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Sample records for p-gp protein expression

  1. Mini-P-gp and P-gp Co-Expression in Brown Trout Erythrocytes: A Prospective Blood Biomarker of Aquatic Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Emeline; Amblard, Christian; Desmolles, François; Combourieu, Bruno; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2015-01-01

    In aquatic organisms, such as fish, blood is continually exposed to aquatic contaminants. Multidrug Resistance (MDR) proteins are ubiquitous detoxification membrane pumps, which recognize various xenobiotics. Moreover, their expression is induced by a large class of drugs and pollutants. We have highlighted the co-expression of a mini P-gp of 75 kDa and a P-gp of 140 kDa in the primary culture of brown trout erythrocytes and in the erythrocytes of wild brown trout collected from three rivers in the Auvergne region of France. In vitro experiments showed that benzo[a]pyrene, a highly toxic pollutant model, induced the co-expression of mini-P-gp and P-gp in trout erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner and relay type response. Similarly, in the erythrocytes of wild brown trout collected from rivers contaminated by a mixture of PAH and other multi-residues of pesticides, mini-P-gp and P-gp were able to modulate their expression, according to the nature of the pollutants. The differential and complementary responses of mini-P-gp and P-gp in trout erythrocytes suggest the existence in blood cells of a real protective network against xenobiotics/drugs. This property could be exploited to develop a blood biomarker of river pollution. PMID:26854141

  2. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the effects of piperine on P-gp function and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yi; Chin Tan, Theresa May; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Piperine, a major component of black pepper, is used as spice and nutrient enhancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute and prolonged piperine exposure on cellular P-gp expression and function in vitro and in vivo. Piperine at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, determined by MTT assay to be non-cytotoxic, was observed to inhibit P-gp mediated efflux transport of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin across L-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell monolayers. The acute inhibitory effect was dependent on piperine concentration, with abolishment of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin polarized transport attained at 50 {mu}M of piperine. In contrast, prolonged (48 and 72 h) co-incubation of Caco-2 cell monolayers with piperine (50 and 100 {mu}M) increased P-gp activity through an up-regulation of cellular P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA levels. The up-regulated protein was functionally active, as demonstrated by a higher degree of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin efflux across the cell monolayers, but the induction was readily reversed by the removal of the spice from the culture medium. Peroral administration of piperine at the dose of 112 {mu}g/kg body weight/day to male Wistar rats for 14 consecutive days also led to increased intestinal P-gp levels. However, there was a concomitant reduction in the rodent liver P-gp although the kidney P-gp level was unaffected. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when piperine is to be co-administered with drugs that are P-gp substrates, particularly for patients whose diet relies heavily on pepper.

  3. P-gp expression in brown trout erythrocytes: evidence of a detoxification mechanism in fish erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Emeline; Amblard, Christian; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2013-01-01

    Blood is a site of physiological transport for a great variety of molecules, including xenobiotics. Blood cells in aquatic vertebrates, such as fish, are directly exposed to aquatic pollution. P-gp are ubiquitous “membrane detoxification proteins” implicated in the cellular efflux of various xenobiotics, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which may be pollutants. The existence of this P-gp detoxification system inducible by benzo [a] pyrene (BaP), a highly cytotoxic PAH, was investigated in the nucleated erythrocytes of brown trout. Western blot analysis showed the expression of a 140-kDa P-gp in trout erythrocytes. Primary cultures of erythrocytes exposed to increasing concentrations of BaP showed no evidence of cell toxicity. Yet, in the same BaP-treated erythrocytes, P-gp expression increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Brown trout P-gp erythrocytes act as membrane defence mechanism against the pollutant, a property that can be exploited for future biomarker development to monitor water quality. PMID:24305632

  4. Dasatinib reverses the multidrug resistance of breast cancer MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin by downregulating P-gp expression via inhibiting the activation of ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Sun, Huijun; Huo, Xiaokui; Sun, Pengyuan; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Zhihao; Yang, Xiaobo; Liu, Kexin

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles to the efficiency of cancer chemotherapy, which often results from the overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In the present study, we determined the effect of dasatinib which was approved for imatinib resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment on P-gp-mediated MDR. Our results showed that dasatinib significantly increased the sensitivity of P-gp-overexpressing MCF-7/Adr cells to doxorubicin in MTT assays; thus lead to an enhanced cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in MCF-7/Adr cells. Additionally, dasatinib increased the intracellular accumulation, inhibited the efflux of doxorubicin in MCF-7/Adr cells, and significantly enhanced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in MCF-7/Adr cells. Further studies showed that dasatinib altered the expression levels of mRNA, protein levels of P-gp, and the phosphorylation of signal–regulated kinase (ERK) both in time-dependent (before 24 h) and dose-dependent manners at concentrations that produced MDR reversals. In conclusion, dasatinib reverses P-gp-mediated MDR by downregulating P-gp expression, which may be partly attributed to the inhibition of ERK pathway. Dasatinib may play an important role in circumventing MDR when combined with other conventional antineoplastic drugs. PMID:25482933

  5. Expression of HIF-1α and P-gp in non-small cell lung cancer and the relationship with HPV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yimin; Yu, Le-Qun; Zhu, Lixia; Zhao, Nian; Zhou, Xing-Ju; Lu, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to study the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and analyze its correlation with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. From January, 2012 to May, 2014, 72 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pathologic tissue samples were selected from the study group. Fifty-four lung benign lesions were selected to serve as the control group. HIF-1α and P-gp expression levels were detected using immunohistochemistry. PCR was used to detect the expression of HPV genome employing specific primers for HPV 16 and 18 types. The results showed that there was 47.2 and 63.9% positive HIF-1α and P-gp expression in the study group. No P-gp or HIF-1α expression was detected in the control group. The results established a positive correlation between the expression of HIF-1α and P-gp. In the study group, the expression and differentiation degree of HIF-1α was related to lymphatic metastasis. The HIF-1α expression in the well-differentiated samples was lower than that in the moderate or poorly differentiated samples. HIF-1α expression in patients with lymphatic metastasis was higher than in patients without metastasis. The expression rate of P-gp in adenocarcinoma was higher than that in squamous carcinoma. The detection rate of HPV DNA was 45.83 and 3.70% in the study and control groups, respectively. The HPV infection and differentiation degree had relevance to lymphatic metastasis in the study group. The HPV DNA detection rate in the well-differentiated samples was lower than that in the moderate or poorly differentiated samples. The HPV DNA detection rate in patients with lymphatic metastasis was higher than that in patients with no lymphatic metastasis. There was a close link between HIF-1α, P-gp expression and NSCLC occurrence, and the development of multidrug resistance. In conclusion, the detection of HIF-1α and P-gp expression can effectively predict drug resistance during chemotherapy in NSCLC, and

  6. Validation of a P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) Humanized Mouse Model by Integrating Selective Absolute Quantification of Human MDR1, Mouse Mdr1a and Mdr1b Protein Expressions with In Vivo Functional Analysis for Blood-Brain Barrier Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Muhammad Waqas; Uchida, Yasuo; Hoshi, Yutaro; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to establish a useful validation method for newly generated humanized mouse models. The novel approach of combining our established species-specific protein quantification method combined with in vivo functional studies is evaluated to validate a humanized mouse model of P-gp/MDR1 efflux transporter. The P-gp substrates digoxin, verapamil and docetaxel were administered to male FVB Mdr1a/1b(+/+) (FVB WT), FVB Mdr1a/1b(-/-) (Mdr1a/1b(-/-)), C57BL/6 Mdr1a/1b(+/+) (C57BL/6 WT) and humanized C57BL (hMDR1) mice. Brain-to-plasma total concentration ratios (Kp) were measured. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomic (QTAP) analysis was used to selectively quantify the protein expression levels of hMDR1, Mdr1a and Mdr1b in the isolated brain capillaries. The protein expressions of other transporters, receptors and claudin-5 were also quantified. The Kp for digoxin, verapamil, and docetaxel were 20, 30 and 4 times higher in the Mdr1a/1b(-/-) mice than in the FVB WT controls, as expected. The Kp for digoxin, verapamil and docetaxel were 2, 16 and 2-times higher in the hMDR1 compared to the C57BL/6 WT mice. The hMDR1 mice had 63- and 9.1-fold lower expressions of the hMDR1 and Mdr1a proteins than the corresponding expression of Mdr1a in C57BL/6 WT mice, respectively. The protein expression levels of other molecules were almost consistent between C57BL/6 WT and hMDR1 mice. The P-gp function at the BBB in the hMDR1 mice was smaller than that in WT mice due to lower protein expression levels of hMDR1 and Mdr1a. The combination of QTAP and in vivo functional analyses was successfully applied to validate the humanized animal model and evaluates its suitability for further studies. PMID:25932627

  7. Transport Inhibition of Digoxin Using Several Common P-gp Expressing Cell Lines Is Not Necessarily Reporting Only on Inhibitor Binding to P-gp

    PubMed Central

    Lumen, Annie Albin; Li, Libin; Li, Jiben; Ahmed, Zeba; Meng, Zhou; Owen, Albert; Ellens, Harma; Hidalgo, Ismael J.; Bentz, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We have reported that the P-gp substrate digoxin required basolateral and apical uptake transport in excess of that allowed by digoxin passive permeability (as measured in the presence of GF120918) to achieve the observed efflux kinetics across MDCK-MDR1-NKI (The Netherlands Cancer Institute) confluent cell monolayers. That is, GF120918 inhibitable uptake transport was kinetically required. Therefore, IC50 measurements using digoxin as a probe substrate in this cell line could be due to inhibition of P-gp, of digoxin uptake transport, or both. This kinetic analysis is now extended to include three additional cell lines: MDCK-MDR1-NIH (National Institute of Health), Caco-2 and CPT-B2 (Caco-2 cells with BCRP knockdown). These cells similarly exhibit GF120918 inhibitable uptake transport of digoxin. We demonstrate that inhibition of digoxin transport across these cell lines by GF120918, cyclosporine, ketoconazole and verapamil is greater than can be explained by inhibition of P-gp alone. We examined three hypotheses for this non-P-gp inhibition. The inhibitors can: (1) bind to a basolateral digoxin uptake transporter, thereby inhibiting digoxin's cellular uptake; (2) partition into the basolateral membrane and directly reduce membrane permeability; (3) aggregate with digoxin in the donor chamber, thereby reducing the free concentration of digoxin, with concomitant reduction in digoxin uptake. Data and simulations show that hypothesis 1 was found to be uniformly acceptable. Hypothesis 2 was found to be uniformly unlikely. Hypothesis 3 was unlikely for GF120918 and cyclosporine, but further studies are needed to completely adjudicate whether hetero-dimerization contributes to the non-P-gp inhibition for ketoconazole and verapamil. We also find that P-gp substrates with relatively low passive permeability such as digoxin, loperamide and vinblastine kinetically require basolateral uptake transport over that allowed by +GF120918 passive permeability, while highly permeable

  8. Expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα and intrinsic resistance in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiarui; Zhang, Jinhui; Zhang, Lichuan; Zhao, Long; Fan, Sufang; Yang, Zhonghai; Gao, Fei; Kong, Ying; Xiao, Gary Guishan; Wang, Qi

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between the endogenous levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), lung resistance-related protein (LRP), glutathione-s-transferase-π (GST‑π) and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) and intrinsic drug resistance in four human lung cancer cell lines, SK-MES-1, SPCA-1, NCI-H-460 and NCI-H-446, of different histological types. The expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was measured by immunofluorescence, Western blotting and RT-PCR. Drug resistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 was determined using MTT assays. The correlation between expression of the resistance-related proteins and their roles in the resistance to drugs in these cancer cell lines was analyzed. We found that the endogenous levels of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα in the four cell lines varied. The level of GST-π in the SK-MES-1 cells was the highest, whereas the level of P-gp in the SPCA-1 cells was the lowest. The chemoresistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 in the four cell lines was different. The SPCA-1 cell line was most resistance to cisplatin; SK-MES-1 was most resistance to VP-16; whereas SK-MES-1 was most sensitive to doxorubicin. There was a positive correlation between GST-π expression and resistance to cisplatin, between TopoIIα expression and resistance to VP-16; and a negative correlation was noted between TopoIIα expression and resistance to doxorubicin. In summary, the endogenous expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was different in the four human lung cancer cell lines of different histological types, and this variance may be associated with the variation in chemosensitivity to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16. Among the related proteins, GST-π may be useful for the prediction of the intrinsic resistance to cisplatin, whereas TopoIIα may be useful to predict resistance to doxorubicin and VP-16 in human lung cancer cell lines. PMID:21805041

  9. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP).

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-06-20

    The transmembrane ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug-drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand-transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P-gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC-transporters. PMID:26970257

  10. Evaluating Potential P-gp Substrates: Main Aspects to Choose the Adequate Permeability Model for Assessing Gastrointestinal Drug Absorption.

    PubMed

    da Silva Junior, João Batista; Dezani, Thaisa Marinho; Dezani, André Bersani; dos Reis Serra, Cristina Helena

    2015-01-01

    The success of an oral drug route administration depends on many factors that interfere in its bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and clinical safety. In human cells, ATP-dependent efflux transporter proteins, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), BCRP and MRP2, reduce the absorption of drugs. A tiered approach chosen to evaluate drugs as substrates or inhibitors of efflux pumps, particularly P-gp, should be carefully selected, since each study method has advantages and intrinsic limitations to their processes. Depending on the adopted study conditions, the results may not correspond to the real characteristics of the drug regarding to its modulation by specific efflux proteins. This mini-review aims at summarizing the role of P-gp in the drugs oral absorption and correlating some of the most used permeability methods to determine the drug condition as P-gp substrate. Studies about P-gp have shown that it is a dynamic protein, facilitating secretion of endogenous compounds, as aldosterone, and protecting cells against xenobiotics. Different efflux assays are employed to evaluate drugs as P-gp substrates. In an initial planning, MDCK-MDR1 tend to be the chosen method for efflux studies due its ability of express P-gp, followed by studies conducted in Caco-2 models. However, it is necessary to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each method to generate sound results and to set the correlation in vitro x in situ x in vivo. PMID:25963568

  11. Co-administration strategy to enhance brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp/Abcb1) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) mediated efflux with m-TOR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Mukul; Khurana, Varun; Qin, Bin; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-09-15

    The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the interaction of vandetanib with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1) in vitro and in vivo (ii) to study the modulation of P-gp and BCRP mediated efflux of vandetanib with specific transport inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors, everolimus and temsirolimus. Cellular accumulation and bi-directional transport studies in MDCKII cell monolayers were conducted to delineate the role of efflux transporters on disposition of vandetanib. Brain distribution studies were conducted in male FVB wild-type mice with vandetanib administered intravenously either alone or in the presence of specific inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors. In vitro studies suggested that vandetanib is a high affinity substrate of Bcrp1 but is not transported by P-gp. Interestingly, in vivo brain distribution studies in FVB wild type mice indicated that vandetanib penetration into the brain is restricted by both Bcrp1 and P-gp mediated active efflux at the blood brain barrier (BBB). Co-administration of elacridar, a dual P-gp/BCRP inhibitor increased the brain to plasma concentration ratio of vandetanib upto 5 fold. Of the two m-TOR pathway inhibitors examined; everolimus showed potent effect on modulating vandetanib brain penetration whereas no significant affect on vandetanib brain uptake was observed following temsirolimus co-administration. This finding could be clinically relevant as everolimus can provide synergistic pharmacological effect in addition to primary role of vandetanib efflux modulation at BBB for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:22633931

  12. Alternation of adriamycin penetration kinetics in MCF-7 cells from 2D to 3D culture based on P-gp expression through the Chk2/p53/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng; Zhou, Fang; Hao, Kun; Liu, Jiali; Chen, Qianying; Ni, Ping; Zhou, Honghao; Wang, Guangji; Zhang, Jingwei

    2015-01-15

    Monolayer cells are largely different from tumor masses, and might misguide drug screenings. 3D in vitro cell culture models simulate the characteristics of tumor masses in vivo and have recently been used in many studies of anti-cancer drugs. Among various 3D cell culture models, multi-cellular layer (MCL) models allow for the direct quantitative assessment of the penetration of chemotherapeutic agents through solid tissue environments without requiring the use of fluorescently labeled drugs or imaging molecules. Therefore, in our present study, a 3D-no base and embedded MCF-7 MCL model was successfully developed for a 14-day culture. Over time, its thickness and cell layers increased and exhibited highly proliferative properties and drug resistance to adriamycin (ADR) with markedly elevated IC50 values. Meanwhile, G2/M stage cycle arrest was also observed, which likely up-regulated P-gp expression through the Chk2/p53/NF-κB pathway. The elevated P-gp expression altered the ADR penetration kinetics in MCF-7 MCLs in vitro by accelerating the apparent penetration of ADR through the intercellular spaces of the MCLs. Additionally, a decreased ADR retention within tumor cells was observed, but could be significantly reversed by a P-gp inhibitor. The attenuated ADR retention in the deeper cells of tumor masses was confirmed in xenografted mice in vivo. This phenomenon could be elucidated by the mathematical modeling of penetration kinetics parameters. Our study provided a new model that evaluated and improved the quantification of the drug penetration kinetics, revealed the relationship between P-gp and drug penetration through tumor masses, and suggested the potential molecular mechanisms. PMID:25478729

  13. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-)), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2 (-∕-)), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-) Abcg2 (-∕-)) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  14. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M.; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2−∕−), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−Abcg2−∕−) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  15. The putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan does not affect the transcellular permeability and cellular uptake of the calcium channel antagonist verapamil in the P-glycoprotein expressing cell line MDCK II MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Saaby, Lasse; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Brodin, Birger

    2015-01-01

    Verapamil is used in high doses for the treatment of cluster headache. Verapamil has been described as a P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) substrate. We wished to evaluate in vitro whether co administration of a P-gp inhibitor with verapamil could be a feasible strategy for increasing CNS uptake of verapamil. Fluxes of radiolabelled verapamil across MDCK II MDR1 monolayers were measured in the absence and presence of the putative P-gp inhibitor telmisartan (a clinically approved drug compound). Verapamil displayed a vectorial basolateral-to-apical transepithelial efflux across the MDCK II MDR1 monolayers with a permeability of 5.7 × 10−5 cm sec−1 compared to an apical to basolateral permeability of 1.3 × 10−5 cm sec-1. The efflux could be inhibited with the P-gp inhibitor zosuquidar. Zosuquidar (0.4 μmol/L) reduced the efflux ratio (PB-A/PA-B) for verapamil 4.6–1.6. The presence of telmisartan, however, only caused a slight reduction in P-gp-mediated verapamil transport to an efflux ratio of 3.4. Overall, the results of the present in vitro approach indicate, that clinical use of telmisartan as a P-gp inhibitor may not be an effective strategy for increasing brain uptake of verapamil by co-administration with telmisartan. PMID:26171231

  16. Knockdown of HOXA10 reverses the multidrug resistance of human chronic mylogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp and MRP-1.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ying-Jie; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Wang, Hong; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of leukemia cells is a major obstacle in chemotherapeutic treatment. The high expression and constitutive activation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) have been reported to play a vital role in enhancing cell resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the reversal of MDR by silencing homeobox A10 (HOXA10) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/ADM cells by modulating the expression of P-gp and MRP-1. K562/ADM cells were stably transfected with HOXA10-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HOXA10 was markedly suppressed following transfection with a shRNA-containing vector. The sensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADR was enhanced by the silencing of HOXA10, due to the increased intracellular accumulation of ADR. The accumulation of ADR induced by the silencing of HOXA10 may be due to the downregulation of P-gp and MRP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that downregulating HOXA10 inhibited the protein expression of P-gp and MRP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of HOXA10 combats resistance and that HOXA10 is a potential target for resistant human CML. PMID:27035504

  17. Esters of the Marine-Derived Triterpene Sipholenol A Reverse P-GP-Mediated Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchao; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Vispute, Saurabh G.; Jain, Sandeep; Chen, Yangmin; Li, Jessalyn; Youssef, Diaa T. A.; El Sayed, Khalid A.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that several sipholane triterpenes, sipholenol A, sipholenone E, sipholenol L and siphonellinol D, have potent reversal effect for multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells that overexpressed P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1). Through comparison of cytotoxicity towards sensitive and multi-drug resistant cell lines, we identified that the semisynthetic esters sipholenol A-4-O-acetate and sipholenol A-4-O-isonicotinate potently reversed P-gp-mediated MDR but had no effect on MRP1/ABCC1 and BCRP/ABCG2-mediated MDR. The results from [3H]-paclitaxel accumulation and efflux studies suggested that these two triterpenoids were able to increase the intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel by inhibiting its active efflux. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that these two compounds did not alter the expression levels of P-gp when treated up to 72 h. These sipholenol derivatives also stimulated the ATPase activity of P-gp membranes, which suggested that they might be substrates of P-gp. Moreover, in silico molecular docking studies revealed the virtual binding modes of these two compounds into human homology model of P-gp. In conclusion, sipholenol A-4-O-acetate and sipholenol A-4-O-isonicotinate efficiently inhibit the P-gp and may represent potential reversal agents for the treatment of multidrug resistant cancers. PMID:25874923

  18. Multifunctional PLGA Nanobubbles as Theranostic Agents: Combining Doxorubicin and P-gp siRNA Co-Delivery Into Human Breast Cancer Cells and Ultrasound Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Deng, Liwei; Li, Tingting; Shen, Xue; Yan, Jie; Zuo, Liangming; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Yiyao

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. One of the effective approaches to overcome MDR is to use nanoparticle-mediated the gene silence of chemotherapeutic export proteins by RNA interference to increase drug accumulation in drug resistant cancer cells. In this work, a new co-delivery system, DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA nanobubbles (NBs) around 327 nm, to overcome doxorubicin (DOX) resistance in MCF-7 human breast cancer was designed and developed. Positively charged polyethylenimine (PEI) were modified onto the surface of DOX-PLGA NBs through DCC/NHS crosslinking, and could efficiently condense P-gp shRNA into DOX-PLGA/PEI NBs at vector/shRNA weight ratios of 70:1 and above. An in vitro release profile demonstrated an efficient DOX release (more than 80%) from DOX-PLGA/PEI NBs at pH 4.4, suggesting a pH-responsive drug release for the multifunctionalized NBs. Cellular experimental results further showed that DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs could facilitate cellular uptake of DOX into cells and increase the cell proliferation suppression effect of DOX against MCF-7/ADR cells (a DOX-resistant and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression cancer cell line). The IC50 of DOX-PLGA NBs against MCF-7/ADR cells was 2-fold lower than that of free DOX. The increased cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of DOX delivered by DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs in MCF-7/ADR cells was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectrophotometry, and might be owning to the down-regulation of P-gp and reduced the efflux of DOX. The cellular uptake mechanism of DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs indicated that the macropinocytosis was one of the pathways for the uptake of NBs by MCF-7/ADR cells, which was also an energy-dependent process. Furthermore, the in vitro cellular ultrasound imaging suggested that the employment of the DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs could efficiently enhance ultrasound imaging of cancer cells. These results demonstrated

  19. The expression of P-glycoprotein in leukemia cells is associated with the upregulated expression of nestin, a class 6 filament protein.

    PubMed

    Coculova, Martina; Imrichova, Denisa; Seres, M; Messingerova, Lucia; Bohacova, Viera; Sulova, Zdena; Breier, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious obstacle to the effective chemotherapeutic treatment of leukemia. Expression of plasma membrane P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a transporter involved in drug efflux, is the most frequently observed molecular causality of MDR. We observed the coexpression of P-gp and the filament protein nestin in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines SKM-1 and MOLM-13 following the induction of P-gp expression using vincristine. Nestin is considered a marker of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is causal relationship between the expression of P-glycoprotein and the expression of nestin in both of these AML cell lines. The expression of P-gp was induced in SKM-1 cells by selective pressure using vincristine (VCR), mitoxantrone (MTX), azacytidine (AzaC) and lenalidomide (LEN). Whereas the selective pressure of VCR, MTX and AzaC also induced P-gp expression in MOLM-13 cells, LEN was found to be ineffective in this regard. In all cases in which P-gp expression was induced in SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells, its expression was associated with the induction of nestin mRNA expression and the presence of a 200-220kDa nestin-immunoreactive protein band in western blots. Silencing P-gp expression using s10418 siRNA (known as the P-gp silencer) was associated with the downregulation of the nestin transcript level, demonstrated using RT-PCR. Nestin mRNA was also observed in two P-gp-positive variants of L1210 cells that were obtained either by selection with VCR or by transfection with a retrovirus encoding human P-gp. Detectable levels of nestin transcripts were not observed in P-gp-negative parental L1210 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that the induction of P-gp expression is causally associated with the expression of nestin in leukemia cells. PMID:27479651

  20. BCRP and P-gp relay overexpression in triple negative basal-like breast cancer cell line: a prospective role in resistance to Olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Robin; Daumar, Pierre; Mounetou, Emmanuelle; Aubel, Corinne; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Abrial, Catherine; Vatoux, Catherine; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bamdad, Mahchid

    2015-01-01

    The triple negative basal-like (TNBL) breast carcinoma is an aggressive and unfavorable prognosis disease. Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as Olaparib could represent a promising targeted therapy but their sensitivity against Multidrug Resistance proteins (MDR), which causes resistance, is not well defined. Thus, our work focused on the analysis of P-gp and BCRP coexpression in the SUM1315 TNBL human cell line, in correlation with Olaparib intracellular concentration. Western blot analyses showed a clear coexpression of P-gp and BCRP in SUM1315 cells. A low cytotoxic Olaparib treatment clearly led to an increased expression of both BCRP and P-gp in these cells. Indeed, after 1.5 h of treatment, BCRP expression was increased with a 1.8 fold increase rate. Then, P-gp took over from 3 h to 15 h with an average increase rate of 1.8 fold, and finally returned to control value at 24 h. HPLC-UV analyses showed that, in the same treatment conditions, the intracellular Olaparib concentration increased from 1 h to 3 h and remained relatively stable until 24 h. Results suggest that the resistance mechanism induced by Olaparib in TNBL SUM1315 cell line may be overpassed if a cytotoxic and stable intracellular level of the drug can be maintained. PMID:26234720

  1. A New Class of Safe, Potent, and Specific P-gp Modulator: Flavonoid Dimer FD18 Reverses P-gp-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Breast Xenograft in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yan, Clare S W; Wong, Iris L K; Chan, Kin-Fai; Kan, Jason W Y; Chong, Tsz Cheung; Law, Man Chun; Zhao, Yunzhe; Chan, Shun Wan; Chan, Tak Hang; Chow, Larry M C

    2015-10-01

    Flavonoid dimer FD18 is a new class of dimeric P-gp modulator that can reverse cancer drug resistance. FD18 is a potent (EC50 = 148 nM for paclitaxel), safe (selective index = 574), and selective P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulator. FD18 can modulate multidrug resistance toward paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and mitoxantrone in human breast cancer LCC6MDR in vitro. FD18 (1 μM) can revert chemosensitivity of LCC6MDR back to parental LCC6 level. FD18 was 11- to 46-fold more potent than verapamil. FD18 (1 μM) can increase accumulation of doxorubicin by 2.7-fold, daunorubicin (2.1-fold), and rhodamine 123 (5.2-fold) in LCC6MDR. FD18 inhibited P-gp-mediated doxorubicin efflux and has no effect on influx. FD18 at 1 μM did not affect the protein expression level of P-gp. Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that intraperitoneal administration of 45 mg/kg FD18 was enough to maintain a plasma level above EC50 (148 nM) for more than 600 min. Toxicity studies with FD18 (90 mg/kg, i.p. for 12 times in 22 days) with paclitaxel (12 mg/kg, i.v. for 12 times in 22 days) revealed no obvious toxicity or death in mice. In vivo efficacy studies indicated that FD18 (45 mg/kg, i.p. for 12 times in 22 days) together with paclitaxel (12 mg/kg, i.v. for 12 times in 22 days) resulted in a 46% reduction in LCC6MDR xenograft volume (n = 11; 648 ± 84 mm(3)) compared to paclitaxel control (n = 8; 1201 ± 118 mm(3)). There were no animal deaths or significant drop in body weight and vital organ wet weight. FD18 can increase paclitaxel accumulation in LCC6MDR xenograft by 1.8- to 2.2-fold. The present study suggests that FD18 represents a new class of safe and potent P-gp modulator in vivo. PMID:26291333

  2. A Potent and Selective P-gp Modulator for Altering Multidrug Resistance Due to Pump Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, Stefano; Contino, Marialessandra; Lazzarato, Loretta; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Blangetti, Marco; Fruttero, Roberta; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio

    2016-02-17

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane protein responsible for the active transport of several endogenous and exogenous substances. It constitutes a defense mechanism and, at the same time, it severely compromises the success rate of antitumor chemotherapy. In this study a small library of alkyl/oxyalkyl derivatives of MC70 [4'-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydro-1H-isoquinolin-2-ylmethyl)biphenyl-4-ol], a well-known P-gp inhibitor, was synthesized through straightforward functionalization of the phenolic group present in the structure of MC70. All compounds were characterized for their effect on P-gp, proving capable of blocking P-gp-mediated calcein-AM efflux with micromolar potency, following their ability to act as high-affinity substrates of this transporter. Excitingly, compound 4 [6,7-dimethoxy-2-((4'-butoxybiphen-4-yl)methyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] exhibited low nanomolar potency (5.2 nm) and had a peculiar activity profile, acting both as a positive allosteric modulator and as a substrate of the transporter. A new and more efficient synthesis of MC70 is also described. PMID:26797828

  3. Avermectin induces P-glycoprotein expression in S2 cells via the calcium/calmodulin/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang; Sun, Yin-Jian; Yang, Lin; Huang, Shile; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2013-04-25

    Avermectin (AVM) is a macrocyclic lactone agent widely used as a nematicide, acaricide and insecticide in veterinary medicine and plant protection. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump for xenobiotic compounds, and is involved in multidrug resistance. To understand the development of AVM resistance in invertebrates, we investigated the mechanisms by which AVM affected P-gp expression in Drosophila S2 cells. We found that AVM induced upregulation of P-gp protein expression, increased P-gp ATPase activity and enhanced cellular efflux of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 from cells. Furthermore, we observed that AVM-induced expression of P-gp was due to elevation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). This occurred both directly, by activating calcium ion channels, and indirectly, by activating chloride ion channels. These results are supported by our observations that verapamil, a Ca(2+) channel blocker, and niflumic acid, a chloride channel antagonist, significantly attenuated AVM-induced [Ca(2+)](i) elevation, thereby reducing P-gp expression. Inhibition of P-gp with anti-P-gp antibody or cyclosporine A (a P-gp inhibitor) reduced the AVM-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i), implying that P-gp and [Ca(2+)](i) regulate each other. Finally, we found that trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamic acid, an NF-κB inhibitor, attenuated the AVM-induced expression of P-gp, suggesting that AVM induces P-gp protein expression via the calmodulin/Relish (NF-κB) signaling pathway. PMID:23523950

  4. Differential effect of P-gp and MRP2 on cellular translocation of gemifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Kwatra, Deep; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics widely indicated in the treatment of both human and animal diseases. The primary objective of this study was to assess short and long term affinity of gemifloxacin towards efflux transporters (P-gp, MRP2) and nuclear hormone receptor (PXR). Uptake and dose dependent inhibition studies were performed with [14C] erythromycin (0.25μCi/ml) on MDCKII-MDR1 and MDCKII-MRP2 cells. Cellular accumulation of calcein-AM was further determined to confirm the affinity of gemifloxacin towards P-gp and MRP2. Transport studies were conducted to determine bi-directional permeability and to assess efflux ratio of gemifloxacin. LS-180 cells were treated with three different concentrations of gemifloxacin for 72hrs and real-time PCR analysis was performed to study the quantitative gene expression levels of PXR, MDR1 and MRP2. Further, [14C] erythromycin uptake was also performed on LS-180 treated cells to better delineate the functional activity of efflux transporters. Results from our study suggest that gemifloxacin may be a substrate of both the efflux transporters studied. This compound inhibited both P-gp and MRP2 mediated efflux of [14C] erythromycin in a dose dependent manner with IC50 values of 123 ± 2μM and 16 ± 2μM, respectively. The efflux ratio of [14C] erythromycin lowered from 3.56 to 1.63 on MDCKII-MDR1 cells and 4.93 to 1.26 on MDCKII-MRP2 cells. This significant reduction in efflux ratio further confirmed the substrate specificity of gemifloxacin towards P-gp and MRP2. Long term exposure significantly induced the expression of PXR (18 fold), MDR1 (6 fold) and MRP2 (6 fold). A decrease (20%) in [14C] erythromycin uptake further confirmed the elevated functional activity of P-gp and MRP2. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that gemifloxacin is effluxed by both P-gp and MRP2. Long term exposure induced their gene expression and functional activity. This substrate specificity of gemifloxacin towards these efflux

  5. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Mona W.; Donaldson, Gregory P.; Severin, Geoffrey B.; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O.; Waters, Christopher M.; Lee, Vincent T.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5ʹ-phosphoguanylyl-(3ʹ,5ʹ)-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP–regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP–governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway. PMID:26305945

  6. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mona W; Donaldson, Gregory P; Severin, Geoffrey B; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O; Waters, Christopher M; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3',5')-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP-regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP-governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway. PMID:26305945

  7. Cbl-b inhibits P-gp transporter function by preventing its translocation into caveolae in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Qu, Xiujuan; Teng, Yuee; Li, Zhi; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jing; Ma, Yanju; Fan, Yibo; Li, Ce; Liu, Shizhou; Wang, Zhenning; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Yunpeng

    2015-01-01

    The transport function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) requires its efficient localization to caveolae, a subset of lipid rafts, and disruption of caveolae suppresses P-gp transport function. However, the regulatory molecules involved in the translocation of P-gp into caveolae remain unknown. In the present study, we showed that c-Src dependent Caveolin-1 phosphorylation promoted the translocation of P-gp into caveolae, resulting in multidrug resistance in adriamycin resistant gastric cancer SGC7901/Adr and breast cancer MCF-7/Adr cells. In a negative feedback loop, the translocation of Cbl-b from the nucleus to the cytoplasm prevented the localization of P-gp to caveolae resulting in the reversal of MDR through the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Src. Clinical data showed a significant positive relationship between Cbl-b expression and survival in P-gp positive breast cancer patients who received anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Our findings identified a new regulatory mechanism of P-gp transport function in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers. PMID:25788263

  8. Abamectin resistance in Drosophila is related to increased expression of P-glycoprotein via the dEGFR and dAkt pathways.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang; Sun, Ying-Jian; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Many insects have evolved resistance to abamectin but the mechanisms involved in this resistance have not been well characterized. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent drug-efflux pump transmembrane protein, may be involved in abamectin resistance. We investigated the role of P-gp in abamectin (ABM) resistance in Drosophila using an ABM-resistant strain developed in the laboratory. A toxicity assay, Western blotting analysis and a vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity assay all demonstrated the existence of a direct relationship between P-gp expression and ABM resistance in these flies. Our observations indicate that P-gp levels in flies' heads were higher than in their thorax and abdomen, and that both P-gp levels and LC(50) values were higher in resistant than in susceptible and P-gp-deficient strains. In addition, P-gp levels in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of resistant flies were higher than in susceptible and P-gp-deficient flies, which is further evidence that a high level of P-gp in the BBB is related to ABM resistance. Furthermore, we found greater expression of Drosophila EGFR (dEGFR) in the resistant strain than in the susceptible strain, and that the level of Drosophila Akt (dAkt) was much higher in resistant than in susceptible flies, whereas that in P-gp-deficient flies was very low. Compared to susceptible flies, P-gp levels in the resistant strain were markedly suppressed by the dEGFR and dAkt inhibitors lapatinib and wortmannin. These results suggest that the increased P-gp in resistant flies was regulated by the dEGFR and dAkt pathways and that increased expression of P-gp is an important component of ABM resistance in insects. PMID:23648830

  9. A plausible explanation for enhanced bioavailability of P-gp substrates in presence of piperine: simulation for next generation of P-gp inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Durg Vijay; Godbole, Madan M; Misra, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has a major role to play in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, since it effluxes many cytotoxic hydrophobic anticancer drugs from gastrointestinal tract, brain, liver and kidney. Piperine is known to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin, as a substrate of P-gp by at least 2000%. Besides these at least 50 other substrates and inhibitors of P-gp have been reported so far. All P-gp inhibitors have diverse structures. Although little is known about binding of some flavonoids and steroids at the NBD (nucleotide binding domain) of P-gp in the vicinity of ATP binding site inhibiting its hydrolysis, a valid explanation of how P-gp accommodates such a diverse set of inhibitors is still awaited. In the present study, piperine up to 100 μM has not shown observable cytotoxic effect on MDCK cell line, and it has been shown to accumulate rhodamine by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescent activated cell sorter in MDCK cells. Computational simulation for piperine and some first and second generation P-gp inhibitors has shown that these dock at the NBD site of P-gp. A comparative simulation study has been carried out regarding their docking and binding energies. Binding conformation of P-gp co-crystallized complexes with ADP, AMP-PNP (Adenylyl-imidodiphosphate), and ATP were compared with piperine. The receptor based E-pharmacophore of docked piperine has been simulated to find common features amongst P-gp inhibitors. Finally it has been concluded that piperine could be utilized as base molecule for design and development of safe non-toxic inhibitor of P-gp in order to enhance the bioavailability of most of its substrates. PMID:22864626

  10. Expression and significance of glucose transporter-1, P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein and glutathione S-transferase-π in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MAO, ZHONG-PING; ZHAO, LI-JUN; ZHOU, SHUI-HONG; LIU, MENG-QIN; TAN, WEI-FENG; YAO, HONG-TIAN

    2015-01-01

    Increasing glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) activity is one of the most important ways to increase the cellular influx of glucose. We previously demonstrated that increased GLUT-1 expression was an independent predictor of survival in patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Thus, GLUT-1 may present a novel therapeutic target in laryngeal carcinoma. In this study, the expression of GLUT-1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) in laryngeal carcinomas was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Additionally, possible correlations between GLUT-1 and P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π and various clinicopathological parameters were analyzed. In this study, 52.9% (18/34), 58.8% (20/34), 20.6% (7/34) and 58.8% (20/34) of the laryngeal carcinomas were positive for GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π, respectively. The expression of GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π was higher in laryngeal carcinoma specimens when compared with laryngeal precancerous lesions (P<0.05). Pearson’s correlation analysis showed correlations between GLUT-1 and P-gp (r=0.364; P=0.034), GLUT-1 and MRP1 (r=0.359; P=0.037) and P-gp and GST-π (r=0.426; P=0.012). GLUT-1 expression was found to significantly correlate with tumor-node-metastasis classification (P=0.02) and clinical stage (P=0.037). Furthermore, P-gp was found to significantly correlate with clinical stage (P=0.026). Univariate analysis showed that MRP1 expression was significantly associated with poor survival (c2=5.16; P=0.023). Multivariate analysis revealed that lymph node metastasis (P=0.009) and MRP1 overexpression (P=0.023) were significant predictors of poor survival. In the present study, the expression of GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π in laryngeal carcinomas was investigated, as well as the correlations between these proteins. P-gp was found to significantly correlate with clinical stage, while MRP1 overexpression was significantly associated with poor survival. PMID:25621055

  11. MDR1 synonymous polymorphisms alter transporter specificity and protein stability in a stable epithelial monolayer.

    PubMed

    Fung, King Leung; Pan, James; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Lund, Paul E; Pixley, Jessica N; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Gottesman, Michael M

    2014-01-15

    The drug efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by MDR1 can be influenced by genetic polymorphisms, including two synonymous changes in the coding region of MDR1. Here we report that the conformation of P-gp and its drug efflux activity can be altered by synonymous polymorphisms in stable epithelial monolayers expressing P-gp. Several cell lines with similar MDR1 DNA copy number were developed and termed LLC-MDR1-WT (expresses wild-type P-gp), LLC-MDR1-3H (expresses common haplotype P-gp), and LLC-MDR1-3HA (a mutant that carries a different valine codon in position 3435). These cell lines express similar levels of recombinant mRNA and protein. P-gp in each case is localized on the apical surface of polarized cells. However, the haplotype and its mutant P-gps fold differently from the wild-type, as determined by UIC2 antibody shift assays and limited proteolysis assays. Surface biotinylation experiments suggest that the non-wild-type P-gps have longer recycling times. Drug transport assays show that wild-type and haplotype P-gp respond differently to P-gp inhibitors that block efflux of rhodamine 123 or mitoxantrone. In addition, cytotoxicity assays show that the LLC-MDR1-3H cells are more resistant to mitoxantrone than the LLC-MDR1-WT cells after being treated with a P-gp inhibitor. Expression of polymorphic P-gp, however, does not affect the host cell's morphology, growth rate, or monolayer formation. Also, ATPase activity assays indicate that neither basal nor drug-stimulated ATPase activities are affected in the variant P-gps. Taken together, our findings indicate that "silent" polymorphisms significantly change P-gp function, which would be expected to affect interindividual drug disposition and response. PMID:24305879

  12. The influence of passage number for Caco2 cell models when evaluating P-gp mediated drug transport.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Crowe, A

    2015-12-01

    Caco2 cells are a human adenocarcinoma cell line that forms tight junctions and are widely used to examine bidirectional drug transport as well as P-glycoprotein mediated efflux. Unfortunately Caco2 cell lines can be very heterogeneous in nature. Our aim was to improve the Caco2 cell model for determination of P-glycoprotein mediated drug transport. Young passage Caco2 from ATCC had inadequate expression of P-glycoprotein, therefore three approaches were adopted to upregulate Caco2 P-glycoprotein expression to mimic that in vivo; a) incubation of mature Caco2 monolayer with rifampicin, b) prolonged exposure of Caco2 cells to vinblastine (generating the Caco2 VIN line), and c) splitting cells every 7 to 9 days until late passage numbers (over P80) were available. Upon development of the models, P-gp expression and activity was determined using western blotting and bidirectional transport studies of rhodamine123. All four models exhibited P-gp mediated efflux transport for rhodamine123. Incubation with rifampicin did not alter bidirectional transport compared to passage 44 cells. Increased passage number altered P-glycoprotein expression and the efflux ratio increased to 4.7 for passage 80 from 1.4 of passage 44. The highest basolateral to apical transport was observed for both passage 89 Caco2 and the Caco2 VIN model with an efflux ratio of 13 to 14. Western blot images confirmed the increased P-glycoprotein expression of late passage and Caco2 VIN. Caco2 cells are not ready for P-gp related research when first acquired from ATCC (Passage 18). Late passage Caco2 cell monolayers or Caco2 VIN models are needed to determine P-gp mediated efflux transport. PMID:26817277

  13. Asclepiasterol, a novel C21 steroidal glycoside derived from Asclepias curassavica, reverses tumor multidrug resistance by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Wang, Jun; Ma, Yan; Li, Wen-Xue; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-05-24

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major cause of cancer therapy failure. In this study, we identified a novel C21 steroidal glycoside, asclepiasterol, capable of reversing P-gp-mediated MDR. Asclepiasterol (2.5 and 5.0μM) enhanced the cytotoxity of P-gp substrate anticancer drugs in MCF-7/ADR and HepG-2/ADM cells. MDR cells were more responsive to paclitaxel in the presence of asclepiasterol, and colony formation of MDR cells was only reduced upon treatment with a combination of asclepiasterol and doxorubicin. Consistent with these findings, asclepiasterol treatment increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in MDR cells. Asclepiasterol decreased expression of P-gp protein without stimulating or suppressing MDR1 mRNA levels. Asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp suppression caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in two MDR cell types, and EGF, an activator of the MAPK/ERK pathway, reversed the P-gp down-regulation, implicating the MAPK/ERK pathway in asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp down-regulation. These results suggest that asclepiasterol could be developed as a modulator for reversing P-gp-mediated MDR in P-gp-overexpressing cancer variants. PMID:27129170

  14. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by Aconitum alkaloids: Implication for clinical drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinjun; Lin, Na; Li, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guiyu; He, Shugui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Ou, Rilan; Li, Na; Liu, Shuqiang; Feng, Lizhi; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lu, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The Aconitum species, which mainly contain bioactive Aconitum alkaloids, are frequently administered concomitantly with other herbal medicines or chemical drugs in clinics. The potential risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) arising from co-administration of Aconitum alkaloids and other drugs against specific targets such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) must be evaluated. This study focused on the effects of three representative Aconitum alkaloids: aconitine (AC), benzoylaconine (BAC), and aconine, on the expression and activity of P-gp. We observed that Aconitum alkaloids increased P-gp expression in LS174T and Caco-2 cells in the order AC > BAC > aconine. Nuclear receptors were involved in the induction of P-gp. AC and BAC increased the P-gp transport activity. Strikingly, intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial mass also increased. Furthermore, exposure to AC decreased the toxicity of vincristine and doxorubicin towards the cells. In vivo, AC significantly up-regulated the P-gp protein levels in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of FVB mice, and protected them against acute AC toxicity. Taken together, the findings of our in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that AC can induce P-gp expression, and that co-administration of AC with P-gp substrate drugs may cause DDIs. Our findings have important implications for Aconitum therapy in clinics. PMID:27139035

  15. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by Aconitum alkaloids: Implication for clinical drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinjun; Lin, Na; Li, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guiyu; He, Shugui; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Ou, Rilan; Li, Na; Liu, Shuqiang; Feng, Lizhi; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhongqiu; Lu, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The Aconitum species, which mainly contain bioactive Aconitum alkaloids, are frequently administered concomitantly with other herbal medicines or chemical drugs in clinics. The potential risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) arising from co-administration of Aconitum alkaloids and other drugs against specific targets such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) must be evaluated. This study focused on the effects of three representative Aconitum alkaloids: aconitine (AC), benzoylaconine (BAC), and aconine, on the expression and activity of P-gp. We observed that Aconitum alkaloids increased P-gp expression in LS174T and Caco-2 cells in the order AC > BAC > aconine. Nuclear receptors were involved in the induction of P-gp. AC and BAC increased the P-gp transport activity. Strikingly, intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial mass also increased. Furthermore, exposure to AC decreased the toxicity of vincristine and doxorubicin towards the cells. In vivo, AC significantly up-regulated the P-gp protein levels in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of FVB mice, and protected them against acute AC toxicity. Taken together, the findings of our in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that AC can induce P-gp expression, and that co-administration of AC with P-gp substrate drugs may cause DDIs. Our findings have important implications for Aconitum therapy in clinics. PMID:27139035

  16. Time and concentration dependency of P-gp, MRP1 and MRP5 induction in response to gemcitabine uptake in Capan-2 pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kohan, Hamed Gilzad; Boroujerdi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    1. Influx and efflux proteins play a major role in the overall uptake and efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and cellular chemo-resistance. 2. The present study investigated the time course and dose dependency of the induction of three efflux proteins, P-gp, MRP1 and MRP5, in response to gemcitabine exposure in Capan-2 pancreatic cancer cell line at transcriptional and translational levels. The influence of exposure on the influx protein (ENT1), the net cellular uptake of the gemcitabine, the overall ATPase activity and the cell death rate were also measured. 3. The time course of the expression exhibited an initial rise, toward a plateau level. The estimated Km and Vmax confirmed that MRP5 and to a lesser extent MRP1 are the prominent proteins for efflux of gemcitabine. Both mRNA and protein expression demonstrated the time and concentration dependency of the induction; and the elevated ATPase activity validated that the induced efflux proteins are functionally active. 4. The results of the study revealed that the efficacy window of gemcitabine as it relates to the function of the efflux proteins is concentration and temporal dependent and is well correlated to the first 60 min of exposure. PMID:25564970

  17. Accurate models for P-gp drug recognition induced from a cancer cell line cytotoxicity screen.

    PubMed

    Levatić, Jurica; Ćurak, Jasna; Kralj, Marijeta; Šmuc, Tomislav; Osmak, Maja; Supek, Fran

    2013-07-25

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1) is a promiscuous drug efflux pump of substantial pharmacological importance. Taking advantage of large-scale cytotoxicity screening data involving 60 cancer cell lines, we correlated the differential biological activities of ∼13,000 compounds against cellular P-gp levels. We created a large set of 934 high-confidence P-gp substrates or nonsubstrates by enforcing agreement with an orthogonal criterion involving P-gp overexpressing ADR-RES cells. A support vector machine (SVM) was 86.7% accurate in discriminating P-gp substrates on independent test data, exceeding previous models. Two molecular features had an overarching influence: nearly all P-gp substrates were large (>35 atoms including H) and dense (specific volume of <7.3 Å(3)/atom) molecules. Seven other descriptors and 24 molecular fragments ("effluxophores") were found enriched in the (non)substrates and incorporated into interpretable rule-based models. Biological experiments on an independent P-gp overexpressing cell line, the vincristine-resistant VK2, allowed us to reclassify six compounds previously annotated as substrates, validating our method's predictive ability. Models are freely available at http://pgp.biozyne.com . PMID:23772653

  18. Inhibitory effects of herbal constituents on P-glycoprotein in vitro and in vivo: Herb–drug interactions mediated via P-gp

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xue Hu, Jinping Wang, Baolian Sheng, Li Liu, Zhihao Yang, Shuang Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Modulation of drug transporters via herbal medicines which have been widely used in combination with conventional prescription drugs may result in herb–drug interactions in clinical practice. The present study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 50 major herbal constituents on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro and in vivo as well as related inhibitory mechanisms. Among these herbal medicines, four constituents, including emodin, 18β-glycyrrhetic acid (18β-GA), dehydroandrographolide (DAG), and 20(S)-ginsenoside F{sub 1} [20(S)-GF{sub 1}] exhibited significant inhibition (> 50%) on P-gp in MDR1-MDCKII and Caco-2 cells. Emodin was the strongest inhibitor of P-gp (IC{sub 50} = 9.42 μM), followed by 18β-GA (IC{sub 50} = 21.78 μM), 20(S)-GF{sub 1} (IC{sub 50} = 76.08 μM) and DAG (IC{sub 50} = 77.80 μM). P-gp ATPase activity, which was used to evaluate the affinity of substrates to P-gp, was stimulated by emodin and DAG with K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of 48.61, 29.09 μM and 71.29, 38.45 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. However, 18β-GA and 20(S)-GF{sub 1} exhibited significant inhibition on both basal and verapamil-stimulated P-gp ATPase activities at high concentration. Molecular docking analysis (CDOCKER) further elucidated the mechanism for structure–inhibition relationships of herbal constituents with P-gp. When digoxin was co-administered to male SD rats with emodin or 18β-GA, the AUC{sub 0−t} and Cmax of digoxin were increased by approximately 51% and 58%, respectively. Furthermore, 18β-GA, DAG, 20(S)-GF{sub 1} and Rh{sub 1} at 10 μM significantly inhibited CYP3A4/5 activity, while emodin activated the metabolism of midazolam in human liver microsomes. In conclusion, four herbal constituents demonstrated inhibition of P-gp to specific extents in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings provided the basis for the reliable assessment of the potential risks of herb–drug interactions in humans. - Highlights: • Emodin, 18

  19. Contribution of radixin to P-glycoprotein expression and transport activity in mouse small intestine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kentaro; Tomono, Takumi; Sakai, Riyo; Kano, Takashi; Morimoto, Kaori; Kato, Yukio; Ogihara, Takuo

    2013-08-01

    The ERM proteins, ezrin, radixin, and moesin, are membrane-cytoskeleton cross-linkers with multiple physiological functions. We previously showed that radixin is involved in posttranslational regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Here, we investigated the physiological role of radixin in regulating P-gp expression and activity in the small intestine by comparing wild-type- and radixin knockout (Rdx) mice. In intestinal tissue homogenates, P-gp protein levels increased markedly from the upper part to the lower part of the small intestine in both wild-type- and Rdx(-/-) mice. In the membrane fractions, a similar pattern was seen in wild-type mice. However, the membrane expression of P-gp protein remained at the same level from the upper to the lower part of the small intestine in Rdx(-/-) mice. When rhodamine123 (Rho123), a substrate of P-gp, was orally administered to Rdx(-/-) and wild-type mice, the absorption phase of Rho123 was greater in Rdx(-/-) than in wild-type mice, whereas the elimination phase in Rdx(-/-) mice was not different from that of wild-type mice. Our results indicate that radixin plays an important role in regulating P-gp localization and P-gp functional activity at the intestinal membrane. PMID:23754525

  20. P-glycoprotein expression in Perna viridis after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Wen-Chang; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Tao Jiang; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2014-08-01

    Bivalves naturally exposed to toxic algae have mechanisms to prevent from harmful effects of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins. However, quite few studies have examined the mechanisms associated, and the information currently available is still insufficient. Multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) is ubiquitous in aquatic invertebrates and plays an important role in defense against xenobiotics. Here, to explore the roles of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the DSP toxins resistance in shellfish, complete cDNA of P-gp gene in the mussel Perna viridis was cloned and analyzed. The accumulation of okadaic acid (OA), a main component of DSP toxins, MXR activity and expression of P-gp in gills of P. viridis were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a dinoflagellate producing DSP toxins in the presence or absence of P-gp inhibitors PGP-4008, verapamil (VER) and cyclosporin A (CsA). The mussel P. viridis P-gp closely matches MDR/P-gp/ABCB protein from various organisms, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. After exposure to P. lima, OA accumulation, MXR activity and P-gp expression significantly increased in gills of P. viridis. The addition of P-gp-specific inhibitors PGP-4008 and VER decreased MXR activity induced by P. lima, but had no effect on the OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. However, CsA, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of ABC transporter not only decreased MXR activity, but also increased OA accumulation in gills of P. viridis. Together with the ubiquitous presence of other ABC transporters such as MRP/ABCC in bivalves and potential compensatory mechanism in P-gp and MRP-mediated resistance, we speculated that besides P-gp, other ABC transporters, especially MRP might be involved in the resistance mechanisms to DSP toxins. PMID:24811006

  1. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiquan; Song, Maomin

    2014-11-01

    Chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of breast cancer. However, the resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, often mediated by multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms, is a common occurrence. The present study examined the expression of several MDR-related proteins (MRPs) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast, and assessed their association with clinicopathological variables and their prognostic significance. In addition, immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of MRP, p-glycoprotein (P-gp), topoisomerase 2α (Topo2α), thymidylate synthase (TS) and glutathione-S-transferase π (GST-π) in 156 resected IDCs of the breast. Pearson's χ(2) test and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used to analyze the association between MDR protein expression and several clinicopathological variables. The association between each of the five MDR proteins was also examined. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression modeling were used to assess overall survival. The expression of MRP, P-gp, Topo2α, TS and GST-π was detected in 20.5% (32/156), 25.0% (39/156), 84.0% (131/156), 41.7% (65/156) and 41.0% (64/156) of cases examined, respectively. No correlation was identified between MRP and Topo-2α and the clinicopathological variables examined. By contrast, P-gp (χ(2)=20.226; P<0.0001) and GST-π (χ(2)=35.032; P<0.0001) were found to positively correlate with tumor grade. In addition, staining for TS was associated with axillary lymph node metastasis (χ(2)=42.281; P<0.0001). The expression levels of P-gp and GST-π were found to be significantly correlated (r= 0.319; P<0.0001). Furthermore, GST-π expression was elevated in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (χ(2)=17.407; P<0.0001). Tumor histological grade, in addition to TS and GST-π expression, were significant predictors of a poor survival outcome. TS and GST-π are consequently useful prognostic biomarkers in IDC, therefore, when establishing a personalized

  2. P-glycoprotein and its inducible expression in three bivalve species after exposure to Prorocentrum lima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Liu, Su-Li; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp or ABCB1) belongs to the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters responsible for multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) in aquatic organisms. To provide more information of P-gp in shellfish, in this study, complete cDNA of P-gp in three bivalve species including Ruditapes philippinarum, Scapharca subcrenata and Tegillarca granosa were cloned and its expressions in gill, digestive gland, adductor muscle and mantle of the three bivalves were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a toxogenic dinoflagellate. The complete sequences of R. philippinarum, S. subcrenata and T. granosa P-gp showed high homology with MDR/P-gp/ABCB proteins from other species, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the amino acid sequences of P-gp from S. subcrenata and T. granosa had a closest relationship, forming an independent branch, then grouping into the other branch with Mytilus californianus, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. However, P-gp sequences from R. philippinarum were more similar to the homologs from the more distantly related Aplysia californica than to homologs from S. subcrenata and T. granosa, suggesting that bivalves P-gp might have different paralogs. P-glycoprotein expressed in all detected tissues but there were large differences between them. After exposure to P. lima, the expression of P-gp changed in the four tissues in varying degrees within the same species and between different species, but the changes in mRNA and protein level were not always synchronous. PMID:26539802

  3. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  4. Acetaminophen Modulates P-Glycoprotein Functional Expression at the Blood-Brain Barrier by a Constitutive Androstane Receptor–Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Zhang, Yifeng; Laracuente, Mei-Li; Vanderah, Todd W.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Effective pharmacologic treatment of pain with opioids requires that these drugs attain efficacious concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS). A primary determinant of CNS drug permeation is P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an endogenous blood-brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporter that is involved in brain-to-blood transport of opioid analgesics (i.e., morphine). Recently, the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) has been identified as a regulator of P-gp functional expression at the BBB. This is critical to pharmacotherapy of pain/inflammation, as patients are often administered acetaminophen (APAP), a CAR-activating ligand, in conjunction with an opioid. Our objective was to investigate, in vivo, the role of CAR in regulation of P-gp at the BBB. Following APAP treatment, P-gp protein expression was increased up to 1.4–1.6-fold in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, APAP increased P-gp transport of BODIPY-verapamil in freshly isolated rat brain capillaries. This APAP-induced increase in P-gp expression and activity was attenuated in the presence of CAR pathway inhibitor okadaic acid or transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D, suggesting P-gp regulation is CAR-dependent. Furthermore, morphine brain accumulation was enhanced by P-gp inhibitors in APAP-treated animals, suggesting P-gp–mediated transport. A warm-water (50°C) tail-flick assay revealed a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in animals treated with morphine 3 or 6 hours after APAP treatment, as compared with animals treated concurrently. Taken together, our data imply that inclusion of APAP in a pain treatment regimen activates CAR at the BBB and increases P-gp functional expression, a clinically significant drug-drug interaction that modulates opioid analgesic efficacy. PMID:24019224

  5. Reversal of P-gp and BCRP-mediated MDR by tariquidar derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Qin; Wang, Lin; Lei, Yan; Hu, Tao; Zhang, Fei-Long; Cho, Chi-Hin; To, Kenneth K W

    2015-08-28

    With an aim to generate non-toxic, specific and highly potent multidrug resistance (MDR) modulators, a novel series of anthranilic acid amide-substituted tariquidar derivatives were synthesized. The new compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity toward normal human colon fibroblasts (CCD18-Co), human gastric epithelial cell line (HFE) and primary rat liver cells, and for their ability to inhibit P-gp/BCRP-mediated drug efflux and reversal of P-gp and BCRP-mediated MDR in parental and drug-resistant cancer cell lines (LCC6 MDR1, MCF-7 FLV1000, R-HepG2, SW620-Ad300). While tariquidar is highly toxic to normal cells, the new derivatives exhibited much lower or negligible cytotoxicity. Some of the new tariquidar derivatives inhibited both P-gp and BCRP-mediated drug efflux whereas a few of them bearing a sulfonamide functional group (1, 5, and 16) are specific to P-gp. The new compounds were also found to potentiate the anticancer activity of the transporter substrate anticancer drugs in the corresponding transporter-overexpressing cell lines. The extent of resistance reversal was found to be consistent with the transporter inhibitory effect of the new derivatives. To further understand the mechanism of P-gp and BCRP inhibition, the tariquidar derivatives were found to interact with the transporters using an antibody-based UIC2 or 5D3 shift assay. Moreover, the transporters-inhibiting derivatives were found to modulate the ATPase activities of the two MDR transporters. Our data thus advocate further development of the new compounds for the circumvention of MDR. PMID:26197160

  6. Interaction of BDE-47 and its Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP: Considerations for Human Exposure and Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp; also known as MDR1, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; also known as ABCG2), are membrane-bound proteins that mediate the cellular efflux of xenobiotics as an important defense against chemic...

  7. Liquid Chromatographic Method for Irinotecan Estimation: Screening of P-gp Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, M.; Negi, L. M.; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, F. J.; Iqbal, Zeenat; Khan, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed to develop a simple, sensitive, robust and reliable HPLC method for the estimation of irinotecan in the physiological media in order to assess the permeability profile of irinotecan, using the everted gut sac, in the presence of various P-gp modulators. Separation was achieved using, C18 column with mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.045 µM sodium dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate buffer containing ion pair agent heptane sulphonic acid sodium salt (0.0054 µM), pH 3. The flow rate was maintained at 1 ml/min and analysis was performed at 254.9 nm using PDA detector. Calibration data showed an excellent linear relationship between peak-area verses drug concentration (r2, 0.9999). Linearity was found to be in the range of 0.060-10.0 µg/ml. Limits of detection and quantification were found to ~0.020 µg/ml and ~0.060 µg/ml, respectively. The developed method was found to be precise (RSD < 1.5%, for repeatability and <2.55% for intermediate precision, acceptable ranges of precision), accurate (The recovered content of irinotecan in the presence of various P-gp modulators varied from 96.11-101.51%, within acceptable range, 80-120%), specific and robust (% RSD < 2). Developed method has been applied successfully for the evaluation of eleven P-gp modulators from diverse chemical class. PMID:25767314

  8. Casein Kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated Phosphorylation of Hsp90β as a Novel Mechanism of Rifampin-induced MDR1 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Won; Hasanuzzaman, Md.; Cho, Munju; Heo, Ye Rang; Ryu, Min-Jung; Ha, Na-Young; Park, Hyun June; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2015-01-01

    The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the MDR1 gene is a drug-exporting transporter located in the cellular membrane. P-gp induction is regarded as one of the main mechanisms underlying drug-induced resistance. Although there is great interest in the regulation of P-gp expression, little is known about its underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that casein kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of heat shock protein 90β (Hsp90β) and subsequent stabilization of PXR is a key mechanism in the regulation of MDR1 expression. Furthermore, we show that CK2 is directly activated by rifampin. Upon exposure to rifampin, CK2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of Hsp90β at the Ser-225/254 residues. Phosphorylated Hsp90β then interacts with PXR, causing a subsequent increase in its stability, leading to the induction of P-gp expression. In addition, inhibition of CK2 and Hsp90β enhances the down-regulation of PXR and P-gp expression. The results of this study may facilitate the development of new strategies to prevent multidrug resistance and provide a plausible mechanism for acquired drug resistance by CK2-mediated regulation of P-gp expression. PMID:25995454

  9. Fullerene inhibits benzo(a)pyrene Efflux from Cyprinus carpio hepatocytes by affecting cell membrane fluidity and P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiqing; Hu, Xialin; Wang, Rui; Yuan, Jin; Yin, Daqiang

    2016-05-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) can protect cells by pumping out toxic compounds, and has been found widely expressed in fish tissues. Here, we illustrate the P-gp efflux ability for benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in the hepatocytes of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) after exposing to fullerene aqueous suspension (nC60). The results revealed that nC60 increased the membrane fluidity by decreasing the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids, and increased the cholesterol contents. These findings, combined with 10-38% and 70-75% down-regulation of P-gp mRNA and protein respectively, suggested that nC60 caused inhibition on P-gp efflux transport system. Therefore, we further investigated the cellular efflux ability for BaP. Results showed unequivocally that nC60 is a potent P-gp inhibitor. The retaining BaP amounts after efflux were elevated by 1.7-2.8 fold during the 10 day exposure. Meanwhile, 5mg/L humic acid (one of the important fractions of natural organic matter, which is ubiquitous in aquatic environment) alleviated the nC60 damage to hepatocytes in terms of oxidative damage, cholesterol increment, and P-gp content reduction; and finally attenuated the suppressed P-gp efflux ability. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence of nC60 toxicity to P-gp functionality in fish and illustrates the possible mechanism of the suppressed P-gp efflux ability for BaP. PMID:26918948

  10. P-glycoprotein expression and localization in the rat uterus throughout gestation and labor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-Tao; Shynlova, Oksana; Kibschull, Mark; Zhong, Mei; Yu, Yan-Hong; Matthews, Stephen G; Lye, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    Uterine tissues contain the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by Abcb1a/1b gene), but little is known about how it changes through gestation. Our aim was to investigate the expression profile and cellular localization of P-gp in the pregnant, laboring and post-partum (PP) rat uterus. We propose that during pregnancy the mechanical and hormonal stimuli play a role in regulating myometrial Abcb1a/1b/P-gp. Samples from bilaterally and unilaterally pregnant rats were collected throughout gestation, during labor, and PP (n=4-6/gestational day). RNA and protein were isolated and subjected to quantitative PCR and immunoblotting; P-gp transcript and protein were localized by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Expression of Abcb1a/1b gene and membrane P-gp protein in uterine tissue (1) increased throughout gestation, peaked at term (GD19-21) and dropped during labor (GD23L); and (2) was upregulated only in gravid but not in empty horn of unilaterally pregnant rats. (3) The drop of Abcb1a/1b mRNA on GD23 was prevented by artificial maintenance of elevated progesterone (P4) levels in late gestation; (4) injection of the P4 receptor antagonist RU486 on GD19 caused a significant decrease in Abcb1 mRNA levels. (5) In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry indicated that Abcb1/P-gp is absent from myometrium throughout gestation; (6) was expressed exclusively by uterine microvascular endothelium (at early gestation) and luminal epithelium (at mid and late gestation), but was undetectable during labor. In conclusion, ABC transporter protein P-gp in pregnant uterus is hormonally and mechanically regulated. However, its substrate(s) and precise function in these tissues during pregnancy remains to be determined. PMID:27335130

  11. Inhibitory effect of clemastine on P-glycoprotein expression and function: an in vitro and in situ study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Mehran Mesgari; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishekar, Hamed; Mohammadnejad, Leila; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Transporters have an important role in pharmacokinetics of drugs. Inhibition or induction of drug transporters activity can affect drug absorption, safety, and efficacy. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is the most important membrane transporter that is responsible for active efflux of drugs. It is important to understand which drugs are substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of P-gp to minimize or avoid unwanted interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of clemastine on the expression and function of P-gp. Materials and Methods: The effect of clemastine on P-gp function and expression was evaluated in vitro byrhodamine-123 (Rho123) efflux assay in Caco-2 cells and Western blot analysis. Rat in situ single pass intestinal permeability model was used to investigate the clemastine effect on digoxin Peff, as a known P-gp substrate. Digoxin levels in intestinal perfusates were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Results: The Caco-2 intracellular accumulation of Rho123 in clemastine and verapamil treated cells was 90.8 ± 9.8 and 420.6±25.4 pg/mg protein, respectively which was significantly higher than that in control cells (50.2±6.0; P<0.05). Immunoblotting results indicated that clemastine decreased expression of P-gp in Caco-2 cells in vitro. More over effective intestinal permeability (Peff) of digoxin in the presence of clemastine, was significantly increased compare to control group. Conclusion: Findings of our study suggested dose dependent P-gp inhibition activity for clemastine in vitro and in situ. Therefore co-administration of clemastine with P-gp substrates may result in unwanted interactions and side effects. PMID:27279987

  12. Deactivation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Reverses Chemotherapeutics Resistance of Leukemia Cells via Down-Regulating P-gp

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xulong; Xiao, Weihua; Wang, Lihua; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by overexpression of p-glycoprotein is a major obstacle in chemotherapy of malignant cancer, which usually is characterized by constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), but their relation between MDR and STAT3 remains unclear. Here, we showed that STAT3 was overexpressed and highly activated in adriamycin-resistant K562/A02 cells compared with its parental K562 cells. Blockade of activation of STAT3 by STAT3 decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) promoted the accumulation and increased their sensitivity to adriamycin by down-regulating transcription of mdr1 and expression of P-gp, which were further confirmed by using STAT3-specific inhibitor JSI-124. Inhibition of STAT3 could also decrease mdr1 promoter mediated luciferase expression by using mdr1 promoter luciferase reporter construct. Otherwise, activation of STAT3 by STAT3C improved mdr1 transcription and P-gp expression. The ChIP results demonstrated that STAT3 could bind to the potential promoter region of mdr1, and STAT3 decoy depressed the binding. Further mutation assay show +64∼+72 region could be the STAT3 binding site. Our data demonstrate a role of STAT3 in regulation of mdr1 gene expression in myeloid leukemia and suggest that STAT3 may be a promising therapeutic target for overcoming MDR resistance in myeloid leukemia. PMID:21677772

  13. Reversing of multidrug resistance breast cancer by co-delivery of P-gp siRNA and doxorubicin via folic acid-modified core-shell nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Chunlong; Wu, Jianzhong; Tang, Jinhai

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of major limitation for the successful treatment of many cancers including breast cancer. Co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been developed because of its ability to generate synergistic anticancer effects via different mechanisms of action, to reverse MDR and increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy. Herein, we employed a kind of efficient multifunctional tumor targeted nanomicelles (PECL3) for the co-delivery of hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs and siRNA. This kind of nanomicelles were constructed by folic acid (FA)-decorated PEG-b-(PCL-g-PEI)-b-PCL triblock copolymers, which were synthesized through "click chemistry" and "ring opening" polymerization. Driven by the "core-shell" structure and the electrostatic interaction, this triblock copolymer could efficiently encapsulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp) siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The obtained nanomicelles can prevent renal clearance, RNase degradation and aggregation in circulation. Compared to the non-specific delivery, these FA functionalized nanomicelles could efficiently deliver P-gp siRNA to reducing both P-gp expression levels and IC50 value of the DOX in DOX-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR). Additionally, in vivo results showed that DOX loaded PECL3 (D-PECL3) micelles could reduce toxicity of DOX on nontarget tissues and significantly inhibited MCF-7/ADR tumor growth through encapsulating DOX in the micelles and deliver them to target tumor region. Taken together, these results proof that PECL3 micelles could co-deliver siRNA and drug to inhibit MDR tumor growth. These results suggested that the co-delivery of DOX and siRNA in tumor-targeting nanomicelles could excite synergistic effect of gene therapy and chemotherapy, thus can efficiently reverse MDR cancer and kill the cancer cells. PMID:26655793

  14. Expression and significance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and MDR1/P-glycoprotein in laryngeal carcinoma tissue and hypoxic Hep-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    XIE, JIN; LI, DA-WEI; CHEN, XIN-WEI; WANG, FEI; DONG, PIN

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and MDR1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissues, and also to investigate the regulation of MDR1 gene expression by HIF-1α in Hep-2 cells under hypoxic conditions. The expression of HIF-1α and MDR1/P-gp in human LSCC tissues was examined using immunohistochemistry. The HIF-1α and MDR1 gene expression in the Hep-2 cells was detected using real-time quantitative reverse transcription (QRT)-PCR and western blot analysis under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In hypoxia, HIF-1α expression was inhibited by RNA interference. HIF-1α and MDR1/P-gp expression was high in the LSCC tissues and was associated with the clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). HIF-1α expression was positively correlated with MDR1/P-gp expression (P<0.01). In the Hep-2 cells, HIF-1α and MDR1/P-gp expression significantly increased in response to hypoxia. The inhibition of HIF-1α expression synergistically downregulated the expression of the MDR1 gene in hypoxic Hep-2 cells. HIF-1α expression is positively correlated with MDR1/P-gp expression in LSCC, and the two proteins may be able to serve as potential biomarkers for predicting the malignant progression and metastasis of LSCC. HIF-1α may be critical for the upregulation of MDR1 gene expression induced by hypoxia in Hep-2 cells. PMID:23946810

  15. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  16. A study comparing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents versus enzyme (P-gp) inducers in the treatment of 2,4,6 trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Toklu, H Z; Kabasakal, L; Imeryuz, N; Kan, B; Celikel, C; Cetinel, S; Orun, O; Yuksel, M; Dulger, G A

    2013-08-01

    The intestinal microflora is an important cofactor in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation; and the epithelial cell barrier function is critical in providing protection against the stimulation of mucosal immune system by the microflora. In the present study, therapeutic role of the antibacterial drugs rifampicin and ciprofloxacine were investigated in comparison to spironolactone, an enzyme inducer, in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis of the rats. Drugs were administered for 14 days following induction of colitis. All drug treatments ameliorated the clinical hallmarks of colitis as determined by body weight loss and assessment of diarrhea, colon length, and histology. Oxidative damage and neutrophil infiltration as well as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expressions that were increased during colitis, were decreased significantly. Rifampicin and ciprofloxacin were probably effective due to their antibacterial and immunomodulating properties. The multidrug resistence gene (MDR1) and its product p-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, findings of the P-gp expression were inconclusive but regarding previous studies, it can be suggested that the beneficial effects of rifampicin and spironolactone may be partly due to their action as a P-gp ligand. Spironolactone has been reported to supress the transcription of proinflamatory cytokines that are considered to be of importance in immunoinflammatory diseases. It is also a powerful pregnane X receptor (PXR) inducer; thus, inhibition of the expression of NF-κB and TNF-α, and amelioration of inflammation by spironolactone suggest that this may have been through the activation of PXR. However, our findings regarding PXR expression were inconclusive. Activation of PXR by spironolactone probably also contributed to the induction of P-gp, resulting in extrusion of noxious substances

  17. Abraxane, the Nanoparticle Formulation of Paclitaxel Can Induce Drug Resistance by Up-Regulation of P-gp

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Xiangli; Ma, Huailei; Gong, He; Liu, Juan; Fang, Xiangdong; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) can actively pump paclitaxel (PTX) out of cells and induces drug resistance. Abraxane, a nanoparticle (NP) formulation of PTX, has multiple clinical advantages over the single molecule form. However, it is still unclear whether Abraxane overcomes the common small molecule drug resistance problem mediated by P-gp. Here we were able to establish an Abraxane-resistant cell line from the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. We compared the transcriptome of A549/Abr resistant cell line to that of its parental cell line using RNA-Seq technology. Several pathways were found to be up or down regulated. Specifically, the most significantly up-regulated gene was ABCB1, which translates into P-glycoprotein. We verified the overexpression of P-glycoprotein and confirmed its function by reversing the drug resistance with P-gp inhibitor Verapamil. The results suggest that efflux pathway plays an important role in the Abraxane-resistant cell line we established. However, the relevance of this P-gp mediated Abraxane resistance in tumors of lung cancer patients remains unknown. PMID:26182353

  18. Abraxane, the Nanoparticle Formulation of Paclitaxel Can Induce Drug Resistance by Up-Regulation of P-gp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minzhi; Lei, Chunni; Yang, Yadong; Bu, Xiangli; Ma, Huailei; Gong, He; Liu, Juan; Fang, Xiangdong; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) can actively pump paclitaxel (PTX) out of cells and induces drug resistance. Abraxane, a nanoparticle (NP) formulation of PTX, has multiple clinical advantages over the single molecule form. However, it is still unclear whether Abraxane overcomes the common small molecule drug resistance problem mediated by P-gp. Here we were able to establish an Abraxane-resistant cell line from the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. We compared the transcriptome of A549/Abr resistant cell line to that of its parental cell line using RNA-Seq technology. Several pathways were found to be up or down regulated. Specifically, the most significantly up-regulated gene was ABCB1, which translates into P-glycoprotein. We verified the overexpression of P-glycoprotein and confirmed its function by reversing the drug resistance with P-gp inhibitor Verapamil. The results suggest that efflux pathway plays an important role in the Abraxane-resistant cell line we established. However, the relevance of this P-gp mediated Abraxane resistance in tumors of lung cancer patients remains unknown. PMID:26182353

  19. Does the Clearance of Inhaled (99m)Tc-Sestamibi Correlate with Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 Expression in the Human Lung?

    PubMed

    Mohan, Hosahalli K; Routledge, Thomas; Cane, Paul; Livieratos, Lefteris; Ballinger, James R; Peters, Adrien M

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To examine the relation between the lung elimination rate of inhaled technetium 99m ((99m)Tc)-sestamibi and immunohistochemical expression of bronchopulmonary multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and assess the repeatability of the inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi clearance technique. Materials and Methods (99m)Tc-sestamibi is a known substrate for P-gp and MRP1, which are established cellular drug efflux transporters. The elimination rate of (99m)Tc-sestamibi from the lungs after inhalation as an aerosol has been hypothesized to be regulated by expression of these transporters. Institutional ethics committee approval was received for this prospective study. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The clearance of inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi from the lungs of 13 patients due to undergo surgery for primary lung cancer (five of 13) or spontaneous pneumothorax (eight of 13) was estimated after dynamic imaging of the lungs during a period of 40 minutes. The time taken to clear 50% of inhaled sestamibi (T1/2) was compared with a semiquantitative immunohistochemical assessment (grade 0-3) of MRP1 and P-gp expression in the lung by using parametric and nonparametric tests. The study was repeated in five participants to assess the repeatability of the technique by using a Bland Altman analysis method. Results MRP1 expression was seen in 12 of 13 patients, while P-gp expression was seen in only two. The mean (99m)Tc-sestamibi elimination rate was faster in patients (n = 6) with low levels of MRP1 expression (grade 0-1) and mean T1/2 of 105 minutes ± 20 (standard deviation), compared with those with higher levels of MRP1 expression (grade 2-3, n = 7) and mean T1/2 of 149 minutes ± 28 (P = .008). Bland-Altman analysis revealed excellent agreement between test and retest values. Conclusion Inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi clearance study is a repeatable technique demonstrating significant correlation with MRP1 expression in

  20. Forced expression of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) reverses P-glycoprotein (ABCB1)-mediated drug efflux and MDR1 gene expression in Adriamycin-resistant human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kanagasabai, Ragu; Krishnamurthy, Karthikeyan; Druhan, Lawrence J; Ilangovan, Govindasamy

    2011-09-23

    Mutant p53 accumulation has been shown to induce the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1) and ATP binding cassette (ABC)-based drug efflux in human breast cancer cells. In the present work, we have found that transcriptional activation of the oxidative stress-responsive heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and expression of heat shock proteins, including Hsp27, which is normally known to augment proteasomal p53 degradation, are inhibited in Adriamycin (doxorubicin)-resistant MCF-7 cells (MCF-7/adr). Such an endogenous inhibition of HSF-1 and Hsp27 in turn results in p53 mutation with gain of function in its transcriptional activity and accumulation in MCF-7/adr. Also, lack of HSF-1 enhances nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity together with mutant p53 and induces MDR1 gene and P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), resulting in a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Ectopic expression of Hsp27, however, significantly depleted both mutant p53 and NF-κB (p65), reversed the drug resistance by inhibiting MDR1/P-gp expression in MCF-7/adr cells, and induced cell death by increased G(2)/M population and apoptosis. We conclude from these results that HSF-1 inhibition and depletion of Hsp27 is a trigger, at least in part, for the accumulation of transcriptionally active mutant p53, which can either directly or NF-κB-dependently induce an MDR1/P-gp phenotype in MCF-7 cells. Upon Hsp27 overexpression, this pathway is abrogated, and the acquired multidrug resistance is significantly abolished so that MCF-7/adr cells are sensitized to Dox. Thus, clinical alteration in Hsp27 or NF-κB level will be a potential approach to circumvent drug resistance in breast cancer. PMID:21784846

  1. Nanolipoparticles-mediated MDR1 siRNA delivery reduces doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer cells and silences MDR1 expression in xenograft model of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nourbakhsh, Mahnaz; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Lage, Hermann; Abnous, Khalil; mosaffa, Fatemeh; Badiee, Ali; Behravan, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an efflux protein, the overexpression of which has been associated with multidrug resistance in various cancers. Although siRNA delivery to reverse P-gp expression may be promising for sensitizing of tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs, the therapeutic use of siRNA requires effective carriers that can deliver siRNA intracellularly with minimal toxicity on target cells. We investigated a special class of PEGylated lipid-based nanoparticles (NP), named nanolipoparticles (NLPs), for siRNA-mediated P-gp downregulation. Materials and Methods: NLPs were prepared based on low detergent dialysis method. After characterization, we evaluated the effect of NLPs on siRNA delivery, and P-gp downregulation compared to oligofectamine™ (OFA) in vitro and in vivo. Results: Our results showed a significant decrease in P-gp expression and subsequent enhancement of chemosensitivity to doxorubicin in vitro. Although the effectiveness of NLPs for in vitro siRNA delivery compared to OFA was limited, the results of in vivo studies showed noticeable effectiveness of NLPs for systemic siRNA delivery. siRNA delivery using NLPs could downregulate MDR1 in tumor cells more than 80%, while OFA had a reverse effect on MDR1 expression in vivo. Conclusion: The results indicated that the prepared NLPs could be suitable siRNA delivery systems for tumor therapy. PMID:26019802

  2. 4,5-Di-substituted benzyl-imidazol-2-substituted amines as the structure template for the design and synthesis of reversal agents against P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wong, Iris L K; Wan, Shengbiao; Chow, Larry M C; Jiang, Tao

    2014-08-18

    Over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a primary multidrug transporter which is located in plasma membranes, plays a major role in the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Naamidines are a class of marine imidazole alkaloids isolated from Leucetta and Clathrina sponges, possessing a Y-shaped scaffold. Based on the results previously obtained from the third-generation MDR modulator ONT-093 and other modulators developed in our group, we designed and synthesized a series of novel 4,5-di-substituted benzyl-1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-substituted amines using the Naamidine scaffold as the structure template. Subsequently, their reversing activity for Taxol resistance has been evaluated in P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance breast cancer cell line MDA435/LCC6MDR. Compounds 12c with a Y-shaped scaffold, and compound 17c which is 'X-shaped' scaffold and possesses a 4-diethylamino group at aryl ring B, turned out to be the most potent P-gp modulators. It appears that compounds 12c and 17c at 1 μM concentration can sensitize LCC6MDR cells toward Taxol by 26.4 and 24.5 folds, with an EC50 212.5 and 210.5 nM, respectively. These two compounds are about 5-6 folds more potent than verapamil (RF = 4.5). Moreover, compounds 12c and 17c did not exhibit obvious cytotoxicity in either cancer cell lines or normal mouse fibroblast cell lines. This study has demonstrated that the synthetic Naamidine analogues can be potentially employed as effective, safe modulators for the P-gp-mediated drug resistance cancer cells. PMID:24952376

  3. In Silico Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Studies on P-gp Modulators of Tetrahydroisoquinoline-Ethyl-Phenylamine Series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. The drug efflux by a transport protein is the main reason for MDR. In humans, MDR mainly occurs when the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of proteins is overexpressed simultaneously. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is most commonly associated with human MDR; it utilizes energy from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to transport a number of substrates out of cells against concentration gradients. By the active transport of substrates against concentration gradients, intracellular concentrations of substrates are decreased. This leads to the cause of failure in cancer chemotherapy. Results Herein, we report Topomer CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) and HQSAR (Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) models for third generation MDR modulators. The Topomer CoMFA model showed good correlation between the actual and predicted values for training set molecules. The developed model showed cross validated correlation coefficient (q2) = 0.536 and non-cross validated correlation coefficient (r2) = 0.975 with eight components. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.777, r2 = 0.956) with 5-8 atom counts was used to predict the activity of test set compounds. Both models were validated using test set compounds, and gave a good predictive values of 0.604 and 0.730. Conclusions The contour map near R1 indicates that substitution of a bulkier and polar group to the ortho position of the benzene ring enhances the inhibitory effect. This explains why compounds with a nitro group have good inhibitory potency. Molecular fragment analyses shed light on some essential structural and topological features of third generation MDR modulators. Fragments analysis showed that the presence of tertiary nitrogen, a central phenyl ring and an aromatic dimethoxy group contributed to the inhibitory effect. Based on contour map information and fragment information, five new molecules with variable R1 substituents were

  4. Induction of multidrug resistance downregulates the expression of CFTR in colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Breuer, W; Slotki, I N; Ausiello, D A; Cabantchik, I Z

    1993-12-01

    The epithelial cell line HT-29, which constitutively expresses the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), was induced to become drug resistant by cultivation in the presence of colchicine. The gradual acquisition of drug resistance was associated with a corresponding increase in the expression of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and a marked (> 80%) decrease in the constitutive levels of CFTR protein, as determined by immunoblotting. The reduction in CFTR content occurred at the onset of acquisition of drug resistance when P-gp expression was still relatively low. Reversal of drug resistance by removal of colchicine from the culture medium led to a 70% decrease in P-gp levels and a concomitant 40% increase in CFTR. The levels of other membrane proteins such as Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase remained relatively constant (< 26% variation). We propose that a selective downregulation of CFTR is elicited by acquisition of the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype and that induction of P-gp expression leads to a reversible repression of CFTR biosynthesis. These findings provide an experimental foundation for the complementary patterns of expression of the CFTR and MDR1 genes observed in vivo. PMID:7506492

  5. Influence of overexpression of efflux proteins on the function and gene expression of endogenous peptide transporters in MDR-transfected MDCKII cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiying; Pal, Dhananjay; Patel, Ashaben; Kwatra, Deep; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-30

    The objective of this study is to delineate whether overexpression of human efflux transporters (P-gp, MRP2, and BCRP) in transfected MDCK cells affect the functional activities, and gene and protein expression of endogenous influx peptide transporter system (PepT). Real-time PCR, immunoblotting, uptake and permeability studies of [(3)H]Gly-Sar were conducted on transfected MDCKII and wild-type cells to investigate functional differences. Cellular [(3)H]Gly-Sar accumulation was significantly lower in transfected MDCKII cell lines compared to wild-type cells. Transport efficiency of apical peptide transporters was markedly reduced to around 25%, 30%, and 40% in P-gp-, MRP2-, and BCRP-overexpressed MDCK cell lines, respectively. With ascending cell-passage, transport efficiency was enhanced. A significantly higher Gly-Sar permeability was observed across parental cell-monolayers over transfected cells at all pHs. Levels of mRNA for both canine PepT1 and PepT2 were substantially reduced when efflux transporters overexpressed but enhanced when mRNA-levels of efflux genes diminished with ascending cell-passage of transfected cells. An inverse correlation was evident between endogenous PepT and exogenous efflux transporters in transfected MDCKII cells. Results of protein expression also supported these findings. Overexpression of MDR genes can affect endogenous PepT function which might be due to the phenomenon of transporter-compensation resulting in down-regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:23262422

  6. Influence of overexpression of efflux proteins on the function and gene expression of endogenous peptide transporters in MDR-transfected MDCKII cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiying; Pal, Dhananjay; Patel, Ashaben; Kwatra, Deep; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to delineate whether overexpression of human efflux transporters (P-gp, MRP2, and BCRP) in transfected MDCK cells affect the functional activities, and gene and protein expression of endogenous influx peptide transporter system (PepT). Real-time PCR, immunoblotting, uptake and permeability studies of [3H]Gly-Sar were conducted on transfected MDCKII and wild-type cells to investigate functional differences. Cellular [3H]Gly-Sar accumulation was significantly lower in transfected MDCKII cell lines compared to wild-type cells. Transport efficiency of apical peptide transporters was markedly reduced to around 25%, 30%, and 40% in P-gp-, MRP2-, and BCRP-overexpressed MDCK cell lines, respectively. With ascending cell-passage, transport efficiency was enhanced. A significantly higher Gly-Sar permeability was observed across parental cell-monolayers over transfected cells at all pHs. Levels of mRNA for both canine PepT1 and PepT2 were substantially reduced when efflux transporters overexpressed but enhanced when mRNA-levels of efflux genes diminished with ascending cell-passage of transfected cells. An inverse correlation was evident between endogenous PepT and exogenous efflux transporters in transfected MDCKII cells. Results of protein expression also supported these findings. Overexpression of MDR genes can affect endogenous PepT function which might be due to the phenomenon of transporter-compensation resulting in down-regulation of endogenous genes. PMID:23262422

  7. Immunocytochemical detection of the multidrug resistance-associated protein and P-glycoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia: impact of antibodies, sample source and disease status.

    PubMed

    Filipits, M; Suchomel, R W; Lechner, K; Pirker, R

    1997-07-01

    Immunocytochemical detection of the expression of the MRP gene and the MDR1 gene in clinical specimens might be affected by several factors. Thus, we studied the impact of monoclonal antibodies, sample source (peripheral blood vs bone marrow) and disease status on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in leukemic cells of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MRP expression was determined by means of anti-MRP antibodies (QCRL-1, QCRL-3, QCRL-1/QCRL-3 or MRPr1). In the case of P-gp, monoclonal antibodies C219 and MRK16 were used. High MRP expression ranged from 5 to 35% and high P-gp expression from 5 to 14% of the specimens. A fair correlation between results obtained with QCRL-1/QCRL-3 and those obtained with MRPr1, as well as a moderate correlation between C219 and MRK16, were seen. MRP and P-gp expression of peripheral blood blasts were similar to those of bone marrow blasts in the majority of cases. The degrees of MRP expression at the time of diagnosis were also similar to the degrees of expression at relapse, albeit an analysis of sequential MRP expression in 13 patients indicated an increase of expression at relapse in six patients as compared to the time of diagnosis. PMID:9204994

  8. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  9. Protein identification and Peptide expression resolver: harmonizing protein identification with protein expression data.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Paul; Butler, Heather; Eng, Kevin; Hugo, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Proteomic discovery platforms generate both peptide expression information and protein identification information. Peptide expression data are used to determine which peptides are differentially expressed between study cohorts, and then these peptides are targeted for protein identification. In this paper, we demonstrate that peptide expression information is also a powerful tool for enhancing confidence in protein identification results. Specifically, we evaluate the following hypothesis: tryptic peptides originating from the same protein have similar expression profiles across samples in the discovery study. Evidence supporting this hypothesis is provided. This hypothesis is integrated into a protein identification tool, PIPER (Protein Identification and Peptide Expression Resolver), that reduces erroneous protein identifications below 5%. PIPER's utility is illustrated by application to a 72-sample biomarker discovery study where it is demonstrated that false positive protein identifications can be reduced below 5%. Consequently, it is recommended that PIPER methodology be incorporated into proteomic studies where both protein expression and identification data are collected. PMID:18062667

  10. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  11. N-alkylated isatins evade P-gp mediated efflux and retain potency in MDR cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vine, Kara L; Belfiore, Lisa; Jones, Luke; Locke, Julie M; Wade, Samantha; Minaei, Elahe; Ranson, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel anticancer therapeutics with the ability to overcome multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms is of high priority. A class of molecules that show potential in overcoming MDR are the N-alkylated isatins. In particular 5,7-dibromo-N-alkylisatins are potent microtubule destabilizing agents that act to depolymerize microtubules, induce apoptosis and inhibit primary tumor growth in vivo. In this study we evaluated the ability of four dibrominated N-alkylisatin derivatives and the parent compound, 5,7-dibromoisatin, to circumvent MDR. All of the isatin-based compounds examined retained potency against the MDR cell lines; U937VbR and MES-SA/Dx5 and displayed bioequivalent dose-dependent cytotoxicity to that of the parental control cell lines. We show that one mechanism by which the isatin-based compounds overcome MDR is by circumventing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated drug efflux. Thus, as the isatin-based compounds are not susceptible to extrusion from P-gp overexpressing tumor cells, they represent a promising alternative strategy as a stand-alone or combination therapy for treating MDR cancer. PMID:27441242

  12. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Genistein in a Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line: Impact on Sorafenib Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Arias, Agostina; Ceballos, María Paula; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Luquita, Marcelo Gabriel; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Ghanem, Carolina Inés; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, María Laura

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide. Sorafenib is the only drug available that improves the overall survival of HCC patients. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 and 3) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are efflux pumps that play a key role in cancer chemoresistance. Their modulation by dietary compounds may affect the intracellular accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are substrates of these transporters. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen abundant in soybean that exerts its genomic effects through Estrogen-Receptors and Pregnane-X-Receptor (PXR), which are involved in the regulation of the above-mentioned transporters. We evaluated the effect of GNT on the expression and activity of P-gp, MRP2, MRP3 and BCRP in HCC-derived HepG2 cells. GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) increased P-gp and MRP2 protein expression and activity, correlating well with an increased resistance to sorafenib cytotoxicity as detected by the methylthiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assay. GNT induced P-gp and MRP2 mRNA expression at 10 but not at 1.0 μM concentration suggesting a different pattern of regulation depending on the concentration. Induction of both transporters by 1.0 μM GNT was prevented by cycloheximide, suggesting translational regulation. Downregulation of expression of the miR-379 by GNT could be associated with translational regulation of MRP2. Silencing of PXR abolished P-gp induction by GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) and MRP2 induction by GNT (only at 10 μM), suggesting partial mediation of GNT effects by PXR. Taken together, the data suggest the possibility of nutrient-drug interactions leading to enhanced chemoresistance in HCC when GNT is ingested with soy rich diets or dietary supplements. PMID:25781341

  13. [11C]phenytoin revisited: synthesis by [11C]CO carbonylation and first evaluation as a P-gp tracer in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background At present, several positron emission tomography (PET) tracers are in use for imaging P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function in man. At baseline, substrate tracers such as R-[11C]verapamil display low brain concentrations with a distribution volume of around 1. [11C]phenytoin is supposed to be a weaker P-gp substrate, which may lead to higher brain concentrations at baseline. This could facilitate assessment of P-gp function when P-gp is upregulated. The purpose of this study was to synthesize [11C]phenytoin and to characterize its properties as a P-gp tracer. Methods [11C]CO was used to synthesize [11C]phenytoin by rhodium-mediated carbonylation. Metabolism and, using PET, brain pharmacokinetics of [11C]phenytoin were studied in rats. Effects of P-gp function on [11C]phenytoin uptake were assessed using predosing with tariquidar. Results [11C]phenytoin was synthesized via [11C]CO in an overall decay-corrected yield of 22 ± 4%. At 45 min after administration, 19% and 83% of radioactivity represented intact [11C]phenytoin in the plasma and brain, respectively. Compared with baseline, tariquidar predosing resulted in a 45% increase in the cerebral distribution volume of [11C]phenytoin. Conclusions Using [11C]CO, the radiosynthesis of [11C]phenytoin could be improved. [11C]phenytoin appeared to be a rather weak P-gp substrate. PMID:22747744

  14. miR200c attenuates P-gp-mediated MDR and metastasis by targeting JNK2/c-Jun signaling pathway in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hua; Cai, Guo-Xiang; Pan, Shu-Fang; Deng, Wan-Li; Wang, Yu-Wei; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Cai, San-Jun; Zhu, Hui-Rong; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNA-200c (miR200c) recently emerged as an important regulator of tumorigenicity and cancer metastasis; however, its role in regulating multidrug resistance (MDR) remains unknown. In the current study, we found that the expression levels of miR200c in recurrent and metastatic colorectal cancers were significantly lower, whereas the JNK2 expression was higher compared with primary tumors. We showed that in MDR colorectal cancer cells, miR200c targeted the 3' untranslated region of the JNK2 gene. Overexpression of miR200c attenuated the levels of p-JNK, p-c-Jun, P-gp, and MMP-2/-9, the downstream factors of the JNK signaling pathway, resulting in increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, which was accompanied by heightened apoptosis and decreased cell invasion and migration. Moreover, in an orthotopic MDR colorectal cancer mouse model, we demonstrated that overexpression of miR200c effectively inhibited the tumor growth and metastasis. At last, in the tumor samples from patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer with routine postsurgical chemotherapy, we observed an inverse correlation between the levels of mRNA expression of miR200c and JNK2, ABCB1, and MMP-9, thus predicting patient therapeutic outcomes. In summary, we found that miR200c negatively regulated the expression of JNK2 gene and increased the sensitivity of MDR colorectal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, via inhibiting the JNK2/p-JNK/p-c-Jun/ABCB1 signaling. Restoration of miR200c expression in MDR colorectal cancer may serve as a promising therapeutic approach in MDR-induced metastasis. PMID:25205654

  15. Reduced ABCB1 Expression and Activity in the Presence of Acrylic Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Ramin; Baradaran, Behzad; Valizadeh, Hadi; Yousefi, Bahman; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1), an integral membrane protein in the apical surface of human intestinal epithelial cells, plays a crucial role in the intestinal transport and efflux leading to changes in the bioavailability of oral pharmaceutical compounds. This study was set to examine the potential effects of three Eudragits RL100, S100 and L100 on the intestinal epithelial membrane transport of rhodammine-123 (Rho-123), a substrate of P-gp using a monolayer of human colon cancer cell line (Caco-2). Methods: The least non-cytotoxic concentrations of the excipients were assessed in Caco-2 cells by the MTT assay. Then the transepithelial transport of Rho-123 across Caco-2 monolayers was determined with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Besides, the expression of the P-gp in cells exposed to the polymers was demonstrated using Western-blotting analysis. Results: Treatment of cells with Eudragit RL100 and L100 led to a very slight change while Eudragit S100 showed 61% increase in Rho-123 accumulation (P<0.001) and also reduced transporter expression. Conclusion: Our studies suggest that using proper concentrations of the Eudragit S100 in drug formulation would improve intestinal permeability and absorption of p-gp substrate drugs. PMID:24754004

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of [N-methyl-11C]N-Desmethyl-loperamide as a New and Improved PET Radiotracer for Imaging P-gp Function

    PubMed Central

    Lazarova, Neva; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Hong, Jinsoo; Seneca, Nicholas; Tuan, Ed; Gladding, Robert L.; Liow, Jeih-San; Taku, Andrew; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    [11C]Loperamide has been proposed for imaging P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function with positron emission tomography (PET), but its metabolism to [N-methyl-11C]N-desmethyl-loperamide ([11C]dLop; [11C]3) precludes quantification. We considered that [11C]3 might itself be a superior radiotracer for imaging brain P-gp function and therefore aimed to prepare [11C]3 and characterize its efficacy. An amide precursor (2) was synthesized and methylated with [11C]iodomethane to give [11C]3. After administration of [11C]3 to wild type mice, brain radioactivity uptake was very low. In P-gp (mdr-1a (−/−)) knockout mice, brain uptake of radioactivity at 30 min increased about 3.5 fold by PET measures, and over seven-fold by ex vivo measures. In knockout mice, brain radioactivity was predominantly (90%) unchanged radiotracer. In monkey PET experiments, brain radioactivity uptake was also very low, but after P-gp blockade increased more than seven-fold. [11C]3 is an effective new radiotracer for imaging brain P-gp function and, in favor of future successful quantification, appears free of extensive brain-penetrant radiometabolites. PMID:18783208

  17. B4GALT family mediates the multidrug resistance of human leukemia cells by regulating the hedgehog pathway and the expression of p-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H; Ma, H; Wei, W; Ji, D; Song, X; Sun, J; Zhang, J; Jia, L

    2013-01-01

    β-1, 4-Galactosyltransferase gene (B4GALT) family consists of seven members, which encode corresponding enzymes known as type II membrane-bound glycoproteins. These enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of different glycoconjugates and saccharide structures, and have been recognized to be involved in various diseases. In this study, we sought to determine the expressional profiles of B4GALT family in four pairs of parental and chemoresistant human leukemia cell lines and in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) of leukemia patients with multidrug resistance (MDR). The results revealed that B4GALT1 and B4GALT5 were highly expressed in four MDR cells and patients, altered levels of B4GALT1 and B4GALT5 were responsible for changed drug-resistant phenotype of HL60 and HL60/adriamycin-resistant cells. Further data showed that manipulation of these two gene expression led to increased or decreased activity of hedgehog (Hh) signaling and proportionally mutative expression of p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR-associated protein 1 (MRP1) that are both known to be related to MDR. Thus, we propose that B4GALT1 and B4GALT5, two members of B4GALT gene family, are involved in the development of MDR of human leukemia cells, probably by regulating the activity of Hh signaling and the expression of P-gp and MRP1. PMID:23744354

  18. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  19. High Levels of Expression of P-glycoprotein/Multidrug Resistance Protein Result in Resistance to Vintafolide.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Amy D; O'Neil, Jennifer; Stoeck, Alexander; Reddy, Joseph A; Cristescu, Razvan; Haines, Brian B; Hinton, Marlene C; Dorton, Ryan; Bloomfield, Alicia; Nelson, Melissa; Vetzel, Marilynn; Lejnine, Serguei; Nebozhyn, Michael; Zhang, Theresa; Loboda, Andrey; Picard, Kristen L; Schmidt, Emmett V; Dussault, Isabelle; Leamon, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Targeting surface receptors overexpressed on cancer cells is one way to specifically treat cancer versus normal cells. Vintafolide (EC145), which consists of folate linked to a cytotoxic small molecule, desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH), takes advantage of the overexpression of folate receptor (FR) on cancer cells. Once bound to FR, vintafolide enters the cell by endocytosis, and the reducing environment of the endosome cleaves the linker, releasing DAVLBH to destabilize microtubules. Vintafolide has shown efficacy and improved tolerability compared with DAVLBH in FR-positive preclinical models. As the first FR-targeting drug to reach the clinic, vintafolide has achieved favorable responses in phase II clinical trials in FR-positive ovarian and lung cancer. However, some FR-positive patients in these clinical trials do not respond to vintafolide. We sought to identify potential biomarkers of resistance to aid in the future development of this and other FR-targeting drugs. Here, we confirm that high P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression was the strongest predictor of resistance to DAVLBH in a panel of 359 cancer cell lines. Furthermore, targeted delivery of DAVLBH via the FR, as in vintafolide, fails to overcome P-gp-mediated efflux of DAVLBH in both in vitro and in vivo preclinical models. Therefore, we suggest that patients whose tumors express high levels of P-gp be excluded from future clinical trials for vintafolide as well as other FR-targeted therapeutics bearing a P-gp substrate. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1998-2008. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27256377

  20. Modulation of CYPs, P-gp, and PXR by Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy) and Its Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Manda, Vamshi K; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Dale, Olivia R; Kumarihamy, Mallika; Cutler, Stephen J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Muhammad, Ilias; Khan, Shabana I

    2016-04-01

    Eschscholzia californica, a native US plant, is traditionally used as a sedative, analgesic, and anxiolytic herb. With the rapid rise in the use of herbal supplements together with over-the-counter and prescription drugs, the risk for potential herb-drug interactions is also increasing. Most of the clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions occur due to modulation of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs), P-glycoprotein, and the pregnane X receptor by concomitantly used herbs. This study aimed to determine the effects of an EtOH extract, aqueous extract (tea), basic CHCl3 fractions, and isolated major alkaloids, namely protopine (1), escholtzine (2), allocryptopine (3), and californidine (4), of E. californica on the activity of cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein and the pregnane X receptor. The EtOH extract and fractions showed strong time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19, and reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6. Among the alkaloids, escholtzine (2) and allocryptopine (3) exhibited time-dependent inhibition of CYP 3A4, CYP 2C9, and CYP 2C19 (IC50 shift ratio > 2), while protopine (1) and allocryptopine (3) showed reversible inhibition of CYP 2D6 enzyme. A significant activation of the pregnane X receptor (> 2-fold) was observed with the EtOH extract, basic CHCl3 fraction, and alkaloids (except protopine), which resulted into an increased expression of mRNA and the activity of CYP 3A4 and CYP 1A2. The expression of P-glycoprotein was unaffected. However, aqueous extract (tea) and its main alkaloid californidine (4) did not affect cytochrome P450s, P-glycoprotein, or the pregnane X receptor. This data suggests that EtOH extract of E. californica and its major alkaloids have a potential of causing interactions with drugs that are metabolized by cytochrome P450s, while the tea seems to be safer. PMID:27054913

  1. Predictable tuning of protein expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Mads T; Pedersen, Margit; Klausen, Michael S; Jensen, Sheila I; Wulff, Tune; Harrison, Scott; Nielsen, Alex T; Herrgård, Markus J; Sommer, Morten O A

    2016-03-01

    We comprehensively assessed the contribution of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence to protein expression and used the data to develop EMOPEC (Empirical Model and Oligos for Protein Expression Changes; http://emopec.biosustain.dtu.dk). EMOPEC is a free tool that makes it possible to modulate the expression level of any Escherichia coli gene by changing only a few bases. Measured protein levels for 91% of our designed sequences were within twofold of the desired target level. PMID:26752768

  2. Overcoming multidrug resistance in Dox-resistant neuroblastoma cell lines via treatment with HPMA copolymer conjugates containing anthracyclines and P-gp inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Koziolová, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Cuchalová, Lucie; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Hraběta, Jan; Eckschlager, Tomáš; Sivák, Ladislav; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš; Šubr, Vladimír

    2016-07-10

    Water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer conjugates bearing the anticancer drugs doxorubicin (Dox) or pirarubicin (THP), P-gp inhibitors derived from reversin 121 (REV) or ritonavir (RIT)), or both anticancer drug and P-gp inhibitor were designed and synthesized. All biologically active molecules were attached to the polymer carrier via pH-sensitive spacer enabling controlled release in mild acidic environment modeling endosomes and lysosomes of tumor cells. The cytotoxicity of the conjugates against three sensitive and Dox-resistant neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines, applied alone or in combination, was studied in vitro. All conjugates containing THP displayed higher cytotoxicity against all three Dox-resistant NB cell lines compared with the corresponding Dox-containing conjugates. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of conjugates containing both drug and P-gp inhibitor was up to 10 times higher than that of the conjugate containing only drug. In general, the polymer-drug conjugates showed higher cytotoxicity when conjugates containing inhibitors were added 8 or 16h prior to treatment compared with conjugates bearing both the inhibitor and the drug. The difference in cytotoxicity was more pronounced at the 16-h time point. Moreover, higher inhibitor:drug ratios resulted in higher cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of the polymer-drug used in combination with polymer P-gp inhibitor was up to 84 times higher than that of the polymer-drug alone. PMID:27189135

  3. Synthesis of methylated quercetin derivatives and their reversal activities on P-gp- and BCRP-mediated multidrug resistance tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian; Wong, Iris L K; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Si Wen; Liu, Tao; Wen, Bin Jin; Chow, Larry M C; Wan Sheng, Biao

    2012-08-01

    Three methylated quercetins and a series of O-3 substituted 5,7,3',4'-tetra-O-methylated quercetin derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated on the modulating activity of P-gp, BCRP and MRP1 in cancer cell lines. Compound 17 (with a 2-((4-methoxybenzoyl)oxy)ethyl at O-3) is the most potent P-gp modulator. Three derivatives, compound 9 (3,7,3',4'-tetra-O-methylated quercetin), compound 14 (with a 2-((3-oxo-3-(3,4,5trimethoxyphenyl)prop-1-en-1-yl)oxy)ethyl at O-3) and compound 17, consistently exhibited promising BCRP-modulating activity. Interestingly, compound 17 was found to be equipotent against both P-gp and BCRP. Importantly, these synthetic quercetin derivatives did not exhibit any inherent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines or normal mouse fibroblast cell lines. These quercetin derivatives can be employed as safe and effective modulators of P-gp- or BCRP-mediated drug resistance in cancer. PMID:22743241

  4. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  5. Expression and purification of GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Harper, S; Speicher, D W

    2001-05-01

    An increasingly common strategy for expressing proteins and large peptides in prokaryotic systems is to express the protein of interest connected to a "tag" that provides the basis for rapid high-affinity purification. This unit describes the expression and purification of fusion proteins containing the 26-kDa glutathione-S-transferase protein as well as methods for cleaving the affinity tag and repurifying the target protein. Advantages of this popular fusion protein system include high protein yields, high-affinity one-step protein purification of the fusion protein, existence of several alternative protease cleavage sites for removing the affinity tag when required, and ease of removal of the cleaved affinity tag. PMID:18429193

  6. P-gp, MRP2 and OAT1/OAT3 mediate the drug-drug interaction between resveratrol and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yongming; Liu, Zhihao; Wang, Changyuan; Meng, Qiang; Huo, Xiaokui; Liu, Qi; Sun, Huijun; Sun, Pengyuan; Yang, Xiaobo; Ma, Xiaodong; Liu, Kexin

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of present study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol (Res) on altering methotrexate (MTX) pharmacokinetics and clarify the related molecular mechanism. Res significantly increased rat intestinal absorption of MTX in vivo and in vitro. Simultaneously, Res inhibited MTX efflux transport in MDR1-MDCK and MRP2-MDCK cell monolayers, suggesting that the target of drug interaction was MDR1 and MRP2 in the intestine during the absorption process. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in renal clearance of MTX after simultaneous intravenous administration. Similarly, MTX uptake was markedly inhibited by Res in rat kidney slices and hOAT1/3-HEK293 cell, indicating that OAT1 and OAT3 were involved in the drug interaction in the kidney. Additionally, concomitant administration of Res decreased cytotoxic effects of MTX in hOAT1/3-HEK293 cells, and ameliorated nephrotoxicity caused by MTX in rats. Conversely, intestinal damage caused by MTX was not exacerbated after Res treatment. In conclusion, Res enhanced MTX absorption in intestine and decreased MTX renal elimination by inhibiting P-gp, MRP2, OAT1 and OAT3 in vivo and in vitro. Res improved MTX-induced renal damage without increasing intestinal toxicity. PMID:27377006

  7. Comb-like amphiphilic polypeptide-based copolymer nanomicelles for co-delivery of doxorubicin and P-gp siRNA into MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Suo, Aili; Qian, Junmin; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Rongrong; Xu, Weijun; Wang, Hejing

    2016-05-01

    A comb-like amphiphilic copolymer methoxypolyethylene glycol-graft-poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-phenylalanine) (mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe) was successfully synthesized. To synthesize mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe, diblock copolymer PLL-b-Phe was first synthesized by successive ring-opening polymerization of α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides followed by the removal of benzyloxycarbonyl protecting groups, and then mPEG was grafted onto PLL-b-Phe by reductive amination via Schiff's base formation. The chemical structures of the copolymers were identified by (1)H NMR. mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe copolymer had a critical micelle concentration of 6.0mg/L and could self-assemble in an aqueous solution into multicompartment nanomicelles with a mean diameter of approximately 78 nm. The nanomicelles could encapsulate doxorubicin (DOX) through hydrophobic and π-π stacking interactions between DOX molecules and Phe blocks and simultaneously complex P-gp siRNA with cationic PLL blocks via electrostatic interactions. The DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles showed spherical morphology, possessed narrow particle size distribution and had a mean particle size of 120 nm. The DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles exhibited pH-responsive release behaviors and displayed accelerated release under acidic conditions. The DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles were efficiently internalized into MCF-7 cells, and DOX released could successfully reach nuclei. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the DOX/P-gp siRNA-loaded nanomicelles showed a much higher cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells than DOX-loaded nanomicelles due to their synergistic killing effect and that the blank nanomicelles had good biocompatibility. Thus, the novel comb-like mPEG-g-PLL-b-Phe nanomicelles could be a promising vehicle for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drug and genetic material. PMID:26952460

  8. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  9. IF7-Conjugated Nanoparticles Target Annexin 1 of Tumor Vasculature against P-gp Mediated Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Hong; Liu, Ya-Rong; Luan, Xin; Liu, Hai-Jun; Gao, Yun-Ge; Wu, Hao; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2015-08-19

    Multidrug resistance is the main cause of clinical chemotherapeutic failure. Antiangiogenic cancer therapy with nanomedicine that allows the targeted delivery of antiangiogenic agents to tumor endothelial cells may contribute to innovative strategies for treating multidrug-resistant cancers. In this study, we developed a new nanodrug delivery system (nano-DDS), with improved antiangiogenic efficacy against multidrug resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells. Here, the IF7 ligand was a peptide designed to bind the annexin 1 (Anxa 1), a highly specific marker of the tumor vasculature surface, with high affinity and specificity. IF7-conjugated Anxa 1-targeting nanoparticles containing paclitaxel (IF7-PTX-NP) allowed controlled drug release and displayed favorable prolonged circulation in vivo. IF7-PTX-NP was significantly internalized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) through the IF7-Anxa 1 interaction, and this facilitated uptake enhanced the expected antiangiogenic activity of inhibiting HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation in a Matrigel plug relative to those of Taxol and PTX-NP. As IF7-PTX-NP targeted the tumor vessels, more nanoparticles accumulated in MCF-7/ADR tumors, and more importantly, induced significant apoptosis of the tumor vascular endothelial cells and necrosis of the tumor tissues. Low dose paclitaxel (1 mg/kg) formulated in IF7-PTX-NP showed significant anticancer efficacy, delaying the growth of MCF-7/ADR tumors. The same efficacy was only obtained with an 8-fold dose of paclitaxel (8 mg/kg) as Taxol plus XR9576, a potent P-gp inhibitor. The anticancer efficacy of IF7-PTX-NP was strongly associated with the improved antiangiogenic effect, evident as a dramatic reduction in the tumor microvessel density and pronounced increase in apoptotic tumor cells, with no obvious toxicity to the mice. This nano-DDS, which targets the tumor neovasculature, offers a promising strategy for the treatment of multidrug

  10. An isoquinoline alkaloid from the Chinese herbal plant Corydalis yanhusuo W.T. Wang inhibits P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associate protein 1.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Tan, Juan; Wink, Michael; Ma, Yonggang; Li, Na; Su, Guannan

    2013-02-15

    Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associate protein 1 (MRP1) is a major mechanism leading to multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells. These transporters expel anti-cancer drugs and greatly impair therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. A Chinese herbal plant Yanhusuo (Corydalis yanhusuo W.T. Wang, YHS) is frequently used in functional food and traditional Chinese medicine to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. The objective of this work was to study effects of glaucine, an alkaloid component of YHS, on P-gp and MRP1 in resistant cancer cells. The resistant cancer cell line, MCF-7/ADR and corresponding parental sensitive cells were employed to determine reversal properties of glaucine. Glaucine inhibits P-gp and MRP1-mediated efflux and activates ATPase activities of the transporters, indicating that it is a substrate and inhibits P-gp and MRP1 competitively. Furthermore, glaucine suppresses expression of ABC transporter genes. It reverses the resistance of MCF-7/ADR to adriamycin and mitoxantrone effectively. PMID:23194502

  11. Tissue-specific regulation of expression and activity of P-glycoprotein in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Achira, Meguru; Totsuka, Ryuichi; Fujimura, Hisako; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2002-07-01

    Cyclosporine A and steroids are effective against rheumatoid arthritis and also known as substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We investigated the effect of arthritis on the hepatic and intestinal P-gp activity in rats, and substantiated the expression level of the hepatic P-gp. Doxorubicin was used as a P-gp substrate. Cumulative biliary excretion and intestinal exsorption of doxorubicin following intravenous administration were compared between adjuvant arthritis (AA) and normal rats. Intestinal P-gp activity was also investigated by intestinal everted sac method, and hepatic P-gp was detected by FITC-labeled antibody and visualized using a confocal laser microscope system. Biliary clearance of doxorubicin in AA rats was significantly decreased from that in normal rats. The expression level of the hepatic P-gp in AA rats was very low compared to normal rats, indicating down-regulation. Intestinal exsorption clearance was not different between AA and normal rats. Permeability of doxorubicin across intestinal everted sac was comparable between AA and normal rats, corresponding to in vivo study. In AA rats, hepatic P-gp activity was decreased due to the reduction of expression level, but intestinal P-gp activity was not changed. Different regulation systems may be involved in liver and intestine. PMID:12113888

  12. Synergistic effect of folate-mediated targeting and verapamil-mediated P-gp inhibition with paclitaxel -polymer micelles to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feihu; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Yuxuan; Zheng, Dandan; Hao, Leilei; Duan, Cunxian; Jia, Lejiao; Liu, Guangpu; Liu, Yue

    2011-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is a significant obstacle for successful cancer chemotherapy. Overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a key factor contributing to the development of tumor drug resistance. Verapamil (VRP), a P-gp inhibitor, has been reported to be able to reverse completely the resistance caused by P-gp. For optimal synergy, the drug and inhibitor combination may need to be temporally colocalized in the tumor cells. Herein, we investigated the effectiveness of simultaneous and targeted delivery of anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), along with VRP, using DOMC-FA micelles to overcome tumor drug resistance. The floate-functionalized dual agent loaded micelles resulted in the similar cytotoxicity to PTX-loaded micelles/free VRP combination and co-administration of two single-agent loaded micelles, which was higher than that of PTX-loaded micelles. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of dual agent micelles could be ascribe to increased accumulation of PTX in drug-resistant tumor cells. We suggest that the synergistic effect of folate receptor-mediated internalization and VRP-mediated overcoming MDR could be beneficial in treatment of MDR solid tumors by targeting delivery of micellar PTX into tumor cells. As a result, the difunctional micelle systems is a very promising approach to overcome tumor drug resistance. PMID:21903258

  13. Human-Mouse Chimeras with Normal Expression and Function Reveal That Major Domain Swapping Is Tolerated by P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1).

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Kristen M; Hall, Matthew D; Moen, Janna K; Chufan, Eduardo E; Fetsch, Patricia A; Shukla, Suneet; Gill, Deborah R; Hyde, Stephen C; Xia, Di; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-02-23

    The efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a vital role in the transport of molecules across cell membranes and has been shown to interact with a panoply of functionally and structurally unrelated compounds. How human P-gp interacts with this large number of drugs has not been well understood, although structural flexibility has been implicated. To gain insight into this transporter's broad substrate specificity and to assess its ability to accommodate a variety of molecular and structural changes, we generated human-mouse P-gp chimeras by the exchange of homologous transmembrane and nucleotide-binding domains. High-level expression of these chimeras by BacMam- and baculovirus-mediated transduction in mammalian (HeLa) and insect cells, respectively, was achieved. There were no detectable differences between wild-type and chimeric P-gp in terms of cell surface expression, ability to efflux the P-gp substrates rhodamine 123, calcein-AM, and JC-1, or to be inhibited by the substrate cyclosporine A and the inhibitors tariquidar and elacridar. Additionally, expression of chimeric P-gp was able to confer a paclitaxel-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells characteristic of P-gp-mediated drug resistance. P-gp ATPase assays and photo-cross-linking with [(125)I]iodoarylazidoprazosin confirmed that transport and biochemical properties of P-gp chimeras were similar to those of wild-type P-gp, although differences in drug binding were detected when human and mouse transmembrane domains were combined. Overall, chimeras with one or two mouse P-gp domains were deemed functionally equivalent to human wild-type P-gp, demonstrating the ability of human P-gp to tolerate major structural changes. PMID:26820614

  14. Low Intensity Ultrasound Promotes the Sensitivity of Rat Brain Glioma to Doxorubicin by Down-Regulating the Expressions of P-Glucoprotein and Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Ke; Bi, Yonghua; Yu, Guibo; Wang, Siwei; Qi, Xun; Zhong, Hongshan

    2013-01-01

    The overall prognosis for malignant glioma is extremely poor, and treatment options are limited in part because of multidrug resistant proteins. Our previous findings suggest low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) can induce apoptosis of glioma cells. Given this finding, we were interested in determining if LIUS could help treat glioma by inhibiting multidrug resistant proteins, and if so, which pathways are involved. In this study, the toxicity sensitivity and multidrug resistance proteins of glioma induced by LIUS were investigated using CCK-8, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorency, and RT-PCR in tissue samples and cultured cells. LIUS inhibited increase of C6 cells in an intensity- and time-dependent manner. The toxicity sensitivity of C6 cells increased significantly after LIUS sonication (intensity of 142.0 mW/cm2) or Doxorubicin (DOX) at different concentration, particularly by the combination of LIUS sonication and DOX. The expressions of P-gp and MRP1 decreased significantly post-sonication at intensity of 142.0 mW/cm2 both in vitro and in vivo. The expressions of p110 delta (PI3K), NF-κB-p65, Akt/PKB, and p-Akt/PKB were downregulated by LIUS sonication and DOX treatment separately or in combination at the same parameters in rat glioma. These results indicate that LIUS could increase the toxicity sensitivity of glioma by down-regulating the expressions of P-gp and MRP1, which might be mediated by the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB pathway. PMID:23940624

  15. Alterations in function and expression of ABC transporters at blood-brain barrier under diabetes and the clinical significances

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a systematic metabolic disease, which often develops a number of well-recognized vascular complications including brain complications which may partly result from the dysfunction of blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB is generally considered as a mechanism for protecting the brain from unwanted actions resulting from substances in the blood and maintaining brain homeostasis via monitoring the entry or efflux of compounds. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters including P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and breast cancer-related protein (BCRP), widely expressed in the luminal membrane of the microvessel endothelium and in the apical membrane of the choroids plexus epithelium, play important roles in the function of BBB. However, these transporters are easily altered by some diseases. The present article was focused on the alteration in expression and function of both P-GP and BCRP at BBB by diabetes and the clinical significances. PMID:25540622

  16. Transient Protein Expression by Agroinfiltration in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; McNulty, Alyssa; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Lai, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Current systems of recombinant protein production include bacterial, insect, and mammalian cell culture. However, these platforms are expensive to build and operate at commercial scales and/or have limited abilities to produce complex proteins. In recent years, plant-based expression systems have become top candidates for the production of recombinant proteins as they are highly scalable, robust, safe, and can produce complex proteins due to having a eukaryotic endomembrane system. Newly developed "deconstructed" viral vectors delivered via Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agroinfiltration) have enabled robust plant-based production of proteins with a wide range of applications. The leafy Lactuca sativa (lettuce) plant with its strong foundation in agriculture is an excellent host for pharmaceutical protein production. Here, we describe a method for agroinfiltration of lettuce that can rapidly produce high levels of recombinant proteins in a matter of days and has the potential to be scaled up to an agricultural level. PMID:26614281

  17. Biotechnology Protein Expression and Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Project Scientist Core Facility is to provide purified proteins, both recombinant and natural, to the Biotechnology Science Team Project Scientists and the NRA-Structural Biology Test Investigators. Having a core facility for this purpose obviates the need for each scientist to develop the necessary expertise and equipment for molecular biology, protein expression, and protein purification. Because of this, they are able to focus their energies as well as their funding on the crystallization and structure determination of their target proteins.

  18. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  19. Proteomics for Protein Expression Profiling in Neuroscience*

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Willard M.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    As the technology of proteomics moves from a theoretical approach to a practical reality, neuroscientists will have to determine the most appropriate applications for this technology. Neuroscientists will have to surmount difficulties particular to their research, such as limited sample amounts, heterogeneous cellular compositions in samples, and the fact that many proteins of interest are rare, hydrophobic proteins. This review examines protein isolation and protein fractionation and separation using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry proteomic methods. Methods for quantifying relative protein expression between samples (e.g., 2-DIGE, and ICAT) are also described. The coverage of the proteome, ability to detect membrane proteins, resource requirements, and quantitative reliability of different approaches is also discussed. Although there are many challenges in proteomic neuroscience, this field promises many rewards in the future. PMID:15176464

  20. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein expression and function by anti-diabetic drugs gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Mehran Mesgari; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a trans-membrane drug efflux pump. Several drugs are P-gp substrates. Some drugs may affect the activity of P-gp by inhibiting its function, resulting in significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs). It is critical to understand which drugs are inhibitors of P-gp so that adverse DDIs can be minimized or avoided. This study investigated the effects of gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone on the function and expression of P-gp. Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) efflux assays in Caco-2 cells and western blot testing were used to study in vitro the effect of the drugs on P-gp function and expression. The in situ rat single-pass intestinal permeability model was developed to study the effect of the drugs on P-gp function. Digoxin and verapamil were used as a known substrate and inhibitor of P-gp, respectively. Digoxin levels in intestinal perfusion samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Intestinal effective permeability (Peff) of digoxin in the presence of 0.1, 10, and 500 μM gliclazide, 100 and 7000 μM metformin, and 50 and 300 μM pioglitazone was significantly increased relative to the digoxin treated cells (P < 0.01). P-gp expression was decreased by gliclazide, metformin and pioglitazone. Intracellular accumulation of Rh 123 by the drugs increased, but the differences were not significant relative to the control cells (P > 0.05). It was found that gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone inhibited P-gp efflux activity in situ and down-regulated P-gp expression in vitro. Further investigations are necessary to confirm the obtained results and to define the mechanism underlying P-gp inhibition by the drugs. PMID:27499787

  1. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein expression and function by anti-diabetic drugs gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone in vitro and in situ.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mehran Mesgari; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a trans-membrane drug efflux pump. Several drugs are P-gp substrates. Some drugs may affect the activity of P-gp by inhibiting its function, resulting in significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs). It is critical to understand which drugs are inhibitors of P-gp so that adverse DDIs can be minimized or avoided. This study investigated the effects of gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone on the function and expression of P-gp. Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) efflux assays in Caco-2 cells and western blot testing were used to study in vitro the effect of the drugs on P-gp function and expression. The in situ rat single-pass intestinal permeability model was developed to study the effect of the drugs on P-gp function. Digoxin and verapamil were used as a known substrate and inhibitor of P-gp, respectively. Digoxin levels in intestinal perfusion samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Intestinal effective permeability (Peff) of digoxin in the presence of 0.1, 10, and 500 μM gliclazide, 100 and 7000 μM metformin, and 50 and 300 μM pioglitazone was significantly increased relative to the digoxin treated cells (P < 0.01). P-gp expression was decreased by gliclazide, metformin and pioglitazone. Intracellular accumulation of Rh 123 by the drugs increased, but the differences were not significant relative to the control cells (P > 0.05). It was found that gliclazide, metformin, and pioglitazone inhibited P-gp efflux activity in situ and down-regulated P-gp expression in vitro. Further investigations are necessary to confirm the obtained results and to define the mechanism underlying P-gp inhibition by the drugs. PMID:27499787

  2. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  3. The potential predictive role of nuclear NHERF1 expression in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine first line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Anita; Caldarola, Lucia; Dell'Endice, Stefania; Scarpi, Emanuela; Saragoni, Luca; Monti, Manlio; Santini, Daniele; Brunetti, Oronzo; Simone, Giovanni; Silvestris, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resistance in advanced gastric cancer (GC) might be related to function of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins. The adaptor protein NHERF1 (Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor) is an important player in cancer progression for a number of solid malignancies, even if its role to develop drug resistance remains uncertain. Herein, we aimed to analyze the potential association between NHERF1 expression and P-gp, sorcin and HIF-1α MDR-related proteins in advanced GC patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX) chemotherapy regimen, and its relation to response. Total number of 28 untreated patients were included into the study. Expression and subcellular localization of all proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumor samples. We did not found significant association between NHERF1 expression and the MDR-related proteins. A trend was observed between positive cytoplasmic NHERF1 (cNHERF1) expression and negative nuclear HIF-1α (nHIF-1α) expression (68.8% versus 31.3% respectively, P = 0.054). However, cytoplasmic P-gp (cP-gp) expression was positively correlated with both cHIF-1α and sorcin expression (P = 0.011; P = 0.002, respectively). Interestingly, nuclear NHERF1 (nNHERF1) staining was statistically associated with clinical response. In detail, 66.7% of patients with high nNHERF1 expression had a disease control rate, while 84.6% of subjects with negative nuclear expression of the protein showed progressive disease (P = 0.009). Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant correlation between nNHERF1 and clinical response (OR 0.06, P = 0.019). These results suggest that nuclear NHERF1 could be related to resistance to the EOX regimen in advanced GC patients, identifying this marker as a possible independent predictive factor. PMID:26126066

  4. The potential predictive role of nuclear NHERF1 expression in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine first line chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangia, Anita; Caldarola, Lucia; Dell'Endice, Stefania; Scarpi, Emanuela; Saragoni, Luca; Monti, Manlio; Santini, Daniele; Brunetti, Oronzo; Simone, Giovanni; Silvestris, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resistance in advanced gastric cancer (GC) might be related to function of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins. The adaptor protein NHERF1 (Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor) is an important player in cancer progression for a number of solid malignancies, even if its role to develop drug resistance remains uncertain. Herein, we aimed to analyze the potential association between NHERF1 expression and P-gp, sorcin and HIF-1α MDR-related proteins in advanced GC patients treated with epirubicin/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (EOX) chemotherapy regimen, and its relation to response. Total number of 28 untreated patients were included into the study. Expression and subcellular localization of all proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumor samples. We did not found significant association between NHERF1 expression and the MDR-related proteins. A trend was observed between positive cytoplasmic NHERF1 (cNHERF1) expression and negative nuclear HIF-1α (nHIF-1α) expression (68.8% versus 31.3% respectively, P = 0.054). However, cytoplasmic P-gp (cP-gp) expression was positively correlated with both cHIF-1α and sorcin expression (P = 0.011; P = 0.002, respectively). Interestingly, nuclear NHERF1 (nNHERF1) staining was statistically associated with clinical response. In detail, 66.7% of patients with high nNHERF1 expression had a disease control rate, while 84.6% of subjects with negative nuclear expression of the protein showed progressive disease (P = 0.009). Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant correlation between nNHERF1 and clinical response (OR 0.06, P = 0.019). These results suggest that nuclear NHERF1 could be related to resistance to the EOX regimen in advanced GC patients, identifying this marker as a possible independent predictive factor. PMID:26126066

  5. Expression Pattern of Id Proteins in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Andrew D.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Houston, Ronald H.; Durban, Ashley N.; Brisbin, Bethany J.; Oostra, Tyler D.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Kahwash, Basil M.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding or inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins are up regulated in a variety of neoplasms, particularly in association with high-grade, poorly differentiated tumors, while differentiated tissues show little or no Id expression. The four Id genes are members of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors and act as negative regulators of transcription by binding to and sequestering HLH complexes. We tested the hypothesis that Id proteins are overexpressed in medulloblastoma by performing immunohistochemistry using a medulloblastoma tissue microarray with 45 unique medulloblastoma and 11 normal control cerebella, and antibodies specific for Id1, Id2, Id3, and Id4. A semi-quantitative staining score that took staining intensity and the proportion of immunoreactive cells into account was used. Id1 was not detected in normal cerebella or in medulloblastoma cells, but 78 % of tumors showed strong Id1 expression in endothelial nuclei of tumor vessels. Id2 expression was scant in normal cerebella and increased in medulloblastoma (median staining score: 4). Id3 expression was noted in some neurons of the developing cerebellar cortex, but it was markedly up regulated in medulloblastoma (median staining score: 12) and in tumor endothelial cells. Id4 was not expressed in normal cerebella or in tumor cells. Id2 or Id3 overexpression drove proliferation in medulloblastoma cell lines by altering the expression of critical cell cycle regulatory proteins in favor of cell proliferation. This study shows that Id1 expression in endothelial cells may contribute to angiogenic processes and that increased expression of Id2 and Id3 in medulloblastoma is potentially involved in tumor cell proliferation and survival. PMID:23397264

  6. Cultured CD4T cells and primary human lymphocytes express hOATPs: intracellular accumulation of saquinavir and lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Janneh, O; Hartkoorn, R C; Jones, E; Owen, A; Ward, S A; Davey, R; Back, D J; Khoo, S H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Drug efflux tranporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)) limit the cellular uptake of human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors but the contribution of influx transporters in cells that (over)express P-gp or MRP is less clear. Here, we studied the expression of one influx transporter system, human organic anion-transporting polypeptide (hOATP), in some T-cell lines (CEM, CEMVBL, CEME1000) and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and examined the effects of manipulation of influx/efflux transporters on the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir. Experimental approach: The expression of hOATPs was studied by PCR. We used hOATP substrate or inhibitor (estrone-3-sulphate (E-3-S) or montelukast, respectively) and inhibitors of P-gp (XR9576) and MRP (MK571 and frusemide) to study functional interactions between influx and efflux transporters in the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir. Lipophilicity of the drugs was measured by octanol/saline partition coefficient. Key results: CEM cells, their variants and PBMCs express various hOATP isoforms, with OATP3A1 detected in all of the cells. MK571, XR9576 and frusemide increased the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir. E-3-S and montelukast reduced the uptake of saquinavir and lopinavir in some, but not all, of the cells. Pretreatment of the cells with MK571, XR9576 or frusemide, followed by E-3-S co-incubation reduced the cellular accumulation of saquinavir and lopinavir. Lopinavir is much more lipophilic than saquinavir. Conclusions and implications: Human OATPs, MRP, P-gp and lipophilicity determine the cellular uptake and retention of saquinavir and lopinavir. These data may have important implications for drug–drug interactions, drug safety and efficacy. PMID:19002102

  7. Influence of Panax ginseng on cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Malati, Christine Y; Robertson, Sarah M; Hunt, Jennifer D; Chairez, Cheryl; Alfaro, Raul M; Kovacs, Joseph A; Penzak, Scott R

    2012-06-01

    A number of herbal preparations have been shown to interact with prescription medications secondary to modulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and/or P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of Panax ginseng on CYP3A and P-gp function using the probe substrates midazolam and fexofenadine, respectively. Twelve healthy participants (8 men) completed this open-label, single-sequence pharmacokinetic study. Healthy volunteers received single oral doses of midazolam 8 mg and fexofenadine 120 mg, before and after 28 days of P ginseng 500 mg twice daily. Midazolam and fexofenadine pharmacokinetic parameter values were calculated and compared before and after P ginseng administration. Geometric mean ratios (postginseng/preginseng) for midazolam area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC(0-∞)), half-life (t(1/2)), and maximum concentration (C(max)) were significantly reduced at 0.66 (0.55-0.78), 0.71 (0.53-0.90), and 0.74 (0.56-0.93), respectively. Conversely, fexofenadine pharmacokinetics were unaltered by P ginseng administration. Based on these results, P ginseng appeared to induce CYP3A activity in the liver and possibly the gastrointestinal tract. Patients taking P ginseng in combination with CYP3A substrates with narrow therapeutic ranges should be monitored closely for adequate therapeutic response to the substrate medication. PMID:21646440

  8. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth. PMID:24984624

  9. Tumor endothelial expression of P-glycoprotein upon microvesicular transfer of TrpC5 derived from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, YePing; Pan, QiongXi; Jiang, Li; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, FangFang; Liu, YanJun; Xing, Hui; Shi, Mei; Li, Jiao; Li, XiYuan; Zhu, YaoDan; Chen, Yun; Bruce, Iain C.; Jin, Jian Ma, Xin

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TrpC5 was mainly accumulated in microvesicles of drug-resistant MCF-7/ADM cells. • Microvesicles from MCF-7/ADM transferred TrpC5 to endothelial cells. • TrpC5 inhibition reduced P-glycoprotein accumulation on tumor blood vessels in vivo. - Abstract: Treatment of carcinoma commonly fails due to chemoresistance. Studies have shown that endothelial cells acquire resistance via the tumor microenvironment. Microvesicle (MV) shedding from the cell membrane to the microenvironment plays an important role in communication between cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MCF-7 adriamycin-resistant cells (MCF-7/ADM) shed MVs that alter the characteristics of human microvessel endothelial cells (HMECs). MVs from tumor cells transferred a Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channel TrpC5 to HMECs, inducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by activation of the transcription factor NFATc3 (nuclear factor of activated T cells isoform c3). Expression of the mdr1 gene was blocked by the TrpC5-blocking antibody T5E3, and the production of P-gp in HMECs was reduced by blockade of TrpC5. Thus, we postulate that endothelial cells acquire the resistant protein upon exposure to TrpC5-containg MVs in the microenvironment, and express P-gp in the TrpC5–NFATc3 signal pathway.

  10. Quantitative Assessment of the Impact of Fluorine Substitution on P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) Mediated Efflux, Permeability, Lipophilicity, and Metabolic Stability.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Martin; Hou, Xinjun; Kuhn, Max; Wager, Travis T; Kauffman, Gregory W; Verhoest, Patrick R

    2016-06-01

    Strategic replacement of one or more hydrogen atoms with fluorine atom(s) is a common tactic to improve potency at a given target and/or to modulate parameters such as metabolic stability and pKa. Molecular weight (MW) is a key parameter in design, and incorporation of fluorine is associated with a disproportionate increase in MW considering the van der Waals radius of fluorine versus hydrogen. Herein we examine a large compound data set to understand the effect of introducing fluorine on the risk of encountering P-glycoprotein mediated efflux (as measured by MDR efflux ratio), passive permeability, lipophilicity, and metabolic stability. Statistical modeling of the MDR ER data demonstrated that an increase in MW as a result of introducing fluorine atoms does not lead to higher risk of P-gp mediated efflux. Fluorine-corrected molecular weight (MWFC), where the molecular weight of fluorine has been subtracted, was found to be a more relevant descriptor. PMID:27228214

  11. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  12. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  13. Expression, regulation, and function of drug transporters in cervicovaginal tissues of a mouse model used for microbicide testing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Pearlman, Andrew; Rohan, Lisa C

    2016-09-15

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) are three efflux transporters that play key roles in the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs used in the pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV sexual transmission. In this study, we investigated the expression, regulation, and function of these transporters in cervicovaginal tissues of a mouse model. Expression and regulation were examined using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining, in the mouse tissues harvested at estrus and diestrus stages under natural cycling or after hormone synchronization. The three transporters were expressed at moderate to high levels compared to the liver. Transporter proteins were localized in various cell types in different tissue segments. Estrous cycle and exogenous hormone treatment affected transporter mRNA and protein expression, in a tissue- and transporter-dependent manner. Depo-Provera-synchronized mice were dosed vaginally or intraperitoneally with (3)H-TFV, with or without MK571 co-administration, to delineate the function of cervicovaginal Mrp4. Co-administration of MK571 significantly increased the concentration of vaginally-administered TFV in endocervix and vagina. MK571 increased the concentration of intraperitoneally-administered TFV in the cervicovaginal lavage and vagina by several fold. Overall, P-gp, Bcrp, and Mrp4 were positively expressed in mouse cervicovaginal tissues, and their expression can be regulated by the estrous cycle or by exogenous hormones. In this model, the Mrp4 transporter impacted TFV distribution in cervicovaginal tissues. PMID:27453435

  14. Ecto-5′-nucleotidase expression is associated with the progression of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YU, YI; WANG, WEI; SONG, LEI; HU, WENTAO; DONG, CHI; PEI, HAILONG; ZHOU, GUANGMING; YUE, ZHONGJIN

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common tissue tumor that occurs across all age groups and has become one of the types of cancer with the fastest increasing incidence. Due to the resistance of RCC chemo- and radiotherapy, surgery is the only currently effective treatment. Therefore, specific markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of RCC are expected to result in novel methods of treatment. Ecto-5′-nucleotidase, also termed cluster of differentiation (CD)73, is a protein that is activated in several types of aggressive cancer and may promote cancer progression. CD73 was examined in the present study to determine the association between the protein and RCC. The expression levels of CD73 in 159 RCC tissue sections and 30 paratumorous normal renal tissue samples obtained from 235 patients that underwent nephrectomy were examined by immunohistochemical staining. By contrast, the expression level of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a potential prognostic factor in RCC, was also examined in 85 RCC and 13 normal tissue samples. Intense CD73 expression was identified in 75 out of 159 RCC cell membranes compared with normal renal tissues. In contrast, there was high P-gp expression in the blood vessels of 42 out of 85 RCC tissues and there was no significant difference between the P-gp expression identified in RCC cells (34 out of 85) and the cell membrane of normal renal cells (2 out of 13). The expression level of CD73 in RCC cells was significantly associated with tumor type, tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage, and tumor grade. However, the expression of P-gp in RCC cells was only associated with the TNM stage and tumor grade. Using a multivariable Cox regression analysis, it was found that the median survival rate of RCC patients with intense CD73 expression in RCC cells was 62.06±5.35 months, which was drastically shorter compared with rare CD73 expression (103.72±3.67 months). In conclusion, the expression level of CD73 is significantly associated with RCC tumor progression

  15. The Effects of Cetirizine on P-glycoprotein Expression and Function In vitro and In situ

    PubMed Central

    Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishekar, Hamed; Mohammadnejad, Leila; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a major role in oral absorption of drugs. Induction or inhibition of P-gp by drugs contributes to variability of its transport activity and often results in clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cetirizine, a second generation H1 antihistamine, on P-gp function and expression in vitro and in situ. Methods: The in-vitro rhodamin-123 (Rho123) efflux assay in Caco-2 cells was used to study the effect of cetirizine on P-gp function. Western blot analysis was used for surveying the effect of cetirizine on expression of P-gp in Caco-2 cells. Rat in situ single-pass intestinal permeability technique was used to calculate the intestinal permeability of a known P-gp substrate (digoxin) in the presence of cetirizine. The amounts of digoxin and cetirizine in intestinal perfusion samples were analyzed using a HPLC method. Results: The results showed significant increase in Rho123 uptake (P < 0.05) and also P-gp band intensity decrease in cetirizine-treated cells in vitro. Furthermore the intestinal permeability of digoxin was also increased significantly in the presence of cetirizine (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Therefore it is concluded that cetirizine is a P-gp inhibitor and this should be considered in co administration of cetrizine with other P-gp substrate drugs. Further investigations are required to confirm our results and to determine the mechanism underlying P-gp inhibition by cetirizine. PMID:27123426

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana SEPALLATA3 protein prokaryotic expression and purification.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Fu, A Y; Zhang, G C; Li, T J; Zhang, J H

    2015-01-01

    SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) can be attributed to E class gene of the ABCE model of floral organ development. In order to reveal how SEP3 proteins form polymers, and the relationship between the polymers and their biological functions, the experiments of Arabidopsis thaliana AtSEP3 protein soluble expression in vitro were performed to construct a vector of prokaryotic expression, and investigate induced expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The protein soluble expression was analyzed through the aspects of different protein domains, induction time, induction temperature, etc. Different structural domains and expression conditions were screened, and 0.1% IPTG inducing at 22 oC for 15 h was estimated as an optimal expression strategy. The nickel chelating resin was used to purify the protein in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the results indicated that AtSEP3 protein was present in the form of tetramer. PMID:26025404

  17. Using the BacMam Baculovirus System to Study Expression and Function of Recombinant Efflux Drug Transporters in Polarized Epithelial Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Fung, King Leung; Kapoor, Khyati; Pixley, Jessica N.; Talbert, Darrell J.; Kwit, Alexandra D.T.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily includes several membrane-bound proteins that are critical to drug pharmacokinetics and disposition. Pharmacologic evaluation of these proteins in vitro remains a challenge. In this study, human ABC transporters were expressed in polarized epithelial cell monolayers transduced using the BacMam baculovirus gene transfer system. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of BacMam baculovirus to transduce cells grown in monolayers. In a porcine kidney cell line, LLC-PK1 cells, baculoviral transduction is successful only via the apical side of a polarized monolayer. We observed that recombinant ABC transporters were expressed on the cell surface with post-translational modification. Furthermore, sodium butyrate played a critical role in recombinant protein expression, and preincubation in the presence of tunicamycin or thapsigargin enhanced protein expression. Cells overexpressing human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) showed vectorial basolateral-to-apical transport of [3H]-paclitaxel, which could be reversed by the inhibitor tariquidar. Similarly, coexpression of human P-gp and ABCG2 in LLC-PK1 cells resulted in higher transport of mitoxantrone, which is a substrate for both transporters, than in either P-gp– or ABCG2-expressing cells alone. Taken together, our results indicate that a high level of expression of efflux transporters in a polarized cell monolayer is technically feasible with the BacMam baculovirus system PMID:26622052

  18. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  19. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  20. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  1. Purify First: rapid expression and purification of proteins from XMRV.

    PubMed

    Gillette, William K; Esposito, Dominic; Taylor, Troy E; Hopkins, Ralph F; Bagni, Rachel K; Hartley, James L

    2011-04-01

    Purifying proteins from recombinant sources is often difficult, time-consuming, and costly. We have recently instituted a series of improvements in our protein purification pipeline that allows much more accurate choice of expression host and conditions and purification protocols. The key elements are parallel cloning, small scale parallel expression and lysate preparation, and small scale parallel protein purification. Compared to analyzing expression data only, results from multiple small scale protein purifications predict success at scale-up with greatly improved reliability. Using these new procedures we purified eight of nine proteins from xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) on the first attempt at large scale. PMID:21146612

  2. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  3. Proteomics beyond large-scale protein expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Boersema, Paul J; Kahraman, Abdullah; Picotti, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Proteomics is commonly referred to as the application of high-throughput approaches to protein expression analysis. Typical results of proteomics studies are inventories of the protein content of a sample or lists of differentially expressed proteins across multiple conditions. Recently, however, an explosion of novel proteomics workflows has significantly expanded proteomics beyond the analysis of protein expression. Targeted proteomics methods, for example, enable the analysis of the fine dynamics of protein systems, such as a specific pathway or a network of interacting proteins, and the determination of protein complex stoichiometries. Structural proteomics tools allow extraction of restraints for structural modeling and identification of structurally altered proteins on a proteome-wide scale. Other variations of the proteomic workflow can be applied to the large-scale analysis of protein activity, location, degradation and turnover. These exciting developments provide new tools for multi-level 'omics' analysis and for the modeling of biological networks in the context of systems biology studies. PMID:25636126

  4. HeLa Based Cell Free Expression Systems for Expression of Plasmodium Rhoptry Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Raghavendra; Sam-Yellowe, Tobili

    2015-01-01

    Malaria causes significant global morbidity and mortality. No routine vaccine is currently available. One of the major reasons for lack of a vaccine is the challenge of identifying suitable vaccine candidates. Malarial proteins expressed using prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell based expression systems are poorly glycosylated, generally insoluble and undergo improper folding leading to reduced immunogenicity. The wheat germ, rabbit reticulocyte lysate and Escherichia coli lysate cell free expression systems are currently used for expression of malarial proteins. However, the length of expression time and improper glycosylation of proteins still remains a challenge. We demonstrate expression of Plasmodium proteins in vitro using HeLa based cell free expression systems, termed "in vitro human cell free expression systems". The 2 HeLa based cell free expression systems transcribe mRNA in 75 min and 3 µl of transcribed mRNA is sufficient to translate proteins in 90 min. The 1-step expression system is a transcription and translation coupled expression system; the transcription and co-translation occurs in 3 hr. The process can also be extended for 6 hr by providing additional energy. In the 2-step expression system, mRNA is first transcribed and then added to the translation mix for protein expression. We describe how to express malaria proteins; a hydrophobic PF3D7_0114100 Maurer's Cleft - 2 transmembrane (PfMC-2TM) protein, a hydrophilic PF3D7_0925900 protein and an armadillo repeats containing protein PF3D7_1361800, using the HeLa based cell free expression system. The proteins are expressed in micro volumes employing 2-step and 1-step expression strategies. An affinity purification method to purify 25 µl of proteins expressed using the in vitro human cell free expression system is also described. Protein yield is determined by Bradford's assay and the expressed and purified proteins can be confirmed by western blotting analysis. Expressed recombinant proteins can be

  5. SUMO fusion technology for difficult-to-express proteins.

    PubMed

    Butt, Tauseef R; Edavettal, Suzanne C; Hall, John P; Mattern, Michael R

    2005-09-01

    The demands of structural and functional genomics for large quantities of soluble, properly folded proteins in heterologous hosts have been aided by advancements in the field of protein production and purification. Escherichia coli, the preferred host for recombinant protein expression, presents many challenges which must be surmounted in order to over-express heterologous proteins. These challenges include the proteolytic degradation of target proteins, protein misfolding, poor solubility, and the necessity for good purification methodologies. Gene fusion technologies have been able to improve heterologous expression by overcoming many of these challenges. The ability of gene fusions to improve expression, solubility, purification, and decrease proteolytic degradation will be discussed in this review. The main disadvantage, cleaving the protein fusion, will also be addressed. Focus will be given to the newly described SUMO fusion system and the improvements that this technology has advanced over traditional gene fusion systems. PMID:16084395

  6. Data presenting a modified bacterial expression vector for expressing and purifying Nus solubility-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Heng; Terman, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are the predominant source for producing recombinant proteins but while many exogenous proteins are expressed, only a fraction of those are soluble. We have found that a new actin regulatory enzyme Mical is poorly soluble when expressed in bacteria but the use of a Nus fusion protein tag greatly increases its solubility. However, available vectors containing a Nus tag have been engineered in a way that hinders the separation of target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. We have now used recombinant DNA approaches to overcome these issues and reengineer a Nus solubility tag-containing bacterial expression vector. The data herein present a modified bacterial expression vector useful for expressing proteins fused to the Nus solubility tag and separating such target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. PMID:27547802

  7. pH dependent but not P-gp dependent bidirectional transport study of S-propranolol: the importance of passive diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Benet, Leslie Z.; Okochi, Hideaki; Chen, Xijing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent controversial publications, citing studies purporting to show that P-gp mediates the transport of propranolol, proposed that passive biological membrane transport is negligible. Based on the BDDCS, the extensively metabolized-highly permeable-highly soluble BDDCS class 1 drug, propranolol, shows a high passive permeability at concentrations unrestricted by solubility that can overwhelm any potential transporter effects. Here we reinvestigate the effects of passive diffusion and carrier-mediated transport on S-propranolol. Methods Bidirectional permeability and inhibition of efflux transport studies were carried out in MDCK, MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell lines at different concentrations. Transcellular permeability studies were conducted at different apical pHs in the rat jejunum Ussing chamber model and PAMPA system. Results S-propranolol exhibited efflux ratios lower than 1 in MDCK, MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cells. No significant differences of Papp, B->A in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitor GG918 were observed. However, an efflux ratio of 3.63 was found at apical pH 6.5 with significant decrease in Papp, A->B and increase in Papp, B->A compared to apical pH 7.4 in Caco-2 cell lines. The pH dependent permeability was confirmed in the Ussing chamber model. S-propranolol flux was unchanged during inhibition by verapamil and rifampin. Furthermore, pH dependent permeability was also observed in the PAMPA system. Conclusions S-propranolol does not exhibit active transport as proposed previously. The "false" positive efflux ratio can be explained by the pH partition theory. As expected, passive diffusion, but not active transport, plays the primary role in the permeability of the BDDCS class 1 drug propranolol. PMID:25690341

  8. Aberrant expression of signaling proteins in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wuhan; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Congyan; Cui, Miao; Li, Wei; Xu, Juan; Zhang, David Y

    2013-09-01

    Dysregulated expression of signaling proteins may contribute to the pathophysiology of essential thrombocythemia (ET). This study aimed to characterize protein expression in ET and to correlate the dysregulated proteins with phenotypes and prognosis of ET patients. The expression of 128 proteins in peripheral blood neutrophils from 74 ET patients was assessed and compared with those from 29 healthy subjects and 35 polycythemia vera (PV) patients using protein pathway array. Fifteen proteins were differentially expressed between ET patients and normal controls. These dysregulated proteins were involved in the signaling pathways related with apoptosis and inflammation. Our results showed a significant overlap in protein expression between ET patients with JAK2V617F mutation and PV patients. In addition, nine proteins were associated with JAK2V617F mutation status in ET patients. Furthermore, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and Stat3 were independent risk factors for subsequent thrombosis during follow-up on multivariable analysis. Our study shows a broad dysregulation of signaling protein in ET patients, suggesting their roles in ET pathogenesis. The expression levels of ERβ and Stat3 could be promising predictors of subsequent thrombosis in ET patients. PMID:23639951

  9. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Ye; Yu, Xin-Da; Song, Chun-Juan; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Xin-Rong; Duan, Ying; Zhang, Ju

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system. METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this, cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein’s cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein. RESULTS: The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced, with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank: DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted. CONCLUSION: F protein expresses cDNA clone in a prokaryotic system, which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein. PMID:17465469

  10. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  11. Induction of Expression and Functional Activity of P-glycoprotein Efflux Transporter by Bioactive Plant Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Abuznait, Alaa H.; Qosa, Hisham; O’Connell, Nicholas D.; Akbarian-Tefaghi, Jessica; Sylvester, Paul W.; El Sayed, Khalid A.; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bioactive plant natural products on the expression and functional activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is poorly understood. Interactions of bioactive plant-based food and dietary supplements with P-gp can cause significant alteration of pharmacokinetic properties of P-gp substrate drugs when used in combination. This can augment toxicity and/or interfere with the drug’s therapeutic outcomes. This study investigated the effects of diverse commonly used plant natural products on the expression and activity of P-gp in human adenocarcinoma cells (LS-180). These natural products included the tobacco cembranoid (1S,2E,4R,6R,7E,11E)-2,7,11-cembratriene-4,6-diol (cembratriene), the palm oil-derived γ-tocotrienol, the extra-virgin olive oil-derived secoiridoid oleocanthal, and the triterpene acid asiatic acid derived from Melaleuca ericifolia and abundant in several other common plant dietary supplements. Treatment with 25 μM of cembratriene, oleocanthal, γ-tocotrienol, or asiatic acid showed 2.3-3.0-fold increase in P-gp expression as demonstrated by Western blotting. These results were consistent with those obtained by quantitative analysis of fluorescent micrographs for P-gp. Accumulation studies demonstrated 31-38% decrease in rhodamine 123 intracellular levels when LS-180 cells were treated with the investigated compounds as a result of P-gp induction. Bioactive natural products can up-regulate the P-gp expression and functionality, which may induce herb/food-drug interactions when concomitantly used with P-gp substrate drugs. PMID:21851848

  12. Pannexin 2 protein expression is not restricted to the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Le Vasseur, Maxence; Lelowski, Jonathan; Bechberger, John F.; Sin, Wun-Chey; Naus, Christian C.

    2014-01-01

    Pannexins (Panx) are proteins homologous to the invertebrate gap junction proteins called innexins (Inx) and are traditionally described as transmembrane channels connecting the intracellular and extracellular compartments. Three distinct Panx paralogs (Panx1, Panx2 and Panx3) have been identified in vertebrates but previous reports on Panx expression and functionality focused primarily on Panx1 and Panx3 proteins. Several gene expression studies reported that Panx2 transcript is largely restricted to the central nervous system (CNS) hence suggesting that Panx2 might serve an important role in the CNS. However, the lack of suitable antibodies prevented the creation of a comprehensive map of Panx2 protein expression and Panx2 protein localization profile is currently mostly inferred from the distribution of its transcript. In this study, we characterized novel commercial monoclonal antibodies and surveyed Panx2 expression and distribution at the mRNA and protein level by real-time qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Panx2 protein levels were readily detected in every tissue examined, even when transcriptional analysis predicted very low Panx2 protein expression. Furthermore, our results indicate that Panx2 transcriptional activity is a poor predictor of Panx2 protein abundance and does not correlate with Panx2 protein levels. Despite showing disproportionately high transcript levels, the CNS expressed less Panx2 protein than any other tissues analyzed. Additionally, we showed that Panx2 protein does not localize at the plasma membrane like other gap junction proteins but remains confined within cytoplasmic compartments. Overall, our results demonstrate that the endogenous expression of Panx2 protein is not restricted to the CNS and is more ubiquitous than initially predicted. PMID:25505382

  13. Trps1 is associated with the multidrug resistance of osteosarcoma by regulating MDR1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ming; Hu, Jing; Li, Weiwei; Su, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhou, Gengyin

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant clinical problem in the chemotherapy of osteosarcoma and has been linked to the cellular expression of several multidrug-efflux transporters such as MDR1/P-gp. Our inhibition of the transcription factor Trps1 led to repression of MDR1/P-gp while its overexpression resulted in upregulation of MDR1/P-gp. Flow cytometric analysis suggested Trps1 increased the release of several anti-cancer drugs, thus decreasing their accumulation. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical samples indicated that the expression of Trps1 directly correlated with MDR1/P-gp. Trps1 inhibited TGFbeta-1 and directly bound to the MDR1 promoter. Our data demonstrate a role for Trps1 in the regulation of MDR1 expression in osteosarcoma. PMID:24491996

  14. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy. PMID:27362979

  15. mir-29 regulates Mcl-1 protein expression and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mott, J L; Kobayashi, S; Bronk, S F; Gores, G J

    2007-09-13

    Cellular expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is tightly regulated. Recently, Bcl-2 expression was shown to be regulated by microRNAs, small endogenous RNA molecules that regulate protein expression through sequence-specific interaction with messenger RNA. By analogy, we reasoned that Mcl-1 expression may also be regulated by microRNAs. We chose human immortalized, but non-malignant, H69 cholangiocyte and malignant KMCH cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for these studies, because Mcl-1 is dysregulated in cells with the malignant phenotype. By in silico analysis, we identified a putative target site in the Mcl-1 mRNA for the mir-29 family, and found that mir-29b was highly expressed in cholangiocytes. Interestingly, mir-29b was downregulated in malignant cells, consistent with Mcl-1 protein upregulation. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 protein expression in KMCH cells. This effect was direct, as mir-29b negatively regulated the expression of an Mcl-1 3' untranslated region (UTR)-based reporter construct. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 cellular protein levels and sensitized the cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) cytotoxicity. Transfection of non-malignant cells (that express high levels of mir-29) with a locked-nucleic acid antagonist of mir-29b increased Mcl-1 levels and reduced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Thus mir-29 is an endogenous regulator of Mcl-1 protein expression, and thereby, apoptosis. PMID:17404574

  16. mir-29 Regulates Mcl-1 Protein Expression and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Justin L.; Kobayashi, Shogo; Bronk, Steven F.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is tightly regulated. Recently, Bcl-2 expression was shown to be regulated by microRNAs, small endogenous RNA molecules that regulate protein expression through sequence-specific interaction with messenger RNA. By analogy, we reasoned that Mcl-1 expression may also be regulated by microRNAs. We chose human immortalized, but non-malignant, H69 cholangiocyte and malignant KMCH cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for these studies because Mcl-1 is dysregulated in cells with the malignant phenotype. In silico analysis identified a putative target site in the Mcl-1 mRNA for the mir-29 family, and we found that mir-29b was highly expressed in cholangiocytes. Interestingly, mir-29b was downregulated in malignant cells, consistent with Mcl-1 protein upregulation. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 protein expression in KMCH cells. This effect was direct, as mir-29b negatively regulated expression of an Mcl-1 3’ untranslated region (UTR)-based reporter construct. Enforced mir-29b expression reduced Mcl-1 cellular protein levels and sensitized the cancer cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Transfection of non-malignant cells (that express high levels of mir-29) with a locked-nucleic acid antagonist of mir-29b increased Mcl-1 levels and reduced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Thus mir-29 is an endogenous regulator of Mcl-1 protein expression and, thereby, apoptosis. PMID:17404574

  17. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B; Patel, Trushar R; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  18. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B.; Patel, Trushar R.; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  19. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  20. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  1. Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array: A Just-In-Time Multiplexed Protein Expression and Purification Platform

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally. PMID:21943897

  2. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  3. Timosaponin A-III reverses multi-drug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells via downregulation of MDR1 and MRP1 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Ru; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Hong; Yi, Ying-Jie; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie

    2016-05-01

    One of the major causes of failure in chemotherapy for patients with human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is the acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR is often associated with the overexpression of drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family. Timosaponin A-III (TAIII), a saponin isolated from the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides, has previously demonstrated the ability to suppress certain human tumor processes and the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent. Nevertheless, the ability of TAIII to reverse MDR has not yet been explored. In this study, the adriamycin (ADM) resistance reversal effect of TAIII in human CML K562/ADM cells and the underlying mechanism was investigated. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay showed that TAIII had a reversal effect on the drug resistance of K562/ADM cells. Flow cytometry assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of ADM after cells were pretreated with TAIII, and the changes in the accumulation of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) dye in K562/ADM cells were determined to be similar to the changes of intracellular accumulation of ADM. After pretreatment of cells with TAIII, the decreasing expression of P-gp and MRP1 mRNA was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blotting showed TAIII inhibiting P-gp and MRP1 expression depended on the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway by decreasing the activity of p-Akt. Moreover, wortmannin an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway has a strong inhibitory effect on the expression of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Besides, the combined treatment with TAIII did not have an affect on wortmannin downregulation of p-Akt, P-gp and MRP1. Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TAIII induced MDR reversal through inhibition of P-gp and MRP1 expression and function with regained adriamycin sensitivity which might mainly correlate to the regulation of PI3K

  4. Evolution, diversification, and expression of KNOX proteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yang, Xue; Zhao, Wei; Lang, Tiange; Samuelsson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    The KNOX (KNOTTED1-like homeobox) transcription factors play a pivotal role in leaf and meristem development. The majority of these proteins are characterized by the KNOX1, KNOX2, ELK, and homeobox domains whereas the proteins of the KNATM family contain only the KNOX domains. We carried out an extensive inventory of these proteins and here report on a total of 394 KNOX proteins from 48 species. The land plant proteins fall into two classes (I and II) as previously shown where the class I family seems to be most closely related to the green algae homologs. The KNATM proteins are restricted to Eudicots and some species have multiple paralogs of this protein. Certain plants are characterized by a significant increase in the number of KNOX paralogs; one example is Glycine max. Through the analysis of public gene expression data we show that the class II proteins of this plant have a relatively broad expression specificity as compared to class I proteins, consistent with previous studies of other plants. In G. max, class I protein are mainly distributed in axis tissues and KNATM paralogs are overall poorly expressed; highest expression is in the early plumular axis. Overall, analysis of gene expression in G. max demonstrates clearly that the expansion in gene number is associated with functional diversification. PMID:26557129

  5. Expression of Recombinant Proteins in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Maria; Taupp, Marcus; Hallam, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein expression in the microbial eukaryotic host Pichia pastoris offers the possibility to generate high amounts of recombinant protein in a fast and easy to use expression system. As a single-celled microorganism P. pastoris is easy to manipulate and grows rapidly on inexpensive media at high cell densities. Being a eukaryote, P. pastoris is able to perform many of the post-translational modifications performed by higher eukaryotic cells and the obtained recombinant proteins undergo protein folding, proteolytic processing, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation [1]. As a methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris is capable of metabolizing methanol as its sole carbon source. The strong promoter for alcohol oxidase, AOX1, is tightly regulated and induced by methanol and it is used for the expression of the gene of interest. Accordingly, the expression of the foreign protein can be induced by adding methanol to the growth medium [2; 3]. Another important advantage is the secretion of the recombinant protein into the growth medium, using a signal sequence to target the foreign protein to the secretory pathway of P. pastoris. With only low levels of endogenous protein secreted to the media by the yeast itself and no added proteins to the media, a heterologous protein builds the majority of the total protein in the medium and facilitates following protein purification steps [3; 4]. The vector used here (pPICZαA) contains the AOX1 promoter for tightly regulated, methanol-induced expression of the gene of interest; the α-factor secretion signal for secretion of the recombinant protein, a Zeocin resistance gene for selection in both E. coli and Pichia and a C-terminal peptide containing the c-myc epitope and a polyhistidine (6xHis) tag for detection and purification of a recombinant protein. We also show western blot analysis of the recombinant protein using the specific Anti-myc-HRP antibody recognizing the c-myc epitope on the parent vector. PMID:20186119

  6. Engineering Cells to Improve Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Su; Shiloach, Joseph; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular engineering of bacteria, fungi, insect cells and mammalian cells is a promising methodology to improve recombinant protein production for structural, biochemical, and commercial applications. Increased understanding of the host organism biology has suggested engineering strategies targeting bottlenecks in transcription, translation, protein processing and secretory pathways, as well as cell growth and survival. A combination of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology has been used to improve the properties of cells for protein production, which has resulted in enhanced yields of multiple protein classes. PMID:24704806

  7. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  8. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27373589

  9. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  10. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals. PMID:19156736

  11. Protein expression analyses at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masae; Karagiannis, Peter; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level. PMID:25197931

  12. Expression of trisomic proteins in Down syndrome model systems.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Claire; Ahmed, Md Mahiuddin; Dubach, Daphne; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2013-01-10

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic aberration leading to intellectual disability. DS results from an extra copy of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) and the increased expression of trisomic genes due to gene dosage. While expression in DS and DS models has been studied extensively at the RNA level, much less is known about expression of trisomic genes at the protein level. We have used quantitative Western blotting with antibodies to 20 proteins encoded by HSA21 to assess trisomic protein expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from patients with DS and in brains from two mouse models of DS. These antibodies have recently become available and the 20 proteins largely have not been investigated previously for their potential contributions to the phenotypic features of DS. Twelve proteins had detectable expression in LCLs and three, CCT8, MX1 and PWP2, showed elevated levels in LCLs derived from patients with DS compared with controls. Antibodies against 15 proteins detected bands of appropriate sizes in lysates from mouse brain cortex. Genes for 12 of these proteins are trisomic in the Tc1 mouse model of DS, but only SIM2 and ZNF295 showed elevated expression in Tc1 cortex when compared with controls. Genes for eight of the 15 proteins are trisomic in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, but only ZNF294 was over expressed in cortex. Comparison of trisomic gene expression at the protein level with previous reports at the mRNA level showed many inconsistencies. These may be caused by natural inter-individual variability, differences in the age of mice analyzed, or post-transcriptional regulation of gene dosage effects. These antibodies provide resources for further investigation of the molecular basis of intellectual disability in DS. PMID:23103828

  13. Human SUMO fusion systems enhance protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Haolong; Guan, Wei; Ling, Haili; Wang, Zhiyong; Mu, Tianyang; Shuler, Franklin D; Fang, Xuexun

    2010-10-01

    A major challenge associated with recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is generation of large quantities of soluble, functional protein. Yeast SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier), has been shown to enhance heterologous protein expression and solubility as fusion tag, however, the effects of human SUMOs on protein expression have not been investigated. Here we describe the use of human SUMO1 and SUMO2 as a useful gene fusion technology. Human SUMO1 and SUMO2 fusion expression vectors were constructed and tested in His-tag and ubiquitin fusion expression systems. Two difficult-to-express model proteins, matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP13) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) were fused to the C-terminus of the human SUMO1 and SUMO2 expression vectors. These constructs were expressed in E. coli and evaluation of MMP13 and eGFP expression and solubility was conducted. We found that both SUMO1 and SUMO2 had the ability to enhance the solubility of MMP13 and eGFP, with the SUMO2 tag having a more significant effect. Since fusion tags produce varying quantities of soluble proteins, we assessed the effect of SUMO2 coupled with ubiquitin (Ub). SUMO2-ubiquitin and ubiquitin-SUMO2 fusion expression plasmids were constructed with eGFP as a passenger protein. Following expression in E. coli, both plasmids could improve eGFP expression and solubility similar to the SUMO2 fusion and better than the ubiquitin fusion. The sequential order of SUMO2 and ubiquitin had little effect on expression and solubility of eGFP. Purification of eGFP from the gene fusion product, SUMO2-ubiquitin-eGFP, involved cleavage by a deubiquitinase (Usp2-cc) and Ni-Sepharose column chromatography. The eGFP protein was purified to high homogeneity. In summary, human SUMO1 and SUMO2 are useful gene fusion technologies enhancing the expression, solubility and purification of model heterologous proteins. PMID:20457256

  14. Induction of a multixenobiotic resistance protein (MXR) in the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea after heavy metals exposure.

    PubMed

    Achard, M; Baudrimont, M; Boudou, A; Bourdineaud, J P

    2004-05-12

    Multixenobiotic resistance mechanisms (MXR) related to the mammalian P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter protein (P-gp) are known to occur in several marine invertebrates. In the present work, we report on the induction of an MXR protein by various heavy metals in the gills of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea. The evaluation of the MXR protein level was assessed by Western blot using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against the human P-gp (C219). A field transplantation experiment, where clams were caged in a gradient relative to an industrial site, demonstrated a positive relationship between MXR levels and (a) metal pollution (Cd and Zn) in the environment and (b) metal bioaccumulation in the gills. To establish this correlative relationship, clams were exposed to different levels of cadmium (15-60 microg l(-1)) for up to 15 days in a controlled laboratory experiment. MXR protein levels increased in time for all treatments (including the control). However, the highest levels of MXR protein titer were expressed in clams that had been exposed to the lowest dose of cadmium. The causes for this observed inverse relationship between the exposure dose and the MXR induction is discussed. MXR protein titer was also shown to be induced by other heavy metals (zinc, inorganic mercury, and copper). PMID:15084411

  15. In vitro potential modulation of baicalin and baicalein on P-glycoprotein activity and expression in Caco-2 cells and rat gut sacs.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qing; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Miao, Peipei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yujie; Ma, Shuangcheng

    2016-09-01

    Context Previous studies have shown that Scutellariae Radix, the dried root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (Labiatae), has a certain inhibitory effect on P-glycoprotein (P-gp), but the effects of its main active constituents on P-gp are still ambiguous. Objectives In vitro studies were performed to investigate the effects of its main active constituents (baicalin and its aglycone, baicalein) on the activity and expression of P-gp in intestine using Caco-2 cells and rat gut sacs. Materials and methods In Caco-2 cell experiments, the effects of baicalin and baicalein on P-gp activity were investigated using a P-gp substrate, rhodamine 123 and non-substrate fluorescein Na, by determining their intracellular fluorescence accumulation, and their effects on P-gp expression were determined using flow cytometry. In addition, rat gut sac model was selected to investigate the effects of baicalin and baicalein on the transport of verapamil, a classical P-gp substrate. The gut sacs of male Sprague-Dawley rats were filled with 0.4 mL the test solution contained verapamil (0.2575 mg/mL) and the drugs [baicalin and baicalein, at concentrations of 1/8 IC50 (59.875, 41.5 μg/mL), 1/4 IC50 (119.75, 83 μg/mL) and 1/2 IC50 (239.5, 166 μg/mL)], and then incubated in Tyrode's solution for a period of time. After termination of the incubation, the incubated solution was processed for the subsequent detection. Results According to the results of MTT assay, the IC50 values of verapamil, baicalin and baicalein were 104, 479, 332 μg/mL, respectively. The obtained results from the two models were confirmed mutually. As a result, baicalin exhibited no obvious effect on intracellular accumulation of Rh-123, and almost had no effect on P-gp expression and verapamil transportation, while baicalein significantly increased intracellular accumulation of Rh-123 (p < 0.01), down-regulated P-gp expression (p < 0.01) and increased the transport of verapamil (p < 0

  16. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  17. Proteins and an Inflammatory Network Expressed in Colon Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhong; Fang, Changming; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Niemeyer, Christina C.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is crucial to homeostasis of normal intestinal epithelia because it suppresses the β-catenin/TCF pathway. Consequently, loss or mutation of the APC gene causes colorectal tumors in humans and mice. Here, we describe our use of Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to compare protein expression in colon tumors to that of adjacent healthy colon tissue from ApcMin/+ mice. Twenty-seven proteins were found to be up-regulated in colon tumors and twenty-five down-regulated. As an extension of the proteomic analysis, the differentially expressed proteins were used as “seeds” to search for co-expressed genes. This approach revealed a co-expression network of 45 genes that is up-regulated in colon tumors. Members of the network include the antibacterial peptide cathelicidin (CAMP), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-8, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM1). The co-expression network is associated with innate immunity and inflammation, and there is significant concordance between its connectivity in humans versus mice (Friedman: p value = 0.0056). This study provides new insights into the proteins and networks that are likely to drive the onset and progression of colon cancer. PMID:21366352

  18. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J.; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  19. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  20. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  1. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  2. Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in yeast cells expressing neurotoxic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ralf J.

    2015-01-01

    Critically impaired protein degradation is discussed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and motor neuron diseases. Misfolded, aggregated, or surplus proteins are efficiently degraded via distinct protein degradation pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, autophagy, and vesicular trafficking. These pathways are regulated by covalent modification of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and are evolutionary highly conserved from humans to yeast. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mechanisms of protein degradation, and for the elucidation of pathways underlying programmed cell death. The expression of human neurotoxic proteins triggers cell death in yeast, with neurotoxic protein-specific differences. Therefore, yeast cell death models are suitable for analyzing the role of protein degradation pathways in modulating cell death upon expression of disease-causing proteins. This review summarizes which protein degradation pathways are affected in these yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic models, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of human disorders. PMID:25814926

  3. Translation Levels Control Multi-Spanning Membrane Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cecilia; Bostrom, Jenny; Fuh, Germaine; Lee, Chingwei V.; Huang, Arthur; Vandlen, Richard L.; Yansura, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to express eukaryotic multi-spanning membrane proteins at high-levels have been generally unsuccessful. In order to investigate the cause of this limitation and gain insight into the rate limiting processes involved, we have analyzed the effect of translation levels on the expression of several human membrane proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli). These results demonstrate that excessive translation initiation rates of membrane proteins cause a block in protein synthesis and ultimately prevent the high-level accumulation of these proteins. Moderate translation rates allow coupling of peptide synthesis and membrane targeting, resulting in a significant increase in protein expression and accumulation over time. The current study evaluates four membrane proteins, CD20 (4-transmembrane (TM) helixes), the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, 7-TMs) RA1c and EG-VEGFR1, and Patched 1 (12-TMs), and demonstrates the critical role of translation initiation rates in the targeting, insertion and folding of integral membrane proteins in the E. coli membrane. PMID:22563408

  4. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase

  5. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  6. A study protocol for quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) by LC-MS/MS: application for inter-strain differences in protein expression levels of transporters, receptors, claudin-5, and marker proteins at the blood–brain barrier in ddY, FVB, and C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics has opened a new horizon in biological sciences. Global proteomic analysis is a promising technology for the discovery of thousands of proteins, post-translational modifications, polymorphisms, and molecular interactions in a variety of biological systems. The activities and roles of the identified proteins must also be elucidated, but this is complicated by the inability of conventional proteomic methods to yield quantitative information for protein expression. Thus, a variety of biological systems remain “black boxes”. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) enables the determination of absolute expression levels (mol) of any target protein, including low-abundance functional proteins, such as transporters and receptors. Therefore, QTAP will be useful for understanding the activities and roles of individual proteins and their differences, including normal/disease, human/animal, or in vitro/in vivo. Here, we describe the study protocols and precautions for QTAP experiments including in silico target peptide selection, determination of peptide concentration by amino acid analysis, setup of selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) analysis in liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, preparation of protein samples (brain capillaries and plasma membrane fractions) followed by the preparation of peptide samples, simultaneous absolute quantification of target proteins by SRM/MRM analysis, data analysis, and troubleshooting. An application of QTAP in biological sciences was introduced that utilizes data from inter-strain differences in the protein expression levels of transporters, receptors, tight junction proteins and marker proteins at the blood–brain barrier in ddY, FVB, and C57BL/6J mice. Among 18 molecules, 13 (abcb1a/mdr1a/P-gp, abcc4/mrp4, abcg2/bcrp, slc2a1/glut1, slc7a5/lat1, slc16a1/mct1, slc22a8/oat3, insr, lrp1, tfr1, claudin-5, Na+/K+-ATPase, and γ-gtp) were detected in the isolated brain capillaries, and their

  7. Mapping the expression of soluble olfactory proteins in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Dani, Francesca Romana; Iovinella, Immacolata; Felicioli, Antonio; Niccolini, Alberto; Calvello, Maria Antonietta; Carucci, Maria Giovanna; Qiao, Huili; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Turillazzi, Stefano; Moneti, Gloriano; Pelosi, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Chemical communication in insects is mediated by soluble binding proteins, belonging to two large families, Odorant-binding Proteins (OBPs) and Chemosensory Proteins (CSPs). Recently, evidence has been provided that OBPs are involved in recognition of chemical stimuli. We therefore decided to investigate the expression of OBPs and CSPs in the honeybee at the protein level, using a proteomic approach. Our results are in agreement with previous reports of expression at the RNA level and show that 12 of the 21 OBPs predicted in the genome of the honeybee Apis mellifera and 2 of the 6 CSPs are present in the foragers' antennae, while the larvae express only three OBPs and a single CSP. MALDI mass spectrometry on crude antennal extracts and MALDI profiling on sections of antennae demonstrated that these techniques can be applied to investigate individual differences in the expression of abundant proteins, such as OBPs and CSPs, as well as to detect the presence of proteins in different regions of the antenna. Finally, as part of a project aimed at the characterization of all OBPs and CSPs of the honeybee, we expressed 5 OBPs and 4 CSPs in a bacterial system and measured their affinity to a number of ligands. Clear differences in their binding spectra have been observed between OBPs, as well as CSPs. PMID:20155982

  8. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes. PMID:26237676

  9. Individual expression of influenza virus PA protein induces degradation of coexpressed proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ezquerro, J J; de la Luna, S; Ortín, J; Nieto, A

    1995-01-01

    In the process of in vivo reconstitution of influenza virus transcriptase-replicase complex, an inhibitory effect was observed when the level of PA protein expression was increased. This inhibition was paralleled by a decrease in the accumulation of the other influenza virus core proteins. The sole expression of PA protein was sufficient to reduce the accumulation level of the proteins encoded by the coexpressed genes. The PA effect was observed upon influenza virus and non-influenza virus proteins and independently of the expression system chosen and the origin of cell line used. The expression of PA protein did not induce variations in the translation of the target proteins but did induce variations on their half-lives, which were clearly reduced. A functional PA subunit seems to be necessary to induce this negative effect, because an inactive point mutant was unable to decrease the steady-state levels or the half-lives of the reporter proteins. The PA effect was observed as early as 5 h after its expression, and continuous synthesis of proteins was not required for performance of its biological activity. The results presented represent the first biological activity of individually expressed PA polymerase subunit. PMID:7884889

  10. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced. PMID:27485335

  11. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ

  12. Expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 by reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Geisert, E E; Johnson, H G; Binder, L I

    1990-01-01

    After an injury to the central nervous system, a dramatic change in the astrocytes bordering the wound occurs. The most characteristic feature of this process, termed reactive gliosis, is the upregulation of the intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the present study, we show that reactive astrocytes express high levels of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), a protein normally found in the somatodendritic compartment of neurons. When sections of injured brain are double-stained with antibodies directed against MAP-2 and glial fibrillary protein, all of the reactive astrocytes are found to contain MAP-2. The high levels of this protein appear to represent a permanent change in reactive astrocytes. In parallel quantitative studies, an elevated level of MAP-2 in the injured brain is confirmed by an immunoblot analysis of injured and normal white matter. This report demonstrates the direct involvement of a microtubule protein in the process of reactive gliosis. Images PMID:1692628

  13. Expressing and purifying membrane transport proteins in high yield.

    PubMed

    Hale, Calvin C; Hill, Chananada K; Price, Elmer M; Bossuyt, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Structural analysis of native or recombinant membrane transport proteins has been hampered by the lack of effective methodologies to purify sufficient quantities of active protein. We addressed this problem by expressing a polyhistidine tagged construct of the cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX1) in Trichoplusia ni larvae (caterpillars) from which membrane vesicles were prepared. Larvae vesicles containing recombinant NCX1-his protein supported NCX1 transport activity that was mechanistically not different from activity in native cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles although the specific activity was reduced. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of both the 120 and 70 kDa forms of the NCX1 protein. Larvae vesicle proteins were solubilized in sodium cholate detergent and fractionated on a chelated Ni(2+) affinity chromatography column. After extensive washing, eluted fractions were mixed with soybean phospholipids and reconstituted. The resulting proteoliposomes contained NCX1 activity suggesting the protein retained native conformation. SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at 120 and 70 kDa. Purification of large amounts of active NCX1 via this methodology should facilitate biophysical analysis of the protein. The larva expression system has broad-based application for membrane proteins where expression and purification of quantities required for physical analyses is problematic. PMID:11741710

  14. EGFR/HER2 inhibitors effectively reduce the malignant potential of MDR breast cancer evoked by P-gp substrates in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yiting; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hongying; Zhang, Zijing; Chu, Chengyu; Liu, Xiuping; Zou, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by chemotherapy in breast cancer frequently leads to tumor invasion, metastasis and poor clinical outcome. We preliminarily found that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in enhancing the malignant potential of MDR breast cancer cells, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated in vitro and in vivo that EGFR/HER2 promote the invasive and metastatic abilities of MDR breast cancer. More importantly, a new function of EGFR/HER2 inhibitors was revealed for the first time, which could improve the treatment efficacy of breast cancer by reversing the MDR process rather than by inhibiting tumor growth. Firstly, using quantitative real‑time PCR and western blot analysis, we found that overexpression of EGFR/HER2 in MCF7/Adr cells upregulated CD147 and MMP2/9 at both the transcription and protein expression levels, which promoted tumor cell migration, as determined using an in vitro invasion assay. Secondly, the upregulated levels of CD147 and MMP2/9 were decreased when EGFR/HER2 activity was inhibited, and therefore tumor invasion was also significantly inhibited. These phenomena were also demonstrated in nude mouse assays. Additionally, in MDR breast cancer patients, we found that overexpression of EGFR and P‑gp levels led to shorter overall survival (OS) and disease‑free survival (DFS) by IHC assays and Kaplan‑Meier survival analysis. In conclusion, EGFR/HER2 play a crucial role in enhancing CD147 and MMP expression to establish favorable conditions for invasion/metastasis in MDR breast cancer. The scope of application of EGFR/HER2 inhibitors may be expanded in EGFR/HER2‑positive patients. We suggest that MDR breast cancer patients may benefit from novel therapies targeting EGFR/HER2. PMID:26718028

  15. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: A macroarray study

    PubMed Central

    FUTYMA, KONRAD; MIOTŁA, PAWEŁ; RÓŻYŃSKA, KRYSTYNA; ZDUNEK, MAŁGORZATA; SEMCZUK, ANDRZEJ; RECHBERGER, TOMASZ; WOJCIEROWSKI, JACEK

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs. PMID:25231141

  16. Genome engineering for improved recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mahalik, Shubhashree; Sharma, Ashish K; Mukherjee, Krishna J

    2014-01-01

    A metabolic engineering perspective which views recombinant protein expression as a multistep pathway allows us to move beyond vector design and identify the downstream rate limiting steps in expression. In E.coli these are typically at the translational level and the supply of precursors in the form of energy, amino acids and nucleotides. Further recombinant protein production triggers a global cellular stress response which feedback inhibits both growth and product formation. Countering this requires a system level analysis followed by a rational host cell engineering to sustain expression for longer time periods. Another strategy to increase protein yields could be to divert the metabolic flux away from biomass formation and towards recombinant protein production. This would require a growth stoppage mechanism which does not affect the metabolic activity of the cell or the transcriptional or translational efficiencies. Finally cells have to be designed for efficient export to prevent buildup of proteins inside the cytoplasm and also simplify downstream processing. The rational and the high throughput strategies that can be used for the construction of such improved host cell platforms for recombinant protein expression is the focus of this review. PMID:25523647

  17. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system. PMID:23996319

  18. Identification of prognostic biomarkers for glioblastomas using protein expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, YONG; JOO, KYEUNG MIN; SEONG, DONG HO; CHOI, YOON-LA; KONG, DOO-SIK; KIM, YONGHYUN; KIM, MI HYUN; JIN, JUYOUN; SUH, YEON-LIM; SEOL, HO JUN; SHIN, CHUL SOO; LEE, JUNG-IL; KIM, JONG-HYUN; SONG, SANG YONG; NAM, DO-HYUN

    2012-01-01

    A set of proteins reflecting the prognosis of patients have clinical significance since they could be utilized as predictive biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets. With the aim of finding novel diagnostic and prognostic markers for glioblastoma (GBM), a tissue microarray (TMA) library consisting of 62 GBMs and 28 GBM-associated normal spots was constructed. Immunohistochemistry against 78 GBM-associated proteins was performed. Expression levels of each protein for each patient were analyzed using an image analysis program and converted to H-score [summation of the intensity grade of staining (0–3) multiplied by the percentage of positive cells corresponding to each grade]. Based on H-score and hierarchical clustering methods, we divided the GBMs into two groups (n=19 and 37) that had significantly different survival lengths (p<0.05). In the two groups, expression of nine proteins (survivin, cyclin E, DCC, TGF-β, CDC25B, histone H1, p-EGFR, p-VEGFR2/3, p16) was significantly changed (q<0.05). Prognosis-predicting potential of these proteins were validated with another independent library of 82 GBM TMAs and a public GBM DNA microarray dataset. In addition, we determined 32 aberrant or mislocalized subcellular protein expression patterns in GBMs compared with relatively normal brain tissues, which could be useful for diagnostic biomarkers of GBM. We therefore suggest that these proteins can be used as predictive biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets for GBM. PMID:22179774

  19. Protein Co-Expression Network Analysis (ProCoNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, David L.; Baratt, Arie; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Smith, Richard D.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Katze, Michael G.; Mcweeney, Shannon K.

    2013-06-01

    Biological networks are important for elucidating disease etiology due to their ability to model complex high dimensional data and biological systems. Proteomics provides a critical data source for such models, but currently lacks robust de novo methods for network construction, which could bring important insights in systems biology. We have evaluated the construction of network models using methods derived from weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). We show that approximately scale-free peptide networks, composed of statistically significant modules, are feasible and biologically meaningful using two mouse lung experiments and one human plasma experiment. Within each network, peptides derived from the same protein are shown to have a statistically higher topological overlap and concordance in abundance, which is potentially important for inferring protein abundance. The module representatives, called eigenpeptides, correlate significantly with biological phenotypes. Furthermore, within modules, we find significant enrichment for biological function and known interactions (gene ontology and protein-protein interactions). Biological networks are important tools in the analysis of complex systems. In this paper we evaluate the application of weighted co-expression network analysis to quantitative proteomics data. Protein co-expression networks allow novel approaches for biological interpretation, quality control, inference of protein abundance, a framework for potentially resolving degenerate peptide-protein mappings, and a biomarker signature discovery.

  20. Hedyotis diffusa Willd overcomes 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colorectal cancer HCT-8/5-FU cells by downregulating the expression of P-glycoprotein and ATP-binding casette subfamily G member 2

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIONGYU; WANG, XIANGFENG; SHEN, ALING; ZHANG, YUCHEN; CHEN, YOUQIN; SFERRA, THOMAS J.; LIN, JIUMAO; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, exhibits potent anticancer activity in models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Aggressive forms of CRC exhibit resistance to widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, including the antimetabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, less is known with regard to the activity of HDW against 5-FU-resistant cancer. In the present study, the mechanism of action and the potency of ethanol extracts of HDW (EEHDW) were investigated on a multidrug-resistant CRC HCT-8/5-FU cell line. Using an MTT cell proliferation assay, EEHDW treatment was shown to significantly reduce the cell viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EEHDW significantly increased the retention of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate, rhodamine-123, as compared with the untreated controls. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms targeted by EEHDW in the resistant cells, the expression levels of the ABC drug transporter protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2), were analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp and ABCG2 were reduced in the HCT-8/5-FU cells following EEHDW treatment, indicating that EEHDW inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by downregulating the expression of ABCG2 and P-gp. Therefore, the potential application of EEHDW as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant represents a promising alternative approach to the treatment of drug-resistant CRC. PMID:26640560

  1. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Tabor, Kathryn M.; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A.

    2015-01-01

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3′ untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models. PMID:25628360

  2. Expression of P-glycoprotein in excised human nasal mucosa and optimized models of RPMI 2650 cells.

    PubMed

    Dolberg, Anne M; Reichl, Stephan

    2016-07-11

    To assess the transmucosal drug transport in the development of medications for intranasal administration, cellular in vitro models are preferred over the use of animal tissues due to inter-species variations and ethical concerns. With regard to the distribution of active agents and multidrug resistance, the ABC transporter P-glycoprotein plays a major role in several mammalian tissues. The present study compares the expression of this efflux pump in optimized in vitro models based on the human RPMI 2650 cell line with specimens of human turbinate mucosa. The presence of the ABCB1 gene was investigated at the mRNA and protein levels using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in differently cultured RPMI 2650 cells and excised human nasal epithelium. Furthermore, the localization and activity of P-gp was examined by immunohistochemical staining and functionality assays using different substrates in both in vitro and ex vivo models. Both mRNA and protein expression of P-gp was found in all studied models. Furthermore, transporter functionality was detected in both RPMI 2650 cell culture models and excised human mucosa. The results demonstrated a highly promising comparability between RPMI 2650 models and explants of human nasal tissue concerning the influence of MDR1 on drug disposition. The RPMI 2650 cell line might become a useful tool in preclinical trials to improve reproducibility and achieve greater applicability to humans of experimental data regarding passive diffusion and active efflux of drug candidates. PMID:27155589

  3. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  4. Recombinant baculovirus vectors expressing glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Jowett, J B; Jones, I M

    1993-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses are a popular means of producing heterologous protein in eukaryotic cells. Purification of recombinant proteins away from the insect cell background can, however, remain an obstacle for many developments. Recently, prokaryotic fusion protein expression systems have been developed allowing single-step purification of the heterologous protein and specific proteolytic cleavage of the affinity tag moiety from the desired antigen. Here we report the introduction of these attributes to the baculovirus system. "Baculo-GEX" vectors enable baculovirus production of fusion proteins with the above advantages, but in a eukaryotic post-translational processing environment. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusions are stable cytoplasmic proteins in insect cells and may therefore be released by sonication alone, avoiding the solubility problems and detergent requirements of bacterial systems. Thus large amounts of authentic antigen may be purified in a single, non-denaturing step. PMID:7763917

  5. Using ion exchange chromatography to purify a recombinantly expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEX) separates molecules by their surface charge, a property that can vary vastly between different proteins. There are two types of IEX, cation exhange and anion exchange chromatography. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors for anion exchange chromatography of a recombinantly expressed protein having a pI of 4.9 and containing two cysteine residues and one tryptophan residue, using an FPLC system. Prior to anion exchange, the protein had been salted out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and partially purified via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (see Salting out of proteins using ammonium sulfate precipitation and Use and Application of Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Protein Purification). Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment. PMID:24674065

  6. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  7. Astragaloside IV reduces the expression level of P-glycoprotein in multidrug-resistant human hepatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    WANG, PEI-PEI; XU, DU-JUAN; HUANG, CAN; WANG, WEI-PING; XU, WEN-KE

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside is a saponin widely used in traditional Chinese medicine and has been reported to be a potent multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agent. The present study investigated the role of astragaloside IV (ASIV) in the regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by the mdr1 gene) and its effect on the reversal of MDR. The activity of ASIV was evaluated using human hepatic cancer cells Bel-7402 and the corresponding 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant cells Bel-7402/FU. ASIV (0.08 mg/ml) potentiated the cytotoxicity of 5-FU which was demonstrated using the MTT assay on Bel-7402/FU cells. ASIV reduced the expression of P-gp as was revealed by immunocytochemistry. Accumulation and efflux studies with the P-gp substrate, rhodamine 123 (Rh123), demonstrated that ASIV inhibited P-gp-mediated drug efflux. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that ASIV enhanced the drug accumulation of 5-FU using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for drug resistant cells. Furthermore, ASIV may downregulate the expression of P-gp, which was examined using western blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that ASIV reverses the drug resistance of Bel-7402/FU cells by downregulating the expression of mdr1. ASIV may represent a potent modulator of P-gp-mediated MDR in hepatic cancer therapy. PMID:24676670

  8. Astragaloside Ⅳ reduces the expression level of P-glycoprotein in multidrug-resistant human hepatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Xu, Du-Juan; Huang, Can; Wang, Wei-Ping; Xu, Wen-Ke

    2014-06-01

    Astragaloside is a saponin widely used in traditional Chinese medicine and has been reported to be a potent multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agent. The present study investigated the role of astragaloside Ⅳ (ASIV) in the regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by the mdr1 gene) and its effect on the reversal of MDR. The activity of ASIV was evaluated using human hepatic cancer cells Bel-7402 and the corresponding 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant cells Bel-7402/FU. ASIV (0.08 mg/ml) potentiated the cytotoxicity of 5-FU which was demonstrated using the MTT assay on Bel-7402/FU cells. ASIV reduced the expression of P-gp as was revealed by immunocytochemistry. Accumulation and efflux studies with the P-gp substrate, rhodamine 123 (Rh123), demonstrated that ASIV inhibited P-gp-mediated drug efflux. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that ASⅣ enhanced the drug accumulation of 5-FU using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for drug resistant cells. Furthermore, ASIV may downregulate the expression of P-gp, which was examined using western blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that ASIV reverses the drug resistance of Bel-7402/FU cells by downregulating the expression of mdr1. ASIV may represent a potent modulator of P-gp-mediated MDR in hepatic cancer therapy. PMID:24676670

  9. Bovine parotid secretory protein: structure, expression and relatedness to other BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein)-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T T; Hood, K; Oden, K; McCracken, J; Morris, C A

    2003-08-01

    Members of the family of BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein)-like proteins are as yet incompletely characterized, particularly in cattle, where full-length sequence information is available for only three of the 13 family members known from other species. Structural bioinformatic analyses incorporating bovine homologues of several members of the BPI-like protein family, including two forms of bovine parotid secretory protein (PSP), showed that this family is also present in cattle. Expression analyses of several members of the BPI-like protein family in cattle, including PSP (Bsp30), von Ebner's minor salivary gland protein (VEMSGP) and lung-specific X protein (LUNX), showed a restricted pattern of expression, consistent with earlier hypotheses that these proteins function in the innate immune response to bacteria. The possible role of bovine PSP in susceptibility to pasture bloat in cattle is discussed. PMID:12887305

  10. Combining in Vitro Folding with Cell Free Protein Synthesis for Membrane Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Hein, Christopher; Hoffmann, Beate; Matulef, Kimberly; Bernhard, Frank; Dötsch, Volker; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2016-08-01

    Cell free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a promising methodology for protein expression. While polypeptide production is very reliable and efficient using CFPS, the correct cotranslational folding of membrane proteins during CFPS is still a challenge. In this contribution, we describe a two-step protocol in which the integral membrane protein is initially expressed by CFPS as a precipitate followed by an in vitro folding procedure using lipid vesicles for converting the protein precipitate to the correctly folded protein. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach for the K(+) channels KcsA and MVP and the amino acid transporter LeuT. We determine the crystal structure of the KcsA channel obtained by CFPS and in vitro folding to show the structural similarity to the cellular expressed KcsA channel and to establish the feasibility of using this two-step approach for membrane protein production for structural studies. Our studies show that the correct folding of these membrane proteins with complex topologies can take place in vitro without the involvement of the cellular machinery for membrane protein biogenesis. This indicates that the folding instructions for these complex membrane proteins are contained entirely within the protein sequence. PMID:27384110

  11. Relationship between P-glycoprotein expression and cyclosporin A in kidney. An immunohistological and cell culture study.

    PubMed Central

    García del Moral, R.; O'Valle, F.; Andújar, M.; Aguilar, M.; Lucena, M. A.; López-Hidalgo, J.; Ramírez, C.; Medina-Cano, M. T.; Aguilar, D.; Gómez-Morales, M.

    1995-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded in humans by the mdr-1 gene, acts physiologically as an efflux pump to expel hydrophobic substances from cells. This glycoprotein is closely related to multidrug resistance in tumor cells and can be modulated by cyclosporin A (CsA). We investigated the relationship between CsA and P-gp in 52 renal allograft biopsies and in cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) renal tubule cells to determine whether the intrarenal accumulation of CsA or chronic stimulation with the drug modified the expression of P-gp. Expression of P-gp and CsA was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining was evaluated semiquantitatively. Modulation of P-gp in MDCK cells after chronic stimulation with CsA for 7, 30, and 60 days was analyzed by flow cytometry. P-gp and CsA immunostaining in renal post-transplant biopsies showed considerable overlap in all cases (Spearman's test, r = 0.577, P < 0.001). After 7 days in vitro, the number of cells expressing P-gp increased progressively; a further increase in mean fluorescence was found after 60 days (P < 0.001, Student's t-test). Our findings suggest that in non-neoplastic cells, CsA may stimulate P-gp as a mechanism of detoxification. Individual differences in the adaptive responses to glycoprotein may be responsible for the appearance of nephrotoxicity or a CsA-resistant rejection reaction in cases of overexpression on lymphocytes and macrophages. Images Figure 1 PMID:7856751

  12. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  13. p53 AND MDM2 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN ACTINIC CHEILITIS

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Maria da Conceição Andrade; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Moreira, André Luis Gomes; Reis, Sílvia Regina Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant lip lesion caused by excessive and prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to histomorphological alterations indicative of abnormal cell differentiation. In this pathology, varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia may be found. There are few published studies regarding the p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis. Fifty-eight cases diagnosed with actinic cheilitis were histologically evaluated using Banóczy and Csiba (1976) parameters, and were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using the streptavidin-biotin method in order to assess p53 and MDM2 protein expression. All studied cases expressed p53 proteins in basal and suprabasal layers. In the basal layer, the nuclei testing positive for p53 were stained intensely, while in the suprabasal layer, cells with slightly stained nuclei were predominant. All cases also tested positive for the MDM2 protein, but with varying degrees of nuclear expression and a predominance of slightly stained cells. A statistically significant correlation between the percentage of p53 and MDM2-positive cells was established, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. The expression of p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis can be an important indicator in lip carcinogenesis, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. PMID:19082401

  14. Beyond protein expression, MOPED goes multi-omics.

    PubMed

    Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Stanberry, Larissa; Lee, Elaine; Choiniere, John; Anderson, Nathaniel; Stewart, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    MOPED (Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database; http://moped.proteinspire.org) has transitioned from solely a protein expression database to a multi-omics resource for human and model organisms. Through a web-based interface, MOPED presents consistently processed data for gene, protein and pathway expression. To improve data quality, consistency and use, MOPED includes metadata detailing experimental design and analysis methods. The multi-omics data are integrated through direct links between genes and proteins and further connected to pathways and experiments. MOPED now contains over 5 million records, information for approximately 75,000 genes and 50,000 proteins from four organisms (human, mouse, worm, yeast). These records correspond to 670 unique combinations of experiment, condition, localization and tissue. MOPED includes the following new features: pathway expression, Pathway Details pages, experimental metadata checklists, experiment summary statistics and more advanced searching tools. Advanced searching enables querying for genes, proteins, experiments, pathways and keywords of interest. The system is enhanced with visualizations for comparing across different data types. In the future MOPED will expand the number of organisms, increase integration with pathways and provide connections to disease. PMID:25404128

  15. Interfacial polymerization for colorimetric labeling of protein expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Sheldon, Phillip R; Hoversten, Liv J; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  16. Interfacial Polymerization for Colorimetric Labeling of Protein Expression in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Jacob L.; Sheldon, Phillip R.; Hoversten, Liv J.; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  17. Beyond protein expression, MOPED goes multi-omics

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Stanberry, Larissa; Lee, Elaine; Choiniere, John; Anderson, Nathaniel; Stewart, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    MOPED (Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database; http://moped.proteinspire.org) has transitioned from solely a protein expression database to a multi-omics resource for human and model organisms. Through a web-based interface, MOPED presents consistently processed data for gene, protein and pathway expression. To improve data quality, consistency and use, MOPED includes metadata detailing experimental design and analysis methods. The multi-omics data are integrated through direct links between genes and proteins and further connected to pathways and experiments. MOPED now contains over 5 million records, information for approximately 75 000 genes and 50 000 proteins from four organisms (human, mouse, worm, yeast). These records correspond to 670 unique combinations of experiment, condition, localization and tissue. MOPED includes the following new features: pathway expression, Pathway Details pages, experimental metadata checklists, experiment summary statistics and more advanced searching tools. Advanced searching enables querying for genes, proteins, experiments, pathways and keywords of interest. The system is enhanced with visualizations for comparing across different data types. In the future MOPED will expand the number of organisms, increase integration with pathways and provide connections to disease. PMID:25404128

  18. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities.

    PubMed

    Völler, Daniel; Linck, Lisa; Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  19. The Expression and Significance of Neuronal Iconic Proteins in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongxia; Hu, Ruimin; Sun, Jianyong; Mao, Xing; Zhao, Zhonghua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that there are many common cell biological features shared by neurons and podocytes; however, the mechanism of podocyte foot process formation remains unclear. Comparing the mechanisms of process formation between two cell types should provide useful guidance from the progress of neuron research. Studies have shown that some mature proteins of podocytes, such as podocin, nephrin, and synaptopodin, were also expressed in neurons. In this study, using cell biological experiments and immunohistochemical techniques, we showed that some neuronal iconic molecules, such as Neuron-specific enolase, nestin and Neuron-specific nuclear protein, were also expressed in podocytes. We further inhibited the expression of Neuron-specific enolase, nestin, synaptopodin and Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase-1 by Small interfering RNA in cultured mouse podocytes and observed the significant morphological changes in treated podocytes. When podocytes were treated with Adriamycin, the protein expression of Neuron-specific enolase, nestin, synaptopodin and Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase-1 decreased over time. Meanwhile, the morphological changes in the podocytes were consistent with results of the Small interfering RNA treatment of these proteins. The data demonstrated that neuronal iconic proteins play important roles in maintaining and regulating the formation and function of podocyte processes. PMID:24699703

  20. Expression of bone matrix proteins in urolithiasis model rats.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Fujita, K; Sasaki, S; Sato, M; Sugimoto, M; Hirota, S; Kitamura, Y; Nomura, S; Kohri, K

    1999-08-01

    Urinary calcium stones are a pathological substance, and they show similarities to physiological mineralization and other pathological mineralizations. The expression of messenger (m) RNAs of osteopontin (OPN), matrix Gla protein (MGP), osteonectin (ON) and osteocalcin (OC) in bones and teeth has been described. We previously identified OPN as an important stone matrix protein. In addition, the spontaneous calcification of arteries and cartilage in mice lacking MGP was recently reported, a finding which indicates that MGP has a function as an inhibitor of mineralization. Here, we examined the mRNA expressions of OPN, MGP, ON, and OC in the kidneys of stone-forming model rats administered an oxalate precursor, ethylene glycol (EG) for up to 28 days. The Northern blotting showed that the mRNA expressions of OPN and MGP were markedly increased with the administration of EG, but their expression patterns differed. The OPN mRNA expression reached the maximal level at day 7 after the initiation of the EG treatment and showed no significant difference after 14 and 28 days, whereas the MGP mRNA expression rose gradually to day 28. The in situ hybridization demonstrated that the cell type expressing OPN mRNA was different from that expressing MGP. We suggest that OPN acts on calcification and MGP acts on suppression. PMID:10460895

  1. hTERT protein expression is independent of clinicopathological parameters and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elkak, AE; Meligonis, G; Salhab, M; Mitchell, B; Blake, JRS; Newbold, RF; Mokbel, K

    2005-01-01

    Background Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that synthesises telomeres after cell division and maintains chromosomal length and stability thus leading to cellular immortalisation. The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) subunit seems to be the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase and knowledge of factors controlling hTERT transcription may be useful in therapeutic strategies. The hTERT promoter contains binding sites for c-Myc and there is some experimental and in vitro evidence that c-Myc may increase hTERT expression. We previously reported no correlation between c-Myc mRNA expression and hTERT mRNA or telomerase activity in human breast cancer. This study aims to examine the correlation between hTERT expression as determined by immunohistochemistry and c-Myc expression, lymph node status, and tumour size and grade in human breast cancer. Materials and methods The immunohistochemical expression of hTERT and c-Myc was investigated in 38 malignant breast tumours. The expression of hTERT was then correlated with the lymph node status, c-Myc expression and other clinicopathological parameters of the tumours. Results hTERT expression was positive in 27 (71%) of the 38 tumours. 15 (79%) of 19 node positive tumours were hTERT positive compared with 11 (63%) of 19 node negative tumours. The expression was higher in node positive tumours but this failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.388). There was no significant association with tumour size, tumour grade or c-Myc expression. However, hTERT expression correlated positively with patients' age (correlation coefficient = 0.415, p = 0.0097). Conclusion hTERT protein expression is independent of lymph node status, tumour size and grade and c-Myc protein expression in human breast cancer PMID:16202165

  2. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  3. Expression of Yes Associated Protein, YAP, Modulates Survivin Expression in Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F.; Lam-Himlin, Dora M.; Klein, Alison P.; Nayar, Suresh K.; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice following genetic manipulation of Yes associated protein (YAP), a transcription co-activator. Here we comprehensively documented YAP protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear YAP expression is significantly increased in human ICC and HCC. We found that increased YAP protein levels in HCC are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein (IAPs) family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both HCC and ICC. We found nuclear YAP expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both ICC and HCC. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress YAP in the liver, we found Survivin mRNA expression depends upon YAP protein levels. Our findings suggested that YAP contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression. PMID:22436626

  4. Over-producing soluble protein complex and validating protein-protein interaction through a new bacterial co-expression system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jumei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yuqing; Wang, Yi; Wang, Mingchao; Duan, Xin; He, Zheng-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins exert their functions through a protein complex and protein-protein interactions. However, the study of these types of interactions is complicated when dealing with toxic or hydrophobic proteins. It is difficult to use the popular Escherichia coli host for their expression, as these proteins in all likelihood require a critical partner protein to ensure their proper folding and stability. In the present study, we have developed a novel co-expression vector, pHEX, which is compatible with, and thus can be partnered with, many commercially available E. coli vectors, such as pET, pGEX and pMAL. The pHEX contains the p15A origin of replication and a T7 promoter, which can over-produce a His-tagged recombinant protein. The new co-expression system was demonstrated to efficiently co-produce and co-purify heterodimeric protein complexes, for example PE25/PPE41 (Rv2430c/Rv2431c) and ESAT6/CFP10 (Rv3874/Rv3875), from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Furthermore, the system was also effectively used to characterize protein-protein interactions through convenient affinity tags. Using an in vivo pull-down assay, for the first time we have confirmed the presence of three pairs of PE/PPE-related novel protein interactions in this pathogen. In summary, a convenient and efficient co-expression vector system has been successfully developed. The new system should be applicable to any protein complex or any protein-protein interaction of interest in a wide range of biological organisms. PMID:19747546

  5. P-glycoprotein expression in normal and reactive bone marrows.

    PubMed Central

    Hegewisch-Becker, S.; Fliegner, M.; Tsuruo, T.; Zander, A.; Zeller, W.; Hossfeld, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of mdr1 gene product P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was investigated in 53 normal and reactive bone marrows by means of immunocytochemistry, using the monoclonal antibody (mAb) C219 and the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. In a limited number of patients, data were confirmed by using the mAb MRK16 or a polymerase chain reaction assay for mdr1 gene expression. There was no history of prior chemotherapy or any malignancy in this group. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained as part of a routine diagnostic programme in bone marrow donors or in patients presenting with a variety of diagnoses such as unexplained gammopathy, fever, anaemia, other changes in peripheral blood smear, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, or urticaria pigmentosa. Morphologically the bone marrow was normal in 23 patients, a megaloblastic erythropoiesis was seen in two patients and unspecific changes were seen in 28 patients. Twenty-seven of 53 samples were found to be positive for P-gp expression with the percentage of positive cells ranging from 2%-80% (mean = 24%). With a cutoff point of 10%, five of 23 normal (22%) and 13 of 28 reactive bone marrows (46%) were considered positive for P-gp expression. There was no obvious correlation between diagnosis or age and P-gp expression. Additional staining for the early surface marker CD-34 was performed in 12 samples, with none of them revealing more than 1% positivity. Since P-gp expression has so far been described only in CD-34 positive bone marrow cells, data suggest that P-gp expression may be reinduced in CD-34 negative cells under conditions which remain to be determined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8094974

  6. The protein expression landscape of the Arabidopsis root

    PubMed Central

    Petricka, Jalean J.; Schauer, Monica A.; Megraw, Molly; Breakfield, Natalie W.; Thompson, J. Will; Georgiev, Stoyan; Soderblom, Erik J.; Ohler, Uwe; Moseley, Martin Arthur; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Benfey, Philip N.

    2012-01-01

    Because proteins are the major functional components of cells, knowledge of their cellular localization is crucial to gaining an understanding of the biology of multicellular organisms. We have generated a protein expression map of the Arabidopsis root providing the identity and cell type-specific localization of nearly 2,000 proteins. Grouping proteins into functional categories revealed unique cellular functions and identified cell type-specific biomarkers. Cellular colocalization provided support for numerous protein–protein interactions. With a binary comparison, we found that RNA and protein expression profiles are weakly correlated. We then performed peak integration at cell type-specific resolution and found an improved correlation with transcriptome data using continuous values. We performed GeLC-MS/MS (in-gel tryptic digestion followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) proteomic experiments on mutants with ectopic and no root hairs, providing complementary proteomic data. Finally, among our root hair-specific proteins we identified two unique regulators of root hair development. PMID:22447775

  7. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) interacting proteins exhibit different expression patterns during development.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, C M; Spatuzza, M; Di Marco, B; Gloria, A; Barrancotto, G; Cupo, A; Musumeci, S A; D'Antoni, S; Bardoni, B; Catania, M V

    2015-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the lack of expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein involved in mRNA transport and translation. FMRP is a component of mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes and it can interact with a range of proteins either directly or indirectly, as demonstrated by two-hybrid selection and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. Most of FMRP-interacting proteins are RNA-binding proteins such as FXR1P, FXR2P and 82-FIP. Interestingly, FMRP can also interact directly with the cytoplasmic proteins CYFIP1 and CYFIP2, which do not bind RNA and link FMRP to the RhoGTPase pathway. The interaction with these different proteins may modulate the functions of FMRP by influencing its affinity to RNA and by affecting the FMRP ability of cytoskeleton remodeling through Rho/Rac GTPases. To better define the relationship of FMRP with its interacting proteins during brain development, we have analyzed the expression pattern of FMRP and its interacting proteins in the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum at different ages in wild type (WT) mice. FMRP and FXR2P were strongly expressed during the first week and gradually decreased thereafter, more rapidly in the cerebellum than in the cortex. FXR1P was also expressed early and showed a reduction at later stages of development with a similar developmental pattern in these two regions. CYFIP1 was expressed at all ages and peaked in the third post-natal week. In contrast, CYFIP2 and 82-FIP (only in forebrain regions) were moderately expressed at P3 and gradually increased after P7. In general, the expression pattern of each protein was similar in the regions examined, except for 82-FIP, which exhibited a strong expression at P3 and low levels at later developmental stages in the cerebellum. Our data indicate that FMRP and its interacting proteins have distinct developmental patterns of expression and suggest that FMRP may be preferentially associated to certain proteins in

  8. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Modolo, Filipe; Biz, Michelle Tillmann; Martins, Marília Trierveiller; Machado de Sousa, Suzana Orsini; de Araújo, Ney Soares

    2010-03-01

    Altered expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components has been reported in several pathologies; however, few ECM proteins have been evaluated in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). The aim of this study was to analyze the expression and distribution of the ECM proteoglycans: biglycan and decorin; and glycoproteins: osteonectin, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin in the AOT. Three-micrometer sections from paraffin-embedded specimens were evaluated employing a streptavidin-biotin immunohistochemical method with the antibodies against the proteins previously cited. Only the osteonectin was expressed in the epithelial cells. The eosinophilic amorphous material and the connective tissue showed expression of all components studied. The calcification foci expressed only osteopontin. In conclusion, the low expression of the components studied in neoplastic epithelial cells suggests that the epithelial cells act probably as stimulators of the expression by the stroma, which in turn can act as agonist or antagonist of the tumor growth. These results suggest that the components studied probably have a key role in the biological behavior of the AOT. PMID:20070486

  9. PROTEIN EXPRESSION AND SECRETION BY TRICHODERMA REESEI UNDER LOW ENDOGENOUS PROTEIN BACKGROUND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) is one of the most commonly used fungi for the manufacturing of industrial enzyme products. The fungus is capable of secreting proteins in levels up to 100 grams per liter. A number of homologous and heterologous proteins have been successfully over-expressed...

  10. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  11. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  12. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  13. Cementum attachment protein/protein-tyrosine phosphotase-like member A is not expressed in teeth.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Beyeler, Michael; Lang, Niklaus P; Trueb, Beat

    2009-02-01

    Cementum is a highly specialized connective tissue that covers tooth roots. The only cementum-specific protein described to date is the cementum attachment protein (CAP). A putative sequence for CAP was established from a cDNA clone isolated from a human cementifying fibroma cDNA library. This sequence overlaps with a phosphatase-like protein in muscle termed the protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like member A (PTPLA). To clarify the nature of CAP/PTPLA, we cloned the homologous rat protein and determined its sequence. The rat protein shared 94% sequence identity with the human protein. On Northern blots containing RNA from various rat tissues of different developmental stages, the cDNA hybridized to an mRNA expressed in heart and skeletal muscle but not in teeth. These results were confirmed by real-time PCR. Thus, the sequence deposited in public databanks under the name 'cementum attachment protein' does not represent genuine CAP. PMID:19148556

  14. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU) has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC), on the level of protein expression. Results In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. Conclusions The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology. PMID:23083100

  15. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins Hung-Yueh Yeh*, Kelli L. Hiett, John E. Line, Brian B. Oakley and Bruce S. Seal, Poultry Microbiological Safety Research Unit, Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, Uni...

  16. Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins: Choosing the Appropriate Host

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Nathalie; Dementin, Sébastien; Hivin, Patrick; Boutigny, Sylvain; Rioux, Jean-Baptiste; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Richaud, Pierre; Joyard, Jacques; Pignol, David; Sabaty, Monique; Desnos, Thierry; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Vernet, Thierry; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides) and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells) hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals), functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes) and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments). The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. Conclusions/Significance Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein. PMID:22216205

  17. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  18. Optimization of Translation Profiles Enhances Protein Expression and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5’-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein. PMID:25965266

  19. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  20. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Amy; Lovell, Scott; Lorimer, Don; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Wallace, Ellen; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Archer, Kimberly; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-12-01

    With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38{alpha}), viral polymerase (HCV NS5B), and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ) were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  1. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins.

    PubMed

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  2. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  3. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Bonning, Bryony C.; Harrison, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  4. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  5. LC–MS Based Detection of Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Leepika; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2010-01-01

    While several techniques are available in proteomics, LC-MS based analysis of complex protein/peptide mixtures has turned out to be a mainstream analytical technique for quantitative proteomics. Significant technical advances at both sample preparation/separation and mass spectrometry levels have revolutionized comprehensive proteome analysis. Moreover, automation and robotics for sample handling process permit multiple sampling with high throughput. For LC-MS based quantitative proteomics, sample preparation turns out to be critical step, as it can significantly influence sensitivity of downstream analysis. Several sample preparation strategies exist, including depletion of high abundant proteins or enrichment steps that facilitate protein quantification but with a compromise of focusing on a smaller subset of a proteome. While several experimental strategies have emerged, certain limitations such as physiochemical properties of a peptide/protein, protein turnover in a sample, analytical platform used for sample analysis and data processing, still imply challenges to quantitative proteomics. Other aspects that make analysis of a proteome a challenging task include dynamic nature of a proteome, need for efficient and fast analysis of protein due to its constant modifications inside a cell, concentration range of proteins that exceed dynamic range of a single analytical method, and absence of appropriate bioinformatics tools for analysis of large volume and high dimensional data. This paper gives an overview of various LC-MS methods currently used in quantitative proteomics and their potential for detecting differential protein expression. Fundamental steps such as sample preparation, LC separation, mass spectrometry, quantitative assessment and protein identification are discussed. For quantitative assessment of protein expression, both label and label free approaches are evaluated for their set of merits and demerits. While most of these methods edge on providing

  6. Altered Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Accessory Proteins in Murine and Human Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Noelle; Gaynor, Katherine U; Rowan, Simon C; Walsh, Sinead M; Fabre, Aurelie; Boylan, John; Keane, Michael P; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic, progressive fibrotic disease with a poor prognosis. The balance between transforming growth factor β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling plays an important role in tissue homeostasis, and alterations can result in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that multiple BMP accessory proteins may be responsible for maintaining this balance in the lung. Using the bleomycin mouse model for fibrosis, we examined an array of BMP accessory proteins for changes in mRNA expression. We report significant increases in mRNA expression of gremlin 1, noggin, follistatin, and follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), and significant decreases in mRNA expression of chordin, kielin/chordin-like protein, nephroblastoma overexpressed gene, and BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI). Protein expression studies demonstrated increased levels of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice and in the lungs of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transforming growth factor β stimulation resulted in increased expression of noggin, BAMBI, and FSTL1 in human small airway epithelial cells. These results provide the first evidence that multiple BMP accessory proteins are altered in fibrosis and may play a role in promoting fibrotic injury. PMID:26765958

  7. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  8. Expression of Exocytosis Proteins in Rat Supraoptic Nucleus Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, V.; Schwab, Y.; Lelos, N.; Onaka, T.; Pittman, Q. J.; Ludwig, M.

    2012-01-01

    In magnocellular neurones of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), the neuropeptides vasopressin and oxytocin are synthesised and packaged into large dense-cored vesicles (LDCVs). These vesicles undergo regulated exocytosis from nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary gland and from somata/dendrites in the SON. Regulated exocytosis of LDCVs is considered to involve the soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex [comprising vesicle associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2), syntaxin-1 and soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein-25 (SNAP-25)] and regulatory proteins [such as synaptotagmin-1, munc-18 and Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS-1)]. Using fluorescent immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, in both oxytocin and vasopressin neurones, we observed VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1-immunoreactivity in axon terminals. The somata and dendrites contained syntaxin-1 and other regulatory exocytosis proteins, including munc-18 and CAPS-1. However, the distribution of VAMP-2 and synaptotagmin-1 in the SON was limited to putative pre-synaptic contacts because they co-localised with synaptophysin (synaptic vesicle marker) and had no co-localisation with either oxytocin or vasopressin. SNAP-25 immunoreactivity in the SON was limited to glial cell processes and was not detected in oxytocin or vasopressin somata/dendrites. The present results indicate differences in the expression and localisation of exocytosis proteins between the axon terminals and somata/dendritic compartment. The absence of VAMP-2 and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity from the somata/dendrites suggests that there might be different SNARE protein isoforms expressed in these compartments. Alternatively, exocytosis of LDCVs from somata/dendrites may use a different mechanism from that described by the SNARE complex theory. PMID:21988098

  9. Tools to cope with difficult-to-express proteins.

    PubMed

    Saccardo, Paolo; Corchero, José Luís; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2016-05-01

    The identification of DNA coding sequences contained in the genome of many organisms coupled to the use of high throughput approaches has fueled the field of recombinant protein production. Apart from basic research interests, the growing relevance of this field is highlighted by the global sales of the top ten biopharmaceuticals on the market, which exceeds the trillion USD in a steady increasing tendency. Therefore, the demand of biological compounds seems to have a long run on the market. One of the most popular expression systems is based on Escherichia coli cells which apart from being cost-effective counts with a large selection of resources. However, a significant percentage of the genes of interest are not efficiently expressed in this system, or the expressed proteins are accumulated within aggregates, degraded or lacking the desired biological activity, being finally discarded. In some instances, expressing the gene in a homologous expression system might alleviate those drawbacks but then the process usually increases in complexity and is not as cost-effective as the prokaryotic systems. An increasing toolbox is available to approach the production and purification of those difficult-to-express proteins, including different expression systems, promoters with different strengths, cultivation media and conditions, solubilization tags and chaperone coexpression, among others. However, in most cases, the process follows a non-integrative trial and error strategy with discrete success. This review is focused on the design of the whole process by using an integrative approach, taken into account the accumulated knowledge of the pivotal factors that affect any of the key processes, in an attempt to rationalize the efforts made in this appealing field. PMID:27079572

  10. Differential Expression of Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins during Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Philipp, Mario T.

    1998-01-01

    In an earlier paper we described the transcriptionally regulated differential levels of expression of two lipoproteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, P35 and P7.5, during growth of the spirochetes in culture from logarithmic phase to stationary phase (K. J. Indest, R. Ramamoorthy, M. Solé, R. D. Gilmore, B. J. B. Johnson, and M. T. Philipp, Infect. Immun. 65:1165–1171, 1997). Here we further assess this phenomenon by investigating whether the expression of other antigens of B. burgdorferi, including some well-characterized ones, are also regulated in a growth-phase-dependent manner in vitro. These studies revealed 13 additional antigens, including OspC, BmpD, and GroEL, that were upregulated 2- to 66-fold and a 28-kDa protein that was downregulated 2- to 10-fold, during the interval between the logarithmic- and stationary-growth phases. Unlike with these in vitro-regulated proteins, the levels of expression of OspA, OspB, P72, flagellin, and BmpA remained unchanged throughout growth of the spirochetes in culture. Furthermore, ospAB, bmpAB, groEL, and fla all exhibited similar mRNA profiles, which is consistent with the constitutive expression of these genes. By contrast, the mRNA and protein profiles of ospC and bmpD indicated regulated expression of these genes. While bmpD exhibited a spike in mRNA expression in early stationary phase, ospC maintained a relatively higher level of mRNA throughout culture. These findings demonstrate that there are additional genes besides P7.5 and P35 whose regulated expression can be investigated in vitro and which may thus serve as models to facilitate the study of regulatory mechanisms in an organism that cycles between an arthropod and a vertebrate host. PMID:9784512

  11. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; You, Zongbing

    2008-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma) on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands), epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin), oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain, hepatocytes, or lymphocytes

  12. Survivin and related proteins in canine mammary tumors: immunohistochemical expression.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, L; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; D'Andrea, A; Ciccarelli, A; Della Salda, L

    2015-03-01

    Survivin is reexpressed in most human breast cancers, where its expression has been associated with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis, and poor response to therapy. Survivin expression was evaluated in 41 malignant canine mammary tumors (CMTs) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to histological grade and stage, and correlated with that of some related molecules (β-catenin, caspase 3, heat shock proteins) to understand their possible role in canine mammary tumorigenesis. An increase in nuclear survivin expression, compared with healthy mammary glands, was observed in CMTs, where nuclear immunolabeling was related to the presence of necrosis. No statistically significant relation was found between the expression of the investigated molecules and the histological grade or stage. The present study may suggest an important involvement of survivin in CMT tumorigenesis. Its overexpression in most of the cases evaluated might suggest that targeting survivin in CMTs may be a valid anticancer therapy. PMID:24686389

  13. Expression and serological reactivity of hemorrhagic enteritis virus hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Lobová, Dana; Celer, Vladimír

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to express the recombinant hexon protein of the hemorrhagic enteritis virus, to establish the diagnostic value of this protein for serological detection of antibodies in turkey serum samples and to assess seroprevalence of the infection in the Czech Republic. The N' terminal part of the hexon protein was expressed in a bacterial expression system and used as an antigen in an ELISA test for the detection of hemorrhagic enteritis virus specific antibodies in turkey sera. Validation of the test was performed by comparison with a commercially available ELISA test. Serological reactivity was assessed on a panel of 126 turkey sera by a newly developed ELISA test. Serum samples were taken from turkey farms with the history of hemorrhagic enteritis virus infection, from farms with animals free of infection, and from turkey farms following vaccination. Both ELISA kits gave identical results (100 %) with the tested sera. ELISA based on the recombinant hexon protein thus proved useful and cheaper for detection of antibodies in turkey flocks infected with the hemorrhagic enteritis virus. PMID:26471497

  14. Human testis expresses a specific poly(A)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Féral, C; Guellaën, G; Pawlak, A

    2001-05-01

    In testis mRNA stability and translation initiation are extensively under the control of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABP). Here we have cloned a new human testis-specific PABP (PABP3) of 631 amino acids (70.1 kDa) with 92.5% identical residues to the ubiquitous PABP1. A northern blot of multiple human tissues hybridised with PABP3- and PABP1-specific oligonucleotide probes revealed two PABP3 mRNAs (2.1 and 2.5 kb) detected only in testis, whereas PABP1 mRNA (3.2 kb) was present in all tested tissues. In human adult testis, PABP3 mRNA expression was restricted to round spermatids, whereas PABP1 was expressed in these cells as well as in pachytene spermatocytes. PABP3-specific antibodies identified a protein of 70 kDa in human testis extracts. This protein binds poly(A) with a slightly lower affinity as compared to PABP1. The human PABP3 gene is intronless with a transcription start site 61 nt upstream from the initiation codon. A sequence of 256 bp upstream from the transcription start site drives the promoter activity of PABP3 and its tissue-specific expression. The expression of PABP3 might be a way to bypass PABP1 translational repression and to produce the amount of PABP needed for active mRNA translation in spermatids. PMID:11328870

  15. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders. PMID:26975317

  16. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins. PMID:25851716

  17. Alternative Eukaryotic Expression Systems for the Production of Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; López-Estepa, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco J; Suárez, Teresa; Vega, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Besides the most established expression hosts, several eukaryotic microorganisms and filamentous fungi have also been successfully used as platforms for the production of foreign proteins. Filamentous fungi and Dictyostelium discoideum are two prominent examples. Filamentous fungi, typically Aspergillus and Trichoderma, are usually employed for the industrial production of enzymes and secondary metabolites for food processing, pharmaceutical drugs production, and textile and paper applications, with multiple products already accepted for their commercialization. The low cost of culture medium components, high secretion capability directly to the extracellular medium, and the intrinsic ability to produce post-translational modifications similar to the mammalian type, have promoted this group as successful hosts for the expression of proteins, including examples from phylogenetically distant groups: humans proteins such as IL-2, IL-6 or epithelial growth factor; α-galactosidase from plants; or endoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi, among others. D. discoideum is a social amoeba that can be used as an expression platform for a variety of proteins, which has been extensively illustrated for cytoskeletal proteins. New vectors for heterologous expression in D. discoideum have been recently developed that might increase the usefulness of this system and expand the range of protein classes that can be tackled. Continuous developments are ongoing to improve strains, promoters, production and downstream processes for filamentous fungi, D. discoideum, and other alternative eukaryotic hosts. Either for the overexpression of individual genes, or in the coexpression of multiples genes, this chapter illustrates the enormous possibilities offered by these groups of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:27165325

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  19. Effects of Ketoconazole on the Biodistribution and Metabolism of [11C]Loperamide and [11C]N-Desmethyl-loperamide in Wild-type and P-gp Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seneca, Nicholas; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Shetty, H. Umesha; Tuan, Edward; Kannan, Pavitra; Taku, Andrew; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction [11C]Loperamide and [11C]N-desmethyl-loperamide ([11C]dLop) have been proposed as radiotracers for imaging brain P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function. A major route of [11C]loperamide metabolism is N-demethylation to [11C]dLop. We aimed to test whether inhibition of CYP3A4 with ketoconazole might reduce the metabolism of [11C]loperamide and [11C]dLop in mice, and thereby improve the quality of these radiotracers. Methods Studies were performed in wild-type and P-gp knockout (mdr–1a/b −/−) mice. During each of seven study sessions, one pair of mice, comprising one wild-type and one knockout mouse, waspretreated with ketoconazole (50 mg/kg, i.p.) while another such pair was left untreated. Mice were sacrificed at 30 min after injection of [11C]loperamide or [11C]dLop. Whole brain and plasma samples were measured for radioactivity and analyzed with radio-HPLC. Results Ketoconazole increased the plasma concentrations of [11C]loperamide and its main radiometabolite, [11C]dLop, by about two-fold in both wild-type and knockout mice, whereas the most polar radiometabolite was decreased three-fold. Furthermore, ketoconazole increased the brain concentrations of [11C]loperamide and the radiometabolite [11C]dLop by about two-fold in knockout mice, and decreased the brain concentrations of the major and most polar radiometabolite in wild-type and knockout mice by 82 and 49%, respectively. In contrast, ketoconazole had no effect on plasma and brain distribution of administered [11C]dLop and its radiometabolites in either wild-type or knockout mice, except to increase the low plasma [11C]dLop concentration. The least polar radiometabolite of [11C]dLop was identified with LC-MSn as the N-hydroxymethyl analog of [11C]dLop and this also behaved as a P-gp substrate. Conclusion In this study, ketoconazole (50 mg/kg, i.p.) proved partiallyeffective for inhibiting the N-demethylation of [11C]loperamide in mouse in vivo but had relatively smaller or no effect on [11C

  20. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  1. High level expression of mammalian protein farnesyltransferase in a baculovirus system. The purified protein contains zinc.

    PubMed

    Chen, W J; Moomaw, J F; Overton, L; Kost, T A; Casey, P J

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian enzyme protein farnesyltransferase is a heterodimeric protein that catalyzes the addition of a farnesyl isoprenoid to a cysteine in ras proteins. Since oncogenic forms of ras proteins require the farnesyl group for transforming activity, the structure and mechanism of this enzyme are important to define. However, such studies have been difficult to approach because of the low abundance of the enzyme in mammalian tissues and hence the problems of obtaining large quantities of the protein. We report here the co-expression of the two subunits of protein farnesyltransferase by Sf9 cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus containing the coding sequences of both polypeptides. This results in the production of milligram quantities of enzyme which can be readily purified by conventional chromatographic methods. The individual subunits of the enzyme can also be expressed in the Sf9 cells, but the ability to reconstitute active enzyme from extracts containing individual subunits is quite low. In contrast, the enzyme produced by co-expression of the two subunits is fully active and retains the properties of the mammalian form, including the specificity for the COOH-terminal amino acid of substrate proteins and the ability to bind short peptides encompassing the prenylation site of a ras protein. Furthermore, through atomic absorption analysis of the purified protein, we have confirmed the previous tentative assignment of protein farnesyltransferase as a zinc metalloenzyme by demonstrating that it contains an essentially stoichiometric amount of zinc. The ability to produce and purify milligram quantities of protein farnesyltransferase readily will allow detailed mechanistic and structural studies on this enzyme. PMID:8486655

  2. HIV-1 Tat Protein Enhances Expression and Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yancong; Zhang, Kun; Yin, Xiaojie; Nie, Qichang; Ma, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters can transfer a variety of antiviral agents from the cytoplasm to body fluid, which results in a reduced intracellular concentration of the drugs. Proteins of HIV-1, e.g., Tat and gp120, altered some types of ABC transporter expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. However, the effect of Tat on ABC transporters in T lymphocytes is unclear. In this study the status of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in Tat expressing cell lines was examined with real-time PCR and flow cytometry. It was found that HIV-1 Tat protein upregulated BCRP expression and enhanced efflux mediated by BCRP significantly, which could inhibit antiviral drugs from entering infected cells and interfere with the therapeutic effect of HAART. PMID:26367065

  3. Cooperative working of bacterial chromosome replication proteins generated by a reconstituted protein expression system

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kei; Katayama, Tsutomu; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.

    2013-01-01

    Replication of all living cells relies on the multirounds flow of the central dogma. Especially, expression of DNA replication proteins is a key step to circulate the processes of the central dogma. Here we achieved the entire sequential transcription–translation–replication process by autonomous expression of chromosomal DNA replication machineries from a reconstituted transcription–translation system (PURE system). We found that low temperature is essential to express a complex protein, DNA polymerase III, in a single tube using the PURE system. Addition of the 13 genes, encoding initiator, DNA helicase, helicase loader, RNA primase and DNA polymerase III to the PURE system gave rise to a DNA replication system by a coupling manner. An artificial genetic circuit demonstrated that the DNA produced as a result of the replication is able to provide genetic information for proteins, indicating the in vitro central dogma can sequentially undergo two rounds. PMID:23737447

  4. Ribozymes, riboswitches and beyond: regulation of gene expression without proteins

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Although various functions of RNA are carried out in conjunction with proteins, some catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, which contribute to a range of cellular processes, require little or no assistance from proteins. Furthermore, the discovery of metabolite-sensing riboswitches and other types of RNA sensors has revealed RNA-based mechanisms that cells use to regulate gene expression in response to internal and external changes. Structural studies have shown how these RNAs can carry out a range of functions. In addition, the contribution of ribozymes and riboswitches to gene expression is being revealed as far more widespread than was previously appreciated. These findings have implications for understanding how cellular functions might have evolved from RNA-based origins. PMID:17846637

  5. Improving Protein Expression Prediction Using Extra Features and Ensemble Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Armando; Vinga, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The article focus is the improvement of machine learning models capable of predicting protein expression levels based on their codon encoding. Support vector regression (SVR) and partial least squares (PLS) were used to create the models. SVR yields predictions that surpass those of PLS. It is shown that it is possible to improve the models predictive ability by using two more input features, codon identification number and codon count, besides the already used codon bias and minimum free energy. In addition, applying ensemble averaging to the SVR or PLS models also improves the results even further. The present work motivates the test of different ensembles and features with the aim of improving the prediction models whose correlation coefficients are still far from perfect. These results are relevant for the optimization of codon usage and enhancement of protein expression levels in synthetic biology problems. PMID:26934190

  6. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  7. Fibroblast adhesion to recombinant tropoelastin expressed as a protein A-fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, L E; Parks, W C; Wu, L J; Mecham, R P

    1991-01-01

    A bovine tropoelastin cDNA encoding exons 15-36 that includes the elastin-receptor binding site was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus. After isolation of the fusion protein by affinity chromatography on Ig-Sepharose, the tropoelastin domain was separated from plasmid-pR1T2T-encoded Protein A (Protein A') by CNBr cleavage. Cell-adhesion assays demonstrated specific adhesion to the recombinant tropoelastin. Furthermore, the data indicate that interactions involving the bovine elastin receptor mediate nuchalligament fibroblast adhesion to the recombinant protein. In agreement with earlier studies of fibroblast chemotaxis to bovine tropoelastin, nuchal-ligament fibroblast adhesion demonstrated developmental regulation of the elastin receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1996952

  8. Serum protein-expression profiling using the ProteinChip biomarker system.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kate; Figueredo, Sharel; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Yip, Christine; Fung, Eric T

    2004-01-01

    Protein-expression profiling of serum is a common approach to the discovery of potential diagnostic and therapeutic markers of disease. Like any other proteome, the serum proteome is characterized by protein expression across a large dynamic range. This single facet requires the employment of fractionation procedures prior to detection of protein. The authors use a combination of conventional column chromatography with array-based chromatography to simplify the serum proteome into subproteomes, thus providing a greater representation of the serum proteome. Robotics is employed to increase the throughput of sample processing. These procedures result in large amounts of data that are analyzed through a series of preprocessing and postprocessing steps. A well-designed serum profiling project can therefore result in the discovery of statistically sound, clinically meaningful protein biomarkers. PMID:15020796

  9. Altered surfactant protein A gene expression and protein metabolism associated with repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    George, Caroline L S; White, Misty L; O'Neill, Marsha E; Thorne, Peter S; Schwartz, David A; Snyder, Jeanne M

    2003-12-01

    Chronically inhaled endotoxin, which is ubiquitous in many occupational and domestic environments, can adversely affect the respiratory system resulting in an inflammatory response and decreased lung function. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) is part of the lung innate immune system and may attenuate the inflammatory response in various types of lung injury. Using a murine model to mimic occupational exposures to endotoxin, we hypothesized that SP-A gene expression and protein would be elevated in response to repeat exposure to inhaled grain dust and to purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrate that repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin, either in the form of grain dust or purified LPS, results in increased whole lung SP-A gene expression and type II alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia, whereas SP-A protein levels in lung lavage fluid are decreased. Furthermore, these alterations in SP-A gene activity and protein metabolism are dependent on an intact endotoxin signaling system. PMID:12922979

  10. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed. PMID:26408650