Science.gov

Sample records for p-gp protein expression

  1. ATP-binding cassette proteins BCRP, MRP1 and P-gp expression and localization in the human umbilical cord.

    PubMed

    Riches, Zoe; Walia, Gurinder; Berman, Jacob M; Wright, Tricia E; Collier, Abby C

    2016-06-01

    1. The umbilical cord is a direct conduit to the fetus hence transporters could have roles in partitioning substances between the maternal-placental-fetal units. Here we determined the expression and localization of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters BCRP (ABCG2), P-gp (ABCB1) and MRP1 (ABCC1) in human umbilical cords. 2. The mRNA for BCRP and MRP1 was detected in 25/25 samples, but P-gp was detected in only 5/25. ABC transporter mRNA expression relative to 18S was 25.6 ± 0.3, 26.5 ± 0.6 and 22.2 ± 0.2 cycles for BCRP, MRP1 and P-gp respectively. 3. Using a subset of 10 umbilical cords, BCRP protein was present in all samples (immunoblot) with positive correlation between mRNA and proteins (p = 0.07, r = 0.62) and between immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) (p = 0.03, r = 0.67). P-gp protein was observed in 4/10 samples by both immunoblot and IHC, with no correlation between mRNA and protein (p = 0.45, r = 0.55) or immunoblotting and IHC (p = 0.2, r = 0.72), likely due to small sample size. MRP1 protein was not observed. 4. Localization of BCRP and P-gp proteins was to Wharton's jelly with no specific staining in arterial or venous endothelia. 5. Understanding ABC transporter expression in the umbilical cord may be useful for determining fetal exposures to xenobiotics if functional properties can be defined. PMID:26407213

  2. Mini-P-gp and P-gp Co-Expression in Brown Trout Erythrocytes: A Prospective Blood Biomarker of Aquatic Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Emeline; Amblard, Christian; Desmolles, François; Combourieu, Bruno; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2015-01-01

    In aquatic organisms, such as fish, blood is continually exposed to aquatic contaminants. Multidrug Resistance (MDR) proteins are ubiquitous detoxification membrane pumps, which recognize various xenobiotics. Moreover, their expression is induced by a large class of drugs and pollutants. We have highlighted the co-expression of a mini P-gp of 75 kDa and a P-gp of 140 kDa in the primary culture of brown trout erythrocytes and in the erythrocytes of wild brown trout collected from three rivers in the Auvergne region of France. In vitro experiments showed that benzo[a]pyrene, a highly toxic pollutant model, induced the co-expression of mini-P-gp and P-gp in trout erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner and relay type response. Similarly, in the erythrocytes of wild brown trout collected from rivers contaminated by a mixture of PAH and other multi-residues of pesticides, mini-P-gp and P-gp were able to modulate their expression, according to the nature of the pollutants. The differential and complementary responses of mini-P-gp and P-gp in trout erythrocytes suggest the existence in blood cells of a real protective network against xenobiotics/drugs. This property could be exploited to develop a blood biomarker of river pollution. PMID:26854141

  3. Mini-P-gp and P-gp Co-Expression in Brown Trout Erythrocytes: A Prospective Blood Biomarker of Aquatic Pollution.

    PubMed

    Valton, Emeline; Amblard, Christian; Desmolles, François; Combourieu, Bruno; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2015-01-01

    In aquatic organisms, such as fish, blood is continually exposed to aquatic contaminants. Multidrug Resistance (MDR) proteins are ubiquitous detoxification membrane pumps, which recognize various xenobiotics. Moreover, their expression is induced by a large class of drugs and pollutants. We have highlighted the co-expression of a mini P-gp of 75 kDa and a P-gp of 140 kDa in the primary culture of brown trout erythrocytes and in the erythrocytes of wild brown trout collected from three rivers in the Auvergne region of France. In vitro experiments showed that benzo[a]pyrene, a highly toxic pollutant model, induced the co-expression of mini-P-gp and P-gp in trout erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner and relay type response. Similarly, in the erythrocytes of wild brown trout collected from rivers contaminated by a mixture of PAH and other multi-residues of pesticides, mini-P-gp and P-gp were able to modulate their expression, according to the nature of the pollutants. The differential and complementary responses of mini-P-gp and P-gp in trout erythrocytes suggest the existence in blood cells of a real protective network against xenobiotics/drugs. This property could be exploited to develop a blood biomarker of river pollution. PMID:26854141

  4. Expression of Chlamydia muridarum plasmid genes and immunogenicity of pGP3 and pGP4 in different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Mosolygó, Tímea; Faludi, Ildikó; Balogh, Emese P; Szabó, Ágnes M; Karai, Adrienn; Kerekes, Fanni; Virók, Dezső P; Endrész, Valéria; Burián, Katalin

    2014-05-01

    Chlamydia muridarum carries a cryptic plasmid (pMoPn) of 7.5kb, which encodes seven genes. Our aims were to describe the transcriptional pattern of the pMoPn genes in C. muridarum-infected mice and to evaluate the host immune responses against pGP3 and pGP4 proteins. BALB/c and C57BL/6N female mice were inoculated intranasally with C. muridarum and sacrificed at different time points, and the total RNA was extracted from the lung suspensions to determine the levels of expression of the different plasmid genes by RT qPCR. The supernatants of the lungs were subjected to the quantitation of recoverable C. muridarum. TCA04 and TCA05, which encode pGP3 and pGP4, respectively, were amplified by PCR and cloned into the pET vector. The proteins were overexpressed in E. coli HB101 and purified. Selected groups of BALB/c and C57BL/6N mice were infected with C. muridarum 1-3 times. The humoral immune responses in the sera of the mice to the proteins encoded by TCA04 and TCA05 were tested by Western blotting, and the cellular immune responses were assessed in lymphocyte proliferation assays. The proteins recognized by the mouse sera were further analysed by a LC/MSMS technique. The kinetics of C. muridarum growth were similar in the mouse strains used, but the pathogen burden was higher in the BALB/c mice in the late phase of infection. All the plasmid genes in the BALB/c mice showed an increased level of expression on day 7, whereas the expression of the same genes did not change on day 7 in the C57BL/6N mice. The levels of expression of the plasmid genes were higher in the C57BL/6N mice at later time points. In Western blot assays, the sera of the singly infected C57BL/6N mice reacted with the monomeric form of pGP3, whereas the sera of the singly infected BALB/c mice reacted with the trimeric form of pGP3. The sera of the multiply infected C57BL/6N mice also recognized pGP4. Similarly to the humoral immune response, cellular immune responses to pGP3 and pGP4 were detected in the C. muridarum-infected C57BL/6N mice, but the spleen cells of BALB/c mice responded with proliferation only to the pGP3 protein. These results suggest that the proteins encoded by pMoPn genes may modulate the host immune response during C. muridarum infection, and that the evolved immune response against plasmid proteins, similarly to that against other chlamydial proteins, depends on the genetic background of the host. PMID:24631212

  5. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the effects of piperine on P-gp function and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yi; Chin Tan, Theresa May; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Piperine, a major component of black pepper, is used as spice and nutrient enhancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute and prolonged piperine exposure on cellular P-gp expression and function in vitro and in vivo. Piperine at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, determined by MTT assay to be non-cytotoxic, was observed to inhibit P-gp mediated efflux transport of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin across L-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell monolayers. The acute inhibitory effect was dependent on piperine concentration, with abolishment of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin polarized transport attained at 50 {mu}M of piperine. In contrast, prolonged (48 and 72 h) co-incubation of Caco-2 cell monolayers with piperine (50 and 100 {mu}M) increased P-gp activity through an up-regulation of cellular P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA levels. The up-regulated protein was functionally active, as demonstrated by a higher degree of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin efflux across the cell monolayers, but the induction was readily reversed by the removal of the spice from the culture medium. Peroral administration of piperine at the dose of 112 {mu}g/kg body weight/day to male Wistar rats for 14 consecutive days also led to increased intestinal P-gp levels. However, there was a concomitant reduction in the rodent liver P-gp although the kidney P-gp level was unaffected. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when piperine is to be co-administered with drugs that are P-gp substrates, particularly for patients whose diet relies heavily on pepper.

  6. Concomitance of P-gp/LRP Expression with EGFR Mutations in Exons 19 and 21 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hong; Lu, Weipeng; Li, Mei; Zhang, Qiuping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Traditional chemotherapy is the main adjuvant therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the emergence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) has greatly restricted the curative effect of chemotherapy. Therefore, it is necessary to find a method to treat MDR NSCLC clinically. It is worth investigating whether NSCLCs that are resistant to traditional chemotherapy can be effectively treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Materials and Methods The expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and lung resistance-related protein (LRP) was detected by immunohistochemistry, and mutations in EGFR (exons 19 and 21) and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) (exon 2) were detected by high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) of surgical NSCLC specimens from 127 patients who did not undergo traditional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A Pearson chi-square test was performed to analyze the correlations between the expression of P-gp and LRP and mutations in EGFR and KRAS. Results The expression frequencies of P-gp and LRP were significantly higher in adenocarcinomas from non-smoking patients; the expression frequency of LRP was significantly higher in cancer tissue from female patients. The frequency of EGFR mutations was significantly higher in well to moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas from non-smoking female patients. The frequency of EGFR mutations in the cancers that expressed P-gp, LRP, or both P-gp and LRP was significantly higher than that in cancers that did not express P-gp or LRP. Conclusion NSCLCs expressing P-gp/LRP bear the EGFR mutation in exon 19 or 21 easily. PMID:26632382

  7. Validation of a P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) Humanized Mouse Model by Integrating Selective Absolute Quantification of Human MDR1, Mouse Mdr1a and Mdr1b Protein Expressions with In Vivo Functional Analysis for Blood-Brain Barrier Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Muhammad Waqas; Uchida, Yasuo; Hoshi, Yutaro; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to establish a useful validation method for newly generated humanized mouse models. The novel approach of combining our established species-specific protein quantification method combined with in vivo functional studies is evaluated to validate a humanized mouse model of P-gp/MDR1 efflux transporter. The P-gp substrates digoxin, verapamil and docetaxel were administered to male FVB Mdr1a/1b(+/+) (FVB WT), FVB Mdr1a/1b(-/-) (Mdr1a/1b(-/-)), C57BL/6 Mdr1a/1b(+/+) (C57BL/6 WT) and humanized C57BL (hMDR1) mice. Brain-to-plasma total concentration ratios (Kp) were measured. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomic (QTAP) analysis was used to selectively quantify the protein expression levels of hMDR1, Mdr1a and Mdr1b in the isolated brain capillaries. The protein expressions of other transporters, receptors and claudin-5 were also quantified. The Kp for digoxin, verapamil, and docetaxel were 20, 30 and 4 times higher in the Mdr1a/1b(-/-) mice than in the FVB WT controls, as expected. The Kp for digoxin, verapamil and docetaxel were 2, 16 and 2-times higher in the hMDR1 compared to the C57BL/6 WT mice. The hMDR1 mice had 63- and 9.1-fold lower expressions of the hMDR1 and Mdr1a proteins than the corresponding expression of Mdr1a in C57BL/6 WT mice, respectively. The protein expression levels of other molecules were almost consistent between C57BL/6 WT and hMDR1 mice. The P-gp function at the BBB in the hMDR1 mice was smaller than that in WT mice due to lower protein expression levels of hMDR1 and Mdr1a. The combination of QTAP and in vivo functional analyses was successfully applied to validate the humanized animal model and evaluates its suitability for further studies. PMID:25932627

  8. Transport Inhibition of Digoxin Using Several Common P-gp Expressing Cell Lines Is Not Necessarily Reporting Only on Inhibitor Binding to P-gp

    PubMed Central

    Lumen, Annie Albin; Li, Libin; Li, Jiben; Ahmed, Zeba; Meng, Zhou; Owen, Albert; Ellens, Harma; Hidalgo, Ismael J.; Bentz, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We have reported that the P-gp substrate digoxin required basolateral and apical uptake transport in excess of that allowed by digoxin passive permeability (as measured in the presence of GF120918) to achieve the observed efflux kinetics across MDCK-MDR1-NKI (The Netherlands Cancer Institute) confluent cell monolayers. That is, GF120918 inhibitable uptake transport was kinetically required. Therefore, IC50 measurements using digoxin as a probe substrate in this cell line could be due to inhibition of P-gp, of digoxin uptake transport, or both. This kinetic analysis is now extended to include three additional cell lines: MDCK-MDR1-NIH (National Institute of Health), Caco-2 and CPT-B2 (Caco-2 cells with BCRP knockdown). These cells similarly exhibit GF120918 inhibitable uptake transport of digoxin. We demonstrate that inhibition of digoxin transport across these cell lines by GF120918, cyclosporine, ketoconazole and verapamil is greater than can be explained by inhibition of P-gp alone. We examined three hypotheses for this non-P-gp inhibition. The inhibitors can: (1) bind to a basolateral digoxin uptake transporter, thereby inhibiting digoxin's cellular uptake; (2) partition into the basolateral membrane and directly reduce membrane permeability; (3) aggregate with digoxin in the donor chamber, thereby reducing the free concentration of digoxin, with concomitant reduction in digoxin uptake. Data and simulations show that hypothesis 1 was found to be uniformly acceptable. Hypothesis 2 was found to be uniformly unlikely. Hypothesis 3 was unlikely for GF120918 and cyclosporine, but further studies are needed to completely adjudicate whether hetero-dimerization contributes to the non-P-gp inhibition for ketoconazole and verapamil. We also find that P-gp substrates with relatively low passive permeability such as digoxin, loperamide and vinblastine kinetically require basolateral uptake transport over that allowed by +GF120918 passive permeability, while highly permeable P-gp substrates such as amprenavir, quinidine, ketoconazole and verapamil do not, regardless of whether they actually use the basolateral transporter. PMID:23976943

  9. Expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα and intrinsic resistance in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiarui; Zhang, Jinhui; Zhang, Lichuan; Zhao, Long; Fan, Sufang; Yang, Zhonghai; Gao, Fei; Kong, Ying; Xiao, Gary Guishan; Wang, Qi

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between the endogenous levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), lung resistance-related protein (LRP), glutathione-s-transferase-π (GST‑π) and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) and intrinsic drug resistance in four human lung cancer cell lines, SK-MES-1, SPCA-1, NCI-H-460 and NCI-H-446, of different histological types. The expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was measured by immunofluorescence, Western blotting and RT-PCR. Drug resistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 was determined using MTT assays. The correlation between expression of the resistance-related proteins and their roles in the resistance to drugs in these cancer cell lines was analyzed. We found that the endogenous levels of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα in the four cell lines varied. The level of GST-π in the SK-MES-1 cells was the highest, whereas the level of P-gp in the SPCA-1 cells was the lowest. The chemoresistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 in the four cell lines was different. The SPCA-1 cell line was most resistance to cisplatin; SK-MES-1 was most resistance to VP-16; whereas SK-MES-1 was most sensitive to doxorubicin. There was a positive correlation between GST-π expression and resistance to cisplatin, between TopoIIα expression and resistance to VP-16; and a negative correlation was noted between TopoIIα expression and resistance to doxorubicin. In summary, the endogenous expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was different in the four human lung cancer cell lines of different histological types, and this variance may be associated with the variation in chemosensitivity to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16. Among the related proteins, GST-π may be useful for the prediction of the intrinsic resistance to cisplatin, whereas TopoIIα may be useful to predict resistance to doxorubicin and VP-16 in human lung cancer cell lines. PMID:21805041

  10. Serum serotonin reduced the expression of hepatic transporter Mrp2 and P-gp via regulating nuclear receptor CAR in PI-IBS rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yun-Yun; Huang, Jing; Ma, Yan-Rong; Han, Miao; Ma, Kang; Qin, Hong-Yan; Rao, Zhi; Wu, Xin-An

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) play important roles in the pharmacological effects and (or) side-effects of many drugs, and are regulated by several mediators, including neurotransmitters. This work aimed to investigate whether serum levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) affected the expression of hepatic transporters or DMEs. The expression of hepatic transporters was assessed using the Western-blot technique in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic-acid-induced rat model of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS), in which serum levels of 5-HT were significantly elevated. To further clarify the underlying mechanism, the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and the 5-HT depleting agent parachlorophenylalanine (pCPA) were applied to adjust serum levels of 5-HT. Serum levels of 5-HT were measured using LC-MS/MS; the expression of hepatic transporters, DMEs, and nuclear receptors were examined by Western-blot technique. Our results showed that in PI-IBS rats the expression of multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) was significantly decreased, while colonic enterochromaffin cell density and serum levels of 5-HT were all significantly increased. Moreover, 5-HTP treatment significantly increased serum levels of 5-HT and decreased the expression of Mrp2 and glycoprotein P (P-gp), whereas treatment with pCPA markedly decreased serum levels of 5-HT and increased the expression of Mrp2 and P-gp. Our results indicated that serum 5-HT regulates the expression of Mrp2 and P-gp, and the underlying mechanism may be related to the altered expression of the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). PMID:26053941

  11. The two enantiomers of tetrahydropalmatine are inhibitors of P-gp, but not inhibitors of MRP1 or BCRP.

    PubMed

    Sun, Siyuan; Chen, Zhongjian; Li, Liping; Sun, Dongli; Tian, Ye; Pan, Hao; Bi, Huichang; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Jiang, Huidi

    2012-12-01

    Tetrahydropalmatine (THP), with one chiral centre, is one of the major constituents of Rhizoma corydalis. THP is considered to possess analgesic, sedative, hypnotic actions and cardiac protection. The aim of this study was to elucidate the stereoselective interaction between THP and ABC transporters. The present study investigated three most important ABC transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The intracellular accumulation and bidirectional transport suggested THP enantiomers were inhibitors of P-gp, but not of MRP1 or BCRP. The IC(50) values of (-)-THP and (+)-THP on rhodamine 123 (P-gp substrate) efflux were 48.6 and 20.0 µM, respectively, which showed obvious stereoselective difference. In the bidirectional transport, THP enantiomers showed high passive permeability and the contribution of P-gp could not be testified. The western blot and real-time RT-PCR assays showed that THP enantiomers reduced the protein expression of P-gp, but did not affect its mRNA expression. In in vitro cytotoxicity test, THP enantiomers showed the potential of increasing the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in P-gp-mediated multidrug resistant tumour cells. The present study showed the stereoselective interaction between THP enantiomers and P-gp, which should be considered in clinical practice. PMID:22900779

  12. Development of Classification Models for Identifying “True” P-glycoprotein (P-gp) Inhibitors Through Inhibition, ATPase Activation and Monolayer Efflux Assays

    PubMed Central

    Rapposelli, Simona; Coi, Alessio; Imbriani, Marcello; Bianucci, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an efflux pump involved in the protection of tissues of several organs by influencing xenobiotic disposition. P-gp plays a key role in multidrug resistance and in the progression of many neurodegenerative diseases. The development of new and more effective therapeutics targeting P-gp thus represents an intriguing challenge in drug discovery. P-gp inhibition may be considered as a valid approach to improve drug bioavailability as well as to overcome drug resistance to many kinds of tumours characterized by the over-expression of this protein. This study aims to develop classification models from a unique dataset of 59 compounds for which there were homogeneous experimental data on P-gp inhibition, ATPase activation and monolayer efflux. For each experiment, the dataset was split into a training and a test set comprising 39 and 20 molecules, respectively. Rational splitting was accomplished using a sphere-exclusion type algorithm. After a two-step (internal/external) validation, the best-performing classification models were used in a consensus predicting task for the identification of compounds named as “true” P-gp inhibitors, i.e., molecules able to inhibit P-gp without being effluxed by P-gp itself and simultaneously unable to activate the ATPase function. PMID:22837672

  13. Alternation of adriamycin penetration kinetics in MCF-7 cells from 2D to 3D culture based on P-gp expression through the Chk2/p53/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng; Zhou, Fang; Hao, Kun; Liu, Jiali; Chen, Qianying; Ni, Ping; Zhou, Honghao; Wang, Guangji; Zhang, Jingwei

    2015-01-15

    Monolayer cells are largely different from tumor masses, and might misguide drug screenings. 3D in vitro cell culture models simulate the characteristics of tumor masses in vivo and have recently been used in many studies of anti-cancer drugs. Among various 3D cell culture models, multi-cellular layer (MCL) models allow for the direct quantitative assessment of the penetration of chemotherapeutic agents through solid tissue environments without requiring the use of fluorescently labeled drugs or imaging molecules. Therefore, in our present study, a 3D-no base and embedded MCF-7 MCL model was successfully developed for a 14-day culture. Over time, its thickness and cell layers increased and exhibited highly proliferative properties and drug resistance to adriamycin (ADR) with markedly elevated IC50 values. Meanwhile, G2/M stage cycle arrest was also observed, which likely up-regulated P-gp expression through the Chk2/p53/NF-κB pathway. The elevated P-gp expression altered the ADR penetration kinetics in MCF-7 MCLs in vitro by accelerating the apparent penetration of ADR through the intercellular spaces of the MCLs. Additionally, a decreased ADR retention within tumor cells was observed, but could be significantly reversed by a P-gp inhibitor. The attenuated ADR retention in the deeper cells of tumor masses was confirmed in xenografted mice in vivo. This phenomenon could be elucidated by the mathematical modeling of penetration kinetics parameters. Our study provided a new model that evaluated and improved the quantification of the drug penetration kinetics, revealed the relationship between P-gp and drug penetration through tumor masses, and suggested the potential molecular mechanisms. PMID:25478729

  14. Effects of norfloxacin on hepatic genes expression of P450 isoforms (CYP1A and CYP3A), GST and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in Swordtail fish (Xiphophorus Helleri).

    PubMed

    Liang, Ximei; Wang, Lan; Ou, Ruikang; Nie, Xiangping; Yang, YuFeng; Wang, Fang; Li, Kaibin

    2015-10-01

    The presence of antibiotics including norfloxacin in the aquatic environment may cause adverse effects in non-target organisms. But the toxic mechanisms of fluoroquinolone to fish species are still not completely elucidated. Thus, it is essential to investigate the response of fish to the exposure of fluoroquinolone at molecular or cellular level for better and earlier prediction of these environmental pollutants toxicity. The sub-chronic toxic effects of norfloxacin (NOR) on swordtail fish (Xiphophoru s helleri) were investigated by measuring mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and their corresponding enzyme activities (including ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, erythromycin N-demethylase and GST. Results showed that NOR significantly affected the expression of CYP1A, CYP3A, GST and P-gp genes in swordtails. The gene expressions were more responsive to NOR exposure than their corresponding enzyme activities. Moreover, sexual differences were found in gene expression and enzyme activities of swordtails exposed to NOR. Females displayed more dramatic changes than males. The study further demonstrated that the combined biochemical and molecular parameters were considered as useful biomarkers to improve our understanding of potential ecotoxicological risks of NOR exposure to aquatic organisms. PMID:25893329

  15. The putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan does not affect the transcellular permeability and cellular uptake of the calcium channel antagonist verapamil in the P-glycoprotein expressing cell line MDCK II MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Saaby, Lasse; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Brodin, Birger

    2015-01-01

    Verapamil is used in high doses for the treatment of cluster headache. Verapamil has been described as a P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) substrate. We wished to evaluate in vitro whether co administration of a P-gp inhibitor with verapamil could be a feasible strategy for increasing CNS uptake of verapamil. Fluxes of radiolabelled verapamil across MDCK II MDR1 monolayers were measured in the absence and presence of the putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan (a clinically approved drug compound). Verapamil displayed a vectorial basolateral-to-apical transepithelial efflux across the MDCK II MDR1 monolayers with a permeability of 5.7 × 10−5 cm sec−1 compared to an apical to basolateral permeability of 1.3 × 10−5 cm sec-1. The efflux could be inhibited with the P-gp inhibitor zosuquidar. Zosuquidar (0.4 μmol/L) reduced the efflux ratio (PB-A/PA-B) for verapamil 4.6–1.6. The presence of telmisartan, however, only caused a slight reduction in P-gp-mediated verapamil transport to an efflux ratio of 3.4. Overall, the results of the present in vitro approach indicate, that clinical use of telmisartan as a P-gp inhibitor may not be an effective strategy for increasing brain uptake of verapamil by co-administration with telmisartan. PMID:26171231

  16. Glucosylceramide synthase inhibitors sensitise CLL cells to cytotoxic agents without reversing P-gp functional activity.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Gareth; Butters, Terry D; Ganeshaguru, Kanagasabai; Mehta, Atul B

    2009-05-01

    Malignant B-cells from most chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients over-express MDR1 encoded P-glycoprotein (P-gp) multidrug efflux pump. Inhibition of glucosylceramide (GC) synthesis has been shown in cell lines to correlate with the expression and function of P-gp and sensitise cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. We investigated the hypothesis that reducing intracellular GC levels will reduce P-gp expression in malignant cells from CLL patients. We studied the ability of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitors N-butyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin (OGB-1) and N-nonyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin (OGB-2) to sensitise CLL cells to conventional cytotoxic drug 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (CdA) and the cytostatic drugs chlorambucil and fludarabine. The effect on P-gp activity was analysed using the calcein-AM accumulation assay where a multidrug activity factor (MAF) of >10 in the presence of a P-gp inhibitor denotes P-gp functional activity. The P-gp over-expressing cell line CEM-VLB showed a MAF value of 96.4 with the P-gp inhibitor Z.3HCL, which fell to 15.7 after co-incubation with OGB-1 and 45.9 with OGB-2. The IC(50) for vincristine fell from >10 microg/ml to 55.5 ng/ml in the presence of OGB-2. In P-gp(+ve) peripheral blood mononuclear cells from three normal volunteers, the mean MAF values for Z.3HCL, OGB-1 and OGB-2 were 23.86, 1.83 and 16.2 respectively. In 9/13 CLL samples the mean P-gp functional activity was 22.15 and P-gp was over-expressed in 12/13 samples. However, the MAF value with OGB-1 and OGB-2 was <10. Nevertheless, sensitisation in CLL cells was observed by a reduction in the IC(50) in the presence of OGB-1 and OGB-2 with the conventional drugs. We conclude that although GCS inhibitors sensitize CLL cells to cytotoxic and cytostatic drugs, they do not appear to have any effect on P-gp functional activity. PMID:19285492

  17. Esters of the Marine-Derived Triterpene Sipholenol A Reverse P-GP-Mediated Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchao; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Vispute, Saurabh G.; Jain, Sandeep; Chen, Yangmin; Li, Jessalyn; Youssef, Diaa T. A.; El Sayed, Khalid A.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that several sipholane triterpenes, sipholenol A, sipholenone E, sipholenol L and siphonellinol D, have potent reversal effect for multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells that overexpressed P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1). Through comparison of cytotoxicity towards sensitive and multi-drug resistant cell lines, we identified that the semisynthetic esters sipholenol A-4-O-acetate and sipholenol A-4-O-isonicotinate potently reversed P-gp-mediated MDR but had no effect on MRP1/ABCC1 and BCRP/ABCG2-mediated MDR. The results from [3H]-paclitaxel accumulation and efflux studies suggested that these two triterpenoids were able to increase the intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel by inhibiting its active efflux. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that these two compounds did not alter the expression levels of P-gp when treated up to 72 h. These sipholenol derivatives also stimulated the ATPase activity of P-gp membranes, which suggested that they might be substrates of P-gp. Moreover, in silico molecular docking studies revealed the virtual binding modes of these two compounds into human homology model of P-gp. In conclusion, sipholenol A-4-O-acetate and sipholenol A-4-O-isonicotinate efficiently inhibit the P-gp and may represent potential reversal agents for the treatment of multidrug resistant cancers. PMID:25874923

  18. Multifunctional PLGA Nanobubbles as Theranostic Agents: Combining Doxorubicin and P-gp siRNA Co-Delivery Into Human Breast Cancer Cells and Ultrasound Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Deng, Liwei; Li, Tingting; Shen, Xue; Yan, Jie; Zuo, Liangming; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Yiyao

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. One of the effective approaches to overcome MDR is to use nanoparticle-mediated the gene silence of chemotherapeutic export proteins by RNA interference to increase drug accumulation in drug resistant cancer cells. In this work, a new co-delivery system, DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA nanobubbles (NBs) around 327 nm, to overcome doxorubicin (DOX) resistance in MCF-7 human breast cancer was designed and developed. Positively charged polyethylenimine (PEI) were modified onto the surface of DOX-PLGA NBs through DCC/NHS crosslinking, and could efficiently condense P-gp shRNA into DOX-PLGA/PEI NBs at vector/shRNA weight ratios of 70:1 and above. An in vitro release profile demonstrated an efficient DOX release (more than 80%) from DOX-PLGA/PEI NBs at pH 4.4, suggesting a pH-responsive drug release for the multifunctionalized NBs. Cellular experimental results further showed that DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs could facilitate cellular uptake of DOX into cells and increase the cell proliferation suppression effect of DOX against MCF-7/ADR cells (a DOX-resistant and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression cancer cell line). The IC50 of DOX-PLGA NBs against MCF-7/ADR cells was 2-fold lower than that of free DOX. The increased cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of DOX delivered by DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs in MCF-7/ADR cells was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectrophotometry, and might be owning to the down-regulation of P-gp and reduced the efflux of DOX. The cellular uptake mechanism of DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs indicated that the macropinocytosis was one of the pathways for the uptake of NBs by MCF-7/ADR cells, which was also an energy-dependent process. Furthermore, the in vitro cellular ultrasound imaging suggested that the employment of the DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs could efficiently enhance ultrasound imaging of cancer cells. These results demonstrated that the developed DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs is a potential, safe and efficient theranotic agent for cancer therapy and diagnostics. PMID:26510307

  19. BCRP and P-gp relay overexpression in triple negative basal-like breast cancer cell line: a prospective role in resistance to Olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Robin; Daumar, Pierre; Mounetou, Emmanuelle; Aubel, Corinne; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Abrial, Catherine; Vatoux, Catherine; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2015-01-01

    The triple negative basal-like (TNBL) breast carcinoma is an aggressive and unfavorable prognosis disease. Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as Olaparib could represent a promising targeted therapy but their sensitivity against Multidrug Resistance proteins (MDR), which causes resistance, is not well defined. Thus, our work focused on the analysis of P-gp and BCRP coexpression in the SUM1315 TNBL human cell line, in correlation with Olaparib intracellular concentration. Western blot analyses showed a clear coexpression of P-gp and BCRP in SUM1315 cells. A low cytotoxic Olaparib treatment clearly led to an increased expression of both BCRP and P-gp in these cells. Indeed, after 1.5 h of treatment, BCRP expression was increased with a 1.8 fold increase rate. Then, P-gp took over from 3 h to 15 h with an average increase rate of 1.8 fold, and finally returned to control value at 24 h. HPLC-UV analyses showed that, in the same treatment conditions, the intracellular Olaparib concentration increased from 1 h to 3 h and remained relatively stable until 24 h. Results suggest that the resistance mechanism induced by Olaparib in TNBL SUM1315 cell line may be overpassed if a cytotoxic and stable intracellular level of the drug can be maintained. PMID:26234720

  20. BCRP and P-gp relay overexpression in triple negative basal-like breast cancer cell line: a prospective role in resistance to Olaparib.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Robin; Daumar, Pierre; Mounetou, Emmanuelle; Aubel, Corinne; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Abrial, Catherine; Vatoux, Catherine; Penault-Llorca, Frdrique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2015-01-01

    The triple negative basal-like (TNBL) breast carcinoma is an aggressive and unfavorable prognosis disease. Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as Olaparib could represent a promising targeted therapy but their sensitivity against Multidrug Resistance proteins (MDR), which causes resistance, is not well defined. Thus, our work focused on the analysis of P-gp and BCRP coexpression in the SUM1315 TNBL human cell line, in correlation with Olaparib intracellular concentration. Western blot analyses showed a clear coexpression of P-gp and BCRP in SUM1315 cells. A low cytotoxic Olaparib treatment clearly led to an increased expression of both BCRP and P-gp in these cells. Indeed, after 1.5 h of treatment, BCRP expression was increased with a 1.8 fold increase rate. Then, P-gp took over from 3 h to 15 h with an average increase rate of 1.8 fold, and finally returned to control value at 24 h. HPLC-UV analyses showed that, in the same treatment conditions, the intracellular Olaparib concentration increased from 1 h to 3 h and remained relatively stable until 24 h. Results suggest that the resistance mechanism induced by Olaparib in TNBL SUM1315 cell line may be overpassed if a cytotoxic and stable intracellular level of the drug can be maintained. PMID:26234720

  1. A New Class of Safe, Potent, and Specific P-gp Modulator: Flavonoid Dimer FD18 Reverses P-gp-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Breast Xenograft in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yan, Clare S W; Wong, Iris L K; Chan, Kin-Fai; Kan, Jason W Y; Chong, Tsz Cheung; Law, Man Chun; Zhao, Yunzhe; Chan, Shun Wan; Chan, Tak Hang; Chow, Larry M C

    2015-10-01

    Flavonoid dimer FD18 is a new class of dimeric P-gp modulator that can reverse cancer drug resistance. FD18 is a potent (EC50 = 148 nM for paclitaxel), safe (selective index = 574), and selective P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulator. FD18 can modulate multidrug resistance toward paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and mitoxantrone in human breast cancer LCC6MDR in vitro. FD18 (1 μM) can revert chemosensitivity of LCC6MDR back to parental LCC6 level. FD18 was 11- to 46-fold more potent than verapamil. FD18 (1 μM) can increase accumulation of doxorubicin by 2.7-fold, daunorubicin (2.1-fold), and rhodamine 123 (5.2-fold) in LCC6MDR. FD18 inhibited P-gp-mediated doxorubicin efflux and has no effect on influx. FD18 at 1 μM did not affect the protein expression level of P-gp. Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that intraperitoneal administration of 45 mg/kg FD18 was enough to maintain a plasma level above EC50 (148 nM) for more than 600 min. Toxicity studies with FD18 (90 mg/kg, i.p. for 12 times in 22 days) with paclitaxel (12 mg/kg, i.v. for 12 times in 22 days) revealed no obvious toxicity or death in mice. In vivo efficacy studies indicated that FD18 (45 mg/kg, i.p. for 12 times in 22 days) together with paclitaxel (12 mg/kg, i.v. for 12 times in 22 days) resulted in a 46% reduction in LCC6MDR xenograft volume (n = 11; 648 ± 84 mm(3)) compared to paclitaxel control (n = 8; 1201 ± 118 mm(3)). There were no animal deaths or significant drop in body weight and vital organ wet weight. FD18 can increase paclitaxel accumulation in LCC6MDR xenograft by 1.8- to 2.2-fold. The present study suggests that FD18 represents a new class of safe and potent P-gp modulator in vivo. PMID:26291333

  2. The Role of CD44 and ERM Proteins in Expression and Functionality of P-glycoprotein in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Deep; Padula, Matthew P; Lu, Jamie F; Jaiswal, Ritu; Djordjevic, Steven P; Bebawy, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is often attributed to the over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which prevents the accumulation of anticancer drugs within cells by virtue of its active drug efflux capacity. We have previously described the intercellular transfer of P-gp via extracellular vesicles (EVs) and proposed the involvement of a unique protein complex in regulating this process. In this paper, we investigate the role of these mediators in the regulation of P-gp functionality and hence the acquisition of MDR following cell to cell transfer. By sequentially silencing the FERM domain-binding proteins, Ezrin, Radixin and Moesin (ERM), as well as CD44, which we also report a selective packaging in breast cancer derived EVs, we have established a role for these proteins, in particular Radixin and CD44, in influencing the P-gp-mediated MDR in whole cells. We also report for the first time the role of ERM proteins in the vesicular transfer of functional P-gp. Specifically, we demonstrate that intercellular membrane insertion is dependent on Ezrin and Moesin, whilst P-gp functionality is governed by the integrity of all ERM proteins in the recipient cell. This study identifies these candidate proteins as potential new therapeutic targets in circumventing MDR clinically. PMID:26938523

  3. Knockdown of HOXA10 reverses the multidrug resistance of human chronic mylogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp and MRP-1.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ying-Jie; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Wang, Hong; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of leukemia cells is a major obstacle in chemotherapeutic treatment. The high expression and constitutive activation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) have been reported to play a vital role in enhancing cell resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the reversal of MDR by silencing homeobox A10 (HOXA10) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/ADM cells by modulating the expression of P-gp and MRP-1. K562/ADM cells were stably transfected with HOXA10-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HOXA10 was markedly suppressed following transfection with a shRNA-containing vector. The sensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADR was enhanced by the silencing of HOXA10, due to the increased intracellular accumulation of ADR. The accumulation of ADR induced by the silencing of HOXA10 may be due to the downregulation of P-gp and MRP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that downregulating HOXA10 inhibited the protein expression of P-gp and MRP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of HOXA10 combats resistance and that HOXA10 is a potential target for resistant human CML. PMID:27035504

  4. Increased expression of sorcin is associated with multidrug resistance in leukemia cells via up-regulation of MDR1 expression through cAMP response element-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Nakao, Ryota; Kondo, Rumi; Nishitsuji, Mai; Saito, Youhei; Kuga, Takahisa; Hatayama, Takumi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2014-06-13

    Sorcin, a 22 kDa Ca(2+) binding protein, was first identified in a vincristine-resistant Chinese hamster lung cell line, and was later demonstrated to be involved in the development of multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotypes in a variety of human cancer cell lines. However, the exact role of sorcin in MDR cells is yet to be fully elucidated. Here we explored the role of sorcin in the development of MDR in leukemia cells, and revealed that the expression level of sorcin was directly correlated to the expression of MDR1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In addition, it was shown that sorcin induced the expression of MDR1/P-gp through a cAMP response element (CRE) between -716 and -709 bp of the mdr1/p-gp gene. Furthermore, overexpression of sorcin increased the phosphorylation of CREB1 and the binding of CREB1 to the CRE sequence of mdr1/p-gp promoter, and induced the expression of MDR1/P-gp. These findings suggested that sorcin induces MDR1/P-gp expression markedly through activation of the CREB pathway and is associated with the MDR phenotype. The new findings may be helpful for understanding the mechanisms of MDR in human cancer cells, prompting its further investigation as a molecular target to overcome MDR. PMID:24796664

  5. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mona W; Donaldson, Gregory P; Severin, Geoffrey B; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O; Waters, Christopher M; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3',5')-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP-regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP-governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway. PMID:26305945

  6. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Mona W.; Donaldson, Gregory P.; Severin, Geoffrey B.; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O.; Waters, Christopher M.; Lee, Vincent T.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5ʹ-phosphoguanylyl-(3ʹ,5ʹ)-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP–regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP–governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway. PMID:26305945

  7. Differential expression of DNA topoisomerase II alpha and -beta in P-gp and MRP-negative VM26, mAMSA and mitoxantrone-resistant sublines of the human SCLC cell line GLC4.

    PubMed Central

    Withoff, S.; de Vries, E. G.; Keith, W. N.; Nienhuis, E. F.; van der Graaf, W. T.; Uges, D. R.; Mulder, N. H.

    1996-01-01

    Sublines of the human small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell line GLC4 with acquired resistance to teniposide, amsacrine and mitoxantrone (GLC4/VM20x, GLC4/AM3x and GLC4/MIT60x, respectively) were derived to study the contribution of DNA topoisomerase II alpha and -beta (TopoII alpha and -beta) to resistance for TopoII-targeting drugs. The cell lines did not overexpress P-glycoprotein or the multidrug resistance-associated protein but were cross-resistant to other TopoII drugs. GLC4/VM20x showed a major decrease in TopoII alpha protein (54%; for all assays presented in this paper the GLC4 level was defined to be 100%) without reduction in TopoII beta protein; GLC4/AM3x showed only a major decrease in TopoII beta protein (to 18%) and not in TopoII alpha. In GLC4/MIT60x, the TopoII alpha and -beta protein levels were both decreased (TopoII alpha to 31%; TopoII beta protein was undetectable). The decrease in TopoII alpha protein in GLC4/VM20x and GLC4/MIT60x, was mediated by decreased TopoII alpha mRNA levels. Loss of TopoII alpha gene copies contributed to the mRNA decrease in these cell lines. Only in the GLC4/MIT60x cell line was an accumulation defect observed for the drug against which the cell line was made resistant. In conclusion, TopoII alpha and -beta levels were decreased differentially in the resistant cell lines, suggesting that resistance to these drugs may be mediated by a decrease in a specific isozyme. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8980384

  8. Abamectin resistance in Drosophila is related to increased expression of P-glycoprotein via the dEGFR and dAkt pathways.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang; Sun, Ying-Jian; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Many insects have evolved resistance to abamectin but the mechanisms involved in this resistance have not been well characterized. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent drug-efflux pump transmembrane protein, may be involved in abamectin resistance. We investigated the role of P-gp in abamectin (ABM) resistance in Drosophila using an ABM-resistant strain developed in the laboratory. A toxicity assay, Western blotting analysis and a vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity assay all demonstrated the existence of a direct relationship between P-gp expression and ABM resistance in these flies. Our observations indicate that P-gp levels in flies' heads were higher than in their thorax and abdomen, and that both P-gp levels and LC(50) values were higher in resistant than in susceptible and P-gp-deficient strains. In addition, P-gp levels in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of resistant flies were higher than in susceptible and P-gp-deficient flies, which is further evidence that a high level of P-gp in the BBB is related to ABM resistance. Furthermore, we found greater expression of Drosophila EGFR (dEGFR) in the resistant strain than in the susceptible strain, and that the level of Drosophila Akt (dAkt) was much higher in resistant than in susceptible flies, whereas that in P-gp-deficient flies was very low. Compared to susceptible flies, P-gp levels in the resistant strain were markedly suppressed by the dEGFR and dAkt inhibitors lapatinib and wortmannin. These results suggest that the increased P-gp in resistant flies was regulated by the dEGFR and dAkt pathways and that increased expression of P-gp is an important component of ABM resistance in insects. PMID:23648830

  9. Insulin resistance contributes to multidrug resistance in HepG2 cells via activation of the PERK signaling pathway and upregulation of Bcl-2 and P-gp.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyue; Li, Linjing; Li, Jing; Cheng, Yan; Chen, Jing; Shen, Minghui; Zhang, Shangdi; Wei, Hulai

    2016-05-01

    Liver tumorigenesis frequently causes insulin resistance which may be used as an independent risk factor for evaluation of survival and post-surgery relapse of liver cancer patients. In the present study, HepG2/IR, an insulin resistant HepG2 cell line, was established by exposing HepG2 cells to 0.5 µmol/l of insulin for 72 h, and comparison of HepG2/IR with the parental HepG2 cells indicated that the HepG2/IR cells showed significantly enhanced resistance to the most frequently used chemotherapeutics for solid tumors, such as cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, vincristine and mitomycin. Flow cytometric analysis of cisplatin-treated HepG2/IR cells showed a significantly decreased hypodiploid peak and a significantly downregulated expression level of pro-apoptotic protein caspase-3 compared with the parental HepG2 cells. Our data further showed swollen endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the cisplatin-treated HepG2/IR cells with significantly increased levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phosphorylated protein kinase R-like ER kinase (p-PERK) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). There was also an upregulated expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) whereas no significant change was observed for CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), which is known to be induced by ER stress and to mediate apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that insulin resistance in HepG2 cells promoted a protective unfolded protein response and upregulated the expression of ER chaperone protein GRP78, which resulted in the phosphorylation of PERK kinase to activate the PERK-mediated ER stress signal transduction pathway and the upregulation of Bcl-2 and P-gp, leading to the inhibition of the caspase-3-dependent apoptosis pathway and to the survival of liver tumor cells. PMID:26935266

  10. MDR1 Synonymous Polymorphisms Alter Transporter Specificity and Protein Stability in a Stable Epithelial Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Fung, King Leung; Pan, James; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Lund, Paul E.; Pixley, Jessica N.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The drug efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by MDR1 can be influenced by genetic polymorphisms, including two synonymous changes in the coding region of MDR1. Here we report that the conformation of P-gp and its drug efflux activity can be altered by synonymous polymorphisms in stable epithelial monolayers expressing P-gp. Several cell lines with similar MDR1 DNA copy number were developed and termed LLC-MDR1-WT (expresses wild-type P-gp), LLC-MDR1-3H (expresses common haplotype P-gp), and LLC-MDR1-3HA (a mutant that carries a different valine codon in position 3435). These cell lines express similar levels of recombinant mRNA and protein. P-gp in each case is localized on the apical surface of polarized cells. However, the haplotype and its mutant P-gps fold differently from the wild-type, as determined by UIC2 antibody shift assays and limited proteolysis assays. Surface biotinylation experiments suggest that the non-wild-type P-gps have longer recycling times. Drug transport assays show that wild-type and haplotype P-gp respond differently to P-gp inhibitors that block efflux of rhodamine-123 or mitoxantrone. In addition, cytotoxicity assays show that the LLC-MDR1-3H cells are more resistant to mitoxantrone than the LLC-MDR1-WT cells after being treated with a P-gp inhibitor. Expression of polymorphic P-gp, however, does not affect the host cell’s morphology, growth rate, or monolayer formation. Also, ATPase activity assays indicate that neither basal nor drug-stimulated ATPase activities are affected in the variant P-gps. Taken together, our findings indicate that “silent” polymorphisms significantly change P-gp function, which would be expected to affect interindividual drug disposition and response. PMID:24305879

  11. An electrically tight in vitro blood-brain barrier model displays net brain-to-blood efflux of substrates for the ABC transporters, P-gp, Bcrp and Mrp-1.

    PubMed

    Helms, Hans Christian; Hersom, Maria; Kuhlmann, Louise Borella; Badolo, Lasina; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2014-09-01

    Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily including breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2), P-glycoprotein (P-gp/Abcb1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp's/Abcc's) are expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of this study was to investigate if a bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte in vitro BBB co-culture model displayed polarized transport of known efflux transporter substrates. The co-culture model displayed low mannitol permeabilities of 0.95 ± 0.1 · 10(-6) cm·s(-1) and high transendothelial electrical resistances of 1,177 ± 101 Ω·cm(2). Bidirectional transport studies with (3)H-digoxin, (3)H-estrone-3-sulphate and (3)H-etoposide revealed polarized transport favouring the brain-to-blood direction for all substrates. Steady state efflux ratios of 2.5 ± 0.2 for digoxin, 4.4 ± 0.5 for estrone-3-sulphate and 2.4 ± 0.1 for etoposide were observed. These were reduced to 1.1 ± 0.08, 1.4 ± 0.2 and 1.5 ± 0.1, by addition of verapamil (digoxin), Ko143 (estrone-3-sulphate) or zosuquidar + reversan (etoposide), respectively. Brain-to-blood permeability of all substrates was investigated in the presence of the efflux transporter inhibitors verapamil, Ko143, zosuquidar, reversan and MK 571 alone or in combinations. Digoxin was mainly transported via P-gp, estrone-3-sulphate via Bcrp and Mrp's and etoposide via P-gp and Mrp's. The expression of P-gp, Bcrp and Mrp-1 was confirmed using immunocytochemistry. The findings indicate that P-gp, Bcrp and at least one isoform of Mrp are functionally expressed in our bovine/rat co-culture model and that the model is suitable for investigations of small molecule transport. PMID:24934296

  12. The influence of passage number for Caco2 cell models when evaluating P-gp mediated drug transport.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Crowe, A

    2015-12-01

    Caco2 cells are a human adenocarcinoma cell line that forms tight junctions and are widely used to examine bidirectional drug transport as well as P-glycoprotein mediated efflux. Unfortunately Caco2 cell lines can be very heterogeneous in nature. Our aim was to improve the Caco2 cell model for determination of P-glycoprotein mediated drug transport. Young passage Caco2 from ATCC had inadequate expression of P-glycoprotein, therefore three approaches were adopted to upregulate Caco2 P-glycoprotein expression to mimic that in vivo; a) incubation of mature Caco2 monolayer with rifampicin, b) prolonged exposure of Caco2 cells to vinblastine (generating the Caco2 VIN line), and c) splitting cells every 7 to 9 days until late passage numbers (over P80) were available. Upon development of the models, P-gp expression and activity was determined using western blotting and bidirectional transport studies of rhodamine123. All four models exhibited P-gp mediated efflux transport for rhodamine123. Incubation with rifampicin did not alter bidirectional transport compared to passage 44 cells. Increased passage number altered P-glycoprotein expression and the efflux ratio increased to 4.7 for passage 80 from 1.4 of passage 44. The highest basolateral to apical transport was observed for both passage 89 Caco2 and the Caco2 VIN model with an efflux ratio of 13 to 14. Western blot images confirmed the increased P-glycoprotein expression of late passage and Caco2 VIN. Caco2 cells are not ready for P-gp related research when first acquired from ATCC (Passage 18). Late passage Caco2 cell monolayers or Caco2 VIN models are needed to determine P-gp mediated efflux transport. PMID:26817277

  13. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by Aconitum alkaloids: Implication for clinical drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinjun; Lin, Na; Li, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guiyu; He, Shugui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Ou, Rilan; Li, Na; Liu, Shuqiang; Feng, Lizhi; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lu, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The Aconitum species, which mainly contain bioactive Aconitum alkaloids, are frequently administered concomitantly with other herbal medicines or chemical drugs in clinics. The potential risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) arising from co-administration of Aconitum alkaloids and other drugs against specific targets such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) must be evaluated. This study focused on the effects of three representative Aconitum alkaloids: aconitine (AC), benzoylaconine (BAC), and aconine, on the expression and activity of P-gp. We observed that Aconitum alkaloids increased P-gp expression in LS174T and Caco-2 cells in the order AC > BAC > aconine. Nuclear receptors were involved in the induction of P-gp. AC and BAC increased the P-gp transport activity. Strikingly, intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial mass also increased. Furthermore, exposure to AC decreased the toxicity of vincristine and doxorubicin towards the cells. In vivo, AC significantly up-regulated the P-gp protein levels in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of FVB mice, and protected them against acute AC toxicity. Taken together, the findings of our in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that AC can induce P-gp expression, and that co-administration of AC with P-gp substrate drugs may cause DDIs. Our findings have important implications for Aconitum therapy in clinics. PMID:27139035

  14. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by Aconitum alkaloids: Implication for clinical drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinjun; Lin, Na; Li, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guiyu; He, Shugui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Ou, Rilan; Li, Na; Liu, Shuqiang; Feng, Lizhi; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lu, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The Aconitum species, which mainly contain bioactive Aconitum alkaloids, are frequently administered concomitantly with other herbal medicines or chemical drugs in clinics. The potential risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) arising from co-administration of Aconitum alkaloids and other drugs against specific targets such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) must be evaluated. This study focused on the effects of three representative Aconitum alkaloids: aconitine (AC), benzoylaconine (BAC), and aconine, on the expression and activity of P-gp. We observed that Aconitum alkaloids increased P-gp expression in LS174T and Caco-2 cells in the order AC > BAC > aconine. Nuclear receptors were involved in the induction of P-gp. AC and BAC increased the P-gp transport activity. Strikingly, intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial mass also increased. Furthermore, exposure to AC decreased the toxicity of vincristine and doxorubicin towards the cells. In vivo, AC significantly up-regulated the P-gp protein levels in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of FVB mice, and protected them against acute AC toxicity. Taken together, the findings of our in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that AC can induce P-gp expression, and that co-administration of AC with P-gp substrate drugs may cause DDIs. Our findings have important implications for Aconitum therapy in clinics. PMID:27139035

  15. The effects of proteasome inhibitor bortezomib on a P-gp positive leukemia cell line K562/A02.

    PubMed

    Lü, S; Chen, Z; Yang, J; Chen, L; Zhou, H; Xu, X; Li, J; Han, F; Wang, J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the efficacy of proteasome inhibitor bortezomib to multidrug resistant (MDR) acute leukemia cells. We observed the effects of bortezomib on a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) positive leukemia line K562/A02. The results showed that bortezomib has significant effects on P-gp positive K562/A02 cells including cytotoxicity (48 h IC(50): 171.36 nM), induction of apoptosis (31.71 +/- 1.07% apoptotic cells after 24 h treatment at 100 nM), and inhibition of proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity (relative activity to untreated controls: 20.07 +/- 0.66% at 24 h with 10 nM bortezomib). These effects were lower than those observed in K562 cells (IC(50), percentage of apoptotic cells, relative chymotrypsin-like activity to untreated controls were 56.28 nM, 77.95 +/- 0.35%, 5.35 +/- 2.05% after the same treatments, respectively). No synergy between daunorubicin and bortezomib was shown in the killing of K562/A02 cells (synergistic ratios were <1). P-gp expression levels did not decrease in K562/A02 cells after bortezomib treatment. Pretreatment with bortezomib does not improve the intracellular anthracycline concentration in K562/A02 cells. Bortezomib shows a promising effect for the treatment of refractory/relapsed leukemia, but it does not improve the effect of anthracycline to MDR leukemia cells. PMID:19254348

  16. Inhibitory effects of herbal constituents on P-glycoprotein in vitro and in vivo: Herb–drug interactions mediated via P-gp

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xue Hu, Jinping Wang, Baolian Sheng, Li Liu, Zhihao Yang, Shuang Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Modulation of drug transporters via herbal medicines which have been widely used in combination with conventional prescription drugs may result in herb–drug interactions in clinical practice. The present study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 50 major herbal constituents on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro and in vivo as well as related inhibitory mechanisms. Among these herbal medicines, four constituents, including emodin, 18β-glycyrrhetic acid (18β-GA), dehydroandrographolide (DAG), and 20(S)-ginsenoside F{sub 1} [20(S)-GF{sub 1}] exhibited significant inhibition (> 50%) on P-gp in MDR1-MDCKII and Caco-2 cells. Emodin was the strongest inhibitor of P-gp (IC{sub 50} = 9.42 μM), followed by 18β-GA (IC{sub 50} = 21.78 μM), 20(S)-GF{sub 1} (IC{sub 50} = 76.08 μM) and DAG (IC{sub 50} = 77.80 μM). P-gp ATPase activity, which was used to evaluate the affinity of substrates to P-gp, was stimulated by emodin and DAG with K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of 48.61, 29.09 μM and 71.29, 38.45 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. However, 18β-GA and 20(S)-GF{sub 1} exhibited significant inhibition on both basal and verapamil-stimulated P-gp ATPase activities at high concentration. Molecular docking analysis (CDOCKER) further elucidated the mechanism for structure–inhibition relationships of herbal constituents with P-gp. When digoxin was co-administered to male SD rats with emodin or 18β-GA, the AUC{sub 0−t} and Cmax of digoxin were increased by approximately 51% and 58%, respectively. Furthermore, 18β-GA, DAG, 20(S)-GF{sub 1} and Rh{sub 1} at 10 μM significantly inhibited CYP3A4/5 activity, while emodin activated the metabolism of midazolam in human liver microsomes. In conclusion, four herbal constituents demonstrated inhibition of P-gp to specific extents in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings provided the basis for the reliable assessment of the potential risks of herb–drug interactions in humans. - Highlights: • Emodin, 18β-GA, DAG, and 20(S)-GF{sub 1} significantly inhibited P-gp in vitro. • P-gp ATPase activity was stimulated by emodin and DAG. • 18β-GA and 20(S)-GF{sub 1} exhibited significant inhibition on P-gp ATPase activity. • Molecular docking analysis elucidated the SAR of herbal constituents with P-gp. • Pretreatment with emodin or 18β-GA increased the AUC and Cmax of digoxin in vivo.

  17. P-glycoprotein expression in Perna viridis after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Wen-Chang; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Tao Jiang; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2014-08-01

    Bivalves naturally exposed to toxic algae have mechanisms to prevent from harmful effects of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins. However, quite few studies have examined the mechanisms associated, and the information currently available is still insufficient. Multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) is ubiquitous in aquatic invertebrates and plays an important role in defense against xenobiotics. Here, to explore the roles of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the DSP toxins resistance in shellfish, complete cDNA of P-gp gene in the mussel Perna viridis was cloned and analyzed. The accumulation of okadaic acid (OA), a main component of DSP toxins, MXR activity and expression of P-gp in gills of P. viridis were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins in the presence or absence of P-gp inhibitors PGP-4008, verapamil (VER) and cyclosporin A (CsA). The mussel P. viridis P-gp closely matches MDR/P-gp/ABCB protein from various organisms, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. After exposure to P. lima, OA accumulation, MXR activity and P-gp expression significantly increased in gills of P. viridis. The addition of P-gp-specific inhibitors PGP-4008 and VER decreased MXR activity induced by P. lima, but had no effect on the OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. However, CsA, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of ABC transporter not only decreased MXR activity, but also increased OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. Together with the ubiquitous presence of other ABC transporters such as MRP/ABCC in bivalves and potential compensatory mechanism in P-gp and MRP-mediated resistance, we speculated that besides P-gp, other ABC transporters, especially MRP might be involved in the resistance mechanisms to DSP toxins. PMID:24811006

  18. Doxorubicin delivery enhanced by electroporation to gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells with P-gp overexpression.

    PubMed

    Kulbacka, Julita; Daczewska, Ma?gorzata; Dubi?ska-Magiera, Magda; Choroma?ska, Anna; Rembia?kowska, Nina; Surowiak, Pawe?; Kulbacki, Marek; Kotulska, Ma?gorzata; Saczko, Jolanta

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation (EP) can effectively support the penetration of macromolecules from the extracellular space into cells. Electropores induced by the influence of electromagnetic field generate additional paths of transport for macromolecules. The aim of this study was evaluation of the electroporation effect on doxorubicin transport efficiency to human colon (LoVo and LoVo/DX) and gastric (EPG85-257/P and EPG85-257/RDB) adenocarcinoma cells with overexpression of P-glycoprotein and murine macrophage cell line (P388/D1). In our EP experiments cells were placed into a cuvette with aluminum electrodes and pulsed with five square electric pulses of 1300 V/cm and duration of 50 ?s each. Cells were also treated with low doxorubicin concentration ([DOX]=1.7 ?M). The ultrastructure (TEM) and changes of P-glycoprotein expression of tumor cells subjected to electric field were monitored. The mitochondrial cell function and trypan blue staining were evaluated after 24h. Our results indicate the most pronounced effect of EP with DOX and disturbed ultrastructure in resistant gastric and colon cells with decrease of P-gp expression. Electroporation may be an attractive delivery method of cytostatic drugs in chemotherapy, enabling reduction of drug dose, exposure time and side effects. PMID:24767854

  19. P-glycoprotein and its inducible expression in three bivalve species after exposure to Prorocentrum lima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Liu, Su-Li; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp or ABCB1) belongs to the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters responsible for multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) in aquatic organisms. To provide more information of P-gp in shellfish, in this study, complete cDNA of P-gp in three bivalve species including Ruditapes philippinarum, Scapharca subcrenata and Tegillarca granosa were cloned and its expressions in gill, digestive gland, adductor muscle and mantle of the three bivalves were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a toxogenic dinoflagellate. The complete sequences of R. philippinarum, S. subcrenata and T. granosa P-gp showed high homology with MDR/P-gp/ABCB proteins from other species, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the amino acid sequences of P-gp from S. subcrenata and T. granosa had a closest relationship, forming an independent branch, then grouping into the other branch with Mytilus californianus, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. However, P-gp sequences from R. philippinarum were more similar to the homologs from the more distantly related Aplysia californica than to homologs from S. subcrenata and T. granosa, suggesting that bivalves P-gp might have different paralogs. P-glycoprotein expressed in all detected tissues but there were large differences between them. After exposure to P. lima, the expression of P-gp changed in the four tissues in varying degrees within the same species and between different species, but the changes in mRNA and protein level were not always synchronous. PMID:26539802

  20. In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation Scaling Factors for Intestinal P-glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: Part II. The Impact of Cross-Laboratory Variations of Intestinal Transporter Relative Expression Factors on Predicted Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Matthew D; Achour, Brahim; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Russell, Matthew R; Carlson, Gordon; Warhurst, Geoffrey; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2016-03-01

    Relative expression factors (REFs) are used to scale in vitro transporter kinetic data via in vitro-in vivo extrapolation linked to physiologically based pharmacokinetic (IVIVE-PBPK) models to clinical observations. Primarily two techniques to quantify transporter protein expression are available, immunoblotting and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Literature-collated REFs ranged from 0.4 to 5.1 and 1.1 to 90 for intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), respectively. The impact of using human jejunum-Caco-2 REFs for P-gp (REFiP-gp) and BCRP (REFiBCRP), generated from the same samples and using different proteomic methodologies from independent laboratories, on PBPK outcomes was assessed. A 5-fold decrease in REFiP-gp for a single oral dose of digoxin resulted in a 1.19- and 1.31-fold higher plasma area under the curve and Cmax, respectively. All generated REFiP-gp values led to simulated digoxin Cmax values within observed ranges; however, combining kinetic data generated from a different laboratory with the 5-fold lower REFiP-gp could not recover a digoxin-rifampicin drug-drug interaction, emphasizing the necessity to obtain transporter-specific kinetic estimates and REFs from the same in vitro system. For a theoretical BCRP compound, with absorption taking place primarily in the jejunum, a decrease in the REFiBCRP from 2.22 (University of Manchester) to 1.11 (Bertin Pharma) promoted proximal intestinal absorption while delaying tmax 1.44-fold. Laboratory-specific differences in REF may lead to different IVIVE-PBPK outcomes. To understand the mechanisms underlying projected pharmacokinetic liabilities, it is important to assess the potential impact of bias on the generation of REFs on an interindividual basis within a target population. PMID:26842595

  1. P-gp modulating drugs greatly potentiate the in vitro effect of ivermectin against resistant larvae of Haemonchus placei.

    PubMed

    Heckler, R P; Almeida, G D; Santos, L B; Borges, D G L; Neves, J P L; Onizuka, M K V; Borges, F A

    2014-10-15

    Since its production in the 1980s, ivermectin (IVM) has been used indiscriminately and the selection pressure to which bovine gastrointestinal nematodes have been exposed has been intense, resulting in considerable economic losses due to parasitic resistance. One possibility for the control of resistant parasites is the use of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulators, because one of the main biochemical changes in ivermectin-resistant parasites is the increased activity of membrane proteins responsible for the efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro effect of eight P-gp modulating drugs to potentiate IVM efficacy against an IVM-resistant field isolate of Haemonchus placei (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae). The association of IVM with cyclosporin-A, ceftriaxone, dexamethasone, diminazene aceturate, quercetin, trifluoperazine, verapamil, or vinblastine resulted in increased IVM (10(-4)M) efficacy of 5.1%, 49.06%, 76.42%, 3.31%, 28.85%, 13.74%, 45.64% and 43.61%, respectively, and reduced the IVM half maximal effective concentration (EC50) from 4.381 × 10(-6)M to 9.877 × 10(-8), 2.739 × 10(-7), 1.240 × 10(-6), 1.651 × 10(-6), 2.710 × 10(-7), 1.159 × 10(-7), 1.026 × 10(-6) and 7.136 × 10(-7)M, respectively. Only diminazene aceturate did not significantly reduce the number of migrating larvae when associated with IVM (P > 0.05). The effect of P-gp modulating drugs depended on IVM concentration, with greater potentiating effect at lower IVM concentrations. The in vitro application of trifluoperazine, dexamethasone, quercetin, verapamil, cyclosporin A, vinblastine, and ceftriaxone potentiated IVM efficacy against an IVM-resistant field isolate of H. placei, resulting in higher efficacy and lower IVM EC50. PMID:25178553

  2. Effects of microcystin-LR on the expression of P-glycoprotein in Jenynsia multidentata.

    PubMed

    Amé, María Valeria; Baroni, María Verónica; Galanti, Lucas Nicolás; Bocco, José Luis; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto

    2009-03-01

    The multixenobiotic resistance phenomenon (MXR) related to the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter protein (P-gp) has been identified and characterized in several aquatic organisms. In the present work, we prove the presence of a P-gp in liver, gills and brain of Jenynsia multidentata by Western Blot and RT-PCR. A 170 kDa protein has been found in liver and gills while in brain a approximately 80 kDa protein has been detected. The partial nucleotide sequence obtained in this autochthonous fish showed high similarity ranging from 83% to 92% with other fishes. In addition, P-gp expression in this fish was evaluated after time and dose-dependent exposures to the cyanotoxin microcystin-LR. Individuals were exposed to MC-LR at concentrations of 2, 5 and 10 microg L(-1) for 24h and for 6, 12 and 24h at 2 microg L(-1) MC-LR. Changes in P-gp expression were observed in liver, gills and brain. However, this response was tissue specific. Only in gills of J. multidentata P-gp expression, measured either by real-time RT-PCR or Western Blot, was significantly higher compared to controls at most tested times and doses. A 3-fold increase with respect to controls was found at 12h by RT-PCR and after 24h by Western Blot. In dose-dependent experiments the maximum P-gp expression was observed at 2 microg L(-1) MC-LR, measured by both RT-PCR and Western Blot. In the liver, P-gp protein levels were significantly increased after 24h of exposure, at every toxin dose tested. Thus, probably longer exposures would show also significant increases in this tissue. Considering these results we can propose that P-gp belongs to the defence system involved in the response to MC-LR in J. multidentata. PMID:19124144

  3. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3-Liganded Vitamin D Receptor Increases Expression and Transport Activity of P-glycoprotein in Isolated Rat Brain Capillaries and Human and Rat Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Durk, Matthew R.; Chan, Gary N.Y.; Campos, Christopher R.; Peart, John C.; Chow, Edwin C.Y.; Lee, Eason; Cannon, Ronald E.; Bendayan, Reina; Miller, David S.; Pang, K. Sandy

    2012-01-01

    MDR1/P-gp induction by the vitamin D receptor (VDR) was investigated in isolated rat brain capillaries and rat (RBE4) and human (hCMEC/D3) brain microvessel endothelial cell lines. Incubation of isolated rat brain capillaries with 10 nM of the VDR ligand, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] for 4 h increased P-gp protein expression (4-fold). Incubation with 1,25(OH)2D3 for 4 or 24 h increased P-gp transport activity (specific luminal accumulation of NBD-CSA, the fluorescent P-gp substrate) by 25 – 30%. In RBE4 cells, Mdr1b mRNA was induced in a concentration-dependent manner by exposure to 1,25(OH)2D3. Concomitantly, P-gp protein expression increased 2.5-fold and was accompanied by a 20 – 35% reduction in cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrates, rhodamine 6G (R6G) and HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled human amyloid beta 1-42 (hAβ42). In hCMEC/D3 cells, a three day exposure to 100 nM 1,25(OH)2D3 increased MDR1 mRNA expression (40%) and P-gp protein (3-fold); cellular accumulation of R6G and hAβ42 was reduced by 30%. Thus, VDR activation up-regulates Mdr1/MDR1 and P-gp protein in isolated rat brain capillaries and rodent and human brain microvascular endothelia, implicating a role for VDR in increasing the brain clearance of P-gp substrates, including hAβ42 a plaque-forming precursor in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23035695

  4. Crystal Structure of an EAL Domain in Complex with Reaction Product 5′-pGpG

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Paganin, Julien; Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Réty, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438–686): one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5′-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5′-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains. PMID:23285035

  5. P-gp substrate-induced neurotoxicity in an Abcb1a knock-in/Abcb1b knock-out mouse model with a mutated canine ABCB1 targeted insertion.

    PubMed

    Swain, M D; Orzechowski, K L; Swaim, H L; Jones, Y L; Robl, M G; Tinaza, C A; Myers, M J; Jhingory, M V; Buckely, L E; Lancaster, V A; Yancy, H F

    2013-06-01

    Certain dog breeds, especially Collies, are observed to exhibit neurotoxicity to avermectin drugs, which are P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates. This neurotoxicity is due to an ABCB1 gene mutation (ABCB1-1Δ) that results in non-functional P-gp expression. A developed Abcb1a knock-in/Abcb1b knock-out mouse model expressing the ABCB1-1Δ canine gene was previously reported and mice exhibited sensitivity upon ivermectin administration. Here, model and wild-type mice were administered P-gp substrates doramectin, moxidectin, and digoxin. While knock-in/knock-out mice exhibited ataxia, lethargy and tremor, wild-type mice remained unaffected. In addition, no neurotoxic clinical signs were observed in either mouse type administered domperidone, a P-gp substrate with no reported neurotoxicity in ABCB1-1Δ Collies. Overall, neurotoxic signs displayed by model mice closely paralleled those observed in ivermectin-sensitive Collies. This model can be used to identify toxic P-gp substrates with altered safety in dog populations and may reduce dog use in safety studies that are part of the drug approval process. PMID:23186803

  6. Interaction of BDE-47 and its Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP: Considerations for Human Exposure and Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp; also known as MDR1, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; also known as ABCG2), are membrane-bound proteins that mediate the cellular efflux of xenobiotics as an important defense against chemic...

  7. Casein Kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated Phosphorylation of Hsp90β as a Novel Mechanism of Rifampin-induced MDR1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Won; Hasanuzzaman, Md; Cho, Munju; Heo, Ye Rang; Ryu, Min-Jung; Ha, Na-Young; Park, Hyun June; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2015-07-01

    The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the MDR1 gene is a drug-exporting transporter located in the cellular membrane. P-gp induction is regarded as one of the main mechanisms underlying drug-induced resistance. Although there is great interest in the regulation of P-gp expression, little is known about its underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that casein kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of heat shock protein 90β (Hsp90β) and subsequent stabilization of PXR is a key mechanism in the regulation of MDR1 expression. Furthermore, we show that CK2 is directly activated by rifampin. Upon exposure to rifampin, CK2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of Hsp90β at the Ser-225/254 residues. Phosphorylated Hsp90β then interacts with PXR, causing a subsequent increase in its stability, leading to the induction of P-gp expression. In addition, inhibition of CK2 and Hsp90β enhances the down-regulation of PXR and P-gp expression. The results of this study may facilitate the development of new strategies to prevent multidrug resistance and provide a plausible mechanism for acquired drug resistance by CK2-mediated regulation of P-gp expression. PMID:25995454

  8. Fullerene inhibits benzo(a)pyrene Efflux from Cyprinus carpio hepatocytes by affecting cell membrane fluidity and P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiqing; Hu, Xialin; Wang, Rui; Yuan, Jin; Yin, Daqiang

    2016-05-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) can protect cells by pumping out toxic compounds, and has been found widely expressed in fish tissues. Here, we illustrate the P-gp efflux ability for benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in the hepatocytes of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) after exposing to fullerene aqueous suspension (nC60). The results revealed that nC60 increased the membrane fluidity by decreasing the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids, and increased the cholesterol contents. These findings, combined with 10-38% and 70-75% down-regulation of P-gp mRNA and protein respectively, suggested that nC60 caused inhibition on P-gp efflux transport system. Therefore, we further investigated the cellular efflux ability for BaP. Results showed unequivocally that nC60 is a potent P-gp inhibitor. The retaining BaP amounts after efflux were elevated by 1.7-2.8 fold during the 10 day exposure. Meanwhile, 5mg/L humic acid (one of the important fractions of natural organic matter, which is ubiquitous in aquatic environment) alleviated the nC60 damage to hepatocytes in terms of oxidative damage, cholesterol increment, and P-gp content reduction; and finally attenuated the suppressed P-gp efflux ability. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence of nC60 toxicity to P-gp functionality in fish and illustrates the possible mechanism of the suppressed P-gp efflux ability for BaP. PMID:26918948

  9. Persistent expression and function of P-glycoprotein on peripheral blood lymphocytes identifies corticosteroid resistance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Amit; Tripathi, Deepak; Rai, Mohit K; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) are the mainstay of treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. However, some patients have poor response to CS treatment. Among the multiple mechanisms of CS resistance, overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) may be one of them as this result in efflux of CS from lymphocytes. Thus, we evaluated the role of P-gp protein on PBLs in patients with SLE in its response to CS therapy. SLE patients (n = 42) (fulfilling ACR revised criteria) who were naïve to CS and immunosuppressive drugs were enrolled. Disease activity was assessed using SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and expression, and function of P-gp was evaluated by flow cytometry at baseline and after 3 months of therapy with CS. At 3 months, patients with SLEDAI >4 and SLEDAI ≤4 were grouped as nonresponders and responders, respectively. P-gp expression was significantly increased on PBLs of SLE patients as compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001). P-gp expression and function correlated with SLEDAI (r = 0.49, p = 0.005; and r = 0.49, p = 0.001, respectively). P-gp expression and function were not different in responders and nonresponders at baseline. However, at 3 months of CS therapy, P-gp expression and function decreased in responders (p < 0.001 and p < 0.005, respectively), whereas in nonresponders, it remained unchanged. Persistent overexpression and activity of P-gp are associated with poor response to CS in CS naïve patients of SLE. PMID:26415739

  10. Multi-drug resistance in a canine lymphoid cell line due to increased P-glycoprotein expression, a potential model for drug-resistant canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M; Teske, E; Schrickx, J A

    2014-12-01

    Canine lymphoma is routinely treated with a doxorubicin-based multidrug chemotherapy protocol, and although treatment is initially successful, tumor recurrence is common and associated with therapy resistance. Active efflux of chemotherapeutic agents by transporter proteins of the ATP-Binding Cassette superfamily forms an effective cellular defense mechanism and a high expression of these transporters is frequently observed in chemotherapy-resistant tumors in both humans and dogs. In this study we describe the ABC-transporter expression in a canine lymphoid cell line and a sub-cell line with acquired drug resistance following prolonged exposure to doxorubicin. This sub-cell line was more resistant to doxorubicin and vincristine, but not to prednisolone, and had a highly increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp/abcb1) expression and transport capacity for the P-gp model-substrate rhodamine123. Both resistance to doxorubicin and vincristine, and rhodamine123 transport capacity were fully reversed by the P-gp inhibitor PSC833. No changes were observed in the expression and function of the ABC-transporters MRP-1 and BCRP. It is concluded that GL-40 cells represent a useful model for studying P-gp dependent drug resistance in canine lymphoid neoplasia, and that this model can be used for screening substances as potential P-gp substrates and their capacity to modulate P-gp mediated drug resistance. PMID:24975508

  11. Active brain targeting of a fluorescent P-gp substrate using polymeric magnetic nanocarrier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirthivasan, B.; Singh, D.; Bommana, M. M.; Raut, S. L.; Squillante, E.; Sadoqi, M.

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NP) were developed for the active brain targeting of water-soluble P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate rhodamine 123 (Rh123). The NP matrix of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(lactic acid) (M-PEG-PLA) was prepared by single emulsion solvent evaporation of polymers with oleic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (OAMNP) and Rh123. All formulations were characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, magnetic content and Rh123 encapsulation efficiency. The maximum encapsulation efficiency of Rh123 was 45 ± 3% and of OAMNP was 42 ± 4%. The brain targeting and biodistribution study was performed on Sprague Dawley rats (3 groups, n = 6). Rh123 (0.4 mg kg-1) was administered in saline form, NP containing Rh123, and NP containing Rh123 in the presence of a magnetic field (0.8 T). The fluorimetric analysis of brain homogenates revealed a significant uptake (p < 0.05) of Rh123 in the magnetically targeted group relative to controls. These results were supported by fluorescence microscopy. This study reveals the ability of magnetically targeted nanoparticles to deliver substances to the brain, the permeation of which would otherwise be inhibited by the P-gp system.

  12. Cyclosporin A affects the bioavailability of ginkgolic acids via inhibition of P-gp and BCRP.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yao, Qing-Qing; Xu, Si-Yun; Hu, Hai-Hong; Shen, Qi; Tian, Ye; Pan, Lan-Ying; Zhou, Hui; Jiang, Hui-di; Lu, Chuang; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2014-11-01

    Ginkgolic acids (GAs) in natural product Ginkgobiloba L. are the pharmacological active but also toxic components. Two compounds, GA (C15:1) and GA (C17:1) are the most abundant GAs. In this study, several in vitro and in vivo models were applied to investigate transport mechanism of GAs. A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of GA (C15:1) and GA (C17:1) was applied to analyze the biological specimens. The Papp(AP→BL) values of GA (C15:1) and GA (C17:1) were 1.66-2.13×10(-)(6)cm/s and 1.34-1.85×10(-)(6)cm/s determined using MDCK and MDCK-MDR1 cell monolayers, respectively. The Papp(BL→AP) were remarkably greater in the MDCK-MDR1 cell line, which were 6.77-11.2×10(-)(6)cm/s for GA (C15:1) and 4.73-5.15×10(-)(6)cm/s for GA (C17:1). Similar results were obtained in LLC-PK1 and LLC-PK1-BCRP cell monolayers. The net efflux ratio of GA (C15:1) and GA (C17:1) in both cell models was greater than 2 and markedly reduced by the presence of Cyclosporin A (CsA) or GF120918, inhibitors of P-gp and BCRP, suggesting that GAs are P-gp and BCRP substrates. The results from a rat bioavailability study also showed that co-administrating CsA intravenously (20mg/kg) could significantly increase GA (C15:1) and GA (C17:1) AUC0-t by 1.46-fold and 1.53-fold and brain concentration levels of 1.43-fold and 1.51-fold, respectively, due to the inhibition of P-gp and BCRP efflux transporters by CsA. PMID:24980806

  13. Reversal Effects of Pantoprazole on Multidrug Resistance in Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells by Down-Regulating the V-ATPases/mTOR/HIF-1?/P-gp and MRP1 Signaling Pathway In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Huang, Shu-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Hao; Yang, Vincent W.; Zou, Xiao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    To investigate reversal effects of pantoprazole (PPZ) on multidrug resistance (MDR) in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro. Human gastric adenocarcinoma cell SGC7901 was cultured in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and antibiotics in a humidified 5% CO2 atmosphere at 37C. Adriamycin (ADR)-resistant cells were cultured with addition of 0.8 ?g/ml of ADR maintaining MDR phenotype. ADR was used to calculate ADR releasing index; CCK-8 Assay was performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of anti-tumor drugs; BCECF-AM pH-sensitive fluorescent probe was used to measure intracellular pH (pHi) value of cells, whereas pH value of medium was considered as extracellular pH (pHe) value; Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining analyses were employed to determine protein expressions and intracellular distributions of vacuolar H+-ATPases (V-ATPases), mTOR, HIF-1?, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and multidrug resistant protein 1 (MRP1); SGC7901 and SGC7901/ADR cells were inoculated in athymic nude mice. Thereafter, effects of ADR with or without PPZ pretreatment were compared by determining the tumor size and weight, apoptotic cells in tumor tissues were detected by TUNEL assay. At concentrations greater than 20 ?g/ml, PPZ pretreatment reduced ADR releasing index and significantly enhanced intracellular ADR concentration of SGC7901 (P <0.01). Similarly, PPZ pretreatment significantly decreased ADR releasing index of SGC7901/ADR dose-dependently (P <0.01). PPZ pretreatment also decreased cell viabilities of SGG7901 and SGC7901/ADR dose-dependently. After 24-h PPZ pretreatment, administration of chemotherapeutic agents demonstrated maximal cytotoxic effects on SGC7901 and SGC7901/ADR cells (P < 0.05). The resistance index in PPZ pretreatment group was significantly lower than that in non-PPZ pretreatment group (3.71 vs. 14.80). PPZ at concentration >10 ?g/ml significantly decreased pHi in SGC7901 and SGC7901/ADR cells and diminished or reversed transmembrane pH gradient (P < 0.05). PPZ pretreatment also significantly inhibited protein expressions of V-ATPases, mTOR, HIF-1?, P-gp, and MRP1, and alter intracellular expressions in parent and ADR-resistant cells (P < 0.05). In vivo experiments further confirmed that PPZ pretreatment could enhance anti-tumor effects of ADR on xenografted tumor of nude mice and also improve the apoptotic index in xenografted tumor tissues. PPZ pretreatment enhances the cytotoxic effects of anti-tumor drugs on SGC7901 and reverse MDR of SGC7901/ADR by downregulating the V-ATPases/mTOR/HIF-1?/P-gp and MRP1 signaling pathway. PMID:22396185

  14. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  15. A study comparing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents versus enzyme (P-gp) inducers in the treatment of 2,4,6 trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Toklu, H Z; Kabasakal, L; Imeryuz, N; Kan, B; Celikel, C; Cetinel, S; Orun, O; Yuksel, M; Dulger, G A

    2013-08-01

    The intestinal microflora is an important cofactor in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation; and the epithelial cell barrier function is critical in providing protection against the stimulation of mucosal immune system by the microflora. In the present study, therapeutic role of the antibacterial drugs rifampicin and ciprofloxacine were investigated in comparison to spironolactone, an enzyme inducer, in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis of the rats. Drugs were administered for 14 days following induction of colitis. All drug treatments ameliorated the clinical hallmarks of colitis as determined by body weight loss and assessment of diarrhea, colon length, and histology. Oxidative damage and neutrophil infiltration as well as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expressions that were increased during colitis, were decreased significantly. Rifampicin and ciprofloxacin were probably effective due to their antibacterial and immunomodulating properties. The multidrug resistence gene (MDR1) and its product p-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, findings of the P-gp expression were inconclusive but regarding previous studies, it can be suggested that the beneficial effects of rifampicin and spironolactone may be partly due to their action as a P-gp ligand. Spironolactone has been reported to supress the transcription of proinflamatory cytokines that are considered to be of importance in immunoinflammatory diseases. It is also a powerful pregnane X receptor (PXR) inducer; thus, inhibition of the expression of NF-κB and TNF-α, and amelioration of inflammation by spironolactone suggest that this may have been through the activation of PXR. However, our findings regarding PXR expression were inconclusive. Activation of PXR by spironolactone probably also contributed to the induction of P-gp, resulting in extrusion of noxious substances from the tissue. PMID:24101390

  16. The use of microdialysis techniques in mice to study P-gp function at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Sziráki, István; Erdő, Franciska; Trampus, Péter; Sike, Mirabella; Molnár, Petra Magdolna; Rajnai, Zsuzsanna; Molnár, Judit; Wilhelm, Imola; Fazakas, Csilla; Kis, Emese; Krizbai, István; Krajcsi, Péter

    2013-04-01

    An integrated assay system involving dual/triple-probe microdialysis techniques in rats was developed earlier for testing interactions with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier using quinidine/PSC-833 as a P-gp substrate/inhibitor combination. The aim of the present study was to expand our assay system to mice using microdialysis with simultaneous sampling of blood and brain and to compare the result with a primary mouse brain endothelial cell monolayer (pMBMEC) assay. Brain penetration of quinidine was dose dependent in both anesthetized and awake mice after intraperitoneal drug administration. PSC-833 pretreatment caused a 2.5- to 3.4-fold increase in quinidine levels of brain dialysate samples in anesthetized or awake animals, after single or repeated administration of PSC-833. In pMBMEC, a 2.0- to 2.5-fold efflux ratio was observed in the transcellular transport of quinidine. The P-gp-mediated vectorial transport of quinidine was eliminated by PSC-833. These results indicate that quinidine with PSC-833 is a good probe substrate-reference inhibitor combination for testing drug-drug interactions with P-gp in the in vivo and in vitro mouse systems. With increasing number of humanized transgenic mice, a test system with mouse microdialysis experimentation becomes more important to predict drug-drug interactions in humans. PMID:23204072

  17. Abraxane, the Nanoparticle Formulation of Paclitaxel Can Induce Drug Resistance by Up-Regulation of P-gp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minzhi; Lei, Chunni; Yang, Yadong; Bu, Xiangli; Ma, Huailei; Gong, He; Liu, Juan; Fang, Xiangdong; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) can actively pump paclitaxel (PTX) out of cells and induces drug resistance. Abraxane, a nanoparticle (NP) formulation of PTX, has multiple clinical advantages over the single molecule form. However, it is still unclear whether Abraxane overcomes the common small molecule drug resistance problem mediated by P-gp. Here we were able to establish an Abraxane-resistant cell line from the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. We compared the transcriptome of A549/Abr resistant cell line to that of its parental cell line using RNA-Seq technology. Several pathways were found to be up or down regulated. Specifically, the most significantly up-regulated gene was ABCB1, which translates into P-glycoprotein. We verified the overexpression of P-glycoprotein and confirmed its function by reversing the drug resistance with P-gp inhibitor Verapamil. The results suggest that efflux pathway plays an important role in the Abraxane-resistant cell line we established. However, the relevance of this P-gp mediated Abraxane resistance in tumors of lung cancer patients remains unknown. PMID:26182353

  18. Enhanced autophagy reveals vulnerability of P-gp mediated epirubicin resistance in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Han; Yang, Ai-Jun; Wang, Min; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chen-Yu; Xie, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Xu; Dong, Jing-Fei; Li, Min

    2016-04-01

    Epirubicin (EPI) is widely used for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), but a substantial number of patients develop EPI resistance that is associated with poor outcome. The underlying mechanism for EPI resistance remains poorly understood. We have developed and characterized an EPI-resistant (EPI-R) cell line from parental MDA-MB-231 cells. These EPI-R cells reached stable growth in the medium containing 8 μg/ml of EPI. They overexpressed P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and contained numerous autophagic vacuoles. The suppression of P-gp overexpression and/or autophagy restored the sensitivity of these EPI-R cells to EPI. We further show that autophagy conferred resistance to EPI on MDA cells by blocking the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB)-mediated pro-apoptotic signals. Together, these results reveal a synergistic role of P-gp, autophagy, and NF-κB pathways in the development of EPI resistance in TNBC cells. They also suggest that blocking the P-gp overexpression and autophagy may be an effective means of reducing EPI resistance. PMID:26767845

  19. Abraxane, the Nanoparticle Formulation of Paclitaxel Can Induce Drug Resistance by Up-Regulation of P-gp

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Xiangli; Ma, Huailei; Gong, He; Liu, Juan; Fang, Xiangdong; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) can actively pump paclitaxel (PTX) out of cells and induces drug resistance. Abraxane, a nanoparticle (NP) formulation of PTX, has multiple clinical advantages over the single molecule form. However, it is still unclear whether Abraxane overcomes the common small molecule drug resistance problem mediated by P-gp. Here we were able to establish an Abraxane-resistant cell line from the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. We compared the transcriptome of A549/Abr resistant cell line to that of its parental cell line using RNA-Seq technology. Several pathways were found to be up or down regulated. Specifically, the most significantly up-regulated gene was ABCB1, which translates into P-glycoprotein. We verified the overexpression of P-glycoprotein and confirmed its function by reversing the drug resistance with P-gp inhibitor Verapamil. The results suggest that efflux pathway plays an important role in the Abraxane-resistant cell line we established. However, the relevance of this P-gp mediated Abraxane resistance in tumors of lung cancer patients remains unknown. PMID:26182353

  20. Functional and energetic characterization of P-gp-mediated doxorubicin transport in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Jennifer L; Bains, Onkar S; Lee, Denny S H; Kennedy, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    An assessment of energetic costs associated with P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated xenobiotic efflux is important in understanding the energy budgets, tradeoffs, and fitness of organisms inhabiting contaminated environments. Here, a functional characterization and determination of the energetic costs associated with doxorubicin (DOX) efflux was examined in isolated hepatocytes of rainbow trout. The accumulation and efflux of DOX were both concentration dependent. The efflux of DOX over a 3 h incubation period resulted in a significant decrease in intracellular ATP concentrations (maximum decrease 25%) compared to control baseline levels, while significant increases in concentrations of ADP (max. 26%), AMP (max. 36%) and inorganic phosphate (max. 11%). were observed. In addition, significant reductions in the adenylate energy charge ([AEC]: max 11%), and phosphorylation potential ([PP]: max. 53%) were shown in cells incubated with DOX compared to control cells. Inhibition of DOX efflux (max. 61%) by the non-competitive P-gp inhibitor tariquidar (XR9576), demonstrated that changes in ATP, ADP, AMP, inorganic phosphate concentrations, AEC and PP in DOX-exposed hepatocytes were mainly due to P-gp activity. Overall, these results indicate that the exposure of trout hepatocytes to DOX increases energetic and metabolic costs that are associated specifically with P-gp efflux activity. PMID:18664392

  1. Forced expression of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) reverses P-glycoprotein (ABCB1)-mediated drug efflux and MDR1 gene expression in Adriamycin-resistant human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kanagasabai, Ragu; Krishnamurthy, Karthikeyan; Druhan, Lawrence J; Ilangovan, Govindasamy

    2011-09-23

    Mutant p53 accumulation has been shown to induce the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1) and ATP binding cassette (ABC)-based drug efflux in human breast cancer cells. In the present work, we have found that transcriptional activation of the oxidative stress-responsive heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and expression of heat shock proteins, including Hsp27, which is normally known to augment proteasomal p53 degradation, are inhibited in Adriamycin (doxorubicin)-resistant MCF-7 cells (MCF-7/adr). Such an endogenous inhibition of HSF-1 and Hsp27 in turn results in p53 mutation with gain of function in its transcriptional activity and accumulation in MCF-7/adr. Also, lack of HSF-1 enhances nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity together with mutant p53 and induces MDR1 gene and P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), resulting in a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Ectopic expression of Hsp27, however, significantly depleted both mutant p53 and NF-κB (p65), reversed the drug resistance by inhibiting MDR1/P-gp expression in MCF-7/adr cells, and induced cell death by increased G(2)/M population and apoptosis. We conclude from these results that HSF-1 inhibition and depletion of Hsp27 is a trigger, at least in part, for the accumulation of transcriptionally active mutant p53, which can either directly or NF-κB-dependently induce an MDR1/P-gp phenotype in MCF-7 cells. Upon Hsp27 overexpression, this pathway is abrogated, and the acquired multidrug resistance is significantly abolished so that MCF-7/adr cells are sensitized to Dox. Thus, clinical alteration in Hsp27 or NF-κB level will be a potential approach to circumvent drug resistance in breast cancer. PMID:21784846

  2. Expression of KAP1 in epithelial ovarian cancer and its correlation with drug-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mingqiu; Fu, Xin; Cui, Yanfen; Xu, Shilei; Xu, Yue; Dong, Qiuping; Sun, Lu

    2015-01-01

    KAP1 is a universal corepressor for Kruppel-associated box zinc finger proteins. In this study, expression level of KAP1 and its association with drug resistance and expression of P-gp and BCRP in epithelial ovarian cancer were investigated. Immunohistological staining of KAP1 in cancer and matched paraneoplastic tissues was evaluated in 242 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Immunohistological staining of P-gp and BCRP were also evaluated, and the associations with the expression of KAP1 in epithelial ovarian cancer were investigated. MTT assay for cell proliferation and clonogenic survival assay were applied to determine the effect of KAP1 on the sensitivity of DDP, through up-regulating the level of KAP1 expression of SKOV3 using KAP1 plasmid and down-regulating the level of KAP1 expression of SKOV3/DDP using siRNA. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of KAP1 in cancer tissues were higher than matched paraneoplastic tissues (t = 21.39, P<0.001). The patients with higher KAP1 expression often had drug resistance, and the level of KAP1 expression was positively correlated with the expression of P-gp and BCRP (P = 0.07 and P<0.001 respectively). Up-regulated the expression of KAP1 in SKOV3 cell line induced the up-regulated expression of BCRP and P-gp, increasing the resistance of chemotherapeutic drug, and down-regulated the expression of KAP1 got opposite effects. KAP1 expression correlated with aggressive clinical features in ovarian cancer, maybe through regulating the expression of P-gp and BCRP. PMID:26770323

  3. Nanolipoparticles-mediated MDR1 siRNA delivery reduces doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer cells and silences MDR1 expression in xenograft model of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nourbakhsh, Mahnaz; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Lage, Hermann; Abnous, Khalil; mosaffa, Fatemeh; Badiee, Ali; Behravan, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an efflux protein, the overexpression of which has been associated with multidrug resistance in various cancers. Although siRNA delivery to reverse P-gp expression may be promising for sensitizing of tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs, the therapeutic use of siRNA requires effective carriers that can deliver siRNA intracellularly with minimal toxicity on target cells. We investigated a special class of PEGylated lipid-based nanoparticles (NP), named nanolipoparticles (NLPs), for siRNA-mediated P-gp downregulation. Materials and Methods: NLPs were prepared based on low detergent dialysis method. After characterization, we evaluated the effect of NLPs on siRNA delivery, and P-gp downregulation compared to oligofectamine™ (OFA) in vitro and in vivo. Results: Our results showed a significant decrease in P-gp expression and subsequent enhancement of chemosensitivity to doxorubicin in vitro. Although the effectiveness of NLPs for in vitro siRNA delivery compared to OFA was limited, the results of in vivo studies showed noticeable effectiveness of NLPs for systemic siRNA delivery. siRNA delivery using NLPs could downregulate MDR1 in tumor cells more than 80%, while OFA had a reverse effect on MDR1 expression in vivo. Conclusion: The results indicated that the prepared NLPs could be suitable siRNA delivery systems for tumor therapy. PMID:26019802

  4. Influence of overexpression of efflux proteins on the function and gene expression of endogenous peptide transporters in MDR-transfected MDCKII cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiying; Pal, Dhananjay; Patel, Ashaben; Kwatra, Deep; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-30

    The objective of this study is to delineate whether overexpression of human efflux transporters (P-gp, MRP2, and BCRP) in transfected MDCK cells affect the functional activities, and gene and protein expression of endogenous influx peptide transporter system (PepT). Real-time PCR, immunoblotting, uptake and permeability studies of [(3)H]Gly-Sar were conducted on transfected MDCKII and wild-type cells to investigate functional differences. Cellular [(3)H]Gly-Sar accumulation was significantly lower in transfected MDCKII cell lines compared to wild-type cells. Transport efficiency of apical peptide transporters was markedly reduced to around 25%, 30%, and 40% in P-gp-, MRP2-, and BCRP-overexpressed MDCK cell lines, respectively. With ascending cell-passage, transport efficiency was enhanced. A significantly higher Gly-Sar permeability was observed across parental cell-monolayers over transfected cells at all pHs. Levels of mRNA for both canine PepT1 and PepT2 were substantially reduced when efflux transporters overexpressed but enhanced when mRNA-levels of efflux genes diminished with ascending cell-passage of transfected cells. An inverse correlation was evident between endogenous PepT and exogenous efflux transporters in transfected MDCKII cells. Results of protein expression also supported these findings. Overexpression of MDR genes can affect endogenous PepT function which might be due to the phenomenon of transporter-compensation resulting in down-regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:23262422

  5. Influence of overexpression of efflux proteins on the function and gene expression of endogenous peptide transporters in MDR-transfected MDCKII cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiying; Pal, Dhananjay; Patel, Ashaben; Kwatra, Deep; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to delineate whether overexpression of human efflux transporters (P-gp, MRP2, and BCRP) in transfected MDCK cells affect the functional activities, and gene and protein expression of endogenous influx peptide transporter system (PepT). Real-time PCR, immunoblotting, uptake and permeability studies of [3H]Gly-Sar were conducted on transfected MDCKII and wild-type cells to investigate functional differences. Cellular [3H]Gly-Sar accumulation was significantly lower in transfected MDCKII cell lines compared to wild-type cells. Transport efficiency of apical peptide transporters was markedly reduced to around 25%, 30%, and 40% in P-gp-, MRP2-, and BCRP-overexpressed MDCK cell lines, respectively. With ascending cell-passage, transport efficiency was enhanced. A significantly higher Gly-Sar permeability was observed across parental cell-monolayers over transfected cells at all pHs. Levels of mRNA for both canine PepT1 and PepT2 were substantially reduced when efflux transporters overexpressed but enhanced when mRNA-levels of efflux genes diminished with ascending cell-passage of transfected cells. An inverse correlation was evident between endogenous PepT and exogenous efflux transporters in transfected MDCKII cells. Results of protein expression also supported these findings. Overexpression of MDR genes can affect endogenous PepT function which might be due to the phenomenon of transporter-compensation resulting in down-regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:23262422

  6. Protein identification and Peptide expression resolver: harmonizing protein identification with protein expression data.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Paul; Butler, Heather; Eng, Kevin; Hugo, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Proteomic discovery platforms generate both peptide expression information and protein identification information. Peptide expression data are used to determine which peptides are differentially expressed between study cohorts, and then these peptides are targeted for protein identification. In this paper, we demonstrate that peptide expression information is also a powerful tool for enhancing confidence in protein identification results. Specifically, we evaluate the following hypothesis: tryptic peptides originating from the same protein have similar expression profiles across samples in the discovery study. Evidence supporting this hypothesis is provided. This hypothesis is integrated into a protein identification tool, PIPER (Protein Identification and Peptide Expression Resolver), that reduces erroneous protein identifications below 5%. PIPER's utility is illustrated by application to a 72-sample biomarker discovery study where it is demonstrated that false positive protein identifications can be reduced below 5%. Consequently, it is recommended that PIPER methodology be incorporated into proteomic studies where both protein expression and identification data are collected. PMID:18062667

  7. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  8. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Genistein in a Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line: Impact on Sorafenib Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Arias, Agostina; Ceballos, María Paula; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Luquita, Marcelo Gabriel; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Ghanem, Carolina Inés; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, María Laura

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide. Sorafenib is the only drug available that improves the overall survival of HCC patients. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 and 3) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are efflux pumps that play a key role in cancer chemoresistance. Their modulation by dietary compounds may affect the intracellular accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are substrates of these transporters. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen abundant in soybean that exerts its genomic effects through Estrogen-Receptors and Pregnane-X-Receptor (PXR), which are involved in the regulation of the above-mentioned transporters. We evaluated the effect of GNT on the expression and activity of P-gp, MRP2, MRP3 and BCRP in HCC-derived HepG2 cells. GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) increased P-gp and MRP2 protein expression and activity, correlating well with an increased resistance to sorafenib cytotoxicity as detected by the methylthiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assay. GNT induced P-gp and MRP2 mRNA expression at 10 but not at 1.0 μM concentration suggesting a different pattern of regulation depending on the concentration. Induction of both transporters by 1.0 μM GNT was prevented by cycloheximide, suggesting translational regulation. Downregulation of expression of the miR-379 by GNT could be associated with translational regulation of MRP2. Silencing of PXR abolished P-gp induction by GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) and MRP2 induction by GNT (only at 10 μM), suggesting partial mediation of GNT effects by PXR. Taken together, the data suggest the possibility of nutrient-drug interactions leading to enhanced chemoresistance in HCC when GNT is ingested with soy rich diets or dietary supplements. PMID:25781341

  9. Mechanisms of tetrandrine and 5-bromotetrandrine in reversing multidrug resistance may relate to down-regulation of multidrug resistance associated protein 7 expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Dai, Jing-Ying; Chen, Bao-An; Cai, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Shuai; Gao, Feng

    2012-06-01

    Both tetrandrine (Tet) and 5-bromotetrandrine (BrTet) can effectively reverse P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR). The structure of multidrug resistance associated protein 7 (MRP7) has its own specificity and difference compared with other members of the MRP family. This study was aimed to investigate whether Tet and BrTet can inhibit the expression level of MRP7 so as to further look into the mechanisms of the reversal effects of Tet and BrTet on MDR. The inhibitory effects of daunorubicin (DNR) used alone on the proliferation of K562 and K562/A02 cells were evaluated by MTT assay, the IC(50) of DNR and drug resistant folds were calculated. The mRNA level of MRP7 was tested by real-time PCR, and the protein levels of MRP7 and P-gp were tested by Western blot. The DNR accumulation was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM). The results showed that the resistance of K562/A02 cells to DNR was 23.65-folds of that of K562 cells. After administration of 1 µmol/L Tet or 2 µmol/L BrTet, the mRNA level of MRP7 in the K562/A02 cells decreased to 2% and 12% respectively, and the protein level of MRP7 decreased by 53.2% and 83.7% respectively. The protein level of P-gp decreased by 58.47% and 52.20% in the 1 µmol/L Tet and 2 µmol/L BrTet groups. FCM detection showed that 1 µmol/L Tet and 2 µmol/L BrTet significantly increased the accumulation of DNR in K562/A02 cells by 94.32% and 271% respectively. It is concluded that Tet and BrTet both can reverse MDR in vitro. The mechanisms may be related to the inhibition of MRP7 overexpression and the increase of anticancer drug concentration in cells. At the same molar concentration, the effects of Tet and BrTet in inhibiting the protein level of MRP7 expression do not show significant difference. PMID:22739155

  10. Reduced ABCB1 Expression and Activity in the Presence of Acrylic Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Ramin; Baradaran, Behzad; Valizadeh, Hadi; Yousefi, Bahman; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1), an integral membrane protein in the apical surface of human intestinal epithelial cells, plays a crucial role in the intestinal transport and efflux leading to changes in the bioavailability of oral pharmaceutical compounds. This study was set to examine the potential effects of three Eudragits RL100, S100 and L100 on the intestinal epithelial membrane transport of rhodammine-123 (Rho-123), a substrate of P-gp using a monolayer of human colon cancer cell line (Caco-2). Methods: The least non-cytotoxic concentrations of the excipients were assessed in Caco-2 cells by the MTT assay. Then the transepithelial transport of Rho-123 across Caco-2 monolayers was determined with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Besides, the expression of the P-gp in cells exposed to the polymers was demonstrated using Western-blotting analysis. Results: Treatment of cells with Eudragit RL100 and L100 led to a very slight change while Eudragit S100 showed 61% increase in Rho-123 accumulation (P<0.001) and also reduced transporter expression. Conclusion: Our studies suggest that using proper concentrations of the Eudragit S100 in drug formulation would improve intestinal permeability and absorption of p-gp substrate drugs. PMID:24754004

  11. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  12. Synthesis and Evaluation of [N-methyl-11C]N-Desmethyl-loperamide as a New and Improved PET Radiotracer for Imaging P-gp Function

    PubMed Central

    Lazarova, Neva; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Hong, Jinsoo; Seneca, Nicholas; Tuan, Ed; Gladding, Robert L.; Liow, Jeih-San; Taku, Andrew; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    [11C]Loperamide has been proposed for imaging P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function with positron emission tomography (PET), but its metabolism to [N-methyl-11C]N-desmethyl-loperamide ([11C]dLop; [11C]3) precludes quantification. We considered that [11C]3 might itself be a superior radiotracer for imaging brain P-gp function and therefore aimed to prepare [11C]3 and characterize its efficacy. An amide precursor (2) was synthesized and methylated with [11C]iodomethane to give [11C]3. After administration of [11C]3 to wild type mice, brain radioactivity uptake was very low. In P-gp (mdr-1a (−/−)) knockout mice, brain uptake of radioactivity at 30 min increased about 3.5 fold by PET measures, and over seven-fold by ex vivo measures. In knockout mice, brain radioactivity was predominantly (90%) unchanged radiotracer. In monkey PET experiments, brain radioactivity uptake was also very low, but after P-gp blockade increased more than seven-fold. [11C]3 is an effective new radiotracer for imaging brain P-gp function and, in favor of future successful quantification, appears free of extensive brain-penetrant radiometabolites. PMID:18783208

  13. In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation Scaling Factors for Intestinal P-Glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: Part I: A Cross-Laboratory Comparison of Transporter-Protein Abundances and Relative Expression Factors in Human Intestine and Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Matthew D; Achour, Brahim; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Russell, Matthew R; Carlson, Gordon; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2016-03-01

    Over the last 5 years the quantification of transporter-protein absolute abundances has dramatically increased in parallel to the expanded use of in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK)-linked models, for decision-making in pharmaceutical company drug development pipelines and regulatory submissions. Although several research groups have developed laboratory-specific proteomic workflows, it is unclear if the large range of reported variability is founded on true interindividual variability or experimental variability resulting from sample preparation or the proteomic methodology used. To assess the potential for methodological bias on end-point abundance quantification, two independent laboratories, the University of Manchester (UoM) and Bertin Pharma (BPh), employing different proteomic workflows, quantified the absolute abundances of Na/K-ATPase, P-gp, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in the same set of biologic samples from human intestinal and Caco-2 cell membranes. Across all samples, P-gp abundances were significantly correlated (P = 0.04, Rs = 0.72) with a 2.4-fold higher abundance (P = 0.001) generated at UoM compared with BPh. There was a systematically higher BCRP abundance in Caco-2 cell samples quantified by BPh compared with UoM, but not in human intestinal samples. Consequently, a similar intestinal relative expression factor (REF), derived from distal jejunum and Caco-2 monolayer samples, between laboratories was found for P-gp. However, a 2-fold higher intestinal REF was generated by UoM (2.22) versus BPh (1.11). We demonstrate that differences in absolute protein abundance are evident between laboratories and they probably result from laboratory-specific methodologies relating to peptide choice. PMID:26631742

  14. Drug resistance induced by ouabain via the stimulation of MDR1 gene expression in human carcinomatous pulmonary cells.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, F; Tondelier, D; Edelman, A; Baudouin-Legros, M

    2001-02-15

    The inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase by cardiotonic drugs like ouabain deeply perturbs both the properties of the cell membrane and the ionic composition of the cytoplasm and hence alters fundamental cell reactions. These three types of reactions may be involved in the stimulation of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1) gene expression and the synthesis of permeability glycoprotein [P-glycoprotein (P-gp)]. We have determined whether ouabain, which binds to an extracellular motif of the Na+/K+-ATPase, stimulates MDR-1 gene expression by measuring both mRNA and protein and whether the resulting P-gp extrudes hydrophobic compounds and causes resistance to antimitotic agents. The experiments were performed on Calu-3 cells, a human cell line from a pulmonary carcinoma. Northern blotting showed that treating the cells with submicromolar concentrations of ouabain stimulated MDR-1 gene expression within 24 h. The ouabain-induced stimulation of MDR-1 expression was not restricted to Calu-3 cells but also occurred in human carcinomatous colon (T-84 and HT-29) and hepatic (H7V3) cells. However, it is not ubiquitous because it was not found in HeLa cells. The stimulation was reproduced by other Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitors and occurred via enhanced gene transcription, apparently due to the increased cytosolic calcium concentration. Ouabain also increased the membrane content of P-gp, as detected by immunoblotting and immunohistology. We have developed a microvideo assay based on the properties of acetoxymethyl ester calcein and calcein to show that this P-gp extruded the hydrophobic acetoxymethyl ester calcein. Ouabain also caused the Calu-3 cells to become resistant to doxorubicin and vinblastine. Thus, although ouabain acts extracellularly, it may stimulate MDR-1 gene expression and P-gp synthesis and make cells resistant to hydrophobic cytotoxic compounds. PMID:11245485

  15. Predictable tuning of protein expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Mads T; Pedersen, Margit; Klausen, Michael S; Jensen, Sheila I; Wulff, Tune; Harrison, Scott; Nielsen, Alex T; Herrgård, Markus J; Sommer, Morten O A

    2016-03-01

    We comprehensively assessed the contribution of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence to protein expression and used the data to develop EMOPEC (Empirical Model and Oligos for Protein Expression Changes; http://emopec.biosustain.dtu.dk). EMOPEC is a free tool that makes it possible to modulate the expression level of any Escherichia coli gene by changing only a few bases. Measured protein levels for 91% of our designed sequences were within twofold of the desired target level. PMID:26752768

  16. Modulation of CYPs, P-gp, and PXR by Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy) and Its Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Manda, Vamshi K; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Dale, Olivia R; Kumarihamy, Mallika; Cutler, Stephen J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Muhammad, Ilias; Khan, Shabana I

    2016-04-01

    Eschscholzia californica, a native US plant, is traditionally used as a sedative, analgesic, and anxiolytic herb. With the rapid rise in the use of herbal supplements together with over-the-counter and prescription drugs, the risk for potential herb-drug interactions is also increasing. Most of the clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions occur due to modulation of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs), P-glycoprotein, and the pregnane X receptor by concomitantly used herbs. This study aimed to determine the effects of an EtOH extract, aqueous extract (tea), basic CHCl3 fractions, and isolated major alkaloids, namely protopine (1), escholtzine (2), allocryptopine (3), and californidine (4), of E. californica on the activity of cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein and the pregnane X receptor. The EtOH extract and fractions showed strong time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19, and reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6. Among the alkaloids, escholtzine (2) and allocryptopine (3) exhibited time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19 (IC50 shift ratio > 2), while protopine (1) and allocryptopine (3) showed reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6 enzyme. A significant activation of the pregnane X receptor (> 2-fold) was observed with the EtOH extract, basic CHCl3 fraction, and alkaloids (except protopine), which resulted into an increased expression of mRNA and the activity of CYP 3A4 and CYP 1A2. The expression of P-glycoprotein was unaffected. However, aqueous extract (tea) and its main alkaloid californidine (4) did not affect cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein, or the pregnane X receptor. This data suggests that EtOH extract of E. californica and its major alkaloids have a potential of causing interactions with drugs that are metabolized by cytochrome P450s, while the tea seems to be safer. PMID:27054913

  17. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  18. Expression and purification of GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Harper, S; Speicher, D W

    2001-05-01

    An increasingly common strategy for expressing proteins and large peptides in prokaryotic systems is to express the protein of interest connected to a "tag" that provides the basis for rapid high-affinity purification. This unit describes the expression and purification of fusion proteins containing the 26-kDa glutathione-S-transferase protein as well as methods for cleaving the affinity tag and repurifying the target protein. Advantages of this popular fusion protein system include high protein yields, high-affinity one-step protein purification of the fusion protein, existence of several alternative protease cleavage sites for removing the affinity tag when required, and ease of removal of the cleaved affinity tag. PMID:18429193

  19. Using the BacMam Baculovirus System to Study Expression and Function of Recombinant Efflux Drug Transporters in Polarized Epithelial Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Fung, King Leung; Kapoor, Khyati; Pixley, Jessica N; Talbert, Darrell J; Kwit, Alexandra D T; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily includes several membrane-bound proteins that are critical to drug pharmacokinetics and disposition. Pharmacologic evaluation of these proteins in vitro remains a challenge. In this study, human ABC transporters were expressed in polarized epithelial cell monolayers transduced using the BacMam baculovirus gene transfer system. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of BacMam baculovirus to transduce cells grown in monolayers. In a porcine kidney cell line, LLC-PK1 cells, baculoviral transduction is successful only via the apical side of a polarized monolayer. We observed that recombinant ABC transporters were expressed on the cell surface with post-translational modification. Furthermore, sodium butyrate played a critical role in recombinant protein expression, and preincubation in the presence of tunicamycin or thapsigargin enhanced protein expression. Cells overexpressing human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) showed vectorial basolateral-to-apical transport of [(3)H]-paclitaxel, which could be reversed by the inhibitor tariquidar. Similarly, coexpression of human P-gp and ABCG2 in LLC-PK1 cells resulted in higher transport of mitoxantrone, which is a substrate for both transporters, than in either P-gp- or ABCG2-expressing cells alone. Taken together, our results indicate that a high level of expression of efflux transporters in a polarized cell monolayer is technically feasible with the BacMam baculovirus system. PMID:26622052

  20. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  1. Comb-like amphiphilic polypeptide-based copolymer nanomicelles for co-delivery of doxorubicin and P-gp siRNA into MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Suo, Aili; Qian, Junmin; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Rongrong; Xu, Weijun; Wang, Hejing

    2016-05-01

    A comb-like amphiphilic copolymer methoxypolyethylene glycol-graft-poly(l-lysine)-block-poly(l-phenylalanine) (mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe) was successfully synthesized. To synthesize mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe, diblock copolymer PLL-b-Phe was first synthesized by successive ring-opening polymerization of α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides followed by the removal of benzyloxycarbonyl protecting groups, and then mPEG was grafted onto PLL-b-Phe by reductive amination via Schiff's base formation. The chemical structures of the copolymers were identified by (1)H NMR. mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe copolymer had a critical micelle concentration of 6.0mg/L and could self-assemble in an aqueous solution into multicompartment nanomicelles with a mean diameter of approximately 78nm. The nanomicelles could encapsulate doxorubicin (DOX) through hydrophobic and π-π stacking interactions between DOX molecules and Phe blocks and simultaneously complex P-gp siRNA with cationic PLL blocks via electrostatic interactions. The DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles showed spherical morphology, possessed narrow particle size distribution and had a mean particle size of 120nm. The DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles exhibited pH-responsive release behaviors and displayed accelerated release under acidic conditions. The DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles were efficiently internalized into MCF-7 cells, and DOX released could successfully reach nuclei. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles showed a much higher cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells than DOX-loaded nanomicelles due to their synergistic killing effect and that the blank nanomicelles had good biocompatibility. Thus, the novel comb-like mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe nanomicelles could be a promising vehicle for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drug and genetic material. PMID:26952460

  2. Gene expression. MicroRNA control of protein expression noise.

    PubMed

    Schmiedel, Jörn M; Klemm, Sandy L; Zheng, Yannan; Sahay, Apratim; Blüthgen, Nils; Marks, Debora S; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) repress the expression of many genes in metazoans by accelerating messenger RNA degradation and inhibiting translation, thereby reducing the level of protein. However, miRNAs only slightly reduce the mean expression of most targeted proteins, leading to speculation about their role in the variability, or noise, of protein expression. We used mathematical modeling and single-cell reporter assays to show that miRNAs, in conjunction with increased transcription, decrease protein expression noise for lowly expressed genes but increase noise for highly expressed genes. Genes that are regulated by multiple miRNAs show more-pronounced noise reduction. We estimate that hundreds of (lowly expressed) genes in mouse embryonic stem cells have reduced noise due to substantial miRNA regulation. Our findings suggest that miRNAs confer precision to protein expression and thus offer plausible explanations for the commonly observed combinatorial targeting of endogenous genes by multiple miRNAs, as well as the preferential targeting of lowly expressed genes. PMID:25838385

  3. Introduction to expression by fusion protein vectors.

    PubMed

    Riggs, P; La Vallie, E R; McCoy, J M

    2001-05-01

    This overview discusses issues involved with creating and manipulating vectors for expression of fusion proteins. The requirements for efficient translation include a promoter and a start codon, along with the fact that the mRNA encoding the protein to be expressed must contain a ribosome-binding site that is not blocked by mRNA secondary structure. The level of expression is also affected by codon preferences, and may be affected by the coding sequence in other ways that are not yet well understood. In virtually all cases, these problems can be solved by altering the sequence preceding the start codon, and/or by making changes in the 5' end of the coding sequence that do not change the protein sequence, taking advantage of the degeneracy of the genetic code. However, it is often quicker to solve these problems by making fusions between genes. In this approach the cloned gene is introduced into an expression vector 3' to a sequence (carrier sequence) coding for the amino terminus of a highly expressed protein (carrier protein). The carrier sequence provides the necessary signals for good expression, and the expressed fusion protein contains an N-terminal region encoded by the carrier. The carrier sequence can also code for an entire functional moiety or even for an entire protein that can be exploited in purifying the protein, either with antibodies or with an affinity purification specific for that carrier protein. Alternatively unique physical properties of the carrier protein (e.g., heat stability) can be exploited to allow selective purification of the fusion protein. Often, proteins fused to these carriers can be separated from the bulk of intracellular contaminants by taking advantage of special attributes. PMID:18265130

  4. Resveratrol Increases Anti-Proliferative Activity of Bestatin Through Downregulating P-Glycoprotein Expression Via Inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway in K562/ADR Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Changyuan; Jia, Yongming; Liu, Zhihao; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Kexin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle in the clinical therapy of hematological malignancies. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression results in reduction of intracellular drug concentration with a consequence that the cytotoxicity of anti-tumor drugs is decreased, which leads to MDR in K562/ADR cells. In this study, we found that resveratrol enhanced the anti-proliferative activity of bestatin in K562/ADR cells. Co-treatment with resveratrol, IC50 values of bestatin in K562/ADR cells significantly decreased and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8 increased, which indicated that resveratrol potentiated bestatin-induced apoptosis. Resveratrol increased the intracellular concentration of bestatin through inhibiting P-gp function and downregulating P-gp expression at mRNA and protein levels, which increased anti-proliferative activity of bestatin in K562/ADR cells. Resveratrol decreased the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR but did not affect the phosphorylations of JNK or ERK1/2. These results demonstrated that resveratrol could increase the anti-proliferative activity of bestatin through downregulating P-gp expression via suppressing the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1233-1239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26460589

  5. Membrane protein expression: no cells required.

    PubMed

    Katzen, Federico; Peterson, Todd C; Kudlicki, Wieslaw

    2009-08-01

    Structural and functional studies of membrane proteins have been severely hampered by difficulties in producing sufficient quantities of properly folded protein products. It is well established that cell-based expression of membrane proteins is generally problematic and frequently results in low yield, cell toxicity, protein aggregation and misfolding. Owing to its inherent open nature, cell-free protein expression has become a highly promising tool for the fast and efficient production of these difficult-to-express proteins. Here we review the most recent advances in this field, underscoring the potentials and weaknesses of the newly developed approaches and place specific emphasis on the use of nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs or nanodiscs). PMID:19616329

  6. [Effect of cryptotanshinone on imatinib sensitivity and P-glycoprotein expression of chronic myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Ge, Yu-qing; Cheng, Ru-bin; Yang, Bo; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CPT), a lipid soluble active compound in Salvia miltiorrhiza, has a significant inhibitory effect on multiple malignant tumors, e. g. chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and can effectively enhance imatinib's chemotherapeutic effect. However, its functional molecular mechanism remained unclear. In this experiment, the authors conducted a systematic study on the effect of CPT on the imatinib sensitivity and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in CML cells by using CML cells K562 and imatinib persister K562-R. The MTT assays were performed to determine CPT's impact on the inhibitory effect of imatinib. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining analysis was used to detect the changes in the cell apoptosis rate. The active changes in apoptosis regulatory proteins Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PARP were determined by Western blot. After the cells were pretreated with the gradient concentration of CPT, the expression of P-gp was analyzed by Western blot and flow cytometry. The changes in intracellular concentrations of imatinib were determined by HPLC analysis. The results indicated that the pretreatment with CPT significantly increased the proliferation inhibiting and apoptosis inducing effects of imatinib on K562 and K562-R cells as well as the degradation product expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PARP, with a significant difference with the control group (P < 0.01). However, CPT showed no impact on the P-gp expression in CML cells and the intracellular concentrations of imatinib. In summary, the findings suggested that CPT enhanced the sensitivity of CML cells to imatinib. Its mechanism is not dependent on the inhibition in P-gp expression and the increase in intracellular drug concentration. PMID:26591531

  7. IF7-Conjugated Nanoparticles Target Annexin 1 of Tumor Vasculature against P-gp Mediated Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Hong; Liu, Ya-Rong; Luan, Xin; Liu, Hai-Jun; Gao, Yun-Ge; Wu, Hao; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2015-08-19

    Multidrug resistance is the main cause of clinical chemotherapeutic failure. Antiangiogenic cancer therapy with nanomedicine that allows the targeted delivery of antiangiogenic agents to tumor endothelial cells may contribute to innovative strategies for treating multidrug-resistant cancers. In this study, we developed a new nanodrug delivery system (nano-DDS), with improved antiangiogenic efficacy against multidrug resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells. Here, the IF7 ligand was a peptide designed to bind the annexin 1 (Anxa 1), a highly specific marker of the tumor vasculature surface, with high affinity and specificity. IF7-conjugated Anxa 1-targeting nanoparticles containing paclitaxel (IF7-PTX-NP) allowed controlled drug release and displayed favorable prolonged circulation in vivo. IF7-PTX-NP was significantly internalized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) through the IF7-Anxa 1 interaction, and this facilitated uptake enhanced the expected antiangiogenic activity of inhibiting HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation in a Matrigel plug relative to those of Taxol and PTX-NP. As IF7-PTX-NP targeted the tumor vessels, more nanoparticles accumulated in MCF-7/ADR tumors, and more importantly, induced significant apoptosis of the tumor vascular endothelial cells and necrosis of the tumor tissues. Low dose paclitaxel (1 mg/kg) formulated in IF7-PTX-NP showed significant anticancer efficacy, delaying the growth of MCF-7/ADR tumors. The same efficacy was only obtained with an 8-fold dose of paclitaxel (8 mg/kg) as Taxol plus XR9576, a potent P-gp inhibitor. The anticancer efficacy of IF7-PTX-NP was strongly associated with the improved antiangiogenic effect, evident as a dramatic reduction in the tumor microvessel density and pronounced increase in apoptotic tumor cells, with no obvious toxicity to the mice. This nano-DDS, which targets the tumor neovasculature, offers a promising strategy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancer. PMID:26076081

  8. Why highly expressed proteins evolve slowly

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, D. Allan; Bloom, Jesse D.; Adami, Christoph; Wilke, Claus O.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2005-01-01

    Much recent work has explored molecular and population-genetic constraints on the rate of protein sequence evolution. The best predictor of evolutionary rate is expression level, for reasons that have remained unexplained. Here, we hypothesize that selection to reduce the burden of protein misfolding will favor protein sequences with increased robustness to translational missense errors. Pressure for translational robustness increases with expression level and constrains sequence evolution. Using several sequenced yeast genomes, global expression and protein abundance data, and sets of paralogs traceable to an ancient whole-genome duplication in yeast, we rule out several confounding effects and show that expression level explains roughly half the variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein evolutionary rates. We examine causes for expression's dominant role and find that genome-wide tests favor the translational robustness explanation over existing hypotheses that invoke constraints on function or translational efficiency. Our results suggest that proteins evolve at rates largely unrelated to their functions and can explain why highly expressed proteins evolve slowly across the tree of life. PMID:16176987

  9. Protein Expression Regulation under Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christine; Silva, Gustavo Monteiro; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to affect both translation and protein turnover, but very few large scale studies describe protein expression under stress. We measure protein concentrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae over the course of 2 h in response to a mild oxidative stress induced by diamide, providing detailed time-resolved information for 815 proteins, with additional data for another ?1,100 proteins. For the majority of proteins, we discover major differences between the global transcript and protein response. Although mRNA levels often return to baseline 1 h after treatment, protein concentrations continue to change. Integrating our data with features of translation and protein degradation, we are able to predict expression patterns for 41% of the proteins in the core data set. Predictive features include, among others, targeting by RNA-binding proteins (Lhp1 and Khd1), RNA secondary structures, RNA half-life, and translation efficiency under unperturbed conditions and in response to oxidative reagents, but not chaperone binding. We are able to both describe general dynamics of protein concentration changes and suggest possible regulatory mechanisms for individual proteins. PMID:21933953

  10. An isoquinoline alkaloid from the Chinese herbal plant Corydalis yanhusuo W.T. Wang inhibits P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associate protein 1.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Tan, Juan; Wink, Michael; Ma, Yonggang; Li, Na; Su, Guannan

    2013-02-15

    Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associate protein 1 (MRP1) is a major mechanism leading to multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells. These transporters expel anti-cancer drugs and greatly impair therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. A Chinese herbal plant Yanhusuo (Corydalis yanhusuo W.T. Wang, YHS) is frequently used in functional food and traditional Chinese medicine to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. The objective of this work was to study effects of glaucine, an alkaloid component of YHS, on P-gp and MRP1 in resistant cancer cells. The resistant cancer cell line, MCF-7/ADR and corresponding parental sensitive cells were employed to determine reversal properties of glaucine. Glaucine inhibits P-gp and MRP1-mediated efflux and activates ATPase activities of the transporters, indicating that it is a substrate and inhibits P-gp and MRP1 competitively. Furthermore, glaucine suppresses expression of ABC transporter genes. It reverses the resistance of MCF-7/ADR to adriamycin and mitoxantrone effectively. PMID:23194502

  11. Low Intensity Ultrasound Promotes the Sensitivity of Rat Brain Glioma to Doxorubicin by Down-Regulating the Expressions of P-Glucoprotein and Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Ke; Bi, Yonghua; Yu, Guibo; Wang, Siwei; Qi, Xun; Zhong, Hongshan

    2013-01-01

    The overall prognosis for malignant glioma is extremely poor, and treatment options are limited in part because of multidrug resistant proteins. Our previous findings suggest low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) can induce apoptosis of glioma cells. Given this finding, we were interested in determining if LIUS could help treat glioma by inhibiting multidrug resistant proteins, and if so, which pathways are involved. In this study, the toxicity sensitivity and multidrug resistance proteins of glioma induced by LIUS were investigated using CCK-8, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorency, and RT-PCR in tissue samples and cultured cells. LIUS inhibited increase of C6 cells in an intensity- and time-dependent manner. The toxicity sensitivity of C6 cells increased significantly after LIUS sonication (intensity of 142.0 mW/cm2) or Doxorubicin (DOX) at different concentration, particularly by the combination of LIUS sonication and DOX. The expressions of P-gp and MRP1 decreased significantly post-sonication at intensity of 142.0 mW/cm2 both in vitro and in vivo. The expressions of p110 delta (PI3K), NF-κB-p65, Akt/PKB, and p-Akt/PKB were downregulated by LIUS sonication and DOX treatment separately or in combination at the same parameters in rat glioma. These results indicate that LIUS could increase the toxicity sensitivity of glioma by down-regulating the expressions of P-gp and MRP1, which might be mediated by the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway. PMID:23940624

  12. Hyperammonemia enhances the function and expression of P-glycoprotein and Mrp2 at the blood-brain barrier through NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Mian; Sun, Binbin; Li, Ying; Xu, Ping; Liu, Can; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia is considered to be the main neurotoxin responsible for hepatic encephalopathy resulting from liver failure. Liver failure has been reported to alter expression and activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of this study was to investigate whether ammonia is involved in abnormalities of expression and activity of P-gp and Mrp2 at the BBB. Hyperammonemic rats were developed by an intraperitoneal injection of ammonium acetate (NH4 Ac, 4.5 mmol/kg). Results showed that Mrp2 function markedly increased in cortex and hippocampus of rats at 6 h following NH4 Ac administration. Significant increase in function of P-gp was observed in hippocampus of rats. Meanwhile, such alterations were in line with the increase in mRNA and protein levels of P-gp and Mrp2. Significant increase in levels of nuclear amount of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 was also observed. Primarily cultured rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (rBMECs) were used for in vitro study. Data indicated that 24 h exposure to ammonia significantly increased function and expression of P-gp and Mrp2 in rBMECs, accompanied with activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, such alterations induced by ammonia were reversed by NF-κB inhibitor. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that hyperammonemia increases the function and expression of P-gp and Mrp2 at the BBB via activating NF-κB pathway. Hyperammonemia, a proverbial main factor responsible for neurocognitive disorder and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction resulting from liver failure, could increase the expression and activity of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) at the BBB both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the NF-κB activation stimulated by hyperammonemia may be the potential mechanism underlying such abnormalities induced by hyperammonemia. PMID:25200138

  13. Alterations in function and expression of ABC transporters at blood-brain barrier under diabetes and the clinical significances

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a systematic metabolic disease, which often develops a number of well-recognized vascular complications including brain complications which may partly result from the dysfunction of blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB is generally considered as a mechanism for protecting the brain from unwanted actions resulting from substances in the blood and maintaining brain homeostasis via monitoring the entry or efflux of compounds. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters including P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and breast cancer-related protein (BCRP), widely expressed in the luminal membrane of the microvessel endothelium and in the apical membrane of the choroids plexus epithelium, play important roles in the function of BBB. However, these transporters are easily altered by some diseases. The present article was focused on the alteration in expression and function of both P-GP and BCRP at BBB by diabetes and the clinical significances. PMID:25540622

  14. Transient Protein Expression by Agroinfiltration in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; McNulty, Alyssa; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Lai, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Current systems of recombinant protein production include bacterial, insect, and mammalian cell culture. However, these platforms are expensive to build and operate at commercial scales and/or have limited abilities to produce complex proteins. In recent years, plant-based expression systems have become top candidates for the production of recombinant proteins as they are highly scalable, robust, safe, and can produce complex proteins due to having a eukaryotic endomembrane system. Newly developed "deconstructed" viral vectors delivered via Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agroinfiltration) have enabled robust plant-based production of proteins with a wide range of applications. The leafy Lactuca sativa (lettuce) plant with its strong foundation in agriculture is an excellent host for pharmaceutical protein production. Here, we describe a method for agroinfiltration of lettuce that can rapidly produce high levels of recombinant proteins in a matter of days and has the potential to be scaled up to an agricultural level. PMID:26614281

  15. Biotechnology Protein Expression and Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Project Scientist Core Facility is to provide purified proteins, both recombinant and natural, to the Biotechnology Science Team Project Scientists and the NRA-Structural Biology Test Investigators. Having a core facility for this purpose obviates the need for each scientist to develop the necessary expertise and equipment for molecular biology, protein expression, and protein purification. Because of this, they are able to focus their energies as well as their funding on the crystallization and structure determination of their target proteins.

  16. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  17. Occludin immunolocalization and protein expression in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Chasiotis, Helen; Kelly, Scott P

    2008-05-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an integral component of models illustrating ion transport mechanisms across fish epithelia; however, little is known about TJ proteins in fishes. Using immunohistochemical methods and Western blot analysis, we examined the localization and expression of occludin, a transmembrane TJ protein, in goldfish tissues. In goldfish gills, discontinuous occludin immunostaining was detected along the edges of secondary gill lamellae and within parts of the interlamellar region that line the lateral walls of the central venous sinus. In the goldfish intestine, occludin immunolocalized in a TJ-specific distribution pattern to apical regions of columnar epithelial cells lining the intestinal lumen. In the goldfish kidney, occludin was differentially expressed in discrete regions of the nephron. Occludin immunostaining was strongest in the distal segment of the nephron, moderate in the collecting duct and absent in the proximal segment. To investigate a potential role for occludin in the maintenance of the hydromineral balance of fishes, we subjected goldfish to 1, 2 and 4 weeks of food deprivation, and then examined the endpoints of hydromineral status, Na+,K+-ATPase activity and occludin protein expression in the gills, intestine and kidney. Occludin expression altered in response to hydromineral imbalance in a tissue-specific manner suggesting a dynamic role for this TJ protein in the regulation of epithelial permeability in fishes. PMID:18456879

  18. p53 and P-glycoprotein are often co-expressed and are associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Linn, S. C.; Honkoop, A. H.; Hoekman, K.; van der Valk, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Giaccone, G.

    1996-01-01

    Expression of both P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and mutant p53 have recently been reported to be associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer. The expression of P-gp is associated in vitro and in vivo with cross-resistance to several anti-cancer drugs. p53 plays a regulatory role in apoptosis, and mutant p53 has been suggested to be involved in drug resistance. Interestingly, in vitro experiments have shown that mutant p53 can activate the promoter of the MDR1 gene, which encodes P-gp. We investigated whether p53 and P-gp are simultaneously expressed in primary breast cancer cells and analysed the impact of the co-expression on patients prognosis. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate P-gp expression (JSB-1, C219) and nuclear p53 accumulation (DO-7) in 20 operable chemotherapy untreated and 30 locally advanced breast cancers undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide. Double immunostaining showed that P-gp expression and nuclear p53 accumulation often occur concomitantly in the same tumour cells. A correlation between p53 and P-gp expression was found in all 50 breast cancers (P = 0.003; Fisher's exact test). P-gp expression, nuclear p53 accumulation, and co-expression of p53 and P-gp were more frequently observed in locally advanced breast cancers than in operable breast cancers (P = 0.0004, P = 0.048; P = 0.002 respectively. Fisher's exact test). Co-expression of p53 and P-gp was the strongest prognostic factor for shorter survival by multivariate analysis (P = 0.004) in the group of locally advanced breast cancers (univariate analysis: P = 0.0007). Only 3 out of 13 samples sequentially taken before and after chemotherapy displayed a change in P-gp or p53 staining. In conclusion, nuclear p53 accumulation is often associated with P-gp expression in primary breast cancer, and simultaneous expression of p53 and P-gp is associated with shorter survival in locally advanced breast cancer patients. Co-expression of P-gp and mutant p53 belong to a series of molecular events resulting in a more aggressive phenotype, drug resistance and poor prognosis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8679460

  19. Expression, purification, and crystallisationof membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Bernadette

    Approximately, 29,000 protein structures are deposited in the Protein Databank (January 2005), but only about 90 of which are independent membrane protein structures. This represents a significant increase in knowledge compared with a matter of only 5 years ago when a mere handful of membrane protein structures were available. Despite the advances, our understanding of the structure-function relationships and mechanism of action of many membrane proteins is still lacking. This is particularly true of many of the more clinically relevant membrane proteins, such as the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The GPCRs regulate cellular responses to a wide range of biologically active molecules including hormones and drugs and are thus important targets for therapeutic intervention in a number of disease states. However, the increasing number of membrane protein structures has provided a critical mass of information which has yielded a more rational approach to the process of obtaining diffraction quality crystals. It is the different stages of this process; expression, solubilisation, purification, and crystallisation that will be covered in this lecture.

  20. Cultured CD4T cells and primary human lymphocytes express hOATPs: intracellular accumulation of saquinavir and lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Janneh, O; Hartkoorn, R C; Jones, E; Owen, A; Ward, S A; Davey, R; Back, D J; Khoo, S H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Drug efflux tranporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)) limit the cellular uptake of human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors but the contribution of influx transporters in cells that (over)express P-gp or MRP is less clear. Here, we studied the expression of one influx transporter system, human organic anion-transporting polypeptide (hOATP), in some T-cell lines (CEM, CEMVBL, CEME1000) and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and examined the effects of manipulation of influx/efflux transporters on the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir. Experimental approach: The expression of hOATPs was studied by PCR. We used hOATP substrate or inhibitor (estrone-3-sulphate (E-3-S) or montelukast, respectively) and inhibitors of P-gp (XR9576) and MRP (MK571 and frusemide) to study functional interactions between influx and efflux transporters in the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir. Lipophilicity of the drugs was measured by octanol/saline partition coefficient. Key results: CEM cells, their variants and PBMCs express various hOATP isoforms, with OATP3A1 detected in all of the cells. MK571, XR9576 and frusemide increased the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir. E-3-S and montelukast reduced the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir in some, but not all, of the cells. Pretreatment of the cells with MK571, XR9576 or frusemide, followed by E-3-S co-incubation reduced the cellular accumulation of saquinavir and lopinavir. Lopinavir is much more lipophilic than saquinavir. Conclusions and implications: Human OATPs, MRP, P-gp and lipophilicity determine the cellular uptake and retention of saquinavir and lopinavir. These data may have important implications for drug–drug interactions, drug safety and efficacy. PMID:19002102

  1. Engineering Genes for Predictable Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon; Villalobos, Alan; Welch, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The DNA sequence used to encode a polypeptide can have dramatic effects on its expression. Lack of readily available tools has until recently inhibited meaningful experimental investigation of this phenomenon. Advances in synthetic biology and the application of modern engineering approaches now provide the tools for systematic analysis of the sequence variables affecting heterologous expression of recombinant proteins. We here discuss how these new tools are being applied and how they circumvent the constraints of previous approaches, highlighting some of the surprising and promising results emerging from the developing field of gene engineering. PMID:22425659

  2. Protein kinase C control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ventura, C; Maioli, M

    2001-01-01

    Gene expression is fashioned at multiple interconnected levels and is controlled by a complex interplay between nucleosomal assembly, the establishment of multifaceted transcriptional motifs, and the temporal and spatial organization of chromatin in loops and domains. Protein phosphorylation is one of the most versatile posttranslational modifications used in eukaryotic cells and plays a crucial role in the continuous remodeling of different transcriptional regulators. The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine-threonine kinases encompasses 12 different isozymes that have been shown to transduce a myriad of signals mediated by phospholipid hydrolysis as a consequence of the activation of G protein-coupled receptors, tyrosine kinase receptors, and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Although the analysis of PKC activity in many systems has provided crucial insights to its biological function, unraveling the molecular mechanisms that underlie isozyme-specific modulation of gene expression within the complexity of genome structure and function remains a challenging issue. This review focuses on recent advances in PKC-dependent regulation of gene expression within the context of the dynamic linkages involving nuclear architecture and transcription. Implications of isozyme-specific phosphorylation of selected members of transcription factors are also discussed. Future perspectives disclosed by recently available methods for large-scale transcriptional profiling are also outlined. PMID:11693964

  3. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth. PMID:24984624

  4. Tumor endothelial expression of P-glycoprotein upon microvesicular transfer of TrpC5 derived from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, YePing; Pan, QiongXi; Jiang, Li; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, FangFang; Liu, YanJun; Xing, Hui; Shi, Mei; Li, Jiao; Li, XiYuan; Zhu, YaoDan; Chen, Yun; Bruce, Iain C.; Jin, Jian Ma, Xin

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TrpC5 was mainly accumulated in microvesicles of drug-resistant MCF-7/ADM cells. • Microvesicles from MCF-7/ADM transferred TrpC5 to endothelial cells. • TrpC5 inhibition reduced P-glycoprotein accumulation on tumor blood vessels in vivo. - Abstract: Treatment of carcinoma commonly fails due to chemoresistance. Studies have shown that endothelial cells acquire resistance via the tumor microenvironment. Microvesicle (MV) shedding from the cell membrane to the microenvironment plays an important role in communication between cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MCF-7 adriamycin-resistant cells (MCF-7/ADM) shed MVs that alter the characteristics of human microvessel endothelial cells (HMECs). MVs from tumor cells transferred a Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channel TrpC5 to HMECs, inducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by activation of the transcription factor NFATc3 (nuclear factor of activated T cells isoform c3). Expression of the mdr1 gene was blocked by the TrpC5-blocking antibody T5E3, and the production of P-gp in HMECs was reduced by blockade of TrpC5. Thus, we postulate that endothelial cells acquire the resistant protein upon exposure to TrpC5-containg MVs in the microenvironment, and express P-gp in the TrpC5–NFATc3 signal pathway.

  5. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  6. Alternative Strategies for Expressing Multicomponent Protein Complexes in Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Expression of recombinant proteins in insect cells infected with baculoviruses is commonplace. This system provides an easy way to generate a significant amount of properly folded, functional protein with proper posttranslational modifications and can be used to effectively produce multi-protein complexes. This chapter describes an alternative method of expressing high order protein complexes in insect cell culture. Specific examples involving the expression of 5- and 8-protein complexes are discussed. PMID:26820865

  7. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  8. Multiple efflux pumps are involved in the transepithelial transport of colchicine: combined effect of p-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 leads to decreased intestinal absorption throughout the entire small intestine.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Sabit, Hairat; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to thoroughly characterize the efflux transporters involved in the intestinal permeability of the oral microtubule polymerization inhibitor colchicine and to evaluate the role of these transporters in limiting its oral absorption. The effects of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) inhibitors on colchicine bidirectional permeability were studied across Caco-2 cell monolayers, inhibiting one versus multiple transporters simultaneously. Colchicine permeability was then investigated in different regions of the rat small intestine by in situ single-pass perfusion. Correlation with the P-gp/MRP2 expression level throughout different intestinal segments was investigated by immunoblotting. P-gp inhibitors [N-(4-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-isoquinolinyl)ethyl]-phenyl)-9,10-dihydro-5-methoxy-9-oxo-4-acridine carboxamide (GF120918), verapamil, and quinidine], and MRP2 inhibitors [3-[[3-[2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenyl]-(2-dimethylcarbamoylethylsulfanyl)methylsulfanyl] propionic acid (MK571), indomethacin, and p-aminohippuric acid (p-AH)] significantly increased apical (AP)-basolateral (BL) and decreased BL-AP Caco-2 transport in a concentration-dependent manner. No effect was obtained by the BCRP inhibitors fumitremorgin C (FTC) and pantoprazole. P-gp/MRP2 inhibitors combinations greatly reduced colchicine mucosal secretion, including complete abolishment of efflux (GF120918/MK571). Colchicine displayed low (versus metoprolol) and constant permeability along the rat small-intestine. GF120918 significantly increased colchicine permeability in the ileum with no effect in the jejunum, whereas MK571 augmented jejunal permeability without changing the ileal transport. The GF120918/MK571 combination caused an effect similar to that of MK571 alone in the jejunum and to that of GF120918 alone in the ileum. P-gp expression followed a gradient increasing from proximal to distal segments, whereas MRP2 decreased from proximal to distal small intestinal regions. Overall, it was revealed that the combined effect of P-gp and MRP2, but not BCRP, dominates colchicine transepithelial transport, leading to complete coverage of the entire small intestine, and makes the efflux transport dominate the intestinal permeability process. PMID:19589874

  9. The Effects of Cetirizine on P-glycoprotein Expression and Function In vitro and In situ

    PubMed Central

    Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishekar, Hamed; Mohammadnejad, Leila; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a major role in oral absorption of drugs. Induction or inhibition of P-gp by drugs contributes to variability of its transport activity and often results in clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cetirizine, a second generation H1 antihistamine, on P-gp function and expression in vitro and in situ. Methods: The in-vitro rhodamin-123 (Rho123) efflux assay in Caco-2 cells was used to study the effect of cetirizine on P-gp function. Western blot analysis was used for surveying the effect of cetirizine on expression of P-gp in Caco-2 cells. Rat in situ single-pass intestinal permeability technique was used to calculate the intestinal permeability of a known P-gp substrate (digoxin) in the presence of cetirizine. The amounts of digoxin and cetirizine in intestinal perfusion samples were analyzed using a HPLC method. Results: The results showed significant increase in Rho123 uptake (P < 0.05) and also P-gp band intensity decrease in cetirizine-treated cells in vitro. Furthermore the intestinal permeability of digoxin was also increased significantly in the presence of cetirizine (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Therefore it is concluded that cetirizine is a P-gp inhibitor and this should be considered in co administration of cetrizine with other P-gp substrate drugs. Further investigations are required to confirm our results and to determine the mechanism underlying P-gp inhibition by cetirizine.

  10. Biochemical interaction of anti-HCV telaprevir with the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/ABCB1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ABCG2 are involved in the intestinal absorption and renal excretion of various substrate drugs. Their activities affect sub-therapeutic drug concentrations and excretion of natural transporter substrates. The new oral anti-HCV drug telaprevir has dramatically improved the efficacy of hepatitis-C virus (HCV) treatment, and recent studies have suggested a possible pharmacological interaction between telaprevir and P-gp. We studied the kinetics of in vitro interactions between telaprevir and P-gp and BCRP to understand the molecular basis of that interaction. Findings The effect of telaprevir on P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport was evaluated by an in vitro vesicle transporter assay using different transport substrates, and the kinetics of transporter inhibition was determined. The results showed that telaprevir could inhibit P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport in the in vitro vesicle transport assay, with each IC50 values of ≈ 7 μmol/L and ≈ 30 μmol/L, respectively. Analyses of Lineweaver–Burk plots showed that telaprevir was likely to be a competitive inhibitor against P-gp and BCRP. Photoaffinity labeling experiments were employed to observe competitive inhibition by telaprevir using iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) as a binding substrate for P-gp and BCRP. These experiments revealed that telaprevir inhibited [125I]-IAAP-binding with P-gp and BCRP. Conclusion Telaprevir competitively inhibited P-gp and BCRP, and P-gp-mediated transport was more sensitive to telaprevir compared with BCRP-mediated transport. These data suggest that telaprevir represses the transporter functions of P-gp and BCRP via direct inhibition. PMID:24196382

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana SEPALLATA3 protein prokaryotic expression and purification.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Fu, A Y; Zhang, G C; Li, T J; Zhang, J H

    2015-01-01

    SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) can be attributed to E class gene of the ABCE model of floral organ development. In order to reveal how SEP3 proteins form polymers, and the relationship between the polymers and their biological functions, the experiments of Arabidopsis thaliana AtSEP3 protein soluble expression in vitro were performed to construct a vector of prokaryotic expression, and investigate induced expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The protein soluble expression was analyzed through the aspects of different protein domains, induction time, induction temperature, etc. Different structural domains and expression conditions were screened, and 0.1% IPTG inducing at 22 oC for 15 h was estimated as an optimal expression strategy. The nickel chelating resin was used to purify the protein in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the results indicated that AtSEP3 protein was present in the form of tetramer. PMID:26025404

  12. Using the BacMam Baculovirus System to Study Expression and Function of Recombinant Efflux Drug Transporters in Polarized Epithelial Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Fung, King Leung; Kapoor, Khyati; Pixley, Jessica N.; Talbert, Darrell J.; Kwit, Alexandra D.T.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily includes several membrane-bound proteins that are critical to drug pharmacokinetics and disposition. Pharmacologic evaluation of these proteins in vitro remains a challenge. In this study, human ABC transporters were expressed in polarized epithelial cell monolayers transduced using the BacMam baculovirus gene transfer system. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of BacMam baculovirus to transduce cells grown in monolayers. In a porcine kidney cell line, LLC-PK1 cells, baculoviral transduction is successful only via the apical side of a polarized monolayer. We observed that recombinant ABC transporters were expressed on the cell surface with post-translational modification. Furthermore, sodium butyrate played a critical role in recombinant protein expression, and preincubation in the presence of tunicamycin or thapsigargin enhanced protein expression. Cells overexpressing human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) showed vectorial basolateral-to-apical transport of [3H]-paclitaxel, which could be reversed by the inhibitor tariquidar. Similarly, coexpression of human P-gp and ABCG2 in LLC-PK1 cells resulted in higher transport of mitoxantrone, which is a substrate for both transporters, than in either P-gp– or ABCG2-expressing cells alone. Taken together, our results indicate that a high level of expression of efflux transporters in a polarized cell monolayer is technically feasible with the BacMam baculovirus system PMID:26622052

  13. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  14. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  15. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  16. HeLa Based Cell Free Expression Systems for Expression of Plasmodium Rhoptry Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Raghavendra; Sam-Yellowe, Tobili

    2015-01-01

    Malaria causes significant global morbidity and mortality. No routine vaccine is currently available. One of the major reasons for lack of a vaccine is the challenge of identifying suitable vaccine candidates. Malarial proteins expressed using prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell based expression systems are poorly glycosylated, generally insoluble and undergo improper folding leading to reduced immunogenicity. The wheat germ, rabbit reticulocyte lysate and Escherichia coli lysate cell free expression systems are currently used for expression of malarial proteins. However, the length of expression time and improper glycosylation of proteins still remains a challenge. We demonstrate expression of Plasmodium proteins in vitro using HeLa based cell free expression systems, termed "in vitro human cell free expression systems". The 2 HeLa based cell free expression systems transcribe mRNA in 75 min and 3 µl of transcribed mRNA is sufficient to translate proteins in 90 min. The 1-step expression system is a transcription and translation coupled expression system; the transcription and co-translation occurs in 3 hr. The process can also be extended for 6 hr by providing additional energy. In the 2-step expression system, mRNA is first transcribed and then added to the translation mix for protein expression. We describe how to express malaria proteins; a hydrophobic PF3D7_0114100 Maurer's Cleft - 2 transmembrane (PfMC-2TM) protein, a hydrophilic PF3D7_0925900 protein and an armadillo repeats containing protein PF3D7_1361800, using the HeLa based cell free expression system. The proteins are expressed in micro volumes employing 2-step and 1-step expression strategies. An affinity purification method to purify 25 µl of proteins expressed using the in vitro human cell free expression system is also described. Protein yield is determined by Bradford's assay and the expressed and purified proteins can be confirmed by western blotting analysis. Expressed recombinant proteins can be used for immunizations, immunoassays and protein sequencing. PMID:26131624

  17. Proteomics beyond large-scale protein expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Boersema, Paul J; Kahraman, Abdullah; Picotti, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Proteomics is commonly referred to as the application of high-throughput approaches to protein expression analysis. Typical results of proteomics studies are inventories of the protein content of a sample or lists of differentially expressed proteins across multiple conditions. Recently, however, an explosion of novel proteomics workflows has significantly expanded proteomics beyond the analysis of protein expression. Targeted proteomics methods, for example, enable the analysis of the fine dynamics of protein systems, such as a specific pathway or a network of interacting proteins, and the determination of protein complex stoichiometries. Structural proteomics tools allow extraction of restraints for structural modeling and identification of structurally altered proteins on a proteome-wide scale. Other variations of the proteomic workflow can be applied to the large-scale analysis of protein activity, location, degradation and turnover. These exciting developments provide new tools for multi-level 'omics' analysis and for the modeling of biological networks in the context of systems biology studies. PMID:25636126

  18. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-11-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in H-?N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis. PMID:20844927

  19. Regulation of hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by organochlorine pesticides.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Simon; Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Fardel, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Organochlorine (OC) pesticides constitute a major class of persistent and toxic organic pollutants, known to modulate drug-detoxifying enzymes. In the present study, OCs were demonstrated to also alter the activity and expression of human hepatic drug transporters. Activity of the sinusoidal influx transporter OCT1 (organic cation transporter 1) was thus inhibited by endosulfan, chlordane, heptachlor, lindane, and dieldrine, but not by dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane isomers, whereas those of the canalicular efflux pumps MRP2 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 2) and BCRP (breast cancer resistance protein) were blocked by endosulfan, chlordane, heptachlor, and chlordecone; this latter OC additionally inhibited the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity. OCs, except endosulfan, were next found to induce MDR1/P-gp and MRP2 mRNA expressions in hepatoma HepaRG cells; some of them also upregulated BCRP. By contrast, expression of sinusoidal transporters was not impaired (organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 and OATP2B1) or was downregulated (sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and OCT1). Such regulations of drug transporter activity and expression, depending on the respective nature of OCs and transporters, may contribute to the toxicity of OC pesticides. PMID:24464585

  20. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  1. Transient Expression of Viral Proteins in Plants Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hitzeroth, Inga I; van Zyl, Albertha R

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of viral proteins in plants is a novel alternative to other expression platforms. The viral proteins can be used as potential vaccines or in diagnostics. Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or whole plants are infiltrated with recombinant Agrobacterium that harbor the gene of interest. Protein expression in the plants is rapid and results are obtained within 2-7 days. Here we describe how to make electrocompetent Agrobacterium, how to transform Agrobacterium, how to infiltrate leaves or plants with the recombinant Agrobacterium, and lastly how to extract the protein for analysis by gel electrophoresis. PMID:27076324

  2. Vectors for the expression of tagged proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Craven, R A; Griffiths, D J; Sheldrick, K S; Randall, R E; Hagan, I M; Carr, A M

    1998-10-01

    A series of vectors is described which enables the episomal expression of proteins fused to different tag sequences in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Proteins can be expressed with their amino termini fused to GFP/EGFP, three copies of the HA or Pk epitopes or a combined tag which contains two copies of the myc epitope and six histidine residues (MH). Fusion of the carboxyl terminus of a protein to a tag is possible with GFP/EGFP or Pk. Expression of the fusion proteins is controlled by the medium strength mutant version of the regulatable nmt1 promoter. PMID:9852950

  3. Pannexin 2 protein expression is not restricted to the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Le Vasseur, Maxence; Lelowski, Jonathan; Bechberger, John F.; Sin, Wun-Chey; Naus, Christian C.

    2014-01-01

    Pannexins (Panx) are proteins homologous to the invertebrate gap junction proteins called innexins (Inx) and are traditionally described as transmembrane channels connecting the intracellular and extracellular compartments. Three distinct Panx paralogs (Panx1, Panx2 and Panx3) have been identified in vertebrates but previous reports on Panx expression and functionality focused primarily on Panx1 and Panx3 proteins. Several gene expression studies reported that Panx2 transcript is largely restricted to the central nervous system (CNS) hence suggesting that Panx2 might serve an important role in the CNS. However, the lack of suitable antibodies prevented the creation of a comprehensive map of Panx2 protein expression and Panx2 protein localization profile is currently mostly inferred from the distribution of its transcript. In this study, we characterized novel commercial monoclonal antibodies and surveyed Panx2 expression and distribution at the mRNA and protein level by real-time qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Panx2 protein levels were readily detected in every tissue examined, even when transcriptional analysis predicted very low Panx2 protein expression. Furthermore, our results indicate that Panx2 transcriptional activity is a poor predictor of Panx2 protein abundance and does not correlate with Panx2 protein levels. Despite showing disproportionately high transcript levels, the CNS expressed less Panx2 protein than any other tissues analyzed. Additionally, we showed that Panx2 protein does not localize at the plasma membrane like other gap junction proteins but remains confined within cytoplasmic compartments. Overall, our results demonstrate that the endogenous expression of Panx2 protein is not restricted to the CNS and is more ubiquitous than initially predicted. PMID:25505382

  4. A highly efficient pipeline for protein expression in Leishmania tarentolae using infrared fluorescence protein as marker

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Leishmania tarentolae, a unicellular eukaryotic protozoan, has been established as a novel host for recombinant protein production in recent years. Current protocols for protein expression in Leishmania are, however, time consuming and require extensive lab work in order to identify well-expressing cell lines. Here we established an alternative protein expression work-flow that employs recently engineered infrared fluorescence protein (IFP) as a suitable and easy-to-handle reporter protein for recombinant protein expression in Leishmania. As model proteins we tested three proteins from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, including a NAC and a type-B ARR transcription factor. Results IFP and IFP fusion proteins were expressed in Leishmania and rapidly detected in cells by deconvolution microscopy and in culture by infrared imaging of 96-well microtiter plates using small cell culture volumes (2 μL - 100 μL). Motility, shape and growth of Leishmania cells were not impaired by intracellular accumulation of IFP. In-cell detection of IFP and IFP fusion proteins was straightforward already at the beginning of the expression pipeline and thus allowed early pre-selection of well-expressing Leishmania clones. Furthermore, IFP fusion proteins retained infrared fluorescence after electrophoresis in denaturing SDS-polyacrylamide gels, allowing direct in-gel detection without the need to disassemble cast protein gels. Thus, parameters for scaling up protein production and streamlining purification routes can be easily optimized when employing IFP as reporter. Conclusions Using IFP as biosensor we devised a protocol for rapid and convenient protein expression in Leishmania tarentolae. Our expression pipeline is superior to previously established methods in that it significantly reduces the hands-on-time and work load required for identifying well-expressing clones, refining protein production parameters and establishing purification protocols. The facile in-cell and in-gel detection tools built on IFP make Leishmania amenable for high-throughput expression of proteins from plant and animal sources. PMID:20459748

  5. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B.; Patel, Trushar R.; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  6. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B; Patel, Trushar R; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  7. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  8. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  9. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  10. Evolution, diversification, and expression of KNOX proteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yang, Xue; Zhao, Wei; Lang, Tiange; Samuelsson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    The KNOX (KNOTTED1-like homeobox) transcription factors play a pivotal role in leaf and meristem development. The majority of these proteins are characterized by the KNOX1, KNOX2, ELK, and homeobox domains whereas the proteins of the KNATM family contain only the KNOX domains. We carried out an extensive inventory of these proteins and here report on a total of 394 KNOX proteins from 48 species. The land plant proteins fall into two classes (I and II) as previously shown where the class I family seems to be most closely related to the green algae homologs. The KNATM proteins are restricted to Eudicots and some species have multiple paralogs of this protein. Certain plants are characterized by a significant increase in the number of KNOX paralogs; one example is Glycine max. Through the analysis of public gene expression data we show that the class II proteins of this plant have a relatively broad expression specificity as compared to class I proteins, consistent with previous studies of other plants. In G. max, class I protein are mainly distributed in axis tissues and KNATM paralogs are overall poorly expressed; highest expression is in the early plumular axis. Overall, analysis of gene expression in G. max demonstrates clearly that the expansion in gene number is associated with functional diversification. PMID:26557129

  11. Engineering Cells to Improve Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Su; Shiloach, Joseph; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular engineering of bacteria, fungi, insect cells and mammalian cells is a promising methodology to improve recombinant protein production for structural, biochemical, and commercial applications. Increased understanding of the host organism biology has suggested engineering strategies targeting bottlenecks in transcription, translation, protein processing and secretory pathways, as well as cell growth and survival. A combination of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology has been used to improve the properties of cells for protein production, which has resulted in enhanced yields of multiple protein classes. PMID:24704806

  12. Expression of Recombinant Proteins in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Maria; Taupp, Marcus; Hallam, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein expression in the microbial eukaryotic host Pichia pastoris offers the possibility to generate high amounts of recombinant protein in a fast and easy to use expression system. As a single-celled microorganism P. pastoris is easy to manipulate and grows rapidly on inexpensive media at high cell densities. Being a eukaryote, P. pastoris is able to perform many of the post-translational modifications performed by higher eukaryotic cells and the obtained recombinant proteins undergo protein folding, proteolytic processing, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation [1]. As a methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris is capable of metabolizing methanol as its sole carbon source. The strong promoter for alcohol oxidase, AOX1, is tightly regulated and induced by methanol and it is used for the expression of the gene of interest. Accordingly, the expression of the foreign protein can be induced by adding methanol to the growth medium [2; 3]. Another important advantage is the secretion of the recombinant protein into the growth medium, using a signal sequence to target the foreign protein to the secretory pathway of P. pastoris. With only low levels of endogenous protein secreted to the media by the yeast itself and no added proteins to the media, a heterologous protein builds the majority of the total protein in the medium and facilitates following protein purification steps [3; 4]. The vector used here (pPICZαA) contains the AOX1 promoter for tightly regulated, methanol-induced expression of the gene of interest; the α-factor secretion signal for secretion of the recombinant protein, a Zeocin resistance gene for selection in both E. coli and Pichia and a C-terminal peptide containing the c-myc epitope and a polyhistidine (6xHis) tag for detection and purification of a recombinant protein. We also show western blot analysis of the recombinant protein using the specific Anti-myc-HRP antibody recognizing the c-myc epitope on the parent vector. PMID:20186119

  13. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  14. Differential protein expression analysis following olfactory learning in Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Zhen; Yan, Wei-Yu; Wang, Zi-Long; Guo, Ya-Hui; Yi, Yao; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zeng, Zhi-Jiang

    2015-11-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in honeybees have helped to elucidate the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. In this study, protein expression changes following olfactory learning in Apis cerana were investigated using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology. A total of 2406 proteins were identified from the trained and untrained groups. Among these proteins, 147 were differentially expressed, with 87 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated in the trained group compared with the untrained group. These results suggest that the differentially expressed proteins may be involved in the regulation of olfactory learning and memory in A. cerana. The iTRAQ data can provide information on the global protein expression patterns associated with olfactory learning, which will facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory of honeybees. PMID:26427996

  15. Timosaponin A-III reverses multi-drug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells via downregulation of MDR1 and MRP1 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Ru; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Hong; Yi, Ying-Jie; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie

    2016-05-01

    One of the major causes of failure in chemotherapy for patients with human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is the acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR is often associated with the overexpression of drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family. Timosaponin A-III (TAIII), a saponin isolated from the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides, has previously demonstrated the ability to suppress certain human tumor processes and the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent. Nevertheless, the ability of TAIII to reverse MDR has not yet been explored. In this study, the adriamycin (ADM) resistance reversal effect of TAIII in human CML K562/ADM cells and the underlying mechanism was investigated. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay showed that TAIII had a reversal effect on the drug resistance of K562/ADM cells. Flow cytometry assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of ADM after cells were pretreated with TAIII, and the changes in the accumulation of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) dye in K562/ADM cells were determined to be similar to the changes of intracellular accumulation of ADM. After pretreatment of cells with TAIII, the decreasing expression of P-gp and MRP1 mRNA was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blotting showed TAIII inhibiting P-gp and MRP1 expression depended on the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by decreasing the activity of p-Akt. Moreover, wortmannin an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a strong inhibitory effect on the expression of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Besides, the combined treatment with TAIII did not have an affect on wortmannin downregulation of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TAIII induced MDR reversal through inhibition of P-gp and MRP1 expression and function with regained adriamycin sensitivity which might mainly correlate to the regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:26984633

  16. Expression screening of membrane proteins with cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Linnéa; Enberg, Johan; Neutze, Richard; Göran Karlsson, B; Pedersen, Anders

    2012-03-01

    Detailed biophysical studies of integral membrane proteins are often hampered by sample preparation difficulties. Membrane proteins are typically difficult to express in sufficient amounts to enable the use of demanding techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography for structural biology. Here, we show that an inexpensive batch-based cell-free expression system can be a viable alternative for production of a wide range of different membrane proteins, both of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Out of 38 tested protein constructs, 37 express at levels suitable for structural biology, i.e. enough to produce several milligrams of protein routinely and without excessive costs. This success rate was not anticipated and is even more impressive considering that more than half of the expressed proteins where of mammalian origin. A detergent screen identified Brij-58 as the, in general, most successful choice for co-translational solubilization of the expressed proteins. PMID:22270086

  17. Rapid expression screening of eukaryotic membrane proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Cory L; Morrison, Melissa; Joanne Lemieux, M

    2013-04-01

    The overexpression of milligram quantities of protein remains a key bottleneck in membrane protein structural biology. A challenge of particular difficulty has been the overproduction of eukaryotic membrane proteins. In order to cope with the frequently poor expression levels associated with these challenging proteins, it is often necessary to screen a large number of homologues to find a well expressing clone. To facilitate this process using the heterologous, eukaryotic expression host Pichia pastoris, we have developed a simple fluorescent induction plate-screening assay that allows for the rapid detection of well expressing clones of eukaryotic membrane proteins that have been fused to GFP. Using a eukaryotic membrane protein known to express well in P. pastoris (human aquaporin 4) and homologues of the ER associated membrane protein phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT), we demonstrate that when a large number of clones are screened, a small number of highly expressing "jackpot" clones can be isolated. A jackpot PEMT clone resulted in 5 mg/L yield after purification. The method allows for the facile simultaneous screening of hundreds of clones providing an alternate to in-culture screening and will greatly accelerate the search for overexpressing eukaryotic membrane proteins. PMID:23339074

  18. SMAD4 protein expression and cell proliferation in colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Olschwang, Sylviane; Fléjou, Jean-François

    2011-11-01

    The TGFβ signalling pathway is a growth inhibitor system that operates in both normal and tumour cells. Alterations to components of this pathway, including SMAD4, result in resistance to growth inhibition and uncontrolled proliferation. The aim of this study was to analyse the relationships between SMAD4, a key protein in the growth-inhibiting TGFβ pathway; cell proliferation proteins Ki67, p27 and S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2); and mismatch repair (MMR) proteins as well as prognostic indicators in colorectal adenocarcinomas. A series of 230 sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas were studied using tissue microarrays by immunohistochemistry for SMAD4, Ki67, p27, SKP2 and MMR protein (hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6) expression. Protein expression was analysed with respect to pathological prognostic criteria. Loss of SMAD4 nuclear expression (27/230, 12%) correlated with the presence of lymph node metastases, MMR protein expression and the absence of p27 in tumour cells (p = 0.04, p = 0.08 and p = 0.03, respectively). A high Ki67 index did not correlate with SMAD4 expression; however, it did correlate with moderate or poor histological differentiation, SKP2 expression and aberrant or absent MMR protein expression (p = 0.02, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, the results of our study suggest that the loss of SMAD4, occurring in 12% of colorectal adenocarcinomas, correlated with the presence of lymph node metastases and absence of p27 expression but not with high cellular proliferation. However, high proliferation correlated with SKP2 and aberrant MMR protein expression. Although the advantage of immunohistochemistry is high throughput, our results allow only an initial evaluation, and subsequent studies, including genetic analyses, are required. PMID:22002709

  19. Expression of foreign proteins in Escherichia coli by fusing with an archaeal FK506 binding protein.

    PubMed

    Ideno, A; Furutani, M; Iwabuchi, T; Iida, T; Iba, Y; Kurosawa, Y; Sakuraba, H; Ohshima, T; Kawarabayashi, Y; Maruyama, T

    2004-03-01

    Improper protein-folding often results in inclusion-body formation in a protein expression system using Escherichia coli. To express such proteins in the soluble fraction of E. coli cytoplasm, we developed an expression system by fusing the target protein with an archaeal FK506 binding protein (FKBP). It has been reported that an archaeal FKBP from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus sp. KS-1 (TcFKBP18), possesses not only peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, but also chaperone-like activity to enhance the refolding yield of an unfolded protein by suppressing irreversible protein aggregation. To study the effect of this fusion strategy with FKBP on the expression of foreign protein in E. coli, a putative rhodanese (thiosulfate sulfurtransferase) from a hyperthermophilic archaeon and two mouse antibody fragments were used as model target proteins. When they were expressed alone in E. coli, they formed insoluble aggregates. Their genes were designed to be expressed as a fusion protein by connecting them to the C-terminal end of TcFKBP18 with an oligopeptide containing a thrombin cleavage site. By fusing TcFKBP18, the expression of the target protein in the soluble fraction was significantly increased. The percentage of the soluble form in the expressed protein reached 10-28% of the host soluble proteins. After purification and protease digestion of the expressed antibody fragment-TcFKBP18 fusion protein, the cleaved antibody fragment (single-chain Fv) showed specific binding to the antigen in ELISA. This indicated that the expressed antibody fragment properly folded to the active form. PMID:14564491

  20. Chemometrics of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Lay-Chin; Dharmaraj, Saravanan; Gooi, Boon-Hui; Singh, Manjit; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues for differentiating cancer and normal tissues. METHODS: A Proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins between CRC and normal tissues. The proteins were extracted using Tris buffer and thiourea lysis buffer (TLB) for extraction of aqueous soluble and membrane-associated proteins, respectively. Chemometrics, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were used to assess the usefulness of these proteins for identifying the cancerous state of tissues. RESULTS: Differentially expressed proteins identified were 37 aqueous soluble proteins in Tris extracts and 24 membrane-associated proteins in TLB extracts. Based on the protein spots intensity on 2D-gel images, PCA by applying an eigenvalue > 1 was successfully used to reduce the number of principal components (PCs) into 12 and seven PCs for Tris and TLB extracts, respectively, and subsequently six PCs, respectively from both the extracts were used for LDA. The LDA classification for Tris extract showed 82.7% of original samples were correctly classified, whereas 82.7% were correctly classified for the cross-validated samples. The LDA for TLB extract showed that 78.8% of original samples and 71.2% of the cross-validated samples were correctly classified. CONCLUSION: The classification of CRC tissues by PCA and LDA provided a promising distinction between normal and cancer types. These methods can possibly be used for identification of potential biomarkers among the differentially expressed proteins identified. PMID:21547128

  1. DYSREGULATION OF PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA (PML) PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN PREECLAMPTIC PLACENTAE

    PubMed Central

    LEAVENWORTH, Jonathan D.; GROESCH, Kathleen A.; HU, Xin; MALM, Scott; TORRY, Ronald J.; ABRAMS, Robert; TORRY, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is a nucleoprotein that can regulate a variety of cellular stress responses. The aim of this study was to determine qualitative and quantitative changes in PML expression in preeclamptic placentae. Immunoblot, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry techniques were used to determine PML gene expression and localization in normal (n=6) and preeclamptic (n=6) placentae and primary cells. PML protein was immunolocalized within nuclei of villus mesenchyme, but largely absent in trophoblast nuclei, with a trend for increased PML reactivity in preeclamptic placenta. Immunoblot analyses of nuclear extracts confirmed relative increases (~3 fold) of PML expression in preeclamptic placentae (p<0.05). Conversely, less PML mRNA (~2 fold) was detected in preeclamptic versus normal placental samples. In vitro, PML expression could be increased by hypoxia in cultured endothelial cells but not trophoblast. Increased PML protein expression in preeclamptic villi suggests it could contribute to decreased vascularity and placental growth and/or function. PMID:20228380

  2. Interaction of Oligomeric Breast Cancer Resistant Protein (BCRP) with Adjudin: A Male Contraceptive with Anti-Cancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yan Ho; Jenardhanan, Pranitha; Mathur, Premendu P.; Qian, Xiaojing; Xia, Weiliang; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, Chuen Yan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP, ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, which together with two other ABC efflux drug pumps, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1) is the most important multidrug resistance protein found in eukaryotic cells including cells in the testis. However, unlike P-gp and MRP1, which are components of the Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB), BCRP is not expressed at the BTB in rodents and human testes. Instead, BCRP is expressed by peritubular myoid cells and endothelial cells of the lymphatic vessel in the tunica propria, residing outside the BTB. As such, the testis is equipped with two levels of defense against xenobiotics or drugs, preventing these harmful substances from entering the adluminal compartment to perturb meiosis and post-meiotic spermatid development: one at the level of the BTB conferred by P-gp and MRP1 and one at the tunica propria conferred by BCRP. The presence of drug transporters at the tunica propria as well as at the Sertoli cell BTB thus poses significant obstacles in developing non-hormonal contraceptives if these drugs (e.g., adjudin) exert their effects in germ cells behind the BTB, such as in the adluminal (apical) compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Herein, we summarize recent findings pertinent to adjudin, a non-hormonal male contraceptive, and molecular interactions of adjudin with BCRP so that this information can be helpful to devise delivery strategies to evade BCRP in the tunica propria to improve its bioavailability in the testis. PMID:25620224

  3. Proteins and an Inflammatory Network Expressed in Colon Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhong; Fang, Changming; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Niemeyer, Christina C.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is crucial to homeostasis of normal intestinal epithelia because it suppresses the ?-catenin/TCF pathway. Consequently, loss or mutation of the APC gene causes colorectal tumors in humans and mice. Here, we describe our use of Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to compare protein expression in colon tumors to that of adjacent healthy colon tissue from ApcMin/+ mice. Twenty-seven proteins were found to be up-regulated in colon tumors and twenty-five down-regulated. As an extension of the proteomic analysis, the differentially expressed proteins were used as seeds to search for co-expressed genes. This approach revealed a co-expression network of 45 genes that is up-regulated in colon tumors. Members of the network include the antibacterial peptide cathelicidin (CAMP), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-8, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM1). The co-expression network is associated with innate immunity and inflammation, and there is significant concordance between its connectivity in humans versus mice (Friedman: p value = 0.0056). This study provides new insights into the proteins and networks that are likely to drive the onset and progression of colon cancer. PMID:21366352

  4. MULTIPLEX EXPRESSION CLONING OF BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER MEMBRANE PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Nitin; Shusta, Eric V.

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a vascular endothelial interface that separates the brain interior from the bloodstream. Membrane proteins resident at the BBB play important functional and regulatory roles. The current study describes the development and successful implementation of a multiplex expression cloning (MEC) method to allow facile identification of BBB membrane proteins. The overriding goal of the MEC approach was to mine a BBB cDNA library and selectively isolate membrane protein-encoding cDNAs. This selection process was achieved via fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) of cDNA-expressing mammalian host cells for those cells that were immunolabeled with a BBB membrane protein-specific polyclonal antiserum (BMSPA). After optimization of the host cell expression system, four selection rounds allowed the isolation of a panel of 15 unique cDNAs that encoded BBB membrane proteins. The identified proteins display significant diversity in structure, function and in vivo expression levels. The MEC approach thus proved effective for conducting moderate throughput membrane proteome analyses of the BBB while limiting any biases caused by membrane protein insolubility or low in vivo expression levels that can complicate other proteomic approaches. PMID:19180536

  5. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  6. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories. Despite these advantages, many targets are unsuitable for expression in E. coli, and attempts will not yield protein that can be utilized in downstream applications. A thorough understanding of the protein target, the requirements of the final application, and available tools are all essential for planning a successful expression experiment. This protocol is designed to optimize expression and solubility using an E. coli host and expression vector with an IPTG-inducible T7 promoter. The general features of the method are easily extended to other organisms and expression systems. Small-scale expression cultures are used to identify the optimum expression parameters for a given target. Thorough analysis of the total cell content and soluble fraction is used to screen out failed targets and those unlikely to succeed in large-scale purification cultures. The protocol listed here can be used in individual tubes for a small number of targets or adapted for use in 48-well plates for high throughput applications (Abdullah et al., 2009). Using the same culture for initial expression analysis and solubility analysis reduces variability between expression trials and saves the time required to produce separate cultures. PMID:24423272

  7. Clinical implications of ?-catenin protein expression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziyi; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Jianxin; Niu, Jianing; Ma, Zhenhai; Zhao, Haidong; Liu, Caigang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and significance of ?-catenin in the diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. Overall, 241 patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer who had undergone radical surgery were enrolled in this study. ?-catenin protein expression in breast cancer samples was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. ?-catenin was expressed in Nuclei/Plasma of the samples from 41 patients. ?-catenin protein expression correlated with the histological grade of the tumor (P<0.05) and Ki-67 labeling (P<0.01). Survival analysis showed that ?-catenin expression negatively correlated with breast cancer-specific survival. Our results showed prominent expression of ?-catenin in breast cancer and strongly implicate the ?-catenin in tumor promotion. PMID:26823833

  8. A Statistical Study on Oscillatory Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiwei

    Motivated by the experiments on the dynamics of a common network motif, p53 and Mdm2 feedback loop, by Lahav et al. [Nat. Genet 36, 147(2004)] in individual cells and Lev Bar-or et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 11250(2000)] at the population of cells, we propose a statistical signal-response model with aiming to describe the different oscillatory behaviors for the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins both in individual and in population of cells in a unified way. At the cellular level, the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins are described by a group of nonlinear dynamical equations where the damage-derived signal is assumed to have the form with abrupt transition (on leftrightarrow off) as soon as signal strength passes forth and back across a threshold. Each cell responses to the damage with different time duration within which the oscillations persist. For the case of population of cells, the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins will be the population average of the individual cells, which results damped oscillations, due to the averaging over the cell population with the different response time.

  9. Understanding protein evolutionary rate by integrating gene co-expression with protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Among the many factors determining protein evolutionary rate, protein-protein interaction degree (PPID) has been intensively investigated in recent years, but its precise effect on protein evolutionary rate is still heavily debated. Results We first confirmed that the correlation between protein evolutionary rate and PPID varies considerably across different protein interaction datasets. Specifically, because of the maximal inconsistency between yeast two-hybrid and other datasets, we reasoned that the difference in experimental methods contributes to our inability to clearly define how PPID affects protein evolutionary rate. To address this, we integrated protein interaction and gene co-expression data to derive a co-expressed protein-protein interaction degree (ePPID) measure, which reflects the number of partners with which a protein can permanently interact. Thus, irrespective of the experimental method employed, we found that (1) ePPID is a better predictor of protein evolutionary rate than PPID, (2) ePPID is a more robust predictor of protein evolutionary rate than PPID, and (3) the contribution of ePPID to protein evolutionary rate is statistically independent of expression level. Analysis of hub proteins in the Structural Interaction Network further supported ePPID as a better predictor of protein evolutionary rate than the number of distinct binding interfaces and clarified the slower evolution of co-expressed multi-interface hub proteins over that of other hub proteins. Conclusions Our study firmly established ePPID as a robust predictor of protein evolutionary rate, irrespective of experimental method, and underscored the importance of permanent interactions in shaping the evolutionary outcome. PMID:21190591

  10. Cell adhesion protein expression in melanocytic matricoma.

    PubMed

    Soler, Alejandro Peralta; Burchette, James L; Bellet, Jane S; Olson, John A

    2007-06-01

    Melanocytic matricoma is a rare neoplasm thought to recapitulate the hair follicle in anagen. The tumor forms a nodule in the dermis containing basaloid, intermediate and shadow cells admixed with pigmented melanocytes dispersed as single dendritic cells. Because cadherins and catenins are crucial in the development of hair tumors, we examined the expression of E(epithelial)-, P(placental)-, N(nerve)-cadherin and beta-catenin in a melanocytic matricoma. A 66-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of breast cancer presented with a pigmented nodule on the shoulder. Pathology revealed a melanocytic matricoma with S-100 and HMB45-positive melanocytes. E- and P-cadherin were localized at the cell membrane of basaloid and differentiating keratinocytes, and in melanocytes, recapitulating the anagen hair. Both cadherins were absent in shadow cells. N-cadherin was not expressed. Beta-catenin had a differential distribution, in the nucleus and cytoplasm of basaloid cells, but at the cell membrane in differentiating cells and negative in shadow cells, paralleling the expression of E- and P-cadherin. Our results support the previously hypothesized resemblance of the tumor to the hair bulb in anagen and suggest a transcriptional role of beta-catenin in the development of this rare neoplasm. PMID:17518772

  11. Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in yeast cells expressing neurotoxic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ralf J.

    2015-01-01

    Critically impaired protein degradation is discussed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and motor neuron diseases. Misfolded, aggregated, or surplus proteins are efficiently degraded via distinct protein degradation pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, autophagy, and vesicular trafficking. These pathways are regulated by covalent modification of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and are evolutionary highly conserved from humans to yeast. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mechanisms of protein degradation, and for the elucidation of pathways underlying programmed cell death. The expression of human neurotoxic proteins triggers cell death in yeast, with neurotoxic protein-specific differences. Therefore, yeast cell death models are suitable for analyzing the role of protein degradation pathways in modulating cell death upon expression of disease-causing proteins. This review summarizes which protein degradation pathways are affected in these yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic models, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of human disorders. PMID:25814926

  12. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase, demonstrated differential expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Conclusions Relative expression profiles demonstrate which proteins are likely utilized in carbohydrate utilization and end-product synthesis and suggest that H2 synthesis occurs via bifurcating hydrogenases while ethanol synthesis is predominantly catalyzed by a bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Differences in expression profiles of core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase may dictate carbon and electron flux towards energy storage compounds and end-products. Combined knowledge of relative protein expression levels and their changes in response to physiological conditions may aid in targeted metabolic engineering strategies and optimization of fermentation conditions for improvement of biofuels production. PMID:22994686

  13. An E. coli expression system optimized for DELLA proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolin; Frearson, Nicky; Kirk, Christopher; Jones, William T; Harvey, Dawn; Rakonjac, Jasna; Foster, Toshi; Al-Samarrai, Taha

    2008-03-01

    The DELLA proteins are involved in regulation of plant growth in response to phytohormonal signals such as GA, ethylene, and auxin. They have become one of most challenging and active area of research due to their fundamental roles in plant biology. Here, we describe the first successful expression of the N-terminal domains of DELLA proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Malus domestica in Escherichia coli system which will be used to produce monoclonal antibodies for profiling protein micro-arrays. Optimizations of the cloning, expression, and purification using specific tags have been discussed. PMID:17949995

  14. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  15. Mapping the expression of soluble olfactory proteins in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Dani, Francesca Romana; Iovinella, Immacolata; Felicioli, Antonio; Niccolini, Alberto; Calvello, Maria Antonietta; Carucci, Maria Giovanna; Qiao, Huili; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Turillazzi, Stefano; Moneti, Gloriano; Pelosi, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Chemical communication in insects is mediated by soluble binding proteins, belonging to two large families, Odorant-binding Proteins (OBPs) and Chemosensory Proteins (CSPs). Recently, evidence has been provided that OBPs are involved in recognition of chemical stimuli. We therefore decided to investigate the expression of OBPs and CSPs in the honeybee at the protein level, using a proteomic approach. Our results are in agreement with previous reports of expression at the RNA level and show that 12 of the 21 OBPs predicted in the genome of the honeybee Apis mellifera and 2 of the 6 CSPs are present in the foragers' antennae, while the larvae express only three OBPs and a single CSP. MALDI mass spectrometry on crude antennal extracts and MALDI profiling on sections of antennae demonstrated that these techniques can be applied to investigate individual differences in the expression of abundant proteins, such as OBPs and CSPs, as well as to detect the presence of proteins in different regions of the antenna. Finally, as part of a project aimed at the characterization of all OBPs and CSPs of the honeybee, we expressed 5 OBPs and 4 CSPs in a bacterial system and measured their affinity to a number of ligands. Clear differences in their binding spectra have been observed between OBPs, as well as CSPs. PMID:20155982

  16. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O/sub 2/ supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with (/sup 35/S)methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins.

  17. Ethnic variability in the expression of hepatic drug transporters: absolute quantification by an optimized targeted quantitative proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kuan-wei; Bacon, James; Zheng, Ming; Guo, Yingying; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic OATPs 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1, as well as P-gp, play important roles in regulating liver uptake and biliary excretion of drugs. The intrinsic ethnic variability in OATP1B1-mediated hepatic uptake of statins has been proposed to underlie the ethnic variability in plasma exposures of statins between Caucasians and Asians. Using a targeted quantitative proteomic approach, we determined hepatic protein concentrations of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1, P-gp, and PMCA4 (a housekeeping protein) in a panel of human livers (n = 141) and compared protein expression across Caucasian, Asian, African-American, and unidentified donors. Using an optimized protocol that included sodium deoxycholate as a membrane protein solubilizer, the hepatic protein expression levels (mean S.D.) of these transporters across all livers were determined to be 15.0 6.0, 16.1 8.1, 4.1 1.3, 0.6 0.2, and 2.4 1.0 fmol/?g of total membrane protein, respectively. The scaling factor was 3.5 mg of total membrane protein in 100 mg of wet liver tissue. OATP1B1 protein expression was significantly associated with the c.388A>G (rs2306283, N130D) single nucleotide polymorphism. When compared across ethnicity, the hepatic expression levels of OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were unexpectedly higher in Asians relative to Caucasians, suggesting that hepatic OATP expression alone does not explain the increased systemic statin levels in Asians compared with Caucasians. These findings may help improve physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict statin pharmacokinetic profiles and enable extrapolation of pharmacokinetic data of OATP substrates across ethnic groups. PMID:25926430

  18. Expression of a proline-enriched protein in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, T.T.; Cooney, C.L.; Gomez, R.F.

    1982-03-01

    The feasibility of expressing repeated synthetic codons in bacterial cells was demonstrated by showing that repeated codons for proline were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant DNA technology was used to clone synthetic polydeoxyguanylate: polydeoxycytidylate into the PstI site of plasmid pBR322. Recombinant plasmid pGC139 was shown by means of HaeIII restriction digestion to contain approximately 41 cloned base pairs; the cloned sequence was expressed as a fusion to an ampicillinase protein. The resulting protein, enriched in proline, was expressed from plasmid in pGC139 in E. coli maxicells. Extension of this technology could lead to improvement in the production of amino acids and to nutritional enrichment of single-cell protein. (Refs. 12).

  19. Variation in Protein Intake Induces Variation in Spider Silk Expression

    PubMed Central

    Blamires, Sean J.; Wu, Chun-Lin; Tso, I-Min

    2012-01-01

    Background It is energetically expensive to synthesize certain amino acids. The proteins (spidroins) of spider major ampullate (MA) silk, MaSp1 and MaSp2, differ in amino acid composition. Glutamine and proline are prevalent in MaSp2 and are expensive to synthesize. Since most orb web spiders express high proline silk they might preferentially attain the amino acids needed for silk from food and shift toward expressing more MaSp1 in their MA silk when starved. Methodology/Principal Findings We fed three spiders; Argiope aetherea, Cyrtophora moluccensis and Leucauge blanda, high protein, low protein or no protein solutions. A. aetherea and L. blanda MA silks are high in proline, while C. moluccesnsis MA silks are low in proline. After 10 days of feeding we determined the amino acid compositions and mechanical properties of each species' MA silk and compared them between species and treatments with pre-treatment samples, accounting for ancestry. We found that the proline and glutamine of A. aetherea and L. blanda silks were affected by protein intake; significantly decreasing under the low and no protein intake treatments. Glutmaine composition in C. moluccensis silk was likewise affected by protein intake. However, the composition of proline in their MA silk was not significantly affected by protein intake. Conclusions Our results suggest that protein limitation induces a shift toward different silk proteins with lower glutamine and/or proline content. Contradictions to the MaSp model lie in the findings that C. moluccensis MA silks did not experience a significant reduction in proline and A. aetherea did not experience a significant reduction in serine on low/no protein. The mechanical properties of the silks could not be explained by a MaSp1 expressional shift. Factors other than MaSp expression, such as the expression of spidroin-like orthologues, may impact on silk amino acid composition and spinning and glandular processes may impact mechanics. PMID:22363691

  20. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Manuell, Andrea L; Beligni, Maria Verónica; Elder, John H; Siefker, David T; Tran, Miller; Weber, Annika; McDonald, Thomas L; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2007-05-01

    We have engineered the chloroplast of eukaryotic algae to produce a number of recombinant proteins, including human monoclonal antibodies, but, to date, have achieved expression to only 0.5% of total protein. Here, we show that, by engineering the mammalian coding region of bovine mammary-associated serum amyloid (M-SAA) as a direct replacement for the chloroplast psbA coding region, we can achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. Chloroplast-expressed M-SAA accumulates predominantly as a soluble protein, contains the correct amino terminal sequence and has little or no post-translational modification. M-SAA is found in mammalian colostrum and stimulates the production of mucin in the gut, acting in the prophylaxis of bacterial and viral infections. Chloroplast-expressed and purified M-SAA is able to stimulate mucin production in human gut epithelial cell lines. As Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an edible alga, production of therapeutic proteins in this organism offers the potential for oral delivery of gut-active proteins, such as M-SAA. PMID:17359495

  1. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ from those of acquired cholesteatomas, which originate from retraction pocket epithelia. PMID:26335306

  2. A study protocol for quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) by LC-MS/MS: application for inter-strain differences in protein expression levels of transporters, receptors, claudin-5, and marker proteins at the blood–brain barrier in ddY, FVB, and C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics has opened a new horizon in biological sciences. Global proteomic analysis is a promising technology for the discovery of thousands of proteins, post-translational modifications, polymorphisms, and molecular interactions in a variety of biological systems. The activities and roles of the identified proteins must also be elucidated, but this is complicated by the inability of conventional proteomic methods to yield quantitative information for protein expression. Thus, a variety of biological systems remain “black boxes”. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) enables the determination of absolute expression levels (mol) of any target protein, including low-abundance functional proteins, such as transporters and receptors. Therefore, QTAP will be useful for understanding the activities and roles of individual proteins and their differences, including normal/disease, human/animal, or in vitro/in vivo. Here, we describe the study protocols and precautions for QTAP experiments including in silico target peptide selection, determination of peptide concentration by amino acid analysis, setup of selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) analysis in liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, preparation of protein samples (brain capillaries and plasma membrane fractions) followed by the preparation of peptide samples, simultaneous absolute quantification of target proteins by SRM/MRM analysis, data analysis, and troubleshooting. An application of QTAP in biological sciences was introduced that utilizes data from inter-strain differences in the protein expression levels of transporters, receptors, tight junction proteins and marker proteins at the blood–brain barrier in ddY, FVB, and C57BL/6J mice. Among 18 molecules, 13 (abcb1a/mdr1a/P-gp, abcc4/mrp4, abcg2/bcrp, slc2a1/glut1, slc7a5/lat1, slc16a1/mct1, slc22a8/oat3, insr, lrp1, tfr1, claudin-5, Na+/K+-ATPase, and γ-gtp) were detected in the isolated brain capillaries, and their protein expression levels were within a range of 0.637-101 fmol/μg protein. The largest difference in the levels between the three strains was 2.2-fold for 13 molecules, although bcrp and mct1 displayed statistically significant differences between C57BL/6J and the other strain(s). Highly sensitive simultaneous absolute quantification achieved by QTAP will increase the usefulness of proteomics in biological sciences and is expected to advance the new research field of pharmacoproteomics (PPx). PMID:23758935

  3. Expression of human salivary protein genes.

    PubMed

    Mamula, P W; Morley, D J; Larsen, S H; Karn, R C

    1988-02-01

    Human proline-rich proteins (PRPs) are polymorphic, homologous in sequence, and linked in a cluster called the human salivary protein complex (SPC). Recently this complex was localized to human chromosome band 12p13.2 (Mamula et al., Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 39:279, 1985). We have isolated a PRP cDNA, EO27, from a human parotid gland library, identified it by DNA sequencing, and used it to study the molecular and cellular biology of PRP production. Cell-free translation and mRNA characterization with EO27 indicate that the numerous PRPs seen in saliva are produced from relatively few, large precursors, probably by posttranslational cleavage. This supports an hypothesis originally proposed by Friedman and Karn in 1977 (Am. J. Hum. Genet. 29:44 A; Biochem. Genet. 15:549) and later supported by biochemical studies (Karn et al., Biochem Genet. 17:1061, 1979) and molecular studies (Mamula et al., Fed. Proc. 43:1522, 1984; Maeda et al., J. Biol. Chem. 260:1123, 1985). EO27 was also used in this study to localize PRP mRNA production to the acinar cells of the parotid gland by in situ hybridization. PMID:3288192

  4. Differential protein expression in Phalaenopsis under low temperature.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu-Yun; Liang, Fang; Jiang, Su-Hua; Wan, Mo-Fei; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Xian-Yun; Cui, Bo

    2015-01-01

    A comparative proteomic analysis was carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of responses to cold stress in Phalaenopsis after treated by low temperature (13/8 °C day/night) for 15 days. Differentially expressed proteins were examined using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Among 85 differentially expressed proteins, 73 distinct proteins were identified. Comparative analysis revealed that the identified proteins mainly participate in photosynthesis, protein synthesis, folding and degradation, respiration, defense response, amino acid metabolism, energy pathway, cytoskeleton, transcription regulation, signal transduction, and seed storage protein, while the functional classification of the remaining four proteins was not determined. These data suggested that the proteins might work cooperatively to establish a new homeostasis under cold stress; 37 % of the identified cold-responsive proteins were associated with various aspects of chloroplast physiology, and 56 % of them were predicted to be located in the chloroplasts, implying that the cold stress tolerance of Phalaenopsis was achieved, at least partly, by regulation of chloroplast function. Moreover, the protein destination control, which was mediated by chaperones and proteases, plays an important role in tolerance to cold stress. PMID:25349090

  5. Lentiviral Fluorescent Protein Expression Vectors for Biotinylation Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Riz, Irene; Hawley, Teresa S.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo biotinylation tagging, based on a method in which a protein of interest is tagged with a peptide that is biotinylated in vivo by coexpression of E.coli BirA biotin ligase, has been successfully used for isolation of protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes in mammalian cells. We describe a modification of this methodology in which cells stably expressing the tagged gene of interest and the BirA gene can be selected by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). We recently implemented this approach to isolate and characterize proteins associated with TLX1, a homeodomain transcription factor with leukemogenic function. The modified technique utilizes two components: a lentiviral vector coexpressing the gene of interest containing a biotinylation tag on a bicistronic transcript together with a downstream yellow fluorescent protein gene; and a second lentiviral vector encoding a fusion protein composed of bacterial BirA linked to the green fluorescent protein. This FACS-based binary in vivo biotinylation tagging system allows precise control over the levels of BirA-mediated biotinylation as well as the expression of the gene of interest, which is especially important if high-level expression negatively impacts cell growth or viability. PMID:21116996

  6. Expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 by reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Geisert, E E; Johnson, H G; Binder, L I

    1990-01-01

    After an injury to the central nervous system, a dramatic change in the astrocytes bordering the wound occurs. The most characteristic feature of this process, termed reactive gliosis, is the upregulation of the intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the present study, we show that reactive astrocytes express high levels of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), a protein normally found in the somatodendritic compartment of neurons. When sections of injured brain are double-stained with antibodies directed against MAP-2 and glial fibrillary protein, all of the reactive astrocytes are found to contain MAP-2. The high levels of this protein appear to represent a permanent change in reactive astrocytes. In parallel quantitative studies, an elevated level of MAP-2 in the injured brain is confirmed by an immunoblot analysis of injured and normal white matter. This report demonstrates the direct involvement of a microtubule protein in the process of reactive gliosis. Images PMID:1692628

  7. Expression patterns of protein C inhibitor in mouse development.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Uhrin, Pavel; Weipoltshammer, Klara; Almeder, Marlene; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Geiger, Margarethe; Meijers, Joost C M; Schöfer, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Proteolysis of extracellular matrix is an important requirement for embryonic development and is instrumental in processes such as morphogenesis, angiogenesis, and cell migration. Efficient remodeling requires controlled spatio-temporal expression of both the proteases and their inhibitors. Protein C inhibitor (PCI) effectively blocks a range of serine proteases, and recently has been suggested to play a role in cell differentiation and angiogenesis. In this study, we mapped the expression pattern of PCI throughout mouse development using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. We detected a wide-spread, yet distinct expression pattern with prominent PCI levels in skin including vibrissae, and in fore- and hindgut. Further sites of PCI expression were choroid plexus of brain ventricles, heart, skeletal muscles, urogenital tract, and cartilages. A strong and stage-dependent PCI expression was observed in the developing lung. In the pseudoglandular stage, PCI expression was present in distal branching tubules whereas proximal tubules did not express PCI. Later in development, in the saccular stage, PCI expression was restricted to distal bronchioli whereas sacculi did not express PCI. PCI expression declined in postnatal stages and was not detected in adult lungs. In general, embryonic PCI expression indicates multifunctional roles of PCI during mouse development. The expression pattern of PCI during lung development suggests its possible involvement in lung morphogenesis and angiogenesis. PMID:20229239

  8. Genome engineering for improved recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mahalik, Shubhashree; Sharma, Ashish K; Mukherjee, Krishna J

    2014-01-01

    A metabolic engineering perspective which views recombinant protein expression as a multistep pathway allows us to move beyond vector design and identify the downstream rate limiting steps in expression. In E.coli these are typically at the translational level and the supply of precursors in the form of energy, amino acids and nucleotides. Further recombinant protein production triggers a global cellular stress response which feedback inhibits both growth and product formation. Countering this requires a system level analysis followed by a rational host cell engineering to sustain expression for longer time periods. Another strategy to increase protein yields could be to divert the metabolic flux away from biomass formation and towards recombinant protein production. This would require a growth stoppage mechanism which does not affect the metabolic activity of the cell or the transcriptional or translational efficiencies. Finally cells have to be designed for efficient export to prevent buildup of proteins inside the cytoplasm and also simplify downstream processing. The rational and the high throughput strategies that can be used for the construction of such improved host cell platforms for recombinant protein expression is the focus of this review. PMID:25523647

  9. Aberrant LRP16 protein expression in primary neuroendocrine lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yun; Li, Xiaoying; Lu, Yali; Liu, Lin; Zhao, Po

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Leukemia related protein 16 gene (LRP16) localized on chromosome 11q12.1, is an important estrogen-responsive gene and a crucial regulator for NF-kB activation. LRP16 is frequently expressed in human cancers; however, the LRP16 gene remains unexplored in lung neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of LRP16 expression in primary lung neuroendocrine tumors. Methods: lung neuroendocrine tumors were analyzed for LRP16 gene expression by two-step non-biotin immunohistochemical method. Results: Fifty of ninety (55.6%) cases of neuroendocrine lung tumors tested were positive for LRP16 protein by immunohistochemistry. The expression of LRP16 was mainly located in cytoplasm and nucleus of tumor cells. LRP16 protein was corresponding to tumor type and clinical stage, as well as survival time. Conclusions: The results indicate that abnormal LRP16 expression is noted in neuroendocrine lung tumors and the expression can give insight into the pathogenesis of the disease. The LRP16 protein may serve as a potential marker in predicting prognosis of neuroendocrine lung tumors. PMID:26261536

  10. RNA Binding Proteins that Control Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kajitani, Naoko; Schwartz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is strictly linked to the differentiation program of the infected mucosal epithelial cell. In the basal and lower levels of the epithelium, early genes coding for pro-mitotic proteins and viral replication factors are expressed, while terminal cell differentiation is required for activation of late gene expression and production of viral particles at the very top of the epithelium. Such productive infections are normally cleared within 18–24 months. In rare cases, the HPV infection is stuck in the early stage of the infection. Such infections may give rise to cervical lesions that can progress to cancer, primarily cancer of the uterine cervix. Since cancer progression is strictly linked to HPV gene expression, it is of interest to understand how HPV gene expression is regulated. Cis-acting HPV RNA elements and cellular RNA-binding proteins control HPV mRNA splicing and polyadenylation. These interactions are believed to play a particularly important role in the switch from early to late gene expression, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of HPV. Indeed, it has been shown that the levels of various RNA binding proteins change in response to differentiation and in response to HPV induced cervical lesions and cancer. Here we have compiled published data on RNA binding proteins involved in the regulation of HPV gene expression. PMID:25950509

  11. In vivo protein expression and immune responses generated by DNA vaccines expressing mycobacterial antigens fused with a reporter protein.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Anita; Jiang, Weiwen; Velaz-Faircloth, Maria; Cobb, Alison J; Henry, Stanley C; Frothingham, Richard

    2002-08-19

    We cloned six mycobacterial antigens into a mammalian expression vector as fusion proteins with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Plasmid DNA was injected intramuscularly, and the injection sites were examined 1 week later. Expression of each antigen-EGFP fusion protein was visualized as green fluorescence in muscle tissue sections. A plasmid expressing EGFP alone and a plasmid with a frameshift mutation served as positive and negative controls. Visualization of fluorescent protein in vivo was 100% specific when compared to in vitro results. In vivo sensitivity was only 37% based on individual injection sites, but increased to 100% when results from multiple injection sites were combined for each plasmid. EGFP alone was expressed in a higher proportion of myocytes than the antigen-EGFP fusion proteins (P < 0.001). There was a trend toward an inverse correlation between protein size and the proportion of myocytes with visible fluorescence (r = -0.68; P = 0.09). We compared antibody subtypes generated to Mycobacterium bovis antigen 85A, when it was expressed alone or as a fusion protein. Inclusion of EGFP modified the immune response toward a Th1 response, as indicated by the ratio of antigen 85A-specific IgG2a to IgG1 generated by each plasmid (antigen 85A alone 0.73 +/- 0.18 versus antigen 85A-EGFP 1.82 +/- 0.57, mean +/- S.D.; P < 0.01), though the magnitude of the antibody isotype shift was modest. Direct visualization of antigen-EGFP fusion proteins provided a simple and rapid method to confirm in vivo antigen expression. PMID:12163270

  12. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system. PMID:23996319

  13. Cell cycle programs of gene expression control morphogenetic protein localization.

    PubMed

    Lord, M; Yang, M C; Mischke, M; Chant, J

    2000-12-25

    Genomic studies in yeast have revealed that one eighth of genes are cell cycle regulated in their expression. Almost without exception, the significance of cell cycle periodic gene expression has not been tested. Given that many such genes are critical to cellular morphogenesis, we wanted to examine the importance of periodic gene expression to this process. The expression profiles of two genes required for the axial pattern of cell division, BUD3 and BUD10/AXL2/SRO4, are strongly cell cycle regulated. BUD3 is expressed close to the onset of mitosis. BUD10 is expressed in late G1. Through promotor-swap experiments, the expression profile of each gene was altered and the consequences examined. We found that an S/G2 pulse of BUD3 expression controls the timing of Bud3p localization, but that this timing is not critical to Bud3p function. In contrast, a G1 pulse of BUD10 expression plays a direct role in Bud10p localization and function. Bud10p, a membrane protein, relies on the polarized secretory machinery specific to G1 to be delivered to its proper location. Such a secretion-based targeting mechanism for membrane proteins provides cells with flexibility in remodeling their architecture or evolving new forms. PMID:11134078

  14. Protein co-expression network analysis (ProCoNA)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biological networks are important for elucidating disease etiology due to their ability to model complex high dimensional data and biological systems. Proteomics provides a critical data source for such models, but currently lacks robust de novo methods for network construction, which could bring important insights in systems biology. Results We have evaluated the construction of network models using methods derived from weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). We show that approximately scale-free peptide networks, composed of statistically significant modules, are feasible and biologically meaningful using two mouse lung experiments and one human plasma experiment. Within each network, peptides derived from the same protein are shown to have a statistically higher topological overlap and concordance in abundance, which is potentially important for inferring protein abundance. The module representatives, called eigenpeptides, correlate significantly with biological phenotypes. Furthermore, within modules, we find significant enrichment for biological function and known interactions (gene ontology and protein-protein interactions). Conclusions Biological networks are important tools in the analysis of complex systems. In this paper we evaluate the application of weighted co-expression network analysis to quantitative proteomics data. Protein co-expression networks allow novel approaches for biological interpretation, quality control, inference of protein abundance, a framework for potentially resolving degenerate peptide-protein mappings, and a biomarker signature discovery. PMID:23724967

  15. Protein Co-Expression Network Analysis (ProCoNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, David L.; Baratt, Arie; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Smith, Richard D.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Katze, Michael G.; Mcweeney, Shannon K.

    2013-06-01

    Biological networks are important for elucidating disease etiology due to their ability to model complex high dimensional data and biological systems. Proteomics provides a critical data source for such models, but currently lacks robust de novo methods for network construction, which could bring important insights in systems biology. We have evaluated the construction of network models using methods derived from weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). We show that approximately scale-free peptide networks, composed of statistically significant modules, are feasible and biologically meaningful using two mouse lung experiments and one human plasma experiment. Within each network, peptides derived from the same protein are shown to have a statistically higher topological overlap and concordance in abundance, which is potentially important for inferring protein abundance. The module representatives, called eigenpeptides, correlate significantly with biological phenotypes. Furthermore, within modules, we find significant enrichment for biological function and known interactions (gene ontology and protein-protein interactions). Biological networks are important tools in the analysis of complex systems. In this paper we evaluate the application of weighted co-expression network analysis to quantitative proteomics data. Protein co-expression networks allow novel approaches for biological interpretation, quality control, inference of protein abundance, a framework for potentially resolving degenerate peptide-protein mappings, and a biomarker signature discovery.

  16. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Horstick, Eric J; Jordan, Diana C; Bergeron, Sadie A; Tabor, Kathryn M; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A

    2015-04-20

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3' untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models. PMID:25628360

  17. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3′ untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models. PMID:25628360

  18. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  19. Abnormal expression of leiomyoma cytoskeletal proteins involved in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ura, Blendi; Scrimin, Federica; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Aloisio, Michelangelo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ricci, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are monoclonal tumors. Several factors are involved in the neoplastic transformation of the myometrium. In our study we focused on dysregulated cytoskeletal proteins in the leiomyoma as compared to the myometrium. Paired tissue samples of ten leiomyomas and adjacent myometria were obtained and analyzed by two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry was used for protein identification, and western blotting for 2-DE data validation. The values of ten cytoskeletal proteins were found to be significantly different: eight proteins were upregulated in the leiomyoma and two proteins were downregulated. Three of the upregulated proteins (myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9, four and a half LIM domains protein 1 and LIM and SH3 domain protein 1) are involved in cell migration, while downregulated protein transgelin is involved in replicative senescence. Myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9) was further validated by western blotting because it is considered to be a cell migration marker in several cancers and could play a key role in leiomyoma development. Our data demonstrate significant alterations in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins involved in leiomyoma growth. A better understanding of the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in leiomyoma pathogenesis may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new pharmacological approaches. PMID:26986808

  20. Expression, delivery and function of insecticidal proteins expressed by recombinant baculoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal po...

  1. Using ion exchange chromatography to purify a recombinantly expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEX) separates molecules by their surface charge, a property that can vary vastly between different proteins. There are two types of IEX, cation exhange and anion exchange chromatography. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors for anion exchange chromatography of a recombinantly expressed protein having a pI of 4.9 and containing two cysteine residues and one tryptophan residue, using an FPLC system. Prior to anion exchange, the protein had been salted out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and partially purified via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (see Salting out of proteins using ammonium sulfate precipitation and Use and Application of Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Protein Purification). Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment. PMID:24674065

  2. Recombinant baculovirus vectors expressing glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Jowett, J B; Jones, I M

    1993-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses are a popular means of producing heterologous protein in eukaryotic cells. Purification of recombinant proteins away from the insect cell background can, however, remain an obstacle for many developments. Recently, prokaryotic fusion protein expression systems have been developed allowing single-step purification of the heterologous protein and specific proteolytic cleavage of the affinity tag moiety from the desired antigen. Here we report the introduction of these attributes to the baculovirus system. "Baculo-GEX" vectors enable baculovirus production of fusion proteins with the above advantages, but in a eukaryotic post-translational processing environment. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusions are stable cytoplasmic proteins in insect cells and may therefore be released by sonication alone, avoiding the solubility problems and detergent requirements of bacterial systems. Thus large amounts of authentic antigen may be purified in a single, non-denaturing step. PMID:7763917

  3. Enhancement of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jill H.; Hall, Randy A.

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate physiological responses to a diverse array of stimuli and are the molecular targets for numerous therapeutic drugs. GPCRs primarily signal from the plasma membrane, but when expressed in heterologous cells many GPCRs exhibit poor trafficking to the cell surface. Multiple approaches have been taken to enhance GPCR surface expression in heterologous cells, including addition/deletion of receptor sequences, co-expression with interacting proteins, and treatment with pharmacological chaperones. In addition to allowing for enhanced surface expression of certain GPCRs in heterologous cells, these approaches have also shed light on the control of GPCR trafficking in vivo and in some cases have led to new therapeutic approaches for treating human diseases that result from defects in GPCR trafficking. PMID:19679364

  4. Hedyotis diffusa Willd overcomes 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colorectal cancer HCT-8/5-FU cells by downregulating the expression of P-glycoprotein and ATP-binding casette subfamily G member 2

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIONGYU; WANG, XIANGFENG; SHEN, ALING; ZHANG, YUCHEN; CHEN, YOUQIN; SFERRA, THOMAS J.; LIN, JIUMAO; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, exhibits potent anticancer activity in models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Aggressive forms of CRC exhibit resistance to widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, including the antimetabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, less is known with regard to the activity of HDW against 5-FU-resistant cancer. In the present study, the mechanism of action and the potency of ethanol extracts of HDW (EEHDW) were investigated on a multidrug-resistant CRC HCT-8/5-FU cell line. Using an MTT cell proliferation assay, EEHDW treatment was shown to significantly reduce the cell viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EEHDW significantly increased the retention of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate, rhodamine-123, as compared with the untreated controls. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms targeted by EEHDW in the resistant cells, the expression levels of the ABC drug transporter protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2), were analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp and ABCG2 were reduced in the HCT-8/5-FU cells following EEHDW treatment, indicating that EEHDW inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by downregulating the expression of ABCG2 and P-gp. Therefore, the potential application of EEHDW as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant represents a promising alternative approach to the treatment of drug-resistant CRC. PMID:26640560

  5. Expression levels of transdominant peptides and proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sandrock, Tanya; Poritz, Mark; Kim, Marianne; Feldhaus, Michael J; Roth, Bruce; Caponigro, Giordano; Kamb, Alexander

    2002-01-15

    From libraries of peptides and protein fragments, several inhibitors that block pheromone response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been isolated previously. In many cases, the inhibitors are displayed as part of a scaffold, such as green fluorescent protein. Each of the inhibitors has a characteristic physiological strength or genetic penetrance. In this report, the roles of expression level and display scaffold on the activities of a subset of pheromone-response pathway inhibitors were examined. Special consideration was given to the relationship between expression levels of specific inhibitors, which may exceed 50 microM in some instances, and penetrance. PMID:11754477

  6. The Expression and Significance of Neuronal Iconic Proteins in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongxia; Hu, Ruimin; Sun, Jianyong; Mao, Xing; Zhao, Zhonghua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that there are many common cell biological features shared by neurons and podocytes; however, the mechanism of podocyte foot process formation remains unclear. Comparing the mechanisms of process formation between two cell types should provide useful guidance from the progress of neuron research. Studies have shown that some mature proteins of podocytes, such as podocin, nephrin, and synaptopodin, were also expressed in neurons. In this study, using cell biological experiments and immunohistochemical techniques, we showed that some neuronal iconic molecules, such as Neuron-specific enolase, nestin and Neuron-specific nuclear protein, were also expressed in podocytes. We further inhibited the expression of Neuron-specific enolase, nestin, synaptopodin and Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase-1 by Small interfering RNA in cultured mouse podocytes and observed the significant morphological changes in treated podocytes. When podocytes were treated with Adriamycin, the protein expression of Neuron-specific enolase, nestin, synaptopodin and Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase-1 decreased over time. Meanwhile, the morphological changes in the podocytes were consistent with results of the Small interfering RNA treatment of these proteins. The data demonstrated that neuronal iconic proteins play important roles in maintaining and regulating the formation and function of podocyte processes. PMID:24699703

  7. Beyond protein expression, MOPED goes multi-omics

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Stanberry, Larissa; Lee, Elaine; Choiniere, John; Anderson, Nathaniel; Stewart, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    MOPED (Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database; http://moped.proteinspire.org) has transitioned from solely a protein expression database to a multi-omics resource for human and model organisms. Through a web-based interface, MOPED presents consistently processed data for gene, protein and pathway expression. To improve data quality, consistency and use, MOPED includes metadata detailing experimental design and analysis methods. The multi-omics data are integrated through direct links between genes and proteins and further connected to pathways and experiments. MOPED now contains over 5 million records, information for approximately 75 000 genes and 50 000 proteins from four organisms (human, mouse, worm, yeast). These records correspond to 670 unique combinations of experiment, condition, localization and tissue. MOPED includes the following new features: pathway expression, Pathway Details pages, experimental metadata checklists, experiment summary statistics and more advanced searching tools. Advanced searching enables querying for genes, proteins, experiments, pathways and keywords of interest. The system is enhanced with visualizations for comparing across different data types. In the future MOPED will expand the number of organisms, increase integration with pathways and provide connections to disease. PMID:25404128

  8. Beyond protein expression, MOPED goes multi-omics.

    PubMed

    Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Stanberry, Larissa; Lee, Elaine; Choiniere, John; Anderson, Nathaniel; Stewart, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    MOPED (Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database; http://moped.proteinspire.org) has transitioned from solely a protein expression database to a multi-omics resource for human and model organisms. Through a web-based interface, MOPED presents consistently processed data for gene, protein and pathway expression. To improve data quality, consistency and use, MOPED includes metadata detailing experimental design and analysis methods. The multi-omics data are integrated through direct links between genes and proteins and further connected to pathways and experiments. MOPED now contains over 5 million records, information for approximately 75,000 genes and 50,000 proteins from four organisms (human, mouse, worm, yeast). These records correspond to 670 unique combinations of experiment, condition, localization and tissue. MOPED includes the following new features: pathway expression, Pathway Details pages, experimental metadata checklists, experiment summary statistics and more advanced searching tools. Advanced searching enables querying for genes, proteins, experiments, pathways and keywords of interest. The system is enhanced with visualizations for comparing across different data types. In the future MOPED will expand the number of organisms, increase integration with pathways and provide connections to disease. PMID:25404128

  9. Elevated Aurora Kinase A Protein Expression in Diabetic Skin Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Moon Kyun; An, Je Min; Kang, Sang Gue

    2014-01-01

    Background Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A) plays an important role in the regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis. Dysregulated Aurora-A leads to mitotic faults and results in pathological conditions. No studies on Aurora-A expression in human diabetic skin tissue have been reported. In light of this, we explored the expression of Aurora-A in human diabetic skin tissue. Methods Aurora-A protein was evaluated by western blotting in 6 human diabetic skin tissue and 6 normal skin specimens. Results Increased expression of Aurora-A protein was detected in all diabetic skin tissue samples in both western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. However, in the case of the normal skin tissue, no bands of Aurora-A protein were detected in either the western blotting analysis or the immunohistochemical staining. Conclusions Thus far, there have been no studies on the expression of Aurora-A in diabetic skin tissue. However, we believe that oxidative DNA damage related to the expression of Aurora-A protein and Aurora-A could be involved inhuman diabetic skin tissue. PMID:24511492

  10. A versatile lentiviral expression system to identify mammalian protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anthony B; Moffat, Jason

    2012-08-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are central to our understanding of protein function, biological processes and signaling pathways. Affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is a powerful approach for detecting PPIs and protein complexes and relies on the purification of bait proteins using bait-specific binding reagents. These binding reagents may recognize bait proteins directly or affinity tags that are fused to bait proteins. A limitation of the latter approach is that expression of affinity tagged baits is largely constrained to engineered or unnatural cell lines, which results in the AP-MS identification of PPIs that may not accurately reflect those seen in nature. Therefore, generating cell lines stably expressing affinity tagged bait proteins in a broad range of cell types and cell lines is important for identifying PPIs that are dependent on different contexts. To facilitate the identification of PPIs across many mammalian cell types, we developed the mammalian affinity purification and lentiviral expression (MAPLE) system. MAPLE uses recombinant lentiviral technology to stably and efficiently express affinity tagged complementary DNA (cDNA) in mammalian cells, including cells that are difficult to transfect and non-dividing cells. The MAPLE vectors contain a versatile affinity (VA) tag for multi-step protein purification schemes and subcellular localization studies. In this methods article, we present a step-by-step overview of the MAPLE system workflow. PMID:22713554

  11. Expression of Yes Associated Protein, YAP, Modulates Survivin Expression in Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F.; Lam-Himlin, Dora M.; Klein, Alison P.; Nayar, Suresh K.; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice following genetic manipulation of Yes associated protein (YAP), a transcription co-activator. Here we comprehensively documented YAP protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear YAP expression is significantly increased in human ICC and HCC. We found that increased YAP protein levels in HCC are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein (IAPs) family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both HCC and ICC. We found nuclear YAP expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both ICC and HCC. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress YAP in the liver, we found Survivin mRNA expression depends upon YAP protein levels. Our findings suggested that YAP contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression. PMID:22436626

  12. Astragaloside IV reduces the expression level of P-glycoprotein in multidrug-resistant human hepatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    WANG, PEI-PEI; XU, DU-JUAN; HUANG, CAN; WANG, WEI-PING; XU, WEN-KE

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside is a saponin widely used in traditional Chinese medicine and has been reported to be a potent multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agent. The present study investigated the role of astragaloside IV (ASIV) in the regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by the mdr1 gene) and its effect on the reversal of MDR. The activity of ASIV was evaluated using human hepatic cancer cells Bel-7402 and the corresponding 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant cells Bel-7402/FU. ASIV (0.08 mg/ml) potentiated the cytotoxicity of 5-FU which was demonstrated using the MTT assay on Bel-7402/FU cells. ASIV reduced the expression of P-gp as was revealed by immunocytochemistry. Accumulation and efflux studies with the P-gp substrate, rhodamine 123 (Rh123), demonstrated that ASIV inhibited P-gp-mediated drug efflux. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that ASIV enhanced the drug accumulation of 5-FU using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for drug resistant cells. Furthermore, ASIV may downregulate the expression of P-gp, which was examined using western blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that ASIV reverses the drug resistance of Bel-7402/FU cells by downregulating the expression of mdr1. ASIV may represent a potent modulator of P-gp-mediated MDR in hepatic cancer therapy. PMID:24676670

  13. Relationship between P-glycoprotein expression and cyclosporin A in kidney. An immunohistological and cell culture study.

    PubMed Central

    Garca del Moral, R.; O'Valle, F.; Andjar, M.; Aguilar, M.; Lucena, M. A.; Lpez-Hidalgo, J.; Ramrez, C.; Medina-Cano, M. T.; Aguilar, D.; Gmez-Morales, M.

    1995-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded in humans by the mdr-1 gene, acts physiologically as an efflux pump to expel hydrophobic substances from cells. This glycoprotein is closely related to multidrug resistance in tumor cells and can be modulated by cyclosporin A (CsA). We investigated the relationship between CsA and P-gp in 52 renal allograft biopsies and in cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) renal tubule cells to determine whether the intrarenal accumulation of CsA or chronic stimulation with the drug modified the expression of P-gp. Expression of P-gp and CsA was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining was evaluated semiquantitatively. Modulation of P-gp in MDCK cells after chronic stimulation with CsA for 7, 30, and 60 days was analyzed by flow cytometry. P-gp and CsA immunostaining in renal post-transplant biopsies showed considerable overlap in all cases (Spearman's test, r = 0.577, P < 0.001). After 7 days in vitro, the number of cells expressing P-gp increased progressively; a further increase in mean fluorescence was found after 60 days (P < 0.001, Student's t-test). Our findings suggest that in non-neoplastic cells, CsA may stimulate P-gp as a mechanism of detoxification. Individual differences in the adaptive responses to glycoprotein may be responsible for the appearance of nephrotoxicity or a CsA-resistant rejection reaction in cases of overexpression on lymphocytes and macrophages. Images Figure 1 PMID:7856751

  14. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  15. Glutamate up-regulates P-glycoprotein expression in rat brain microvessel endothelial cells by an NMDA receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao-Jie; Liu, Guo-Qing

    2004-07-30

    The accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular space in the central nervous system (CNS) plays a major part in ischemic and anoxic damage. In this study, we examined the effect of glutamate on the expression and activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in rat brain microvessel endothelial cells (RBMECs) making up the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The level of P-gp expression significantly increased in RBMECs after the treatment of 100 microM glutamate. At this concentration, glutamate also enhanced rat mdr1a and mdr1b mRNA levels determined by RT-PCR analysis. Flow cytometry was used to study P-gp activity by analysis of intracellular rhodamine123 (Rh123) accumulation. Overexpression of P-gp resulted in a decreased intracellular accumulation of Rh123 in RBMECs. Glutamate-induced increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed by using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (2',7'-DCF) assay. MK-801, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine obviously blocked ROS generation and attenuated the changes of both expression and activity of P-gp induced by glutamate in RBMECs. These data suggested that glutamate up-regulated P-gp expression in RBMECs by an NMDA receptor-mediated mechanism and that glutamate-induced generation of ROS was linked to the regulation of P-gp expression. Therefore, transport of P-gp substrates in BBB appears to be affected during ischemic and anoxic injury. PMID:15234189

  16. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  17. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or

  18. PROTEIN EXPRESSION AND SECRETION BY TRICHODERMA REESEI UNDER LOW ENDOGENOUS PROTEIN BACKGROUND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) is one of the most commonly used fungi for the manufacturing of industrial enzyme products. The fungus is capable of secreting proteins in levels up to 100 grams per liter. A number of homologous and heterologous proteins have been successfully over-expressed...

  19. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  20. SURFACTANT PROTEIN D EXPRESSION IN NORMAL AND PNEUMONIC OVINE LUNG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), a hydrophilic pulmonary surfactant collagenous calcium-dependent lectin with opsonizing activity, binds to surface glycoconjugates expressed by a wide variety of microorganisms such as Gram-negative bacteria, Influenza A virus, and various fungi as well as surface carboh...

  1. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins Hung-Yueh Yeh*, Kelli L. Hiett, John E. Line, Brian B. Oakley and Bruce S. Seal, Poultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, Uni...

  2. Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins: Choosing the Appropriate Host

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Nathalie; Dementin, Sébastien; Hivin, Patrick; Boutigny, Sylvain; Rioux, Jean-Baptiste; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Richaud, Pierre; Joyard, Jacques; Pignol, David; Sabaty, Monique; Desnos, Thierry; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Vernet, Thierry; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides) and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells) hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals), functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes) and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments). The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. Conclusions/Significance Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein. PMID:22216205

  3. SAMHD1's protein expression profile in humans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sarah; Schenkova, Kristina; Adam, Tarek; Erikson, Elina; Lehmann-Koch, Judith; Sertel, Serkan; Verhasselt, Bruno; Fackler, Oliver T; Lasitschka, Felix; Keppler, Oliver T

    2015-07-01

    The deoxynucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase and 3' → 5' exonuclease SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 infection in noncycling hematopoietic cells in vitro, and SAMHD1 mutations are associated with AGS. Little is known about the in vivo expression and functional regulation of this cellular factor. Here, we first assessed the SAMHD1 protein expression profile on a microarray of 25 human tissues from >210 donors and in purified primary cell populations. In vivo, SAMHD1 was expressed in the majority of nucleated cells of hematopoietic origin, including tissue-resident macrophages, DCs, pDCs, all developmental stages of thymic T cells, monocytes, NK cells, as well as at lower levels in B cells. Of note, SAMHD1 was abundantly expressed in HIV target cells residing in the anogenital mucosa, providing a basis for its evaluation as a cellular factor that may impact the efficiency of HIV transmission. Next, we examined the effect of the activation status and proinflammatory cytokine treatment of cells on expression and phosphorylation of SAMHD1. Activated, HIV-susceptible CD4(+) T cells carried pSAMHD1(T592), whereas resting CD4(+) T cells and macrophages expressed the unphosphorylated protein with HIV-restrictive activity. Surprisingly, stimulation of these primary cells with IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, IL-18, IL-27, or TNF-α affected neither SAMHD1 expression levels nor threonine 592 phosphorylation. Only IL-1β moderately down-regulated SAMHD1 in activated CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, this study establishes the first cross-sectional protein expression profile of SAMHD1 in human tissues and provides insight into its cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation and unresponsiveness to multiple proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25646359

  4. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D. (Villa Park, IL); Hanson, Deborah K. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  5. Expression, purification and characterization of murine Dkk1 protein.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Damien; Gillard, Corinne; Lebhar, Helène; Vayssière, Béatrice; Touitou, Robert; Rawadi, Georges; Mollat, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) protein is a secreted inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling and modulates that pathway during embryonic development. It is also implicated in several diseases and hence Dkk1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In the present study 6His-tagged Dkk1 expression and secretion was assessed in five mammalian cell types. Only FreeStyle 293-F cells showed significant Dkk1 protein expression in culture medium. High and stable expression of the Dkk1 protein was obtained from a selected stable FreeStyle 293-F clone 3F8, that grows in suspension in serum-free medium. The 3F8 clone showed a high Dkk1 production level (10mg/L) for up to 2 months of culture. A one step purification procedure resulting in large amounts of highly pure and active Dkk1 protein was developed. Purified Dkk1 binds its receptors LRP5 and LRP6, and is able to dose dependently inhibit canonical Wnt signaling. Recombinant Dkk1 is glycosylated, but this modification is not essential for its biological activity. In summary, an abundant source of pure and functionally active Dkk1 protein is developed that will support the identification of inhibitors such as neutralizing antibodies that could find therapeutic use. PMID:18456511

  6. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup ∧}E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1{sup ∧}E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. - Highlights: • E4 gene products have a modular structure, and are expressed from the E1{sup ∧}E4 spliced mRNA. • E4 proteins are modified during epithelial differentiation by phosphorylation and proteolysis. • The E4 proteins contribute to genome amplification-efficiency and virus synthesis. • E4 proteins are abundantly expressed and may facilitate efficient virus release and transmission. • High-risk E4 proteins are deposited as amyloid fibres and can be used as infection biomarkers.

  7. Expression, delivery and function of insecticidal proteins expressed by recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Jeremy A; Bonning, Bryony C; Harrison, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  8. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Bonning, Bryony C.; Harrison, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  9. Functional expression and characterisation of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Haferkamp, I; Linka, N

    2012-09-01

    Membrane transporters set the framework organising the complexity of plant metabolism in cells, tissues and organisms. Their substrate specificity and controlled activity in different cells is a crucial part for plant metabolism to run pathways in concert. Transport proteins catalyse the uptake and exchange of ions, substrates, intermediates, products and cofactors across membranes. Given the large number of metabolites, a wide spectrum of transporters is required. The vast majority of in silico annotated membrane transporters in plant genomes, however, has not yet been functionally characterised. Hence, to understand the metabolic network as a whole, it is important to understand how transporters connect and control the metabolic pathways of plant cells. Heterologous expression and in vitro activity studies of recombinant transport proteins have highly improved their functional analysis in the last two decades. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in membrane protein expression and functional characterisation using various host systems and transport assays. PMID:22639981

  10. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Amy; Lovell, Scott; Lorimer, Don; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Wallace, Ellen; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Archer, Kimberly; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-12-01

    With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38{alpha}), viral polymerase (HCV NS5B), and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ) were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  11. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Amy; Lovell, Scott; Lorimer, Don; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Wallace, Ellen; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Archer, Kimberly; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-01-01

    Background With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. Results In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38α), viral polymerase (HCV NS5B), and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ) were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. Conclusion The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research. PMID:19383143

  12. LC-MS Based Detection of Differential Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Tuli, Leepika; Ressom, Habtom W

    2009-10-01

    While several techniques are available in proteomics, LC-MS based analysis of complex protein/peptide mixtures has turned out to be a mainstream analytical technique for quantitative proteomics. Significant technical advances at both sample preparation/separation and mass spectrometry levels have revolutionized comprehensive proteome analysis. Moreover, automation and robotics for sample handling process permit multiple sampling with high throughput.For LC-MS based quantitative proteomics, sample preparation turns out to be critical step, as it can significantly influence sensitivity of downstream analysis. Several sample preparation strategies exist, including depletion of high abundant proteins or enrichment steps that facilitate protein quantification but with a compromise of focusing on a smaller subset of a proteome. While several experimental strategies have emerged, certain limitations such as physiochemical properties of a peptide/protein, protein turnover in a sample, analytical platform used for sample analysis and data processing, still imply challenges to quantitative proteomics. Other aspects that make analysis of a proteome a challenging task include dynamic nature of a proteome, need for efficient and fast analysis of protein due to its constant modifications inside a cell, concentration range of proteins that exceed dynamic range of a single analytical method, and absence of appropriate bioinformatics tools for analysis of large volume and high dimensional data.This paper gives an overview of various LC-MS methods currently used in quantitative proteomics and their potential for detecting differential protein expression. Fundamental steps such as sample preparation, LC separation, mass spectrometry, quantitative assessment and protein identification are discussed.For quantitative assessment of protein expression, both label and label free approaches are evaluated for their set of merits and demerits. While most of these methods edge on providing "relative abundance" information, absolute quantification is achieved with limitation as it caters to fewer proteins. Isotope labeling is extensively used for quantifying differentially expressed proteins, but is severely limited by successful incorporation of its heavy label. Lengthy labeling protocols restrict the number of samples that can be labeled and processed. Alternatively, label free approach appears promising as it can process many samples with any number of comparisons possible but entails reproducible experimental data for its application. PMID:20473349

  13. LC–MS Based Detection of Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Leepika; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2010-01-01

    While several techniques are available in proteomics, LC-MS based analysis of complex protein/peptide mixtures has turned out to be a mainstream analytical technique for quantitative proteomics. Significant technical advances at both sample preparation/separation and mass spectrometry levels have revolutionized comprehensive proteome analysis. Moreover, automation and robotics for sample handling process permit multiple sampling with high throughput. For LC-MS based quantitative proteomics, sample preparation turns out to be critical step, as it can significantly influence sensitivity of downstream analysis. Several sample preparation strategies exist, including depletion of high abundant proteins or enrichment steps that facilitate protein quantification but with a compromise of focusing on a smaller subset of a proteome. While several experimental strategies have emerged, certain limitations such as physiochemical properties of a peptide/protein, protein turnover in a sample, analytical platform used for sample analysis and data processing, still imply challenges to quantitative proteomics. Other aspects that make analysis of a proteome a challenging task include dynamic nature of a proteome, need for efficient and fast analysis of protein due to its constant modifications inside a cell, concentration range of proteins that exceed dynamic range of a single analytical method, and absence of appropriate bioinformatics tools for analysis of large volume and high dimensional data. This paper gives an overview of various LC-MS methods currently used in quantitative proteomics and their potential for detecting differential protein expression. Fundamental steps such as sample preparation, LC separation, mass spectrometry, quantitative assessment and protein identification are discussed. For quantitative assessment of protein expression, both label and label free approaches are evaluated for their set of merits and demerits. While most of these methods edge on providing “relative abundance” information, absolute quantification is achieved with limitation as it caters to fewer proteins. Isotope labeling is extensively used for quantifying differentially expressed proteins, but is severely limited by successful incorporation of its heavy label. Lengthy labeling protocols restrict the number of samples that can be labeled and processed. Alternatively, label free approach appears promising as it can process many samples with any number of comparisons possible but entails reproducible experimental data for its application. PMID:20473349

  14. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  15. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins.

    PubMed

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  16. Expression and Localization of Plant Protein Disulfide Isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B. S.; Subramaniam, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Dixon, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a putative protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and an antiserum was raised against the expressed PDI-active protein. The antiserum recognized a protein of approximately 60 kD in extracts from alfalfa, soybean, and tobacco roots and stems. Levels of this protein remained relatively constant on exposure of alfalfa cell suspension cultures to the protein glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, whereas a slightly lower molecular mass form, also detected by the antiserum, was induced by this treatment. A lower molecular mass form of PDI was also observed in roots of alfalfa seedlings during the first 5 weeks after germination. PDI levels increased in developing soybean seeds up to 17 d after fertilization and then declined. Tissue print immunoblots revealed highest levels of PDI protein in the cambial tissues of soybean stems and petioles and in epidermal, subepidermal, cortical, and pith tissues of stems of alfalfa and tobacco. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the localization of PDI to the endoplasmic reticulum in soybean root nodules. PMID:12231974

  17. Expression and Localization of Plant Protein Disulfide Isomerase.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, B. S.; Subramaniam, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Dixon, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a putative protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and an antiserum was raised against the expressed PDI-active protein. The antiserum recognized a protein of approximately 60 kD in extracts from alfalfa, soybean, and tobacco roots and stems. Levels of this protein remained relatively constant on exposure of alfalfa cell suspension cultures to the protein glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, whereas a slightly lower molecular mass form, also detected by the antiserum, was induced by this treatment. A lower molecular mass form of PDI was also observed in roots of alfalfa seedlings during the first 5 weeks after germination. PDI levels increased in developing soybean seeds up to 17 d after fertilization and then declined. Tissue print immunoblots revealed highest levels of PDI protein in the cambial tissues of soybean stems and petioles and in epidermal, subepidermal, cortical, and pith tissues of stems of alfalfa and tobacco. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the localization of PDI to the endoplasmic reticulum in soybean root nodules. PMID:12231974

  18. Expression of Exocytosis Proteins in Rat Supraoptic Nucleus Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, V.; Schwab, Y.; Lelos, N.; Onaka, T.; Pittman, Q. J.; Ludwig, M.

    2012-01-01

    In magnocellular neurones of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), the neuropeptides vasopressin and oxytocin are synthesised and packaged into large dense-cored vesicles (LDCVs). These vesicles undergo regulated exocytosis from nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary gland and from somata/dendrites in the SON. Regulated exocytosis of LDCVs is considered to involve the soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex [comprising vesicle associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2), syntaxin-1 and soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein-25 (SNAP-25)] and regulatory proteins [such as synaptotagmin-1, munc-18 and Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS-1)]. Using fluorescent immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, in both oxytocin and vasopressin neurones, we observed VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1-immunoreactivity in axon terminals. The somata and dendrites contained syntaxin-1 and other regulatory exocytosis proteins, including munc-18 and CAPS-1. However, the distribution of VAMP-2 and synaptotagmin-1 in the SON was limited to putative pre-synaptic contacts because they co-localised with synaptophysin (synaptic vesicle marker) and had no co-localisation with either oxytocin or vasopressin. SNAP-25 immunoreactivity in the SON was limited to glial cell processes and was not detected in oxytocin or vasopressin somata/dendrites. The present results indicate differences in the expression and localisation of exocytosis proteins between the axon terminals and somata/dendritic compartment. The absence of VAMP-2 and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity from the somata/dendrites suggests that there might be different SNARE protein isoforms expressed in these compartments. Alternatively, exocytosis of LDCVs from somata/dendrites may use a different mechanism from that described by the SNARE complex theory. PMID:21988098

  19. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  20. Pannexin Protein Expression in the Rat Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Alan R.; Phillips, Sharon C.; Sokoya, Elke M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Connexin proteins are well known to participate in cell-to-cell communication within the cerebral vasculature. Pannexins are a recently discovered family of proteins that could potentially be involved in cell-to-cell communication. Herein, we sought to determine whether pannexins are expressed in rat middle cerebral artery (MCA). Methods A combination of RT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry techniques was used to characterize the expression pattern of pannexins in rat MCA. A fluorescent dye uptake approach in cultured smooth muscle cells was used to determine whether these cells have functional hemichannels. Results We report for the first time that pannexins are expressed in the cerebral vasculature. We reveal that pannexin 1 is expressed in smooth muscle but not in endothelium and pannexin 2 is expressed in both endothelium and smooth muscle. Fluorescent dye entered cultured smooth muscle cells in the absence of extracellular calcium or when the cells were depolarized, which was prevented by the putative hemichannel blocker carbenoxolone. Conclusions The identification of pannexins in rat MCA indicates that pannexin expression is not restricted to neuronal cells. Dye uptake in cultured smooth muscle cells exhibited properties similar to those of connexin and pannexin hemichannels, which may represent another form of cell-to-cell communication within the vasculature. PMID:22301733

  1. Tools to cope with difficult-to-express proteins.

    PubMed

    Saccardo, Paolo; Corchero, José Luís; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2016-05-01

    The identification of DNA coding sequences contained in the genome of many organisms coupled to the use of high throughput approaches has fueled the field of recombinant protein production. Apart from basic research interests, the growing relevance of this field is highlighted by the global sales of the top ten biopharmaceuticals on the market, which exceeds the trillion USD in a steady increasing tendency. Therefore, the demand of biological compounds seems to have a long run on the market. One of the most popular expression systems is based on Escherichia coli cells which apart from being cost-effective counts with a large selection of resources. However, a significant percentage of the genes of interest are not efficiently expressed in this system, or the expressed proteins are accumulated within aggregates, degraded or lacking the desired biological activity, being finally discarded. In some instances, expressing the gene in a homologous expression system might alleviate those drawbacks but then the process usually increases in complexity and is not as cost-effective as the prokaryotic systems. An increasing toolbox is available to approach the production and purification of those difficult-to-express proteins, including different expression systems, promoters with different strengths, cultivation media and conditions, solubilization tags and chaperone coexpression, among others. However, in most cases, the process follows a non-integrative trial and error strategy with discrete success. This review is focused on the design of the whole process by using an integrative approach, taken into account the accumulated knowledge of the pivotal factors that affect any of the key processes, in an attempt to rationalize the efforts made in this appealing field. PMID:27079572

  2. Expression screening of fusion partners from an E. coli genome for soluble expression of recombinant proteins in a cell-free protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin-Ho; Keum, Jung-Won; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2011-01-01

    While access to soluble recombinant proteins is essential for a number of proteome studies, preparation of purified functional proteins is often limited by the protein solubility. In this study, potent solubility-enhancing fusion partners were screened from the repertoire of endogenous E. coli proteins. Based on the presumed correlation between the intracellular abundance and folding efficiency of proteins, PCR-amplified ORFs of a series of highly abundant E. coli proteins were fused with aggregation-prone heterologous proteins and then directly expressed for quantitative estimation of the expression efficiency of soluble translation products. Through two-step screening procedures involving the expression of 552 fusion constructs targeted against a series of cytokine proteins, we were able to discover a number of endogenous E. coli proteins that dramatically enhanced the soluble expression of the target proteins. This strategy of cell-free expression screening can be extended to quantitative, global analysis of genomic resources for various purposes. PMID:22073212

  3. Expression and serological reactivity of hemorrhagic enteritis virus hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Lobová, Dana; Celer, Vladimír

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to express the recombinant hexon protein of the hemorrhagic enteritis virus, to establish the diagnostic value of this protein for serological detection of antibodies in turkey serum samples and to assess seroprevalence of the infection in the Czech Republic. The N' terminal part of the hexon protein was expressed in a bacterial expression system and used as an antigen in an ELISA test for the detection of hemorrhagic enteritis virus specific antibodies in turkey sera. Validation of the test was performed by comparison with a commercially available ELISA test. Serological reactivity was assessed on a panel of 126 turkey sera by a newly developed ELISA test. Serum samples were taken from turkey farms with the history of hemorrhagic enteritis virus infection, from farms with animals free of infection, and from turkey farms following vaccination. Both ELISA kits gave identical results (100 %) with the tested sera. ELISA based on the recombinant hexon protein thus proved useful and cheaper for detection of antibodies in turkey flocks infected with the hemorrhagic enteritis virus. PMID:26471497

  4. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins. PMID:25851716

  5. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  6. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  7. Heterogeneity mapping of protein expression in tumors using quantitative immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Faratian, Dana; Christiansen, Jason; Gustavson, Mark; Jones, Christine; Scott, Christopher; Um, InHwa; Harrison, David J

    2011-01-01

    Morphologic heterogeneity within an individual tumor is well-recognized by histopathologists in surgical practice. While this often takes the form of areas of distinct differentiation into recognized histological subtypes, or different pathological grade, often there are more subtle differences in phenotype which defy accurate classification (Figure 1). Ultimately, since morphology is dictated by the underlying molecular phenotype, areas with visible differences are likely to be accompanied by differences in the expression of proteins which orchestrate cellular function and behavior, and therefore, appearance. The significance of visible and invisible (molecular) heterogeneity for prognosis is unknown, but recent evidence suggests that, at least at the genetic level, heterogeneity exists in the primary tumor(1,2), and some of these sub-clones give rise to metastatic (and therefore lethal) disease. Moreover, some proteins are measured as biomarkers because they are the targets of therapy (for instance ER and HER2 for tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin), respectively). If these proteins show variable expression within a tumor then therapeutic responses may also be variable. The widely used histopathologic scoring schemes for immunohistochemistry either ignore, or numerically homogenize the quantification of protein expression. Similarly, in destructive techniques, where the tumor samples are homogenized (such as gene expression profiling), quantitative information can be elucidated, but spatial information is lost. Genetic heterogeneity mapping approaches in pancreatic cancer have relied either on generation of a single cell suspension(3), or on macrodissection(4). A recent study has used quantum dots in order to map morphologic and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer tissue(5), providing proof of principle that morphology and molecular mapping is feasible, but falling short of quantifying the heterogeneity. Since immunohistochemistry is, at best, only semi-quantitative and subject to intra- and inter-observer bias, more sensitive and quantitative methodologies are required in order to accurately map and quantify tissue heterogeneity in situ. We have developed and applied an experimental and statistical methodology in order to systematically quantify the heterogeneity of protein expression in whole tissue sections of tumors, based on the Automated QUantitative Analysis (AQUA) system(6). Tissue sections are labeled with specific antibodies directed against cytokeratins and targets of interest, coupled to fluorophore-labeled secondary antibodies. Slides are imaged using a whole-slide fluorescence scanner. Images are subdivided into hundreds to thousands of tiles, and each tile is then assigned an AQUA score which is a measure of protein concentration within the epithelial (tumor) component of the tissue. Heatmaps are generated to represent tissue expression of the proteins and a heterogeneity score assigned, using a statistical measure of heterogeneity originally used in ecology, based on the Simpson's biodiversity index(7). To date there have been no attempts to systematically map and quantify this variability in tandem with protein expression, in histological preparations. Here, we illustrate the first use of the method applied to ER and HER2 biomarker expression in ovarian cancer. Using this method paves the way for analyzing heterogeneity as an independent variable in studies of biomarker expression in translational studies, in order to establish the significance of heterogeneity in prognosis and prediction of responses to therapy. PMID:22064683

  8. Epithelial membrane protein 1 expression in ovarian serous tumors

    PubMed Central

    DEMIRAG, GUZIN GONULLU; KEFELI, MEHMET; KEMAL, YASEMIN; YUCEL, IDRIS

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the clinical significance of epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1) expression in ovarian serous tumors. A total of 84 cases of ovarian serous tumor (50 patients with malignant ovarian serous tumors and 34 patients with borderline and benign serous tumors) were retrospectively analyzed. Differences in the expression levels of EMP1 between the malignant and non-malignant tumor groups were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, the association between EMP1 expression and prognostic factors in malignant ovarian serous tumors was investigated. The expression levels of EMP1 were significantly reduced in all the 50 malignant ovarian serous tumors, compared with the 34 non-malignant ovarian serous tumors (P<0.000). Reduced expression of EMP1 was correlated with high grade (P=0.009) and stage (P<0.000) of malignant tumors. EMP1 expression was not observed to be correlated with any other investigated parameters, including surgery, type of operation and chemotherapy response (P>0.005). These results indicated that EMP1 may have a significant role as a negative regulator in ovarian serous tumors, and reduced EMP1 expression in serous tumors may be associated with increased disease severity. PMID:26998138

  9. Transcriptional Modulation of Heat-Shock Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Stephanou, Anastasis; Latchman, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex signaling pathways regulating Hsp expression may lead to novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21152185

  10. Eukaryotic integral membrane protein expression utilizing the Escherichia coli glycerol-conducting channel protein (GlpF).

    PubMed

    Neophytou, Irene; Harvey, Richard; Lawrence, Jayne; Marsh, Phil; Panaretou, Barry; Barlow, David

    2007-11-01

    A fusion protein expression system is described that allows for production of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The eukaryotic membrane protein targets are fused to the C terminus of the highly expressed E. coli inner membrane protein, GlpF (the glycerol-conducting channel protein). The generic utility of this system for heterologous membrane-protein expression is demonstrated by the expression and insertion into the E. coli cell membrane of the human membrane proteins: occludin, claudin 4, duodenal ferric reductase and a J-type inwardly rectifying potassium channel. The proteins are produced with C-terminal hexahistidine tags (to permit purification of the expressed fusion proteins using immobilized metal affinity chromatography) and a peptidase cleavage site (to allow recovery of the unfused eukaryotic protein). PMID:17828601

  11. Knockdown of MACC1 expression increases cisplatin sensitivity in cisplatin-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruitao; Shi, Huirong; Ren, Fang; Li, Xia; Zhang, Minghui; Feng, Wei; Jia, Yanyan

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal expression of metastasis-associated in colon cancer 1 (MACC1) was found to be closely associated with several types of malignant tumors. The present study aimed to verify the relationship between MACC1 and cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells and the possible mechanisms, which was implemented by inhibition of the expression of MACC1 in cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780/DDP and COC1/DDP. MACC1 shRNA eukaryotic plasmids and negative control plasmids were transfected into A2780/DDP and COC1/DDP cells, respectively, while A2780/DDP and COC1/DDP cells were used as blank controls. Western blotting and sqRT-PCR were used to detect the expression of MACC1 in the different cell groups. Different concentrations of cispaltin (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 µmol/l) were used to treat the cell groups, respectively, and then the chemosensitivity of cisplatin and cell apoptosis were examined by MTT and flow cytometry, respectively. The activity of caspase-3 was determined by spectrophotometry. Expression levels of p-ERK1/2, permeability glycoprotein (P-gp), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-XL, Bax and Bad protein were detected in the different ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. After MACC1 knockdown, the chemosensitivity of cisplatin in the ovarian cancer cells was enhanced, and the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis rates were increased. The expression levels of Bax and Bad were upregulated, the activity of caspase-3 was increased, while the expression levels of p-ERK1/2, P-gp, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL were downregulated as a result of MACC1 inhibition. These results indicate that inhibition of MACC1 improves the chemosensitivity of cisplatin in epithelial ovarian cancer cells, through the regulation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway on P-gp and its downstream apoptosis proteins. PMID:26794135

  12. Improving Protein Expression Prediction Using Extra Features and Ensemble Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Armando; Vinga, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The article focus is the improvement of machine learning models capable of predicting protein expression levels based on their codon encoding. Support vector regression (SVR) and partial least squares (PLS) were used to create the models. SVR yields predictions that surpass those of PLS. It is shown that it is possible to improve the models predictive ability by using two more input features, codon identification number and codon count, besides the already used codon bias and minimum free energy. In addition, applying ensemble averaging to the SVR or PLS models also improves the results even further. The present work motivates the test of different ensembles and features with the aim of improving the prediction models whose correlation coefficients are still far from perfect. These results are relevant for the optimization of codon usage and enhancement of protein expression levels in synthetic biology problems. PMID:26934190

  13. Improving Protein Expression Prediction Using Extra Features and Ensemble Averaging.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Armando; Vinga, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The article focus is the improvement of machine learning models capable of predicting protein expression levels based on their codon encoding. Support vector regression (SVR) and partial least squares (PLS) were used to create the models. SVR yields predictions that surpass those of PLS. It is shown that it is possible to improve the models predictive ability by using two more input features, codon identification number and codon count, besides the already used codon bias and minimum free energy. In addition, applying ensemble averaging to the SVR or PLS models also improves the results even further. The present work motivates the test of different ensembles and features with the aim of improving the prediction models whose correlation coefficients are still far from perfect. These results are relevant for the optimization of codon usage and enhancement of protein expression levels in synthetic biology problems. PMID:26934190

  14. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M

    2016-03-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article "Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels" [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  15. HIV-1 Tat Protein Enhances Expression and Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yancong; Zhang, Kun; Yin, Xiaojie; Nie, Qichang; Ma, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters can transfer a variety of antiviral agents from the cytoplasm to body fluid, which results in a reduced intracellular concentration of the drugs. Proteins of HIV-1, e.g., Tat and gp120, altered some types of ABC transporter expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. However, the effect of Tat on ABC transporters in T lymphocytes is unclear. In this study the status of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in Tat expressing cell lines was examined with real-time PCR and flow cytometry. It was found that HIV-1 Tat protein upregulated BCRP expression and enhanced efflux mediated by BCRP significantly, which could inhibit antiviral drugs from entering infected cells and interfere with the therapeutic effect of HAART. PMID:26367065

  16. Cooperative working of bacterial chromosome replication proteins generated by a reconstituted protein expression system

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kei; Katayama, Tsutomu; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.

    2013-01-01

    Replication of all living cells relies on the multirounds flow of the central dogma. Especially, expression of DNA replication proteins is a key step to circulate the processes of the central dogma. Here we achieved the entire sequential transcription–translation–replication process by autonomous expression of chromosomal DNA replication machineries from a reconstituted transcription–translation system (PURE system). We found that low temperature is essential to express a complex protein, DNA polymerase III, in a single tube using the PURE system. Addition of the 13 genes, encoding initiator, DNA helicase, helicase loader, RNA primase and DNA polymerase III to the PURE system gave rise to a DNA replication system by a coupling manner. An artificial genetic circuit demonstrated that the DNA produced as a result of the replication is able to provide genetic information for proteins, indicating the in vitro central dogma can sequentially undergo two rounds. PMID:23737447

  17. Fibroblast adhesion to recombinant tropoelastin expressed as a protein A-fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, L E; Parks, W C; Wu, L J; Mecham, R P

    1991-01-01

    A bovine tropoelastin cDNA encoding exons 15-36 that includes the elastin-receptor binding site was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus. After isolation of the fusion protein by affinity chromatography on Ig-Sepharose, the tropoelastin domain was separated from plasmid-pR1T2T-encoded Protein A (Protein A') by CNBr cleavage. Cell-adhesion assays demonstrated specific adhesion to the recombinant tropoelastin. Furthermore, the data indicate that interactions involving the bovine elastin receptor mediate nuchalligament fibroblast adhesion to the recombinant protein. In agreement with earlier studies of fibroblast chemotaxis to bovine tropoelastin, nuchal-ligament fibroblast adhesion demonstrated developmental regulation of the elastin receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1996952

  18. Human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas express extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, M.; Trautmann, B.; Göttler, M.; Peters, S.; Zauner, I.; Maillet, B.; Klöppel, G.

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterised by a dense connective tissue reaction. To test the hypothesis that stroma components are synthesised and produced by the tumour cells themselves, eight cell lines as well as six xenografted tumours from human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas were examined for the expression of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), using cDNA probes and antibodies to collagen types I, III and IV, vitronectin, fibronectin, undulin and laminin. All tumour cell lines (CAPAN-1, CAPAN-2, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1, PaCa-2, PaCa-3, PaCa-44) and xenografted human pancreatic tumours expressed at least one of the examined ECM at the RNA (collagen type IV > laminin = fibronectin = vitronectin > collagen type III > undulin > collagen type I) or protein level (collagen type IV = collagen type III > vitronectin > laminin > collagen type I = fibronectin > undulin). In nude mouse tumours expression of laminin and collagen I was most pronounced in well-differentiated carcinomas. In a few tumours, collagen type III, vitronectin and undulin were expressed on the luminal side of the neoplastic glands, suggesting loss of normal polar differentiation. Incubation with fetal calf serum modulated ECM RNA levels to a varying extent in all but one cell line (AsPC-1). The results suggest that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas cells are capable of synthesising and producing extracellular matrix proteins in vitro and in vivo, but that the extent and pattern of ECM expression differs between the various tumours and conditions tested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8286197

  19. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed. PMID:26408650

  20. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-01

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1^E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein's flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1^E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1^E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1^E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1^E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. PMID:24016539

  1. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears. PMID:20347821

  2. Expression pattern of Protein Kinase C ϵ during mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCϵ) belongs to the novel PKC subfamily, which consists of diacylglycerol dependent- and calcium independent-PKCs. Previous studies have shown that PKCϵ is important in different contexts, such as wound healing or cancer. In this study, we contribute to expand the knowledge on PKCϵ by reporting its expression pattern during murine midgestation using the LacZ reporter gene and immunostaining procedures. Results Sites showing highest PKCϵ expression were heart at ealier stages, and ganglia in older embryos. Other stained domains included somites, bone, stomach, kidney, and blood vessels. Conclusions The seemingly strong expression of PKCϵ in heart and ganglia shown in this study suggests a important role of this isoform in the vascular and nervous systems during mouse development. However, functional redundancy with other PKCs during midgestation within these domains and others reported here possibly exists since PKCϵ deficient mice do not display obvious embryonic developmental defects. PMID:23639204

  3. A Plasmodium Falciparum Bromodomain Protein Regulates Invasion Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Josling, Gabrielle A; Petter, Michaela; Oehring, Sophie C; Gupta, Archna P; Dietz, Olivier; Wilson, Danny W; Schubert, Thomas; Längst, Gernot; Gilson, Paul R; Crabb, Brendan S; Moes, Suzette; Jenoe, Paul; Lim, Shu Wei; Brown, Graham V; Bozdech, Zbynek; Voss, Till S; Duffy, Michael F

    2015-06-10

    During red-blood-cell-stage infection of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite undergoes repeated rounds of replication, egress, and invasion. Erythrocyte invasion involves specific interactions between host cell receptors and parasite ligands and coordinated expression of genes specific to this step of the life cycle. We show that a parasite-specific bromodomain protein, PfBDP1, binds to chromatin at transcriptional start sites of invasion-related genes and directly controls their expression. Conditional PfBDP1 knockdown causes a dramatic defect in parasite invasion and growth and results in transcriptional downregulation of multiple invasion-related genes at a time point critical for invasion. Conversely, PfBDP1 overexpression enhances expression of these same invasion-related genes. PfBDP1 binds to acetylated histone H3 and a second bromodomain protein, PfBDP2, suggesting a potential mechanism for gene recognition and control. Collectively, these findings show that PfBDP1 critically coordinates expression of invasion genes and indicate that targeting PfBDP1 could be an invaluable tool in malaria eradication. PMID:26067602

  4. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  5. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of osteoarthritis-related differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y C; Deng, B Y; Zhang, L G; Xu, P; Du, X P; Zhang, Q G; Yang, B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify genes and pathways for osteoarthritis (OA) diagnosis and therapy. We downloaded the gene expression profile of OA from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database including 10 early OA, 9 late OA, and 5 normal control samples. Next, we screened differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between early- and late-stage OA samples comparing with healthy control samples. Then, the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) software was used to construct protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, which was to predict the proteins that may interact with DEGs. The Gene Ontology (GO)-enrichment method was used to analyze the function of genes in the PPI networks. Meanwhile network module analysis was performed using Cytoscape. A total of 24 and 29 DEGs were identified for the early and late OA, respectively. TAC1 showed the highest degree in the PPI network. Functional annotation of the TAC1 network module indicated that this gene is associated with the G protein-coupled signal transduction pathway. In summary, TAC1, together with G protein-coupled receptors, appear to play a role in the biogenesis and progress of OA. Further analysis of this gene and pathway could therefore provide a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of OA. PMID:25501146

  6. Expression of odorant-binding proteins and chemosensory proteins in some Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Calvello, M; Brandazza, A; Navarrini, A; Dani, F R; Turillazzi, S; Felicioli, A; Pelosi, P

    2005-04-01

    The expression of chemosensory proteins (CSPs) and odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) in individuals of different castes and ages have been monitored in three species of social hymenopterans, Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae), Vespa crabro (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) and Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae), using PCR with specific primers and polyclonal antibodies. In the paper wasp P. dominulus, OBP is equally expressed in antennae, wings and legs of all castes and ages, while CSP is often specifically present in antennae and in some cases also in legs. In the vespine species V. crabro CSP is antennal specific, while OBP is also expressed in legs and wings. The three CSPs and the five OBPs of A. mellifera show a complex pattern of expression, where both classes of proteins include members specifically expressed in antennae and others present in other parts of the body. These data indicate that at least in some hymenopteran species CSPs are specifically expressed in antennae and could perform roles in chemosensory perception so far assigned only to OBPs. PMID:15763466

  7. Identification of differentially expressed serum proteins in gastric adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Renuse, Santosh; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Solanki, Hitendra Singh; Manju, H.C.; Syed, Nazia; Sharma, Rakesh; Christopher, Rita; Vijayakumar, M.; Kumar, K.V. Veerendra; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha V.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. Blood based biomarkers of gastric cancer have the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of these tumors. Proteins that show altered levels in the circulation of gastric cancer patients could prove useful as putative biomarkers. We used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that show altered levels in the sera of patients with gastric cancer. Our study resulted in identification of 643 proteins, of which 48 proteins showed increased levels and 11 proteins showed decreased levels in serum from gastric cancer patients compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. Proteins that showed increased expression in gastric cancer included inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), Mannose-binding protein C (MBL2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), serum amyloid A protein (SAA1), Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) and extracellular superoxide dismutase [Cu–Zn] (SOD3). We used multiple reaction monitoring assays and validated elevated levels of ITIH4 and SAA1 proteins in serum from gastric cancer patients. Biological significance Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive cancer associated with high mortality. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable interest in diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases including cancers. Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis and high mortality. Pathological diagnosis using biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable importance as they are minimally invasive. In this study, we carried out quantitative proteomic profiling of serum from gastric cancer patients to identify proteins that show altered levels in gastric cancer patients. We identified more than 50 proteins that showed altered levels in gastric cancer patient sera. Validation in a large cohort of well classified patient samples would prove useful in identifying novel blood based biomarkers for gastric cancers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25952687

  8. Characterization of mammalian Gs-alpha proteins expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Stadel, J M; Ecker, D J; Powers, D A; Marsh, J; Hoyle, K; Gross, M; Minnich, M D; Butt, T R; Crooke, S T

    1994-12-01

    The guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, GS, mediates transmembrane signaling by coupling membrane receptors to the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. The full length coding sequences for the M(r) = 42-45,000, short form (S), and M(r) = 46-52,000, long form (L), of the alpha-subunits of rat GS were placed in yeast expression vectors under the regulatory control of the copper-inducible CUP1 promoter and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the presence of 100 microM CuSO4, the transformed yeast expressed GS-alpha mRNAs and proteins. In reconstitution experiments, rat GS-alpha(S and L), solubilized from yeast membranes with 1% cholate, conferred NaF-, (-)isoproterenol-, and guanine nucleotide-dependent sensitivity to adenylyl cyclase catalytic units in S49 lymphoma cyc- cell membranes, which are devoid of endogenous GS-alpha. GS-alpha (S) demonstrated twice the activity of GS-alpha(L) in reconstitution assays of fluoride-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Comparison of GS-alpha (S) expressed in yeast with GS purified from rabbit liver or human erythrocytes showed that the crude recombinant protein was fully competent in reconstituting NaF-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity, but was only 2-5% as potent as purified GS. Addition of bovine brain beta gamma subunits during reconstitution enhanced all parameters of adenylyl cyclase activity for GS-alpha(S and L) obtained from yeast. In contrast, transducin beta gamma only enhanced agonist-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity for GS-alpha (S and L) following reconstitution. These results demonstrate that the expression of functional mammalian GS-alpha subunits in yeast may be useful for their biochemical characterization. PMID:7877135

  9. Preliminary identification of differentially expressed tear proteins in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wasinger, Valerie C.; Pye, David C.; Willcox, Mark D. P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the proteins differentially expressed in the tear film of people with keratoconus and normal subjects. Methods Unstimulated tears from people with keratoconus (KC) and controls (C) were collected using a capillary tube. Tear proteins from people with KC and controls were partitioned using a novel in-solution electrophoresis, Microflow 10 (ProteomeSep), and analyzed using linear ion trap quadrupole fourier transform mass spectrometry. Spectral counting was used to quantify the individual tear proteins. Results Elevated levels of cathepsin B (threefold) were evident in the tears of people with KC. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (ninefold), fibrinogen alpha chain (eightfold), cystatin S (twofold), and cystatin SN (twofold) were reduced in tears from people with KC. Keratin type-1 cytoskeletal-14 and keratin type-2 cytoskeletal-5 were present only in the tears of people with KC. Conclusions The protein changes in tears, that is, the decrease in protease inhibitors and increase in proteases, found in the present and other previously published studies reflect the pathological events involved in KC corneas. Further investigations into tear proteins may help elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of KC, which could result in better treatment options. PMID:24194634

  10. Bacterial expression and photoaffinity labeling of a pheromone binding protein.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D

    1993-03-01

    The first high-level production of a binding-active odorant binding protein is described. The expression cassette polymerase chain reaction was used to generate a DNA fragment encoding the pheromone binding protein (PBP) of the male moth Antheraea polyphemus. Transformation of Escherichia coli cells with a vector containing this construct generated clones which, when induced with isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside, produced the 14-kDa PBP in both the soluble fraction and in inclusion bodies. Purification of the soluble recombinant PBP by preparative isoelectric focusing and gel filtration gave > 95% homogeneous protein, which was immunoreactive with an anti-PBP antiserum and exhibited specific, pheromone-displaceable covalent modification by the photoaffinity label [3H]6E,11Z-hexadecadienyl diazoacetate. Recombinant PBP was indistinguishable from the insect-derived PBP, as determined by both native and denaturing gel electrophoresis, immunoreactivity, and photoaffinity labeling properties. Moreover, the insoluble inclusion body protein could be solubilized, refolded, and purified by the same procedures to give a recombinant PBP indistinguishable from the soluble PBP. Proton NMR spectra of the soluble and refolded protein provide further evidence that they possess the same folded structure. PMID:8453379

  11. Protein expression and characterization of SEP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Zhou, J; Wang, P; Lin, X; Xu, Y

    2015-01-01

    SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box genes play crucial roles in the regulation of floral growth and development. They are required for the specification of sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels as well as for floral determinacy. SEPs perform their functions through the formation of homo- or hetero-polymers, which are the molecular basis of floral quartets. In vitro assays indicated that SEP3 forms a tetramer after binding to DNA, but it is unclear whether DNA binding induces the tetramer, because SEP3 is often reported to form a dimer. Here, we analyzed the oligomeric status of SEP3 domains in the absence of the DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The truncated SEP3 was constructed as a fusion protein and expressed in prokaryotic cells. The purified protein fragment displayed as a tetramer in the size exclusion chromatographic column, and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay demonstrated that the protein contained a dimer unit. Yeast two-hybrid tests further verified that the fragments form homologous polymers in vivo, and that the K domain is involved in tetramer formation. Current results imply that the SEP3 protein regulates the formation of flower meristems using the tetramer as a unit, and that the DNA-binding MADS-box is dispensable for polymer formation. The C-terminal region does not contribute to homo-tetramer formation, but it may be reserved to glue other proteins. PMID:26505403

  12. Protein expression strategies in Tobacco necrosis virus-D.

    PubMed

    Chkuaseli, Tamari; Newburn, Laura R; Bakhshinyan, David; White, K Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco necrosis virus (TNV-D) has a plus-strand RNA genome that is neither 5' capped nor 3' poly-adenylated. Instead, it utilizes a 3' cap-independent translational enhancer (3'CITE) located in its 3' untranslated region (UTR) for translation of its proteins. We have examined the protein expression strategies used by TNV-D and our results indicate that: (i) a base pairing interaction between conserved ACCA and UGGU motifs in the genomic 5'UTR and 3'CITE, respectively, is not required for efficient plant cell infection, (ii) similar potential 5'UTR-3'CITE interactions in the two viral subgenomic mRNAs are not needed for efficient translation of viral proteins in vitro, (iii) a small amount of capsid protein is translated from the viral genome by a largely 3'CITE-independent mechanism, (iv) the larger of two possible forms of capsid protein is efficiently translated, and (v) p7b is translated from subgenomic mRNA1 by a leaky scanning mechanism. PMID:26402375

  13. Expression of Alix protein during early avian development.

    PubMed

    Fraboulet, Sandrine; Hemming, Fiona J; Mahul, Anne-Laure; Cristina, Nadine; Sadoul, Rémy

    2003-05-01

    Alix is a cytoplasmic protein involved in both programmed cell death and endocytosis (Oncogene 21 (2002) 6801). These activities of Alix may be related to its demonstrated capacity to bind ALG-2 (Apoptosis Linked Gene-2), CIN85/SETA and endophilins (J. Biol. Chem. 275 (2000) 19275; Science 271 (1996) 521; Cell Death Differ. 6 (1999) 124; J. Biol. Chem. 274 (1999) 1533; J. Biol. Chem. 28 (2002) 29108). Here we report for the first time the developmental expression pattern of Alix protein during chick development. We show by immunochemistry that the protein appears first in the ventral part of the rostral neural tube (stage 16 HH) and then in more caudal parts, thereby following the rostro-caudal maturation of the neural tube. Later on, the protein is found in the distal part of axons as well as in the dermomyotome where it becomes restricted to the muscle progenitors. This first demonstration of Alix modulation during development suggests a role for the protein in early phases of motoneuron and muscle growth and differentiation. PMID:12711539

  14. Blue Light Modulates Murine Microglial Gene Expression in the Absence of Optogenetic Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kevin P.; Kiernan, Elizabeth A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural optogenetic applications over the past decade have steadily increased; however the effects of commonly used blue light paradigms on surrounding, non-optogenetic protein-expressing CNS cells are rarely considered, despite their simultaneous exposure. Here we report that blue light (450 nm) repetitively delivered in both long-duration boluses and rapid optogenetic bursts gene-specifically altered basal expression of inflammatory and neurotrophic genes in immortalized and primary murine wild type microglial cultures. In addition, blue light reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression in microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide. These results demonstrate previously unreported, off-target effects of blue light in cells not expressing optogenetic constructs. The unexpected gene modulatory effects of blue light on wild type CNS resident immune cells have novel and important implications for the neuro-optogenetic field. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic utility of blue light modulation of the wild type CNS. PMID:26883795

  15. Evaluation of TPGS-modified thermo-sensitive Pluronic PF127 hydrogel as a potential carrier to reverse the resistance of P-gp-overexpressing SMMC-7721 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Ma, Jianli; Hao, Daifeng; Wei, Pei; Zhou, Liang; Liu, Guiyang

    2016-04-01

    In the present studies locally injectable docetaxel nanocrystals loaded d-alpha tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-modified Pluronic F127 (DOC-NCs-TPGS-PF127) thermo-sensitive hydrogels were prepared to reverse drug resistance of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing human liver cancer SMMC-7721 tumors. Firstly, DOC nanosuspensions with mean particle size of 196nm were prepared and dispersed into series of mixed solutions containing PF127 and TPGS of different ratios to obtain DOC-NCs-TPGS-PF127 hydrogels. DOC NCs, exhibiting a uniform distribution and very good physical stability during three sol-gel cycles in the hydrogel network, did not influence the gelation temperature. Swelling-dependent release pattern was found for DOC NCs from hydrogels and release profiles could be well fitted by the Peppas equation. MTT test showed that hydrogels containing 0% or 0.1% TPGS had no cytotoxicity against L929 fibroblasts. Both DOC solution and DOC-NCs-TPGS-PF127 hydrogels exhibited obvious cytotoxicity against sensitive SMMC-7721 cells. When resistant SMMC7721 cells were treated, DOC-NCs-TPGS-PF127 hydrogels showed significantly higher cytotoxicity compared with DOC solution and hydrogels containing no TPGS (DOC-NCs-PF127), with markedly lower IC50 and resistant index (RI). After intratumoral injection in SMMC-7721/RT tumor xenograft Balb/c mice model, DOC-NCs-TPGS-PF127 hydrogels exhibited about 5-fold increase and 1.8-fold increase in the inhibition rate of tumor growth compared with intravenous and intratumoral injection of DOC solution, respectively. It could be concluded that TPGS-modified PF127 thermo-sensitive hydrogel was an excellent locally injectable carrier to reverse P-gp overexpression associated multi-drug resistance. PMID:26764117

  16. Expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein in Bacillus methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Nilasari, Dewi; Dover, Nir; Rech, Sabine; Komives, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts are used in a wide range of industries to produce large scale quantities of proteins, amino acids, and commodity chemicals. While the majority of these processes use glucose or other low-cost sugars as the substrate, Bacillus methanolicus is one example of a biocatalyst that has shown sustained growth on methanol as a carbon source at elevated temperature (50-53°C optimum) resulting in reduced feed and utility costs. Specifically, the complete chemical process enabled by this approach takes methane from natural gas, and following a low-cost conversion to methanol, can be used for the production of high value products. In this study, production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by B. methanolicus is explored. A plasmid was constructed that incorporates the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh) promoter of B. methanolicus MGA3 together with the GFPuv gene. The plasmid, pNW33N, was shown to be effective for expression in other Bacillus strains, although not previously in B. methanolicus. A published electroporation protocol for transformation of B. methanolicus was modified to result in expression of GFP using plasmid pNW33N-mdh-GFPuv (pNmG). Transformation was confirmed by both agarose gel electrophoresis and by observation of green fluorescence under UV light exposure. The mass yield of cells and protein were measured in shake flask experiments. The optimum concentration of methanol for protein production was found to be at 200 mM. Higher concentrations than 200 mM resulted in slightly higher biomass production but lower amounts of recombinant protein. PMID:22275315

  17. Expression of mammalian DT-diaphorase in Escherichia coli: purification and characterization of the expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Wang, R; Yang, C S; Lu, A Y

    1990-12-01

    A full-length cDNA clone, pKK-DTD4, complementary to rat liver cytosolic DT-diaphorase [NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2)] mRNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. The pKK-DTD4 cDNA was obtained by extending the 5'-end sequence of a rat liver DT-diaphorase cDNA clone, pDTD55, to include an ATG initiation codon and the NH2-terminal codons using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Restriction sites for EcoRI and HindIII were incorporated at the 5'- and 3'-ends of the cDNA, respectively, by the PCR reaction. The resulting full-length cDNA was inserted into an expression vector, pKK2.7, at the EcoRI and HindIII restriction sites. E. coli strain AB1899 was transformed with the constructed expression plasmid, and DT-diaphorase was expressed under the control of the tac promotor. The expressed DT-diaphorase exhibited high activity of menadione reduction and was inhibited by dicumarol at a concentration of 10(-5)M. After purification by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography, the expressed enzyme migrated as a single band on 12.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel with a molecular weight equivalent to that of the purified rat liver cytosolic DT-diaphorase. The purified expressed protein was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against rat liver DT-diaphorase on immunoblot analysis. It utilized either NADPH or NADH as electron donor at equal efficiency and displayed high activities in reduction of menadione, 1,4-benzoquinone, and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol which are typical substrates for DT-diaphorase. The expressed DT-diaphorase exhibited a typical flavoprotein spectrum with absorption peaks at 380 and 452 nm. Flavin content determination showed that it contained 2 mol of FAD per mole of the enzyme. Edman protein sequencing of the first 20 amino acid residues at the NH2 terminus of the expressed protein indicated that the expressed DT-diaphorase is not blocked at the NH2 terminus and has an alanine as the first amino acid. The remaining 19 amino acid residues at the NH2 terminus were identical with those of the DT-diaphorase purified from rat liver cytosol. PMID:1703398

  18. Transient expression of proteins by hydrodynamic gene delivery in mice.

    PubMed

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  19. Transient Expression of Proteins by Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  20. Immunohistochemical evaluation of mx protein expression in canine encephalitides.

    PubMed

    Porter, B F; Ambrus, A; Storts, R W

    2006-11-01

    Mx proteins are a group of interferon-induced GTPases whose expression has been demonstrated in a number of human viral infections and in some idiopathic inflammatory diseases. In this study, the expression of Mx protein was evaluated in known viral, nonviral, and idiopathic encephalitides in the dog via immunohistochemistry using an antibody against human MxA. All 12 cases of confirmed viral encephalitis, including 7 cases of canine distemper, 4 cases of canine herpesvirus, and 1 case of rabies, were Mx positive. In canine distemper cases, staining was particularly strong and a variety of cell types were positive, including astrocytes, macrophages/microglia, and neurons. Immunoreactivity for Mx protein was evident in a few cases of nonviral infectious encephalitis, including neosporosis (1/1), Chagas disease (2/3), aspergillosis (1/2), and encephalitozoonosis (1/1). Consistent staining was observed in most cases of idiopathic encephalitis, including granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (7/7), necrotizing meningoencephalitis of pug dogs (6/7), and necrotizing encephalitis of the Yorkshire Terrier (3/3) and Maltese (1/1) breeds. Mx staining was negative in 5 normal dog brains; 3 cases of cryptococcosis; and single cases of blastomycosis, protothecosis, and bacterial meningitis. PMID:17099155

  1. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  2. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to understand intracellular regulatory mechanisms in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which are either common to many autoimmune diseases or specific to some of them. We incorporated large-scale data such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression and demographical information of hundreds of patients and healthy subjects, related to six autoimmune diseases with available large-scale gene expression measurements: multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). These data were analyzed concurrently by statistical and systems biology approaches tailored for this purpose. We found that chemokines such as CXCL1-3, 5, 6 and the interleukin (IL) IL8 tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In addition, the anti-apoptotic gene BCL3, interferon-γ (IFNG), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene physically interact with significantly many genes that tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In general, similar cellular processes tend to be differentially expressed in PBMC in the analyzed autoimmune diseases. Specifically, the cellular processes related to cell proliferation (for example, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, nuclear factor-κB, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, stress-activated protein kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase), inflammatory response (for example, interleukins IL2 and IL6, the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the B-cell receptor), general signaling cascades (for example, mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 and TRK) and apoptosis are activated in most of the analyzed autoimmune diseases. However, our results suggest that in each of the analyzed diseases, apoptosis and chemotaxis are activated via different subsignaling pathways. Analyses of the expression levels of dozens of genes and the protein-protein interactions among them demonstrated that CD and UC have relatively similar gene expression signatures, whereas the gene expression signatures of T1D and JRA relatively differ from the signatures of the other autoimmune diseases. These diseases are the only ones activated via the Fcɛ pathway. The relevant genes and pathways reported in this study are discussed at length, and may be helpful in the diagnoses and understanding of autoimmunity and/or specific autoimmune diseases. PMID:23190644

  3. Induction of apoptosis and bcl-2 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children.

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, A; Hajto, B; Balwierz, W; Klus, K

    2001-01-01

    bcl-2 expression is associated with the expression of the multidrug resistance molecule (p-gp) and the resistance of leukaemia cells to the induction of apoptosis. The activity of p-gp is the main mechanism of resistance of leukaemia cells to chemotherapy. This study assessed the induction of apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) blastic cells following in vitro treatment with dexamethasone (DXM), vincristine (VCR), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in relation to the expression of bcl-2 and p-gp. Common ALL (cALL; n = 24 patients), common ALL with co-expression of myeloid antigens (cALL + My; n = 9), ALL-T (n = 9), and NHL [n = 6 (T type, n = 2; B type, n = 4)] were included. The expression of bcl-2 and p-gp and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry. Spontaneous apoptosis was low (< 5%) in cALL and ALL-T and higher (> 8%) in NHL and cALL + My. A high frequency of bcl-2 expression was noted in cALL and cALL + My. A high frequency of p-gp expression was observed in cALL + My, ALL-T, and NHL. There was a reverse association between bcl-2 expression and spontaneous apoptosis. DXM-induced apoptosis was observed in 52.63%, TNF-induced in 42.85%, VCR-induced in 36.36%, and GM-CSF-induced in 33.3% of leukaemia and lymphoma cases. DXM and GM-CSF-driven apoptosis was reversibly associated with bcl-2-expression (bcl-2-dependent mechanism). VCR and TNF-driven apoptosis was not associated with bcl-2 expression, suggesting a different, bcl-2-independent, mechanism(s) of its induction. The in vitro induction of apoptosis was not associated with expression of p-gp. PMID:11855781

  4. Detection of Differentially Expressed Basal Cell Proteins by Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Todorović, Viktor; Desai, Bhushan V.; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Yin, Taofei; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Mrksich, Milan; Green, Kathleen J.; Patterson, Melanie J. Schroeder

    2010-01-01

    The ability of cells to modulate interactions with each other and the substrate is essential for epithelial tissue remodeling during processes such as wound healing and tumor progression. However, despite strides made in the field of proteomics, proteins involved in adhesion have been difficult to study. Here, we report a method for the enrichment and analysis of proteins associated with the basal surface of the cell and its underlying matrix. The enrichment involves deroofing the cells with 20 mm ammonium hydroxide and the removal of cytosolic and organellar proteins by stringent water wash. Proteomic profiling was achieved by LC-FTMS, which allowed comparison of differentially expressed or shared proteins under different cell states. First, we analyzed and compared the basal cell components of mouse keratinocytes lacking the cell-cell junction molecule plakoglobin with their control counterparts. Changes in the molecules involved in motility and invasion were detected in plakoglobin-deficient cells, including decreased detection of fibronectin, integrin β4, and FAT tumor suppressor. Second, we assessed the differences in basal cell components between two human oral squamous cell carcinoma lines originating from different sites in the oral cavity (CAL33 and UM-SCC-1). The data show differences between the two lines in the type and abundance of proteins specific to cell adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis. Therefore, the method described here has the potential to serve as a platform to assess proteomic changes in basal cell components including extracellular and adhesion-specific proteins involved in wound healing, cancer, and chronic and acquired adhesion-related disorders. PMID:19955077

  5. Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins and Phosphorylated Proteins in Rice Seedlings in Response to Strigolactone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangyu; Jiang, Liangrong; Zheng, Jingsheng; Huang, Rongyu; Wang, Houcong; Hong, Zonglie; Huang, Yumin

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are recently identified plant hormones that inhibit shoot branching and control various aspects of plant growth, development and interaction with parasites. Previous studies have shown that plant D10 protein is a carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase that functions in SL biosynthesis. In this work, we used an allelic SL-deficient d10 mutant XJC of rice (Oryza sativa L. spp. indica) to investigate proteins that were responsive to SL treatment. When grown in darkness, d10 mutant seedlings exhibited elongated mesocotyl that could be rescued by exogenous application of SLs. Soluble protein extracts were prepared from d10 mutant seedlings grown in darkness in the presence of GR24, a synthetic SL analog. Soluble proteins were separated on two-dimensional gels and subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteins that were expressed differentially and phosphoproteins whose phosphorylation status changed in response to GR24 treatment were identified. Eight proteins were found to be induced or down-regulated by GR24, and a different set of 8 phosphoproteins were shown to change their phosphorylation intensities in the dark-grown d10 seedlings in response to GR24 treatment. Analysis of these proteins revealed that they are important enzymes of the carbohydrate and amino acid metabolic pathways and key components of the cellular energy generation machinery. These proteins may represent potential targets of the SL signaling pathway. This study provides new insight into the complex and negative regulatory mechanism by which SLs control shoot branching and plant development. PMID:24699514

  6. Modular Broad-Host-Range Expression Vectors for Single-Protein and Protein Complex Purification

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Barna D.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Csáki, Róbert; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Klement, Éva; Maróti, Gergely; Mészáros, Lívia S.; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L.

    2004-01-01

    A set of modular broad-host-range expression vectors with various affinity tags (six-His-tag, FLAG-tag, Strep-tag II, T7-tag) was created. The complete nucleotide sequences of the vectors are known, and these small vectors can be mobilized by conjugation. They are useful in the purification of proteins and protein complexes from gram-negative bacterial species. The plasmids were easily customized for Thiocapsa roseopersicina, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Methylococcus capsulatus by inserting an appropriate promoter. These examples demonstrate the versatility and flexibility of the vectors. The constructs harbor the T7 promoter for easy overproduction of the desired protein in an appropriate Escherichia coli host. The vectors were useful in purifying different proteins from T. roseopersicina. The FLAG-tag-Strep-tag II combination was utilized for isolation of the HynL-HypC2 protein complex involved in hydrogenase maturation. These tools should be useful for protein purification and for studying protein-protein interactions in a range of bacterial species. PMID:14766546

  7. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present “DyCluster”, a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  8. Structure and expression of a novel compact myelin protein – Small VCP-interacting protein (SVIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiawen; Peng, Dungeng; Voehler, Markus; Sanders, Charles R.; Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University ; Li, Jun; Tennessee Valley Healthcare System – Nashville VA

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin. •We determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). •The helical content of SVIP increases dramatically during its interaction with negatively charged lipid membrane. •This study provides structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes. -- Abstract: SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) was initially identified as one of many cofactors regulating the valosin containing protein (VCP), an AAA+ ATPase involved in endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD). Our previous study showed that SVIP is expressed exclusively in the nervous system. In the present study, SVIP and VCP were seen to be co-localized in neuronal cell bodies. Interestingly, we also observed that SVIP co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin, where VCP was absent. Furthermore, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic measurements, we determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). However, upon binding to the surface of membranes containing a net negative charge, the helical content of SVIP increases dramatically. These findings provide structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes.

  9. High-throughput protein expression using a combination of ligation-independent cloning (LIC) and infrared fluorescent protein (IFP) detection.

    PubMed

    Dortay, Hakan; Akula, Usha Madhuri; Westphal, Christin; Sittig, Marie; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Protein expression in heterologous hosts for functional studies is a cumbersome effort. Here, we report a superior platform for parallel protein expression in vivo and in vitro. The platform combines highly efficient ligation-independent cloning (LIC) with instantaneous detection of expressed proteins through N- or C-terminal fusions to infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). For each open reading frame, only two PCR fragments are generated (with three PCR primers) and inserted by LIC into ten expression vectors suitable for protein expression in microbial hosts, including Escherichia coli, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, the protozoon Leishmania tarentolae, and an in vitro transcription/translation system. Accumulation of IFP-fusion proteins is detected by infrared imaging of living cells or crude protein extracts directly after SDS-PAGE without additional processing. We successfully employed the LIC-IFP platform for in vivo and in vitro expression of ten plant and fungal proteins, including transcription factors and enzymes. Using the IFP reporter, we additionally established facile methods for the visualisation of protein-protein interactions and the detection of DNA-transcription factor interactions in microtiter and gel-free format. We conclude that IFP represents an excellent reporter for high-throughput protein expression and analysis, which can be easily extended to numerous other expression hosts using the setup reported here. PMID:21541323

  10. Extracellular matrix protein expression is brain region dependent.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Grevesse, Thomas; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Campbell, Patrick H; Maoz, Ben M; Berretta, Sabina; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, extracellular matrix (ECM) components form networks that contribute to structural and functional diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of ECM networks has been reported in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that the brain microenvironment is a dynamic structure. A lack of quantitative information about ECM distribution in the brain hinders an understanding of region-specific ECM functions and the role of ECM in health and disease. We hypothesized that each ECM protein as well as specific ECM structures, such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) and interstitial matrix, are differentially distributed throughout the brain, contributing to the unique structure and function in the various regions of the brain. To test our hypothesis, we quantitatively analyzed the distribution, colocalization, and protein expression of aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R throughout the rat brain utilizing immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis and assessed the effect of aggrecan, brevican, and/or tenascin-R on neurite outgrowth in vitro. We focused on aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R as they are especially expressed in the mature brain, and have established roles in brain development, plasticity, and neurite outgrowth. The results revealed a differentiated distribution of all three proteins throughout the brain and indicated that their presence significantly reduces neurite outgrowth in a 3D in vitro environment. These results underline the importance of a unique and complex ECM distribution for brain physiology and suggest that encoding the distribution of distinct ECM proteins throughout the brain will aid in understanding their function in physiology and in turn assist in identifying their role in disease. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1309-1336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26780384

  11. Expression of cell cycle proteins in male breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare, yet potentially aggressive disease. Although literature regarding female breast cancer (FBC) is extensive, little is known about the etiopathogenesis of male breast cancer. Studies from our laboratory show that MBCs have a distinct immunophenotypic profile, suggesting that the etiopathogenesis of MBC is different from FBCs. The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate the immunohistochemical expression of cell cycle proteins in male breast carcinoma to significant clinico-biological endpoints. Methods 75 cases of MBC were identified using the records of the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency over 26 years (1970-1996). Cases were reviewed and analyzed for the immunohistochemical expression of PCNA, Ki67, p27, p16, p57, p21, cyclin-D1 and c-myc and correlated to clinico-biological endpoints of tumor size, node status, stage of the disease, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Decreased DFS was observed in the majority of tumors that overexpressed PCNA (98%, p = 0.004). The overexpression of PCNA was inversely correlated to the expression of Ki67 which was predominantly negative (78.3%). Cyclin D1 was overexpressed in 83.7% of cases. Cyclin D1 positive tumors were smaller than 2 cm (55.6%, p = 0.005), had a low incidence of lymph node metastasis (38.2%, p = 0.04) and were associated with increased DFS of >150 months (p = 0.04). Overexpression of c-myc (90%) was linked with a higher incidence of node negativity (58.3%, p = 0.006) and increased DFS (p = 0.04). p27 over expression was associated with decreased lymph node metastasis (p = 0.04). P21 and p57 positive tumors were related to decreased DFS (p = 0.04). Though p16 was overexpressed in 76.6%, this did not reach statistical significance with DFS (p = 0.06) or nodal status (p = 0.07). Conclusion Aberrant cell cycle protein expression supports our view that these are important pathways involved in the etiopathogenesis of MBC. Tumors with overexpression of Cyclin D1 and c-myc had better outcomes, in contrast to tumors with overexpression of p21, p57, and PCNA with significantly worse outcomes. P27 appears to be a predictive marker for lymph nodal status. Such observation strongly suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle proteins may play a unique role in the initiation and progression of disease in male breast cancer. Such findings open up new avenues for the treatment of MBC as a suitable candidate for novel CDK-based anticancer therapies in the future. PMID:20152033

  12. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  13. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Trichohyalin-like 1 protein is a member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. ► Specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein were generated. ► TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. ► TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in tumor nests of BCC and SCC. ► The expression of TCHHL1 proteins increased in epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris. - Abstract: Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes.

  14. PPAR-β/δ activation promotes phospholipid transfer protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chehaibi, Khouloud; Cedó, Lídia; Metso, Jari; Palomer, Xavier; Santos, David; Quesada, Helena; Naceur Slimane, Mohamed; Wahli, Walter; Julve, Josep; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Jauhiainen, Matti; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2015-03-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-β/δ has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for treating dyslipidemia, including beneficial effects on HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). In the current study, we determined the effects of the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW0742 on HDL composition and the expression of liver HDL-related genes in mice and cultured human cells. The experiments were carried out in C57BL/6 wild-type, LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice and PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice treated with GW0742 (10mg/kg/day) or a vehicle solution for 14 days. GW0742 upregulated liver phospholipid transfer protein (Pltp) gene expression and increased serum PLTP activity in mice. When given to wild-type mice, GW0742 significantly increased serum HDL-C and HDL phospholipids; GW0742 also raised serum potential to generate preβ-HDL formation. The GW0742-mediated effects on liver Pltp expression and serum enzyme activity were completely abolished in PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice. GW0742 also stimulated PLTP mRNA expression in mouse J774 macrophages, differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human hepatoma Huh7. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a common transcriptional upregulation by GW0742-activated PPAR-β/δ of Pltp expression in cultured cells and in mouse liver resulting in enhanced serum PLTP activity. Our results also indicate that PPAR-β/δ activation may modulate PLTP-mediated preβ-HDL formation and macrophage cholesterol efflux. PMID:25662586

  15. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  16. Effect of Culture Time on the Basal Expression Levels of Drug Transporters in Sandwich-Cultured Primary Rat HepatocytesS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Jessica S.; Uyeda, Craig; Grillo, Mark P.; Jin, Lixia

    2011-01-01

    Sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes are used in drug discovery for pharmacological and toxicological assessment of drug candidates, yet their utility as a functional model for drug transporters has not been fully characterized. To evaluate the system as an in vitro model for drug transport, expression changes of hepatic transporters relative to whole liver and freshly isolated hepatocytes (day 0) were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for 4 consecutive days of culture. No significant differences in transporter expression levels were observed between freshly isolated hepatocytes and whole liver. Two distinct mRNA profiles were detected over time showing 1) a more than 5-fold decline in levels of uptake transporters such as Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp), organic anion transporter (Oat) 2, organic anion-transporting polypeptide (Oatp) 1a1, Oatp1a4, and Oatp1b2 and 2) a greater than 5-fold increase of efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), and multidrug resistance-related proteins (Mrp) 1, 2, 3, and 4. In addition, protein levels and functional activities for selected transporters were also determined. Protein levels for Mrp2, Bcrp, P-gp, Ntcp, and Oatp1a4 corresponded to changes in mRNA. Functional activities of Oatps and Oct1 exhibited a 3- and 4-fold decrease on day 2 and day 4, respectively, relative to that on day 0, whereas a more than 10-fold reduction in Oat2 activity was observed. These results indicate that the cell culture conditions used herein did not provide an optimal environment for expression of all hepatic transporters. Significant time-dependent alterations in basal gene expression patterns of transporters were detected compared with those in liver or freshly isolated hepatocytes. Further work and new strategies are required to improve the validity of this model as an in vitro tool for in vivo drug transport or biliary clearance prediction. PMID:21865320

  17. Expression of Water Channel Proteins in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum1

    PubMed Central

    Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Golldack, Dortje; Quigley, Francoise; Michalowski, Christine B.; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for nine major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), some of which function as water channels (aquaporins), from the ice plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. To determine the cellular distribution and expression of these MIPs, oligopeptide-based antibodies were generated against MIP-A, MIP-B, MIP-C, or MIP-F, which, according to sequence and functional characteristics, are located in the plasma membrane (PM) and tonoplast, respectively. MIPs were most abundant in cells involved in bulk water flow and solute flux. The tonoplast MIP-F was found in all cells, while signature cell types identified different PM-MIPs: MIP-A predominantly in phloem-associated cells, MIP-B in xylem parenchyma, and MIP-C in the epidermis and endodermis of immature roots. Membrane protein analysis confirmed MIP-F as tonoplast located. MIP-A and MIP-B were found in tonoplast fractions and also in fractions distinct from either the tonoplast or PM. MIP-C was most abundant but not exclusive to PM fractions, where it is expected based on its sequence signature. We suggest that within the cell, MIPs are mobile, which is similar to aquaporins cycling through animal endosomes. MIP cycling and the differential regulation of these proteins observed under conditions of salt stress may be fundamental for the control of tissue water flux. PMID:10806230

  18. Functions of BET proteins in erythroid gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Stonestrom, Aaron J.; Hsu, Sarah C.; Jahn, Kristen S.; Huang, Peng; Keller, Cheryl A.; Giardine, Belinda M.; Kadauke, Stephan; Campbell, Amy E.; Evans, Perry; Hardison, Ross C.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of bromodomain and extraterminal motif proteins (BETs) are being evaluated for the treatment of cancer and other diseases, yet much remains to be learned about how BET proteins function during normal physiology. We used genomic and genetic approaches to examine BET function in a hematopoietic maturation system driven by GATA1, an acetylated transcription factor previously shown to interact with BETs. We found that BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 were variably recruited to GATA1-regulated genes, with BRD3 binding the greatest number of GATA1-occupied sites. Pharmacologic BET inhibition impaired GATA1-mediated transcriptional activation, but not repression, genome-wide. Mechanistically, BETs promoted chromatin occupancy of GATA1 and subsequently supported transcriptional activation. Using a combination of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genomic engineering and shRNA approaches, we observed that depletion of either BRD2 or BRD4 alone blunted erythroid gene activation. Surprisingly, depletion of BRD3 only affected erythroid transcription in the context of BRD2 deficiency. Consistent with functional overlap among BET proteins, forced BRD3 expression substantially rescued defects caused by BRD2 deficiency. These results suggest that pharmacologic BET inhibition should be interpreted in the context of distinct steps in transcriptional activation and overlapping functions among BET family members. PMID:25696920

  19. Statins Inhibit Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 Expression in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Hakan; Basar, Murat; Seval-Celik, Yasemin; Osteen, Kevin G.; Duleba, Antoni J.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Lockwood, Charles J.; Arici, Aydin

    2012-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of the endogenous mevalonate pathway. Besides inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis, statins may also demonstrate anti-inflammatory properties. Inflammation is implicated in the attachment and invasion of endometrial cells to the peritoneal surface and growth of ectopic endometrium by inducing proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, the effect of statins on monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) expression in endometriotic implants in nude mouse model and in cultured endometriotic cells was evaluated. In mouse model, simvastatin decreased MCP-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in endometriotic implants (P < .05). Similarly, both simvastatin and mevastatin revealed a dose-dependent inhibition of MCP-1 production in cultured endometriotic cells (P < .01). This inhibitory effect of the statins on MCP-1 production was reversed by the downstream substrates of the mevalonate pathway. Moreover, statins decreased MCP-1 messenger RNA expression in cultured endometriotic cells (P < .05). In conclusion, statins exert anti-inflammatory effect in endometriotic cells and could provide a potential treatment of endometriosis in the future. PMID:22267540

  20. Protein Expression Analysis of Melanocyte Differentiation Antigen TRP-2.

    PubMed

    Avogadri, Francesca; Gnjatic, Sacha; Tassello, Jodie; Frosina, Denise; Hanson, Nicole; Laudenbach, Megan; Ritter, Erika; Merghoub, Taha; Busam, Klaus J; Jungbluth, Achim A

    2016-03-01

    Melanocyte differentiation antigens, such as gp100, tyrosinase, and Melan-A and their corresponding antibodies HMB45, T311, and A103, are major diagnostic tools in surgical pathology. Little is known about tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2, or dopachrome tautomerase/DCT) another melanocyte differentiation antigen, which is an enzymatic component of melanogenesis. We identified a commercial reagent to TRP-2, monoclonal antibody (mAb) C-9 and undertook a comprehensive analysis to assess its specificity and usefulness for surgical pathology. Subsequently, we analyzed panels of normal tissues and tumors. We show that TRP-2 is regularly expressed in melanocytes of the normal skin. In cutaneous nevi, TRP-2 is present in junctional as well as in dermal nevocytes. In malignant tumors, C-9 reactivity is restricted to melanocytic and related lesions and present in 84% and 58% of primary and metastatic melanomas, respectively. Ten primary melanomas of the anorectal mucosa were all positive. Like the other melanocyte differentiation antigens, TRP-2 was absent in 6 desmoplastic melanomas. Also, only 2 of 9 angiomyolipomas were TRP-2 positive. We conclude that mAb C-9 is a valuable reagent for the analysis of TRP-2 expression in archival surgical pathology material. The expression pattern of TRP-2 in melanocytic and related lesions appears to parallel other melanocyte differentiation antigens, although the overall incidence is lower than other antigens, such as Melan-A or gp100. PMID:26894771

  1. From gene to protein: Prostatic acid phosphatase: Structure and expression of gene and protein*.

    PubMed

    Laidler, Piotr; Kuciel, Radoslawa; Dulińska, Joanna; Gil, Dorota; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Maria

    2004-11-01

    A set of classes for medical students is designed to reinforce an understanding of the basic laboratory methods of molecular biology and protein biochemistry in the context of a clinically important problem, prostate gland pathology. Students examine the gene coding for prostatic acid phosphatase and they assay expression of the gene in different lines of prostate cancer cell cultures (LNCaP and PC-3). The three-dimensional structure of the expressed protein is also investigated, in relation to its catalytic function. Students are encouraged to collect data for their experiments and to perform laboratory exercises on their own. The theory and practice should stimulate the students' discussion of various fields of biochemistry and molecular biology. PMID:21706764

  2. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  3. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  4. GPR37 Surface Expression Enhancement via N-Terminal Truncation or Protein-Protein Interactions1

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jill H.; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Garcia, Erin L.; Hall, Randy A.

    2009-01-01

    GPR37, also known as the parkin-associated endothelin-like receptor (Pael-R), is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that exhibits poor plasma membrane expression when expressed in most cell types. We sought to find ways to enhance GPR37 trafficking to the cell surface in order to facilitate studies of GPR37 functional activity in heterologous cells. In truncation studies, we found that removing the GPR37 N-terminus (NT) dramatically enhanced the receptor’s plasma membrane insertion. Further studies on sequential NT truncations revealed that removal of the first 210 amino acids increased surface expression nearly as much as removal of the entire NT. In studies examining the effects of co-expression of GPR37 with a variety of other GPCRs, we observed significant increases in GPR37 surface expression when the receptor was co-expressed with the adenosine receptor A2AR or the dopamine receptor D2R. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that full-length GPR37 and, to a greater extent, the truncated GPR37 were capable of robustly associating with D2R, resulting in modestly-altered D2R affinity for both agonists and antagonists. In studies examining potential interactions of GPR37 with PDZ scaffolds, we observed a specific interaction between GPR37 and syntenin-1, which resulted in a dramatic increase in GPR37 surface expression in HEK-293 cells. These findings reveal three independent approaches – N-terminal truncation, co-expression with other receptors and co-expression with syntenin-1 – by which GPR37 surface trafficking in heterologous cells can be greatly enhanced to facilitate functional studies on this orphan receptor. PMID:19799451

  5. Expression of Trans-Membrane Proteins in vitro Using a Cell Free System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, Natalie; Noireaux, Vincent; Chalmeau, Jerome

    2010-10-01

    Trans-membrane proteins represent a significant portion of the proteins expressed by cells. The expression of proteins in vitro, however, remains a challenge. Numerous expression approaches have been developed with cell free expression (CFE) being one of the most promising. CFE is based on a transcription-translation system that has been extracted from E. coli bacteria. Adding the desired DNA allows expression of a selected protein, and in the presence of phospholipids the expression of trans-membrane proteins becomes possible. In order to express trans-membrane proteins in a closed native environment, the cell free system (CFS) is encapsulated with a phospholipid bilayer, creating an artificial cell. To verify protein expression, AquaporinZ (AqpZ), a well-known trans-membrane protein tagged with a green fluorescent protein (eGFP), was used so the expressed proteins could be seen under a fluorescent microscope. These artificial cells will serve as an experimental platform for testing the viability of the expressed trans-membrane proteins. Results from the manipulation of these artificial cells by attaching them to the slide surface through streptavidin-biotin bonding will be presented.

  6. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins. PMID:26308583

  7. Developmental expression of odorant-binding proteins and chemosensory proteins in the embryos of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanxue; Zhang, Shangan; Zhang, Long; Zhao, Xingbo

    2009-06-01

    We have investigated the development of chemosensilla and the secretion of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) in the embryo of Locusta migratoria manilensis. We first report the changes of each sensillum in embryo just preceding hatch in detail and show that different sensilla have different developmental processes. Trichogen cells are first involved in forming the structure of pegs, and then, after retraction, they start secreting OBPs and CSPs in the sensillar lymph. The synthesis of LmigOBP1 starts during the embryogenesis about 0.5 h preceding hatching, specifically in sensilla trichodea and basiconica of the antenna. LmigOBP2, instead, was only found in the outer sensillum lymph (oSl) of sensilla chaetica of the antenna, while we could not detect LmigOBP3 in any type of sensilla of the antenna. The ontogenesis of CSPs in the embryos is similar to that of OBPs. Expression of CSPI homolog in Locusta migratoria is detected using the antiserum raised against SgreCSPI. CSPI is specifically expressed in the outer sensillum lymph of sensilla chaetica of the antenna, and anti-LmigCSPII dose not label any sensilla of the embryos. These data indicate that in locusts, OBPs and CSPs follow different temporal expression patterns, and also that OBPs are expressed in different types of sensilla. PMID:19408312

  8. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cantu-Bustos, J. Enrique; Cano del Villar, Kevin D.; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-01-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography. PMID:27014739

  9. Recombinant protein production data after expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Cano Del Villar, Kevin D; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-06-01

    Fusion proteins have become essential for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. The metal-binding protein CusF has shown several features that make it an attractive fusion protein and affinity tag: "Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF" (Cantu-Bustos et al., 2016 [1]). Here we present accompanying data from protein expression experiments; we tested different protein tags, temperatures, expression times, cellular compartments, and concentrations of inducer in order to obtain soluble protein and low formation of inclusion bodies. Additionally, we present data from the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged with CusF, using Ag(I) metal affinity chromatography. PMID:27014739

  10. [Expression of myelin basic protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein genes in human glial brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Dmytrenko, V V; Boĭko, O I; Shostak, K O; Bilets'kyĭ, A V; Malysheva, T A; Shamaiev, M I; Kliuchka, V M; Rozumenko, V D; Zozulia, Iu P; Kavsan, V M

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the expression of genes encoding myelin basic protein (MBP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) genes in human glial tumors was carried out for determination of the expression specificity of these genes according to tumor types and their malignancy. Low levels of MBP mRNA in astrocytoma specimens of malignancy grades II-IV and significantly higher levels in perifocal zone adjacent to them have been determined by Northern hybridization. Diffuse astrocytomas and anaplastic astrocytomas are characterized mostly by low level of MBP gene expression and high level of GFAP gene expression, but distinct subtypes of diffuse and anaplastic astrocytomas with high level of MBP gene and low level of GFAP gene expression can be also detected that may be the reflection of different oncogenic pathways. Very low levels or even absence of MBP mRNA were revealed in oligodendroglioma and all oligoastrocytomas. Thus, Northern hybridization data are correlated with Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). Obtained results show that MBP is nonspecific marker for tumors of oligodendroglial origin, but determination of relative levels of MBP and GFAP mRNAs may be useful for glial tumors recognition. By such a way, these two genes together with previously found by us YKL-40 and TSC-22 can be included into the gene panel for the determination of so called "gene signatures" of brain tumors. However, severe requirements in relation to a clinical value of these "gene signatures" can not be formulated without their verification on plenty of clinical samples of tumors and valid control. PMID:19663312

  11. RANKL directly induces bone morphogenetic protein-2 expression in RANK-expressing POS-1 osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wittrant, Yohann; Lamoureux, François; Mori, Kanji; Riet, Anne; Kamijo, Akira; Heymann, Dominique; Redini, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    The POS-1 murine model of osteolytic osteosarcoma was used to elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the development of primary bone tumors and associated lung metastasis. The POS-1 cell line is derived from an osteosarcoma tumor which develops spontaneously in C3H mice. The POS-1 cell line was characterized in vitro by mineralization capacity and expression of bone markers by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, compared to primary osteoblasts and bone marrow cells. POS-1 cells showed no mineralization capacity and exhibited an undifferentiated phenotype, expressing both osteoblastic and unexpected osteoclastic markers (TRAP, cathepsin K and RANK). Thereby, experiments were performed to determine whether RANK was functional, by studying the biological activity of murine RANKL through the receptor RANK expressed on POS-1 cells. Results revealed a RANKL-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation, as well as BMP-2 induction at the mRNA and protein levels, and a decrease of POS-1 cell proliferation in the presence of 10 ng/ml RANKL. BMP-2 induction is dependent on the ERK 1/2 signal transduction pathway, as its expression is abolished in the presence of UO126, a specific synthetic inhibitor of the ERK 1/2 pathway. Moreover, a 2-fold molar excess of soluble RANK blocks the RANKL-induced BMP-2 expression, demonstrating that the biological effects of RANKL observed in POS-1 cells are mediated by RANK. This is the first report describing a functional RANK expressed on osteosarcoma cells, as shown by its ability to induce signal transduction pathways and biological activity when stimulated by RANKL. PMID:16328004

  12. β-asarone and levodopa co-administration increase striatal dopamine level in 6-hydroxydopamine induced rats by modulating P-glycoprotein and tight junction proteins at the blood-brain barrier and promoting levodopa into the brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Ma, Ruanxin; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-06-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is widely considered as one of the most effective drug constituents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of L-dopa is <5%, which causes low efficacy. Neuroprotective effects of β-asarone on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats were demonstrated by our previous studies. Co-administration of β-asarone and L-dopa has not been explored until being investigated on PD rats in this study. PD rats were divided into four groups: untreated, L-dopa-treated, β-asarone-treated and co-administered-treated groups. All of the treatments were administered to the rats twice per day for 30 days. The L-dopa, dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), S100β and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels were subsequently determined. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, occludin and actin expression was also assessed in cortex. Changes in BBB ultrastructure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the co-administered treatment increased levels of L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA in striatum, and S100β in plasma, but down-regulated NSE, P-gp, ZO-1, occludin, actin and claudin-5 in cortex. Crevices were observed between capillary endothelial cells at intercellular tight junction of the striatum in co-administered-treated group, while the endothelial cells in untreated group were tightly jointing each other. In addition, the correlations of L-dopa or DA and P-gp or tight junction proteins respectively were significantly negative in co-administered- and β-asarone-treated groups. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment may enhance the L-dopa BBB permeability and attenuate brain injury, which may be beneficial to PD treatment. PMID:26991136

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1096 protein: gene cloning, protein expression, and peptidoglycan deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria modulate and evade the immune defenses of their hosts through peptidoglycan (PG) deacetylation. The PG deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumonia, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis have been characterized. However, thus far, the PG deacetylase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been identified. Results In this study, we cloned the Rv1096 gene from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and expressed Rv1096 protein in both Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis. The results showed that the purified Rv1096 protein possessed metallo-dependent PG deacetylase activity, which increased in the presence of Co2+. The kinetic parameters of the PG deacetylase towards M. smegmatis PG as a substrate were as follows: Km, 0.910 ± 0.007 mM; Vmax, 0.514 ± 0.038 μMmin-1; and Kcat = 0.099 ± 0.007 (S-1). Additionally, the viability of M. smegmatis in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein was 109-fold higher than that of wild-type M. smegmatis after lysozyme treatment. Additionally, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein, M. smegmatis kept its regular shape, with an undamaged cell wall and smooth surface. These results indicate that Rv1096 caused deacetylation of cell wall PG, leading to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Conclusion We have determined that M. tuberculosis Rv1096 is a PG deacetylase. The PG deacetylase activity of Rv1096 contributed to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Our findings suggest that deacetylation of cell wall PG may be involved in evasion of host immune defenses by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24975018

  14. Coat protein expression strategy of oat blue dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael C; Weiland, John J

    2014-02-01

    Oat blue dwarf virus (OBDV) is a member of the genus Marafivirus whose genome encodes a 227 kDa polyprotein (p227) ostensibly processed post-translationally into its functional components. Encoded near the 3' terminus and coterminal with the p227 ORF are ORFs specifying major and minor capsid proteins (CP). Since the CP expression strategy of marafiviruses has not been thoroughly investigated, we produced a series of point mutants in the OBDV CP encoding gene and examined expression in protoplasts. Results support a model in which the 21 kDa major CP is the product of direct translation of a sgRNA, while the 24 kDa minor CP is a cleavage product derived from both the polyprotein and a larger ~26 kDa precursor translated directly from the sgRNA. Cleavage occurs at an LXG[G/A] motif conserved in many viruses that use papain-like proteases for polyprotein processing and protection against degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:24503092

  15. Expression of ERG protein in prostate cancer: variability and biological correlates

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Gustavo; Frolov, Anna; Chatterjee, Deyali; He, Dandan; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Ittmann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States. The TMPRSS2/ERG (T/E) fusion gene is present in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and promotes tumor progression in vivo. The presence of the T/E fusion gene is strongly associated with ERG protein expression but emerging evidence suggests significant interfocal and intrafocal variability in levels of ERG protein expression. We therefore analyzed ERG protein expression by image analysis to objectively quantitate the extent of such heterogeneity and confirmed significant interfocal and intrafocal variability of ERG protein expression levels in cancer expressing ERG. To define the pathways associated with ERG and its variable expression in prostate cancer we have analyzed correlations of ERG expression, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry, with 46 key proteins associated with signal transduction, transcriptional control and other processes using a large tissue microarray with more than 500 prostate cancers. We found significant correlation of ERG expression with markers of activation of the PI3K, MYC and NFkB pathways, which had previously been linked directly or indirectly to ERG expression. We have also identified significant correlations with novel proteins not previously linked to ERG expression including serum response factor, the p160 coactivator SRC1 and Sprouty1. Of note, SKP2 is only correlated with high level ERG protein expression. Thus ERG expression is variable in prostate cancer and is associated with activation of multiple pathways and proteins including several potentially targetable pathways. PMID:25972242

  16. C-reactive protein inhibits survivin expression via Akt/mTOR pathway downregulation by PTEN expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Seob; Kim, Soo Hyuk; Oh, Jaewon; Jin, Taewon; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Sungha; Lee, Sang-Hak; Chung, Ji Hyung; Kang, Seok-Min

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the most important biomarkers for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that CRP affects cell cycle and inflammatory process in cardiac myocytes. Survivin is also involved in cardiac myocytes replication and apoptosis. Reduction of survivin expression is associated with less favorable cardiac remodeling in animal models. However, the effect of CRP on survivin expression and its cellular mechanism has not yet been studied. We demonstrated that treatment of CRP resulted in a significant decrease of survivin protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner in cardiac myocytes. The upstream signaling proteins of survivin, such as Akt, mTOR and p70S6K, were also downregulated by CRP treatment. In addition, CRP increased the protein and mRNA levels of PTEN. The siRNA transfection or specific inhibitor treatment for PTEN restored the CRP-induced downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and survivin protein expression. Moreover, pretreatment with a specific p53 inhibitor decreased the CRP-induced PTEN expression. ERK-specific inhibitor also blocked the p53 phosphorylation and PTEN expression induced by CRP. Our study provides a novel insight into CRP-induced downregulation of survivin protein expression in cardiac myocytes through mechanisms that involved in downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway by expression of PTEN. PMID:24866016

  17. RNA protein interactions governing expression of the most abundant protein in human body, type I collagen

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in human body. The protein turns over slowly and its replacement synthesis is low. However, in wound healing or in pathological fibrosis the cells can increase production of type I collagen several hundred fold. This increase is predominantly due to posttranscriptional regulation, including increased half life of collagen mRNAs and their increased translatability. Type I collagen is composed of two α1 and one α2 polypeptides that fold into a triple helix. This stochiometry is strictly regulated to prevent detrimental synthesis of α1 homotrimers. Collagen polypeptides are co-translationally modified and the rate of modifications is in dynamic equilibrium with the rate of folding, suggesting coordinated translation of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) polypeptides. Collagen α1(I) mRNA has in the 3’ UTR a C-rich sequence that binds protein αCP, this binding stabilizes the mRNA in collagen producing cells. In the 5’UTR both collagen mRNAs have a conserved stem-loop structure (5’SL). The 5’SL is critical for high collagen expression, knock in mice with disruption of the 5’SL are resistant to liver fibrosis. the 5’SL binds protein LARP6 with strict sequence specificity and high affinity. LARP6 recruits RNA helicase A to facilitate translation initiation and associates collagen mRNAs with vimentin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. Binding to vimentin stabilizes collagen mRNAs, while nonmuscle myosin regulates coordinated translation of α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs. When nonmuscle myosin filaments are disrupted the cells secrete only α1 homotrimers. Thus, the mechanism governing high collagen expression involves two RNA binding proteins and development of cytoskeletal filaments. PMID:23907854

  18. Expression and purification of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the metal-binding protein CusF.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Bustos, J Enrique; Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Galbraith, David W; McEvoy, Megan M; Zarate, Xristo

    2016-05-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli has been improved considerably through the use of fusion proteins, because they increase protein solubility and facilitate purification via affinity chromatography. In this article, we propose the use of CusF as a new fusion partner for expression and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Using a cell-free protein expression system, based on the E. coli S30 extract, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was expressed with a series of different N-terminal tags, immobilized on self-assembled protein microarrays, and its fluorescence quantified. GFP tagged with CusF showed the highest fluorescence intensity, and this was greater than the intensities from corresponding GFP constructs that contained MBP or GST tags. Analysis of protein production in vivo showed that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein with low levels of inclusion bodies. Furthermore, fusion proteins can be exported to the cellular periplasm, if CusF contains the signal sequence. Taking advantage of its ability to bind copper ions, recombinant proteins can be purified with readily available IMAC resins charged with this metal ion, producing pure proteins after purification and tag removal. We therefore recommend the use of CusF as a viable alternative to MBP or GST as a fusion protein/affinity tag for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli. PMID:26805756

  19. Differential dissolved protein expression throughout the life cycle of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Lingdan, Li; Pengtao, Gong; Wenchao, Li; Jianhua, Li; Ju, Yang; Chengwu, Liu; He, Li; Guocai, Zhang; Wenzhi, Ren; Yujiang, Chen; Xichen, Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia) has a simple life cycle that alternates between a cyst and a trophozoite, and this parasite is an important human and animal pathogen. To increase our understanding of the molecular basis of the G. lamblia encystment, we have analyzed the soluble proteins expressed by trophozoites and cysts extracted from feces by quantitative proteomic analysis. A total of 63 proteins were identified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, and were categorized as cytoskeletal proteins, a cell-cycle-specific kinase, metabolic enzymes and stress resistance proteins. Importantly, we demonstrated that the expression of seven proteins differed significantly between trophozoites and cysts. In cysts, the expression of three proteins (one variable surface protein (VSP), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), β-tubulin) increased, whereas the expression of four proteins (14-3-3 protein, α-tubulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), protein disulfide isomerase 2 (PDI-2)) decreased significantly when compared with the levels of these proteins in trophozoites. The mRNA expression patterns of four of these proteins (OTC, α-tubulin, GAPDH, VSP) were similar to the expression levels of the proteins. These seven proteins appear to play an important role in the completion of the life cycle of G. lamblia. PMID:23058231

  20. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated the effects of two fusion tags, that is, thioredoxin (Trx) and 6x-His tags, and various expression conditions, on the expression of p28-NRC chimeric protein. Materials and Methods: In order to express the chimeric protein with only 6x-His tag, pET28 expression plasmid was used. Cloning in pET32 expression plasmid was performed to add both Trx and 6x-His tags to the chimeric protein. Expression of the chimeric protein with both plasmids was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis following optimization of expression conditions and host strains. Results: Expression of the chimeric protein in pET28a was performed. However, expression yield of the chimeric protein was low. Optimization of culture conditions and host strains led to reasonable expression yield of the toxic chimeric protein in pET32a vector. In cases of both plasmids, approximately 10 kDa deviation of the apparent molecular weight from the theoretical one was seen in SDS-PAGE of purified chimeric proteins. Conclusions: The study leads to proper expression and purification yield of p28-NRC chimeric protein with Trx tag following optimizing culture conditions and host strains. PMID:27169101

  1. [Expression of Dengue virus type 2 nonstructural protein 3 and isolation of host proteins interacting with it].

    PubMed

    Weng, Daihui; Lei, Yingfeng; Dong, Yangchao; Han, Peijun; Ye, Chuantao; Yang, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Wen

    2015-12-01

    To construct the plasmid expressing the fusion protein of Dengue virus type 2 (DENV2) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) with affinity tag, and isolate the cellular proteins interacting with NS3 protein using tandem affinity purification (TAP) assay. Methods Primers for amplifying NS3 gene were designed according to the sequence of DENV2 genome and chemically synthesized. The NS3 fragments, after amplified by PCR with DENV2 cDNA as template, were digested and cloned into the mammalian eukaryotic expression vector pCI-SF with the tandem affinity tag (FLAG-StrepII). The recombinant pCI-NS3-SF was transiently transformed by Lipofectamine(TM) 2000 into HEK293T cells, and the expression of the fusion protein was confirmed by Western blotting. Cellular proteins that interacted with NS3 were isolated and purified by TAP assay. Results The eukaryotic expression vector expressing NS3 protein was successfully constructed. The host proteins interacting with NS3 protein were isolated by TAP system. Conclusion TAP is an efficient method to isolate the cellular proteins interacting with DENV2 NS3. PMID:26648287

  2. The Up-Regulation of Ribosomal Proteins Further Regulates Protein Expression Profile in Female Schistosoma japonicum after Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun; Li, Chen; Wang, Suwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Pairing of Schistosoma males and females leads to and maintains female sexual maturation. However, the mechanism by which pairing facilitates sexual maturation of females is not clear. An increasing body of evidence suggests that ribosomal proteins have regulatory rather than constitutive roles in protein translation. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the effect of ribosome regulation on female sex maturation, Solexa and iTRAQ techniques were used to analyze the relationship between ribosomal gene or protein expression and sexual development of Schistosoma females. In the present study, considerably higher number of ribosomal genes or proteins were found to be differentially expressed in paired 23-day-old females. Moreover, mature female-specific proteins associated with egg production, such as ferritin-1 heavy chain and superoxide dismutase, were selectively highly expressed in paired females, rather than higher level of protein synthesis of all transcripts compared with those in unpaired 23-day-old females. Furthermore, other developmental stages were utilized to investigate different expression pattern of ribosomal proteins in females by analysing 18-day-old female schistosomula from single- or double-sex infections to determine the relationship between ribosomal protein expression pattern and development. Results showed that undeveloped 18-day-old females from single- and double-sex infections, as well as 23-day-old unpaired females, possessed similar ribosomal protein expression patterns, which were distinct from those in 23-day-old paired females. Conclusions/Significance Our findings reveal that the pairing of females and males triggers a specialized ribosomal protein expression profile which further regulates the protein profile for sexual maturation in Schistosoma japonicum, based on its gene expression profile. PMID:26070205

  3. Cloning, expression, and antigenic characterization of recombinant protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rocha, T S; Tramuta, C; Catania, S; Matucci, A; Giuffrida, M G; Baro, C; Profiti, M; Bertolotti, L; Rosati, S

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a member of the most important avian mycoplasmas, causing chronic respiratory disease in chickens and leading to important economic losses in the poultry industry. Recombinant technology represents a strategic approach used to achieve highly reliable and specific diagnostic tests in veterinary diseases control: in particular this aspect is crucial for confirming mycoplasma infection and for maintaining mycoplasma-free breeder flocks. In this study, we identified a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (i.e., E2) protein by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), characterized it in immunoblotting assays, and analyzed its recombinant (r-E2) in a rec-ELISA test. For full-length protein expression in Escherichia coli (EC) a point mutation was introduced. A rabbit antiserum produced against r-E2 was tested in a Western Blot using different samples of Mycoplasma species. The results showed the applicability of site-directed mutagenesis, with a good yield of the r-E2 after purification. Also, anti-E2 serum reacted with all the tested MG strains showing no cross reaction with other mycoplasmas. The developed E2 ELISA test was capable of detecting MG antibodies in the sera examined. Those results demonstrate the antigenic stability of the E2 protein which could represent a recombinant antigen with potential diagnostic applications. PMID:25667423

  4. (R)-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. Methods (R)-[11C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control) treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R)-[11C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R)-[11C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles) as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM). Results All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R)-[11C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. Conclusions P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate. PMID:21199574

  5. An Approach to Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins. The Case of Bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Round, Ekaterina; Shevchenko, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous overexpression of functional membrane proteins is a major bottleneck of structural biology. Bacteriorhodopsin from Halobium salinarum (bR) is a striking example of the difficulties in membrane protein overexpression. We suggest a general approach with a finite number of steps which allows one to localize the underlying problem of poor expression of a membrane protein using bR as an example. Our approach is based on constructing chimeric proteins comprising parts of a protein of interest and complementary parts of a homologous protein demonstrating advantageous expression. This complementary protein approach allowed us to increase bR expression by two orders of magnitude through the introduction of two silent mutations into bR coding DNA. For the first time the high quality crystals of bR expressed in E. Coli were obtained using the produced protein. The crystals obtained with in meso nanovolume crystallization diffracted to 1.67 Å. PMID:26046789

  6. Differentially expressed proteins associated with Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum, substantially reduces wheat grain yield and quality worldwide. Proteins play important roles in defense against the fungal infection. This study characterized differentially expressed proteins between near-isogenic lines (NILs) contr...

  7. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  8. High-throughput instant quantification of protein expression and purity based on photoactive yellow protein turn off/on label.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmin; Ganesan, Prabhakar; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2013-08-01

    Quantifying the concentration and purity of a target protein is essential for high-throughput protein expression test and rapid screening of highly soluble proteins. However, conventional methods such as PAGE and dot blot assay generally involve multiple time-consuming tasks requiring hours or do not allow instant quantification. Here, we demonstrate a new method based on the Photoactive yellow protein turn Off/On Label (POOL) system that can instantly quantify the concentration and purity of a target protein. The main idea of POOL is to use Photoactive Yellow Protein (PYP), or its miniaturized version, as a fusion partner of the target protein. The characteristic blue light absorption and the consequent yellow color of PYP is absent when initially expressed without its chromophore, but can be turned on by binding its chromophore, p-coumaric acid. The appearance of yellow color upon adding a precursor of chromophore to the co-expressed PYP can be used to check the expression amount of the target protein via visual inspection within a few seconds as well as to quantify its concentration and purity with the aid of a spectrometer within a few minutes. The concentrations measured by the POOL method, which usually takes a few minutes, show excellent agreement with those by the BCA Kit, which usually takes ∼1 h. We demonstrate the applicability of POOL in E. coli, insect, and mammalian cells, and for high-throughput protein expression screening. PMID:23740751

  9. [The heterologous expression and purification of membrane protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Liao, Dan; Xie, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hong-Hai

    2007-10-01

    Membrane proteins fulfill a wide range of central functions in the cell, but their structure determination remains one of the great challenges in structural biology. The heterologous overexpression is a demanding task. Here, we provide an overview of recent advance to heterologous expression and purification of membrane protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whose membrane proteins represent the majority of the new potential drug targets in this bacillus, which is ranked as the number1 cause of infectious disease mortality in the world. A detailed structural and functional understanding of the membranes protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis will be critical both for an understanding of the biology of infection and for the rational development of novel therapeutics. The procedures for functional expression followed by purification of membranes protein are reviewed here together with nonfunctional expression in inclusion bodies and subsequent refolding to produce functional proteins. The new expression systems, new approaches to soluble expression of recombinant proteins, new methods for membrane protein folding in vitro and new purification technology will provide a basis for choosing the best expression and purification protocol for a given membrane protein. The goal of this review is to aid researchers in the choice of a suitable expression system for their favourite proteins and make overproduction of functional membrane proteins becomes easier. PMID:18062277

  10. EXPRESSION OF AN INSECT (DENDROIDES CANADENSIS) ANTIFREEZE PROTEIN IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RESULTS IN A DECREASE IN PLANT FREEZING TEMPERATURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants which express genes encoding insect, Dendroides canadensis, antifreeze proteins (AFP) were produced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The antifreeze protein genes, both with and without the signal peptide sequence (for protein secretion), were expresse...

  11. Regulation of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Protein Expression by MiR-34a in Sporadic Somatotropinomas

    PubMed Central

    Dénes, Judit; Kasuki, Leandro; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Colli, Leandro M.; Takiya, Christina M.; Stiles, Craig E.; Barry, Sayka; de Castro, Margaret; Gadelha, Mônica R.; Korbonits, Márta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with germline AIP mutations or low AIP protein expression have large, invasive somatotroph adenomas and poor response to somatostatin analogues (SSA). Methods To study the mechanism of low AIP protein expression 31 sporadic somatotropinomas with low (n = 13) or high (n = 18) AIP protein expression were analyzed for expression of AIP messenger RNA (mRNA) and 11 microRNAs (miRNAs) predicted to bind the 3’UTR of AIP. Luciferase reporter assays of wild-type and deletion constructs of AIP-3’UTR were used to study the effect of the selected miRNAs in GH3 cells. Endogenous AIP protein and mRNA levels were measured after miRNA over- and underexpression in HEK293 and GH3 cells. Results No significant difference was observed in AIP mRNA expression between tumors with low or high AIP protein expression suggesting post-transcriptional regulation. miR-34a was highly expressed in low AIP protein samples compared high AIP protein adenomas and miR-34a levels were inversely correlated with response to SSA therapy. miR-34a inhibited the luciferase-AIP-3’UTR construct, suggesting that miR-34a binds to AIP-3’UTR. Deletion mutants of the 3 different predicted binding sites in AIP-3’UTR identified the c.*6–30 site to be involved in miR-34a’s activity. miR-34a overexpression in HEK293 and GH3 cells resulted in inhibition of endogenous AIP protein expression. Conclusion Low AIP protein expression is associated with high miR-34a expression. miR-34a can down-regulate AIP-protein but not RNA expression in vitro. miR-34a is a negative regulator of AIP-protein expression and could be responsible for the low AIP expression observed in somatotropinomas with an invasive phenotype and resistance to SSA. PMID:25658813

  12. Identities of Sequestered Proteins in Aggregates from Cells with Induced Polyglutamine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Suhr, Steven T.; Senut, Marie-Claude; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Cuizon, Denise B.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-01-01

    Proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts have been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. One common characteristic of expanded-polyQ expression is the formation of intracellular aggregates (IAs). IAs purified from polyQ-expressing cells were dissociated and studied by protein blot assay and mass spectrometry to determine the identity, condition, and relative level of several proteins sequestered within aggregates. Most of the sequestered proteins comigrated with bands from control extracts, indicating that the sequestered proteins were intact and not irreversibly bound to the polyQ polymer. Among the proteins found sequestered at relatively high levels in purified IAs were ubiquitin, the cell cycle–regulating proteins p53 and mdm-2, HSP70, the global transcriptional regulator Tata-binding protein/TFIID, cytoskeleton proteins actin and 68-kD neurofilament, and proteins of the nuclear pore complex. These data reveal that IAs are highly complex structures with a multiplicity of contributing proteins. PMID:11309410

  13. Expression of myelin proteins in the adult heterozygous Trembler mouse.

    PubMed

    Vallat, J M; Sindou, P; Garbay, B; Preux, P M; Anani, T; Richard, L; Diot, M

    1999-09-01

    The Trembler mouse (Tr) suffers from a dominantly inherited autosomal mutation (glycine to aspartic acid. G150D) affecting the PMP22 gene, which results in an abnormal myelination of the peripheral nervous system. The Tr mouse represents an animal model for the human hereditary neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We compared the expression of PMP22, P0, myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) in nerve biopsies from a 1-year-old heterozygous Tr mouse (Tr/+) with that of a control mouse of the same age. Quantitative and qualitative ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis showed a significant decrease in PMP22, P0 and MBP and an abnormal location of the MAG in the sciatic nerve of the Tr/+ mouse. We also noted a marked reduction in number of myelinated fibers associated with the presence of two types of myelinated axons: a population of abnormally thin myelin sheaths with lower PMP22 labeling than that observed in myelinated fibers from the control mouse, and some others fibers with normal sheaths for axons of comparable diameter to those of normal mouse with no difference in the PMP22 immunolabeling. This pointed to an involvement of PMP22 in the structure of myelin sheaths. PMID:10483786

  14. Green fluorescent protein as a new expression marker in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kremer, L; Baulard, A; Estaquier, J; Poulain-Godefroy, O; Locht, C

    1995-09-01

    This study describes the use and the advantages of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter molecule for mycobacteria. The gfp gene from Aequorea victoria was placed under the control of the hsp60 promoter in the shuttle vector pGFM-11. The gfp expression in the recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG was readily detected on agar plates by the development of an intense green fluorescence upon irradiation with long-wave u.v. light. In mycobacteria containing a pGFM-11 derivative that lacks the hsp60 promoter, no fluorescence was observed. However, this plasmid was successfully used as a promoter-probe vector to identify BCG promoters. The fluorescence emission of GFP in mycobacteria harbouring pGFM-11 and grown in liquid media could be quantified by spectrofluorimetry. This allowed for easy assessment of drug susceptibility. As GFP does not require the addition of substrates or co-factors, the green fluorescent bacilli could be directly observed within infected macrophages using fluorescence and laser confocal microscopy, or in tissue sections of infected mice. Finally, infected cells or free-living recombinant mycobacteria could also be analysed by flow cytometry. The GFP thus appears to be a convenient reporter for mycobacteria, allowing tracing of recombinant mycobacteria, isolation of promoters with interesting properties, in vivo drug testing and the development of new diagnostic tools. PMID:8596440

  15. Heat shock protein expression enhances heat tolerance of reptile embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Dang, Wei; Mou, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Sun, Bao-Jun; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-01-01

    The role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in heat tolerance has been demonstrated in cultured cells and animal tissues, but rarely in whole organisms because of methodological difficulties associated with gene manipulation. By comparing HSP70 expression patterns among representative species of reptiles and birds, and by determining the effect of HSP70 overexpression on embryonic development and hatchling traits, we have identified the role of HSP70 in the heat tolerance of amniote embryos. Consistent with their thermal environment, and high incubation temperatures and heat tolerance, the embryos of birds have higher onset and maximum temperatures for induced HSP70 than do reptiles, and turtles have higher onset and maximum temperatures than do lizards. Interestingly, the trade-off between benefits and costs of HSP70 overexpression occurred between life-history stages: when turtle embryos developed at extreme high temperatures, HSP70 overexpression generated benefits by enhancing embryo heat tolerance and hatching success, but subsequently imposed costs by decreasing heat tolerance of surviving hatchlings. Taken together, the correlative and causal links between HSP70 and heat tolerance provide, to our knowledge, the first unequivocal evidence that HSP70 promotes thermal tolerance of embryos in oviparous amniotes. PMID:25080340

  16. Heat shock protein expression enhances heat tolerance of reptile embryos.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Dang, Wei; Mou, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Sun, Bao-Jun; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-09-22

    The role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in heat tolerance has been demonstrated in cultured cells and animal tissues, but rarely in whole organisms because of methodological difficulties associated with gene manipulation. By comparing HSP70 expression patterns among representative species of reptiles and birds, and by determining the effect of HSP70 overexpression on embryonic development and hatchling traits, we have identified the role of HSP70 in the heat tolerance of amniote embryos. Consistent with their thermal environment, and high incubation temperatures and heat tolerance, the embryos of birds have higher onset and maximum temperatures for induced HSP70 than do reptiles, and turtles have higher onset and maximum temperatures than do lizards. Interestingly, the trade-off between benefits and costs of HSP70 overexpression occurred between life-history stages: when turtle embryos developed at extreme high temperatures, HSP70 overexpression generated benefits by enhancing embryo heat tolerance and hatching success, but subsequently imposed costs by decreasing heat tolerance of surviving hatchlings. Taken together, the correlative and causal links between HSP70 and heat tolerance provide, to our knowledge, the first unequivocal evidence that HSP70 promotes thermal tolerance of embryos in oviparous amniotes. PMID:25080340

  17. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein and P-glycoprotein in Brain Cancer: Two Gatekeepers Team Up

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sagar; Hartz, Anika M.S.; Elmquist, William F.; Bauer, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Brain cancer is a devastating disease. Despite extensive research, treatment of brain tumors has been largely ineffective and the diagnosis of brain cancer remains uniformly fatal. Failure of brain cancer treatment may be in part due to limitations in drug delivery, influenced by the ABC drug efflux transporters P-gp and BCRP at the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers, in brain tumor cells, as well as in brain tumor stem-like cells. P-gp and BCRP limit various anti-cancer drugs from entering the brain and tumor tissues, thus rendering chemotherapy ineffective. To overcome this obstacle, two strategies – targeting transporter regulation and direct transporter inhibition – have been proposed. In this review, we focus on these strategies. We first introduce the latest findings on signaling pathways that could potentially be targeted to down-regulate P-gp and BCRP expression and/or transport activity. We then highlight in detail the new paradigm of P-gp and BCRP working as a “cooperative team of gatekeepers” at the blood-brain barrier, discuss its ramifications for brain cancer therapy, and summarize the latest findings on dual P-gp/BCRP inhibitors. Finally, we provide a brief summary with conclusions and outline the perspectives for future research endeavors in this field. PMID:21827403

  18. Prokaryotic gene fusion expression systems and their use in structural and functional studies of proteins.

    PubMed

    Sheibani, N

    1999-02-01

    The ability to express and purify large quantity of proteins in bacteria has greatly impacted many aspects of biological research. These include their use as a source of reagent for biochemical and biophysical studies as well as a source of antigen for antibody production. Currently many different expression systems are available and new ones are being developed. These systems allow inducible expression of a desired protein as a fusion with an affinity tag for simple purification. The affinity tags can generally be removed by specific proteases which recognize cleavage sites engineered between the affinity tag and the desired protein. Presence of tags that encode epitopes of specific antibodies provide additional means for identification of recombinant proteins. This review provides an overview of some of the most commonly utilized expression systems and examples of the use of these proteins in biochemical and biophysical studies. I will also describe other available systems which may provide suitable alternative for expression of recombinant proteins. PMID:10069435

  19. Glucose enhances collectrin protein expression in insulin-producing MIN6 {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saisho, Kenji; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Yasuda, Tomoko; Sato, Yoshifumi; Fukui, Kenji; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Imagawa, Akihisa; Hatta, Mitsutoki; Shimomura, Iichiro; Yamagata, Kazuya

    2009-11-06

    Collectrin is a novel target gene of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1{alpha} in pancreatic {beta}-cells and controls insulin exocytosis. Although glucose is known to stimulate the expression of genes of the insulin secretory pathway, there is no information on how glucose regulates collectrin expression. We investigated the effects of glucose on the expression of collectrin in MIN6 {beta}-cell line. Glucose, in a dose-dependent manner, increased collectrin protein levels without changing collectrin mRNA levels and protein stability, indicating that glucose stimulation of collectrin protein expression is primarily mediated at a translational level. Although mannose and pyruvate also increased collectrin protein expression level, neither 2-deoxyglucose, mitochondrial fuels leucine and glutamate, sulphonylurea nor Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers, mimicked the effects of glucose. These data indicate the involvement of mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates, distal to pyruvate, in the regulation of collectrin protein expression in {beta}-cells.

  20. Expression of recombinant protein using Corynebacterium Glutamicum: progress, challenges and applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuxia; Yang, Yankun; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Yang; Peng, Feng; Jeffrey, Laura; Harvey, Linda; McNeil, Brian; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-08-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) is a highly promising alternative prokaryotic host for recombinant protein expression, as it possesses several significant advantages over Escherichia coli (E. coli), the currently leading bacterial protein expression system. During the past decades, several experimental techniques and vector components for genetic manipulation of C. glutamicum have been developed and validated, including strong promoters for tightly regulating target gene expression, various types of plasmid vectors, protein secretion systems and methods of genetically modifying the host strain genome to improve protein production potential. This review critically discusses current progress in establishing C. glutamicum as a host for recombinant protein expression, and examines, in depth, some successful case studies of actual application of this expression system. The established "expression tool box" for developing novel constructs based on C. glutamicum as a host are also evaluated. Finally, the existing issues and solutions in process development with C. glutamicum as a host are specifically addressed. PMID:25714007

  1. Protein Expression Profiles Characterize Distinct Features of Mouse Cerebral Cortices at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Kawase-Koga, Yoko; Sun, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The proper development of the mammalian cerebral cortex requires precise protein synthesis and accurate regulation of protein expression levels. To reveal signatures of protein expression in developing mouse cortices, we here generate proteomic profiles of cortices at embryonic and postnatal stages using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). We found that protein expression profiles are mostly consistent with biological features of the developing cortex. Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway analyses demonstrate conserved molecules that maintain cortical development such as proteins involved in metabolism. GO and KEGG pathway analyses further identify differentially expressed proteins that function at specific stages, for example proteins regulating the cell cycle in the embryonic cortex, and proteins controlling axon guidance in the postnatal cortex, suggesting that distinct protein expression profiles determine biological events in the developing cortex. Furthermore, the STRING network analysis has revealed that many proteins control a single biological event, such as the cell cycle regulation, through cohesive interactions, indicating a complex network regulation in the cortex. Our study has identified protein networks that control the cortical development and has provided a protein reference for further investigation of protein interactions in the cortex. PMID:25915664

  2. Altered brain protein expression profiles are associated with molecular neurological dysfunction in the PKU mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Imperlini, Esther; Orrù, Stefania; Corbo, Claudia; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), if not detected and treated in newborns, causes severe neurological dysfunction and cognitive and behavioral deficiencies. Despite the biochemical characterization of PKU, the molecular mechanisms underlying PKU-associated brain dysfunction remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the pathogenesis of this neurological damage by analyzing protein expression profiles in brain tissue of Black and Tan BRachyury-PahEnu2 mice (a mouse model of PKU). We compared the cerebral protein expression of homozygous PKU mice with that of their heterozygous counterparts using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analysis, and identified 21 differentially expressed proteins, four of which were over-expressed and 17 under-expressed. An in silico bioinformatic approach indicated that protein under-expression was related to neuronal differentiation and dendritic growth, and to such neurological disorders as progressive motor neuropathy and movement disorders. Moreover, functional annotation analyses showed that some identified proteins were involved in oxidative metabolism. To further investigate the proteins involved in the neurological damage, we validated two of the proteins that were most strikingly under-expressed, namely, Syn2 and Dpysl2, which are involved in synaptic function and neurotransmission. We found that Glu2/3 and NR1 receptor subunits were over-expressed in PKU mouse brain. Our results indicate that differential expression of these proteins may be associated with the processes underlying PKU brain dysfunction, namely, decreased synaptic plasticity and impaired neurotransmission. PMID:24548049

  3. Cell-specific expression of the carrot EP2 lipid transfer protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sterk, P; Booij, H; Schellekens, G A; Van Kammen, A; De Vries, S C

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a 10-kD protein, designated extracellular protein 2 (EP2), that is secreted by embryogenic cell cultures of carrot was obtained by expression screening. The derived protein sequence and antisera against heterologous plant lipid transfer proteins identified the EP2 protein as a lipid transfer protein. Protein gel blot analysis showed that the EP2 protein is present in cell walls and conditioned medium of cell cultures. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the EP2 gene is expressed in embryogenic cell cultures, the shoot apex of seedlings, developing flowers, and maturing seeds. In situ hybridization showed expression of the EP2 gene in protoderm cells of somatic and zygotic embryos and transient expression in epidermis cells of leaf primordia and all flower organs. In the shoot apical meristem, expression is found in the tunica and lateral zone. In maturing seeds, the EP2 gene is expressed in the outer epidermis of the integument, the seed coat, and the pericarp epidermis, as well as transiently in between both mericarps. Based on the extracellular location of the EP2 protein and the expression pattern of the encoding gene, we propose a role for plant lipid transfer proteins in the transport of cutin monomers through the extracellular matrix to sites of cutin synthesis. PMID:1822991

  4. Differential expression of proteins and phosphoproteins during larval metamorphosis of the polychaete Capitella sp. I

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The spontaneous metamorphosis of the polychaete Capitella sp. I larvae into juveniles requires minor morphological changes, including segment formation, body elongation, and loss of cilia. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression patterns of both proteins and phosphoproteins during the transition from larvae to juveniles in this species. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by multiplex fluorescent staining and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis to identify the differentially expressed proteins as well as the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of both competent larvae and juveniles. Results Twenty-three differentially expressed proteins were identified in the two developmental stages. Expression patterns of two of those proteins were examined at the protein level by Western blot analysis while seven were further studied at the mRNA level by real-time PCR. Results showed that proteins related to cell division, cell migration, energy storage and oxidative stress were plentifully expressed in the competent larvae; in contrast, proteins involved in oxidative metabolism and transcriptional regulation were abundantly expressed in the juveniles. Conclusion It is likely that these differentially expressed proteins are involved in regulating the larval metamorphosis process and can be used as protein markers for studying molecular mechanisms associated with larval metamorphosis in polychaetes. PMID:21888661

  5. Cell-specific expression of the carrot EP2 lipid transfer protein gene.

    PubMed

    Sterk, P; Booij, H; Schellekens, G A; Van Kammen, A; De Vries, S C

    1991-09-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a 10-kD protein, designated extracellular protein 2 (EP2), that is secreted by embryogenic cell cultures of carrot was obtained by expression screening. The derived protein sequence and antisera against heterologous plant lipid transfer proteins identified the EP2 protein as a lipid transfer protein. Protein gel blot analysis showed that the EP2 protein is present in cell walls and conditioned medium of cell cultures. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the EP2 gene is expressed in embryogenic cell cultures, the shoot apex of seedlings, developing flowers, and maturing seeds. In situ hybridization showed expression of the EP2 gene in protoderm cells of somatic and zygotic embryos and transient expression in epidermis cells of leaf primordia and all flower organs. In the shoot apical meristem, expression is found in the tunica and lateral zone. In maturing seeds, the EP2 gene is expressed in the outer epidermis of the integument, the seed coat, and the pericarp epidermis, as well as transiently in between both mericarps. Based on the extracellular location of the EP2 protein and the expression pattern of the encoding gene, we propose a role for plant lipid transfer proteins in the transport of cutin monomers through the extracellular matrix to sites of cutin synthesis. PMID:1822991

  6. Proteomics Based Identification of Cell Migration Related Proteins in HBV Expressing HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huixing; Li, Xi; Chan, Vincent; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics study was performed to investigate the specific protein expression profiles of HepG2 cells transfected with mutant HBV compared with wildtype HBV genome, aiming to identify the specific functions of SH3 binding domain (proline rich region) located in HBx. In addition to the cell movement and kinetics changes due to the expression of HBV genome we have observed previously, here we further targeted to explore the specific changes of cellular proteins and potential intracellular protein interactions, which might provide more information of the potential cellular mechanism of the differentiated cell movements. Specific changes of a number of proteins were shown in global protein profiling in HepG2 cells expressing wildtype HBV, including cell migration related proteins, and interestingly the changes were found recovered by SH3 binding domain mutated HBV. The distinctive expressions of proteins were validated by Western blot analysis. PMID:24763314

  7. Primate transcript and protein expression levels evolve under compensatory selection pressures.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zia; Ford, Michael J; Cusanovich, Darren A; Mitrano, Amy; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Gilad, Yoav

    2013-11-29

    Changes in gene regulation have likely played an important role in the evolution of primates. Differences in messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels across primates have often been documented; however, it is not yet known to what extent measurements of divergence in mRNA levels reflect divergence in protein expression levels, which are probably more important in determining phenotypic differences. We used high-resolution, quantitative mass spectrometry to collect protein expression measurements from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque lymphoblastoid cell lines and compared them to transcript expression data from the same samples. We found dozens of genes with significant expression differences between species at the mRNA level yet little or no difference in protein expression. Overall, our data suggest that protein expression levels evolve under stronger evolutionary constraint than mRNA levels. PMID:24136357

  8. The Junctional Proteins Cingulin and Paracingulin Modulate the Expression of Tight Junction Protein Genes through GATA-4

    PubMed Central

    Guillemot, Laurent; Spadaro, Domenica; Citi, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The cytoplamic junctional proteins cingulin and paracingulin have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression in different cultured cell models. In renal epithelial MDCK cells, depletion of either protein results in a Rho-dependent increase in the expression of claudin-2. Here we examined MDCK cell clones depleted of both cingulin and paracingulin (double-KD cells), and we found that unexpectedly the expression of claudin-2, and also the expression of ZO-3 and claudin-3, were decreased, while RhoA activity was still higher than in control cells. The decreased expression of claudin-2 and other TJ proteins in doubleKD cells correlated with reduced levels of the transcription factor GATA-4, and was rescued by overexpression of GATA-4, but not by inhibiting RhoA activity. These results indicate that in MDCK cells GATA-4 is required for the expression of claudin-2 and other TJ proteins, and that maintenance of GATA-4 expression requires either cingulin or paracingulin. These results and previous studies suggest a model whereby cingulin and paracingulin redundantly control the expression of specific TJ proteins through distinct GATA-4- and RhoA-dependent mechanisms, and that in the absence of sufficient levels of GATA-4 the RhoA-mediated upregulation of claudin-2 is inhibited. PMID:23409073

  9. Expression of ATP-binding cassette membrane transporters in a HIV-1 transgenic rat model.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Kevin R; Hoque, Md Tozammel; Bendayan, Reina

    2014-02-21

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp, product of Mdr1a and Mdr1b genes), multidrug resistance associated proteins (Mrps), and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), all members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane-associated drug transporters superfamily, can significantly restrict the entry of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) into organs which exhibit a barrier function such as the central nervous system (CNS) and the male genital tract (MGT). In vitro, HIV-1 viral proteins such as glycoprotein-120 (gp120) and transcriptional transactivator (tat) have been shown to alter the expression of these transporters and ARVs permeability. The objective of this study was to compare mRNA expression of these transporters, in vivo, in several tissues obtained from HIV-1 transgenic rats (Tg-rat) (8 and 24 weeks) with those of age-matched wild-type rats. At 24 weeks, significant changes in several drug transporter mRNA expressions were observed, in particular, in brain, kidney, liver and testes. These findings suggest that HIV-1 viral proteins can alter the expression of ABC drug transporters, in vivo, in the context of HIV-1 and further regulate ARVs permeability in several organs including the CNS and MGT, two sites which have been reported to display very low ARVs permeability in the clinic. PMID:24472536

  10. Maternal low protein diet and postnatal high fat diet increases adipose imprinted gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal and postnatal diet can alter Igf2 gene expression and DNA methylation. To test whether maternal low protein and postnatal high fat (HF) diet result in alteration in Igf2 expression and obesity, we fed obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats 8% (LP) or 20% (NP) protein for 3 wk prior to breeding and...

  11. Teaching Molecular Biology to Undergraduate Biology Students: An Illustration of Protein Expression and Purification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Cesar Adolfo; Silva, Flavio Henrique; Novo, Maria Teresa Marques

    2004-01-01

    Practical classes on protein expression and purification were given to undergraduate biology students enrolled in the elective course "Introduction to Genetic Engineering." The heterologous expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)* of "Aequorea victoria" is an interesting system for didactic purposes because it can be viewed easily during

  12. Teaching Molecular Biology to Undergraduate Biology Students: An Illustration of Protein Expression and Purification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Cesar Adolfo; Silva, Flavio Henrique; Novo, Maria Teresa Marques

    2004-01-01

    Practical classes on protein expression and purification were given to undergraduate biology students enrolled in the elective course "Introduction to Genetic Engineering." The heterologous expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)* of "Aequorea victoria" is an interesting system for didactic purposes because it can be viewed easily during…

  13. Interaction between Brome Mosaic Virus Proteins and RNAs: Effects on RNA Replication, Protein Expression, and RNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, K.; Dragnea, B.; Kao, C.

    2005-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication has been examined in a number of systems, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed an efficient T-DNA-based gene delivery system using Agrobacterium tumefaciens to transiently express BMV RNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana. The expressed RNAs can systemically infect plants and provide material to extract BMV replicase that can perform template-dependent RNA-dependent RNA synthesis in vitro. We also expressed the four BMV-encoded proteins from nonreplicating RNAs and analyzed their effects on BMV RNA accumulation. The capsid protein that coinfiltrated with constructs expressing RNA1 and RNA2 suppressed minus-strand levels but increased plus-strand RNA accumulation. The replication proteins 1a and 2a could function in trans to replicate and transcribe the BMV RNAs. None of the BMV proteins or RNA could efficiently suppress posttranscriptional silencing. However, 1a expressed in trans will suppress the production of a recombinant green fluorescent protein expressed from the nontranslated portions of BMV RNA1 and RNA2, suggesting that 1a may regulate translation from BMV RNAs. BMV replicase proteins 1a did not affect the accumulation of the BMV RNAs in the absence of RNA replication, unlike the situation reported for S. cerevisiae. This work demonstrates that the Agrobacterium-mediated gene delivery system can be used to study the cis- and trans-acting requirements for BMV RNA replication in plants and that significant differences can exist for BMV RNA replication in different hosts. PMID:16254357

  14. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K.; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs. PMID:25566309

  15. Stress protein expression in early phase spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanyong; Wu, Dankai; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Yongming; Wang, Guoxiang; Yang, Maoguang; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2013-08-25

    Spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury is a stress injury to the spinal cord. Our previous studies using differential proteomics identified 21 differentially expressed proteins (n > 2) in rabbits with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Of these proteins, stress-related proteins included protein disulfide isomerase A3, stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 and heat shock cognate protein 70. In this study, we established New Zealand rabbit models of spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by abdominal aorta occlusion. Results demonstrated that hind limb function initially improved after spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury, but then deteriorated. The pathological morphology of the spinal cord became aggravated, but lessened 24 hours after reperfusion. However, the numbers of motor neurons and interneurons in the spinal cord gradually decreased. The expression of protein disulfide isomerase A3, stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 and heat shock cognate protein 70 was induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury. The expression of these proteins increased within 12 hours after reperfusion, and then decreased, reached a minimum at 24 hours, but subsequently increased again to similar levels seen at 6-12 hours, showing a characterization of induction-inhibition-induction. These three proteins were expressed only in cytoplasm but not in the nuclei. Moreover, the expression was higher in interneurons than in motor neurons, and the survival rate of interneurons was greater than that of motor neurons. It is assumed that the expression of stress-related proteins exhibited a protective effect on neurons. PMID:25206532

  16. Impact of Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Oligomerization and Protein Localization on Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vink, Elizabeth I.; Zheng, Yueting; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Stamminger, Thomas; Krug, Laurie T.; Hearing, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Adenovirus E4-ORF3 protein facilitates virus replication through the relocalization of cellular proteins into nuclear inclusions termed tracks. This sequestration event disrupts antiviral properties associated with target proteins. Relocalization of Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 proteins prevents the DNA damage response from inhibiting Ad replication. Relocalization of PML and Daxx impedes the interferon-mediated antiviral response. Several E4-ORF3 targets regulate gene expression, linking E4-ORF3 to transcriptional control. Furthermore, E4-ORF3 was shown to promote the formation of heterochromatin, down-regulating p53-dependent gene expression. Here, we characterize how E4-ORF3 alters cellular gene expression. Using an inducible, E4-ORF3-expressing cell line, we performed microarray experiments to highlight cellular gene expression changes influenced by E4-ORF3 expression, identifying over four hundred target genes. Enrichment analysis of these genes suggests that E4-ORF3 influences factors involved in signal transduction and cellular defense, among others. The expression of mutant E4-ORF3 proteins revealed that nuclear track formation is necessary to induce these expression changes. Through the generation of knockdown cells, we demonstrate that the observed expression changes may be independent of Daxx and TRIM33 suggesting that an additional factor(s) may be responsible. The ability of E4-ORF3 to manipulate cellular gene expression through the sequestration of cellular proteins implicates a novel role for E4-ORF3 in transcriptional regulation. PMID:25984715

  17. Impact of Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Oligomerization and Protein Localization on Cellular Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Vink, Elizabeth I; Zheng, Yueting; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Stamminger, Thomas; Krug, Laurie T; Hearing, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    The Adenovirus E4-ORF3 protein facilitates virus replication through the relocalization of cellular proteins into nuclear inclusions termed tracks. This sequestration event disrupts antiviral properties associated with target proteins. Relocalization of Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 proteins prevents the DNA damage response from inhibiting Ad replication. Relocalization of PML and Daxx impedes the interferon-mediated antiviral response. Several E4-ORF3 targets regulate gene expression, linking E4-ORF3 to transcriptional control. Furthermore, E4-ORF3 was shown to promote the formation of heterochromatin, down-regulating p53-dependent gene expression. Here, we characterize how E4-ORF3 alters cellular gene expression. Using an inducible, E4-ORF3-expressing cell line, we performed microarray experiments to highlight cellular gene expression changes influenced by E4-ORF3 expression, identifying over four hundred target genes. Enrichment analysis of these genes suggests that E4-ORF3 influences factors involved in signal transduction and cellular defense, among others. The expression of mutant E4-ORF3 proteins revealed that nuclear track formation is necessary to induce these expression changes. Through the generation of knockdown cells, we demonstrate that the observed expression changes may be independent of Daxx and TRIM33 suggesting that an additional factor(s) may be responsible. The ability of E4-ORF3 to manipulate cellular gene expression through the sequestration of cellular proteins implicates a novel role for E4-ORF3 in transcriptional regulation. PMID:25984715

  18. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  19. Evaluation of Salmonella live vaccines with chromosomal expression cassettes for translocated fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Husseiny, Mohamed I; Hensel, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Salmonella enterica is a versatile live carrier for the presentation of recombinant vaccine antigens. Fusion proteins of a type III secretion system effector and heterologous vaccine antigens can be translocated by live attenuated Salmonella strains and mediate protective immunity against infections. Here we investigated the use expression cassettes for translocated fusion protein consisting of effector SseF and antigens of Listeria monocytogenes after stable integration into the Salmonella chromosome. The efficacy of chromosomal expression cassettes was compared to plasmid-based expression cassettes. Our data indicate that live Salmonella vaccines with chromosomal expression cassettes for translocated fusion proteins, although only present in single copy, efficiently stimulate immune responses. PMID:19464562

  20. Preparative expression of secreted proteins in bacteria: status report and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, George; Segatori, Laura

    2005-10-01

    The expression of heterologous secreted proteins in Escherichia coli is widely employed for laboratory and preparative purposes. Thanks to advances in expression technologies over the past 25 years, many mammalian proteins can now be produced routinely in secreted form with yields in the gram/litre scale. Nonetheless, ensuring efficient secretion across the inner membrane, and preventing proteolytic degradation, incorrect disulfide-bond formation and aggregation into periplasmic inclusion bodies, frequently presents significant challenges. Recent advances in the understanding of the periplasmic folding quality control system are leading to new strategies to facilitate the expression of heterologous secreted proteins. In parallel, protein design and directed evolution approaches are beginning to be exploited for engineering of the cellular protein folding machinery to achieve further improvements in protein expression. PMID:16095898

  1. Virus-Derived Vectors for the Expression of Multiple Proteins in Plants.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pooja; Thuenemann, Eva C; Sainsbury, Frank; Lomonossoff, George P

    2016-01-01

    This chapter constitutes a practical guide to using the "pEAQ" vector series for transient or stable expression of one or more protein(s) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The pEAQ vectors are a series of small binary vectors designed for controlled expression of multiple proteins in plants. To achieve high levels of expression, an expression system based on translational enhancement by the untranslated regions of RNA-2 from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), named CPMV-HT, is used. The expression vector pEAQ-HT combines the user-friendly pEAQ plasmid with CPMV-HT to provide a system for high-level expression of proteins in plants. PMID:26614280

  2. Quantitative proteomics of Xenopus laevis embryos: expression kinetics of nearly 4000 proteins during early development.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liangliang; Bertke, Michelle M; Champion, Matthew M; Zhu, Guijie; Huber, Paul W; Dovichi, Norman J

    2014-01-01

    While there is a rich literature on transcription dynamics during the development of many organisms, protein data is limited. We used iTRAQ isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry to generate the largest developmental proteomic dataset for any animal. Expression dynamics of nearly 4,000 proteins of Xenopus laevis was generated from fertilized egg to neurula embryo. Expression clusters into groups. The cluster profiles accurately reflect the major events that mark changes in gene expression patterns during early Xenopus development. We observed decline in the expression of ten DNA replication factors after the midblastula transition (MBT), including a marked decline of the licensing factor XCdc6. Ectopic expression of XCdc6 leads to apoptosis; temporal changes in this protein are critical for proper development. Measurement of expression in single embryos provided no evidence for significant protein heterogeneity between embryos at the same stage of development. PMID:24626130

  3. Quantitative proteomics of Xenopus laevis embryos: expression kinetics of nearly 4000 proteins during early development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liangliang; Bertke, Michelle M.; Champion, Matthew M.; Zhu, Guijie; Huber, Paul W.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2014-03-01

    While there is a rich literature on transcription dynamics during the development of many organisms, protein data is limited. We used iTRAQ isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry to generate the largest developmental proteomic dataset for any animal. Expression dynamics of nearly 4,000 proteins of Xenopus laevis was generated from fertilized egg to neurula embryo. Expression clusters into groups. The cluster profiles accurately reflect the major events that mark changes in gene expression patterns during early Xenopus development. We observed decline in the expression of ten DNA replication factors after the midblastula transition (MBT), including a marked decline of the licensing factor XCdc6. Ectopic expression of XCdc6 leads to apoptosis; temporal changes in this protein are critical for proper development. Measurement of expression in single embryos provided no evidence for significant protein heterogeneity between embryos at the same stage of development.

  4. BCL-6 protein expression in AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: inverse relationship with Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein-1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, A.; Gaidano, G.; Gloghini, A.; Pastore, C.; Saglio, G.; Tirelli, U.; Dalla-Favera, R.; Falini, B.

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the expression of the BCL-6 protein in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (AIDS-NHLs) and at comparing the expression pattern with the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of the tumor clone. A total of 34 AIDS-NHL biopsies, including 16 AIDS-related diffuse large-cell lymphomas (AIDS-DLCLs) and 18 AIDS-related small-noncleaved-cell lymphomas (AIDS-SNCCLs) as well as 7 AIDS-SNCCL cell lines were immunostained with a BCL-6-specific monoclonal antibody. Expression of BCL-6 protein was detected in 9 of 16 AIDS-DLCLs, 18 of 18 AIDS-SNCCLs, and 3 of 7 AIDS-SNCCL cell lines. Expression of BCL-6 among AIDS-NHLs occurred independently of the presence of molecular lesions of the bcl-6 gene. Notably, among EBV-positive AIDS-NHL biopsies and cell lines, expression of BCL-6 was mutually exclusive with the expression of EBV-encoded transforming antigen latent membrane protein-1. The mutual exclusion between BCL-6 and latent membrane protein-1 expression was further confirmed by in vitro superinfection experiments of an AIDS-SNCCL cell line originally devoid of EBV sequences. Overall, the frequent association between AIDS-NHLs and expression of BCL-6, a protein selectively expressed by germinal center B cells, suggests that these lymphomas may originate from the germinal center. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9006332

  5. Expression of ERG protein in prostate cancer: variability and biological correlates.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Gustavo; Frolov, Anna; Chatterjee, Deyali; He, Dandan; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Ittmann, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death of men in the USA. The TMPRSS2/ERG (T/E) fusion gene is present in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and promotes tumor progression in vivo. The presence of the T/E fusion gene is strongly associated with the expression of ERG protein, but emerging evidence indicates a significant interfocal and intrafocal variability in the levels of ERG protein expression. We therefore analyzed ERG protein expression by image analysis to objectively quantitate the extent of such heterogeneity, and confirmed significant interfocal and intrafocal variability of ERG protein expression levels in cancer expressing ERG. To define the pathways associated with ERG and its variable expression in prostate cancer, we have analyzed the correlations of ERG expression, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry, with 46 key proteins associated with signal transduction, transcriptional control, and other processes using a large tissue microarray with more than 500 prostate cancers. We found a significant correlation of ERG expression with the markers of activation of the PI3K, MYC, and NFκB pathways, which had previously been linked directly or indirectly to ERG expression. We have also identified significant correlations with novel proteins that have not been previously linked to ERG expression, including serum response factor, the p160 coactivator SRC1, and Sprouty1. Notably, SKP2 only correlated with a high level of ERG protein expression. Thus ERG expression is variable in prostate cancer and is associated with activation of multiple pathways and proteins including several potentially targetable pathways. PMID:25972242

  6. Reciprocal influence of connexins and apical junction proteins on their expressions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickaël; Spray, David C.; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Membranes of adjacent cells form intercellular junctional complexes to mechanically anchor neighbour cells (anchoring junctions), to seal the paracellular space and to prevent diffusion of integral proteins within the plasma membrane (tight junctions) and to allow cell-to-cell diffusion of small ions and molecules (gap junctions). These different types of specialised plasma membrane microdomains, sharing common adaptor molecules, particularly zonula occludens proteins, frequently present intermingled relationships where the different proteins co-assemble into macromolecular complexes and their expressions are co-ordinately regulated. Proteins forming gap junction channels (connexins, particularly) and proteins fulfilling cell attachment or forming tight junction strands mutually influence expression and functions of one another. PMID:19046940

  7. Human chorionic gonadotropin promotes expression of protein absorption factors in the intestine of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Hao, G; Zhong, H; Wu, Q; Lu, S Q; Zhao, Q; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    Protein use is crucial for the ovulation and spawning of fish. Currently, limited information is available regarding the expression of protein absorption factors during the breeding seasons of teleosts and thus how various proteins involved in this process is not well-understood. The expression of CDX2, CREB, gluatamate dehydrogenase, LAT2, aminopeptidase N, PepT1, and SP1 were significantly elevated from the non-breeding season to the breeding season in female goldfish, and all proteins except PepT1 and SP1 were elevated in male goldfish. Injection of human chorionic gonadotropin upregulated the expression of all proteins except for aminopeptidase N in female goldfish and SP1 in male goldfish, suggesting a luteinizing hormone-inductive effect on protein absorption factors. Protein use in the intestine is increased during the breeding seasons as a result of increased luteinizing hormone. PMID:26345757

  8. High-yield, in vitro protein expression using a continuous-exchange, coupled transcription/ translation system.

    PubMed

    Martin, G A; Kawaguchi, R; Lam, Y; DeGiovanni, A; Fukushima, M; Mutter, W

    2001-10-01

    The Rapid Translation System (RTS 500) (Roche Molecular Biochemicals) is a high-yield protein expression system that utilizes an enhanced E. coli lysate for an in vitro transcription/translation reaction. In contrast to conventional transcription/translation, this system allows protein expression to continue for more than 24 h. We demonstrated the utility of the RTS 500 by expressing different soluble and active proteins that generally pose problems in cell-based expression systems. We first expressed GFP-lunasin, a fusion protein that, because of its toxicity, has been impossible to produce in whole cells. The second protein we expressed, human interleukin-2 (IL-2), is generally difficult to produce, either as the native molecule or as a GSTfusion protein, in a soluble form in bacteria. Finally, we demonstrated the capacity of the RTS 500 to co-express proteins, by the simultaneous production of GFP and CAT in a single reaction. This new technology appears to be particularly usefulfor the convenient production of preparative amounts (100-900 microg) of proteins that are toxic or insoluble in cell-based systems. PMID:11680726

  9. High-throughput Cloning and Expression of Integral Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Recently, several structural genomics centers have been established and a remarkable number of three-dimensional structures of soluble proteins have been solved. For membrane proteins, the number of structures solved has been significantly trailing those for their soluble counterparts, not least because over-expression and purification of membrane proteins is a much more arduous process. By using high throughput technologies, a large number of membrane protein targets can be screened simultaneously and a greater number of expression and purification conditions can be employed, leading to a higher probability of successfully determining the structure of membrane proteins. This unit describes the cloning, expression and screening of membrane proteins using high throughput methodologies developed in our laboratory. Basic Protocol 1 deals with the cloning of inserts into expression vectors by ligation-independent cloning. Basic Protocol 2 describes the expression and purification of the target proteins on a miniscale. Lastly, for the targets that express at the miniscale, basic protocols 3 and 4 outline the methods employed for the expression and purification of targets at the midi-scale, as well as a procedure for detergent screening and identification of detergent(s) in which the target protein is stable. PMID:24510647

  10. [Expression of mannose-binding lectin associated protein 19 (MAp19) in HeLa cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Li, Ping; Jia, Tianjun; Jia, Xiaohui; Zhao, Xia; Cheng, Yongting

    2016-01-01

    Objective To construct an eukaryotic expression vector of mannose-binding lectin associated protein 19 (MAp19) and further express MAp19 fusion proteins. Methods MAp19 gene fragment was amplified by PCR. The eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1/Myc-His A-MAp19 was constructed by gene cloning technology, identified by restriction enzyme digestion and further confirmed by sequencing. The recombined plasmid was then transfected into HeLa cells by liposome-mediated method, and the positive clones with vector pcDNA3.1/Myc-His A-MAp19 were selected by G418. Location of MAp19 fusion proteins in the transfected HeLa cells was observed under the fluorescence microscope, and the expression levels of MAp19 fusion proteins were detected by Western blotting. Results The recombined vector pcDNA3.1/Myc-His A-MAp19 was successfully constructed. The result of DNA sequencing was in accordance with NCBI data bank. By G418 selecting, we obtained the HeLa cells which could stably express exogenous MAp19 fusion proteins. The protein was located in the cytoplasm. Western blotting also suggested that the MAp19 was secretory protein. Conclusion The vector expressing MAp19 has been prepared successfully, and can express the target protein (MAp19) in the eukaryotic cells (HeLa cells). PMID:26728378

  11. Cloning and expression of Toxoplasma gondii dense granular protein 4 (GRA4) in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y L; Hasan, M T; Thiruvengadam, G; Idris, M M; Init, I

    2010-12-01

    GRA4 of Toxoplasma gondii has been shown to prompt IgG, IgM and IgA responses in previous studies and is thus considered one of the major immunogenic proteins from T. gondii that can be used for both diagnostics purposes and vaccine development. This study seeks to clone and express the GRA4 in Pichia pastoris, which has numerous advantages over other systems for expression of eukaryotic proteins. In order to achieve this, the gene was cloned into the pPICZα A expression vector, which was then incorporated into the P. pastoris genome via insertional integration for expression of the recombinant protein, under the AOX1 promoter. The antigen was expressed along with the prepro sequence of the α-factor of yeast so that it could be excreted out of the P. pastoris cells and obtained from the medium. Upon SDS-PAGE analysis it was found that the recombinant protein was expressed optimally as a 40 kDa protein after 96 hours of induction with 0.75% of methanol. The expressed GRA4 protein showed discrepancy in size with the calculated molecular mass. This may be attributed to the various posttranslational modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation. Despite the difference in molecular weight, the recombinant protein was able to detect toxoplasmosis in Western blot format. The recombinant GRA4 was expressed with an intact polyhistidine-tag, which could be used for future purification of the antigen. PMID:21399595

  12. The multifaceted benefits of protein co-expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Alessandra; Ceccarelli, Alessandro; Conte, Emanuele; Montón Silva, Alejandro; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We report here that the expression of protein complexes in vivo in Escherichia coli can be more convenient than traditional reconstitution experiments in vitro. In particular, we show that the poor solubility of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III ε subunit (featuring 3'-5' exonuclease activity) is highly improved when the same protein is co-expressed with the α and θ subunits (featuring DNA polymerase activity and stabilizing ε, respectively). We also show that protein co-expression in E. coli can be used to efficiently test the competence of subunits from different bacterial species to associate in a functional protein complex. We indeed show that the α subunit of Deinococcus radiodurans DNA polymerase III can be co-expressed in vivo with the ε subunit of E. coli. In addition, we report on the use of protein co-expression to modulate mutation frequency in E. coli. By expressing the wild-type ε subunit under the control of the araBAD promoter (arabinose-inducible), and co-expressing the mutagenic D12A variant of the same protein, under the control of the lac promoter (inducible by isopropyl-thio-β-D-galactopyranoside, IPTG), we were able to alter the E. coli mutation frequency using appropriate concentrations of the inducers arabinose and IPTG. Finally, we discuss recent advances and future challenges of protein co-expression in E. coli. PMID:25742393

  13. A mammalian germ cell-specific RNA-binding protein interacts with ubiquitously expressed proteins involved in splice site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, David J.; Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Klink, Albrecht; Stévenin, James; Cooke, Howard J.

    2000-05-01

    RNA-binding motif (RBM) genes are found on all mammalian Y chromosomes and are implicated in spermatogenesis. Within human germ cells, RBM protein shows a similar nuclear distribution to components of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. To address the function of RBM, we have used protein-protein interaction assays to test for possible physical interactions between these proteins. We find that RBM protein directly interacts with members of the SR family of splicing factors and, in addition, strongly interacts with itself. We have mapped the protein domains responsible for mediating these interactions and expressed the mouse RBM interaction region as a bacterial fusion protein. This fusion protein can pull-down several functionally active SR protein species from cell extracts. Depletion and add-back experiments indicate that these SR proteins are the only splicing factors bound by RBM which are required for the splicing of a panel of pre-mRNAs. Our results suggest that RBM protein is an evolutionarily conserved mammalian splicing regulator which operates as a germ cell-specific cofactor for more ubiquitously expressed pre-mRNA splicing activators.

  14. INCREASED LIVER PATHOLOGY IN HEPATITIS C VIRUS TRANSGENIC MICE EXPRESSING THE HEPATITIS B VIRUS X PROTEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was id...

  15. Selecting optimum eukaryotic integral membrane proteins for structure determination by rapid expression and solubilization screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Hays, Franklin A; Roe-Zurz, Zygy; Vuong, Linda; Kelly, Libusha; Ho, Chi-Min; Robbins, Renée M; Pieper, Ursula; O'Connell, Joseph D; Miercke, Larry J W; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Sali, Andrej; Stroud, Robert M

    2009-01-23

    A medium-throughput approach is used to rapidly identify membrane proteins from a eukaryotic organism that are most amenable to expression in amounts and quality adequate to support structure determination. The goal was to expand knowledge of new membrane protein structures based on proteome-wide coverage. In the first phase, membrane proteins from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected for homologous expression in S. cerevisiae, a system that can be adapted to expression of membrane proteins from other eukaryotes. We performed medium-scale expression and solubilization tests on 351 rationally selected membrane proteins from S. cerevisiae. These targets are inclusive of all annotated and unannotated membrane protein families within the organism's membrane proteome. Two hundred seventy-two targets were expressed, and of these, 234 solubilized in the detergent n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside. Furthermore, we report the identity of a subset of targets that were purified to homogeneity to facilitate structure determinations. The extensibility of this approach is demonstrated with the expression of 10 human integral membrane proteins from the solute carrier superfamily. This discovery-oriented pipeline provides an efficient way to select proteins from particular membrane protein classes, families, or organisms that may be more suited to structure analysis than others. PMID:19061901

  16. Development of Novel Rifampicin-Derived P-Glycoprotein Activators/Inducers. Synthesis, In Silico Analysis and Application in the RBE4 Cell Model, Using Paraquat as Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Vânia; Silva, Renata; Palmeira, Andreia; Sousa, Emília; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Branco, Paula Sério; Carvalho, Félix; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a 170 kDa transmembrane protein involved in the outward transport of many structurally unrelated substrates. P-gp activation/induction may function as an antidotal pathway to prevent the cytotoxicity of these substrates. In the present study we aimed at testing rifampicin (Rif) and three newly synthesized Rif derivatives (a mono-methoxylated derivative, MeORif, a peracetylated derivative, PerAcRif, and a reduced derivative, RedRif) to establish their ability to modulate P-gp expression and activity in a cellular model of the rat’s blood–brain barrier, the RBE4 cell line P-gp expression was assessed by western blot using C219 anti-P-gp antibody. P-gp function was evaluated by flow cytometry measuring the accumulation of rhodamine123. Whenever P-gp activation/induction ability was detected in a tested compound, its antidotal effect was further tested using paraquat as cytotoxicity model. Interactions between Rif or its derivatives and P-gp were also investigated by computational analysis. Rif led to a significant increase in P-gp expression at 72 h and RedRif significantly increased both P-gp expression and activity. No significant differences were observed for the other derivatives. Pre- or simultaneous treatment with RedRif protected cells against paraquat-induced cytotoxicity, an effect reverted by GF120918, a P-gp inhibitor, corroborating the observed P-gp activation ability. Interaction of RedRif with P-gp drug-binding pocket was consistent with an activation mechanism of action, which was confirmed with docking studies. Therefore, RedRif protection against paraquat-induced cytotoxicity in RBE4 cells, through P-gp activation/induction, suggests that it may be useful as an antidote for cytotoxic substrates of P-gp. PMID:23991219

  17. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in Penaeus monodon hemocytes after Vibrio harveyi infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Viral and bacterial diseases can cause mass mortalities in commercial shrimp aquaculture. In contrast to studies on the antiviral response, the responses of shrimps to bacterial infections by high throughput techniques have been reported only at the transcriptional level and not at the translational level. In this study, a proteomic analysis of shrimp hemocytes to identify differentially expressed proteins in response to a luminous bacterium Vibrio harveyi was evaluated for its feasibility and is reported for the first time. Results The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) patterns of the hemocyte proteins from the unchallenged and V. harveyi challenged shrimp, Penaeus monodon, at 24 and 48 h post infection were compared. From this, 27 differentially expressed protein spots, and a further 12 weakly to non-differentially regulated control spots, were selected for further analyses by the LC-ESI-MS/MS. The 21 differentially expressed proteins that could be identified by homologous annotation were comprised of proteins that are directly involved in the host defense responses, such as hemocyanin, prophenoloxidase, serine proteinase-like protein, heat shock protein 90 and alpha-2-macroglobulin, and those involved in signal transduction, such as the14-3-3 protein epsilon and calmodulin. Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of hemocyanin expression upon bacterial infection. The expression of the selected proteins which were the representatives of the down-regulated proteins (the 14-3-3 protein epsilon and alpha-2-macroglobulin) and of the up-regulated proteins (hemocyanin) was further assessed at the transcription level using real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions This work suggests the usefulness of a proteomic approach to the study of shrimp immunity and revealed hemocyte proteins whose expression were up regulated upon V. harveyi infection such as hemocyanin, arginine kinase and down regulated such as alpha-2-macroglobulin, calmodulin and 14-3-3 protein epsilon. The information is useful for understanding the immune system of shrimp against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:20626881

  18. Heat Shock Protein27 Expression and Cell Differentiation in Ameloblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Muneteru; Nakano, Keisuke; Funato, Akiyoshi; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Katsutoshi; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Okafuji, Norimasa; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The expression of HSP27 and some CKs were examined the 40 cases of typical solid/multicystic ameloblastoma using immunohistochemical techniques. In order to examine the relevance of HSP in cell differentiation, we focused on the cytoskeletal expression of CK. CK19 is a marker of typical odontogenic epithelium widely observed in follicular and plexiform types of ameloblastomas. Since staining with CK14 is one of the measures of the differentiation potential of squamous cells and is extensively expressed in both follicular and plexiform types, it implies that squamous differentiation of each type can occur. CK8 was strongly detected in tumor nests in plexiform type but weakly detected in follicular type. It was considered that the expression of HSP27 in plexiform type correlated with the expression of CK8 suggesting that HSP27 might have regulated the expression of CK8. PMID:23983585

  19. Interaction of drugs of abuse and maintenance treatments with human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Tournier, Nicolas; Chevillard, Lucie; Megarbane, Bruno; Pirnay, Stéphane; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declèves, Xavier

    2010-08-01

    Drug interaction with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) may influence its tissue disposition including blood-brain barrier transport and result in potent drug-drug interactions. The limited data obtained using in-vitro models indicate that methadone, buprenorphine, and cannabinoids may interact with human P-gp; but almost nothing is known about drugs of abuse and BCRP. We used in vitro P-gp and BCRP inhibition flow cytometric assays with hMDR1- and hBCRP-transfected HEK293 cells to test 14 compounds or metabolites frequently involved in addiction, including buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, methadone, ibogaine, cocaine, cocaethylene, amphetamine, N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, nicotine, ketamine, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), naloxone, and morphine. Drugs that in vitro inhibited P-gp or BCRP were tested in hMDR1- and hBCRP-MDCKII bidirectional transport studies. Human P-gp was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by norbuprenorphine>buprenorphine>methadone>ibogaine and THC. Similarly, BCRP was inhibited by buprenorphine>norbuprenorphine>ibogaine and THC. None of the other tested compounds inhibited either transporter, even at high concentration (100 microm). Norbuprenorphine (transport efflux ratio approoximately 11) and methadone (transport efflux ratio approoximately 1.9) transport was P-gp-mediated; however, with no significant stereo-selectivity regarding methadone enantiomers. BCRP did not transport any of the tested compounds. However, the clinical significance of the interaction of norbuprenorphine with P-gp remains to be evaluated. PMID:19887017

  20. Altered brain protein expression profiles are associated with molecular neurological dysfunction in the PKU mouse model.

    PubMed

    Imperlini, Esther; Orrù, Stefania; Corbo, Claudia; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), if not detected and treated in newborns, causes severe neurological dysfunction and cognitive and behavioral deficiencies. Despite the biochemical characterization of PKU, the molecular mechanisms underlying PKU-associated brain dysfunction remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the pathogenesis of this neurological damage by analyzing protein expression profiles in brain tissue of Black and Tan BRachyury-PahEnu2 mice (a mouse model of PKU). We compared the cerebral protein expression of homozygous PKU mice with that of their heterozygous counterparts using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analysis, and identified 21 differentially expressed proteins, four of which were over-expressed and 17 under-expressed. An in silico bioinformatic approach indicated that protein under-expression was related to neuronal differentiation and dendritic growth, and to such neurological disorders as progressive motor neuropathy and movement disorders. Moreover, functional annotation analyses showed that some identified proteins were involved in oxidative metabolism. To further investigate the proteins involved in the neurological damage, we validated two of the proteins that were most strikingly under-expressed, namely, Syn2 and Dpysl2, which are involved in synaptic function and neurotransmission. We found that Glu2/3 and NR1 receptor subunits were over-expressed in PKU mouse brain. Our results indicate that differential expression of these proteins may be associated with the processes underlying PKU brain dysfunction, namely, decreased synaptic plasticity and impaired neurotransmission. We identified a set of proteins whose expression is affected by hyperphenylalaninemia. We think that phenylketonuria (PKU) brain dysfunction also depends on reduced Syn2 and Dpysl2 levels, increased Glu2/3 and NR1 levels, and decreased Pkm, Ckb, Pgam1 and Eno1 levels. These findings finally confirm that alteration in synaptic function, in transmission and in energy metabolism underlie brain damage provoked by hyperphenylalaninemias. PMID:24548049

  1. Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels in Mesangial Cells Inhibit Matrix Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Wang, Yanxia; Davis, Mark E; Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Chaudhari, Sarika; Begg, Malcolm; Ma, Rong

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix derived from glomerular mesangial cells is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy. Ca(2+) signals mediated by store-operated Ca(2+) channels regulate protein production in a variety of cell types. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells on extracellular matrix protein expression. In cultured human mesangial cells, activation of store-operated Ca(2+) channels by thapsigargin significantly decreased fibronectin protein expression and collagen IV mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibition of the channels by 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly increased the expression of fibronectin and collagen IV. Similarly, overexpression of stromal interacting molecule 1 reduced, but knockdown of calcium release-activated calcium channel protein 1 (Orai1) increased fibronectin protein expression. Furthermore, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly augmented angiotensin II-induced fibronectin protein expression, whereas thapsigargin abrogated high glucose- and TGF-β1-stimulated matrix protein expression. In vivo knockdown of Orai1 in mesangial cells of mice using a targeted nanoparticle siRNA delivery system resulted in increased expression of glomerular fibronectin and collagen IV, and mice showed significant mesangial expansion compared with controls. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of stromal interacting molecule 1 in mesangial cells by recombinant adeno-associated virus-encoded shRNA markedly increased collagen IV protein expression in renal cortex and caused mesangial expansion in rats. These results suggest that store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells negatively regulate extracellular matrix protein expression in the kidney, which may serve as an endogenous renoprotective mechanism in diabetes. PMID:25788524

  2. Protein A-Mouse Acidic Mammalian Chitinase-V5-His Expressed in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli Possesses Chitinase Functions Comparable to CHO-Expressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N′-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase. PMID:24244337

  3. Expression of synthetic human tropoelastin (hTE) protein in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Abdelghani, Mona; El-Heba, Ghada A Abu; Abdelhadi, Abdelhadi A; Abdallah, Naglaa A

    2015-01-01

    Plant molecular farming (PMF) is an important growing prospective approach in plant biotechnology; it includes production of recombinant pharmaceutical and industrial proteins in large quantities from engineered plants. Elastin is a major protein component of tissues that require elasticity, it helps keep skin smooth as it stretches to allow normal. Elastin is used as a raw material for the cosmetic industry. In this work, we aimed to use plant as a bioreactor for the expression and production of the full human tropoelastin protein. Agrobacterium- mediated transient expression system into Nicotiana tabacum using syringe agroinfiltration was used to provide fast and convenient way to produce recombinant proteins with greater expression overall the plant leaf. This study aimed to establish an efficient and rapid system for transiently expression and production of human recombinant tropoelastin protein in transgenic N. tabacum plants. Modified elastin (ELN) gene was biosynthesized and cloned into pCambia1390 vector to be used into N. tabacum agroinfilteration. Optimization of codon usage for the human tropoelastin gene, without changing the primary structure of the protein was carried out to ensure high expression in tobacco plants. The obtained data proved that the 5(th) day post-infiltration is the optimum interval to obtain the maximum production of our recombinant protein. Southern blot analysis was able to detect 2175 bp fragment length representing the ELN orf (open reding frame). On the other hand, ELN -expression within plant's tissue was visualized by RT-PCR during the period 3-10 days post agroinfiltration. At the protein level, western and ELISA confirmed the expression of recombinant tropoelastin protein. Western blot analysis detected the tropoelastin protein as parent band at ∼70 kDa from freshly extracted protein, while two degraded bands of ∼55 and ∼45 kDa, representing a pattern of tropoelastin were appeared with frozen samples. This study showed that biosynthetic ELN gene was successfully expressed into N. tabacum leaves using agroinfiltration technique. PMID:25984768

  4. Detecting differential and correlated protein expression in label-free shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Langston, Michael A; Uberbacher, Edward; Hettich, Robert L; Samatova, Nagiza F

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed a relationship between protein abundance and sampling statistics, such as sequence coverage, peptide count, and spectral count, in label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) shotgun proteomics. The use of sampling statistics offers a promising method of measuring relative protein abundance and detecting differentially expressed or coexpressed proteins. We performed a systematic analysis of various approaches to quantifying differential protein expression in eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae and prokaryotic Rhodopseudomonas palustris label-free LC-MS/MS data. First, we showed that, among three sampling statistics, the spectral count has the highest technical reproducibility, followed by the less-reproducible peptide count and relatively nonreproducible sequence coverage. Second, we used spectral count statistics to measure differential protein expression in pairwise experiments using five statistical tests: Fisher's exact test, G-test, AC test, t-test, and LPE test. Given the S. cerevisiae data set with spiked proteins as a benchmark and the false positive rate as a metric, our evaluation suggested that the Fisher's exact test, G-test, and AC test can be used when the number of replications is limited (one or two), whereas the t-test is useful with three or more replicates available. Third, we generalized the G-test to increase the sensitivity of detecting differential protein expression under multiple experimental conditions. Out of 1622 identified R. palustris proteins in the LC-MS/MS experiment, the generalized G-test detected 1119 differentially expressed proteins under six growth conditions. Finally, we studied correlated expression of these 1119 proteins by analyzing pairwise expression correlations and by delineating protein clusters according to expression patterns. Through pairwise expression correlation analysis, we demonstrated that proteins co-located in the same operon were much more strongly coexpressed than those from different operons. Combining cluster analysis with existing protein functional annotations, we identified six protein clusters with known biological significance. In summary, the proposed generalized G-test using spectral count sampling statistics is a viable methodology for robust quantification of relative protein abundance and for sensitive detection of biologically significant differential protein expression under multiple experimental conditions in label-free shotgun proteomics. PMID:17081042

  5. Decreased expression of nucleophosmin/B23 increases drug sensitivity of adriamycin-resistant Molt-4 leukemia cells through mdr-1 regulation and Akt/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingyan; Chen, Buyuan; Lin, Minhui; Cao, Yanqin; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Xinji; Liu, Tingbo; Hu, Jianda

    2015-03-01

    Nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM) is a nuclear protein with prosurvival and ribosomal RNA processing functions. However, the potential role of NPM involved in drug-resistance in leukemia has not been investigated clearly. In this study, we generated an adriamycin (ADM)-resistant lymphoblastic cell line Molt-4/ADR (MAR) by stepwise induction. Cell proliferation, sensitivity to chemotherapy agents and expressions of drug resistance related molecules were assessed. The IC50 of Molt-4 cells were 0.58±0.11μmol/L and MAR cells were 22.56±1.94μmol/L, meaning MAR cells were 38.63 fold resistant to Molt-4 cells. Furthermore, MAR cells gained an expression of mdr-1 (P-gp) and a higher expression of NPM compared to Molt-4 cells. Knockdown of NPM by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed the viability of both Molt-4 and MAR cells. After NPM RNAi, the IC50 of MAR and Molt-4 cells were 3.83±0.38μmol/L and 0.19±0.02μmol/L respectively. Both of them revealed an increase of drug sensitivity with down-regulation of mdr-1 and Akt/mTOR signaling. Knockdown of mdr-1 could also reverse the drug resistance, with no change in NPM expression. It could be concluded that knockdown of NPM reversed the drug resistance by down-regulating P-gp and Akt/mTOR signal pathway, indicating that NPM may serve as a potential modulator in drug resistance. PMID:25457413

  6. Affinity Purification of a Recombinant Protein Expressed as a Fusion with the Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) Tag.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2015-01-01

    Expression of fusion proteins such as MBP fusions can be used as a way to improve the solubility of the expressed protein in E. coli (Fox and Waugh, 2003; Nallamsetty et al., 2005; Nallamsetty and Waugh, 2006) and as a way to introduce an affinity purification tag. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors as a first step in the purification of a recombinant protein fused with MBP, using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Cells should have been thawed, resuspended in binding buffer, and lysed by sonication or microfluidization before mixing with the amylose resin or loading on the column. Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment. PMID:26096500

  7. Proteins expressed in blue-green sharpshooter leafhoppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used a metagenomics approach to identify proteins from the blue-green sharpshooter, Graphocephala atropunctata (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) which is an important vector of Pierce’s disease of grapes. The 44 proteins are being used as markers to monitor and identify current and exotic introductions o...

  8. Utility of proteomics techniques for assessing protein expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic technologies are currently used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications in protein profiles for assessing the bio-safety of genetically modified (GM) crop organisms. Understanding the natural variation of soybean seed proteins is necessary to evaluate potential uninten...

  9. Utility of proteomics techniques for assessing protein expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, proteomic technologies have been frequently used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles for accessing the bio-safety of genetically modified crops (GMO). Understanding of natural variation of soybean seed proteins is critical for determining...

  10. Immunohistochemical expression of Skp2 protein in oral nevi and melanoma

    PubMed Central

    León, Jorge E.; Carlos, Román; Delgado-Azañero, Wilson; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Paes-de-Almeida, Oslei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of Skp2 protein in 38 oral nevi and 11 primary oral melanomas. Study Design: Expression of this ubiquitin protein was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 49 oral melanocytic lesions, including 38 intramucosal nevi and 11 primary oral melanomas. The labeling index (LI) was assessed considering the percentage of cells expressing nuclear positivity out of the total number of cells, counting 1000 cells per slide. Results: Skp2 protein was rarely expressed in intramucosal nevi, in contrast to oral melanomas, which showed high levels of this protein. Conclusion: These results indicate that Skp2 protein may play a role in the development and progression of oral melanomas, and it also could be useful as an immunohistochemical marker for differential diagnosis of oral benign and malignant melanocytic lesions. Key words:Oral melanoma, oral nevi, Skp2, cell cycle, immunohistochemistry. PMID:23385514

  11. Protein expression profiles of intestinal epithelial co-cultures: effect of functionalised carbon nanotube exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xianyin; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie L.; Clack, James W.; Fears, Sharry L.; Mitra, Somenath; Ntim, Susana Addo; Ringham, Heather N.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the biological effects of low level, water dispersible, functionalised carbon nanotube (f-CNT) exposure in an in vitro model simulating the digestive tract, cellular protein expression was quantified and compared using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQMS). Co-cultured cells were exposed to well-characterised SWCNT-COOH, MWCNT-COOH, and MWCNT-PVP. The relative expression of 2,282 unique proteins was compared across the dose groups. 428 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. At the high dose, the extent of differential protein expression was CNT-specific and directly related to CNT colloidal stability. Cells responded to low level MWCNT-PVP exposure with three-fold greater differential expression. Bioinformatic analysis indicated significant and f-CNT-specific effects on relevant molecular and cellular functions and canonical pathways, with little overlap across f-CNT type and in the absence of overt toxicity. PMID:24228069

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors regularly express synaptic vesicle proteins: evidence of a neuroendocrine phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bümming, Per; Nilsson, Ola; Ahlman, Håkan; Welbencer, Anna; Andersson, Mattias K; Sjölund, Katarina; Nilsson, Bengt

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are thought to originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal, which share many properties with neurons of the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, we demonstrated expression of the hormone ghrelin in GIST. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate a possible neuroendocrine phenotype of GIST. Specimens from 41 GISTs were examined for the expression of 12 different synaptic vesicle proteins. Expression of synaptic-like microvesicle proteins, e.g., Synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), synaptobrevin, synapsin 1, and amphiphysin was demonstrated in a majority of GISTs by immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and quantitative reversetranscriptase PCR. One-third of the tumors also expressed the large dense core vesicle protein vesicular monoamine transporter 1. Presence of microvesicles and dense core vesicles in GIST was confirmed by electron microscopy. The expression of synaptic-like microvesicle proteins in GIST was not related to risk profile or to KIT/platelet derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) mutational status. Thus, GISTs regularly express a subset of synaptic-like microvesicle proteins necessary for the regulated secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones. Expression of synaptic-like micro-vesicle proteins, ghrelin and peptide hormone receptors in GIST indicate a neuroendocrine phenotype and suggest novel possibilities to treat therapy-resistant GIST. PMID:17914114

  13. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  14. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  15. PepGMV Rep-Protein Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chapa-Oliver, Angela María; Mejía-Teniente, Laura; García-Gasca, Teresa; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2012-01-01

    The Geminiviruses genome is a small, single strand DNA that replicates in the plant cell nucleus. Analogous to animal DNA viruses, Geminiviruses depend on the host replication machinery to amplify their genomes and only supply the factors required to initiate their replication. Consequently, Geminiviruses remove the cell-cycle arrest and induce the host replication machinery using an endocycle process. They encode proteins, such as the conserved replication-associated proteins (Rep) that interact with retinoblastoma-like proteins in plants and alter the cell division cycle in yeasts. Therefore, the aim of this work is to analyze the impact of Pepper Golden Mosaic Virus (PepGMV) Rep protein in mammalian cells. Results indicate that the pTracer-SV40:Rep construction obtained in this work can be used to analyze the Rep protein effect in mammalian cells in order to compare the cell cycle regulation mechanisms in plants and animals. PMID:23170183

  16. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:27142790

  17. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release.

    PubMed

    López, Claudia S; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-01

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. PMID:24971705

  18. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    PubMed Central

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. PMID:24971705

  19. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J.; Sirota, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:27142790

  20. Engineered mammalian vector to express EGFP-tagged proteins as biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Geraldo Santana; Novo, Juliana Branco; Clissa, Patricia Bianca; Della Casa, Maisa Splendore; Butera, Diego; da Silva, Ana Maria Moura

    2012-06-01

    Due to its specialized post-translational machinery, mammalian cells represent an interesting and not fully explored system to express snake toxins. Therefore, in this work, we built up a new mammalian expression vector that enhances the feasibility to use mammalian cells to express proteins as biomarkers. Among the modifications, an Igκ signal peptide and a 6xHis tag were inserted into this vector in order to drive the protein to the supernatant and simplify its purification, respectively. In addition, to facilitate selection of high producing clones and also tag proteins which may function as a biomarker, the sequence of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was added. The efficiency of the resulting vector (pToxEGFP) was tested by cloning and expressing the viper venom disintegrin echistatin (Ech) that due to its affinity to integrin αvβ3 was tested as a molecular marker. Expression of EGFP-Ech was achieved in CHO-DXB11 cells resulting in a yield of 22 mg/L. The binding activity of this chimera protein was successfully achieved on human umbilical vein endothelial cells which highly express αvβ3. The results indicate that pToxEGFP may constitute an efficient and versatile expression vector to express tagged proteins with potential biomarker activity. PMID:21847674

  1. Dynamic Stabilization of Expressed Proteins in Engineered Diatom Biosilica Matrices.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yijia; Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Roesijadi, Guritno; Squier, Thomas C

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembly of recombinant proteins within the biosilica of living diatoms represents a means to construct functional materials in a reproducible and scalable manner that will enable applications that harness the inherent specificities of proteins to sense and respond to environmental cues. Here we describe the use of a silaffin-derived lysine-rich 39-amino-acid targeting sequence (Sil3T8) that directs a single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody or an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to assemble within the biosilica frustule, resulting in abundance of >200 000 proteins per frustule. Using either a fluorescent ligand bound to the scFv or the intrinsic fluorescence of EGFP, we monitored protein conformational dynamics, accessibility to external quenchers, binding affinity, and conformational stability. Like proteins in solution, proteins within isolated frustules undergo isotropic rotational motion, but with 2-fold increases in rotational correlation times that are indicative of weak macromolecular associations within the biosilica. Solvent accessibilities and high-affinity (pM) binding are comparable to those in solution. In contrast to solution conditions, scFv antibodies within the biosilica matrix retain their binding affinity in the presence of chaotropic agents (i.e., 8 M urea). Together, these results argue that dramatic increases in protein conformational stability within the biosilica matrices arise through molecular crowding, acting to retain native protein folds and associated functionality with the potential to allow the utility of engineered proteins under a range of harsh environmental conditions associated with environmental sensing and industrial catalytic transformations. PMID:27139003

  2. Overview of approaches to preventing and avoiding proteolysis during expression and purification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Barry J; Henehan, Gary T

    2013-02-01

    Proteases are enzymes that cleave proteins. They occur widely in nature and play a fundamental role in cellular homeostasis; however, their presence can result in unwanted protein degradation during recombinant protein expression and purification. This unit introduces proteases, specifically focusing on the types commonly encountered during production of recombinant proteins. The strategies used to avoid and to prevent proteolysis are also described, with extensive consideration of the molecular, technical, and logistic methodologies involved. PMID:23377852

  3. Evolutionary Divergence of Gene and Protein Expression in the Brains of Humans and Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Soderblom, Erik J; Turner, Meredith E; Moseley, M Arthur; Ely, John J; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C; Wray, Gregory A; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2015-08-01

    Although transcriptomic profiling has become the standard approach for exploring molecular differences in the primate brain, very little is known about how the expression levels of gene transcripts relate to downstream protein abundance. Moreover, it is unknown whether the relationship changes depending on the brain region or species under investigation. We performed high-throughput transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) and proteomic (liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) analyses on two regions of the human and chimpanzee brain: The anterior cingulate cortex and caudate nucleus. In both brain regions, we found a lower correlation between mRNA and protein expression levels in humans and chimpanzees than has been reported for other tissues and cell types, suggesting that the brain may engage extensive tissue-specific regulation affecting protein abundance. In both species, only a few categories of biological function exhibited strong correlations between mRNA and protein expression levels. These categories included oxidative metabolism and protein synthesis and modification, indicating that the expression levels of mRNA transcripts supporting these biological functions are more predictive of protein expression compared with other functional categories. More generally, however, the two measures of molecular expression provided strikingly divergent perspectives into differential expression between human and chimpanzee brains: mRNA comparisons revealed significant differences in neuronal communication, ion transport, and regulatory processes, whereas protein comparisons indicated differences in perception and cognition, metabolic processes, and organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results highlight the importance of examining protein expression in evolutionary analyses and call for a more thorough understanding of tissue-specific protein expression levels. PMID:26163674

  4. Evolutionary Divergence of Gene and Protein Expression in the Brains of Humans and Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Bauernfeind, Amy L.; Soderblom, Erik J.; Turner, Meredith E.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Ely, John J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Wray, Gregory A.; Babbitt, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    Although transcriptomic profiling has become the standard approach for exploring molecular differences in the primate brain, very little is known about how the expression levels of gene transcripts relate to downstream protein abundance. Moreover, it is unknown whether the relationship changes depending on the brain region or species under investigation. We performed high-throughput transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) and proteomic (liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) analyses on two regions of the human and chimpanzee brain: The anterior cingulate cortex and caudate nucleus. In both brain regions, we found a lower correlation between mRNA and protein expression levels in humans and chimpanzees than has been reported for other tissues and cell types, suggesting that the brain may engage extensive tissue-specific regulation affecting protein abundance. In both species, only a few categories of biological function exhibited strong correlations between mRNA and protein expression levels. These categories included oxidative metabolism and protein synthesis and modification, indicating that the expression levels of mRNA transcripts supporting these biological functions are more predictive of protein expression compared with other functional categories. More generally, however, the two measures of molecular expression provided strikingly divergent perspectives into differential expression between human and chimpanzee brains: mRNA comparisons revealed significant differences in neuronal communication, ion transport, and regulatory processes, whereas protein comparisons indicated differences in perception and cognition, metabolic processes, and organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results highlight the importance of examining protein expression in evolutionary analyses and call for a more thorough understanding of tissue-specific protein expression levels. PMID:26163674

  5. Expression Atlas update—an integrated database of gene and protein expression in humans, animals and plants

    PubMed Central

    Petryszak, Robert; Keays, Maria; Tang, Y. Amy; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Barrera, Elisabet; Burdett, Tony; Füllgrabe, Anja; Fuentes, Alfonso Muñoz-Pomer; Jupp, Simon; Koskinen, Satu; Mannion, Oliver; Huerta, Laura; Megy, Karine; Snow, Catherine; Williams, Eleanor; Barzine, Mitra; Hastings, Emma; Weisser, Hendrik; Wright, James; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Huber, Wolfgang; Choudhary, Jyoti; Parkinson, Helen E.; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Expression Atlas (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/gxa) provides information about gene and protein expression in animal and plant samples of different cell types, organism parts, developmental stages, diseases and other conditions. It consists of selected microarray and RNA-sequencing studies from ArrayExpress, which have been manually curated, annotated with ontology terms, checked for high quality and processed using standardised analysis methods. Since the last update, Atlas has grown seven-fold (1572 studies as of August 2015), and incorporates baseline expression profiles of tissues from Human Protein Atlas, GTEx and FANTOM5, and of cancer cell lines from ENCODE, CCLE and Genentech projects. Plant studies constitute a quarter of Atlas data. For genes of interest, the user can view baseline expression in tissues, and differential expression for biologically meaningful pairwise comparisons—estimated using consistent methodology across all of Atlas. Our first proteomics study in human tissues is now displayed alongside transcriptomics data in the same tissues. Novel analyses and visualisations include: ‘enrichment’ in each differential comparison of GO terms, Reactome, Plant Reactome pathways and InterPro domains; hierarchical clustering (by baseline expression) of most variable genes and experimental conditions; and, for a given gene-condition, distribution of baseline expression across biological replicates. PMID:26481351

  6. Expression Atlas update-an integrated database of gene and protein expression in humans, animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Petryszak, Robert; Keays, Maria; Tang, Y Amy; Fonseca, Nuno A; Barrera, Elisabet; Burdett, Tony; Füllgrabe, Anja; Fuentes, Alfonso Muñoz-Pomer; Jupp, Simon; Koskinen, Satu; Mannion, Oliver; Huerta, Laura; Megy, Karine; Snow, Catherine; Williams, Eleanor; Barzine, Mitra; Hastings, Emma; Weisser, Hendrik; Wright, James; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Huber, Wolfgang; Choudhary, Jyoti; Parkinson, Helen E; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Expression Atlas (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/gxa) provides information about gene and protein expression in animal and plant samples of different cell types, organism parts, developmental stages, diseases and other conditions. It consists of selected microarray and RNA-sequencing studies from ArrayExpress, which have been manually curated, annotated with ontology terms, checked for high quality and processed using standardised analysis methods. Since the last update, Atlas has grown seven-fold (1572 studies as of August 2015), and incorporates baseline expression profiles of tissues from Human Protein Atlas, GTEx and FANTOM5, and of cancer cell lines from ENCODE, CCLE and Genentech projects. Plant studies constitute a quarter of Atlas data. For genes of interest, the user can view baseline expression in tissues, and differential expression for biologically meaningful pairwise comparisons-estimated using consistent methodology across all of Atlas. Our first proteomics study in human tissues is now displayed alongside transcriptomics data in the same tissues. Novel analyses and visualisations include: 'enrichment' in each differential comparison of GO terms, Reactome, Plant Reactome pathways and InterPro domains; hierarchical clustering (by baseline expression) of most variable genes and experimental conditions; and, for a given gene-condition, distribution of baseline expression across biological replicates. PMID:26481351

  7. Expression of the SET protein in testes of mice at different developmental stages

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Nan; Liu, Shan; Shao, Li; Gao, Chao; Gao, Li; Liu, Jia-Yin; Cui, Yu-Gui

    2014-01-01

    SET is a multifunctional protein involved in regulating many biological processes of the cell cycle. It is also a regulator of steroidogenesis in the ovary. However, the expression of SET protein in testis, and its function, still remains ambiguous. In this study, we observed the expression of SET in the testes of mice at different developmental stages, and have discussed its potential function in regulating spermatogenesis and androgen production. Forty-eight male mice at different developmental stages (1 week old as the infancy group; 4 weeks old as the prepubertal group; 12 weeks old as the adult group; over 12 months old as the ageing group) were used. Cellular location of SET protein in the testes was observed by immuno-histochemistry. Expression levels of Set mRNA and SET protein were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. SET protein was expressed in spermatogonial cells and spermatocytes; the highest level was mainly in haploid and tetraploid cells of the prepubertal and adult groups, and Leydig cells of the adult and ageing groups. There was a low expression in Sertoli cells. Expression of Set mRNA in the prepubertal group was significantly higher than that in the adult group (P < 0.05), while expression of SET protein was at the highest level in the adult group (P < 0.05). SET protein is mainly expressed in spermatogonial cells and spermatocytes, and poorly expressed in Sertoli cells, suggesting that it is involved in spermatogenesis. Expression of SET protein in Leydig cells suggests a possible role in steroidogenesis. PMID:24923460

  8. [Prokaryotic expression and polyclonal antibody preparation of HPV6b E7 protein].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi; Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Hao

    2011-09-01

    To express and prepare polyclonal antibody of Human papillomavirus type 6b (HPV6b) E7 protein. a prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-2/HPV6b E7 was constructed and GST-HPV6b E7 fusion protein was expressed as a soluble protein in E. coli. The expressed fusion protein was purified via Glutathione-Sepharose 4B column and thrombin cleavage in order to obtain HPV6b E7 protein. Polyclonal IgG antibody was prepared by immunizing New-Zealand rabbits with HPV6b E7 protein. Western-Blot and immunofluorescence analysis showed that the polyclonal IgG antibody could specifically recognize HPV6b E7 protein and its titer was identified. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that large amounts of soluble GST-HPV6b E7 fusion protein was expressed in E. coli after 3.0-6.0 hours of IPTG induction. Polyclonal IgG antibody successfully prepared from immunized rabbits showed high titer and high specificity as confirmed by Western-Blot and immunofluorescence. The preparation of anti-HPV6b E7 polyclonal antibody will facilitate further research on the biological and immunological functions of HPV6b E7 protein. PMID:21998951

  9. Evolved Escherichia coli strains for amplified, functional expression of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gul, Nadia; Linares, Daniel M; Ho, Franz Y; Poolman, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The major barrier to the physical characterization and structure determination of membrane proteins is low protein yield and/or low functionality in recombinant expression. The enteric bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely employed organism for producing recombinant proteins. Beside several advantages of this expression host, one major drawback is that the protein of interest does not always adopt its native conformation and may end up in large insoluble aggregates. We describe a robust strategy to increase the likelihood of overexpressing membrane proteins in a functional state. The method involves fusion in tandem of green fluorescent protein and the erythromycin resistance protein (23S ribosomal RNA adenine N-6 methyltransferase, ErmC) to the C-terminus of a target membrane protein. The fluorescence of green fluorescent protein is used to report the folding state of the target protein, whereas ErmC is used to select for increased expression. By gradually increasing the erythromycin concentration of the medium and testing different membrane protein targets, we obtained a number of evolved strains of which four (NG2, NG3, NG5 and NG6) were characterized and their genome was fully sequenced. Strikingly, each of the strains carried a mutation in the hns gene, whose product is involved in genome organization and transcriptional silencing. The degree of expression of (membrane) proteins correlates with the severity of the hns mutation, but cells in which hns was deleted showed an intermediate expression performance. We propose that (partial) removal of the transcriptional silencing mechanism changes the levels of proteins essential for the functional overexpression of membrane proteins. PMID:24041572

  10. Differential Expression of Intracellular and Extracellular CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Protein by Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda, Julie T.; Harui, Airi; Kiertscher, Sylvia M.; Roth, Jeffrey D.; Roth, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    mRNA encoding for the CB2 cannabinoid receptor is expressed by many subsets of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), but little is known about the resulting protein expression and function. Employing clones from the A549 and 293T cell lines that were constructed to express both full-length human CB2 and GFP, we developed a flow cytometry assay for characterizing CB2 protein expression. A monoclonal antibody directed against human CB2 selectively stained the surface of transduced but not parental cell lines. When cells were fixed and permeabilized, imaging flow cytometry identified large stores of intracellular protein. Total cellular staining for CB2 corresponded closely with the level of GFP expression. When exposed to Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, CB2-expressing cells internalized cell surface CB2 receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Applying these approaches to human PBL, CB2 protein was identified on the surface of human B cells but not on T cells or monocytes. In contrast, when PBL were fixed and permeabilized, intracellular CB2 expression was readily detected in all three subsets by both conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Similar to the protein expression pattern observed in fixed and permeabilized PBL, purified B cells, T cells, and monocytes expressed relatively equal levels of CB2 mRNA by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our findings confirm that human PBL express CB2 protein but that its distribution is predominantly intracellular with only B cells expressing CB2 protein at the extracellular membrane. The differential role of intracellular and extracellular CB2 receptors in mediating ligand signaling and immune function remains to be determined. PMID:23299999

  11. Immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus vectors expressing Norwalk virus capsid protein in the presence or absence of VP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Chen, Shun; Jiang, Xi; Green, Kim Y; Samal, Siba K

    2015-10-01

    Noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Development of an effective vaccine is required for reducing their outbreaks. In order to develop a GI norovirus vaccine, Newcastle disease virus vectors, rLaSota and modified rBC, were used to express VP1 protein of Norwalk virus. Co-expression of VP1 and VP2 proteins by Newcastle disease virus vectors resulted in enhanced expression of Norwalk virus VP1 protein and self-assembly of VP1 protein into virus-like particles. Furthermore, the Norwalk virus-specific IgG response induced in mice by Newcastle disease virus vectors was similar to that induced by baculovirus-expressed virus-like particles in mice. However, the modified rBC vector in the presence of VP2 protein induced significantly higher levels of cellular and mucosal immune responses than those induced by baculovirus-expressed VLPs. These results indicate that Newcastle disease virus has great potential for developing a live Norwalk virus vaccine by inducing humoral, cellular and mucosal immune responses in humans. PMID:26099695

  12. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  13. Fluorescent probe for high-throughput screening of membrane protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Backmark, A E; Olivier, N; Snijder, A; Gordon, E; Dekker, N; Ferguson, A D

    2013-01-01

    Screening of protein variants requires specific detection methods to assay protein levels and stability in crude mixtures. Many strategies apply fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to qualitatively monitor expression, stability, and monodispersity. However, GFP fusion proteins have several important disadvantages; including false-positives, protein aggregation after proteolytic removal of GFP, and reductions in protein yields without the GFP fusion. Here we describe a FSEC screening strategy based on a fluorescent multivalent NTA probe that interacts with polyhistidine-tags on target proteins. This method overcomes the limitations of GFP fusion proteins, and can be used to rank protein production based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. Domain boundaries of the human G-protein coupled adenosine A2a receptor were readily identified from crude detergent-extracts of a library of construct variants transiently produced in suspension-adapted HEK293-6E cells. Well expressing clones of MraY, an important bacterial infection target, could be identified from a library of 24 orthologs. This probe provides a highly sensitive tool to detect target proteins to expression levels down to 0.02 mg/L in crude lysate, and requires minimal amounts of cell culture. PMID:23776061

  14. Expression of Glutamate and Glutamine Transporter Proteins in Neurovascular Unit Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Morgun, A V; Kuvacheva, N V; Khilazheva, E D; Taranushenko, T E; Salmina, A B

    2015-09-01

    Glutamine transporter protein SLC1A5 and glutamate transporter protein EAAT2 responsible for cell-cell communication and energetic coupling were studied using in vitro model of multicellular neurovascular unit consisting of astrocytes, neurons, and endotheliocytes under standard conditions and during chemical hypoxia in vitro. Hypoxic damage to the neurovascular unit cells increased the number of SLC1A5-expressing cells and reduced the number of EAAT2-expressing astrocytes. Metabolic uncoupling in the neurovascular unit cells under hypoxic conditions resulted from abnormal expression of glutamine and glutamate transporter proteins, which is indicative of impaired glutamine and glutamate transport. PMID:26459476

  15. Small-Scale Production of Recombinant Proteins Using the Baculovirus Expression Vector System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Numerous technological improvements, including progress in vector design, simplification of virus isolation techniques, and advancements in molecular biology and cell culture technologies, have greatly facilitated the use of the baculovirus-insect cell system for routine production of recombinant proteins. This chapter outlines the basic techniques for small-scale protein production using the Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS), including protocols for titer estimation in 96-well plates, expression optimization in 24-well plates, and recombinant protein expression from adherent and suspension cultures in six-well plates and in 50 mL insect cell cultures. PMID:26820860

  16. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  17. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  18. Expression of two membrane fusion proteins, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, I; Burkart, A; Szmydynger-Chodobska, J; Dodd, K A; Trimble, W S; Miller, K V; Shim, M; Chodobski, A

    2003-01-01

    In addition to being the major site of cerebrospinal fluid formation, the choroid plexus epithelium emerges as an important source of polypeptides in the brain. Physiologically regulated release of some polypeptides synthesized by the choroid plexus has been shown. The molecular mechanisms underlying this polypeptide secretion have not been characterized, however. In the present study, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, two membrane fusion proteins playing a critical role in exocytosis in neurons and endocrine cells, were found to be expressed in the choroid plexus epithelium. It was also shown that in choroidal epithelium, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein stably interact. Two members of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, were expressed in the rat choroid plexus at the messenger RNA and protein level. However, their newly discovered isoforms, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1b and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2b, produced by alternative RNA splicing, were not detected in choroidal tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vesicle-associated membrane protein is confined to the cytoplasm of choroidal epithelium, whereas synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa is associated with plasma membranes, albeit with a varied cellular distribution among species studied. Specifically, in the rat choroid plexus, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was localized to the basolateral membrane domain of choroidal epithelium and was expressed in small groups of cells. In comparison, in ovine and human choroidal tissues, apical staining for synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was found in the majority of epithelial cells. These species-related differences in cellular synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa distribution suggested that the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa homologue, synaptosome-associated protein of 23 kDa, is also expressed in the rat choroid plexus, which was confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Our findings suggest that synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein are involved in secretion of polypeptides from the choroid plexus epithelium. The presence of synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and its homologue as well as multiple isoforms of vesicle-associated membrane protein in choroidal epithelium may play a role in the apical versus basolateral targeting of secretory vesicles. PMID:12559091

  19. Rift Valley Fever Virus Structural and Nonstructural Proteins: Recombinant Protein Expression and Immunoreactivity Against Antisera from Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William; McVey, D. Scott; Drolet, Barbara S.; Weingartl, Hana; Madden, Daniel; Young, Alan; Ma, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) encodes the structural proteins nucleoprotein (N), aminoterminal glycoprotein (Gn), carboxyterminal glycoprotein (Gc), and L protein, 78-kD, and the nonstructural proteins NSm and NSs. Using the baculovirus system, we expressed the full-length coding sequence of N, NSs, NSm, Gc, and the ectodomain of the coding sequence of the Gn glycoprotein derived from the virulent strain of RVFV ZH548. Western blot analysis using anti-His antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against Gn and N confirmed expression of the recombinant proteins, and in vitro biochemical analysis showed that the two glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, were expressed in glycosylated form. Immunoreactivity profiles of the recombinant proteins in western blot and in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against a panel of antisera obtained from vaccinated or wild type (RVFV)-challenged sheep confirmed the results obtained with anti-His antibodies and demonstrated the suitability of the baculo-expressed antigens for diagnostic assays. In addition, these recombinant proteins could be valuable for the development of diagnostic methods that differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). PMID:23962238

  20. Gene selection and cloning approaches for co-expression and production of recombinant protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Babnigg, György; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Nocek, Boguslaw; Stein, Adam; Eschenfeldt, William; Stols, Lucy; Marshall, Norman; Weger, Alicia; Wu, Ruiying; Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Multiprotein complexes play essential roles in all cells and X-ray crystallography can provide unparalleled insight into their structure and function. Many of these complexes are believed to be sufficiently stable for structural biology studies, but the production of protein-protein complexes using recombinant technologies is still labor-intensive. We have explored several strategies for the identification and cloning of heterodimers and heterotrimers that are compatible with the high-throughput (HTP) structural biology pipeline developed for single proteins. Two approaches are presented and compared which resulted in co-expression of paired genes from a single expression vector. Native operons encoding predicted interacting proteins were selected from a repertoire of genomes, and cloned directly to expression vector. In an alternative approach, Helicobacter pylori proteins predicted to interact strongly were cloned, each associated with translational control elements, then linked into an artificial operon. Proteins were then expressed and purified by standard HTP protocols, resulting to date in the structure determination of two H. pylori complexes. PMID:26671275

  1. Identification of a cis-acting element in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) that is responsive to the HIV-1 rev and human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II rex proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, N; Williams, J; Rekosh, D; Hammarskjöld, M L

    1990-01-01

    A simian virus 40 late replacement vector encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 (pGP120) was used to define a region within the HIV-2 genome that could work as a rev-responsive element (RRE). Our previous work showed that gp120 expression in this system required a functional RRE in cis and required the rev protein in trans (M.-L. Hammarskjöld, J. Heimer, B. Hammarskjöld, I. Sangwan, L. Albert, and D. Rekosh, J. Virol. 63:1959-1966, 1989). Using pGP120, we first mapped an RRE to a 1,042-base-pair (bp) Sau3a fragment in the env region of HIV-2. Both HIV-1 rev (rev1) and HIV-2 rev (rev2) could work in conjunction with this fragment. Further mapping showed that a 272-bp subfragment within the 1,042-bp region was sufficient as an RRE. Surprisingly, the smaller fragment worked only with the rev1 protein and not with its homologous rev2 protein. In addition, the rev2 protein failed to function together with the RRE from HIV-1. We also utilized this system to examine the ability of the rex genes of human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II to functionally substitute for rev. These experiments showed that complementation by both the rexI and rexII proteins required the presence of an RRE. The rex proteins worked well in conjunction with either the HIV-1 or the HIV-2 RRE (the 1,042-bp as well as the 272-bp fragment). Images PMID:2157051

  2. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins and cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins during osteophyte formation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zoricic, Sanja; Maric, Ivana; Bobinac, Dragica; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2003-01-01

    Bone- and cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins (BMPs and CDMPs), which are TGFβ superfamily members, are growth and differentiation factors that have been recently isolated, cloned and biologically characterized. They are important regulators of key events in the processes of bone formation during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, remodelling and regeneration of the skeleton. In the present study, we used immunohistochemical methods to investigate the distribution of BMP-2, -3, -5, -6, -7 and CDMP-1, -2, -3 in human osteophytes (abnormal bony outgrowths) isolated from osteoarthritic hip and knee joints from patients undergoing total joint replacement surgery. All osteophytes consisted of three different areas of active bone formation: (1) endochondral bone formation within cartilage residues; (2) intramembranous bone formation within the fibrous tissue cover and (3) bone formation within bone marrow spaces. The immunohistochemistry of certain BMPs and CDMPs in each of these three different bone formation sites was determined. The results indicate that each BMP has a distinct pattern of distribution. Immunoreactivity for BMP-2 was observed in fibrous tissue matrix as well as in osteoblasts; BMP-3 was mainly present in osteoblasts; BMP-6 was restricted to young osteocytes and bone matrix; BMP-7 was observed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, osteoblasts and young osteocytes of both endochondral and intramembranous bone formation sites. CDMP-1, -2 and -3 were strongly expressed in all cartilage cells. Surprisingly, BMP-3 and -6 were found in osteoclasts at the sites of bone resorption. Since a similar distribution pattern of bone morphogenetic proteins was observed during embryonal bone development, it is suggested that osteophyte formation is regulated by the same molecular mechanism as normal bone during embryogenesis. PMID:12713267

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Fenneropenaeus chinensis Hemocytes upon White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Tang, Xiaoqian; Xing, Jing; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Zhan, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate molecular responses of shrimp hemocytes to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was applied to investigate differentially expressed proteins in hemocytes of Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) at 24 h post infection (hpi). Approximately 580 protein spots were detected in hemocytes of healthy and WSSV-infected shrimps. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 26 protein spots were significantly up-regulated, and 19 spots were significantly down-regulated. By mass spectrometry, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, cytosolic MnSOD, triosephosphate isomerase, tubulin alpha-1 chain, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1, nuclear receptor E75 protein, vacuolar ATP synthase subunit B L form, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, arginine kinase, etc., amounting to 33 differentially modulated proteins were identified successfully. According to Gene Ontology annotation, the identified proteins were classified into nine categories, consisting of immune related proteins, stimulus response proteins, proteins involved in glucose metabolic process, cytoskeleton proteins, DNA or protein binding proteins, proteins involved in steroid hormone mediated signal pathway, ATP synthases, proteins involved in transmembrane transport and ungrouped proteins. Meanwhile, the expression profiles of three up-regulated proteins (SUMO, heat shock protein 70, and arginine kinase) and one down-regulated protein (prophenoloxidase) were further analyzed by real-time RT-PCR at the transcription level after WSSV infection. The results showed that SUMO and heat shock protein 70 were significantly up-regulated at each sampling time point, while arginine kinase was significantly up-regulated at 12 and 24 hpi. In contrast, prophenoloxidase was significantly down-regulated at each sampling time point. The results of this work provided preliminary data on proteins in shrimp hemocytes involved in WSSV infection. PMID:24587154

  4. The redistribution of protein sulfur in transgenic rice expressing a gene for a foreign, sulfur-rich protein.

    PubMed

    Hagan, N D; Upadhyaya, N; Tabe, L M; Higgins, T J V

    2003-04-01

    Sulfur amino acid composition is an important determinant of seed protein quality. A chimeric gene encoding sunflower seed albumin (SSA), one of the most sulfur-rich seed storage proteins identified so far, was introduced into rice (Oryza sativa) in order to modify cysteine and methionine content of the seed. Analysis of a transgenic line expressing SSA at approximately 7% of total seed protein revealed that the mature grain showed little change in the total sulfur amino acid content compared to the parental genotype. This result indicated that the transgenic rice grain was unable to respond to the added demand for cysteine and methionine imposed by the production of SSA. Analysis of the protein composition of the transgenic grain showed changes in the relative levels of the major seed storage proteins, as well as some non-storage proteins, compared to non-transgenic controls. Changes observed at the protein level were concomitant with differences in mRNA accumulation but not always with the level of transcription. The limited sulfur reserves appeared to be re-allocated from endogenous proteins to the new sulfur sink in the transgenic grain. We hypothesize that this response is mediated by a signal transduction pathway that normally modulates seed storage protein composition in response to environmental fluctuations in sulfur availability, via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of gene expression. PMID:12662304

  5. Kinetics study of endogenous heat shock protein 70 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sihong; Diller, Kenneth R; Aggarwal, Shanti J

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the kinetics of HSP70 expression in response to mild thermal stress. The rationale is to produce a basis for design of optimal heating methods to induce HSP70 expression for preconditioning in cardiac surgery. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were heated at 42 degrees C for 0.5 to 5 hours followed by 37 degrees C recovery for 1 to 48 hours. Quantitative analysis of western blot results showed HSP70 expression kinetics is a coupled function of heating temperature and time and of post-heating duration. Bimodal HSP70 expression kinetics were identified which may be an important cause of the "second window of protection" observed by other researchers. PMID:14986403

  6. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. PMID:23668610

  7. Elimination of truncated recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli by removing cryptic translation initiation site.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew J; Barrios, Adam F; Tan, Song

    2016-05-01

    Undesirable truncated recombinant protein products pose a special expression and purification challenge because such products often share similar chromatographic properties as the desired full length protein. We describe here our observation of both full length and a truncated form of a yeast protein (Gcn5) expressed in Escherichia coli, and the reduction or elimination of the truncated form by mutating a cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon within the Gcn5 coding region. Unsuccessful attempts to engineer in a cryptic translation initiation site into other recombinant proteins suggest that cryptic Shine-Dalgarno or START codon sequences are necessary but not sufficient for cryptic translation in E. coli. PMID:26739786

  8. Expression of intermediate filament-associated proteins paranemin and synemin in chicken development.

    PubMed

    Price, M G; Lazarides, E

    1983-12-01

    The expression of two intermediate filament-associated proteins, paranemin (280,000 mol wt) and synemin (230,000 mol wt), was investigated with respect to the expression of two core intermediate filament proteins, desmin and vimentin, in various embryonic and adult chicken muscle and nonmuscle cells. All developing muscle cells, regardless of their type, simultaneously express desmin, vimentin, paranemin, and synemin. However, a difference is observed in the expression of paranemin in adult muscle. This protein is removed during differentiation of both fast and slow skeletal muscle, visceral smooth muscle, and the smooth muscle of muscular arteries, but remains in mature myocardial cells, cardiac conducting fibers, and the smooth muscle cells of elastic arteries. Some of these cells express vimentin, others desmin, and still others a mixture of the two. On the other hand, synemin is expressed in all the above types of adult muscle cells except myocardial cells. Adult myocardial cells also lack vimentin, and its presence is gradually reduced after hatching. Since in adult striated muscle all expressed intermediate filament proteins are found predominantly in association with the peripheries of myofibrillar Z discs, these results suggest that a change in the composition of skeletal and cardiac muscle Z discs occurs during chicken development and maturation. Erythrocytes that express synemin and vimentin do not express paranemin, while both embryonic and adult Schwann cells co-express paranemin and vimentin, but not synemin. Endothelial cells of muscular vessels express paranemin, while those of elastic vessels do not, and neither contains synemin. Paranemin and synemin are not expressed in neurons, epithelial, and most glial cells, suggesting that these two polypeptides are expressed only in conjunction with desmin or vimentin. These results suggest that the composition of intermediate filaments changes during chicken development, not only with respect to their core subunit proteins but also with respect to two associated polypeptides, particularly in muscle cells. PMID:6358235

  9. Prediction of a missing protein expression map in the context of the human proteome project.

    PubMed

    Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Sanchez del Pino, Manuel M; Corrales, Fernando J; Segura, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Experimental evidence for the entire human proteome has been defined in the Human Proteome Project, and it is publicly available in the neXtProt database. However, there are still human proteins for which reliable experimental evidence does not exist, and the identification of such information has become one of the overriding objectives in the chromosome-centric study of the human proteome. With this aim and considering the complexity of protein detection using shotgun and targeted proteomics, the research community has addressed the integration of transcriptomics and proteomics landscapes. Here, we describe an analytical pipeline that predicts the probability of a missing protein being expressed in a biological sample based on (1) gene sequence characteristics, (2) the probability of an expressed gene being a coding gene of a missing protein in a certain sample, and (3) the probability of a gene being expressed in a transcriptomic experiment. More than 3400 microarray experiments were analyzed corresponding to three biological sources: cell lines, normal tissues, and cancer samples. A gene classification based on gene expression profiles distinguished among ubiquitous, nonubiquitous, nonexpressed, and coding genes of missing proteins. In addition, a different tissue-specific expression pattern for the coding genes of missing proteins is reported. Our results underline the relevance of selecting an appropriate sample for the detection of missing proteins and provide a comprehensive method to score their expression probability. Testis, brain, and skeletal muscle are the most promising normal tissues. PMID:25612097

  10. Erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase mediates the upregulation of membrane band 3 protein expression by iron.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qianchuan; Li, Jinying; Feng, Weihua; Xu, Yanqun; Huang, Zhenxia; Lv, Shuqing; Zhou, Hong; Gao, Lei

    2010-03-01

    Iron deficiency leads to abnormal expression and function of band 3 protein in erythrocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The mRNA of erythroid-specific 5-aminolevulinate synthase (eALAS) contains an iron response element and the eALAS protein is an important mediator of iron utilization by erythrocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated silencing of eALAS on the expression of band 3 protein induced by iron. By real-time RT-PCR and Western blot we showed that at mRNA and protein level iron-induced expression of band 3 protein was lower in eALAS-shRNA transfected K562 cells than in control cells. Of note, the lowest expression was detected in K562 cells cultured in iron deficiency condition (p < 0.01). Thus either iron deficiency or depletion of eALAS could suppress the expression of erythroid band 3 protein. These results demonstrated for the first time that iron and the iron-regulatory system regulate the expression of the erythrocyte membrane proteins. PMID:20087844

  11. Using Peptide-Level Proteomics Data for Detecting Differentially Expressed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Suomi, Tomi; Corthals, Garry L; Nevalainen, Olli S; Elo, Laura L

    2015-11-01

    The expression of proteins can be quantified in high-throughput means using different types of mass spectrometers. In recent years, there have emerged label-free methods for determining protein abundance. Although the expression is initially measured at the peptide level, a common approach is to combine the peptide-level measurements into protein-level values before differential expression analysis. However, this simple combination is prone to inconsistencies between peptides and may lose valuable information. To this end, we introduce here a method for detecting differentially expressed proteins by combining peptide-level expression-change statistics. Using controlled spike-in experiments, we show that the approach of averaging peptide-level expression changes yields more accurate lists of differentially expressed proteins than does the conventional protein-level approach. This is particularly true when there are only few replicate samples or the differences between the sample groups are small. The proposed technique is implemented in the Bioconductor package PECA, and it can be downloaded from http://www.bioconductor.org. PMID:26380941

  12. BioBrick™ compatible vector system for protein expression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Tikh, Ilya B; Held, Mark; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    We report here the creation of a modular, plasmid-based protein expression system utilizing elements of the native Rhodobacter puf promoter in a BioBrick(TM)-based vector system with DsRed encoding a red fluorescent reporter protein. A suite of truncations of the puf promoter were made to assess the influence of different portions of this promoter on expression of heterologous proteins. The 3' end of puf was found to be particularly important for increasing expression, with transformants accumulating significant quantities of DsRed under both aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions. Expression levels of this reporter protein in Rhodobacter sphaeroides were comparable to those achieved in Escherichia coli using the strong, constitutive P lac promoter, thus demonstrating the robustness of the engineered system. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability to tune the designed expression system by modulating cellular DsRed levels based upon the promoter segment utilized and oxygenation conditions. Last, we show that the new expression system is able to drive expression of a membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, and that membrane purifications from R. sphaeroides yielded significant quantities of proteorhodopsin. This toolset lays the groundwork for the engineering of multi-step pathways, including recalcitrant membrane proteins, in R. sphaeroides. PMID:24509770

  13. Optimized expression of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Kirsten; Ahuja, Sanjay; Chene, Arnaud; Bejarano, Maria Teresa; Chen, Qijun

    2004-01-01

    Background The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is an important and frequently used tool within malaria research, however, this method remains problematic. High A/T versus C/G content and frequent lysine and arginine repeats in the Plasmodium falciparum genome are thought to be the main reason for early termination in the mRNA translation process. Therefore, the majority of P. falciparum derived recombinant proteins is expressed only as truncated forms or appears as insoluble inclusion bodies within the bacterial cells. Methods Several domains of PfEMP1 genes obtained from different P. falciparum strains were expressed in E. coli as GST-fusion proteins. Expression was carried out under various culture conditions with a main focus on the time point of induction in relation to the bacterial growth stage. Results and conclusions When expressed in E. coli recombinant proteins derived from P. falciparum sequences are often truncated and tend to aggregate what in turn leads to the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. The analysis of various factors influencing the expression revealed that the time point of induction plays a key role in successful expression of A/T rich sequences into their native conformation. Contrary to recommended procedures, initiation of expression at post-log instead of mid-log growth phase generated significantly increased amounts of soluble protein of a high quality. Furthermore, these proteins were shown to be functionally active. Other factors such as temperature, pH, bacterial proteases or the codon optimization for E. coli had little or no effect on the quality of the recombinant protein, nevertheless, optimizing these factors might be beneficial for each individual construct. In conclusion, changing the timepoint of induction and conducting expression at the post-log stage where the bacteria have entered a decelerated growth phase, greatly facilitates and improves the expression of sequences containing rare codons. PMID:15601471

  14. Cloning, Expression, Purification, Regulation, and Subcellular Localization of a Mini-protein from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Soumeya; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Bolla, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    The Cj1169c-encoded putative protein of Campylobacter was expressed and purified from E. coli after sequence optimization. The purified protein allowed the production of a specific rabbit antiserum that was used to study the protein expression in vitro and its subcellular localization in the bacterial cell and putative interactions with other proteins. This protein is produced in Campylobacter and it clearly localizes into the periplasmic space. The level of protein production depends on factors, including pH, temperature, osmolarity, and growth phase suggesting a role in the Campylobacter environmental adaptation. The cysteine residues present in the sequence are probably involved in disulfide bridges, which may promote covalent interactions with other proteins of the Campylobacter envelope. PMID:26750120

  15. Suppression of lipin-1 expression increases monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology Yoshizaki, Takayuki; Hiranaka, Natsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yui, Tomoo; Akanuma, Masayasu; Oka, Kazuya; Kanazawa, Kaoru; Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 affects lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose lipin-1 expression is reduced in obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 depletion using siRNA in 3T3-L1 adipocytes increased MCP-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 is involved in adipose inflammation. -- Abstract: Lipin-1 plays a crucial role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation in adipocytes. Expression of adipose lipin-1 is reduced in obesity, and metabolic syndrome. However, the significance of this reduction remains unclear. This study investigated if and how reduced lipin-1 expression affected metabolism. We assessed mRNA expression levels of various genes related to adipocyte metabolism in lipin-1-depleted 3T3-L1 adipocytes by introducing its specific small interfering RNA. In lipin-1-depleted adipocytes, mRNA and protein expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly increased, although the other genes tested were not altered. The conditioned media from the cells promoted monocyte chemotaxis. The increase in MCP-1 expression was prevented by treatment with quinazoline or salicylate, inhibitors of nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation. Because MCP-1 is related to adipose inflammation and systemic insulin resistance, these results suggest that a reduction in adipose lipin-1 in obesity may exacerbate adipose inflammation and metabolism.

  16. Direct control of Na+-K+-2Cl−-cotransport protein (NKCC1) expression with aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Sokolowski, Bernd; Walton, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Sodium/potassium/chloride cotransporter (NKCC1) proteins play important roles in Na+ and K+ concentrations in key physiological systems, including cardiac, vascular, renal, nervous, and sensory systems. NKCC1 levels and functionality are altered in certain disease states, and tend to decline with age. A sensitive, effective way of regulating NKCC1 protein expression has significant biotherapeutic possibilities. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if the naturally occurring hormone aldosterone (ALD) could regulate NKCC1 protein expression. Application of ALD to a human cell line (HT-29) revealed that ALD can regulate NKCC1 protein expression, quite sensitively and rapidly, independent of mRNA expression changes. Utilization of a specific inhibitor of mineralocorticoid receptors, eplerenone, implicated these receptors as part of the ALD mechanism of action. Further experiments with cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor) and MG132 (proteasome inhibitor) revealed that ALD can upregulate NKCC1 by increasing protein stability, i.e., reducing ubiquitination of NKCC1. Having a procedure for controlling NKCC1 protein expression opens the doors for therapeutic interventions for diseases involving the mis-regulation or depletion of NKCC1 proteins, for example during aging. PMID:24173102

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Protein Profiles Involved in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chiu, Chiang-Yen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Huang, Chun-Hao; Chi, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsi, Edward; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins among various stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by shotgun proteomics using nano-liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry and stable isotope dimethyl labeling. Methods Differentially expressed proteins were identified and compared based on the mass spectral differences of their isotope-labeled peptide fragments generated from protease digestion. Results Our quantitative proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins with stable isotope (deuterium/hydrogen ratio, ≥2) identified a total of 353 proteins, with at least 5 protein biomarker proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between cancer and normal mice by at least a 2-fold alteration. These 5 protein biomarker candidates include α-enolase, α-catenin, 14-3-3 β, VDAC1, and calmodulin with high confidence levels. The expression levels were also found to be in agreement with those examined by Western blot and histochemical staining. Conclusions The systematic decrease or increase of these identified marker proteins may potentially reflect the morphological aberrations and diseased stages of pancreas carcinoma throughout progressive developments leading to PDAC. The results would form a firm foundation for future work concerning validation and clinical translation of some identified biomarkers into targeted diagnosis and therapy for various stages of PDAC. PMID:26262590

  18. JP-8 jet fuel exposure alters protein expression in the lung.

    PubMed

    Drake, Matthew G; Witzmann, Frank A; Hyde, Juanita; Witten, Mark L

    2003-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the proteomic mechanisms of Jet Propulsion-8 (JP-8) toxicity in the lung, specifically relating to lung epithelial cell apoptosis and edema. Male Swiss-Webster mice were exposed to 1 h/day aerosolized JP-8 jet fuel at concentrations of 250, 1000, and 2500 mg/m(3) for 7 days. Lung cytosol and whole lung samples were solubilized, separated via large scale, high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis, and processed for analysis. Significant quantitative differences in lung protein expression were found as a result of JP-8 exposure. At 250 mg/m(3) JP-8 concentration, 31 proteins exhibited increased expression, while 10 showed decreased expression. At 1000 mg/m(3) exposure levels, 21 lung proteins exhibited increased expression and 99 demonstrated decreased expression. At 2500 mg/m(3), 30 exhibited increased expression, while 135 showed decreased expression. Several of the proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting, and were found to relate to cell structure, cell proliferation, protein repair, and apoptosis. These data demonstrate the significant stress JP-8 jet fuel puts on lung epithelium. Furthermore, there was a decrease in alpha1-anti-trypsin expression suggesting that JP-8 jet fuel exposure may have implications for the development of pulmonary disorders. PMID:12965123

  19. Pichia pastoris expressed EtMic2 protein as a potential vaccine against chicken coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Peipei; Sun, Hui; Liu, Qing; Wang, Longjiang; Wang, Tiantian; Shi, Wenyan; Li, Hongmei; Xiao, Yihong; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Fangkun; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2014-09-15

    Chicken coccidiosis caused by Eimeria species leads to tremendous economic losses to the avian industry worldwide. Identification of parasite life cycle specific antigens is a critical step in recombinant protein vaccine development against Eimeria infections. In the present study, we amplified and cloned the microneme-2 (EtMIC2) gene from Eimeria tenella wild type strain SD-01, and expressed the EtMic2 protein using Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli expression systems, respectively. The EtMic2 proteins expressed by P. pastoris and E. coli were used as vaccines to immunize chickens and their protective efficacies were compared and evaluated. The results indicated that both P. pastoris and E. coli expressed EtMic2 proteins exhibited good immunogenicity in stimulating host immune responses and the Pichia expressed EtMic2 provided better protection than the E. coli expressed EtMic2 did by significantly increasing growth rate, inducing high specific antibody response, reducing the oocyst output and cecal lesions. Particularly, the Pichia expressed EtMic2 protein exhibited much better ability in inducing cell mediated immune response than the E. coli expressed EtMic2. PMID:25047705

  20. Functional and expression pattern analysis of chemosensory proteins expressed in antennae and pheromonal gland of Mamestra brassicae.

    PubMed

    Jacquin-Joly, E; Vogt, R G; François, M C; Nagnan-Le Meillour, P

    2001-09-01

    Sequences coding for chemosensory proteins (CSP) CSPMbraA and CSPMbraB, soluble proteins of low mol. wt, have been amplified using polymerase chain reaction on antennal and pheromonal gland complementary DNAs. On the basis of their sequences, these proteins could be classed in the 'OS-D like' protein family whose first member was described in Drosophila, and that includes proteins characterized in chemosensory organs of many insect phylla, including our recent identification in Mamestra brassicae proboscis. Binding assays have shown that these proteins bind the pheromonal component (Z)-11-hexadecenyl-1-acetate (Z11-16:Ac) as well as (Z)-11-octadecenyl-1-acetate (Z11-18:Ac), an other putative component of the M. brassicae pheromonal blend. Furthermore, binding with fatty acids, but not with progesterone that is a structurally unrelated compound, leads to the hypothesis that the odorant-binding capability of the MbraCSPs may be restricted to fatty acids and/or to 16-18 carbon backbone skeletons. Thus, these proteins do not show the same highly binding specificity as the pheromone-binding proteins do. The CSP-related proteins appear homologous based on sequence identity, conserved cysteine residues and general patterns of expression. However, phylogenetic analyses suggest the presence of multiple classes of CSP within a given species and possible diversification of CSPs within different orders. This diversity perhaps contributes to the many CSP functions proposed in the literature. In M. brassicae, we localized the CSPMbraA expression to the sensilla trichodea, devoted to pheromone reception, suggesting a role in the chemosensory pathway. However, we also localized such proteins in the pheromonal gland, devoid of any chemosensory structure. This suggests that the M. brassicae CSP could be involved in transport of hydrophobic molecules through different aqueous media, such as the sensillar lymph, as well as the pheromonal gland cytosol. PMID:11555479

  1. Expression of the extracellular domain of OB-cadherin as an Fc fusion protein using bicistronic retroviral expression vector

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Cristina B. B.; Chu, Khoi; Lee, Yu-Chen; Hu, Mickey C-T.; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Osteoblast cadherin (OB-cadherin, also known as cadherin-11) is a Ca2+-dependent homophilic cell adhesion molecule that is expressed mainly in osteoblasts. OB-cadherin is expressed in prostate cancer and may be involved in the homing of metastatic prostate cancer cells to bone. The extracellular domain of OB-cadherin may be used to inhibit the adhesion between prostate cancer cells and osteoblasts. In this report, we describe the expression of the extracellular domain of OB-cadherin as an Fc fusion protein (OB-CAD-Fc) in human embryonic kidney 293FT cells using a bicistronic retroviral vector. Coexpression of GFP and OB-CAD-Fc through the bicistronic vector permitted enrichment of OB-CAD-Fc–expressing cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Recombinant OB-CAD-Fc proteins were secreted into cell medium, and about 0.85 mg of purified OB-CAD-Fc protein was purified from 1 liter of the conditioned medium using immobilized protein A-affinity chromatography. The purified OB-CAD-Fc was biologically active because it supported the adhesion of PC3 cells and L cells transduced with OB-cadherin. The availability of OB-CAD-Fc offers opportunities to test whether OB-CAD-Fc can be used to inhibit OB-cadherin–mediated prostate cancer bone metastasis in vivo or to generate antibodies for inhibiting the adhesion between prostate cancer cells and osteoblasts. PMID:18620062

  2. Peptides from the SARS-associated coronavirus as tags for protein expression and purification.

    PubMed

    Gruschke, Steffi; Bussmann, Bianca M; Reiche, Sven; Jassoy, Christian

    2008-10-01

    Protein tagging with a peptide is a commonly used technique to facilitate protein detection and to carry out protein purification. Flexibility with respect to the peptide tag is essential since no single tag suites all purposes. This report describes the usage of two short peptides from the SARS-associated coronavirus nucleocapsid (SARS-N) protein as protein tags. Plasmids for the generation of tagged proteins were generated by ligating synthetic oligonucleotides for the peptide-coding regions downstream of the protein coding sequence. The data show recognition of prokaryotically expressed HIV-1 Gag/p24 fusion protein by Western blot and efficient affinity purification using monoclonal antibodies against the tags. The SARS peptide antibody system described presents an alternative tagging opportunity in the growing field of protein science. PMID:18565762

  3. Phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate acting through protein kinase C? induces translocator protein (18-kDa) Tspo gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Batarseh, Amani; Giatzakis, Christoforos; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa cholesterol-binding protein that is expressed at high levels in steroid synthesizing and several cancer cells where it is involved in steroidogenesis and cell proliferation, respectively. The factors regulating Tspo expression are unknown. We analyzed Tspo transcriptional responses to the tumor promoter, phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), in cells with varying TSPO levels. PMA induced Tspo promoter activity and Tspo mRNA levels in TSPO-poor non-steroidogenic cells (NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and COS-7 kidney), but not in TSPO-rich steroidogenic cells (MA-10 Leydig) with high basal Tspo transcriptional activity. The stimulatory effect of PMA was mediated by an 805-515-bp region upstream of the transcription start site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that PMA induced binding of c-jun and GA-binding protein transcription factor (GABP-?) to their respective activator protein 1(AP1) and v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (Ets) sites in this region. Protein kinase C (PKC)-specific inhibitors blocked PMA induction of Tspo promoter activity with an inhibition profile suggestive of involvement of PKC?. PKC? expression correlated with TSPO content in the three cell lines. In NIH-3T3 cells, PKC? overexpression induced Tspo promoter activity, mRNA levels and enhanced PMA-induced up regulation of c-jun and TSPO. In MA-10 cells, a PKC?-specific translocation inhibitor peptide reduced basal Tspo promoter activity. PKC? siRNA pool reduced PKC? and TSPO levels in MA-10 cells indicating a role for PKC? in regulating TSPO expression. Taken together, these data suggest that elevated TSPO expression in steroidogenic cells maybe due to high constitutive expression of PKC? that renders them unresponsive to further induction while PMA activation of PKC? drives inducible TSPO expression in non-steroidogenic cells, likely through AP1 and Ets. PMID:18975922

  4. Expression and one-step purification of Plasmodium proteins in dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    van Bemmelen, M X; Beghdadi-Rais, C; Desponds, C; Vargas, E; Herrera, S; Reymond, C D; Fasel, N

    2000-12-01

    Nearly full-length Circumsporozoite protein (CSP) from Plasmodium falciparum, the C-terminal fragments from both P. falciparm and P. yoelii CSP and a fragment comprising 351 amino acids of P.vivax MSPI were expressed in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Discoidin-tag expression vectors allowed both high yields of these proteins and their purification by a nearly single-step procedure. We exploited the galactose binding activity of Discoidin Ia to separate the fusion proteins by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-4B columns. Inclusion of a thrombin recognition site allowed cleavage of the Discoidin-tag from the fusion protein. Partial secretion of the protein was obtained via an ER independent pathway, whereas routing the recombinant proteins to the ER resulted in glycosylation and retention. Yields of proteins ranged from 0.08 to 3 mg l(-1) depending on the protein sequence and the purification conditions. The recognition of purified MSPI by sera from P. vivax malaria patients was used to confirm the native conformation of the protein expressed in Dictyostelium. The simple purification procedure described here, based on Sepharose-4B, should facilitate the expression and the large-scale purification of various Plasmodium polypeptides. PMID:11163444

  5. A Chimeric Affinity Tag for Efficient Expression and Chromatographic Purification of Heterologous Proteins from Plants.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Jutras, Philippe V; Vorster, Juan; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The use of plants as expression hosts for recombinant proteins is an increasingly attractive option for the production of complex and challenging biopharmaceuticals. Tools are needed at present to marry recent developments in high-yielding gene vectors for heterologous expression with routine protein purification techniques. In this study, we designed the Cysta-tag, a new purification tag for immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of plant-made proteins based on the protein-stabilizing fusion partner SlCYS8. We show that the Cysta-tag may be used to readily purify proteins under native conditions, and then be removed enzymatically to isolate the protein of interest. We also show that commonly used protease recognition sites for linking purification tags are differentially stable in leaves of the commonly used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, with those linkers susceptible to cysteine proteases being less stable then serine protease-cleavable linkers. As an example, we describe a Cysta-tag experimental scheme for the one-step purification of a clinically useful protein, human α1-antitrypsin, transiently expressed in N. benthamiana. With potential applicability to the variety of chromatography formats commercially available for IMAC-based protein purification, the Cysta-tag provides a convenient means for the efficient and cost-effective purification of recombinant proteins from plant tissues. PMID:26913045

  6. High throughput proteome-wide precision measurements of protein expression using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasa-Tolic, L.; Jensen, P.K.; Anderson, G.A.; Lipton, M.S.; Peden, K.K.; Martinovic, S.; Tolic, N.; Bruce, J.E.; Smith, R.D.

    1999-09-01

    In contrast to a cell's virtually static genome, the proteome, the protein complement expressed by an organism, continually changes in response to external stimuli and internal processes. Global gene expression analysis at the mRNA level (i.e., transcriptome) has recently become feasible based on the serial analysis of gene expression and oligonucleotide micro-array assays. These techniques allow the activation states of thousands of genes to be polled simultaneously for a tissue or cell population. However, assays that measure mRNA abundances rather than the functional gene products (i.e., proteins) are uninformative with regard to protein modifications, and can poorly reflect protein abundances due to differences in stabilities, expression rates, etc., for both the mRNAs and proteins. The authors have developed an approach utilizing organisms cultured in stable-isotope labeled media (e.g., rare-isotope depleted and normal) to provide effective internal calibrants for all detected proteins, thus enabling precise proteome-wide measurement of changes in protein abundances resulting from cellular perturbations. The two (or more) isotopically distinctive cell populations are mixed prior to sample processing steps, eliminating all experimental variables associated with cell lysis, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Changes in relative protein abundances are thus precisely reflected by the ratio of two isotopically different and resolvable versions of each protein.

  7. A Chimeric Affinity Tag for Efficient Expression and Chromatographic Purification of Heterologous Proteins from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Frank; Jutras, Philippe V.; Vorster, Juan; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The use of plants as expression hosts for recombinant proteins is an increasingly attractive option for the production of complex and challenging biopharmaceuticals. Tools are needed at present to marry recent developments in high-yielding gene vectors for heterologous expression with routine protein purification techniques. In this study, we designed the Cysta-tag, a new purification tag for immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of plant-made proteins based on the protein-stabilizing fusion partner SlCYS8. We show that the Cysta-tag may be used to readily purify proteins under native conditions, and then be removed enzymatically to isolate the protein of interest. We also show that commonly used protease recognition sites for linking purification tags are differentially stable in leaves of the commonly used expression host Nicotiana benthamiana, with those linkers susceptible to cysteine proteases being less stable then serine protease-cleavable linkers. As an example, we describe a Cysta-tag experimental scheme for the one-step purification of a clinically useful protein, human α1-antitrypsin, transiently expressed in N. benthamiana. With potential applicability to the variety of chromatography formats commercially available for IMAC-based protein purification, the Cysta-tag provides a convenient means for the efficient and cost-effective purification of recombinant proteins from plant tissues. PMID:26913045

  8. Suppression of polyglutamine protein toxicity by co-expression of a heat-shock protein 40 and a heat-shock protein 110.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y; Ren, S; Lao, U; Edgar, B A; Wang, T

    2013-01-01

    A network of heat-shock proteins mediates cellular protein homeostasis, and has a fundamental role in preventing aggregation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In a Drosophila model of polyglutamine (polyQ) disease, the HSP40 family protein, DNAJ-1, is a superior suppressor of toxicity caused by the aggregation of polyQ containing proteins. Here, we demonstrate that one specific HSP110 protein, 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein cb (HSC70cb), interacts physically and genetically with DNAJ-1 in vivo, and that HSC70cb is necessary for DNAJ-1 to suppress polyglutamine-induced cell death in Drosophila. Expression of HSC70cb together with DNAJ-1 significantly enhanced the suppressive effects of DNAJ-1 on polyQ-induced neurodegeneration, whereas expression of HSC70cb alone did not suppress neurodegeneration in Drosophila models of either general polyQ disease or Huntington's disease. Furthermore, expression of a human HSP40, DNAJB1, together with a human HSP110, APG-1, protected cells from polyQ-induced neural degeneration in flies, whereas expression of either component alone had little effect. Our data provide a functional link between HSP40 and HSP110 in suppressing the cytotoxicity of aggregation-prone proteins, and suggest that HSP40 and HSP110 function together in protein homeostasis control. PMID:24091676

  9. Mapping and expression of a human cytomegalovirus major viral protein.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, M G; Mar, E C; Wu, Y M; Huang, E S

    1984-01-01

    We constructed a DNA fragment map of low-passage Towne strain cytomegalovirus by analyzing cross-blot hybridization and hybridizations of isolated recombinant clones. The abundant late transcripts were located on this map by hybridization of labeled total RNA of virus-infected cells to blotted DNA fragments. The most abundant late transcript, carried by the 11.7-kilobase EcoRI fragment (EcoRI-G), was precisely mapped. The EcoRI fragment was fragmented and subcloned in a plasmid carrying simian virus 40 sequences (pSV-OH, constructed by Chi-Bom Chae, Department of Biochemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill). One resulting recombinant plasmid, pHD713SV2, was transferred to simian virus 40-transformed monkey kidney cells (COS-1) by DNA transfection. Synthesis of a cytomegalovirus-specific 67-kilodalton protein was detected in these cells by reaction of blotted proteins with virus-specific monoclonal antibody. The 67-kilodalton protein is a major phosphorylated protein found in virions; it is not glycosylated. The location of the gene for this 67-kilodalton protein is therefore assigned to the center of the L-unique region of human cytomegalovirus, at 0.37 to 0.39 map units. Images PMID:6090690

  10. Advanced method for high-throughput expression of mutated eukaryotic membrane proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keisuke; Sugawara, Taishi; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Tokuda, Natsuko; Kurokawa, Azusa; Misaka, Takumi; Makyio, Hisayoshi; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Nomura, Norimichi; Murata, Takeshi; Abe, Keiko; Iwata, So

    2008-07-11

    Crystallization of eukaryotic membrane proteins is a challenging, iterative process. The protein of interest is often modified in an attempt to improve crystallization and diffraction results. To accelerate this process, we took advantage of a GFP-fusion yeast expression system that uses PCR to direct homologous recombination and gene cloning. We explored the possibility of employing more than one PCR fragment to introduce various mutations in a single step, and found that when up to five PCR fragments were co-transformed into yeast, the recombination frequency was maintained as the number of fragments was increased. All transformants expressed the model membrane protein, while the resulting plasmid from each clone contained the designed mutations only. Thus, we have demonstrated a technique allowing the expression of mutant membrane proteins within 5 days, combining a GFP-fusion expression system and yeast homologous recombination.

  11. Cloning and expression of Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chang-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2009-03-01

    A novel antifreeze protein cDNA was cloned by RT-PCR from the larva of the yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor. The coding fragment of 339 bp encodes a protein of 112 amino acid residues and was fused to the expression vectors pET32a and pTWIN1. The resulted expression plasmids were transformed into Escherischia coli strains BL21 (DE3), ER2566, and Origami B (DE3), respectively. Several strategies were used for expression of the highly disulfide-bonded beta-helix-contained protein with the activity of antifreeze in different expression systems. A protocol for production of refolded and active T. molitor antifreeze protein in bacteria was obtained. PMID:18256902

  12. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  13. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  14. Estrogen Modulates Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Rat Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung-Jin; Ahn, Kyuyoun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to investigate the localization of tight junctions and the modulation of zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1, occludin and claudin-1 expression by estrogen in castrated female rat vagina. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230–240 g, n = 45) were divided into three groups and subjected to a sham operation (control group, n = 15), bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx group, n = 15), or bilateral ovariectomy followed by daily subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg/day, Ovx + Est group, n = 15). The cellular localization and expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Expression of ZO-1 was diffuse in all groups, with the highest intensity in the superficial epithelium in the control group. Occludin was localized in the intermediate and basal epithelium. Claudin-1 was most intense in the superficial layer of the vaginal epithelium in the control group. Expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 was significantly decreased after ovariectomy and was restored to the level of the control after estrogen replacement. Conclusions. Tight junctions are distinctly localized in rat vagina, and estrogen modulates the expression of tight junctions. Further researches are needed to clarify the functional role of tight junctions in vaginal lubrication. PMID:27127786

  15. Co-expression of human agouti-related protein enhances expression and stability of human melanocortin-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kuglae; Jung, Youngjin; Park, Jae-Hyun; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Weontae

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of transmembrane signaling proteins, and they are considered major targets of approximately half of all therapeutic agents. Human melanocortin-4 receptor (hMC4R) plays an important role in the control of energy homeostasis, and its mutants are directly related to severe human obesity. Here, we describe optimized protocols for the high-yield expression and purification of hMC4R that will accelerate structural study. Truncations of the N- and C-termini of hMC4R with T4 lysozyme (T4L) insertion increase the solubility as well as stability of the protein. Strikingly, co-expression of human mini-agouti-related protein (mini-AgRP) in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells enables excellent stability of hMC4R. The protein yield in the human mini-AgRP co-expression system is increased by about 3-4 times compared to that of hMC4R alone. Data from analytical size exclusion chromatography (aSEC) and thermostability assay show that hMC4R becomes homogeneous and stable with a melting temperature of 58°C in the presence of human mini-AgRP. PMID:25446108

  16. Expression, characterisation and antigenicity of a truncated Hendra virus attachment protein expressed in the protozoan host Leishmania tarentolae.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kerstin; Dos Reis, Vinicius Pinho; Finke, Stefan; Sauerhering, Lucie; Stroh, Eileen; Karger, Axel; Maisner, Andrea; Groschup, Martin H; Diederich, Sandra; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is an emerging zoonotic paramyxovirus within the genus Henipavirus that has caused severe morbidity and mortality in humans and horses in Australia since 1994. HeV infection of host cells is mediated by the membrane bound attachment (G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins, that are essential for receptor binding and fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The eukaryotic unicellular parasite Leishmania tarentolae has recently been established as a powerful tool to express recombinant proteins with mammalian-like glycosylation patterns, but only few viral proteins have been expressed in this system so far. Here, we describe the purification of a truncated, Strep-tag labelled and soluble version of the HeV attachment protein (sHeV G) expressed in stably transfected L. tarentolae cells. After Strep-tag purification the identity of sHeV G was confirmed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The functional binding of sHeV G to the HeV cell entry receptor ephrin-B2 was confirmed in several binding assays. Generated polyclonal rabbit antiserum against sHeV G reacted with both HeV and Nipah virus (NiV) G proteins in immunofluorescence assay and efficiently neutralised NiV infection, thus further supporting the preserved antigenicity of the purified protein. PMID:26585033

  17. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marlon D; Nguyen, Thu; Carriere, Patrick P; Tilghman, Syreeta L; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α) signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/) to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patients were stratified according to ERα status, histological grade, and hormonal therapy. Luciferase reporter assays and flow cytometry were implemented to determine the impact of CK2 inhibition on ERE-mediated gene expression and expression of ERα protein. CK2α expression is associated with shorter relapse free survival among ERα (+) patients with grade 1 or 2 tumors, as well as among those patients receiving hormonal therapy. Biochemical inhibition of CK2 activity results in increased ER-transactivation as well as increased expression among ERα (+) and ERα (-) breast cancer cell lines. These findings suggest that CK2 may contribute to estrogen-independent cell proliferation and breast tumor progression, and may potentially serve as a biomarker and pharmacological target in breast cancer. PMID:26703694

  18. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marlon D.; Nguyen, Thu; Carriere, Patrick P.; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α) signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/) to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patients were stratified according to ERα status, histological grade, and hormonal therapy. Luciferase reporter assays and flow cytometry were implemented to determine the impact of CK2 inhibition on ERE-mediated gene expression and expression of ERα protein. CK2α expression is associated with shorter relapse free survival among ERα (+) patients with grade 1 or 2 tumors, as well as among those patients receiving hormonal therapy. Biochemical inhibition of CK2 activity results in increased ER-transactivation as well as increased