample preparation time have had little impact on overall sample throughput. The recent maturation of gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS) using time array detection has decreased chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric detection times by factors of 10 or more, leaving the sampling process as a significant and often limiting factor in the total analysis time. Current methods for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water utilize headspace or purge and trap techniques requiring 20-30 minute sampling times to extract these compounds for analysis by GC/MS. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has recently been presented as a viable alternative to the above methods. Sampling and desorption times of less than 10 minutes have been reported for part-per-billion levels of volatile organics in aqueous solution. These rapid times suggest a potential for combining SPME and GC/TOFMS technologies to create a methodology for high sample throughput.

  17. [Detection of rapid eye movement with rapidly adapting neuronal fuzzy systems in imprecise REM syntax].

    PubMed

    Wallner, F

    1996-04-01

    Both living beings and artificial neuronal networks are capable of 'learning' and behavioural adaptation. But also the fuzzy program designed to detect rapid eye movements (REM) during sleep and described here, can be provided with a self-learning option that provides important information about REM sleep. The algorithm computes REM on the basis of horizontal and vertical EOG. EEG, EMG and actiography signals are employed to optimize the method and eliminate artefacts. In a second step, the fuzzy system learns to detect REM with the aid of a sample data set and a minimal set of syntax rules. From sample data and the actions and reactions of visual scorers, the program extracts additional rules and information, which are then used to build a complete fuzzy structure. Thereafter, the REM detection program optimizes the fuzzy logic structure, independently of visual monitoring, on its own. A direct comparison of the results of the algorithm in a 10-night analysis with those of two experienced visual scorers revealed a better than 95% agreement. Re-analysis with the algorithm showed a 100% concurrence. Complete visual measurement of the eye movements occurring in a single night requires several hours; this compares with only 15 minutes required by the algorithm. PMID:8679911

  18. Rapid development of auricular prosthesis using CAD and rapid prototyping technologies.

    PubMed

    Subburaj, K; Nair, C; Rajesh, S; Meshram, S M; Ravi, B

    2007-10-01

    External ear defects can be corrected by surgery, but this may not be feasible for personal or medical reasons. Reconstructive solutions are a good alternative, but rely on the artistry and availability of the anaplastologist. A semi-automated methodology using computer-aided design (CAD) and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies was developed for auricular prosthesis development, and demonstrated in a real-life case. The correct geometry and position of the prosthesis were ensured by stacking the computed tomography scan images of the contralateral normal ear in reverse order, and joining them using a medical modelling software program. The CAD model of the remnant portion of the defective ear was subtracted from the model of the mirrored contralateral ear, using a haptic CAD system, to obtain the final geometry of the prosthesis. Polymer models were fabricated in RP systems, and used for making a corresponding mould. Medical grade silicone rubber of the appropriate colour was packed into the mould to fabricate the final ear prosthesis and fitted to the deficient side of the patient using medical grade adhesive. The computer-aided methodology gave a high level of accuracy in terms of shape, size and position of the prosthesis, and a significantly shorter lead time compared to the conventional (manual) technique. PMID:17822875

  19. Rapid prototyping of database systems in human genetics data collection.

    PubMed

    Gersting, J M

    1987-06-01

    This work examines some of the problems encountered in developing small and large database application systems involving human genetics data collection efforts that include data on individuals as well as family pedigree data. Rapid prototyping of a database application requires software tools to produce the application with little or no programming. Features of MEGADATS-4 that provide for rapid prototyping and for producing stand-alone applications are examined. PMID:3668405

  20. Application of NASA technology to a rapid transit system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, E. R.; Beck, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    NASA has established a new technology utilization program which involves full time, on-site contact with the user and is currently being applied in the development of the Metropolitan Dade County (Florida) Rapid Transit System. The NASA representative identifies technical problems while participating in daily activities and then draws on the agency's expertise to assist in solutions. NASA expertise assists in the construction of the rapid transit system in the areas of corrosion, solar energy utilization, quality assurance, and fire retardation.

  1. The photon PDF in events with rapidity gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Khoze, V. A.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    We consider photon-initiated events with large rapidity gaps in proton-proton collisions, where one or both protons may break up. We formulate a modified photon PDF that accounts for the specific experimental rapidity gap veto, and demonstrate how the soft survival probability for these gaps may be implemented consistently. Finally, we present some phenomenological results for the two-photon induced production of lepton and W boson pairs.

  2. RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-05-22

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin (N,N,N,N-tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid

  3. Theoretical studies on rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    1986-01-01

    Rapid fluctuations in the emission of solar bursts may have many different origins e.g., the acceleration process can have a pulsating structure, the propagation of energetic electrons and ions can be interrupted from plasma instabilities and finally the electromagnetic radiation produced by the interaction of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves may have a pulsating behavior in time. In two separate studies the conditions for rapid fluctuations in solar flare driven emission were analyzed.

  4. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  5. Microlensing observations rapid search for exoplanets: MORSE code for GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, Alistair; Albrow, Michael D.

    2016-02-01

    The rapid analysis of ongoing gravitational microlensing events has been integral to the successful detection and characterization of cool planets orbiting low-mass stars in the Galaxy. In this paper, we present an implementation of search and fit techniques on graphical processing unit (GPU) hardware. The method allows for the rapid identification of candidate planetary microlensing events and their subsequent follow-up for detailed characterization.

  6. Rapid alignment of velocity and magnetic field in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Matthaeus, W H; Pouquet, A; Mininni, P D; Dmitruk, P; Breech, B

    2008-02-29

    We show that local directional alignment of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations occurs rapidly in magnetohydrodynamics for a variety of parameters and is seen both in direct numerical simulations and in solar wind data. The phenomenon is due to an alignment between magnetic field and gradients of either pressure or kinetic energy, and is similar to alignment of velocity and vorticity in Navier-Stokes turbulence. This rapid and robust relaxation process leads to a local weakening of nonlinear terms. PMID:18352632

  7. Rapid Detection of ESBL-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Dortet, Laurent; Poirel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We rapidly identified extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers prospectively among 245 gram-negative bacilli–positive cultured blood specimens using the Rapid ESBL Nordmann/Dortet/Poirel test and direct bacterial identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This combination identified ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae within 30 min and had high predictive values. PMID:25695535

  8. Review, Selection and Installation of a Rapid Prototype Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEndree, Caryl

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to impress upon the reader the benefits and advantages of investing in rapid prototyping (additive manufacturing) technology thru the procurement of one or two new rapid prototyping machines and the creation of a new Prototype and Model Lab at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This new resource will be available to all of United Space Alliance, LLC (USA), enabling engineers from around the company to pursue a more effective means of communication and design with our co-workers, and our customer, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Rapid Protoyping/3D printing industry mirrors the transition the CAD industry made several years ago, when companies were trying to justify the expenditure of converting to a 3D based system from a 2D based system. The advantages of using a 3D system seemed to be outweighed by the cost it would take to convert not only legacy 2D drawings into 3D models but the training of personnel to use the 3D CAD software. But the reality was that when a 3D CAD system is employed, it gives engineers a much greater ability to conceive new designs and the ability to engineer new tools and products much more effectively. Rapid Prototyping (RP) is the name given to a host of related technologies that are used to fabricate physical objects directly from Computer Aided Design (CAD) data sources. These methods are generally similar to each other in that they add and bond materials in a layer wise-fashion to form objects, instead of machining away material. The machines used in Rapid Prototyping are also sometimes referred to as Rapid Manufacturing machines due to the fact that some of the parts fabricated in a RP machine can be used as the finished product. The name "Rapid Prototyping" is really a misnomer. It is much more than prototypes and it is not always rapid.

  9. Impediments to rapid insertion of innovative displays and peripherals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Gail

    2012-06-01

    In order to optimize system performance and minimize cost for a system to fill capability gaps, an improvement to rapid insertion of innovative display and peripheral technology is required to take advantage of human-machine intersections. Current approaches to testing and integration impedes successful rapid insertion of innovative technology for new systems and incremental upgrades. Considerations to innovative displays and peripherals must occur further to the left of the lifecycle to be successful and key integration areas must be address for success.

  10. Rapid prototyping: A paradigm shift in investment casting

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Pardo, B.T.

    1996-09-01

    The quest for fabricating complex metal parts rapidly and with minimal cost has brought rapid prototyping (RP) processes to the forefront of the investment casting industry. Relatively recent advances in DTM Corporation`s selective laser sintering (SLS) and 3D Systems stereolithography (SL) processes have had a significant impact on the overall quality of patterns produced using these rapid prototyping processes. Sandia National Laboratories uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype and small lot production parts in support of a program called FASTCAST. The SLS process is used to fabricate patterns from materials such as investment casting wax, polycarbonate, and a new material called TrueForm PM{trademark}. With the timely introduction of each of these materials, the quality of patterns fabricated has improved. The development and implementation of SL QuickCast{trademark} software has enabled this process to produce highly accurate patterns for use in investment casting. This paper focuses on the successes with these new pattern materials and the infrastructure required to cast rapid prototyping patterns successfully. In addition, a brief overview of other applications of rapid prototyping at Sandia will be discussed.

  11. A Wire Crossed-Loop-Resonator for Rapid Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Biller, Joshua R.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    A crossed-loop (orthogonal mode) resonator (CLR) was constructed of fine wire to achieve design goals for rapid scan in vivo EPR imaging at VHF frequencies (in practice, near 250 MHz). This application requires the resonator to have a very open design to facilitate access to the animal for physiological support during the image acquisition. The rapid scan experiment uses large amplitude magnetic field scans, and sufficiently large resonator and detection bandwidths to record the rapidly-changing signal response. Rapid-scan EPR is sensitive to RF/microwave source noise and to baseline changes that are coherent with the field scan. The sensitivity to source noise is a primary incentive for using a CLR to isolate the detected signal from the RF source noise. Isolation from source noise of 44 and 47 dB was achieved in two resonator designs. Prior results showed that eddy currents contribute to background problems in rapid scan EPR, so the CLR design had to minimize conducting metal components. Using fine (AWG 38) wire for the resonators decreased eddy currents and lowered the resonator Q, thus providing larger resonator bandwidth. Mechanical resonances at specific scan frequencies are a major contributor to rapid scan backgrounds. PMID:21603086

  12. NASA MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation, a form of containerless processing, is an important tool in materials research. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container; therefore, heterogeneous nucleation on container walls is not possible. This allows studies of deeply undercooled melts. Furthermore, studies of high-temperature, highly reactive materials are also possible. Studies of the solidification and crystallization of undercooled melts is vital to the understanding of microstructure development, particularly the formation of alloys with unique properties by rapid solidification. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) lab has recently been upgraded to allow for rapid quenching of levitated materials. The ESL Rapid Quench System uses a small crucible-like vessel that can be partially filled with a low melting point material, such as a Gallium alloy, as a quench medium. An undercooled sample can be dropped into the vessel to rapidly quench the sample. A carousel with nine vessels sits below the bottom electrode assembly. This system allows up to nine rapid quenches before having to break vacuum and remove the vessels. This new Rapid Quench System will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and initial results are presented.

  13. Spin-Label CW Microwave Power Saturation and Rapid Passage with Triangular Non-Adiabatic Rapid Sweep (NARS) and Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell, A.W., Camenisch, T.G., Ratke, J.J. Sidabras, J.W., Hyde, J.S., 2011 as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions, and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra. In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10−3 to 10−7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  14. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10-3 to 10-7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  15. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kittell, Aaron W; Hyde, James S

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10(-3) to 10(-7) s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  16. Rapid acceleration leads to rapid weakening in earthquake-like laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We simulated the slip of a fault-patch during a large earthquake by rapidly loading an experimental, ring-shaped fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The flywheel abruptly delivers a finite amount of energy by spinning the fault-patch that spontaneously dissipates the energy without operator intervention. We conducted 42 experiments on Sierra White granite (SWG) samples, and 24 experiments on Kasota dolomite (KD) samples. Each experiment starts by spinning a 225 kg disk-shaped flywheel to a prescribed angular velocity. We refer to this experiment as an "earthquake-like slip-event" (ELSE). The strength-evolution in ELSE experiments is similar to the strength-evolution proposed for earthquake models and observed in stick-slip experiments. Further, we found that ELSE experiments are similar to earthquakes in at least three ways: (1) slip driven by the release of a finite amount of stored energy; (2) pattern of fault strength evolution; and (3) seismically observed values, such as average slip, peak-velocity and rise-time. By assuming that the measured slip, D, in ELSE experiments is equivalent to the average slip during an earthquake, we found that ELSE experiments (D = 0.003-4.6 m) correspond to earthquakes in moment-magnitude range of Mw = 4-8. In ELSE experiments, the critical-slip-distance, dc, has mean values of 2.7 cm and 1.2 cm for SWG and KD, that are much shorter than the 1-10 m in steady-state classical experiments in rotary shear systems. We attribute these dc values, to ELSE loading in which the fault-patch is abruptly loaded by impact with a spinning flywheel. Under this loading, the friction-velocity relations are strikingly different from those under steady-state loading on the same rock samples with the same shear system (Reches and Lockner, Nature, 2010). We further note that the slip acceleration in ELSE evolves systematically with fault strength and wear-rate, and that the dynamic weakening is restricted to the period of intense

  17. Hydraulic Response of Colorado River Rapids to a Reworking Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magirl, C. S.; Webb, R. H.

    2005-12-01

    Rapids on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon are formed primarily by the accumulation of coarse sediment from tributaries. Frequent debris-flow events in these tributaries contribute alluvium that constricts the river, accelerates local fluid velocities, increases the water-surface fall through the rapids, and raises the water-surface elevation in the upper pool. In turn, large main-stem floods rework fresh debris-fan deposits by removing the smaller coarse sediment and repositioning the largest particles into a stable matrix on the bed of the rapid. While morphologic changes to debris-fan surfaces in response to main-stem floods are widely studied in Grand Canyon, relatively little is known of the specific changes to the hydraulics of a given rapid. The turbulent and dangerous nature of rapids makes in-situ measurements challenging. The current study, however, successfully measured hydraulics within the core of several rapids. These rapids had been steepened by debris-flow event within the previous seven years. Using a boat-mounted fathometer and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV), point measurements of water-surface elevation, bathymetry, three-dimensional velocity, and turbulence were made at a collection of moderately-sized rapids in Grand Canyon. The boat was a 19-foot J-snout with a 50-hp Mercury outboard motor capable of maneuvering to nearly any location within each rapid. A three-person crew onboard operated the instrumentation. Two crewmembers on shore operated a survey instrument to continually record the boat position on the river. To characterize hydraulic changes in response to a main-stem flood, repeat measurements were made at each site both before and after the 1,200 m3/s controlled flood of November 2004. While this exercise is only a first step in quantifying the fluid dynamics within a rapid, the hydraulic data collected offers a unique insight into the response of coarse-grained alluvial deposits to floods in fast-moving bedrock

  18. GASTRIC MOTOR DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC RAPID GASTRIC EMPTYING

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Manduca, Armando; Lake, David S.; Fidler, Jeff; Edwards, Phillip; Grimm, Roger C.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The mechanisms of “idiopathic” rapid gastric emptying, which is associated with functional dyspepsia and functional diarrhea, are not understood. Our hypotheses were that increased gastric motility and reduced postprandial gastric accommodation contribute to rapid gastric emptying. Methods Fasting and postprandial (300kCal nutrient meal) gastric volumes were measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 20 healthy people and 17 with functional dyspepsia; 7 had normal and 10 had rapid gastric emptying. In 17 healthy people and patients, contractility was analyzed by spectral analysis of a time-series of gastric cross-sectional areas. Logistic regression models analyzed whether contractile parameters, fasting volume, and postprandial volume change could discriminate between health and patients with normal or rapid gastric emptying. Results While upper gastrointestinal symptoms were comparable, patients with rapid emptying had a higher (p = 0.002) body mass index (BMI) than normal gastric emptying. MRI visualized propagating contractions at ~ 3 cpm in healthy people and patients. Compared to controls (0.16 ± 0.02, Mean ± SEM), the amplitude of gastric contractions in the entire stomach was higher (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.2–14.0) in patients with rapid (0.24 ± 0.03) but not normal gastric emptying (0.10 ± 0.03). Similar differences were observed in the distal stomach. However, the propagation velocity, fasting gastric volume, and the postprandial volume change were not significantly different between patients and controls. Conclusions MRI provides a noninvasive and refined assessment of gastric volumes and contractility in humans. Increased gastric contractility may contribute to rapid gastric emptying in functional dyspepsia. PMID:21470342

  19. Rapid Clozapine Titration in Patients with Treatment Refractory Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Özdemir, Armağan; Sağlam, Nazife Gamze Usta; Turan, Şenol; Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Tomruk, Nesrin; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapid clozapine titration in patients with schizophrenia in hospital settings. We conducted a retrospective two-center cohort study to compare the safety and effectiveness of clozapine with different titration rates in treatment-refractory patients with schizophrenia. In the first center, clozapine was started at 25-50 mg followed by 50-100 mg as needed every 6 h on day 1, followed by increases of 50-100 mg/day. In the second center, titration was slower; clozapine initiated with 12.5-50 mg on day 1 followed by increases of 25-50 mg/day. The number of days between starting of clozapine until discharge was shorter in the rapid titration group (22.4 ± 8.72 vs 27.0 ± 10.5, p = 0.1). Number of days of total hospital stay were significantly shorter in the rapid titration group (29.6 ± 10.6 vs 41.2 ± 14.8, p = 0.002). Hypotension was more common in the rapid titration group and one patient had suspected myocarditis. Rapid clozapine titration appeared safe and effective. The length of stay following initiation of clozapine was shorter in the rapid-titration group, although this was not statistically significant. However starting clozapine earlier together with rapid titration has significantly shortened the length of hospital stay in patients with treatment refractory schizophrenia. PMID:26433727

  20. Rapid micro-PCR system for hepatitis C virus amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Young, Kung-Chia; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Wu, Ching-Yi

    2000-08-01

    A rapid micro-polymerase chain reaction ((mu) -PCR) system was integrated to amplify the complementary DNA (cDNA) molecules of hepatitis C virus (HCV). This system consists of a rapid thermal cycling system and a (mu) PCR chip fabricated by MEMS fabrication techniques. This rapid (mu) PCR system is verified by using serum samples from patients with chronic hepatitis C. The HCV amplicon of the rapid (mu) PCR system was analyzed by slab gel electrophoresis with separation of DNA marker in parallel. The (mu) PCR chip was fabricated on silicon wafer and Pyrex glass using photolithography, wet etching, and anodic bonding methods. Using silicon material to fabricate the raction well improves the temperature uniformity of sample and helps to reach the desired temperature faster. The rapid close loop thermal cycling system comprises power supplies, a thermal generator, a computer control PID controller, and a data acquisition subsystem. The thermoelectric (T.E.) cooler is used to work as the thermal generator and a heat sink by controlling the polarity of supplied power. The (mu) PCR system was verified with traditional PCR equipment by loading the same PCR mixture with HCV cDNA and running the same cycle numbers, then comparing both HCV amplicon slab gel electrophoresis. The HCV amplicon from the (mu) PCR system shows a DNA fragment with an expected size of 145 base pairs. The background is lower with the (mu) PCR system than that with the tradional PCR equipment. Comparing the traditional PCR equipment which spends 5.5 hours for 30 cycles to gain the detectable amount of HCV amplicon in slab gel separation, this (mu) PCR system takes 30 minutes to finish the 30 thermal cycles. This work has demonstrated that this rapid (mu) PCR system can provide rapid heat generation and dissipation, improved temperature uniformity in DNA amplification.

  1. Rapid determination of 226Ra in emergency urine samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2014-02-27

    A new method has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for the rapid determination of 226Ra in emergency urine samples following a radiological incident. If a radiological dispersive device event or a nuclear accident occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of radionuclides in urine samples to ensure the safety of the public. Large numbers of urine samples will have to be analyzed very quickly. This new SRNL method was applied to 100 mL urine aliquots, however this method can be applied to smaller or larger sample aliquots as needed.more » The method was optimized for rapid turnaround times; urine samples may be prepared for counting in <3 h. A rapid calcium phosphate precipitation method was used to pre-concentrate 226Ra from the urine sample matrix, followed by removal of calcium by cation exchange separation. A stacked elution method using DGA Resin was used to purify the 226Ra during the cation exchange elution step. This approach combines the cation resin elution step with the simultaneous purification of 226Ra with DGA Resin, saving time. 133Ba was used instead of 225Ra as tracer to allow immediate counting; however, 225Ra can still be used as an option. The rapid purification of 226Ra to remove interferences using DGA Resin was compared with a slightly longer Ln Resin approach. A final barium sulfate micro-precipitation step was used with isopropanol present to reduce solubility; producing alpha spectrometry sources with peaks typically <40 keV FWHM (full width half max). This new rapid method is fast, has very high tracer yield (>90 %), and removes interferences effectively. The sample preparation method can also be adapted to ICP-MS measurement of 226Ra, with rapid removal of isobaric interferences.« less

  2. Social Transitions Cause Rapid Behavioral and Neuroendocrine Changes

    PubMed Central

    Maruska, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    In species that form dominance hierarchies, there are often opportunities for low-ranking individuals to challenge high-ranking ones, resulting in a rise or fall in social rank. How does an animal rapidly detect, process, and then respond to these social transitions? This article explores and summarizes how these social transitions can rapidly (within 24 h) impact an individual’s behavior, physiology, and brain, using the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, as a model. Male A. burtoni form hierarchies in which a few brightly-colored dominant males defend territories and spawn with females, while the remaining males are subordinate, more drab-colored, do not hold a territory, and have minimal opportunities for reproduction. These social phenotypes are plastic and reversible, meaning that individual males may switch between dominant and subordinate status multiple times within a lifetime. When the social environment is manipulated to create males that either ascend (subordinate to dominant) or descend (dominant to subordinate) in rank, there are rapid changes in behavior, circulating hormones, and levels of gene expression in the brain that reflect the direction of transition. For example, within minutes, males ascending in status show bright coloration, a distinct eye-bar, increased dominance behaviors, activation of brain nuclei in the social behavior network, and higher levels of sex steroids in the plasma. Ascending males also show rapid changes in levels of neuropeptide and steroid receptors in the brain, as well as in the pituitary and testes. To further examine hormone–behavior relationships in this species during rapid social ascent, the present study also measured levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, estradiol, progestins, and cortisol in the plasma during the first week of social ascent and tested for correlations with behavior. Plasma levels of all steroids were rapidly increased at 30 min after social ascent, but were not correlated

  3. Social Transitions Cause Rapid Behavioral and Neuroendocrine Changes.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P

    2015-08-01

    In species that form dominance hierarchies, there are often opportunities for low-ranking individuals to challenge high-ranking ones, resulting in a rise or fall in social rank. How does an animal rapidly detect, process, and then respond to these social transitions? This article explores and summarizes how these social transitions can rapidly (within 24 h) impact an individual's behavior, physiology, and brain, using the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, as a model. Male A. burtoni form hierarchies in which a few brightly-colored dominant males defend territories and spawn with females, while the remaining males are subordinate, more drab-colored, do not hold a territory, and have minimal opportunities for reproduction. These social phenotypes are plastic and reversible, meaning that individual males may switch between dominant and subordinate status multiple times within a lifetime. When the social environment is manipulated to create males that either ascend (subordinate to dominant) or descend (dominant to subordinate) in rank, there are rapid changes in behavior, circulating hormones, and levels of gene expression in the brain that reflect the direction of transition. For example, within minutes, males ascending in status show bright coloration, a distinct eye-bar, increased dominance behaviors, activation of brain nuclei in the social behavior network, and higher levels of sex steroids in the plasma. Ascending males also show rapid changes in levels of neuropeptide and steroid receptors in the brain, as well as in the pituitary and testes. To further examine hormone-behavior relationships in this species during rapid social ascent, the present study also measured levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, estradiol, progestins, and cortisol in the plasma during the first week of social ascent and tested for correlations with behavior. Plasma levels of all steroids were rapidly increased at 30 min after social ascent, but were not correlated with

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of rapidly growing mycobacteria using the rapid colorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Ramis, I B; Cnockaert, M; von Groll, A; Nogueira, C L; Leão, S C; Andre, E; Simon, A; Palomino, J C; da Silva, P E A; Vandamme, P; Martin, A

    2015-07-01

    Drug susceptibility testing (DST) of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are recommended for guiding the antimicrobial therapy. We have evaluated the use of resazurin in Mueller-Hinton medium (MHR) for MIC determination of RGM and compared the results with those obtained with the reference standard broth microdilution in Mueller-Hinton (MH) and with the resazurin microtiter assay (REMA) in 7H9 broth. The MIC of eight drugs: amikacin (AMI), cefoxitin (FOX), ciprofloxacin (CIP), clarithromycin (CLA), doxycycline (DOX), linezolid (LZD), moxifloxacin (MXF) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were evaluated against 76 RGM (18 species) using three methods (MH, MHR, and REMA) in a 96-well plate format incubated at 37 °C over 3-5 days. Results obtained in the MH plates were interpreted by the appearance of turbidity at the bottom of the well before adding the resazurin. MHR and 7H9-REMA plates were read by visual observation for a change in color from blue to pink. The majority of results were obtained at day 5 for MH and 1 day after for MHR and 7H9-REMA. However, the preliminary experiment on time to positivity results using the reference strain showed that the resazurin can be added to the MH at day 2 to produce the results at day 3, but future studies with large sets of strains are required to confirm this suggestion. A high level of agreement (kappa 1.000-0.884) was obtained between the MH and the MHR. Comparison of results obtained with 7H9-REMA, on the other hand, revealed several discrepancies and a lower level of agreement (kappa 1.000-0.111). The majority of the strains were resistant to DOX and TMP-SMX, and the most active antimicrobials for RGM were AMI and FOX. In the present study, MHR represented an excellent alternative for MIC determination of RGM. The results could be read reliably, more easily, and more quickly than with the classical MH method. PMID:25820290

  5. Integration of rapid product development technologies information models using STEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mony, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Based on the latest development in particular in CAD/CAM, rapid prototyping, reverse engineering and inspection, rapid product development involves more and more new technologies. The integration of these different systems around common and consistent information models appears now as a main issue to get the best profit from these technologies. The issue of information models to be used in this area has appeared from the beginning and several format such as the STL format were proposed to be able to communicate between these system. The number of different existing formats, the performance as well as the accuracy of these models push today to develop new standard information models and technologies. In that way, STEP is clearly identified as a main integration technology to be applied in rapid product development. STEP has already become an international standard and was adopted by main industrial sectors to build their own integration strategies. The proposed paper present the objectives and specifications of an integrated rapid product development environment based on STEP technologies. The main concept and technical contents of STEP are defined, as well as the role and application of STEP in rapid product development.

  6. Local modulation of steroid action: rapid control of enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Thierry D.; Cornil, Charlotte A.; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Mensah-Nyagan, A. Guy; Balthazart, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens can induce rapid, short-lived physiological and behavioral responses, in addition to their slow, but long-term, effects at the transcriptional level. To be functionally relevant, these effects should be associated with rapid modulations of estrogens concentrations. 17β-estradiol is synthesized by the enzyme aromatase, using testosterone as a substrate, but can also be degraded into catechol-estrogens via hydroxylation by the same enzyme, leading to an increase or decrease in estrogens concentration, respectively. The first evidence that aromatase activity (AA) can be rapidly modulated came from experiments performed in Japanese quail hypothalamus homogenates. This rapid modulation is triggered by calcium-dependent phosphorylations and was confirmed in other tissues and species. The mechanisms controlling the phosphorylation status, the targeted amino acid residues and the reversibility seem to vary depending of the tissues and is discussed in this review. We currently do not know whether the phosphorylation of the same amino acid affects both aromatase and/or hydroxylase activities or whether these residues are different. These processes provide a new general mechanism by which local estrogen concentration can be rapidly altered in the brain and other tissues. PMID:25852459

  7. Rapid Health and Needs assessments after disasters: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Publichealth care providers, stakeholders and policy makers request a rapid insight into health status and needs of the affected population after disasters. To our knowledge, there is no standardized rapid assessment tool for European countries. The aim of this article is to describe existing tools used internationally and analyze them for the development of a workable rapid assessment. Methods A review was conducted, including original studies concerning a rapid health and/or needs assessment. The studies used were published between 1980 and 2009. The electronic databasesof Medline, Embase, SciSearch and Psychinfo were used. Results Thirty-three studies were included for this review. The majority of the studies was of US origin and in most cases related to natural disasters, especially concerning the weather. In eighteen studies an assessment was conducted using a structured questionnaire, eleven studies used registries and four used both methods. Questionnaires were primarily used to asses the health needs, while data records were used to assess the health status of disaster victims. Conclusions Methods most commonly used were face to face interviews and data extracted from existing registries. Ideally, a rapid assessment tool is needed which does not add to the burden of disaster victims. In this perspective, the use of existing medical registries in combination with a brief questionnaire in the aftermath of disasters is the most promising. Since there is an increasing need for such a tool this approach needs further examination. PMID:20515478

  8. Audiovisual Simultaneity Judgment and Rapid Recalibration throughout the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jean-Paul; De Niear, Matthew; Van der Burg, Erik; Wallace, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory interactions are well established to convey an array of perceptual and behavioral benefits. One of the key features of multisensory interactions is the temporal structure of the stimuli combined. In an effort to better characterize how temporal factors influence multisensory interactions across the lifespan, we examined audiovisual simultaneity judgment and the degree of rapid recalibration to paired audiovisual stimuli (Flash-Beep and Speech) in a sample of 220 participants ranging from 7 to 86 years of age. Results demonstrate a surprisingly protracted developmental time-course for both audiovisual simultaneity judgment and rapid recalibration, with neither reaching maturity until well into adolescence. Interestingly, correlational analyses revealed that audiovisual simultaneity judgments (i.e., the size of the audiovisual temporal window of simultaneity) and rapid recalibration significantly co-varied as a function of age. Together, our results represent the most complete description of age-related changes in audiovisual simultaneity judgments to date, as well as being the first to describe changes in the degree of rapid recalibration as a function of age. We propose that the developmental time-course of rapid recalibration scaffolds the maturation of more durable audiovisual temporal representations. PMID:27551918

  9. Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K. R.; Levine, A.

    2014-09-01

    The Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit combines the former Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Database, and other resources into a Web-based tool that gives the regulatory and utility-scale geothermal developer communities rapid and easy access to permitting information. RAPID currently comprises five tools - Permitting Atlas, Regulatory Roadmap, Resource Library, NEPA Database, and Best Practices. A beta release of an additional tool, the Permitting Wizard, is scheduled for late 2014. Because of the huge amount of information involved, RAPID was developed in a wiki platform to allow industry and regulatory agencies to maintain the content in the future so that it continues to provide relevant and accurate information to users. In 2014, the content was expanded to include regulatory requirements for utility-scale solar and bulk transmission development projects. Going forward, development of the RAPID Toolkit will focus on expanding the capabilities of current tools, developing additional tools, including additional technologies, and continuing to increase stakeholder involvement.

  10. Densitometric evaluation of four rapid dental film processing solutions.

    PubMed

    Matthee, M J; Seeliger, J E

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate densitometrically four rapid processing solutions for dental films; also to identify those combinations of film, solution and temperature which produced the best results in terms of radiographic contrast and relative film speed at a given temperature. The film types used were Agfa Dentus M2, Flow X-ray and Kodak Ultra-speed while the rapid processing solutions tested were Kolchem Rapid Dev 1, Kolchem Rapid Dev 2, MEMS Ultra-Neg and Siemens Insta-Neg. An aluminium step-wedge was radiographed under standardized conditions. Processing was done manually at 18, 20, 22, 25, 27, 29 and 32 degrees C, the temperatures being controlled with the aid of two Julabo thermostatically controlled immersion circulators, to ensure constant temperatures. Unexposed films were processed at each temperature setting to determine base plus fog values. Densitometric readings were taken using a digital densitometer, and base plus fog values were subtracted from each reading. Radiographic contrast and relative film speed were calculated and the data obtained subjected to statistical analysis using Duncan's Multiple Range Test. It was concluded that Agfa Dentus M2 film processed with Kolchem Rapid Dev 2 at 18 degrees C gave the highest radiographic contrast of 0.44 and relative film speed of 4.36. All base plus fog values were within the acceptable limit of 0.25. PMID:1820681

  11. Audiovisual Simultaneity Judgment and Rapid Recalibration throughout the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    De Niear, Matthew; Van der Burg, Erik; Wallace, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory interactions are well established to convey an array of perceptual and behavioral benefits. One of the key features of multisensory interactions is the temporal structure of the stimuli combined. In an effort to better characterize how temporal factors influence multisensory interactions across the lifespan, we examined audiovisual simultaneity judgment and the degree of rapid recalibration to paired audiovisual stimuli (Flash-Beep and Speech) in a sample of 220 participants ranging from 7 to 86 years of age. Results demonstrate a surprisingly protracted developmental time-course for both audiovisual simultaneity judgment and rapid recalibration, with neither reaching maturity until well into adolescence. Interestingly, correlational analyses revealed that audiovisual simultaneity judgments (i.e., the size of the audiovisual temporal window of simultaneity) and rapid recalibration significantly co-varied as a function of age. Together, our results represent the most complete description of age-related changes in audiovisual simultaneity judgments to date, as well as being the first to describe changes in the degree of rapid recalibration as a function of age. We propose that the developmental time-course of rapid recalibration scaffolds the maturation of more durable audiovisual temporal representations. PMID:27551918

  12. Modeling of subglacial hydrological development following rapid supraglacial lake drainage

    PubMed Central

    Dow, C F; Kulessa, B; Rutt, I C; Tsai, V C; Pimentel, S; Doyle, S H; van As, D; Lindbäck, K; Pettersson, R; Jones, G A; Hubbard, A

    2015-01-01

    The rapid drainage of supraglacial lakes injects substantial volumes of water to the bed of the Greenland ice sheet over short timescales. The effect of these water pulses on the development of basal hydrological systems is largely unknown. To address this, we develop a lake drainage model incorporating both (1) a subglacial radial flux element driven by elastic hydraulic jacking and (2) downstream drainage through a linked channelized and distributed system. Here we present the model and examine whether substantial, efficient subglacial channels can form during or following lake drainage events and their effect on the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system. We force the model with field data from a lake drainage site, 70 km from the terminus of Russell Glacier in West Greenland. The model outputs suggest that efficient subglacial channels do not readily form in the vicinity of the lake during rapid drainage and instead water is evacuated primarily by a transient turbulent sheet and the distributed system. Following lake drainage, channels grow but are not large enough to reduce the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system, unless preexisting channels are present throughout the domain. Our results have implications for the analysis of subglacial hydrological systems in regions where rapid lake drainage provides the primary mechanism for surface-to-bed connections. Key Points Model for subglacial hydrological analysis of rapid lake drainage events Limited subglacial channel growth during and following rapid lake drainage Persistence of distributed drainage in inland areas where channel growth is limited PMID:26640746

  13. Rapid Inspection of Aerospace Structures - Is It Autonomous Yet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Backes, Paul; Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    The trend to increase the usage of aging aircraft added a great deal of urgency to the ongoing need for low-cost, rapid, simple-to-operate, reliable and efficient NDE methods for detection and characterization of flaws in aircraft structures. In many cases, the problem of inspection is complex due to the limitation of current technology and the need to disassemble aircraft structures and testing them in lab conditions. To overcome these limitations, reliable field inspection tools are being developed for rapid NDE of large and complex-shape structures, that can operate at harsh, hostal and remote conditions with minimum human interface. In recent years, to address the need for rapid inspection in field conditions, numerous portable scanners were developed using NDE methods, including ultrasonics, shearography, thermography. This paper is written with emphasis on ultrasonic NDE scanners, their evolution and the expected direction of growth.

  14. Rapid detection of EBOLA VP40 in microchip immunofiltration assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miethe, Peter; Gary, Dominik; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Gad, Anne-Marie

    2015-05-01

    In the spring of 2014, the Ebola virus (EBOV) strain Zaire caused a dramatic outbreak in several regions of West Africa. The RT-PCR and antigen capture diagnostic proved to be effective for detecting EBOV in blood and serum. In this paper, we present data of a rapid antigen capture test for the detection of VP40. The test was performed in a microfluidic chip for immunofiltration analysis. The chip integrates all necessary assay components. The analytical sensitivity of the rapid test was 8 ng/ml for recombinant VP40. In serum and whole blood samples spiked with virus culture material, the detection limit was 2.2 x 102 PFU/ml. The performance data of the rapid test (15 min) are comparable to that of the VP40 laboratory ELISA.

  15. Review of rapid eye movement behavior sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Abad, Vivien C; Guilleminault, Christian

    2004-03-01

    The spectrum of rapid eye movement behavior disorders (RBD) spans various age groups, with the greatest prevalence in elderly men. Major diagnostic features include harmful or potentially harmful sleep behaviors that disrupt sleep continuity and dream enactment during rapid eye movement sleep. In RBD patients, the polysomnogram during rapid eye movement sleep demonstrates excessive augmentation of chin electromyogram or excessive chin or limb phasic electromyogram twitching. RBD may be associated with various neurodegenerative disorders, such as multiple system atrophy, Parkinson's disease, and dementia with Lewy bodies. Other co-morbid conditions may include narcolepsy, agrypnia excitata, sleepwalking, and sleep terrors. RBD is hypothesized to be caused by primary dysfunction of the pedunculo-pontine nucleus or other key brainstem structures associated with basal ganglia pathology or, alternatively, from abnormal afferent signals in the basal ganglia leading to dysfunction in the midbrain extrapyramidal area/ pedunculo-pontine nucleus regions. PMID:14984689

  16. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-02-01

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound. PMID:25605890

  17. Rapid and selective concentration of microparticles in an optoelectrofluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Park, Je-Kyun

    2009-01-21

    We demonstrate rapid manipulation and selective concentration of microparticles using AC electrokinetics such as dielectrophoresis (DEP) and AC electro-osmosis (ACEO) in an optoelectrofluidic platform based on a liquid crystal display (LCD). When 10 V bias at 10 kHz was applied to the optoelectrofluidic device, only the 1 microm-diameter polystyrene particles were concentrated into the projected LCD image patterns and closely packed, forming the crystalline structure by ACEO flow, while the 6 microm-diameter particles were repelled by negative DEP forces. We have characterized this frequency-dependency of the optoelectrofluidic particle behavior according to the particle diameter. On the basis of these results, we can rapidly concentrate the 1 microm-diameter particles and separate them from the 6 microm particles, by applying an AC signal of 10 kHz frequency. This novel technique can be applied to rapidly concentrate, separate and pattern micro-/nanoparticles in many biological and chemical applications. PMID:19107274

  18. Methods and systems for rapid prototyping of high density circuits

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Jeremy A.; Davis, Donald W.; Chavez, Bart D.; Gallegos, Phillip L.; Wicker, Ryan B.; Medina, Francisco R.

    2008-09-02

    A preferred embodiment provides, for example, a system and method of integrating fluid media dispensing technology such as direct-write (DW) technologies with rapid prototyping (RP) technologies such as stereolithography (SL) to provide increased micro-fabrication and micro-stereolithography. A preferred embodiment of the present invention also provides, for example, a system and method for Rapid Prototyping High Density Circuit (RPHDC) manufacturing of solderless connectors and pilot devices with terminal geometries that are compatible with DW mechanisms and reduce contact resistance where the electrical system is encapsulated within structural members and manual electrical connections are eliminated in favor of automated DW traces. A preferred embodiment further provides, for example, a method of rapid prototyping comprising: fabricating a part layer using stereolithography and depositing thermally curable media onto the part layer using a fluid dispensing apparatus.

  19. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  20. Rapid Characterization of Magnetic Moment of Cells for Magnetic Separation

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M.; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2014-01-01

    NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen were previously shown to be captured at high efficiencies by a microfabricated magnetic sifter. If fine control and optimization of the magnetic separation process is to be achieved, it is vital to be able to characterize the labeled cells’ magnetic moment rapidly. We have thus adapted a rapid prototyping method to obtain the saturation magnetic moment of these cells. This method utilizes a cross-correlation algorithm to analyze the cells’ motion in a simple fluidic channel to obtain their magnetophoretic velocity, and is effective even when the magnetic moments of cells are small. This rapid characterization is proven useful in optimizing our microfabricated magnetic sifter procedures for magnetic cell capture. PMID:24771946