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Sample records for p15ink4b p16ink4a p21cip1

  1. Gene Expression Status and Methylation Pattern in Promoter of P15INK4b and P16INK4a in Cord Blood CD34+ Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Mehdi; Kaviani, Saeid; Noruzinia, Mehrdad; Mortazavi, Yousef; Mobarra, Naser; Alizadeh, Shaban; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Skandari, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Mohammad Hosein; Atashi, Amir; Abroun, Saeid; Zonoubi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Stem cell differentiation into different cell lineages depends upon several factors, cell cycle control elements and intracellular signaling elements, including P15INK4b and P16INK4a genes. Epigenetics may be regarded as a control mechanism which is affected by these factors with respect to their promoter structure. Materials and Methods : The CD34 + cord blood stem cells were purified, isolated and then expanded. The undifferentiated day genome was isolated from part of the cultured cells, and the seventh day differentiated genome was isolated from the other part after differentiation to erythroid lineage. The procedure was followed by a separate Real-Time PCR for the two genes using the obtained cDNA. The processed DNA of the former stages was used for MSP (Methylation Specific PCR) reaction. Finally, pre- and post differentiation results were compared.  Results : After performing MSP for each gene, it became clear that P15INK4b gene has undergone methylation and expression in predifferentiation stage. In addition, its status has not been changed after differentiation. P15INK4b gene expression was reduced after the differentiation. The other gene, P16INK4a, showed no predifferentiation methylation. Itwas completely expressed methylated and underwent reduced expression after differentiation. Conclusion : Specific predifferentiation expression of P15INK4b and P16INK4a genes along with reduction in their expression after erythroid differentiation indicated animportant role for these two genes in biology of CD34+ cells in primary stages and before differentiation. In addition, both genes are capable of epigenetic modifications due to the structure of their promoters. PMID:23997911

  2. Methylation of CpG island of p14(ARK), p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) genes in coke oven workers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Li, X; Ge, L; Yang, J; Sun, J; Niu, Q

    2015-02-01

    To detect the blood genomic DNA methylation in coke oven workers and find a possible early screening index for occupational lung cancer, 74 coke oven workers as the exposed group and 47 water pump workers as the controls were surveyed, and urine samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected. Airborne benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) levels in workplace and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OH-Py) levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. DNA damage of PBMCs and the p14(ARK), p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) gene CpG island methylation in the promoter region were detected by comet assay and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction techniques, respectively. Results show that compared with the controls, concentration of airborne B[a]Ps was elevated in the coke plant, and urinary 1-OH-Py's level and DNA olive tail moment in comet assay were significantly increased in the coke oven workers, and p14(ARK), p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) gene methylation rates were also significantly increased. With the working years and urinary 1-OH-Py's level, the rates of p14(ARK) and p16(INK4a) gene methylation were significantly increased while that of p15(INK4b) gene methylation displayed no statistical change. We conclude that PBMCs' p14(ARK) and p16(INK4a) gene methylation may be used for screening and warning lung cancer in coke oven workers. PMID:24837742

  3. Alterations of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A (p16(INK4a)), p14(ARF), CDKN2B (p15(INK4b)), and CDKN2C (p18(INK4c)) in atypical and anaplastic meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Boström, J; Meyer-Puttlitz, B; Wolter, M; Blaschke, B; Weber, R G; Lichter, P; Ichimura, K; Collins, V P; Reifenberger, G

    2001-08-01

    We investigated 67 meningothelial tumors (20 benign meningiomas, 34 atypical meningiomas, and 13 anaplastic meningiomas) for losses of genetic information from chromosome arms 1p and 9p, as well as for deletion, mutation, and expression of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A (p16(INKa)/MTS1), p14(ARF), CDKN2B (p15(INK4b)/MTS2) (all located at 9p21) and CDKN2C (1p32). Comparative genomic hybridization and microsatellite analysis showed losses on 1p in 11 anaplastic meningiomas (85%), 23 atypical meningiomas (68%), and 5 benign meningiomas (25%). One atypical meningioma with loss of heterozygosity on 1p carried a somatic CDKN2C mutation (c.202C>T: R68X). Losses on 9p were found in five anaplastic meningiomas (38%), six atypical meningiomas (18%), and one benign meningioma (5%). Six anaplastic meningiomas (46%) and one atypical meningioma (3%) showed homozygous deletions of the CDKN2A, p14(ARF), and CDKN2B genes. Two anaplastic meningiomas carried somatic point mutations in CDKN2A (c.262G>T: E88X and c.262G>A: E88K) and p14(ARF) (c.305G>T: G102V and c.305G>A: G102E). One anaplastic meningioma, three atypical meningiomas, and one benign meningioma without a demonstrated homozygous deletion or mutation of CDKN2A, p14(ARF), or CDKN2B lacked detectable transcripts from at least one of these genes. Hypermethylation of CDKN2A, p14(ARF), and CDKN2B could be demonstrated in one of these cases. Taken together, our results indicate that CDKN2C is rarely altered in meningiomas. However, the majority of anaplastic meningiomas either show homozygous deletions of CDKN2A, p14(ARF), and CDKN2B, mutations in CDKN2A and p14(ARF), or lack of expression of one or more of these genes. Thus, inactivation of the G(1)/S-phase cell-cycle checkpoint is an important aberration in anaplastic meningiomas. PMID:11485924

  4. Identification of JTP-70902, a p15(INK4b)-inductive compound, as a novel MEK1/2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Yoshida, Takayuki; Kurachi, Reina; Kakegawa, Junya; Hori, Yoshikazu; Nanayama, Toyomichi; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Abe, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Koichi; Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Koyama, Makoto; Yogosawa, Shingo; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Yamori, Takao; Tajima, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2007-11-01

    The INK4 family members p16(INK4a) and p15(INK4b) negatively regulate cell cycle progression by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6. Loss of p16(INK4a) functional activity is frequently observed in tumor cells, and is thought to be one of the primary causes of carcinogenesis. In contrast, despite the biochemical similarity to p16(INK4a), the frequency of defects in p15(INK4b) was found to be lower than in p16(INK4a), suggesting that p15(INK4b)-inductive agents may be useful for tumor suppression. Here we report the discovery of a novel pyrido-pyrimidine derivative, JTP-70902, which exhibits p15(INK4b)-inducing activity in p16(INK4a)-inactivated human colon cancer HT-29 cells. JTP-70902 also induced another CDK-inhibitor, p27(KIP1), and downregulated the expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1, resulting in G(1) cell cycle arrest. MEK1/2 was identified by compound-immobilized affinity chromatography as the molecular target of JTP-70902, and this was further confirmed by the inhibitory activity of JTP-70902 against MEK1/2 in kinase assays. JTP-70902 suppressed the growth of most colorectal and some other cancer cell lines in vitro, and showed antitumor activity in an HT-29 xenograft model. However, JTP-70902 did not inhibit the growth of COLO320 DM cells; in these, constitutive extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation was not detected, and neither p15(INK4b) nor p27(KIP1) induction was observed. Moreover, p15(INK4b)-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts were found to be more resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of JTP-70902 than wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These findings suggest that JTP-70902 restores CDK inhibitor-mediated cell cycle control by inhibiting MEK1/2 and exerts a potent antitumor effect. PMID:17784872

  5. A COMMON VARIANT OF THE p16INK4A GENETIC REGION IS ASSOCIATED WITH PHYSICAL FUNCTION IN OLDER PEOPLE

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, David; Frayling, Timothy M; Murray, Anna; Hurst, Alison J; Harries, Lorna W; Song, Honglin; Khaw, KayTee; Luben, Robert; Surtees, Paul G; Bandinelli, Stefania S; Corsi, Anna-Maria; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Wallace, Robert B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Pharoah, Paul D

    2007-01-01

    p16INK4a is active in cell senescence, ageing and tumor suppression. Deletion of the small p16INK4a / ARF / p15INK4b region occurs in many cancers. We screened 25 common polymorphisms across the region and 3 related genes for associations with physical functioning in older people. In an initial sample of 938 (aged 65 to 80yrs) from the EPIC study (Norfolk, UK) the rs2811712 SNP minor allele (located between the shared p16INK4a / ARF locus and p15INK4b) was associated with reduced physical impairment. This association remained after testing an additional 1319 EPIC-Norfolk samples (p-value=0.013, total n=2257), and on independent replication in the InCHIANTI Study (n=709, p=0.015), and at one sided significance in Iowa-EPESE (n=419, p=0.079). Overall (n=3372) the prevalence of severely limited physical function was 15.0% in common homozygotes and 7.0% in rare homozygotes (per minor allele Odds Ratio=1.48 95%CI: 1.17−1.88, p =0.001, adjusted for age, sex and study). This estimate was similar excluding screening set 1 (OR=1.45: 95%CI 1.09−1.92, p=0.010, n=2434). These findings require further replication, but provide the first direct evidence that the p16INK4a / ARF / p15INK4b genetic region and the senescence machinery are active in physical ageing in heterogeneous human populations. The mechanism involved may be via greater cellular restorative activity and reduced stem cell senescence. PMID:17459456

  6. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax releases cell cycle arrest induced by p16INK4a.

    PubMed Central

    Low, K G; Dorner, L F; Fernando, D B; Grossman, J; Jeang, K T; Comb, M J

    1997-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax oncoprotein causes cellular transformation by deregulating important cellular processes such as DNA repair, transcription, signal transduction, proliferation, and growth. Although it is clear that normal cell cycle control is deregulated during HTLV-1-induced cellular transformation, the effects of Tax on cell cycle control are not well understood. Flow cytometric analyses of human T cells indicate that cell cycle arrest in late G1, at or before the G1/S restriction point, by p16INK4a is relieved by Tax. Furthermore, Tax-dependent stimulation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and transcriptional activation is inhibited by p16INK4a. This result suggests that p16INK4a is able to block Tax-dependent stimulation of DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression into S phase. In vitro binding assays with recombinant glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and [35S]methionine-labeled proteins indicate that Tax binds specifically with p16INK4a but not with either p21cip1 or p27kip1. Furthermore, sequential immunoprecipitation assays with specific antisera and [35S]methionine-labeled cell lysates subsequent to coexpression with Tax and p16INK4a indicate that the two proteins form complexes in vivo. Immunocomplex kinase assays with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 antiserum indicate that Tax blocks the inhibition of cdk4 kinase activity by p16INK4a. This study identifies p16INK4a as a novel cellular target for Tax and suggests that the inactivation of p16INK4a function is a mechanism of cell cycle deregulation by Tax. PMID:9032327

  7. The role of tumor suppressor p15Ink4b in the regulation of hematopoietic progenitor cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Humeniuk, R; Rosu-Myles, M; Fares, J; Koller, R; Bies, J; Wolff, L

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene p15Ink4b (CDKN2B) is a frequent event in blood disorders like acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. The molecular function of p15Ink4b in hematopoietic differentiation still remains to be elucidated. Our previous study demonstrated that loss of p15Ink4b in mice results in skewing of the differentiation pattern of the common myeloid progenitor towards the myeloid lineage. Here, we investigated a function of p15Ink4b tumor suppressor gene in driving erythroid lineage commitment in hematopoietic progenitors. It was found that p15Ink4b is expressed more highly in committed megakaryocyte–erythroid progenitors than granulocyte–macrophage progenitors. More importantly, mice lacking p15Ink4b have lower numbers of primitive red cell progenitors and a severely impaired response to 5-fluorouracil- and phenylhydrazine-induced hematopoietic stress. Introduction of p15Ink4b into multipotential progenitors produced changes at the molecular level, including activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase\\extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) signaling, increase GATA-1, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) and decrease Pu1, GATA-2 expression. These changes rendered cells more permissive to erythroid commitment and less permissive to myeloid commitment, as demonstrated by an increase in early burst-forming unit-erythroid formation with concomitant decrease in myeloid colonies. Our results indicate that p15Ink4b functions in hematopoiesis, by maintaining proper lineage commitment of progenitors and assisting in rapid red blood cells replenishment following stress. PMID:23359317

  8. Overexpression of p16(INK4a) in Mastocytosis (Urticarial Pigmentosa).

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Jun; Doi, Kazuko; Nakahara, Makiko; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kaku, Yumiko; Nishio, Kiichiro; Kan, Nagisa; Sato, Yuki; Nagata, Shoko; Nakao, Asako; Yoshida, Maiko; Uchi, Hiroshi; Furue, Masutaka

    2016-01-01

    The expression of p16(INK4a) has been reported to induce cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. The p16(INK4a) expression has never been examined in human mast cells and mastocytosis. We immunohistologically examined the expression of p16(INK4a) and tryptase in 5 normal human skin and 4 mastocytosis. In normal mast cells, only 5.9 ± 3.4 (mean ± standard deviation) % of tryptase-positive mast cells coexpressed p16(INK4a). However, significantly higher percentage (86.0 ± 14.1%) of tryptase-positive tumor cells was immunoreactive to p16(INK4a) in all of 4 mastocytosis. The p16(INK4a) overexpression may induce the senescence of neoplastic mast cells to undergo spontaneous regression of mastocytosis. PMID:27333655

  9. Tumor suppressor p16INK4A is necessary for survival of cervical carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Park, Donglim; Munger, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p16INK4A inhibits formation of enzymatically active complexes of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6) with D-type cyclins. Oncogenic stress induces p16INK4A expression, which in turn triggers cellular senescence through activation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. Subversion of oncogene-induced senescence is a key step during cancer development, and many tumors have lost p16INK4A activity by mutation or epigenetic silencing. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated tumors express high levels of p16INK4A in response to E7 oncoprotein expression. Induction of p16INK4A expression is not a consequence of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor inactivation but is triggered by a cellular senescence response and is mediated by epigenetic derepression through the H3K27-specific demethylase (KDM)6B. HPV E7 expression causes an acute dependence on KDM6B expression for cell survival. The p16INK4A tumor suppressor is a critical KDM6B downstream transcriptional target and its expression is critical for cell survival. This oncogenic p16INK4A activity depends on inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, suggesting that in cervical cancer cells where retinoblastoma tumor suppressor is inactivated, CDK4/CDK6 activity needs to be inhibited in order for cells to survive. Finally, we note that HPV E7 expression creates a unique cellular vulnerability to small-molecule KDM6A/B inhibitors. PMID:24046371

  10. Characterization of coordinated immediate responses by p16INK4A and p53 pathways in UVB-irradiated human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Gaur, Rajiv L; Williams, Mandy; Abdraboh, Mohamed E; Rao, Prakash N; Raj, Madhwa H G; Ismail, Fathi M; Ouhtit, Allal

    2009-01-01

    While the precise mechanisms of melanoma development are unknown, recent in vivo studies have revealed that the p16(Ink4a)/Rb pathway is disrupted in melanomagenesis. Here, we characterize the role of p16/Rb in coordinating the early events in UVB-irradiated skin. Foreskins and melanoma cell cultures were irradiated with low and high acute UVB doses and examined for cell-cycle- and apoptosis-associated genes. In melanoma cells, low UVB dose upregulated p16, p53, and p21 expression levels in Malme-3M, and high UVB dose accentuated the expression of p53 and p21(Cip1/Waf1), in particular; however, in SkMel-28 cells only p16 expression was upregulated in response to UV irradiation. In HaCaT cells, high UVB dose caused dramatic increase in p53 expression followed by upregulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1) and Bax, and downregulation of Bcl-2 leading to apoptosis. In HaCaT cells, reinstatement of p16 pathway restored cell-cycle arrest in response to low dose. Foreskin organ culture experiments confirmed our in vitro cell results. These data indicate that the p53 and p16 pathways respond independently to UVB insult. The p16 pathway is favored at low doses and results in cell-cycle arrest; the p53 pathway is more responsive to higher doses and induces apoptosis depending on p53 mutation status. PMID:18719612

  11. p16(INK4A) represses the paracrine tumor-promoting effects of breast stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansari, M M; Hendrayani, S F; Shehata, A I; Aboussekhra, A

    2013-05-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the most abundant and probably the most active cellular component of breast cancer-associated stroma, promote carcinogenesis through paracrine effects; however, the molecular basis remains elusive. We have shown here that p16(INK4A) expression is reduced in 83% CAFs as compared with their normal adjacent counterparts cancer-free tissues isolated from the same patients. This decrease is mainly due to AUF1-dependent higher turnover of the CDKN2A mRNA in CAFs. Importantly, p16(INK4A) downregulation using specific siRNA activated breast fibroblasts and increased the expression/secretion levels of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. Consequently, media conditioned with these cells stimulated the proliferation of epithelial cells. Furthermore, the migration/invasion of breast cancer cells was also enhanced in an SDF-1-dependent manner. This effect was mediated through inducing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition state. By contrast, increase in p16(INK4A) level through ectopic expression or AUF1 downregulation, reduced the secreted levels of SDF-1 and MMP-2 and suppressed the pro-carcinogenic effects of CAFs. In addition, p16(INK4A)-defective fibroblasts accelerated breast tumor xenograft formation and growth rate in mice. Importantly, tumors formed in the presence of p16(INK4A)-defective fibroblasts exhibited higher levels of active Akt, Cox-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9, showing their greater aggressiveness as compared with xenografts formed in the presence of p16(INK4A)-proficient fibroblasts. These results provide the first indication that p16(INK4A) downregulation in breast stromal fibroblasts is an important step toward their activation. PMID:22751126

  12. Human Papillomaviruses, p16INK4a and Akt expression in basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenic role of beta-HPVs in non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), is not still completely understood, and literature data indicate that they might be at least cofactors in the development of certain cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. However, only few reports contain data on basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The HPVs interact with many cellular proteins altering their function or the expression levels, like the p16INK4a and Akt. Our study aimed to determine the presence of different beta -HPV types and the expression of p16INK4a and Akt in BCC, the commonest NMSC, in the normal appearing perilesional skin and in forehead swab of 37 immunocompetent patients. Methods The expression of p16INK4a and Akt, by immunohistochemistry, and the HPV DNA, by nested PCR, were investigated in each sample. Results No correspondence of HPV types between BCC and swab samples was found, whereas a correspondence between perilesional skin and BCC was ascertained in the 16,7% of the patients. In BCC, 16 different types of beta HPV were found and the most frequent types were HPV107 (15,4%), HPV100 (11,5%) and HPV15 (11,5%) all belonging to the beta HPV species 2. Immunohistochemistry detected significant p16INK4a expression in almost all tumor samples (94,3%) with the highest percentages (> 30%) of positive cells detected in 8 cases. A statistically significant (p = 0,012) increase of beta HPV presence was detected in p16INK4a strongly positive samples, in particular of species 2. pAkt expression was detected in all tumor samples with only 2 cases showing rare positive cells, whereas Akt2 expression was found in 14 out of 35 BCC (40%); in particular in HPV positive samples over-expressing p16INK4a. Conclusions Our data show that p16INK4a and pAkt are over-expressed in BCC and that the high expression of p16INK4a and of Akt2 isoform is often associated with the presence of beta-HPV species 2 (i.e. HPV 15). The association of these viruses with the up-regulation of p16INK4a and Akt

  13. p16(INK4a) promoter methylation and 9p21 allelic loss in colorectal carcinomas: relation with immunohistochemical p16(INK4a) expression and with tumor budding.

    PubMed

    Prall, Friedrich; Ostwald, Christiane; Weirich, Volker; Nizze, Horst

    2006-05-01

    In colorectal carcinomas, p16(INK4a) inactivation is known to occur by allelic loss and by promoter methylation, but mutations are rare. p16(INK4a) is up-regulated in tumor buds, and the consequent shutdown of proliferation may be a prerequisite for tumor budding. Fifty-seven colorectal carcinomas from a consecutive series were investigated. Using DNA from tissue homogenates, p16(INK4a) promoter methylation was seen in 17 of 57 tumors by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, and this could be confirmed using DNA from laser-capture microdissected material in 16 of these cases. A total loss of immunohistochemical p16(INK4a) expression was seen in 6 of 17 tumors with promoter methylation. Quantification of immunohistochemical p16(INK4a) expression for the remaining 11 cases revealed statistically lower frequencies of expression as compared with cases without p16(INK4a) promoter methylation. 9p21 allelic loss was observed in 9 cases, but p16(INK4a) expression in these carcinomas was not reduced. Attempted linear regression of p16(INK4a) expression in tumor buds on the degree of tumor budding, as counted on pan-cytokeratin immunostains, did not show a correlation. p16(INK4a) promoter methylation can completely abrogate p16(INK4a) expression in colorectal carcinomas. In many cases, however, it has an appreciable but only modulatory influence on p16(INK4a) expression. Possibly, methylations are heterozygous, and/or mosaic in colorectal carcinomas and/or methylations are not totally stable but can be lost between carcinoma cell replication cycles. Up-regulation of p16(INK4a) does not seem to be a strict requirement for tumor budding, hence, the absence of a correlation. PMID:16647956

  14. Naturally occurring p16Ink4a-positive cells shorten healthy lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Darren J.; Childs, Bennett G.; Durik, Matej; Wijers, Melinde E.; Sieben, Cynthia J.; Zhong, Jian; Saltness, Rachel; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Versoza, Grace C.; Pezeshki, Abdul-Mohammad; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Miller, Jordan D.; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stress-induced irreversible growth arrest often characterized by p16Ink4a expression and a distinctive secretory phenotype, prevents the proliferation of preneoplastic cells and has beneficial roles in tissue remodelling during embryogenesis and wound healing. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues and organs over time and have been speculated to play a role in aging. To explore the physiological relevance and consequences of naturally occurring senescent cells, we used a previously established transgene, INK-ATTAC, to induce apoptosis in p16Ink4a-expressing cells of wild-type mice by injection of AP20187 twice a week starting at one year of age. Here we show that compared to vehicle alone, AP20187 treatment extended median lifespan in both male and female mice of two distinct genetic backgrounds. Clearance of p16Ink4a-positive cells delayed tumorigenesis and attenuated age-related deterioration of several organs without apparent side effects, including kidney, heart and fat, where clearance preserved the functionality of glomeruli, cardio-protective KATP channels, and adipocytes, respectively. Thus, p16Ink4a-positive cells that accumulate during adulthood negatively influence lifespan and promote age-dependent changes in multiple organs, and their therapeutic removal may be an attractive approach to extend healthy lifespan. PMID:26840489

  15. Monitoring Tumorigenesis and Senescence In Vivo with a p16INK4a-Luciferase Model

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Christin E.; Sorrentino, Jessica A.; Clark, Kelly S.; Darr, David B.; Krishnamurthy, Janakiraman; Deal, Allison M.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Castrillon, Diego H.; Beach, David H.; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Monitoring cancer and aging in vivo remains experimentally challenging. Here, we describe a luciferase knockin mouse (p16LUC), which faithfully reports expression of p16INK4a, a tumor suppressor and aging biomarker. Lifelong assessment of luminescence in p16+/LUC mice revealed an exponential increase with aging, which was highly variable in a cohort of contemporaneously housed, syngeneic mice. Expression of p16INK4a with aging did not predict cancer development, suggesting that the accumulation of senescent cells is not a principal determinant of cancer-related death. In 14 of 14 tested tumor models, expression of p16LUC was focally activated by early neoplastic events, enabling visualization of tumors with sensitivity exceeding other imaging modalities. Activation of p16INK4a was noted in the emerging neoplasm and surrounding stromal cells. This work suggests that p16INK4a activation is a characteristic of all emerging cancers, making the p16LUC allele a sensitive, unbiased reporter of neoplastic transformation. PMID:23332765

  16. Naturally occurring p16(Ink4a)-positive cells shorten healthy lifespan.

    PubMed

    Baker, Darren J; Childs, Bennett G; Durik, Matej; Wijers, Melinde E; Sieben, Cynthia J; Zhong, Jian; Saltness, Rachel A; Jeganathan, Karthik B; Verzosa, Grace Casaclang; Pezeshki, Abdulmohammad; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Miller, Jordan D; van Deursen, Jan M

    2016-02-11

    Cellular senescence, a stress-induced irreversible growth arrest often characterized by expression of p16(Ink4a) (encoded by the Ink4a/Arf locus, also known as Cdkn2a) and a distinctive secretory phenotype, prevents the proliferation of preneoplastic cells and has beneficial roles in tissue remodelling during embryogenesis and wound healing. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues and organs over time, and have been speculated to have a role in ageing. To explore the physiological relevance and consequences of naturally occurring senescent cells, here we use a previously established transgene, INK-ATTAC, to induce apoptosis in p16(Ink4a)-expressing cells of wild-type mice by injection of AP20187 twice a week starting at one year of age. We show that compared to vehicle alone, AP20187 treatment extended median lifespan in both male and female mice of two distinct genetic backgrounds. The clearance of p16(Ink4a)-positive cells delayed tumorigenesis and attenuated age-related deterioration of several organs without apparent side effects, including kidney, heart and fat, where clearance preserved the functionality of glomeruli, cardio-protective KATP channels and adipocytes, respectively. Thus, p16(Ink4a)-positive cells that accumulate during adulthood negatively influence lifespan and promote age-dependent changes in several organs, and their therapeutic removal may be an attractive approach to extend healthy lifespan. PMID:26840489

  17. Prognostic Value of Overexpressed p16INK4a in Vulvar Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hanyu; Wang, Si; Zhang, Zhenyu; Lou, Jiangyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the prognostic value of overexpressed p16INK4a in vulvar cancer. Although the tumor suppressor p16INK4a has been shown to be of prognostic value in a wide variety of cancers and precancerous lesions, its role in the vulvar cancer is still unclear. Methods All publications in English language on the association between p16INK4a and clinicopathological features of vulvar cancer were searched from Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science, and those in Chinese language were identified manually and online from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed. Odds ratios(ORs) or risk ratios(RRs) with 95% confidence intervals(CIs) were pooled to assess the strength of association. Publication bias was estimated using funnel plots and the Egger’s regression test. Results A total of 17 studies with 2309 patients were included. The p16INK4a overexpression was found to correlate significantly with the lower International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage(I+II vs III+IV; OR = 0.60,95%CI:0.41–0.86,P = 0.006),negative lymph node metastasis(negative vs positive; OR = 0.61,95%CI:0.39–0.95,P = 0.029),patient’s age<55(OR = 0.54,95%CI:0.31–0.96,P = 0.034),human papillomavirus–positive status(OR = 0.01,95%CI:0.00–0.11,P<0.001),and higher overall survival(RR = 0.53,95%CI = 0.35–0.80,P = 0.003). Conclusion The p16INK4a might be associated with a higher survival and indicates better prognosis of vulvar cancer. PMID:27031618

  18. Clearance of p16Ink4a-positive senescent cells delays ageing-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Baker, Darren J; Wijshake, Tobias; Tchkonia, Tamar; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Childs, Bennett G; van de Sluis, Bart; Kirkland, James L; van Deursen, Jan M

    2011-11-10

    Advanced age is the main risk factor for most chronic diseases and functional deficits in humans, but the fundamental mechanisms that drive ageing remain largely unknown, impeding the development of interventions that might delay or prevent age-related disorders and maximize healthy lifespan. Cellular senescence, which halts the proliferation of damaged or dysfunctional cells, is an important mechanism to constrain the malignant progression of tumour cells. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues and organs with ageing and have been hypothesized to disrupt tissue structure and function because of the components they secrete. However, whether senescent cells are causally implicated in age-related dysfunction and whether their removal is beneficial has remained unknown. To address these fundamental questions, we made use of a biomarker for senescence, p16(Ink4a), to design a novel transgene, INK-ATTAC, for inducible elimination of p16(Ink4a)-positive senescent cells upon administration of a drug. Here we show that in the BubR1 progeroid mouse background, INK-ATTAC removes p16(Ink4a)-positive senescent cells upon drug treatment. In tissues--such as adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and eye--in which p16(Ink4a) contributes to the acquisition of age-related pathologies, life-long removal of p16(Ink4a)-expressing cells delayed onset of these phenotypes. Furthermore, late-life clearance attenuated progression of already established age-related disorders. These data indicate that cellular senescence is causally implicated in generating age-related phenotypes and that removal of senescent cells can prevent or delay tissue dysfunction and extend healthspan. PMID:22048312

  19. Limited overlapping roles of P15INK4b and P18INK4c cell cycle inhibitors in proliferation and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Latres, Esther; Malumbres, Marcos; Sotillo, Rocío; Martín, Javier; Ortega, Sagrario; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana María; Cordón-Cardo, Carlos; Barbacid, Mariano

    2000-01-01

    Entry of quiescent cells into the cell cycle is driven by the cyclin D-dependent kinases Cdk4 and Cdk6. These kinases are negatively regulated by the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors. We report the generation of mice defective in P15INK4b and P18INK4c. Ablation of these genes, either alone or in combination, does not abrogate cell contact inhibition or senescence of mouse embryo fibroblasts in culture. However, loss of P15INK4b, but not of P18INK4c, confers proliferative advantage to these cells and makes them more sensitive to transformation by H-ras oncogenes. In vivo, ablation of P15INK4b and P18INK4c genes results in lymphoproliferative disorders and tumor formation. Mice lacking P18INK4c have deregulated epithelial cell growth leading to the formation of cysts, mostly in the cortical region of the kidneys and the mammary epithelium. Loss of both P15INK4b and P18INK4c does not result in significantly distinct phenotypic manifestations except for the appearance of cysts in additional tissues. These results indicate that P15INK4b and P18IKN4c are tumor suppressor proteins that act in different cellular lineages and/or pathways with limited compensatory roles. PMID:10880462

  20. P16(INK4a) expression as a potential prognostic marker in cervical pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Conceição; Silva, Tânia Correia; Alves, Venâncio A F; Villa, Luisa L; Costa, Maria Cecília; Travassos, Ana Gabriela; Filho, José Bouzas Araújo; Studart, Eduardo; Cheto, Tatiana; de Freitas, Luiz Antonio R

    2006-01-01

    An immunohistochemical analysis with monoclonal antibody p16(INK4a) was performed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 60 cases. The aim was to investigate in biopsies the expression of p16(INK4a) of normal uterine cervical tissue, pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions, and their relation with human papilloma virus (HPV) and HIV status. Three parameters were evaluated: percentage of p16(INK4a) positive cells, reaction intensity, and cell staining pattern. All of these parameters were statistically different when compared among different histological groups. However, logistic regression model showed that the reaction intensity was the best indicator of the expression of p16(INK4a). This expression increases from normal to invasive squamous carcinoma. Sixty-six percent of the patients with CIN grade 1 (CIN1) expressed p16(INK4a) (all these cases were infected with high risk HPV). Our study supports the hypothesis that p16(INK4a) expression in pre-cancerous lesions and cancers can be used to identify HPV-transformed cells. Of great interest for routine diagnostic use is the fact that immunohistochemical testing for p16(INK4a) seems to be capable of identifying HPV-positive cells and potentially recognizing those lesions with an increased risk of progression to high-grade lesions. PMID:16376485

  1. Immunohistological Expression of p16INK4a is Commonly Present Both in Benign and Malignant Sweat Gland Neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Jun; Kaku, Yumiko; Ichiki, Toshio; Eto, Ayaka; Maemura, Hiromi; Otsuka, Akiko; Nakaie, Risa; Kitagawa, Noriko; Morioka, Yuka; Matsuda, Tomoyo; Yoshida, Maiko; Furue, Masutaka

    2015-12-01

    The expression of p16INK4a has been reported to be a significant marker for malignant transformation of epidermal tumors. However, little is known about sweat gland tumors. We examined the immunohistological expression of p16INK4a in benign and malignant sweat gland tumors. The ductal and acrosyringial portion of normal eccrine glands were positively stained with p16INK4a while it was negative in the normal epidermis. Moderate to strong expression of p16INK4a was found in 16 of 17 eccrine poromas, 4 of 5 hidradenomas, 3 of 3 syringocystadenoma papilliferums, 2 of 2 mixed tumors, and 3 of 3 syringomas. The p16INK4a expression was observed focally or diffusely in 4 of 4 porocarcinomas, 4 of 4 apocrine carcinomas and 12 of 17 extramammary Paget's diseases. We conclude that the p16INK4a expression is not a good marker for dictating malignant transformation of sweat gland tumors. PMID:27159948

  2. Examining how p16INK4a expression levels are linked to handgrip strength in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Tung-Wei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Han, Der- Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsin; Chen, Chi-Ling; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies have shown that p16INK4a is more highly expressed in the human body during senescence, studies on its relevance to handgrip strength among old adults, are relatively sparse. We enrolled 205 community-dwelling old adults aged 65 years and older without specific medical conditions. Handgrip strength of the dominant hand was measured. Low handgrip strength was defined as the lowest quartile of handgrip strength among the participants. RNA was extracted from peripheral white blood cells. Use quantitative polymerase chain reaction to estimate the p16INK4a mRNA expression level. The average handgrip strength was 25.22 ± 8.98 kg, and gender difference was observed. In the linear regression model, the p16INK4a mRNA expression level was significantly negatively associated with handgrip strength in men but not in women. The β coefficient, representing the change of handgrip strength for each increment in the p16INK4a mRNA expression level, was −0.208 (p = 0.024) among old men. The negative association remained after additional covariates adjustment. In the multiple logistic regression model among old men, the odds ratio (OR) of low handgrip strength was 1.246 (p = 0.032). In this study, we observed the p16INK4a mRNA expression level was negative associated with handgrip strength among community-dwelling old men. PMID:27549351

  3. Examining how p16(INK4a) expression levels are linked to handgrip strength in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tung-Wei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Han, Der-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsin; Chen, Chi-Ling; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies have shown that p16(INK4a) is more highly expressed in the human body during senescence, studies on its relevance to handgrip strength among old adults, are relatively sparse. We enrolled 205 community-dwelling old adults aged 65 years and older without specific medical conditions. Handgrip strength of the dominant hand was measured. Low handgrip strength was defined as the lowest quartile of handgrip strength among the participants. RNA was extracted from peripheral white blood cells. Use quantitative polymerase chain reaction to estimate the p16(INK4a) mRNA expression level. The average handgrip strength was 25.22 ± 8.98 kg, and gender difference was observed. In the linear regression model, the p16(INK4a) mRNA expression level was significantly negatively associated with handgrip strength in men but not in women. The β coefficient, representing the change of handgrip strength for each increment in the p16(INK4a) mRNA expression level, was -0.208 (p = 0.024) among old men. The negative association remained after additional covariates adjustment. In the multiple logistic regression model among old men, the odds ratio (OR) of low handgrip strength was 1.246 (p = 0.032). In this study, we observed the p16(INK4a) mRNA expression level was negative associated with handgrip strength among community-dwelling old men. PMID:27549351

  4. p16 (INK4a) has clinicopathological and prognostic impact on oropharynx and larynx squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Silva, S.D.; Nonogaki, S.; Soares, F.A.; Kowalski, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    CDKN2A encodes proteins such as p16 (INK4a), which negatively regulate the cell-cycle. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that deletions in CDKN2A occur frequently in cancer. Although p16 (INK4a) may be involved in tumor progression, the clinical impact and prognostic implications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the immunohistochemical expression of p16 (INK4a) in 40 oropharynx and 35 larynx from HNSCC patients treated in a single institution and followed-up at least for 10 years in order to explore potential associations with clinicopathological outcomes and prognostic implications. Forty cases (53.3%) were positive for p16 (INK4a) and this expression was more intense in non-smoking patients (P = 0.050), whose tumors showed negative vascular embolization (P = 0.018), negative lymphatic permeation (P = 0.002), and clear surgical margins (P = 0.050). Importantly, on the basis of negative p16 (INK4a) expression, it was possible to predict a probability of lower survival (P = 0.055) as well as tumors presenting lymph node metastasis (P = 0.050) and capsular rupture (P = 0.0010). Furthermore, increased risk of recurrence was observed in tumors presenting capsular rupture (P = 0.0083). Taken together, the alteration in p16 (INK4a) appears to be a common event in patients with oropharynx and larynx squamous cell carcinoma and the negative expression of this protein correlated with poor prognosis. PMID:22948376

  5. Forkhead-box A1 induces cell senescence in endometrial cancer by regulating p16INK4a.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyun; Bian, Yiding; Liao, Yun; Xia, Ye; Wan, Xiaoping

    2016-08-01

    We previously identified FOXA1 as a tumor-suppressor in EC cells. In the present study, we sought to delineate the different roles of FOXA1 associated with cell senescence and further investigated the correlation between FOXA1 and p16INK4a in the progression of EC. Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we found that FOXA1 expression was significantly downregulated in EC cells compared to that in normal endometrial cells. Functionally, senescence‑associated β-galactosidase staining, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), clonogenic and Transwell assays showed that in addition to acting as a pioneer factor, FOXA1 was significantly upregulated in senescent EC cells. Furthermore, restoration of FOXA1 expression triggered multiple steps of cellular senescence in EC cells and activated p16INK4a expression. All of these findings indicate that FOXA1 promotes cell senescence in EC by interaction with p16INK4a, possibly via the AKT pathway. Notably, a selective PI3K inhibitor raised the possibility that FOXA1‑induced senescence is associated with the AKT pathway in EC cells. Collectively, the present study provides a conceivable molecular mechanism by which cell senescence acts as the barrier to EC, and is regulated by FOXA1-induced p16INK4a expression. This may be a newly identified regulatory mechanism of cell senescence in EC. PMID:27349269

  6. p16INK4a and p14ARF methylation as a potential biomarker for human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ken; Enokida, Hideki; Gotanda, Takenari; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kenryu; Kawahara, Motoshi; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2006-01-20

    Promoter hypermethylation is one of the putative mechanisms underlying the inactivation of negative cell-cycle regulators. We examined whether the methylation status of p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF), genes located upstream of the RB and p53 pathway, is a useful biomarker for the staging, clinical outcome, and prognosis of human bladder cancer. Using methylation-specific PCR (MSP), we examined the methylation status of p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF) in 64 samples from 45 bladder cancer patients (34 males, 11 females). In 19 patients with recurrent bladder cancer, we examined paired tissue samples from their primary and recurrent tumors. The methylation status of representative samples was confirmed by bisulfite DNA sequencing analysis. The median follow-up duration was 34.3 months (range 27.0-100.1 months). The methylation rate for p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF) was 17.8% and 31.1%, respectively, in the 45 patients. The incidence of p16(INKa) and p14(ARF) methylation was significantly higher in patients with invasive (>or=pT2) than superficial bladder cancer (pT1) (p=0.006 and p=0.001, respectively). No MSP bands for p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF) were detected in the 8 patients with superficial, non-recurrent tumors. In 19 patients with tumor recurrence, the p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF) methylation status of the primary and recurrent tumors was similar. Of the 22 patients who had undergone cystectomy, 8 (36.4%) manifested p16(INKa) methylation; p16(INK4a) was not methylated in 23 patients without cystectomy (p=0.002). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with p14(ARF) methylation had a significantly poorer prognosis than those without (p=0.029). This is the first study indicating that MSP analysis of p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF) genes is a useful biomarker for the pathological stage, clinical outcome, and prognosis of patients with bladder cancer. PMID:16316628

  7. MOZ-mediated repression of p16(INK) (4) (a) is critical for the self-renewal of neural and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Perez-Campo, Flor M; Costa, Guilherme; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Stifani, Stefano; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Although inhibition of p16(INK4a) expression is critical to preserve the proliferative capacity of stem cells, the molecular mechanisms responsible for silencing p16(INK4a) expression remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (MOZ) controls the proliferation of both hematopoietic and neural stem cells by modulating the transcriptional repression of p16(INK4a) . In the absence of the HAT activity of MOZ, expression of p16(INK4a) is upregulated in progenitor and stem cells, inducing an early entrance into replicative senescence. Genetic deletion of p16(INK4a) reverses the proliferative defect in both Moz(HAT) (-) (/) (-) hematopoietic and neural progenitors. Our results suggest a critical requirement for MOZ HAT activity to silence p16(INK4a) expression and to protect stem cells from early entrance into replicative senescence. PMID:24307508

  8. Frequent aberrant methylation of p16INK4a in primary rat lung tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Swafford, D S; Middleton, S K; Palmisano, W A; Nikula, K J; Tesfaigzi, J; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G; Belinsky, S A

    1997-01-01

    The p16INK4a (p16) tumor suppressor gene is frequently inactivated by homozygous deletion or methylation of the 5' CpG island in cell lines derived from human non-small-cell lung cancers. However, the frequency of dysfunction in primary tumors appears to be significantly lower than that in cell lines. This discordance could result from the occurrence or selection of p16 dysfunction during cell culture. Alternatively, techniques commonly used to examine tumors for genetic and epigenetic alterations may not be sensitive enough to detect all dysfunctions within the heterogeneous cell population present in primary tumors. If p16 inactivation plays a central role in development of non-small-cell lung cancer, then the frequency of gene inactivation in primary tumors should parallel that observed in cell lines. The present investigation addressed this issue in primary rat lung tumors and corresponding derived cell lines. A further goal was to determine whether the aberrant p16 gene methylation seen in human tumors is a conserved event in this animal model. The rat p16 gene was cloned and sequenced, and the predicted amino acid sequence of its product found to be 62% homologous to the amino acid sequence of the human analog. Homozygous deletion accounted for loss of p16 expression in 8 of 20 cell lines, while methylation of the CpG island extending throughout exon 1 was observed in 9 of 20 cell lines. 2-Deoxy-5-azacytidine treatment of cell lines with aberrant methylation restored gene expression. The methylated phenotype seen in cell lines showed an absolute correlation with detection of methylation in primary tumors. Aberrant methylation was also detected in four of eight primary tumors in which the derived cell line contained a deletion in p16. These results substantiate the primary tumor as the origin for dysfunction of the p16 gene and implicate CpG island methylation as the major mechanism for inactivating this gene in the rat lung tumors examined. Furthermore, rat

  9. Implications of Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations of CDKN2A (p16(INK4a)) in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran; Choi, Bu Young; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant gene silencing is highly associated with altered cell cycle regulation during carcinogenesis. In particular, silencing of the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene, which encodes the p16(INK4a) protein, has a causal link with several different types of cancers. The p16(INK4a) protein plays an executional role in cell cycle and senescence through the regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 and cyclin D complexes. Several genetic and epigenetic aberrations of CDKN2A lead to enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis with recurrence of cancer and poor prognosis. In these cases, the restoration of genetic and epigenetic reactivation of CDKN2A is a practical approach for the prevention and therapy of cancer. This review highlights the genetic status of CDKN2A as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in various cancers. PMID:27428416

  10. UVA-induced epigenetic regulation of P16(INK4a) in human epidermal keratinocytes and skin tumor derived cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Peng; Henning, Stefan; Faust, Alexandra; Boukamp, Petra; Volkmer, Beate; Greinert, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    UVA-radiation (315-400 nm) has been demonstrated to be capable of inducing DNA damage and is regarded as a carcinogen. While chromosomal aberrations found in UVA-irradiated cells and skin tumors provided evidence of the genetic involvement in UVA-carcinogenesis, its epigenetic participation is still illusive. We thus analysed the epigenetic patterns of 5 specific genes that are involved in stem cell fate (KLF4, NANOG), telomere maintenance (hTERT) and tumor suppression in cell cycle control (P16(INK4a), P21(WAFI/CIPI)) in chronically UVA-irradiated HaCaT human keratinocytes. A striking reduction of the permissive histone mark H3K4me3 has been detected in the promoter of P16(INK4a) (4-fold and 9-fold reduction for 10 and 15 weeks UVA-irradiated cells, respectively), which has often been found deregulated in skin cancers. This alteration in histone modification together with a severe promoter hypermethylation strongly impaired the transcription of P16(INK4a) (20-fold and 40-fold for 10 weeks and 15 weeks UVA-irradiation, respectively). Analysis of the skin tumor-derived cells revealed the same severe impairment of the P16(INK4a) transcription attributed to promoter hypermethylation and enrichment of the heterochromatin histone mark H3K9me3 and the repressive mark H3K27me3. Less pronounced UVA-induced epigenetic alterations were also detected for the other genes, demonstrating for the first time that UVA is able to modify transcription of skin cancer associated genes by means of epigenetic DNA and histone alterations. PMID:21986889

  11. Differential p16/INK4A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor expression correlates with chemotherapy efficacy in a cohort of 88 malignant pleural mesothelioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, C J; Murer, B; O'Grady, A; Hearn, L M; Harvey, B J; Kay, E W; Thomas, W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and essentially incurable malignancy most often linked with occupational exposure to asbestos fibres. In common with other malignancies, the development and progression of MPM is associated with extensive dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoint proteins that modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair and senescence. Methods: The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16/INK4A was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using tumour biopsy specimens from 88 MPM cases and a semi-quantitative score for p16/INK4A expression was obtained. Post-diagnosis survival and the survival benefit of chemotherapeutic intervention was correlated with p16/INK4A expression. Results: A low, intermediate and high score for p16/INK4A expression was observed for 45 (51.1%), 28 (31.8%) and 15 (17.1%) of the MPM cases, respectively. Those cases with intermediate or high p16/INK4A tumour expression had a significantly better post-diagnosis survival than those cases whose tumours lost p16 expression (log-rank P<0.001). Those patients with sustained p16/INK4A expression who received chemotherapy also had a better survival than those treated patients whose tumours had lost p16/INK4A expression (log-rank P<0.001). Conclusions: Sustained p16/INK4A expression predicts better post-diagnosis survival in MPM and also better survival following chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26057448

  12. A comprehensive evaluation of human papillomavirus positive status and p16INK4a overexpression as a prognostic biomarker in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zeyi; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Aoki, Kazuo; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Uehara, Takayuki; Agena, Shinya; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have better prognosis than those without HPV infection. Although p16(INK4a) expression is used as a surrogate marker for HPV infection, there is controversy as to whether p16(INK4a) reliably indicates HPV infection. Here, to evaluate the accuracy of p16(INK4a) expression for determining HPV infection and the prognostic value of HPV infection and p16(INK4a) expression for HNSCC survival, especially oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) survival, 150 fresh-frozen HNSCC samples were analyzed for HPV DNA, E6/E7 mRNA and p16(INK4a) expression by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. p16(INK4a) expression was scored from 0 to 4 according to the percentage of p16(INK4a)-positive cells, with overexpression defined as >40% positive cells. Of the 150 tumor samples tested, 10 tumors were nasopharyngeal, 53 oropharyngeal, 39 hypopharyngeal, 24 laryngeal and 24 were located in the oral cavity. HPV DNA was detected in 47 (31.3%) samples, but only 21 also exhibited HPV mRNA expression. Inter-rater agreement was low between p16(INK4a) expression and HPV DNA presence and between p16(INK4a) expression and HPV mRNA expression, but was good between the combination of HPV DNA status and p16(INK4a) overexpression and HPV mRNA expression. Three-year recurrence-free survival was significantly higher for OPSCC patients who were HPV DNA-positive than for OPSCC patients who were HPV DNA-negative (P=0.008) and for OPSCC patients overexpressing p16(INK4a) than for without overexpressing p16(INK4a) (P=0.034). Multivariate analysis revealed that T1-3 stage and the combination of HPV DNA positivity and p16(INK4a) overexpression predicted significantly better recurrence-free survival. This combination is a more accurate marker for active HPV infection in HNSCC than HPV DNA status or general p16(INK4a)-positive status alone and offers a useful and reliable method for detecting and

  13. Inactivation of p16INK4a (inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A) immortalizes primary human keratinocytes by maintaining cells in the stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Maurelli, Riccardo; Zambruno, Giovanna; Guerra, Liliana; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Dimri, Goberdhan; Gellini, Mara; Bondanza, Sergio; Dellambra, Elena

    2006-07-01

    Replicative senescence of human keratinocytes is determined by a progressive decline of clonogenic and dividing cells, and its timing is controlled by clonal evolution (i.e., the transition from stem cells to transient amplifying and postmitotic cells). Progressive increase of p16INK4a (inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A) expression has been shown to correlate with keratinocyte clonal evolution. Thus, the aim of our study is to understand whether p16INK4a accumulation is a triggering mechanism of epidermal clonal evolution or a secondary event. We show that inactivation of p16INK4a, by an antisense strategy, allows primary human keratinocytes to escape replicative senescence. Specifically, p16INK4a inactivation alone blocks clonal evolution and maintains keratinocytes in the stem cell compartment. Antisense excision is followed by keratinocyte senescence, confirming that persistent p16INK4a inactivation is required for maintenance of clonal evolution block. Immortalization is accompanied by resumption of B-Cell Specific Moloney murine leukemia virus site 1 (Bmi-1) expression and telomerase activity, hallmarks of tissue regenerative capacity. In turn, Bmi-1 expression is necessary to maintain the impairment of clonal evolution induced by p16INK4a inactivation. Finally, p16INK4a down-regulation in transient amplifying keratinocytes does not affect clonal evolution, and cells undergo senescence. Thus, p16INK4a inactivation appears to selectively prevent clonal conversion in cells endowed with a high proliferative potential. These data indicate that p16INK4a regulates keratinocyte clonal evolution and that inactivation of p16INK4a in epidermal stem cells is necessary for maintaining stemness. PMID:16754749

  14. Tumor suppressor p16INK4a inhibits cancer cell growth by downregulating eEF1A2 through a direct interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Choi, Bu Young; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Young; Huang, Zunnan; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Dong Joon; Bode, Ann M.; Surh, Young-Joon; Dong, Zigang

    2013-01-01

    Summary The tumor suppressor protein p16INK4a is a member of the INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors, which are involved in the regulation of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-proliferative effects of p16INK4a have not been fully elucidated. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified the eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF)1A2 as a novel interacting partner of p16INK4a. eEF1A2 is thought to function as an oncogene in cancers. The p16INK4a protein interacted with all but the D2 (250–327 aa) domain of eEF1A2. Ectopic expression of p16INK4a decreased the expression of eEF1A2 and inhibited cancer cell growth. Furthermore, suppression of protein synthesis by expression of p16INK4a ex vivo was verified by luciferase reporter activity. Microinjection of p16INK4a mRNA into the cytoplasm of Xenopus embryos suppressed the luciferase mRNA translation, whereas the combination of p16INK4a and morpholino-eEF1A2 resulted in a further reduction in translational activity. We conclude that the interaction of p16INK4a with eEF1A2, and subsequent downregulation of the expression and function of eEF1A2 is a novel mechanism explaining the anti-proliferative effects of p16INK4a. PMID:23444377

  15. The Contrasting Role of p16Ink4A Patterns of Expression in Neuroendocrine and Non-Neuroendocrine Lung Tumors: A Comprehensive Analysis with Clinicopathologic and Molecular Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Nicola; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Franco, Renato; Zito-Marino, Federica; Vaira, Valentina; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Ercoli, Giulia; Nosotti, Mario; Palleschi, Alessandro; Bosari, Silvano; Ferrero, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer encompasses a constellation of malignancies with no validated prognostic markers. p16Ink4A expression has been reported in different subtypes of lung cancers; however, its prognostic value is controversial. Here, we sought to investigate the clinical significance of p16Ink4A immunoexpression according to specific staining patterns and its operational implications. A total of 502 tumors, including 277 adenocarcinomas, 84 squamous cell carcinomas, 22 large cell carcinomas, 47 typical carcinoids, 12 atypical carcinoids, 28 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and 32 small cell carcinomas were reviewed and subjected to immunohistochemical analysis for p16Ink4A and Ki67. The spectrum of p16Ink4A expression was annotated for each case as negative, sporadic, focal, or diffuse. Expression at immunohistochemical level showed intra-tumor homogeneity, regardless tumor histotype. Enrichments in cells expressing p16Ink4A were observed from lower- to higher-grade neuroendocrine malignancies, whereas a decrease was seen in poorly and undifferentiated non-neuroendocrine carcinomas. Tumor proliferation indices were higher in neuroendocrine tumors expressing p16Ink4A while non-neuroendocrine malignancies immunoreactive for p16Ink4A showed a decrease in Ki67-positive cells. Quantitative statistical analyses including each histotype and the p16Ink4A status confirmed the independent prognostic role of p16Ink4A expression, being a high-risk indicator in neuroendocrine tumors and a marker of good prognosis in non-neuroendocrine lung malignancies. In this study, we provide circumstantial evidence to suggest that the routinary assessment of p16Ink4A expression using a three-tiered scoring algorithm, even in a small biopsy, may constitute a reliable, reproducible, and cost-effective substrate for a more accurate risk stratification of each individual patient. PMID:26674347

  16. Aurora B prevents delayed DNA replication and premature mitotic exit by repressing p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Trakala, Marianna; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; Heeschen, Christopher; Malumbres, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    Aurora kinase B is a critical component of the chromosomal passenger complex, which is involved in the regulation of microtubule-kinetochore attachments and cytokinesis. By using conditional knockout cells and chemical inhibition, we show here that inactivation of Aurora B results in delayed G1/S transition and premature mitotic exit. Aurora B deficiency results in delayed DNA replication in cultured fibroblasts as well as liver cells after hepatectomy. This is accompanied by increased transcription of the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. Lack of Aurora B does not prevent mitotic entry but results in a premature exit from prometaphase in the presence of increased p21Cip1-Cdk1 inactive complexes. Aurora B-null cells display reduced degradation of cyclin B1, suggesting the presence of phenomenon known as adaptation to the mitotic checkpoint, previously described in yeast. Elimination of p21Cip1 rescues Cdk1 activity and prevents premature mitotic exit in Aurora B-deficient cells. These results suggest that Aurora B represses p21Cip1, preventing delayed DNA replication, Cdk inhibition and premature mitotic exit. The upregulation of p21Cip1 observed after inhibition of Aurora B may have important implications in cell cycle progression, tetraploidy, senescence or cancer therapy. PMID:23428904

  17. P16INK4a: a potential diagnostic adjunct for prediction of high-grade cervical lesions in liquid-based cytology: with HPV testing and histological correlation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y P; Abdul Raub, S H; Mohd Dali, A Z H; Kassim, F; Visvalingam, V; Zakaria, Z; Kamaluddin, M A; Noor Akmal, S

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary cause of cervical cancer and its precursors. Increased expression of high-risk hrHPV viral oncogenes in abnormal cells might increase the expression of p16INK4a. We aimed to determine the role of p16INK4a in detecting hrHPV-transformed epithelial cells in liquid-based cervical cytology, and compared the results with hrHPV DNA testing by realtime polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Fifty-seven cytological samples were tested for p16INK4a immunomarker and hrHPV DNA. Test performance of both tests was determined by comparing sensitivity, specificity and predictive values using available histological follow-up data as gold standard. Of 57 samples, 36 (63.2%) showed immunoreactivity for p16INK4a and 43 (75.4%) were hrHPV-infected. A fairly low concordance rate (k = 0.504) between p16INK4a immunolabelling and hrHPV DNA status was noted. For prediction of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II and worse lesions, p16INK4a had a sensitivity and specificity of 93.5% and 60%; whereas hrHPV DNA testing had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 20%. Dual testing by combining p16INK4a and hrHPV showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 33.3%. In conclusion, p16INK4a is useful in predicting severity of the cytological abnormalities. Although p16INK4a is more specific but less sensitive than hrHPV in detecting high-grade cervical lesions, a combination of both tests failed to demonstrate significant improvement in diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and predictive value. Larger-scale prospective studies are required to assess further whether this biomarker should be routinely used as primary screening tool independently or in combination with hrHPV testing to improve diagnostic accuracy in cervical cytology. PMID:27568665

  18. Relationships among folate, alcohol consumption, gene variants in one-carbon metabolism and p16INK4a methylation and expression in healthy breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Adana A; Dumitrescu, Ramona G; Brasky, Theodore M; Liu, Zhenhua; Mason, Joel B; Marian, Catalin; Makambi, Kepher H; Spear, Scott L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    p16(INK4a) is a tumor suppressor gene, frequently hypermethylated in breast cancer; this epigenetic silencing of p16(INK4a) occurs early in carcinogenesis. The risk factors and functional consequences of p16(INK4a) methylation are unknown. Alcohol consumption, a breast cancer risk factor, impedes folate metabolism and may thereby alter gene methylation since folate plays a pivotal role in DNA methylation. In a cross-sectional study of 138 women with no history of breast cancer who underwent reduction mammoplasty, we studied breast cancer risk factors, plasma and breast folate concentrations, variation in one-carbon metabolism genes, p16(INK4a) promoter methylation and P16 protein expression. Logistic regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). p16(INK4a) methylation was negatively correlated with P16 expression (r = -0.28; P = 0.002). Alcohol consumption was associated with lower breast folate (P = 0.03), higher p16(INK4a) promoter methylation (P = 0.007) and less P16 expression (P = 0.002). Higher breast folate concentrations were associated with lower p16(INK4a) promoter methylation (P = 0.06). Genetic variation in MTRR (rs1801394) and MTHFD1 (rs1950902) was associated with higher p16 (INK4a) promoter methylation (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.11-6.42 and OR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.12-6.66, respectively), whereas variation in TYMS (rs502396) was associated with less P16 protein expression (OR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.05-0.99). Given that this is the first study to indicate that alcohol consumption, breast folate and variation in one-carbon metabolism genes are associated with p16(INK4a) promoter methylation and P16 protein expression in healthy tissues; these findings require replication. PMID:25344837

  19. Reactive oxygen species promotes cellular senescence in normal human epidermal keratinocytes through epigenetic regulation of p16(INK4a.).

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Mina; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Ozeki, Satoru; Okabe, Koji; Ikebe, Tetsuro

    2014-09-26

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause severe damage to DNA, proteins and lipids in normal cells, contributing to carcinogenesis and various pathological conditions. While cellular senescence arrests the early phase of cell cycle without any detectable telomere loss or dysfunction. ROS is reported to contribute to induction of cellular senescence, as evidence by its premature onset upon treatment with antioxidants or inhibitors of cellular oxidant scavengers. Although cellular senescence is known to be implicated in tumor suppression, it remains unknown whether ROS initially contributed to be cellular senescence in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and their malignant counterparts. To clarify whether ROS induce cellular senescence in NHEKs, we examined the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the expression of cellular senescence-associated molecules in NHEKs, compared to in squamous carcinoma cells (SCCs). Hydrogen peroxide increased the number of cells positive in senescence associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity in NHEKs, but not SCCs. The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, especially p16(INK4a) was upregulated in NHEKs treated with H2O2. Interestingly, H2O2 suppressed the methylation of p16(INK4a), promoter region in NHEKs, but not in SCCs. Hydrogen peroxide also suppressed the expression of phosphorylated Rb and CDK4, resulting in arrest in G0/G1 phase in NHEKs, but not SCCs. Our results indicate that the ROS-induced cellular senescence in NHEKs was caused by the upregulation p16(INK4a) through demethylation in its promoter region, which is not detected in SCCs, suggesting that ROS-induced cellular senescence contributes to tumor suppression of NHEKs. PMID:25181340

  20. High OCT4 and Low p16INK4A Expressions Determine In Vitro Lifespan of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Piccinato, Carla A.; Sertie, Andrea L.; Torres, Natália; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    After long-term culture, mesenchymal stem cells alter their biological properties and enter into a state of replicative senescence. Although several classical biomarkers have been used for quantitative assessment of cellular senescence, no hallmark has been proven completely unique to the senescent state in cells. We used bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) from different healthy young donors and an in vitro model with well-defined senescence end points to identify a set of robust markers that could potentially predict the expansion capacity of MSCs preparations before reaching senescence. For each early passage BM-MSC sample (5th or 6th passages), the normalized protein expression levels of senescence-associated markers p16INK4A, p21WAF1, SOD2, and rpS6S240/244; the concentration of IL6 and IL8 in cell culture supernatants; and the normalized gene expression levels of pluripotency markers OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 were correlated with final population doubling (PD) number. We revealed that the low expression of p16INK4A protein and a high OCT4 gene expression, rather than other evaluated markers, might be potential hallmarks and predictors of greater in vitro lifespan and growth potential, factors that can impact the successful therapeutic use of MSCs preparations. PMID:26089914

  1. P16INK4a Positive Cells in Human Skin Are Indicative of Local Elastic Fiber Morphology, Facial Wrinkling, and Perceived Age.

    PubMed

    Waaijer, Mariëtte E C; Gunn, David A; Adams, Peter D; Pawlikowski, Jeff S; Griffiths, Christopher E M; van Heemst, Diana; Slagboom, P Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Maier, Andrea B

    2016-08-01

    Senescent cells are more prevalent in aged human skin compared to young, but evidence that senescent cells are linked to other biomarkers of aging is scarce. We counted cells positive for the tumor suppressor and senescence associated protein p16INK4a in sun-protected upper-inner arm skin biopsies from 178 participants (aged 45-81 years) of the Leiden Longevity Study. Local elastic fiber morphology, facial wrinkles, and perceived facial age were compared to tertiles of p16INK4a counts, while adjusting for chronological age and other potential confounders.The numbers of epidermal and dermal p16INK4a positive cells were significantly associated with age-associated elastic fiber morphologic characteristics, such as longer and a greater number of elastic fibers. The p16INK4a positive epidermal cells (identified as primarily melanocytes) were also significantly associated with more facial wrinkles and a higher perceived age. Participants in the lowest tertile of epidermal p16INK4a counts looked 3 years younger than those in the highest tertile, independently of chronological age and elastic fiber morphology.In conclusion, p16INK4a positive cell numbers in sun-protected human arm skin are indicative of both local elastic fiber morphology and the extent of aging visible in the face. PMID:26286607

  2. Methylation of p16(INK4a) promoters occurs in vivo in histologically normal human mammary epithelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Charles R.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Esteller, Manel; Chew, Karen; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2003-01-01

    Cultures of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) contain a subpopulation of variant cells with the capacity to propagate beyond an in vitro proliferation barrier. These variant HMECs, which contain hypermethylated and silenced p16(INK4a) (p16) promoters, eventually accumulate multiple chromosomal changes, many of which are similar to those detected in premalignant and malignant lesions of breast cancer. To determine the origin of these variant HMECs in culture, we used Luria-Delbruck fluctuation analysis and found that variant HMECs exist within the population before the proliferation barrier, thereby raising the possibility that variant HMECs exist in vivo before cultivation. To test this hypothesis, we examined mammary tissue from normal women for evidence of p16 promoter hypermethylation. Here we show that epithelial cells with methylation of p16 promoter sequences occur in focal patches of histologically normal mammary tissue of a substantial fraction of healthy, cancer-free women.

  3. Co-Regulation of p16INK4a and Migratory Genes in Culture Conditions that Lead to Premature Senescence in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Darbro, Benjamin W.; Schneider, Galen B.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular stasis, also known as telomere-independent senescence, prevents many epithelial cells from becoming immortalized by telomerase alone. As human keratinocytes age in culture, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a continue to increase, resulting in growth arrest independent of telomere length. Differences in culture conditions have been shown to modulate both p16INK4a expression and replicative capacity of human keratinocytes; however, the mechanism of p16INK4a induction under these conditions is unknown. Using multiple primary keratinocyte cell strains, we verified a delay in p16INK4a induction and an extended lifespan of human keratinocytes when grown in co-culture with post-mitotic fibroblast feeder cells as compared with keratinocytes grown on tissue culture plastic alone. Evaluation of gene expression levels in the two culture conditions by microarray analysis, and subsequent validation, demonstrated that keratinocytes cultured on plastic alone had significantly increased expression of many genes involved in keratinocyte migration and reduced expression levels of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Higher levels of p16INK4a expression were present in cells that also displayed increased amounts of autophosphorylated focal adhesion kinase and urokinase plaminogen activator receptor (uPAR), both markers of keratinocyte migration. Furthermore, when tyrosine phosphorylation or urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/uPAR function was inhibited, both keratinocyte migration and p16INK4a expression were reduced. Our results indicate that keratinocytes cultured in the absence of feeder cells exhibit a migratory phenotype and suggest that p16INK4a is selectively induced under these conditions by a mechanism involving tyrosine kinase activity and the urokinase plasminogen activation system. PMID:16117791

  4. Effect of Iodine Intake on p14ARF and p16INK4a Expression in Thyroid Papillary Carcinoma in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ruimei; Wang, Jinde; Li, Xiaojiang; Li, Lei; Yang, Jie; Ren, Yanxin; Xi, Yan; Sun, Chuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Iodine intake is related to thyroid disease. This study investigated the effect of the amount of iodine intake on p14ARF and p16INK4a expression of thyroid papillary carcinoma in rats. Material/Methods A cohort of 240 SD rats were randomly divided into control group, low iodine, normal iodine, and high iodine groups (n=60 per group). We inoculated 2×105 papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells on the left side of the thyroid gland. After 6 and 12 weeks, serum thyroid hormone level and urine iodine level were measured in addition to morphological observations of tumor tissues. Expression of p14ARF, p16INK4a was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Results The expression of p14ARF, p16INK4a, FT3, and FT4 levels in all iodine-treated animals were significantly lower than in the control group, while TSH level was significantly higher (P<0.05). Compared to the normal iodine group, the low and high groups had lower p14ARF and p16INK4a expression, lower FT3 and FT4 levels, higher TSH levels, and heavier tumors (P<0.05). In a further between-group comparison, p14ARF and p16INK4a expression and FT3 and FT4 levels at 12 weeks were lower than at 6 weeks. Expression of p14ARF and p16INK4a were positively correlated with FT3 and FT4, and negatively correlated with TSH and tumor weight. Conclusions Low and high iodine diet intake could reduce p14ARF and p16INK4a expressions and promote tumor development. PMID:26248224

  5. P21Cip1 is a critical mediator of the cytotoxic action of thymidylate synthase inhibitors in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Geller, James I; Szekely-Szucs, Kinga; Petak, Istvan; Doyle, Belinda; Houghton, Janet A

    2004-09-01

    We have demonstrated previously that interferon (IFN)-gamma sensitizes human colon carcinoma cell lines to the cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil combined with leucovorin and to the thymidylate synthase inhibitor, ZD9331, dependent on thymineless stress-induced DNA damage, independent of p53. Here we demonstrate that the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21(Cip1) regulates thymineless stress-induced cytotoxicity in these cells. HCT116 wild-type (wt) and p53-/- cells underwent apoptosis and loss in clonogenic survival when exposed to ZD9331, whereas p21Cip1-/- cells were resistant. In contrast, IFN-gamma induced marked cytotoxicity in p21Cip1-/- cells only. ZD9331 induced p21Cip1 up-regulation in all of the cell lines examined, as did thymidine deprivation in thymidylate synthase-deficient (thymidylate synthase-) cells. Furthermore, selective induction of p21Cip1 in RKO was sufficient to induce apoptosis. P21Cip1, cdk1, cdk2, and cyclin E mRNA expression increased coincident with S-phase accumulation in HT29 cells treated with ZD9331 or 5fluorouracil/leucovorin, as demonstrated by cDNA microarray analyses. Cell cycle analyses revealed that HCT116 wt and p21Cip1 -/- cells accumulated in S phase within 24 h of ZD9331 exposure; however, wt cells exited S-phase more rapidly, where apoptosis occurred before mitosis, either in late S or G2. Finally, the CDK inhibitor roscovitine potentiated the cytotoxic activity of ZD9331 in both wt and p21Cip1-/- cells, strongly suggesting a role for p21Cip1-dependent CDK inhibition in cytotoxicity induced by thymidylate synthase inhibition. In summary, p21Cip1 positively regulates the cytotoxic action of thymidylate synthase inhibitors, negatively regulates the cytotoxic action of IFN-gamma, and enhances S-phase exit after thymineless stress, possibly via interaction with CDK-cyclin complexes. PMID:15342418

  6. Elevated p16ink4a Expression in Human Labial Salivary Glands as a Potential Correlate of Cognitive Aging in Late Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Christiane Elisabeth; Tritsaris, Katerina; Reibel, Jesper; Lauritzen, Martin; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Osler, Merete; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Background The cell-cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, p16ink4a, is one of the two gene products of the ink4a/ARF (cdkn2a) locus on chromosome 9q21. Up-regulation of p16ink4a has been linked to cellular senescence, and findings from studies on different mammalian tissues suggest that p16ink4a may be a biomarker of organismal versus chronological age. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the immunolocalization pattern of p16ink4a in human labial salivary gland (LSG) tissue, and to analyze whether its expression level in LSGs is a peripheral correlate of cognitive decline in late midlife. Methods The present study was a part of a study of causes and predictors of cognitive decline in middle-aged men in a Danish birth cohort. It is based on data from 181 male participants from the Danish Metropolit birth cohort, born in 1953, who were examined for age-associated alterations in cognition, dental health, and morphological and autonomic innervation characteristics of the LSGs. The participants were allocated to two groups based on the relative change in cognitive performance from young adulthood to late midlife. LSG biopsies were analyzed by qRT-PCR for the expression level of p16ink4a. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of LSGs. Results p16ink4a immunoreactivity was observed in LSG ductal, myoepithelial, and stromal cells, but not in acinar cells. The mean relative expression of p16ink4a in LSGs was higher in the group of participants with decline in cognitive performance. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the relative p16 expression was predictive of the participant’s group assignment. A negative correlation was found between relative p16ink4a expression and the participant’s standardized regression residuals from early adulthood to late midlife cognitive performance scores. Conclusions p16ink4a expression in human LSGs may constitute a potential peripheral

  7. Human Papillomavirus Genotyping and p16INK4a Expression in Cervical Lesions: A Combined Test to Avoid Cervical Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zouheir, Yassine; Fechtali, Taoufiq; Elgnaoui, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Morocco. The cervical cancer has a long precancerous period that provides an opportunity for the screening and treatment. Improving screening tests is a priority goal for the early diagnosis of cervical cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the combination of p16INK4a protein expression, human papillomavirus (HPV) typing, and histopathology for the identification of cervical lesions with high risk to progress to cervical cancer among Moroccan women. A total of 96 cervical biopsies were included in this study. Signal amplification in situ hybridization with biotinylated probes was used to detect HPV. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of p16INK4a protein. HPV DNA was detected in 74.0% of the biopsies (71/96). Of the seventy-one positive HPV cases, we detected 67.6% (48/71) of high risk (HR)-HPV (HPV 16 and 18), 24% of low risk-HPV (HPV 6 and 11), 1.4% intermediate risk-HPV (HPV 31, 33, and 35), and 7% coinfections (HPV 6/11 and 16/18). Overexpression of p16INK4a protein was observed in 72.9% (70/96) of the biopsies. In addition, p16INK4a protein detection was closely correlated with recovery of HR HPV. Our result showed that p16INK4a expression level is correlated with HR-HPV status. PMID:27390742

  8. Human Papillomavirus Genotyping and p16(INK4a) Expression in Cervical Lesions: A Combined Test to Avoid Cervical Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Zouheir, Yassine; Fechtali, Taoufiq; Elgnaoui, Nadia

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Morocco. The cervical cancer has a long precancerous period that provides an opportunity for the screening and treatment. Improving screening tests is a priority goal for the early diagnosis of cervical cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the combination of p16(INK4a) protein expression, human papillomavirus (HPV) typing, and histopathology for the identification of cervical lesions with high risk to progress to cervical cancer among Moroccan women. A total of 96 cervical biopsies were included in this study. Signal amplification in situ hybridization with biotinylated probes was used to detect HPV. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of p16(INK4a) protein. HPV DNA was detected in 74.0% of the biopsies (71/96). Of the seventy-one positive HPV cases, we detected 67.6% (48/71) of high risk (HR)-HPV (HPV 16 and 18), 24% of low risk-HPV (HPV 6 and 11), 1.4% intermediate risk-HPV (HPV 31, 33, and 35), and 7% coinfections (HPV 6/11 and 16/18). Overexpression of p16(INK4a) protein was observed in 72.9% (70/96) of the biopsies. In addition, p16(INK4a) protein detection was closely correlated with recovery of HR HPV. Our result showed that p16(INK4a) expression level is correlated with HR-HPV status. PMID:27390742

  9. Aurora B Overexpression Causes Aneuploidy and p21Cip1 Repression during Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    González-Loyola, Alejandra; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Trakala, Marianna; Partida, David; Samejima, Kumiko; Ogawa, Hiromi; Cañamero, Marta; de Martino, Alba; Martínez-Ramírez, Ángel; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; Earnshaw, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase B, one of the three members of the mammalian Aurora kinase family, is the catalytic component of the chromosomal passenger complex, an essential regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Aurora B is overexpressed in human tumors although whether this kinase may function as an oncogene in vivo is not established. Here, we report a new mouse model in which expression of the endogenous Aurkb locus can be induced in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Aurora B in cultured cells induces defective chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. Long-term overexpression of Aurora B in vivo results in aneuploidy and the development of multiple spontaneous tumors in adult mice, including a high incidence of lymphomas. Overexpression of Aurora B also results in a reduced DNA damage response and decreased levels of the p53 target p21Cip1 in vitro and in vivo, in line with an inverse correlation between Aurora B and p21Cip1 expression in human leukemias. Thus, overexpression of Aurora B may contribute to tumor formation not only by inducing chromosomal instability but also by suppressing the function of the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. PMID:26240282

  10. Aging of mice is associated with p16(Ink4a)- and β-galactosidase-positive macrophage accumulation that can be induced in young mice by senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Brandon M.; Balan, Vitaly; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Strom, Evguenia; Krasnov, Peter; Virtuoso, Lauren P.; Rydkina, Elena; Vujcic, Slavoljub; Balan, Karina; Gitlin, Ilya; Leonova, Katerina; Polinsky, Alexander; Chernova, Olga B.; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells (SCs) have been considered a source of age-related chronic sterile systemic inflammation and a target for anti-aging therapies. To understand mechanisms controlling the amount of SCs, we analyzed the phenomenon of rapid clearance of human senescent fibroblasts implanted into SCID mice, which can be overcome when SCs were embedded into alginate beads preventing them from immunocyte attack. To identify putative SC killers, we analyzed the content of cell populations in lavage and capsules formed around the SC-containing beads. One of the major cell types attracted by secretory factors of SCs was a subpopulation of macrophages characterized by p16(Ink4a) gene expression and β-galactosidase activity at pH6.0 (β-galpH6), thus resembling SCs. Consistently, mice with p16(Ink4a) promoter-driven luciferase, developed bright luminescence of their peritoneal cavity within two weeks following implantation of SCs embedded in alginate beads. p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-expressing cells had surface biomarkers of macrophages F4/80 and were sensitive to liposomal clodronate used for the selective killing of cells capable of phagocytosis. At the same time, clodronate failed to kill bona fide SCs generated in vitro by genotoxic stress. Old mice with elevated proportion of p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-positive cells in their tissues demonstrated reduction of both following systemic clodronate treatment, indicating that a significant proportion of cells previously considered to be SCs are actually a subclass of macrophages. These observations point at a significant role of p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-positive macrophages in aging, which previously was attributed solely to SCs. They require re-interpretation of the mechanisms underlying rejuvenating effects following eradication of p16(Ink4a)/β-galpH6-positive cells and reconsideration of potential cellular target for anti-aging treatment. PMID:27391570

  11. Reversible cell cycle inhibition and premature aging features imposed by conditional expression of p16Ink4a.

    PubMed

    Boquoi, Amelie; Arora, Sanjeevani; Chen, Tina; Litwin, Sam; Koh, James; Enders, Greg H

    2015-02-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p16(Ink4a) (p16) is a canonical mediator of cellular senescence and accumulates in aging tissues, where it constrains proliferation of some progenitor cells. However, whether p16 induction in tissues is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation, mediate senescence, and/or impose aging features has remained unclear. To address these issues, we generated transgenic mice that permit conditional p16 expression. Broad induction at weaning inhibited proliferation of intestinal transit-amplifying and Lgr5+ stem cells and rapidly imposed features of aging, including hair loss, skin wrinkling, reduced body weight and subcutaneous fat, an increased myeloid fraction in peripheral blood, poor dentition, and cataracts. Aging features were observed with multiple combinations of p16 transgenes and transactivators and were largely abrogated by a germline Cdk4 R24C mutation, confirming that they reflect Cdk inhibition. Senescence markers were not found, and de-induction of p16, even after weeks of sustained expression, allowed rapid recovery of intestinal cell proliferation and reversal of aging features in most mice. These results suggest that p16-mediated inhibition of Cdk activity is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation and impose aging features in somatic tissues of mammals and that at least some of these aging features are reversible. PMID:25481981

  12. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  13. Reversible cell cycle inhibition and premature aging features imposed by conditional expression of p16Ink4a

    PubMed Central

    Boquoi, Amelie; Arora, Sanjeevani; Chen, Tina; Litwin, Sam; Koh, James; Enders, Greg H

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p16Ink4a (p16) is a canonical mediator of cellular senescence and accumulates in aging tissues, where it constrains proliferation of some progenitor cells. However, whether p16 induction in tissues is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation, mediate senescence, and/or impose aging features has remained unclear. To address these issues, we generated transgenic mice that permit conditional p16 expression. Broad induction at weaning inhibited proliferation of intestinal transit-amplifying and Lgr5+ stem cells and rapidly imposed features of aging, including hair loss, skin wrinkling, reduced body weight and subcutaneous fat, an increased myeloid fraction in peripheral blood, poor dentition, and cataracts. Aging features were observed with multiple combinations of p16 transgenes and transactivators and were largely abrogated by a germline Cdk4 R24C mutation, confirming that they reflect Cdk inhibition. Senescence markers were not found, and de-induction of p16, even after weeks of sustained expression, allowed rapid recovery of intestinal cell proliferation and reversal of aging features in most mice. These results suggest that p16-mediated inhibition of Cdk activity is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation and impose aging features in somatic tissues of mammals and that at least some of these aging features are reversible. PMID:25481981

  14. CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and ATM promoter methylation in patients with impalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Delmonico, Lucas; Moreira, Aline dos Santos; Franco, Marco Felipe; Esteves, Eliane Barbosa; Scherrer, Luciano; Gallo, Claúdia Vitória de Moura; do Nascimento, Cristina Moreira; Ornellas, Maria Helena Faria; de Azevedo, Carolina Maria; Alves, Gilda

    2015-10-01

    Early detection of breast cancer increases the chances of cure, but the reliable identification of impalpable lesions is still a challenge. In spite of the advances in breast cancer detection, the molecular basis of impalpable lesions and the corresponding circulating biomarkers are not well understood. Impalpable lesions, classified by radiologists according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System in the categories 3 and 4, can be either benign or malignant (slow growing or aggressive). In this article, we report the DNA methylation pattern in CDKN2A (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)) and in ATM gene promoters from 62 impalpable lesions, 39 peripheral blood samples, and 39 saliva samples, assessed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction method. ATM showed the greatest percentage of methylation in DNA from lesions (benign and malignant), blood (even with p16(INK4a)), and saliva, followed by p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Among the malignant cases, ATM promoter was the most hypermethylated in lesion DNA and in blood and saliva DNAs, and p14(ARF), the least. The highest percentage of p16(INK4a) methylation was found in the blood. Finally, our data are relevant because they were obtained using impalpable breast lesions from patients who were carefully recruited in 2 public hospitals of Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26255234

  15. LncRNA PANDAR regulates the G1/S transition of breast cancer cells by suppressing p16INK4A expression

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yi; Tang, Jianjun; Li, Siwei; Li, Liping; Tang, XiaoFeng; Cheng, Chun; Luo, Yanqin; Qian, Xia; Deng, Liang-Ming; Liu, Lijuan; Lv, Xiao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that lncRNA PANDAR (promoter of CDKN1A antisense DNA damage-activated RNA) is induced as a result of DNA damage, and it regulates the reparation of DNA damage. In this study, we investigated the role of lncRNA PANDAR in the progression of breast cancer and found that PANDAR was up-regulated in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The knockdown of PANDAR suppresses G1/S transition of breast cancer cells. We demonstrated mechanistically that the regulation of G1/S transition by PANDAR was partly due to the transcriptional modulation of p16INK4A. Moreover, we showed that PANDAR impacted p16INK4A expression by regulating the recruitment Bmi1 to p16INK4A promoter. To our knowledge, this is the first study which showed the functional roles and mechanisms of PANDAR in regulating the progression of breast cancer. The PANDAR/Bmi1/p16INK4A axis could serve as novel targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:26927017

  16. Simulation of Different Truncated p16INK4a Forms and In Silico Study of Interaction with Cdk4

    PubMed Central

    Fahham, Najmeh; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Sardari, Soroush; Vaziri, Behrouz; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2008-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions studies can greatly increase the amount of structural and functional information pertaining to biologically active molecules and processes. The information obtained from such studies can lead to design and application of new modification in order to obtain a desired bioactivity. Many application packages and servers performing docking, such as HEX, DOT, AUTODOCK, and ZDOCK are now available for predicting the lowest free energy state of a protein complex. In this study, we have focused on cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), a key molecule in the regulation of cell cycle progression at the G1-S phase restriction point and p16INK4a, a tumor suppressor which inhibits Cdk4 activity. Truncated structures were created to find the more critical regions of p16 for interaction. The tertiary structures were determined by ProSAL, GENO3D Web Server. We evaluated their interactions with Cdk4 using two docking systems, HEX 4.5 and DOT 1. Calculations were performed on a high-speed computer. Minimizations and visualizations were carried out by PdbViewer 3.7. Considering shape and shape/electrostatic total energy, structures containing ANK II, III and IV motifs that lack the N-terminal region of the full length p16 molecule showed the best fit complexes among the p16 truncated forms. The free energies were compatible with that of p16 full length original form, the full length. It seems that the N-terminal of the molecule is not crucial for the interaction since the truncated structure containing only this region did not show a good total energy. PMID:19352455

  17. p16(INK4A) mediates age-related changes in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human dental pulp through the DNA damage and stress response.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingmei; Xing, Jing; Feng, Guijuan; Huang, Dan; Lu, Xiaohui; Liu, Suzhe; Tan, Wei; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human dental pulp (DP-MSCs) are characterized by self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation, which play important roles in regenerative medicine. Autologous transfers, as non-immunogenic, constitute the safest approach in cellular transplantations. However, their use may be limited by age-related changes. In the study, we compared DP-MSCs isolated from human in five age groups: 5-12 y, 12-20 y, 20-35 y, 35-50 y, and >50 y. We tested the effect of age on proliferation, differentiation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), cell cycle and programmed cell death. DP-MSCs showed characteristics of senescence as a function of age. Meanwhile, the expression of p16(INK4A) and γ-H2A.X significantly increased with age, whereas heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) was decreased in the senescent DP-MSCs. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed the number of ROS-stained cells and the DCFH fluorescent level were higher in the aged group. Further we examined the senescence of DP-MSCs after modulating p16(INK4A) signaling. The results indicated the dysfunction of DP-MSCs was reversed by p16(INK4A) siRNA. In summary, our study indicated p16(INK4A) pathway may play a critical role in DP-MSCs age-related changes and the DNA damage response (DDR) and stress response may be the main mediators of DP-MSCs senescence induced by excessive activation of p16(INK4A) signaling. PMID:25304494

  18. The p16(INK4A)/pRb pathway and telomerase activity define a subgroup of Ph+ adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia associated with inferior outcome.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wei W; Catallo, Régine; Chebel, Amel; Baranger, Laurence; Thomas, Xavier; Béné, Marie-Christine; Gerland, Luc M; Schmidt, Aline; Beldjord, Kheira; Klein, Nathalie; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Leguay, Thibaut; Huguet, Françoise; Larosa, Fabrice; Hayette, Sandrine; Plesa, Adriana; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Salles, Gilles; Chassevent, Agnès; Ffrench, Martine

    2015-04-01

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) therapies have been improved by pediatric-like approaches. However, treatment failures and relapses are common and new markers are needed to identify patients with poor prognosis in prospective trials. The p16(INK4A)/CDK4-6/pRb pathway and telomerase activity, which are implicated in cell activation and aging, were analyzed to identify new prognostic markers. Proteins of the p16(INK4A)/CDK4-6/pRb pathway and telomerase activity were analyzed in 123 adult B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL cases included in the GRAALL/GRAAPH trials. We found a significantly increased expression of p16(INK4A) in BCP-ALLs with MLL rearrangement. Telomerase activity was significantly lower in Philadelphia chromosome-negative/IKAROS-deleted (BCR-ABL1(-)/IKAROS(del)) cases compared to Philadelphia chromosome-positive (BCR-ABL1+) BCP-ALLs. In BCR-ABL1+ ALLs, high CDK4 expression, phosphorylated pRb (p-pRb) and telomerase activity were significantly associated with a shorter disease-free survival (DFS) and event-free survival (EFS). Enhanced p16(INK4A) expression was only related to a significantly shorter DFS. In vitro analyses of normal stimulated lymphocytes after short- and long-term cultures demonstrated that the observed protein variations of poor prognosis in BCR-ABL1+ ALLs may be related to cell activation but not to cell aging. For these patients, our findings argue for the development of therapeutic strategies including the addition of new lymphocyte activation inhibitors to current treatments. PMID:25675863

  19. p16INK4A tumor suppressor gene expression and CD3epsilon deficiency but not pre-TCR deficiency inhibit TAL1-linked T-lineage leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fasseu, Magali; Aplan, Peter D; Chopin, Martine; Boissel, Nicolas; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Soulier, Jean; von Boehmer, Harald; Sigaux, François; Regnault, Armelle

    2007-10-01

    Inactivation of the CDKN2 genes that encode the p16(INK4A) and p14(ARF) proteins occurs in the majority of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs). Ectopic expression of TAL1 and LMO1 genes is linked to the development of T-ALL in humans. In TAL1xLMO1 mice, leukemia develops in 100% of mice at 5 months. To identify the molecular events crucial to leukemic transformation, we produced several mouse models. We report here that expression of P16(INK4A) in developing TAL1xLMO1 thymocytes blocks leukemogenesis in the majority of the mice, and the leukemias that eventually develop show P16(INK4A) loss of expression. Events related to the T-cell receptor beta selection process are thought to be important for leukemic transformation. We show here that the absence of the pTalpha chain only slightly delays the appearance of TAL1xLMO1-induced T-ALL, which indicates a minor role of the pTalpha chain. We also show that the CD3epsilon-mediated signal transduction pathway is essential for this transformation process, since the TAL1xLMO1xCD3epsilon-deficient mice do not develop T-ALL for up to 1 year. PMID:17507663

  20. The Use of Recombinant Pseudotype Virus-Like Particles Harbouring Inserted Target Antigen to Generate Antibodies against Cellular Marker p16INK4A

    PubMed Central

    Lasickienė, Rita; Gedvilaite, Alma; Norkiene, Milda; Simanaviciene, Vaida; Sezaite, Indre; Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Shikova, Evelina; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2012-01-01

    Protein engineering provides an opportunity to generate new immunogens with desired features. Previously, we have demonstrated that hamster polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly immunogenic and can be employed for the insertion of foreign epitopes at certain surface-exposed positions. In the current study, we have designed pseudotype VLPs consisting of an intact VP1 protein and VP2 protein fused with the target antigen—cellular marker p16INK4A—at its N terminus. Both proteins coexpressed in yeast were self-assembled to pseudotype VLPs harbouring the inserted antigen on the surface. The pseudotype VLPs were used for generation of antibodies against p16INK4A that represents a potential biomarker for cells transformed by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The pseudotype VLPs induced in immunized mice a strong immune response against the target antigen. The antisera raised against pseudotype VLPs showed specific immunostaining of p16INK4A protein in malignant cervical tissue. Spleen cells of the immunized mice were used to generate monoclonal antibodies against p16INK4A protein. The specificity of antibodies was proven by the immunostaining of HPV-transformed cells. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates the potential of pseudotype VLPs with inserted target antigen as a new type of immunogens to generate antibodies of high diagnostic value. PMID:22629125

  1. β-Catenin induces immortalization of melanocytes by suppressing p16INK4a expression and cooperates with N-Ras in melanoma development

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Véronique; Beermann, Friedrich; Martinozzi, Silvia; Carreira, Suzanne; Ackermann, Julien; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Denat, Laurence; Goodall, Jane; Luciani, Flavie; Viros, Amaya; Demirkan, Nese; Bastian, Boris C.; Goding, Colin R.; Larue, Lionel

    2007-01-01

    Tumor progression is a multistep process in which proproliferation mutations must be accompanied by suppression of senescence. In melanoma, proproliferative signals are provided by activating mutations in NRAS and BRAF, whereas senescence is bypassed by inactivation of the p16Ink4a gene. Melanomas also frequently exhibit constitutive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is presumed to induce proliferation, as it does in carcinomas. We show here that, contrary to expectations, stabilized β-catenin reduces the number of melanoblasts in vivo and immortalizes primary skin melanocytes by silencing the p16Ink4a promoter. Significantly, in a novel mouse model for melanoma, stabilized β-catenin bypasses the requirement for p16Ink4a mutations and, together with an activated N-Ras oncogene, leads to melanoma with high penetrance and short latency. The results reveal that synergy between the Wnt and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways may represent an important mechanism underpinning the genesis of melanoma, a highly aggressive and increasingly common disease. PMID:18006687

  2. TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4A transcript levels are predictive for development of high-grade cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Manawapat-Klopfer, Anna; Thomsen, Louise T; Martus, Peter; Munk, Christian; Russ, Rainer; Gmuender, Hans; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Haedicke-Jarboui, Juliane; Stubenrauch, Frank; Kjaer, Susanne K; Iftner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Women persistently infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 are at high risk for development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN3+). We aimed to identify biomarkers for progression to CIN3+ in women with persistent HPV16 infection. In this prospective study, 11,088 women aged 20-29 years were enrolled during 1991-1993, and re-invited for a second visit two years later. Cervical cytology samples obtained at both visits were tested for HPV DNA by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), and HC2-positive samples were genotyped by INNO-LiPA. The cohort was followed for up to 19 years via a national pathology register. To identify markers for progression to CIN3+, we performed microarray analysis on RNA extracted from cervical swabs of 30 women with persistent HPV16-infection and 11 HPV-negative women. Six genes were selected and validated by quantitative PCR. Three genes were subsequently validated within a different and large group of women from the same cohort. Secondly, Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analyses were used to investigate whether expression levels of those three genes predict progression to CIN3+. We found that high transcript levels of TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4a at baseline were associated with increased risk of CIN3+ during follow-up. The hazard ratios of CIN3+ per 10-fold increase in baseline expression level were 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.3) for TMEM45A, 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.5) for p16INK4a, and 1.8 (95% CI: 1.2-2.7) for SERPINB5. In conclusion, high mRNA expression levels of TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4a were associated with increased risk of CIN3+ in persistently HPV16-infected women. PMID:27508094

  3. FOXO target gene CTDSP2 regulates cell cycle progression through Ras and p21Cip1/Waf1

    PubMed Central

    Kloet, David E.A.; Polderman, Paulien E.; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Smits, Lydia M.; vanTriest, Miranda H.; vandenBerg, Maaike C.W.; Koerkamp, Marian J. Groot; vanLeenen, Dik; Lijnzaad, Philip; Holstege, Frank C.; Burgering, Boudewijn M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Activity of FOXO (forkhead box O) transcription factors is inhibited by growth factor–PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)–PKB (protein kinase B)/Akt signalling to control a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle progression. Through comparative analysis of a number of microarray datasets we identified a set of genes commonly regulated by FOXO proteins and PI3K–PKB/Akt, which includes CTDSP2 (C-terminal domain small phosphatase 2). We validated CTDSP2 as a genuine FOXO target gene and show that ectopic CTDSP2 can induce cell cycle arrest. We analysed transcriptional regulation after CTDSP2 expression and identified extensive regulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression, which depends on the phosphatase activity of CTDSP2. The most notably regulated gene is the CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1 and in the present study we show that p21Cip1/Waf1 is partially responsible for the cell cycle arrest through decreasing cyclin–CDK activity. Our data suggest that CTDSP2 induces p21Cip1/Waf1 through increasing the activity of Ras. As has been described previously, Ras induces p21Cip1/Waf1 through p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways and indeed both p53 and MEK inhibition can mitigate the CTDSP2-induced p21Cip1/Waf1 mRNA up-regulation. In support of Ras activation by CTDSP2, depletion of endogenous CTDSP2 results in reduced Ras activity and thus CTDSP2 seems to be part of a larger set of genes regulated by FOXO proteins, which increase growth factor signalling upon FOXO activation. PMID:25990325

  4. DNA copy number aberrations and disruption of the p16Ink4a/Rb pathway in radiation-induced and spontaneous rat mammary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Daisuke; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Takabatake, Takashi; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Nishimura, Yukiko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2010-08-01

    Chromosomal amplifications and deletions are thought to be important events in spontaneous and radiation-induced carcinogenesis. To clarify how ionizing radiation induces mammary carcinogenesis, we characterized genomic copy number aberrations for gamma-ray-induced rat mammary carcinomas using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. We examined 14 carcinomas induced by gamma radiation (2 Gy) and found 26 aberrations, including trisomies of chromosomes 4 and 10 for three and one carcinomas, respectively, an amplification of the chromosomal region 1q12 in two carcinomas, and deletions of the chromosomal regions 3q35q36, 5q32 and 7q11 in two, two and four carcinomas, respectively. These aberrations were not observed in seven spontaneous mammary carcinomas. The expression of p16Ink4a and p19Arf, which are located in the chromosomal region 5q32, was always up-regulated except for a carcinoma with a homozygous deletion of region 5q32. The up-regulation was not accounted for by gene mutations or promoter hypomethylation. However, the amounts of Rb and its mRNA were down-regulated in these carcinomas, indicating a disruption of the p16Ink4a/Rb pathway. This is the first report of array CGH analysis for radiation-induced mammary tumors, which reveals that they show distinct DNA copy number aberration patterns that are different from those of spontaneous tumors and those reported previously for chemically induced tumors. PMID:20681787

  5. Centrosome aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells driven by cooperative interactions between p16INK4a deficiency and telomere-dependent genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Daniel; Feijoo, Purificación; Bernal, Aina; Ercilla, Amaia; Agell, Neus; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all human cancers display chromosome instability (CIN), a condition in which chromosomes are gained or lost at a high rate. CIN occurs early in cancer development where it may undermine the advance of the neoplastic disease. With the aim of establishing the mechanisms underlying CIN in cancer, we investigated possible links between telomere-dysfunction and centrosome defects, which were seen to coincide in early in breast carcinogenesis using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). In this study, we show that TP53 proficient vHMECs cells develop centrosome aberrations when telomere-dysfunction genotoxic stress is produced in the presence of a defective p16INK4a setting and in parallel with an activation of the DNA damage checkpoint response. These aberrations consist of the accumulation of centrosomes in polyploid vHMECs, plus centriole overduplication in both diploid and polyploid cells, thus reflecting that distinct mechanisms underlie the generation of centrosome aberrations in vHMECs. Transduction of vHMEC with hTERT, which rescued the telomere dysfunction phenotype and consequently reduced DNA damage checkpoint activation, led to a progressive reduction of centrosome aberrations with cell culture, both in diploid and in polyploid vHMECs. Radiation-induced DNA damage also raised centrosome aberrations in vHMEC-hTERT. Collectively, our results, using vHMECs define a model where p16INK4a deficiency along with short dysfunctional telomeres cooperatively engenders centrosome abnormalities before p53 function is compromised. PMID:26318587

  6. Culturing on Wharton's Jelly Extract Delays Mesenchymal Stem Cell Senescence through p53 and p16INK4a/pRb Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiejie; Ti, Dongdong; Zhao, Yali; Xu, Shenjun; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great therapeutic potential. However, MSCs undergo replication senescence during the in vitro expansion process. Wharton's jelly from the human umbilical cord harbors a large number of MSCs. In this study, we hypothesized that Wharton's jelly would be beneficial for in vitro expansion of MSCs. Wharton's jelly extract (WJEs), which is mainly composed of extracellular matrix and cytokines, was prepared as coating substrate. Human MSCs were isolated and cultured on WJE-coated plates. Although the proliferation capacity of cells was not augmented by WJE in early phase culture, adynamic growth in late-phase culture was clearly reduced, suggesting that the replicative senescence of MSCs was efficiently slowed by WJE. This was confirmed by β-galactosidase staining and telomere length measurements of MSCs in late-phase culture. In addition, the decreased differentiation ability of MSCs after long-term culture was largely ameliorated by WJE. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), p53, and p16INK4a/pRb expression increased with passaging. Analysis at the molecular level revealed that WJE-based culture efficiently suppressed the enhancement of intracellular ROS, p53, and p16INK4a/pRb in MSCs. These data demonstrated that WJE provided an ideal microenvironment for MSCs culture expansion in vitro preserved MSC properties by delaying MSCs senescence, and allowed large numbers of MSCs to be obtained for basic research and clinical therapies. PMID:23516461

  7. Investigating Diagnostic Problems of CIN1 and CIN2 Associated With High-risk HPV by Combining the Novel Molecular Biomarker PanHPVE4 With P16INK4a.

    PubMed

    van Baars, Romy; Griffin, Heather; Wu, Zhonglin; Soneji, Yasmina J; van de Sandt, Miekel M; Arora, Rupali; van der Marel, Jacolien; ter Harmsel, Bram; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Jenkins, David; Quint, Wim G V; Doorbar, John

    2015-11-01

    Grading cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) determines clinical management of women after abnormal cytology with potential for overdiagnosis and overtreatment. We studied a novel biomarker of human papillomavirus (HPV) life-cycle completion (panHPVE4), in combination with the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein cell-cycle marker and the p16INK4a transformation marker, to improve CIN diagnosis and categorization. Scoring these biomarkers alongside CIN grading by 3 pathologists was performed on 114 cervical specimens with high-risk (HR) HPV. Interobserver agreement for histopathology was moderate (κ=0.43 for CIN1/negative, 0.54 for CIN2/≤CIN1, and 0.36 for CIN3). Agreement was good or excellent for biomarker scoring (E4: κ=0.896; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.763-0.969; p16INK4a : κ=0.798; 95% CI: 0.712-0.884; MCM: κ=0.894; 95% CI: NC (this quantity cannot be calculated). Biomarker expression was studied by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry and was correlated with 104 final CIN diagnoses after histologic review. All 25 histologically negative specimens were p16INK4a and panHPVE4 negative, although 9 were MCM-positive. There were variable extents of p16INK4a positivity in 11/11 CIN1 and extensive panHPVE4 staining in 9/11. Ten CIN2 lesions expressed panHPVE4 and p16INK4a, and 13 CIN2 expressed only p16INK4a. CIN3 showed extensive p16INK4a positivity with no/minimal panHPVE4 staining. PanHPVE4, unlike MCM, distinguished CIN1 from negative. PanHPVE4 with p16INK4a separated CIN2/3 showing only expression of p16INK4a, indicating transforming HR-HPV E7 expression, from CIN1/2 showing completion of HR-HPV life cycle by E4 expression and variable p16INK4a expression. PanHPVE4 and p16INK4a staining are complementary markers that could provide simple, reliable support for diagnosing CIN. Their value in distinguishing CIN1/2 that supports HR-HPV life-cycle completion (and which might ultimately regress) from purely transforming CIN2/3 needing

  8. Investigating Diagnostic Problems of CIN 1 and 2 Associated with High-Risk HPV by Combining the Novel Molecular Biomarker PanHPV E4 with P16ink4a

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhonglin; Soneji, Yasmina Jay; van de Sandt, Miekel; Arora, Rupali; van der Marel, Jacolien; ter Harmsel, Bram; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Jenkins, David; Quint, Wim; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    Grading cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) determines clinical management of women after abnormal cytology with potential for over-diagnosis and overtreatment. We studied a novel biomarker of HPV life-cycle completion (panHPVE4), in combination with the MCM cell-cycle marker and the p16INK4a transformation marker to improve CIN diagnosis and categorization. Scoring these biomarkers alongside CIN grading by three pathologists was performed on 114 cervical specimens with high-risk (HR-) HPV. Inter-observer agreement for histopathology was moderate (kappa (κ): 0.43 for CIN1/negative, 0.54 for CIN2/≤CIN1, and 0.36 for CIN3). Agreement was good or excellent for biomarker scoring (E4: κ=0.896; 95%CI: 0.763-0.969, p16INK4a: κ=0.798; 95%CI: 0.712-0.884, MCM: κ=0.894; 95%CI: n.c.). Biomarker expression was studied by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry and correlated with 104 final CIN diagnoses following histological review. All 25 histologically negative specimens were p16INK4a and panHPVE4 negative although 9 were MCM positive. There were variable extents of p16INK4a positivity in 11/11 CIN1, and extensive panHPVE4 staining in 9/11. Ten CIN2 lesions expressed panHPVE4 and p16INK4a and 13 CIN2 expressed only p16INK4a. CIN3 showed extensive p16INK4a positivity with no/minimal panHPVE4 staining. PanHPVE4, unlike MCM, distinguished CIN1 from negative. PanHPVE4 with p16INK4a separated CIN2/3 showing only expression of p16INK4a indicating transforming HR-HPV E7 expression, from CIN1/2 showing completion of HR-HPV life-cycle by E4 expression and variable p16INK4a expression. PanHPVE4 and p16INK4a staining are complementary markers that could provide simple, reliable support for diagnosing CIN. Their value in distinguishing CIN1/2 that supports HR-HPV life cycle completion (and which might ultimately regress), from purely transforming CIN2/3 needing treatment warrants further research. PMID:26379150

  9. Cables1 controls p21/Cip1 protein stability by antagonizing proteasome subunit alpha type 3

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhi; Li, Zenggang; Li, Zijian; Cheng, Kejun; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), p21/Cip1, is a vital cell cycle regulator, dysregulation of which has been associated with a large number of human malignancies. One critical mechanism that controls p21 function is through its degradation, which allows the activation of its associated cell cycle promoting kinases, CDK2 and CDK4. Thus, delineating how p21 is stabilized and degraded will enhance our understanding of cell growth control and offer a basis for potential therapeutic interventions. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism that controls the dynamic status of p21 through its interaction with Cdk5 and Abl enzyme substrate 1 (Cables1). Cables1 has a proposed role as a tumor suppressor. We found that upregulation of Cables1 protein was correlated with increased half-life of p21 protein, which was attributed to Cables1/p21 complex formation and supported by their co-localization in the nucleus. Mechanistically, Cables1 interferes with the proteasome (Prosome, Macropain) subunit alpha type 3 (PSMA3) binding to p21 and protects p21 from PSMA3-mediated proteasomal degradation. Moreover, silencing of p21 partially reverses the ability of Cables1 to induce cell death and inhibit cell proliferation. In further support of a potential pathophysiological role of Cables1, the expression level of Cables1 is tightly associated with p21 in both cancer cell lines and human lung cancer patient tumor samples. Together, these results suggest Cables1 as a novel p21 regulator through maintaining p21 stability, and support the model that the tumor suppressive function of Cables1 occurs at least in part through enhancing the tumor suppressive activity of p21. PMID:24975575

  10. The 5′-untranslated region of p16INK4a melanoma tumor suppressor acts as a cellular IRES, controlling mRNA translation under hypoxia through YBX1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Alessandra; Latorre, Elisa; Andreotti, Virginia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Harland, Mark; Scarra, Giovanna Bianchi; Ghiorzo, Paola; Spitale, Robert C.; Provenzani, Alessandro; Inga, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    CDKN2A/p16INK4a is an essential tumor suppressor gene that controls cell cycle progression and replicative senescence. It is also the main melanoma susceptibility gene. Here we report that p16INK4a 5′UTR mRNA acts as a cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES). The potential for p16INK4a 5′UTR to drive cap-independent translation was evaluated by dual-luciferase assays using bicistronic and monocistronic vectors. Results of reporters' relative activities coupled to control analyses for actual bicistronic mRNA transcription, indicated that the wild type p16INK4a 5′UTR could stimulate cap-independent translation. Notably, hypoxic stress and the treatment with mTOR inhibitors enhanced the translation-stimulating property of p16INK4a 5′UTR. RNA immunoprecipitation performed in melanoma-derived SK-Mel-28 and in a patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell line indicated that YBX1 can bind the wild type p16INK4a mRNA increasing its translation efficiency, particularly during hypoxic stress. Modulation of YBX1 expression further supported its involvement in cap-independent translation of the wild type p16INK4a but not a c.-42T>A variant. RNA SHAPE assays revealed local flexibility changes for the c.-42T>A variant at the predicted YBX1 binding site region. Our results indicate that p16INK4a 5′UTR contains a cellular IRES that can enhance mRNA translation efficiency, in part through YBX1. PMID:26498684

  11. Hypermethylation of hMLH1, HPP1, p14(ARF), p16(INK4A) and APC in primary adenocarcinomas of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Brücher, Björn L D M; Geddert, Helene; Langner, Cord; Höfler, Heinz; Fink, Ulrich; Siewert, Jörg R; Sarbia, Mario

    2006-09-15

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma (SB-AC) is a very rare tumor entity. Epigenetic alterations, including hypermethylation of DNA mismatch repair genes and tumor suppressor genes, seem to be important for carcinogenesis in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, but have not yet been investigated in SB-AC. In the current study, the prevalence of hypermethylation in a panel of genes involved in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis (hMLH1, HPP1, p14(ARF), p16(INK4A), APC) was determined in a series of SB-AC. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 56 patients with SB-AC who underwent surgical resection between January 1985 and December 2003 were investigated for hypermethylation by means of methylation-specific real-time PCR, and compared with our findings in a previously investigated series of 50 gastric adenocarcinomas. In comparison with adenocarcinomas of the stomach, SB-AC revealed a significantly higher rate of hypermethylation of HPP1 (86% versus 54%, p = 0.0003), p16(INK4A) (32% versus 10%, p = 0.0006), and a significantly lower rate of hypermethylation of APC (48% versus 84%, p = 0.0001). Hypermethylation of hMLH1 and p14(ARF) was present in 23% and 9% of SB-AC, respectively. Locally advanced tumor categories (pT3/4) showed a higher rate of hypermethylation of HPP1 (90%) than did early tumor categories (pT1/2 categories, 40%; p = 0.0036). This was also reflected by the correlation between the HPP1 hypermethylation and high UICC stage (p = 0.02). No correlation was found between hypermethylation and other clinicopathologic parameters such as age, tumor grade and nodal status. Our findings suggest that hypermethylation of hMLH1, HPP1, p16(INK4A) and APC is frequent in primary adenocarcinomas of the small bowel. The differences in the hypermethylation spectrum of small bowel and stomach cancer indicate significant epigenetic differences between these tumors. PMID:16619216

  12. TLR9 re-expression in cancer cells extends the S-phase and stabilizes p16(INK4a) protein expression.

    PubMed

    Parroche, P; Roblot, G; Le Calvez-Kelm, F; Tout, I; Marotel, M; Malfroy, M; Durand, G; McKay, J; Ainouze, M; Carreira, C; Allatif, O; Traverse-Glehen, A; Mendiola, M; Pozo-Kreilinger, J J; Caux, C; Tommasino, M; Goutagny, N; Hasan, U A

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes bacterial, viral or cell damage-associated DNA, which initiates innate immune responses. We have previously shown that TLR9 expression is downregulated in several viral induced cancers including HPV16-induced cervical neoplasia. Findings supported that downregulation of TLR9 expression is involved in loss of anti-viral innate immunity allowing an efficient viral replication. Here we investigated the role of TLR9 in altering the growth of transformed epithelial cells. Re-introducing TLR9 under the control of an exogenous promoter in cervical or head and neck cancer patient-derived cells reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and prevented independent growth of cells under soft agar. Neither TLR3, 7, nor the TLR adapter protein MyD88 expression had any effect on cell proliferation, indicating that TLR9 has a unique role in controlling cell growth. The reduction of cell growth was not due to apoptosis or necrosis, yet we observed that cells expressing TLR9 were slower in entering the S-phase of the cell cycle. Microarray-based gene expression profiling analysis highlighted a strong interferon (IFN) signature in TLR9-expressing head and neck cancer cells, with an increase in IFN-type I and IL-29 expression (IFN-type III), yet neither IFN-type I nor IL-29 production was responsible for the block in cell growth. We observed that the protein half-life of p16(INK4a) was increased in TLR9-expressing cells. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TLR9 affects the cell cycle by regulating p16(INK4a) post-translational modifications and highlights the role of TLR9 in the events that lead to carcinogenesis. PMID:27454079

  13. TLR9 re-expression in cancer cells extends the S-phase and stabilizes p16INK4a protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Parroche, P; Roblot, G; Le Calvez-Kelm, F; Tout, I; Marotel, M; Malfroy, M; Durand, G; McKay, J; Ainouze, M; Carreira, C; Allatif, O; Traverse-Glehen, A; Mendiola, M; Pozo-Kreilinger, J J; Caux, C; Tommasino, M; Goutagny, N; Hasan, U A

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes bacterial, viral or cell damage-associated DNA, which initiates innate immune responses. We have previously shown that TLR9 expression is downregulated in several viral induced cancers including HPV16-induced cervical neoplasia. Findings supported that downregulation of TLR9 expression is involved in loss of anti-viral innate immunity allowing an efficient viral replication. Here we investigated the role of TLR9 in altering the growth of transformed epithelial cells. Re-introducing TLR9 under the control of an exogenous promoter in cervical or head and neck cancer patient-derived cells reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and prevented independent growth of cells under soft agar. Neither TLR3, 7, nor the TLR adapter protein MyD88 expression had any effect on cell proliferation, indicating that TLR9 has a unique role in controlling cell growth. The reduction of cell growth was not due to apoptosis or necrosis, yet we observed that cells expressing TLR9 were slower in entering the S-phase of the cell cycle. Microarray-based gene expression profiling analysis highlighted a strong interferon (IFN) signature in TLR9-expressing head and neck cancer cells, with an increase in IFN-type I and IL-29 expression (IFN-type III), yet neither IFN-type I nor IL-29 production was responsible for the block in cell growth. We observed that the protein half-life of p16INK4a was increased in TLR9-expressing cells. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TLR9 affects the cell cycle by regulating p16INK4a post-translational modifications and highlights the role of TLR9 in the events that lead to carcinogenesis. PMID:27454079

  14. Up-regulation of Survivin during Immortalization of Human Myofibroblasts Is Linked to Repression of Tumor Suppressor p16INK4a Protein and Confers Resistance to Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Chin-Yi; Petti, Carlotta; Bracken, Lauryn; Maritz, Michelle; Xu, Ning; O'Brien, Rosemary; Yang, Chen; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Jun; Lock, Richard B.; MacKenzie, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Survivin is an essential component of the chromosomal passenger complex and a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family. It is expressed at high levels in a large variety of malignancies, where it has been implicated in drug resistance. It was also shown previously that survivin is up-regulated during telomerase-mediated immortalization, which occurs at a relatively early stage during carcinogenesis. This study shows that up-regulation of survivin during immortalization of human myofibroblasts is an indirect consequence of the repression of p16INK4a. Survivin and p16INK4a were functionally linked by assays that showed that either the up-regulation of survivin or repression of p16INK4a rendered telomerase-transduced MRC-5 myofibroblasts resistant to oxidative stress. Conversely, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of survivin activated caspases and enhanced the sensitivity of immortal MRC-5 cells to oxidative stress. The E2F1 transcription factor, which is negatively regulated by the pRB/p16INK4a tumor suppressor pathway, was implicated in the up-regulation of survivin. Using the ChIP assay, it was shown that E2F1 directly interacted with the survivin gene (BIRC5) promoter in cells that spontaneously silenced p16INK4a during telomerase-mediated immortalization. E2F1 binding to the BIRC5 was also enhanced in telomerase-transduced cells subjected to shRNA-mediated repression of p16INK4a. Together, these data show that repression of p16INK4a contributes to the up-regulation of survivin and thereby provides a survival advantage to cells exposed to oxidative stress during immortalization. The up-regulation of survivin during immortalization likely contributes to the vulnerability of immortal cells to transformation by oncogenes that alter intracellular redox state. PMID:23449974

  15. Novel role of cortactin in G protein-coupled receptor agonist-induced nuclear export and degradation of p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) stimulates phosphorylation of cortactin on Y421 and Y446 residues in a time-dependent manner and phosphorylation at Y446 but not Y421 residue is required for MCP1-induced CDK-interacting protein 1 (p21Cip1) nuclear export and degradation in facilitating human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) proliferation. In addition, MCP1-induced cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation, p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation are dependent on Fyn activation. Upstream to Fyn, MCP1 stimulated C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) and Gi/o and inhibition of either one of these molecules using their specific antagonists or inhibitors attenuated MCP1-induced cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation, p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation. Cortactin phosphorylation at Y446 residue is also required for another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist, thrombin-induced p21Cip1 nuclear export and its degradation in promoting HASMC proliferation. Quite interestingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) agonist, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation do not require cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation. Together, these findings demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin at Y446 residue is selective for only GPCR but not RTK agonist-induced nuclear export and proteolytic degradation of p21Cip1 in HASMC proliferation. PMID:27363897

  16. Novel role of cortactin in G protein-coupled receptor agonist-induced nuclear export and degradation of p21Cip1.

    PubMed

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) stimulates phosphorylation of cortactin on Y421 and Y446 residues in a time-dependent manner and phosphorylation at Y446 but not Y421 residue is required for MCP1-induced CDK-interacting protein 1 (p21Cip1) nuclear export and degradation in facilitating human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) proliferation. In addition, MCP1-induced cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation, p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation are dependent on Fyn activation. Upstream to Fyn, MCP1 stimulated C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) and Gi/o and inhibition of either one of these molecules using their specific antagonists or inhibitors attenuated MCP1-induced cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation, p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation. Cortactin phosphorylation at Y446 residue is also required for another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist, thrombin-induced p21Cip1 nuclear export and its degradation in promoting HASMC proliferation. Quite interestingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) agonist, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced p21Cip1 degradation and HASMC proliferation do not require cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation. Together, these findings demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin at Y446 residue is selective for only GPCR but not RTK agonist-induced nuclear export and proteolytic degradation of p21Cip1 in HASMC proliferation. PMID:27363897

  17. Invasion of Normal Human Fibroblasts Induced by v-Fos Is Independent of Proliferation, Immortalization, and the Tumor Suppressors p16INK4a and p53

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Linda A.; Vass, J. Keith; Parkinson, E. Kenneth; Gillespie, David A. F.; Winnie, Joseph N.; Ozanne, Bradford W.

    2004-01-01

    Invasion is generally perceived to be a late event during the progression of human cancer, but to date there are no consistent reports of alterations specifically associated with malignant conversion. We provide evidence that the v-Fos oncogene induces changes in gene expression that render noninvasive normal human diploid fibroblasts highly invasive, without inducing changes in growth factor requirements or anchorage dependence for proliferation. Furthermore, v-Fos-stimulated invasion is independent of the pRb/p16INK4a and p53 tumor suppressor pathways and telomerase. We have performed microarray analysis using Affymetrix GeneChips, and the gene expression profile of v-Fos transformed cells supports its role in the regulation of invasion, independent from proliferation. We also demonstrate that invasion, but not proliferation, is dependent on the activity of the up-regulated epidermal growth factor receptor. Taken together, these results indicate that AP-1-directed invasion could precede deregulated proliferation during tumorigenesis and that sustained activation of AP-1 could be the epigenetic event required for conversion of a benign tumor into a malignant one, thereby explaining why many malignant human tumors present without an obvious premalignant hyperproliferative dysplastic lesion. PMID:14749371

  18. Correlation of p16INK4a immunoexpression and human papillomavirus (HPV) detected by in-situ hybridization in cervical squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheah, P L; Koh, C C; Nazarina, A R; Teoh, K H; Looi, L M

    2016-04-01

    Persistence and eventual integration of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) into the cervical cell is crucial to the progression of cervical neoplasia and it would be beneficial to morphologically identify this transformation in routine surgical pathology practice. Increased p16(INK4a) (p16) expression is a downstream event following HPV E7 binding to pRB. A study was conducted to assess the correlation between hrHPV detection using a commercial in-situ hybridization assay (Ventana INFORM HPV ISH) and p16 immunoexpression (CINtec Histology Kit) in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and squamous carcinoma. 27 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 21 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 51 squamous carcinoma (SCC) were interrogated. hrHPV was significantly more frequent in HSIL (76.2%) and SCC (88.2%) compared to LSIL(37.0%). p16 expression was similarly more frequent in HSIL (95.2%) and SCC (90.2%) compared to LSIL(3.7%). That the rates of hrHPV when compared with p16 expression were almost equivalent in HSIL and SCC while p16 was expressed in only 1 of the 10 LSIL with hrHPV, are expected considering the likelihood that transformation has occurred in HSIL and SCC but does not occur in majority of LSIL. PMID:27126662

  19. Systemic transduction of p16INK4A antitumor peptide inhibits the growth of MBT-2 mouse bladder tumor cell line grafts.

    PubMed

    Shimazui, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Kojima, Takahiro; Inai, Hiromu; Ando, Satoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Uchida, Kazuhiko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    p16(INK4a) (p16), a key molecule in bladder tumor development, inhibits the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and maintains the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in its active hypophosphorylated state. Following the finding that the p16 antitumor peptide dramatically inhibits the growth of aggressive leukemia/lymphoma through the restoration of p16 function using the Wr-T peptide transporter system, in this study, we developed a systemic therapy using mouse‑p16 peptide (m‑p16) in subcutaneous p16‑null mouse bladder tumors. In vitro analysis showed that the growth of p16‑null bladder tumor cells and the hyperphosphorylation of their pRbs were inhibited by p16 transduction in a concentration‑dependent manner. In an animal model, p16‑null MBT‑2 cells were injected subcutaneously into KSN/SKC nude mice. The systemic delivery of the m‑p16 peptide using Wr‑T by cardiac injection significantly inhibited the growth of solid MBT‑2 tumors compared with the control phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) injection. Histological examination by TUNEL staining revealed that apoptosis was increased and pRb phosphorylation was inhibited. Thus, the systemic peptide delivery of p16 restores the hypophosphorylation of pRb and may be a useful tool for the treatment of bladder tumors. PMID:23292502

  20. Role of p16INK4A in Replicative Senescence and DNA Damage-Induced Premature Senescence in p53-Deficient Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Hansen, Gavin; Murray, David

    2012-01-01

    The p16INK4A (hereafter p16) tumor suppressor is encoded by the INK4A/ARF locus which is among the most commonly dysregulated sequences in human cancer. By inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases, p16 activates the G1-S checkpoint, and this response is often considered to be critical for establishing a senescence-like growth arrest. Not all studies support a universal role for p16 in senescence. Single-cell analysis of noncancerous human fibroblast cultures undergoing senescence as a function of culture age (replicative senescence) has revealed that p16 is not expressed in the majority (>90%) of cells that exhibit features of senescence (e.g., flattened and enlarged morphology coupled with senescence-associated β-galactosidase expression), ruling out a requirement for p16 in this process. In addition, ionizing radiation triggers premature senescence in human cancer cell lines that do not express p16. These observations are made with cells that express wild-type p53, a key mediator of the DNA damage response. In this paper, we examine the growing evidence suggesting a negative regulatory relationship between p16 and p53 and discuss recent reports that implicate a role for p16 in replicative senescence and ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence in human cells that lack wild-type p53 function. PMID:22924132

  1. Epigenetic silencing of the p16(INK4a) tumor suppressor is associated with loss of CTCF binding and a chromatin boundary.

    PubMed

    Witcher, Michael; Emerson, Beverly M

    2009-05-15

    The p16(INK4a) tumor suppressor gene is a frequent target of epigenetic inactivation in human cancers, which is an early event in breast carcinogenesis. We describe the existence of a chromatin boundary upstream of the p16 gene that is lost when this gene is aberrantly silenced. We show that the multifunctional protein CTCF associates in the vicinity of this boundary and absence of binding strongly coincides with p16 silencing in multiple types of cancer cells. CTCF binding also correlates with RASSF1A and CDH1 gene activation, and CTCF interaction is absent when these genes are methylated and silenced. Interestingly, defective poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF and dissociation from the molecular chaperone Nucleolin occur in p16-silenced cells, abrogating its proper function. Thus, destabilization of specific chromosomal boundaries through aberrant crosstalk between CTCF, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and DNA methylation may be a general mechanism to inactivate tumor suppressor genes and initiate tumorigenesis in numerous forms of human cancers. PMID:19450526

  2. The CDKN2A/p16(INK) (4a) 5'UTR sequence and translational regulation: impact of novel variants predisposing to melanoma.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Virginia; Bisio, Alessandra; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Harland, Mark; Cabaret, Odile; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Pastorino, Lorenza; Bruno, William; Bertorelli, Roberto; De Sanctis, Veronica; Provenzani, Alessandro; Menin, Chiara; Fronza, Gilberto; Queirolo, Paola; Spitale, Robert C; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Inga, Alberto; Ghiorzo, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Many variants of uncertain functional significance in cancer susceptibility genes lie in regulatory regions, and clarifying their association with disease risk poses significant challenges. We studied 17 germline variants (nine of which were novel) in the CDKN2A 5'UTR with independent approaches, which included mono and bicistronic reporter assays, Western blot of endogenous protein, and allelic representation after polysomal profiling to investigate their impact on CDKN2A mRNA translation regulation. Two of the novel variants (c.-27del23, c.-93-91delAGG) were classified as causal mutations (score ≥3), along with the c.-21C>T, c.-34G>T, and c.-56G>T, which had already been studied by a subset of assays. The novel c.-42T>A as well as the previously described c.-67G>C were classified as potential mutations (score 1 or 2). The remaining variants (c.-14C>T, c.-20A>G, c.-25C>T+c.-180G>A, c.-30G>A, c.-40C>T, c.-45G>A, c.-59C>G, c.-87T>A, c.-252A>T) were classified as neutral (score 0). In conclusion, we found evidence that nearly half of the variants found in this region had a negative impact on CDKN2A mRNA translation, supporting the hypothesis that 5'UTR can act as a cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) to modulate p16(INK) (4a) translation. PMID:26581427

  3. The effect of acute dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane exposure on hypermethylation status and down-regulation of p53 and p16(INK4a) genes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kostka, Grażyna; Urbanek-Olejnik, Katarzyna; Liszewska, Monika; Winczura, Alicja

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the early effect of acute dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure on the methylation status of the promoter region of two tumor suppressor genes: p53 and p16(INK4a) (p16) in rat liver. We analyzed their transcript and protein expression profiles concurrently with the examination of transcriptional and protein expression levels of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1). Male Wistar rats were treated with a single dose of DDT (57 mg kg(-1) of body weight) and the methylation status of p53 and p16 genes was examined after 24 h using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis-MSRA. The obtained results indicate that DDT induced alternations in methylation of the promoter region in both p53 and p16 genes. In all the tested samples, the promoter CpG islands of p53 (-261, -179, and -450) were methylated within 100% as compared to control samples (0%). The methylation status of the p16 promoter (-11 and +77) was also altered due to exposure to DDT. Methylated cytosines were detectable in 75% of the tested DNA samples. The Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed a decrease in mRNA and protein levels of p53, respectively, which was related to the increase in DNA synthesis. These relationships were also observed for mRNA and protein expressions of p16, although to a slighter extent. We also showed that hypermethylation in the promoter region of both tumor suppressor genes was consistent with an increased Dnmt1 mRNA level, and this relationship was further confirmed at the protein level of DNMT1. Concluding, our data suggests that epigenetically mediated changes in gene expression may play an important role in the mechanism of DDT toxicity, including carcinogenic action. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 584-592, 2016. PMID:25410620

  4. p16 INK4a gene promoter variation and differential binding of a repressor, the ras-responsive zinc-finger transcription factor, RREB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuling; Qian, Xiaolan; Redman, Chanelle; Bliskovski, Valeri; Ramsay, Edward S; Lowy, Douglas R; Mock, Beverly A

    2003-04-17

    BALB/c mice are susceptible to the development of pristane-induced plasma cell tumors, and have a rare allelic variant in the coding region of the p16(INK4a) (p16) tumor suppressor gene that produces a protein with impaired activity. We have now found that the BALB/c p16 promoter has an allelic variant that may also compromise p16 activity. Following pristane treatment, BALB/c p16 mRNA levels in B cells were lower than that in DBA/2 or C.D2-Pctr1, a resistant BALB/c congenic strain that harbors DBA/2 chromatin surrounding the p16 locus. Four sequence variants were found between BALB/c and DBA/2 in the p16 promoter region. In reporter assays, the DBA promoter was at least four times more active in driving luciferase expression than the BALB/c promoter. Most of the difference in activity was localized to a single nucleotide deletion in BALB/c. This deletion created a consensus binding site for RREB, a ras-responsive transcriptional element with zinc-finger binding motifs. Transient transfections with RREB confirmed that the p16 promoter can be downregulated by RREB, in a Ras- or Mek-dependent manner, and that the BALB/c promoter is more sensitive than DBA/2 to regulation by RREB. BALB/c mice have both regulatory and coding region defects that may contribute to the impairment of p16 gene function. PMID:12700664

  5. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on dual signal amplification process for p16(INK4a) cervical cancer detection in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Duangkaew, Pattasuda; Tapaneeyakorn, Satita; Apiwat, Chayachon; Dharakul, Tararaj; Laiwejpithaya, Somsak; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan

    2015-12-15

    The p16(INK4a) (p16) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which has been evaluated in several studies as a diagnostic marker of cervical cancer. Immunostaining using p16 specific antibody has confirmed an over-expression of p16 protein in cervical cancer cells and its association with disease progression. This article reports an ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for specific detection of p16 and demonstrates its performance for detection of solubilized p16 protein in cell lysates obtained from patients. Sandwich-based immunoreaction couple with double signal amplification strategy based on catalytic enlargement of particle tag was used for high sensitivity and specificity. The conditions were optimized to create an immunoassay protocol. Disposable screen-printed electrode modified with capture antibodies (Ab1) was selected for further implementation towards point-of-care diagnostics. Small gold nanoparticles (15 nm diameter) conjugated with detection antibodies (Ab2) were found to better serve as a detection label due to limited interference with antigen-antibody interaction. Double signal enhancement was performed by sequential depositions of gold and silver layers. This gave the sensitivity of 1.78 μA mL(ng GST-p16)(-1) cm(-2) and detection limit of 1.3 ng mL(-1) for GST-p16 protein which is equivalent to 0.49 ng mL(-1) for p16 protein and 28 cells for HeLa cervical cancer cells. In addition to purified protein, the proposed immunosensor effectively detected elevated p16 level in cervical swab samples obtained from 10 patients with positive result from standard Pap smear test, indicating that an electrochemical immunosensors hold an excellent promise for detection of cervical cancer in clinical setting. PMID:26201985

  6. miR-299-5p promotes cell growth and regulates G1/S transition by targeting p21Cip1/Waf1 in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    WU, SHUN-QUAN; ZHANG, LANG-HUI; HUANG, HAO-BO; LI, YA-PING; NIU, WEN-YAN; ZHAN, RONG

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are often located in genomic breakpoint regions and are hypothesized to be important regulators involved in the regulation of critical cell processes, including cell apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation. miR-299 has been reported to be upregulated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL); however, the function and mechanistic role of miR-299 in APL remains unknown. The present study demonstrated mir-299 significantly induced cell growth and cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition in APL cells. Notably, the present study revealed that miR-299-5p induces these effects, whereas miR-299-3p does not. Additional studies demonstrated that in APL cells the tumor suppressor p21Cip1/Waf1 is a downstream target of miR-299; miR-299 binds directly to the 3′ untranslated region of p21Cip1/Waf1, and reduces protein, but not mRNA, levels of p21Cip1/Waf1. The present findings demonstrate that miR-299 exerts growth-promoting effects in APL cells through the suppression of p21Cip1/Waf1. Overall, the present study demonstrates that p21Cip1/Waf1 is a direct functional target of miR-299 in APL. PMID:27347210

  7. TP53, p14ARF, p16INK4a and H-ras gene molecular analysis in intestinal-type adenocarcinoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Federica; Oggionni, Maria; Birindelli, Sarah; Suardi, Simona; Tabano, Silvia; Romano, Roberta; Moiraghi, Maria Luisa; Bimbi, Gabriella; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio; Pierotti, Marco A; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana

    2003-06-10

    Intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (ITAC) of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is an uncommon tumor associated with occupational exposure to dusts of different origin. Few investigations addressed molecular alterations in ITAC mainly focused on TP53, K-ras and H-ras gene mutations. The occurrence of TP53, p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) deregulation and H-ras mutations was investigated in 21 consecutive and untreated ITACs cases, 17 with known professional exposure. No H-ras mutations were found. In patients with known exposure, cumulative evidence of TP53 or p14(ARF) alterations accounted for 88% and the evidence of p16(INK4a) alterations for 65%, respectively. TP53 mutations were present in 44% of the ITACs, consisted of G:C-->A:T transitions in 86%, and involved the CpG dinucleotides in 50% of the cases. LOH at the locus 17p13 and an uncommon high rate of p53 stabilization were detected in 58% and 59% of the cases, respectively. p14(ARF)and p16(INK4a) promoter methylation accounted for 80% and 67% respectively, and LOH at the locus 9p21 occurred in 45% of the cases. Interestingly, all dust-exposed tumors with p16(INK4a) alterations shared TP53 or p14(ARF) deregulation. The present results show a close association of this occupational tumor with TP53, p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) gene deregulation. Given the important role that these genes play in cell growth control and apoptosis, the knowledge of ITAC genetic profile may be helpful in selecting more tailored treatments. PMID:12673679

  8. Methylosome Protein 50 and PKCδ/p38δ Protein Signaling Control Keratinocyte Proliferation via Opposing Effects on p21Cip1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Kamalika; Eckert, Richard L

    2015-05-22

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a key epigenetic regulator that symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues on histones H3 and H4 to silence gene expression. PRMT5 is frequently observed in a complex with the cofactor methylosome protein 50 (MEP50), which is required for PRMT5 activity. PKCδ/p38δ signaling, a key controller of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, increases p21(Cip1) expression to suppress keratinocyte proliferation. We now show that MEP50 enhances keratinocyte proliferation and survival via mechanisms that include silencing of p21(Cip1) expression. This is associated with enhanced PRMT5-MEP50 interaction at the p21(Cip1) promoter and enhanced arginine dimethylation of the promoter-associated histones H3 and H4. It is also associated with a MEP50-dependent reduction in the level of p53, a key controller of p21(Cip1) gene expression. We confirm an important biological role for MEP50 and PRMT5 in regulating keratinocyte proliferation using a stratified epidermal equivalent model that mimics in vivo epidermal keratinocyte differentiation. In this model, PRMT5 or MEP50 knockdown results in reduced keratinocyte proliferation. We further show that PKCδ/p38δ signaling suppresses MEP50 expression, leading to reduced H3/H4 arginine dimethylation at the p21(Cip1) promoter, and that this is associated with enhanced p21(Cip1) expression and reduced cell proliferation. These findings describe an opposing action between PKCδ/p38δ MAPK signaling and PRMT5/MEP50 epigenetic silencing mechanisms in regulating cell proliferation. PMID:25851901

  9. Quantitative analysis of CDKN2A methylation, mRNA, and p16(INK4a) protein expression in children and adolescents with Burkitt lymphoma: biological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Robaina, Marcela Cristina S; Faccion, Roberta Soares; Arruda, Viviane Oliveira; de Rezende, Lidia Maria Magalhães; Vasconcelos, Gisele Moledo; Apa, Alexandre Gustavo; Bacchi, Carlos E; Klumb, Claudete Esteves

    2015-02-01

    CDKN2A is a tumor suppressor gene critical in the cell cycle regulation. Little is known regarding the role of CDKN2A methylation in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). CDKN2A methylation was investigated using pyrosequencing in 51 tumor samples. p16(INK4a) mRNA and protein levels were measured using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. CDKN2A methylation was detectable in 72% cases. Nuclear expression of p16(INK4a) was not detected in 41% cases. There was an association between methylation and absence of CDKN2A mRNA (P=0.003). In conclusion, CDKN2A methylation occurs at a high frequency suggesting a role in BL pathogenesis and potential therapeutic implications. PMID:25542698

  10. Low inducible expression of p21Cip1 confers resistance to paclitaxel in BRAF mutant melanoma cells with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun-Hee; Kim, Na-Yeon; Lee, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of oncogenic BRAF inhibitor is limited by the onset of acquired resistance. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of the mitotic inhibitor paclitaxel on three melanoma cell lines with differing sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor. Of the two BRAF inhibitor-resistant cell lines, A375P/Mdr cells harboring the BRAF V600E mutant were resistant and the wild-type BRAF SK-MEL-2 cells were sensitive to paclitaxel. In particular, paclitaxel caused the growth inhibition of SK-MEL-2 cells to a much greater extent than it caused growth inhibition of A375P cells. Paclitaxel exhibited no significant effect on the phosphorylation of MEK-ERK in any cell lines tested, regardless of both the BRAF mutation and the drug resistance, implying that paclitaxel activity is independent of MEK-ERK inhibition. In A375P cells, paclitaxel treatment resulted in a marked emergence of apoptotic cells after mitotic arrest, concomitant with a remarkable induction of p21(Cip1). However, paclitaxel only moderately increased the levels of p21(Cip1) in A375P/Mdr cells, which exhibited a strong resistance to paclitaxel. The p21(Cip1) overexpression partially conferred paclitaxel sensitivity to A375P/Mdr cells. Interestingly, we found an extremely low background expression level of p21(Cip1) in SK-MEL-2 cells lacking normal p53 function, which caused much greater G2/M arrest than that seen in A375P cells. Taken together, these results suggest that paclitaxel may be an effective anticancer agent through regulating the expression of p21(Cip1) for the treatment of BRAF mutant melanoma cells resistant to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:25912549

  11. Inactivation of p16INK4a/CDKN2A gene may be a diagnostic feature of large B cell lymphoma leg type among cutaneous B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Marietta, Virginie; Vergier, Beatrice; Mainhaguiet, Guillaume; Turmo, Michelle; Idrissi, Yamina; Ferrer, Jacky; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Dubus, Pierre; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2008-06-01

    The World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer has individualized three main categories among the primary cutaneous B cell lymphoma (PCBCL): leg-type primary cutaneous large B cell lymphoma (PCLBCL leg type), primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL), and primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma (PCMZL). The genetic features of 21 PCBCL cases (six PCLBCL leg type four PCFCL large cells, seven PCFCL small cells, and four PCMZL) were investigated by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH array). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed to confirm CGH array data and to detect lymphoma-associated gene rearrangements. p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a) CDKN2A gene quantification, methylation analysis, and immunohistochemical detection were also performed. CGH array showed a higher number of recurrent genetic imbalances in PCLBCL leg type (mean 62) than in PCFCL large cells (mean 34). PCFCL small cells and PCMZL exhibited fewer chromosomal alterations (mean 24 and 9). FISH analysis provided concordant results with CGH array data in 97% (98 of 101) assays and demonstrated a t(8;14)(q24;q32) in two of six PCLBCL leg type. Recurrent deletions in 9p21 (p14(ARF)/p16(INK4a)CDKN2A) were a constant finding in PCLBCL leg type (six of six). Conversely, PCFCL large cells exhibited recurrent 1p36 deletions (four of four) without deletion in 9p21 (zero of four). The diagnostic and prognostic impact of the p16(INK4a)CDKN2A gene status in PCBCL should therefore be confirmed on a larger series. PMID:18311490

  12. Limoniastrum guyonianum aqueous gall extract induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells involving p16INK4A re-expression related to UHRF1 and DNMT1 down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described the potential effects of natural compounds as anti-cancer agents in vitro as well as in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-cancer effect of Limoniastrum guyonianum aqueous gall extract (G extract) and luteolin in the human cervical cancer HeLa cell line, and, if so, to clarify the underlying mechanism. Our results show that G extract and luteolin inhibited cell proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Both natural products induced programmed cell death as confirmed by the presence of hypodiploid G0/G1 cells. These effects are associated with an up-regulation of the expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16INK4A and a down-regulation of the expression of the anti-apoptotic actor UHRF1 and its main partner DNMT1. Moreover, G extract- and luteolin-induced UHRF1 and DNMT1 down-regulation is accompanied with a global DNA hypomethylation in HeLa cell line. Altogether our results show that G extract mediates its growth inhibitory effects on human cervical cancer HeLa cell line likely via the activation of a p16INK4A -dependent cell cycle checkpoint signalling pathway orchestrated by UHRF1 and DNMT1 down-regulation. PMID:23688286

  13. The effects of short-term hypoxia on human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation, viability and p16INK4A mRNA expression: Investigation using a simple hypoxic culture system with a deoxidizing agent

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Akira; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A hypoxic environment is thought to be important for the maintenance of stemness and suppressing cell senescence, in stem cells. Therefore, a hypoxic condition is induced during cell expansion and/or induction of intended differentiation. However, the induction of these conditions requires a specially equipped hypoxia chamber and expensive gas mixtures, which are expensive and space-consuming. Owing to these restrictions, appropriate hypoxic conditions cannot be provided during cell transportation, which is increasingly required for regenerative medicine. Hence, a simple and economical culture system is required. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short-term hypoxic conditions on human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation, viability, and senescence, utilizing the CulturePal system (CulturePal-Zero and CulturePal-Five), a novel and simple hypoxic culture system with a built-in deoxidizing agent. The O2 concentration in the CulturePal-Zero was observed to reduce to <0.1% within 1 h, and to 5% within 24h in the CulturePal-Five system. Cell proliferation under these hypoxic conditions showed a sharp increase at 5% O2 concentration, and no noticeable cell death was observed even at severe hypoxic conditions (<0.1% O2) up to 72h. The p16INK4A (cell senescence marker) mRNA expression was retained under hypoxic conditions up to 72h, but it was up-regulated under normoxic conditions. Interestingly, the p16INK4A expression altered proportionately to the O2 concentration. These results indicated that the short-term hypoxic condition, at an approximate O2 concentration of 5%, would be suitable for promoting cell proliferation and repressing cell senescence, without aggravating the MSC viability. Therefore, the CulturePal systems may be suitable for providing an appropriate hypoxic condition in stem cell research and transportation. PMID:26195892

  14. Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Reduces Proliferation in Embryonic Stem Cells via FOXO3A/β-Catenin-Dependent Transcription of p21(cip1).

    PubMed

    McClelland Descalzo, Darcie L; Satoorian, Tiffany S; Walker, Lauren M; Sparks, Nicole R L; Pulyanina, Polina Y; Zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2016-07-12

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which are derived from a peri-implantation embryo, are routinely cultured in medium containing diabetic glucose (Glc) concentrations. While pregnancy in women with pre-existing diabetes may result in small embryos, whether such high Glc levels affect ESC growth remains uncovered. We show here that long-term exposure of ESCs to diabetic Glc inhibits their proliferation, thereby mimicking in vivo findings. Molecularly, Glc exposure increased oxidative stress and activated Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a), promoting increased expression and activity of the ROS-removal enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and the cell-cycle inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1). Diabetic Glc also promoted β-catenin nuclear localization and the formation of a complex with FOXO3a that localized to the promoters of Sod2, p21(cip1), and potentially p27(kip1). Our results demonstrate an adaptive response to increases in oxidative stress induced by diabetic Glc conditions that promote ROS removal, but also result in a decrease in proliferation. PMID:27411103

  15. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Causes p21Cip1 Induction, Akt Signaling Reduction, and Growth Inhibition in PC-3 Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) treatment suppressed proliferation, colony formation, and cell cycle progression in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. CAPE decreased protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, SKP2, c-Myc, Akt1, Akt2, Akt3, total Akt, mTOR, Bcl-2, Rb, as well as phosphorylation of Rb, ERK1/2, Akt, mTOR, GSK3α, GSK3β, PDK1; but increased protein expression of KLF6 and p21Cip1. Microarray analysis indicated that pathways involved in cellular movement, cell death, proliferation, and cell cycle were affected by CAPE. Co-treatment of CAPE with chemotherapeutic drugs vinblastine, paclitaxol, and estramustine indicated synergistic suppression effect. CAPE administration may serve as a potential adjuvant therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:22347457

  16. Apoptosis, cell proliferation and modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(cip1) in vascular remodelling during vein arterialization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Miyakawa, Ayumi Aurea; Cardoso, Leandro; de Figueiredo Borges, Luciano; Gonçalves, Giovana Aparecida; Krieger, Jose Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Neo-intima development and atherosclerosis limit long-term vein graft use for revascularization of ischaemic tissues. Using a rat model, which is technically less challenging than smaller rodents, we provide evidence that the temporal morphological, cellular, and key molecular events during vein arterialization resemble the human vein graft adaptation. Right jugular vein was surgically connected to carotid artery and observed up to 90 days. Morphometry demonstrated gradual thickening of the medial layer and important formation of neo-intima with deposition of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the subendothelial layer from day 7 onwards. Transmission electron microscopy showed that SMCs switch from the contractile to synthetic phenotype on day 3 and new elastic lamellae formation occurs from day 7 onwards. Apoptosis markedly increased on day 1, while alpha-actin immunostaining for SMC almost disappeared by day 3. On day 7, cell proliferation reached the highest level and cellular density gradually increased until day 90. The relative magnitude of cellular changes was higher in the intima vs. the media layer (100 vs. 2 times respectively). Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27(Kip1) and p16(INKA) remained unchanged, whereas p21(Cip1) was gradually downregulated, reaching the lowest levels by day 7 until day 90. Taken together, these data indicate for the first time that p21(Cip1) is the main CDKI protein modulated during the arterialization process the rat model of vein arterialization that may be useful to identify and validate new targets and interventions to improve the long-term patency of vein grafts. PMID:19563615

  17. Aberrant methylation of the CDKN2a/p16INK4a gene promoter region in preinvasive bronchial lesions: a prospective study in high-risk patients without invasive cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Aude; Sesboüé, Richard; Bourguignon, Jeannette; Dautréaux, Brigitte; Métayer, Josette; Frébourg, Thierry; Thiberville, Luc

    2002-07-10

    Among the identified factors involved in malignant transformation, abnormal methylation of the CDKN2A/p16(INK4a) gene promoter has been described as an early event, particularly in bronchial cell cancerization. Precancerous bronchial lesions (n = 70) prospectively sampled during fluorescence endoscopy in a series of 37 patients at high risk for lung cancer were studied with respect to the methylation status of the CDKN2A gene. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction was performed on DNA extracted from pure bronchial cell populations derived from biopsies and detection of p16 protein was studied by immunohistochemistry on contiguous parallel biopsies. Aberrant methylation of the CDKN2A gene promoter was found in 19% of preinvasive lesions and its frequency increased with the histologic grade of the lesions. Methylation in at least 1 bronchial site was significantly more frequent in patients with cancer history, although there was no difference in the outcome of patients with or without methylation in bronchial epithelium. The other risk factors studied (tobacco and asbestos exposure) did not influence the methylation status. There was no relationship between CDKN2A methylation and the evolutionary character of the lesions. Our results confirm that abnormal methylation of the CDKN2A gene promoter is an early event in bronchial cell cancerization, which can persist for several years after carcinogen exposure cessation, and show that this epigenetic alteration cannot predict the evolution of precancerous lesions within a 2-year follow-up. PMID:12115568

  18. p15RS/RPRD1A (p15INK4b-related sequence/regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain-containing protein 1A) interacts with HDAC2 in inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Yanquan; Li, Jun; Wang, Yinyin; Ren, Fangli; Zhou, Yifan; Wu, Yinyuan; Feng, Yarui; Zhou, Yu; Su, Fuqin; Jia, Baoqing; Wang, Dong; Chang, Zhijie

    2015-04-10

    We previously reported that p15RS (p15INK4b-related sequence), a regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing protein, inhibited Wnt signaling by interrupting the formation of the β-catenin·TCF4 complex. However, how p15RS functions as an intrinsic repressor to repress transcription remains unclear. In this study, we show that p15RS, through a specific interaction with HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2), a deacetylase that regulates gene transcription, maintains histone H3 in a deacetylated state in the promoter region of Wnt-targeted genes where β-catenin·TCF4 is bound. We observed that histone deacetylase inhibitors impair the ability of p15RS in inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Depletion of HDAC2 markedly disabled p15RS inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Interestingly, overexpression of p15RS decreases the level of acetylated histone H3 in the c-MYC promoter. Finally, we demonstrate that p15RS significantly enhances the association of HDAC2 and TCF4 and enhances the occupancy of HDAC2 to DNA, resulting in the deacetylation of histone H3 and the failure of β-catenin interaction. We propose that p15RS acts as an intrinsic transcriptional repressor for Wnt/β-catenin-mediated gene transcription at least partially through recruiting HDAC2 to occupy the promoter and maintaining deacetylated histone H3. PMID:25697359

  19. KLRG1 impairs CD4+ T cell responses via p16ink4a and p27kip1 pathways: role in hepatitis B vaccine failure in individuals with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Jia M; Ren, Jun P; Cheng, Yong Q; Ying, Ruo S; Wu, Xiao Y; Lin, Shu M; Griffin, Jeddidiah W D; Li, Guang Y; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2014-01-15

    Coinfection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is quite common, leading to an increase in morbidity and mortality. As such, HBV vaccination is recommended in HCV-infected individuals. However, HBV vaccine responses in HCV-infected individuals are often blunted compared with uninfected populations. The mechanism for this failure of vaccine response in HCV-infected subjects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of an inhibitory receptor, killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G member 1 (KLRG1), in the regulation of CD4(+) T cells and HBV vaccine responses during HCV infection. We demonstrated that KLRG1 was overexpressed on CD4(+) T cells from HCV-infected, HBV vaccine nonresponders compared with HBV vaccine responders. The capacity of CD4(+) T cells to proliferate and secrete IL-2 cytokine was inversely associated with the level of KLRG1 expression. Importantly, blocking KLRG1 signaling resulted in a significant improvement in CD4(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 production in HCV-infected, HBV vaccine nonresponders in response to TCR stimulation. Moreover, blockade of KLRG1 increased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser(473)) and decreased the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p16(ink4a) and p27(kip1), which subsequently enhanced the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and cyclin E. These results suggest that the KLRG1 pathway impairs CD4(+) T cell responses to neoantigen and induces a state of immune senescence in individuals with HCV infection, raising the possibility that blocking this negative-signaling pathway might improve HBV vaccine responses in the setting of chronic viral infection. PMID:24337749

  20. KLRG1 impairs CD4+ T cell responses via p16ink4a and p27kip1 pathways - Role in hepatitis B vaccine failure in individuals with hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Jia M.; Ren, Jun P.; Cheng, Yong Q.; Ying, Ruo S.; Wu, Xiao Y.; Lin, Shu M.; Griffin, Jeddidiah WD; Li, Guang Y.; Moorman, Jonathan P.; Yao, Zhi Q.

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is quite common, leading to an increase in morbidity and mortality. As such, HBV vaccination is recommended in HCV-infected individuals. HBV vaccine responses in HCV-infected individuals, however, are often blunted when compared to uninfected populations. The mechanism for this failure of vaccine response in HCV-infected subjects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of an inhibitory receptor, killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G member 1 (KLRG1), in regulation of CD4+ T cells and HBV vaccine responses during HCV infection. We demonstrated that KLRG1 was over-expressed on CD4+ T cells from HCV-infected, HBV vaccine non-responders (HBV-NR) compared to those responders (HBV-R). The capacity of CD4+ T cell to proliferate and secrete IL-2 cytokine was inversely associated with the level of KLRG1 expression. Importantly, blocking KLRG1 signaling resulted in a significant improvement of CD4+ T cell proliferation and IL-2 production in HCV-infected, HBV-NR in response to T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. Moreover, blockade of KLRG1 increased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and decreased the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p16ink4a and p27kip1, which subsequently enhanced CDK 2 and cyclin E expressions. These results suggest that the KLRG1 pathway impairs CD4+ T cell responses to neo-antigen and induces a state of immune senescence in individuals with HCV infection, raising the possibility that blocking this negative signaling pathway might improve HBV vaccine responses in the setting of chronic viral infection. PMID:24337749

  1. Cdkn2a, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor encoding p16INK4a and p19ARF, is a candidate for the plasmacytoma susceptibility locus, Pctr1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Ramsay, E S; Mock, B A

    1998-03-01

    Plasma cell tumor induction in mice by pristane is under multigenic control. BALB/c mice are susceptible to tumor development; whereas DBA/2 mice are resistant. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms between BALB/c and DBA/2 for Cdkn2a(p16) and Cdkn2b(p15), and between BALB/c and Mus spretus for Cdkn2c(p18(INK4c)) were used to position these loci with respect to the Pctr1 locus. These cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors mapped to a 6 cM interval of chromosome 4 between Ifna and Tal1. C.D2-Chr 4 congenic strains harboring DBA/2 alleles associated with the Pctr1 locus contained DBA/2 "resistant" alleles of the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors p16 and p15. On sequencing p16 and p18 cDNAs, two different allelic variants within ankyrin repeat regions of p16 were found between BALB/c and DBA/2 mice. By using an assay involving PCR amplification and restriction enzyme digestion, allelic variants were typed among several inbred strains of mice. One of the variants, G232A, was specific to two inbred strains, BALB/cAn and ABP/Le, of mice and occurred in a highly conserved amino acid in both human and rat p16. When tested with wild-type (DBA/2) p16, both A134C and G232A BALB/c-specific variants of p16 were inefficient in their ability to inhibit the activity of cyclin D2/CDK4 in kinase assays with retinoblastoma protein, suggesting this defective, inherited allele plays an important role in the genetic susceptibility of BALB/c mice for plasmacytoma induction and that p16(INK4a) is a strong candidate for the Pctr1 locus. PMID:9482902

  2. Translational Upregulation of an Individual p21Cip1 Transcript Variant by GCN2 Regulates Cell Proliferation and Survival under Nutrient Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Stacey L.; Cerniglia, George J.; Johannes, Gregg J.; Ye, Jiangbin; Ryeom, Sandra; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    Multiple transcripts encode for the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. These transcripts produce identical proteins but differ in their 5’ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although several stresses that induce p21 have been characterized, the mechanisms regulating the individual transcript variants and their functional significance are unknown. Here we demonstrate through 35S labeling, luciferase reporter assays, and polysome transcript profiling that activation of the Integrated Stress Response (ISR) kinase GCN2 selectively upregulates the translation of a p21 transcript variant containing 5’ upstream open reading frames (uORFs) through phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α. Mutational analysis reveals that the uORFs suppress translation under basal conditions, but promote translation under stress. Functionally, ablation of p21 ameliorates G1/S arrest and reduces cell survival in response to GCN2 activation. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of p21 post-transcriptional regulation, offer functional significance for the existence of multiple p21 transcripts, and support a key role for GCN2 in regulating the cell cycle under stress. PMID:26102367

  3. Translational Upregulation of an Individual p21Cip1 Transcript Variant by GCN2 Regulates Cell Proliferation and Survival under Nutrient Stress.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Stacey L; Cerniglia, George J; Johannes, Gregg J; Ye, Jiangbin; Ryeom, Sandra; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2015-06-01

    Multiple transcripts encode for the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1). These transcripts produce identical proteins but differ in their 5' untranslated regions (UTRs). Although several stresses that induce p21 have been characterized, the mechanisms regulating the individual transcript variants and their functional significance are unknown. Here we demonstrate through (35)S labeling, luciferase reporter assays, and polysome transcript profiling that activation of the Integrated Stress Response (ISR) kinase GCN2 selectively upregulates the translation of a p21 transcript variant containing 5' upstream open reading frames (uORFs) through phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α. Mutational analysis reveals that the uORFs suppress translation under basal conditions, but promote translation under stress. Functionally, ablation of p21 ameliorates G1/S arrest and reduces cell survival in response to GCN2 activation. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of p21 post-transcriptional regulation, offer functional significance for the existence of multiple p21 transcripts, and support a key role for GCN2 in regulating the cell cycle under stress. PMID:26102367

  4. Promoter-associated endogenous and exogenous small RNAs suppress human bladder cancer cell metastasis by activating p21 (CIP1/WAF1) expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenghe; Ge, Qiangqiang; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Jia; Li, Fan; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating data suggest that micro RNAs (miRNAs) or double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) can activate gene expression by targeting promoters. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (CIP1/WAF1) (p21) has also been shown to suppress epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) which plays a crucial role in the early stage of tumor metastases and invasiveness. In a previous study, we have reported that miR-370-5p is low-expressed in bladder cancer (BCa) tissues and cell lines. Here, we identified that miR-370-5p and sequence homology dsRNA (dsP21-555) fully complementary to promoter hold the potent abilities to induce p21 expression. Moreover, transfection of miR-370-5p or dsP21-555 into BCa cells remarkably inverts EMT-associated genes (increases epithelial cell makers E-cadherin and β-catenin, and decreases mesenchymal cell markers ZEB1 and Vimentin) expression mainly via regulating p21 expression. Besides, through manipulating p21, both the candidates can retard BCa cell migration and invasion. In summary, our results provide evidence that both endogenous and exogenous small RNAs may function to induce p21 expression by interacting with the similar promoter region and impede BCa metastasis. PMID:26643891

  5. p16INK4a immunocytochemistry on cell blocks as an adjunct to cervical cytology: Potential reflex testing on specially prepared cell blocks from residual liquid-based cytology specimens

    PubMed Central

    Shidham, Vinod B.; Mehrotra, Ravi; Varsegi, George; D'Amore, Krista L.; Hunt, Bryan; Narayan, Raj

    2011-01-01

    Background: p16 INK4a (p16) is a well-recognized surrogate molecular marker for human papilloma virus (HPV) related squamous dysplasia. Our hypothesis is that the invasive interventions and related morbidities could be avoided by objective stratification of positive cytologic interpretations by p16 immunostaining of cell block sections of cytology specimens. Materials and Methods: Nuclear immunoreactivity for p16 was evaluated in cell block sections in 133 adequate cases [20 negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy, 28 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), 50 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), 21 atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude HSIL (ASC-H), and 14 atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS)] and analyzed with cervical biopsy results. Results: (a) HSIL cytology (28): 21 (75%) were p16 positive (11 biopsies available — 92% were positive for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 and above) and 7 (25%) were p16 negative (3 biopsies available — all showed only HPV with small atypical parakeratotic cells). (b) LSIL cytology (50): 13 (26%) cases were p16 positive (12 biopsies available — all were CIN1 or above) and 37 (74%) were p16 negative (12 biopsies available — all negative for dysplasia. However, 9 (75%) of these biopsies showed HPV). (c) ASC-H cytology (21): 14 (67%) were p16 positive (6 biopsies available — 5 showed CIN 3/Carcinoma in situ/Ca and 1 showed CIN 1 with possibility of under-sampling. Cytomorphologic re-review favored HSIL) and 7 (33%) were p16 negative (5 biopsies available — 3 negative for dysplasia. Remaining 2 cases — 1 positive for CIN 3 and 1 showed CIN 1 with scant ASC-H cells on cytomorphologic re-review with possibility under-sampling in cytology specimen). (d) ASCUS cytology (14): All (100%) were p16 negative on cell block sections of cervical cytology specimen. HPV testing performed in last 6 months in 7 cases was positive in 3 (43%) cases. Conclusion: p16

  6. Role of senescence marker p16 INK4a measured in peripheral blood T-lymphocytes in predicting length of hospital stay after coronary artery bypass surgery in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Barodka, Viachaslau; Sharpless, Norman E; Torrice, Chad; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Shah, Ashish S; Bandeen Roche, Karen J; Walston, Jeremy D

    2016-02-01

    Adults older than 65 years undergo more than 120,000 coronary artery bypass (CAB) procedures each year in the United States. Chronological age alone, though commonly used in prediction models of outcomes after CAB, does not alone reflect variability in aging process; thus, the risk of complications in older adults. We performed a prospective study to evaluate a relationship between senescence marker p16(INK4a) expression in peripheral blood T-lymphocytes (p16 levels in PBTLs) with aging and with perioperative outcomes in older CAB patients. We included 55 patients age 55 and older, who underwent CAB in Johns Hopkins Hospital between September 1st, 2010 and March 25th, 2013. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data following outline of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons data collection form was collected, and p16 mRNA levels in PBTLs were measured using TaqMan® qRT-PCR. Associations between p16 mRNA levels in PBTLs with length of hospital stay, frailty status, p16 protein levels in the aortic and left internal mammary artery tissue, cerebral oxygen saturation, and augmentation index as a measure of vascular stiffness were measured using regression analyses. Length of hospital stay was the primary outcome of interest, and major organ morbidity, mortality, and discharge to a skilled nursing facility were secondary outcomes. In secondary analysis, we evaluated associations between p16 mRNA levels in PBTLs and interleukin-6 levels using regression analyses. Median age of enrolled patients was 63.5 years (range 56-81 years), they were predominantly male (74.55%), of Caucasian descent (85.45%). Median log2(p16 levels in PBTLs) were 4.71 (range 1.10-6.82). P16 levels in PBTLs were significantly associated with chronological age (mean difference 0.06 for each year increase in age, 95% CI 0.01-0.11) and interleukin 6 levels (mean difference 0.09 for each pg/ml increase in IL-6 levels, 95% CI 0.01-0.18). There were no significant associations with frailty status, augmentation

  7. Down-regulation of both p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1 produces a more aggressive prostate cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Srirupa; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Siriwardana, Sunitha; Sclafani, Robert; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Roles of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors, p21/Cip1 (p21) and p27/Kip1 (p27) in prostate cancer (PCa) progression is still not clear. Lower p27 protein expression in PCa tissues is often associated with poor prognosis, but prognostic significance of p21 is still controversial. Herein, we investigated the role of these molecules in determining PCa growth characteristics. We generated human PCa DU145 cell variants with knocked down levels of p21 (DU-p21) or p27 (DU-p27), or both (DU-p21+p27) via retroviral transduction of respective shRNAs and compared their various characteristics with empty vector-transduced DU145 (DU-EV) cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Knocking down either p21 or p27 did not show any significant change in doubling time, clonogenicity and cell cycle progression in DU145 cells, but simultaneous knock-down of both p21 and p27 significantly enhanced these parameters. In athymic mice, DU-p21+p27 tumors showed higher growth rate than the comparable growth of DU-EV, DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors. Concurrently, DU-p21+p27 tumors had significantly higher proliferation rate, showing 54% and 48% increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively, compared to DU-EV tumors. DU-p21+p27 tumors also showed higher microvessel density and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Proliferation and angiogenic status of DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors was comparable to DU-EV tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo results implicate that p21 and p27 have compensatory roles in advanced prostate cancer cells, and ablation or down-modulation of both these molecules essentially enhances the aggressive prostate carcinoma phenotype. PMID:18583941

  8. p21(CIP1/WAF1)-dependent inhibition of cardiac hypertrophy in response to Angiotensin II involves Akt/Myc and pRb signaling.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Billia, Filio

    2016-09-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1) (p21) is highly expressed in the adult heart. However, in response to stress, its expression is downregulated. Therefore, we investigated the role of p21 in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophic growth. At 2 months of age, p21 knockout mice (p21KO) lack an overt cardiac phenotype. In contrast, by 10 months of age, p21KO developed age-dependent cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. After 3 weeks of trans-aortic banding (TAB), the heart/body weight ratio in 11 week old p21KO mice increased by 57%, as compared to 42% in wild type mice indicating that p21KO have a higher susceptibility to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We then chronically infused 8 week old wild type mice with Angiotensin II (2.0mg/kg/min) or saline subcutaneously by osmotic pumps for 14 days. Recombinant TAT conjugated p21 protein variants (10mg/kg body weight) or saline were intraperitoneally injected once daily for 14 days into Angiotensin II and saline-infused animals. Angiotensin II treated mice developed pathological cardiac hypertrophy with an average increase of 38% in heart/body weight ratios, as compared to saline-treated controls. Reconstitution of p21 function by TAT.p21 protein transduction prevented Angiotensin II-dependent development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Taken together, our genetic and biochemical data show an important function of p21 in the regulation of growth-related processes in the heart. PMID:27486069

  9. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  10. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 by Inhibition of Transcription Activation by p53 and Sp1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1–3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  11. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1-dependent regulation of the expression and oncogenic functions of p21(CIP1/WAF1) in the liver.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, M; Gui, Y; Kandhi, R; Bobbala, D; Tobelaim, W-S; Saucier, C; Yoshimura, A; Ferbeyre, G; Ramanathan, S; Ilangumaran, S

    2016-08-11

    The SOCS1 gene coding for suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 is frequently repressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and hence SOCS1 is considered a tumor suppressor in the liver. However, the tumor-suppressor mechanisms of SOCS1 are not yet well understood. SOCS1 is known to inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokine production and signaling and to promote activation of the p53 tumor suppressor. However, we observed that SOCS1-deficient mice developed numerous and large liver tumor nodules following treatment with the hepatocarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) without showing increased interleukin-6 production or activation of p53. On the other hand, the livers of DEN-treated Socs1-null mice showed elevated levels of p21(CIP1/WAF1) protein (p21). Even though p21 generally functions as a tumor suppressor, paradoxically many cancers, including HCC, are known to express elevated levels of p21 that correlate with poor prognosis. We observed elevated p21 expression also in the regenerating livers of SOCS1-deficient mice and in cisplatin-treated Socs1-null hepatocytes, wherein the p21 protein showed increased stability. We show that SOCS1 interacts with p21 and promotes its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Besides, the DEN-treated livers of Socs1-null mice showed increased nuclear and cytosolic p21 staining, and the latter was associated with growth factor-induced, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of p21 in SOCS1-deficient hepatocytes. Cytosolic p21 is often associated with malignancy and chemo-resistance in many cancers. Accordingly, SOCS1-deficient hepatocytes showed increased resistance to apoptosis that was reversed by shRNA-mediated p21 knockdown. In the regenerating livers of Socs1-null mice, increased p21 expression coincided with elevated cyclinD levels. Correspondingly, SOCS1-deficient hepatocytes showed increased proliferation to growth factor stimulation that was reversed by p21 knockdown. Overall, our findings indicate that the

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1–3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4–2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAPE treatment significantly reduced protein abundance of Skp2, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk7, Rb, phospho-Rb S807/811, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin H, E2F1, c-Myc, SGK, phospho-p70S6kinase T421/S424, phospho-mTOR Ser2481, phospho-GSK3α Ser21, but induced p21Cip1, p27Kip1, ATF4, cyclin E, p53, TRIB3, phospho-p53 (Ser6, Ser33, Ser46, Ser392), phospho-p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182, Chk1, Chk2, phospho-ATM S1981, phospho-ATR S428, and phospho-p90RSK Ser380. CAPE treatment decreased Skp2 and Akt1 protein expression in LNCaP 104-R1 tumors as compared to control group. Overexpression of Skp2, or siRNA knockdown of p21Cip1, p27Kip1, or p53 blocked suppressive effect of CAPE treatment. Co-treatment of CAPE with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT737 showed synergistic suppressive effects. Our finding suggested that CAPE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in CRPC cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1. PMID:25788262

  13. Cell cycle arrest in Metformin treated breast cancer cells involves activation of AMPK, downregulation of cyclin D1, and requires p27Kip1 or p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yongxian; Miskimins, W Keith

    2008-01-01

    Background The antihyperglycemic drug metformin may have beneficial effects on the prevention and treatment of cancer. Metformin is known to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). It has also been shown to inhibit cyclin D1 expression and proliferation of some cultured cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of action by which metformin mediates cell cycle arrest are not completely understood. Results In this study, metformin was found to inhibit proliferation of most cultured breast cancer cell lines. This was independent of estrogen receptor, HER2, or p53 status. Inhibition of cell proliferation was associated with arrest within G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. As in previous studies, metformin treatment led to activation of (AMPK) and downregulation of cyclin D1. However, these events were not sufficient for cell cycle arrest because they were also observed in the MDA-MB-231 cell line, which is not sensitive to growth arrest by metformin. In sensitive breast cancer lines, the reduction in cyclin D1 led to release of sequestered CDK inhibitors, p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and association of these inhibitors with cyclin E/CDK2 complexes. The metformin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231 expresses significantly lower levels of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 than the metformin-sensitive cell line, MCF7. When p27Kip1 or p21Cip1 were overexpressed in MDA-MB-231, the cells became sensitive to cell cycle arrest in response to metformin. Conclusion Cell cycle arrest in response to metformin requires CDK inhibitors in addition to AMPK activation and cyclin D1 downregulation. This is of interest because many cancers are associated with loss or downregulation of CDK inhibitors and the results may be relevant to the development of anti-tumor reagents that target the AMPK pathway. PMID:19046439

  14. Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of whole extract and isolated indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica associated with re-activation of the onco-suppressor p16(INK4a) gene in human colorectal carcinoma (Caco-2) cells.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Flores; Tesoriere, Luisa; Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Attanzio, Alessandro; Gentile, Carla; Livrea, Maria A

    2014-07-18

    Phytochemicals may exert chemo-preventive effects on cells of the gastro-intestinal tract by modulating epigenome-regulated gene expression. The effect of the aqueous extract from the edible fruit of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI extract), and of its betalain pigment indicaxanthin (Ind), on proliferation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells has been investigated. Whole extract and Ind caused a dose-dependent apoptosis of proliferating cells at nutritionally relevant amounts, with IC50 400±25 mg fresh pulp equivalents/mL, and 115±15 μM (n=9), respectively, without toxicity for post-confluent differentiated cells. Ind accounted for ∼80% of the effect of the whole extract. Ind did not cause oxidative stress in proliferating Caco-2 cells. Epigenomic activity of Ind was evident as de-methylation of the tumor suppressor p16(INK4a) gene promoter, reactivation of the silenced mRNA expression and accumulation of p16(INK4a), a major controller of cell cycle. As a consequence, decrease of hyper-phosphorylated, in favor of the hypo-phosphorylated retinoblastoma was observed, with unaltered level of the cycline-dependent kinase CDK4. Cell cycle showed arrest in the G2/M-phase. Dietary cactus pear fruit and Ind may have chemo-preventive potential in intestinal cells. PMID:24937448

  15. Expression of p53, p21(CIP1/WAF1) and eIF4E in the adjacent tissues of oral squamous cell carcinoma: establishing the molecular boundary and a cancer progression model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Li, Bo; Xu, Bo; Han, Bo; Xia, Hui; Chen, Qian-Ming; Li, Long-Jiang

    2015-09-01

    The present study evaluated the expression of key molecules and the status of DNA in both oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and adjacent tissues to establish a molecular surgical boundary and provide a cancer progression model. Biopsy samples from 50 OSCC patients were divided into T (cancer), P1 (0-0.5 cm), P2 (0.5-1 cm), P3 (1-1.5 cm) and P4 (1.5-2 cm) groups based on the distances from the visible boundary of the primary focus. Twenty samples of normal mucosa were used as controls. We used immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry to evaluate p53, p21(CIP1/WAF1), eIF4E and Ki-67 expression and to determine DNA status, respectively. Sub-mucosal invasion was present in the P1 and P2 groups as determined by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Mutant p53 expression decreased gradually from cancerous to normal mucosae, whereas p21(CIP1/WAF1) expression displayed an opposite trend. eIF4E expression decreased from cancerous to normal mucosae. Ki-67 expression, the heteroploidy ratio, S-phase fraction and proliferative index decreased gradually with the distance from the tumour centre. Based on these results, we suggest that the resection boundary in OSCC surgery should be beyond 2 cm from the tumour. Additionally, the adjacent tissues of the primary focus could be used as a model for assessing cancer progression. PMID:25835715

  16. Eukaryotic translation initiator protein 1A isoform, CCS-3, enhances the transcriptional repression of p21CIP1 by proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Yuri; Yu, Mi-young; Park, Jungeun; Lee, Choong-Eun; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    FBI-1, a member of the POK (POZ and Kruppel) family of transcription factors, plays a role in differentiation, oncogenesis, and adipogenesis. eEF1A is a eukaryotic translation elongation factor involved in several cellular processes including embryogenesis, oncogenic transformation, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal organization. CCS-3, a potential cervical cancer suppressor, is an isoform of eEF1A. We found that eEF1A forms a complex with FBI-1 by co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF Mass analysis of the immunoprecipitate. GST fusion protein pull-downs showed that FBI-1 directly interacts with eEF1A and CCS-3 via the zinc finger and POZ-domain of FBI-1. FBI-1 co-localizes with either eEF1A or CCS-3 at the nuclear periplasm. CCS-3 enhances transcriptional repression of the p21CIP1 gene (hereafter referred to as p21) by FBI-1. The POZ-domain of FBI-1 interacts with the co-repressors, SMRT and BCoR. We found that CCS-3 also interacts with the co-repressors independently. The molecular interaction between the co-repressors and CCS-3 at the POZ-domain of FBI-1 appears to enhance FBI-1 mediated transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that CCS-3 may be important in cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and oncogenesis by interacting with the proto-oncogene FBI-1 and transcriptional co-repressors. PMID:19471103

  17. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  18. MycN Is Critical for the Maintenance of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie Ting; Weng, Zhi Hui; Tsang, Kam Sze; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Jiang, Xiao Hua

    2016-01-01

    The biologic studies of human neural crest stem cells (hNCSCs) are extremely challenging due to the limited source of hNCSCs as well as ethical and technical issues surrounding isolation of early human embryonic tissues. On the other hand, vast majority of studies on MycN have been conducted in human tumor cells, thus, the role of MycN in normal human neural crest development is completely unknown. In the present study, we determined the role of MycN in hNCSCs isolated from in vitro-differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). For the first time, we show that suppression of MycN in hNCSCs inhibits cell growth and cell cycle progression. Knockdown of MycN in hNCSCs increases the expression of Cdkn1a, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, which encodes the cyclin-dependent kinases p21CIP1, p16 INK4a and p15INK4b. In addition, MycN is involved in the regulation of human sympathetic neurogenesis, as knockdown of MycN enhances the expression of key transcription factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation, including Phox2a, Phox2b, Mash1, Hand2 and Gata3. We propose that unlimited source of hNCSCs provides an invaluable platform for the studies of human neural crest development and diseases. PMID:26815535

  19. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-05-30

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  20. Targeted p16Ink4a epimutation causes tumorigenesis and reduces survival in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer has long been viewed as a genetic disease; however, epigenetic silencing as the result of aberrant promoter DNA methylation is frequently associated with cancer development, suggesting an epigenetic component to the disease. Nonetheless, it has remained unclear whether an epimutation (an aber...

  1. Absence of p16INK4a and truncation of ARF tumor suppressors in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Mitchell, Michael; Fujii, Hideta; Llanos, Susana; Peters, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    The INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus on human chromosome 9p21 (Human Genome Organization designation CDKN2B-CDKN2A), and the corresponding locus on mouse chromosome 4, encodes three distinct products: two members of the INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor family and a completely unrelated protein, ARF, whose carboxyl-terminal half is specified by the second exon of INK4a but in an alternative reading frame. As INK4 proteins block the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product and ARF protects p53 from degradation, the locus plays a key role in tumor suppression and the control of cell proliferation. To gain further insights into the relative importance of INK4a and ARF in different settings, we have isolated and characterized the equivalent locus in chickens. Surprisingly, although we identified orthologues of INK4b and ARF, chickens do not encode an equivalent of INK4a. Moreover, the reading frame for chicken ARF does not extend into exon 2, because splicing occurs in a different register to that used in mammals. The resultant 60-aa product nevertheless shares functional attributes with its mammalian counterparts. As well as indicating that the locus has been subject to dynamic evolutionary pressures, these unexpected findings suggest that in chickens, the tumor-suppressor functions of INK4a have been compensated for by other genes. PMID:12506196

  2. A Novel POK Family Transcription Factor, ZBTB5, Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Dong-In; Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yun, Chae-Ok; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as a driving force for tumorigenesis. We isolated and characterized a novel POZ domain Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription repressor, ZBTB5 (zinc finger and BTB domain-containing 5). Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) analysis showed that ZBTB5 expression is higher in retinoblastoma and muscle cancer tissues. Immunocytochemistry showed that ZBTB5 was localized to the nucleus, particularly nuclear speckles. ZBTB5 directly repressed transcription of cell cycle arrest gene p21 by binding to the proximal GC-box 5/6 elements and the two distal p53-responsive elements (bp −2323 ∼ −2299; bp −1416 ∼ −1392). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that ZBTB5 and p53 competed with each other in occupying the p53 binding elements. ZBTB5 interacted with co-repressor-histone deacetylase complexes such as BCoR (BCL-6-interacting corepressor), NCoR (nuclear receptor corepressor), and SMRT (silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors) via its POZ domain. These interactions resulted in deacetylation of histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the proximal promoter, which is important in the transcriptional repression of p21. MTT (3-(4,5-di meth yl thi azol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assays and fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that ZBTB5 stimulated both cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, significantly increasing the number of cells in S-phase. Overall, our data suggest that ZBTB5 is a potent transcription repressor of cell cycle arrest gene p21 and a potential proto-oncogene stimulating cell proliferation. PMID:19491398

  3. Quantitative assessment of higher-order chromatin structure of the INK4/ARF locus in human senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Hirosue, Akiyuki; Ishihara, Ko; Tokunaga, Kazuaki; Watanabe, Takehisa; Saitoh, Noriko; Nakamoto, Masafumi; Chandra, Tamir; Narita, Masashi; Shinohara, Masanori; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Somatic cells can be reset to oncogene-induced senescent (OIS) cells or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by expressing specified factors. The INK4/ARF locus encodes p15(INK4b) , ARF, and p16(INK4a) genes in human chromosome 9p21, the products of which are known as common key reprogramming regulators. Compared with growing fibroblasts, the CCCTC-binding factor CTCF is remarkably up-regulated in iPS cells with silencing of the three genes in the locus and is reversely down-regulated in OIS cells with high expression of p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) genes. There are at least three CTCF-enriched sites in the INK4/ARF locus, which possess chromatin loop-forming activities. These CTCF-enriched sites and the p16(INK4a) promoter associate to form compact chromatin loops in growing fibroblasts, while CTCF depletion disrupts the loop structure. Interestingly, the loose chromatin structure is found in OIS cells. In addition, the INK4/ARF locus has an intermediate type of chromatin compaction in iPS cells. These results suggest that senescent cells have distinct higher-order chromatin signature in the INK4/ARF locus. PMID:22340434

  4. Concurrent hypermethylation of multiple genes is associated with grade of oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Dong, S M; Pang, J C; Poon, W S; Hu, J; To, K F; Chang, A R; Ng, H K

    2001-08-01

    Current evidence suggests that epigenetic changes play an important role in the evolution of human cancers. In this study, we evaluated whether hypermethylation of CpG islands at the gene promotor regions of several tumor-related genes is involved in the carcinogenesis of oligodendroglial tumors. We examined the methylation status of 11 genes in a series of 43 oligodendroglial tumors (19 oligodendrogliomas, 13 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, 9 oligoastrocytomas, and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas) by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that hypermethylation of CpG islands was detectable in 8 of 11 genes studied and 74% of tumors were hypermethylated in at least 1 gene. Promotor hypermethylations were detected in O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), RB1, estrogen receptor, p73, p16INK4a, death-associated protein kinase, p15INK4b, and p14ARF at 60%, 34%, 30%, 16%, 12%, 10%, 7%, and 2%, respectively. No hypermethylation was detected in the promotors of glutathione-S-transferase P1, von Hippel-Lindau or the DNA mismatch repair (hMLH1) genes. Statistical analysis revealed that concordant hypermethylation of at least 2 genes, p16INK4a and p15INK4b were significantly associated with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors, and hypermethylation of MGMT was significantly associated with loss of chromosome 19q and with combined loss of chromosomes 1p and 19q. More importantly, several candidate tumor suppressor genes such as p16INK4a, p15INK4b, and p73 that were previously reported as unmutated in oligodendroglial tumors were found to be hypermethylated in their CpG islands. Taken together, we conclude that hypermethylation of CpG islands is a common epigenetic event that is associated with the development of oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:11487055

  5. Biallelic mutations in p16(INK4a) confer resistance to Ras- and Ets-induced senescence in human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huot, Thomas J; Rowe, Janice; Harland, Mark; Drayton, Sarah; Brookes, Sharon; Gooptu, Chandra; Purkis, Patricia; Fried, Mike; Bataille, Veronique; Hara, Eiji; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Peters, Gordon

    2002-12-01

    The INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus is implicated in the senescence-like growth arrest provoked by oncogenic Ras in primary cells. INK4a and ARF are distinct proteins encoded by transcripts in which a shared exon is decoded in alternative reading frames. Here we analyze dermal fibroblasts (designated Q34) from an individual carrying independent missense mutations in each copy of the common exon. Both mutations alter the amino acid sequence of INK4a and functionally impair the protein, although they do so to different degrees. Only one of the mutations affects the sequence of ARF, causing an apparently innocuous change near its carboxy terminus. Unlike normal human fibroblasts, Q34 cells are not permanently arrested by Ras or its downstream effectors Ets1 and Ets2. Moreover, ectopic Ras enables the cells to grow as anchorage-independent colonies, and in relatively young Q34 cells anchorage independence can be achieved without addition of telomerase or perturbation of the p53 pathway. Whereas ARF plays the principal role in Ras-induced arrest of mouse fibroblasts, our data imply that INK4a assumes this role in human fibroblasts. PMID:12417717

  6. Frequent k- ras -2 mutations and p16(INK4A)methylation in hepatocellular carcinomas in workers exposed to vinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, M; Benicke, M; Lehnert, G; Wittekind, C; Wrbitzky, R; Tannapfel, A

    2001-04-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a know animal and human carcinogen associated with liver angiosarcomas (LAS) and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In VC-associated LAS mutations of the K- ras -2 gene have been reported; however, no data about the prevalence of such mutations in VC associated HCCs are available. Recent data indicate K- ras -2 mutations induce P16 methylation accompanied by inactivation of the p16 gene. The presence of K- ras -2 mutations was analysed in tissue from 18 patients with VC associated HCCs. As a control group, 20 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma due to hepatitis B (n = 7), hepatitis C (n = 5) and alcoholic liver cirrhosis (n = 8) was used. The specific mutations were determined by direct sequencing of codon 12 and 13 of the K- ras -2 gene in carcinomatous and adjacent non-neoplastic liver tissue after microdissection. The status of p16 was evaluated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), microsatellite analysis, DNA sequencing and immunohistochemical staining. All patients had a documented chronic quantitated exposure to VC (average 8883 ppmy, average duration: 245 months). K- ras -2 mutations were found in 6 of 18 (33%) examined VC-associated HCCs and in 3 cases of adjacent non-neoplastic liver tissue. There were 3 G --> A point mutations in the tumour tissue. All 3 mutations found in non-neoplastic liver from VC-exposed patients were also G --> A point mutations (codon 12- and codon 13-aspartate mutations). Hypermethylation of the 5' CpG island of the p16 gene was found in 13 of 18 examined carcinomas (72%). Of 6 cancers with K- ras -2 mutations, 5 specimens also showed methylated p16. Within the control group, K- ras -2 mutation were found in 3 of 20 (15%) examined HCC. p16 methylation occurred in 11 out of 20 (55%) patients. K- ras -2 mutations and p16 methylation are frequent events in VC associated HCCs. We observed a K- ras -2 mutation pattern characteristic of chloroethylene oxide, a carcinogenic metabolite of VC. Our results strongly suggest that K- ras -2 mutations play an important role in the pathogenesis of VC-associated HCC. PMID:11286481

  7. CIZ1, a p21Cip1/Waf1-interacting protein, functions as a tumor suppressor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Rio; Watanabe, Wataru; Ueda, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Koller, Richard; Wolff, Linda; Honda, Zen-ichiro; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Honda, Hiroaki

    2013-05-21

    CIZ1 is a nuclear protein involved in DNA replication and is also implicated in human diseases including cancers. To gain an insight into its function in vivo, we generated mice lacking Ciz1. Ciz1-deficient (Ciz1(-/-)) mice grew without any obvious abnormalities, and Ciz1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) did not show any defects in cell cycle status, cell growth, and DNA damage response. However, Ciz1(-/-) MEFs were sensitive to hydroxyurea-mediated replication stress and susceptible to oncogene-induced cellular transformation. In addition, Ciz1(-/-) mice developed various types of leukemias by retroviral insertional mutagenesis. These results indicate that CIZ1 functions as a tumor suppressor in vivo. PMID:23583447

  8. A role for p38 in transcriptional elongation of p21CIP1 in response to Aurora B inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Geeta; Ulrich, Tanja; Gaubatz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Aurora kinases play important functions in mitosis. They are overexpressed in many cancers and are targets for anticancer therapy. Inhibition of Aurora B results in cytokinesis failure and polyploidization, leading to activation of the p53 tumor suppressor and its target genes, including p21. The pathways that mediate p21 activation after Aurora B inhibition are not well understood. In this study, we identified a role for the p38 MAP kinase in activation of p21 when Aurora B is inhibited. We show that p38 is required for the acute cell cycle arrest in G1 and to prevent endoreduplication when Aurora B is inhibited. Stabilization of p53 occurs independently of p38, and recruitment of p53 to the p21 promoter also does not require p38. Instead, enrichment of the elongating form of RNA PolII at the distal region of the p21 gene is strongly reduced when p38 is blocked, indicating that p38 acts in transcriptional elongation of p21. Thus, our results identify an unexpected role of p38 in cell cycle regulation in response to Aurora B inhibition, by promoting the transcriptional elongation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. PMID:23759594

  9. Role of stress-activated OCT4A in the cell fate decisions of embryonal carcinoma cells treated with etoposide

    PubMed Central

    Huna, Anda; Salmina, Kristine; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Krigerts, Jekabs; Inashkina, Inna; Gerashchenko, Bogdan I; Townsend, Paul A; Cragg, Mark S; Jackson, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cellular senescence induced by genotoxic treatments has recently been found to be paradoxically linked to the induction of “stemness.” This observation is critical as it directly impinges upon the response of tumors to current chemo-radio-therapy treatment regimens. Previously, we showed that following etoposide (ETO) treatment embryonal carcinoma PA-1 cells undergo a p53-dependent upregulation of OCT4A and p21Cip1 (governing self-renewal and regulating cell cycle inhibition and senescence, respectively). Here we report further detail on the relationship between these and other critical cell-fate regulators. PA-1 cells treated with ETO display highly heterogeneous increases in OCT4A and p21Cip1 indicative of dis-adaptation catastrophe. Silencing OCT4A suppresses p21Cip1, changes cell cycle regulation and subsequently suppresses terminal senescence; p21Cip1-silencing did not affect OCT4A expression or cellular phenotype. SOX2 and NANOG expression did not change following ETO treatment suggesting a dissociation of OCT4A from its pluripotency function. Instead, ETO-induced OCT4A was concomitant with activation of AMPK, a key component of metabolic stress and autophagy regulation. p16ink4a, the inducer of terminal senescence, underwent autophagic sequestration in the cytoplasm of ETO-treated cells, allowing alternative cell fates. Accordingly, failure of autophagy was accompanied by an accumulation of p16ink4a, nuclear disintegration, and loss of cell recovery. Together, these findings imply that OCT4A induction following DNA damage in PA-1 cells, performs a cell stress, rather than self-renewal, function by moderating the expression of p21Cip1, which alongside AMPK helps to then regulate autophagy. Moreover, this data indicates that exhaustion of autophagy, through persistent DNA damage, is the cause of terminal cellular senescence. PMID:26102294

  10. Evidence for a CDK4-dependent checkpoint in a conditional model of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Sharon; Gagrica, Sladjana; Sanij, Elaine; Rowe, Janice; Gregory, Fiona J; Hara, Eiji; Peters, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence, the stable cell cycle arrest elicited by various forms of stress, is an important facet of tumor suppression. Although much is known about the key players in the implementation of senescence, including the pRb and p53 axes and the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a and p21CIP1, many details remain unresolved. In studying conditional senescence in human fibroblasts that express a temperature sensitive SV40 large T-antigen (T-Ag), we uncovered an unexpected role for CDK4. At the permissive temperature, where pRb and p53 are functionally compromised by T-Ag, cyclin D-CDK4 complexes are disrupted by the high p16INK4a levels and reduced expression of p21CIP1. In cells arrested at the non-permissive temperature, p21CIP1 promotes reassembly of cyclin D-CDK4 yet pRb is in a hypo-phosphorylated state, consistent with cell cycle arrest. In exploring whether the reassembled cyclin D-CDK4-p21 complexes are functional, we found that shRNA-mediated knockdown or chemical inhibition of CDK4 prevented the increase in cell size associated with the senescent phenotype by allowing the cells to arrest in G1 rather than G2/M. The data point to a role for CDK4 kinase activity in a G2 checkpoint that contributes to senescence. PMID:25695870

  11. Deletion analysis of p16(INKa) and p15(INKb) in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Graf Einsiedel, Hagen; Taube, Tillmann; Hartmann, Reinhard; Wellmann, Sven; Seifert, Georg; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl

    2002-06-15

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of INK4 deletions and their impact on outcome in 125 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at first relapse using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients were enrolled into relapse trials ALL-REZ BFM (ALL-Relapse Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster) 90 and 96. The prevalence of p16(INK4a) and p15(INK4b) homozygous deletions was 35% (44 of 125) and 30% (38 of 125), respectively. A highly significant association of both gene deletions was found with the 2 major adverse prognostic factors known for relapsed childhood ALL: T-cell immunophenotype and first remission duration. There was no correlation between INK4 deletions and probability of event-free survival. These findings argue against an independent prognostic role of INK4 deletions in relapsed childhood ALL. PMID:12036898

  12. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL. PMID:27149388

  13. Karyopherin α2 induces apoptosis in tongue squamous cell carcinoma CAL-27 cells through the p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Yu, Lei; Li, Chun-Ming; Li, Ying; Jia, Bao-Lin; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Tumor onset and progression are associated with dysfunction of the nuclear transport machinery at the level of import and export receptors. However, the role of Karyopherin α2 (KPNA2) in human tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) remains unknown. We assessed the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of TSCC CAL-27 cells using wound healing, Transwell and MTT assays, western blotting, electron microscopy and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining following knockdown of KPNA2. The results revealed the antiproliferative, proapoptotic and anti-migratory effects of KPNA2 silencing on the TSCC CAL-27 cells. Moreover, the knockdown of KPNA2 proved to be accompanied by the upregulation of active caspase-3, cytochrome c, Bax, Bad and decreased expression of Bcl-2, p-Bad and XIAP. KPNA2 activated the caspase-dependent pathway in the CAL-27 cells with upregulation of p53, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p16INK4a. Thus, the present study demonstrated that p53/p21Cip1/Waf1/p16INK4a may be an important pathway involved in the function of KPNA2 in TSCC CAL-27 cells. PMID:27109484

  14. Senescence and immortality in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mehmet; Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Bagislar, Sevgi; Senturk, Serif; Yuzugullu, Haluk

    2009-12-01

    Cellular senescence is a process leading to terminal growth arrest with characteristic morphological features. This process is mediated by telomere-dependent, oncogene-induced and ROS-induced pathways, but persistent DNA damage is the most common cause. Senescence arrest is mediated by p16(INK4a)- and p21(Cip1)-dependent pathways both leading to retinoblastoma protein (pRb) activation. p53 plays a relay role between DNA damage sensing and p21(Cip1) activation. pRb arrests the cell cycle by recruiting proliferation genes to facultative heterochromatin for permanent silencing. Replicative senescence that occurs in hepatocytes in culture and in liver cirrhosis is associated with lack of telomerase activity and results in telomere shortening. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells display inactivating mutations of p53 and epigenetic silencing of p16(INK4a). Moreover, they re-express telomerase reverse transcriptase required for telomere maintenance. Thus, senescence bypass and cellular immortality is likely to contribute significantly to HCC development. Oncogene-induced senescence in premalignant lesions and reversible immortality of cancer cells including HCC offer new potentials for tumor prevention and treatment. PMID:19070423

  15. Stabilization of p21 (Cip1/WAF1) following Tip60-dependent acetylation is required for p21-mediated DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M-S; Seo, J; Choi, D Y; Lee, E-W; Ko, A; Ha, N-C; Bok Yoon, J; Lee, H-W; Pyo Kim, K; Song, J

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling post-translational modifications of p21 have been pursued assiduously in recent years. Here, utilizing mass-spectrometry analysis and site-specific acetyl-p21 antibody, two lysine residues of p21, located at amino-acid sites 161 and 163, were identified as Tip60-mediated acetylation targets for the first time. Detection of adriamycin-induced p21 acetylation, which disappeared after Tip60 depletion with concomitant destabilization of p21 and disruption of G1 arrest, suggested that Tip60-mediated p21 acetylation is necessary for DNA damage-induced cell-cycle regulation. The ability of 2KQ, a mimetic of acetylated p21, to induce cell-cycle arrest and senescence was significantly enhanced in p21 null MEFs compared with those of cells expressing wild-type p21. Together, these observations demonstrate that Tip60-mediated p21 acetylation is a novel and essential regulatory process required for p21-dependent DNA damage-induced cell-cycle arrest. PMID:23238566

  16. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhendong; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li; Li, Pengfei

    2009-09-04

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  17. Protective Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells through Attenuating Oxidative Stress and the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in a Mouse Model of d-Galactose-induced Aging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Cai, Dachuan; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Linbo; Jing, Pengwei; Wang, Lu; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell senescence is an important and current hypothesis accounting for organismal aging, especially the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). Ginsenoside Rg1 is the main active pharmaceutical ingredient of ginseng, which is a traditional Chinese medicine. This study explored the protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on Sca-1+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPCs) in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging. The mimetic aging mouse model was induced by continuous injection of d-gal for 42 days, and the C57BL/6 mice were respectively treated with ginsenoside Rg1, Vitamin E or normal saline after 7 days of d-gal injection. Compared with those in the d-gal administration alone group, ginsenoside Rg1 protected Sca-1+ HSC/HPCs by decreasing SA-β-Gal and enhancing the colony forming unit-mixture (CFU-Mix), and adjusting oxidative stress indices like reactive oxygen species (ROS), total anti-oxidant (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, ginsenoside Rg1 decreased β-catenin and c-Myc mRNA expression and enhanced the phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Moreover, ginsenoside Rg1 down-regulated advanced glycation end products (AGEs), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), phospho-histone H2A.X (r-H2A.X), 8-OHdG, p16Ink4a, Rb, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p53 in senescent Sca-1+ HSC/HPCs. Our findings indicated that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve the resistance of Sca-1+ HSC/HPCs in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging through the suppression of oxidative stress and excessive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and reduction of DNA damage response, p16Ink4a-Rb and p53-p21Cip1/Waf1 signaling. PMID:27294914

  18. Oncogenic RAS-induced senescence in human primary thyrocytes: molecular effectors and inflammatory secretome involved

    PubMed Central

    Vizioli, Maria Grazia; Santos, Joana; Pilotti, Silvana; Mazzoni, Mara; Anania, Maria Chiara; Miranda, Claudia; Pagliardini, Sonia; Pierotti, Marco A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a robust and sustained antiproliferative response to oncogenic stress and constitutes an efficient barrier to tumour progression. We have recently proposed that OIS may be involved in the pathogenesis of thyroid carcinoma by restraining tumour progression as well as the transition of well differentiated to more aggressive variants. Here, an OIS inducible model was established and used for dissecting the molecular mechanisms and players regulating senescence in human primary thyrocytes. We show that oncogenic RAS induces senescence in thyrocytes as judged by changes in cell morphology, activation of p16INK4a and p53/p21CIP1 tumour suppressor pathways, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity, and induction of proinflammatory components including IL-8 and its receptor CXCR2. Using RNA interference (RNAi) we demonstrate that p16INK4a is necessary for the onset of senescence in primary thyrocytes as its depletion rescues RAS-induced senescence. Furthermore, we found that IL-8/CXCR2 network reinforces the growth arrest triggered by oncogenic RAS, as its abrogation is enough to resume proliferation. Importantly, we observed that CXCR2 expression coexists with OIS markers in thyroid tumour samples, suggesting that CXCR2 contributes to senescence, thus limiting thyroid tumour progression. PMID:25268744

  19. Renal phenotype of young and old telomerase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schildhorn, Carolin; Jacobi, Christoph; Weissbrodt, Andrea; Hermstedt, Christine; Westhoff, Jens Hendrik; Hömme, Meike; Bhayadia, Raj; Gretz, Norbert; Falk, Christine Susanne; Schmitt, Roland; Bröcker, Verena; Kränzlin, Bettina; Melk, Anette

    2015-09-01

    Telomere shortening in the kidney explains the impaired regenerative capacity, but may not drive the ageing phenotype itself. We investigated kidneys from young and old Terc(+/+) and Terc(-/-) mice of early (G1) and late (G4, G5) generations. Functional parameters declined and age-related morphological changes increased in late generation Terc(-/-) mice and with further age. Podocyte loss was only seen in old G4 Terc(-/-). Whereas p21(CIP1/WAF1) was highest in old G1 and G4 Terc(-/-), telomere shortening and p16(INK4a) expression, also significantly associated with later generation young Terc(-/-), were not further induced in old Terc(-/-) mice. Both, young and old late generation Terc(-/-), showed increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Young late generation Terc(-/-) animals show mild functional and histological abnormalities, the presence of cellular senescence explains their kidneys' limited regenerative capacity. While these aspects resemble the situation seen in aged human kidneys, the lack of telomere shortening and p16(INK4a) induction in older Terc(-/-) animals differs from observations in old human kidneys and may result from clearance of senescent cells. This animal model is well suited to investigate the mechanisms of impaired renal regeneration in aged human kidney, but may not fully explain the natural course of the human renal ageing phenotype. PMID:26277387

  20. SWI/SNF mediates polycomb eviction and epigenetic reprogramming of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Kia, Sima Kheradmand; Gorski, Marcin M; Giannakopoulos, Stavros; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2008-05-01

    Stable silencing of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a tumor suppressor locus occurs in a variety of human cancers, including malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs). MRTs are extremely aggressive cancers caused by the loss of the hSNF5 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We found previously that, in MRT cells, hSNF5 is required for p16(INK4a) induction, mitotic checkpoint activation, and cellular senescence. Here, we investigated how the balance between Polycomb group (PcG) silencing and SWI/SNF activation affects epigenetic control of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus in MRT cells. hSNF5 reexpression in MRT cells caused SWI/SNF recruitment and activation of p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a), but not of p14(ARF). Gene activation by hSNF5 is strictly dependent on the SWI/SNF motor subunit BRG1. SWI/SNF mediates eviction of the PRC1 and PRC2 PcG silencers and extensive chromatin reprogramming. Concomitant with PcG complex removal, the mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) protein is recruited and active histone marks supplant repressive ones. Strikingly, loss of PcG complexes is accompanied by DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B dissociation and reduced DNA methylation. Thus, various chromatin states can be modulated by SWI/SNF action. Collectively, these findings emphasize the close interconnectivity and dynamics of diverse chromatin modifications in cancer and gene control. PMID:18332116

  1. Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2 Induces Bmi1 and Mel18 and Controls Fibroblast Proliferation via Ink4a/ARF

    PubMed Central

    Kranc, Kamil R.; Bamforth, Simon D.; Bragança, José; Norbury, Chris; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2003-01-01

    Cited2 (CBP/p300 interacting transactivator with ED-rich tail 2) is required for embryonic development, coactivation of transcription factor AP-2, and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transactivation. Cited2 is induced by multiple growth factors and cytokines and oncogenically transforms cells. Here, we show that the proliferation of Cited2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts ceases prematurely. This is associated with a reduction in growth fraction, senescent cellular morphology, and increased expression of the cell proliferation inhibitors p16INK4a, p19ARF, and p15INK4b. Deletion of INK4a/ARF (encoding p16INK4a and p19ARF) completely rescued the defective proliferation of Cited2−/− fibroblasts. However, the deletion of INK4a/ARF did not rescue the embryonic malformations observed in Cited2−/− mice, indicating that INK4a/ARF-independent pathways are likely to be involved here. We found that Cited2−/− fibroblasts had reduced expression of the polycomb-group genes Bmi1 and Mel18, which function as INK4a/ARF and Hox repressors. Complementation with CITED2-expressing retrovirus enhanced proliferation, induced Bmi1/Mel18 expression, and decreased INK4a/ARF expression. Bmi1- and Mel18-expressing retroviruses enhanced the proliferation of Cited2−/− fibroblasts, indicating that they function downstream of Cited2. Our results provide genetic evidence that Cited2 controls the expression of INK4a/ARF and fibroblast proliferation, at least in part via the polycomb-group genes Bmi1 and Mel18. PMID:14560011

  2. Islet biology, the CDKN2A/B locus and type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yahui; Sharma, Rohit B; Nwosu, Benjamin U; Alonso, Laura C

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes, fuelled by the obesity epidemic, is an escalating worldwide cause of personal hardship and public cost. Diabetes incidence increases with age, and many studies link the classic senescence and ageing protein p16(INK4A) to diabetes pathophysiology via pancreatic islet biology. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have unequivocally linked the CDKN2A/B locus, which encodes p16 inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (p16(INK4A)) and three other gene products, p14 alternate reading frame (p14(ARF)), p15(INK4B) and antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), with human diabetes risk. However, the mechanism by which the CDKN2A/B locus influences diabetes risk remains uncertain. Here, we weigh the evidence that CDKN2A/B polymorphisms impact metabolic health via islet biology vs effects in other tissues. Structured in a bedside-to-bench-to-bedside approach, we begin with a summary of the evidence that the CDKN2A/B locus impacts diabetes risk and a brief review of the basic biology of CDKN2A/B gene products. The main emphasis of this work is an in-depth look at the nuanced roles that CDKN2A/B gene products and related proteins play in the regulation of beta cell mass, proliferation and insulin secretory function, as well as roles in other metabolic tissues. We finish with a synthesis of basic biology and clinical observations, incorporating human physiology data. We conclude that it is likely that the CDKN2A/B locus influences diabetes risk through both islet and non-islet mechanisms. PMID:27155872

  3. The Role of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Alpha in Bypassing Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kilic Eren, Mehtap; Tabor, Vedrana

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene induced senescence (OIS) is a sustained anti-proliferative response acutely induced in primary cells via activation of mitogenic oncogenes such as Ras/BRAF. This mechanism acts as an initial barrier preventing normal cells transformation into malignant cell. Besides oncogenic activation and DNA damage response (DDR), senescence is modulated by a plethora of other factors, and one of the most important one is oxygen tension of the tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of hypoxia on RasV12-induced senescence in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs). We showed here that hypoxia prevents execution of oncogene induced senescence (OIS), through a strong down-regulation of senescence hallmarks, such as SA- β-galactosidase, H3K9me3, HP1γ, p53, p21CIP1 and p16INK4a in association with induction of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). In addition, hypoxia also decreased marks of H-RasV12-induced DDR in both cell lines through down-regulation of ATM/ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation as well as decreased γ-H2AX positivity. Utilizing shRNA system targeting HIF-1α we show that HIF-1α is directly involved in down regulation of p53 and its target p21CIP1 but not p16INK4a. In line with this finding we found that knock down of HIF-1α leads to a strong induction of apoptotic response, but not restoration of senescence in Ras expressing HDFs in hypoxia. This indicates that HIF-1α is an important player in early steps of tumorigenesis, leading to suppression of senescence through its negative regulation of p53 and p21CIP1. In our work we describe a mechanism through which hypoxia and specifically HIF-1α preclude cells from maintaining senescence-driven anti proliferative response. These findings indicate the possible mechanism through which hypoxic environment helps premalignant cells to evade impingement of cellular failsafe pathways. PMID:24984035

  4. Differential targeting of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21CIP1/WAF1, by chelators with anti-proliferative activity in a range of tumor cell-types

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Rayan S.; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    Chelators such as 2-hydroxy-1-napthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) and di-2-pyridylketone-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) target tumor cell iron pools and inhibit proliferation. These agents also modulate multiple targets, one of which is the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21. Hence, this investigation examined the mechanism of action of these compounds in targeting p21. All the chelators up-regulated p21 mRNA in the five tumor cell-types assessed. In contrast, examining their effect on total p21 protein levels, these agents induced either: (1) down-regulation in MCF-7 cells; (2) up-regulation in SK-MEL-28 and CFPAC-1 cells; or (3) had no effect in LNCaP and SK-N-MC cells. The nuclear localization of p21 was also differentially affected by the ligands depending upon the cell-type, with it being decreased in MCF-7 cells, but increased in SK-MEL-28 and CFPAC-1 cells. Further studies assessing the mechanisms responsible for these effects demonstrated that p21 expression was not correlated with p53 status, suggesting a p53-independent mechanism. Considering this, we examined proteins that modulate p21 independently of p53, namely NDRG1, MDM2 and ΔNp63. These studies demonstrated that a dominant negative MDM2 isoform (p75MDM2) closely resembled p21 expression in response to chelation in three cell lines. These data suggest MDM2 may be involved in the regulation of p21 by chelators. PMID:26335183

  5. Mice Homozygous for a Deletion in the Glaucoma Susceptibility Locus INK4 Show Increased Vulnerability of Retinal Ganglion Cells to Elevated Intraocular Pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2016-04-01

    A genomic region located on chromosome 9p21 is associated with primary open-angle glaucoma and normal tension glaucoma in genome-wide association studies. The genomic region contains the gene for a long noncoding RNA called CDKN2B-AS, two genes that code for cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors 2A and 2B (CDKN2A/p16(INK4A) and CDKN2B/p15(INK4B)) and an additional protein (p14(ARF)). We used a transgenic mouse model in which 70 kb of murine chromosome 4, syntenic to human chromosome 9p21, are deleted to study whether this deletion leads to a discernible phenotype in ocular structures implicated in glaucoma. Homozygous mice of this strain were previously reported to show persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Fundus photography and optical coherence tomography confirmed that finding but showed no abnormalities for heterozygous mice. Optokinetic response, eletroretinogram, and histology indicated that the heterozygous and mutant retinas were normal functionally and morphologically, whereas glial cells were activated in the retina and optic nerve head of mutant eyes. In quantitative PCR, CDKN2B expression was reduced by approximately 50% in the heterozygous mice and by 90% in the homozygous mice, which suggested that the CDKN2B knock down had no deleterious consequences for the retina under normal conditions. However, compared with wild-type and heterozygous animals, the homozygous mice are more vulnerable to retinal ganglion cell loss in response to elevated intraocular pressure. PMID:26883755

  6. c-Maf regulates pluripotency genes, proliferation/self-renewal, and lineage commitment in ROS-mediated senescence of human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan-Ting; Wu, Yao-Ming; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Yen, Men-Luh

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are therapeutically relevant multilineage and immunomodulatory progenitors. Ex vivo expansion of these rare cells is necessary for clinical application and can result in detrimental senescent effects, with mechanisms still largely unknown. We found that vigorous ex vivo expansion of human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hAMSCs) results in proliferative decline, cell cycle arrest, and altered differentiation capacity. This senescent phenotype was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and with increased expression of G1 cell -cycle inhibitors— p15INK4b and p16INK4a — but decreased expression of pluripotency genes—Oct-4, Sox-2, Nanog, and c-Myc—as well as c-Maf a co-factor of MSC lineage-specific transcription factor and sensitive to oxidative stress. These global changes in the transcriptional and functional programs of proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal were all mediated by ROS-induced suppression of c-Maf, as evidenced by binding of c-Maf to promoter regions of multiple relevant genes in hAMSCs which could be reduced by exogenous ROS. Our findings implicate the strong effects of ROS on multiple stem cell functions with a central role for c-Maf in stem cell senescence. PMID:26496036

  7. CBL enhances breast tumor formation by inhibiting tumor suppressive activity of TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, J M; Park, S; Kim, S J; Hong, H Y; Jeong, J; Kim, H-S; Kim, S-J

    2012-12-13

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (CBL) protein family functions as multifunctional adaptor proteins and E3 ubiquitin ligases that are implicated as regulators of signaling in various cell types. Recent discovery revealed mutations of proto-oncogenic CBL in the linker region and RING finger domain in human acute myeloid neoplasm, and these transforming mutations induced carcinogenesis. However, the adaptor function of CBL mediated signaling pathway during tumorigenesis has not been well characterized. Here, we show that CBL is highly expressed in breast cancer cells and significantly inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) tumor suppressive activity. Knockdown of CBL expression resulted in the increased expression of TGF-β target genes, PAI-I and CDK inhibitors such as p15(INK4b) and p21(Cip1). Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBL is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer tissues, and the loss of CBL decreases the tumorigenic activity of breast cancer cells in vivo. CBL directly binds to Smad3 through its proline-rich motif, thereby preventing Smad3 from interacting with Smad4 and blocking nuclear translocation of Smad3. CBL-b, one of CBL protein family, also interacted with Smad3 and knockdown of both CBL and CBL-b further enhanced TGF-β transcriptional activity. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which oncogenic CBL can block TGF-β tumor suppressor activity. PMID:22310290

  8. A complex secretory program orchestrated by the inflammasome controls paracrine senescence

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Juan Carlos; Banito, Ana; Wuestefeld, Torsten; Georgilis, Athena; Janich, Peggy; Morton, Jennifer P; Athineos, Dimitris; Kang, Tae-Won; Lasitschka, Felix; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Pascual, Gloria; Morris, Kelly J.; Khan, Sadaf; Jin, Hong; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Carroll, Thomas; Capper, David; Pritchard, Catrin; Inman, Gareth J.; Longerich, Thomas; Sansom, Owen J.; Benitah, Salvador Aznar; Zender, Lars; Gil, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is crucial for tumour suppression. Senescent cells implement a complex pro-inflammatory response termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The SASP reinforces senescence, activates immune surveillance and paradoxically also has pro-tumourigenic properties. Here, we present evidence that the SASP can also induce “paracrine senescence” in normal cells both in culture and in human and mouse models of OIS in vivo. Coupling quantitative proteomics with small molecule screens, we identified multiple SASP components mediating paracrine senescence, including TGFβ family ligands, VEGF, CCL2 and CCL20. Amongst them, TGFβ ligands play a major role by regulating p15INK4b and p21CIP1. Expression of the SASP is controlled by inflammasome-mediated IL-1 signalling. The inflammasome and IL-1 signalling are activated in senescent cells and IL-1α expression can reproduce SASP activation, resulting in senescence. Our results demonstrate that the SASP can cause paracrine senescence and impact on tumour suppression and senescence in vivo. PMID:23770676

  9. Establishment of ultra long-lived cell lines by transfection of TERT into normal human fibroblast TIG-1 and their characterization.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Mizuna; Kumazaki, Tsutomu; Matsuo, Taira; Mitsui, Youji; Takahashi, Tomoko

    2012-06-01

    To establish useful human normal cell lines, TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) cDNA was transfected into normal female lung fibroblast, TIG-1. After long-term-sub-cultivation of 74 individual clones selected for resistance to G418, we obtained 55 cultures with normal range of life span [75 PDL (population doubling level)], 16 cultures with extended life span (75-140 PDL). In addition, 3 immortal cell strains and unexpectedly, one ultra long-lived cell line (ULT-1) with life span of 166 PDL were established. IMT-1, one of the immortal cell strains was confirmed to maintain long telomere length, high telomerase activity and an extremely low level of p16INK4A. They also showed moderate p53 and p21CIP1 expression, keeping vigorous growth rate even at 450 PDL. High level of fibronectin and collagen 1α expression confirmed IMT-1 as normal fibroblasts, although one X chromosome had been lost. ULT-1, however, kept a near normal karyotypes and had shortening of telomere length, high expression of p16INK4A, moderate levels of senescence associated-β-galactosidase positive cells and decreased growth rate only after 150 PDs (population doublings), and finally reached senescence at 166 PDL with morphology of normal senescent fibroblasts. As resources of standard normal human cell, abundant vials of early and middle passages of ULT-1 have been stocked. The use of the cell line is discussed, focusing on isograft of artificial skin and screening of anti-aging or safe chemical agents. PMID:22273270

  10. Resveratrol Induced Premature Senescence Is Associated with DNA Damage Mediated SIRT1 and SIRT2 Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kilic Eren, Mehtap; Kilincli, Ayten; Eren, Özkan

    2015-01-01

    The natural polyphenolic compound resveratrol (3,4,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has broad spectrum health beneficial activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, anti-cancer, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective effects. Remarkably, resveratrol also induces apoptosis and cellular senescence in primary and cancer cells. Resveratrol’s anti-aging effects both in vitro and in vivo attributed to activation of a (NAD)-dependent histone deacetylase family member sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) protein. In mammals seven members (SIRT1-7) of sirtuin family have been identified. Among those, SIRT1 is the most extensively studied with perceptive effects on mammalian physiology and suppression of the diseases of aging. Yet no data has specified the role of sirtuins, under conditions where resveratrol treatment induces senescence. Current study was undertaken to investigate the effects of resveratrol in human primary dermal fibroblasts (BJ) and to clarify the role of sirtuin family members in particular SIRT1 and SIRT2 that are known to be involved in cellular stress responses and cell cycle, respectively. Here, we show that resveratrol decreases proliferation of BJ cells in a time and dose dependent manner. In addition the increase in senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity and methylated H3K9-me indicate the induction of premature senescence. A significant increase in phosphorylation of γ-H2AX, a surrogate of DNA double strand breaks, as well as in levels of p53, p21CIP1 and p16INK4A is also detected. Interestingly, at concentrations where resveratrol induced premature senescence we show a significant decrease in SIRT1 and SIRT2 levels by Western Blot and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Conversely inhibition of SIRT1 and SIRT2 via siRNA or sirtinol treatment also induced senescence in BJ fibroblasts associated with increased SA-β-gal activity, γ-H2AX phosphorylation and p53, p21CIP1 and p16INK4A levels. Interestingly DNA damaging agent

  11. Protective Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells through Attenuating Oxidative Stress and the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in a Mouse Model of d-Galactose-induced Aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Dachuan; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yanyan; Chen, Linbo; Jing, Pengwei; Wang, Lu; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell senescence is an important and current hypothesis accounting for organismal aging, especially the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). Ginsenoside Rg1 is the main active pharmaceutical ingredient of ginseng, which is a traditional Chinese medicine. This study explored the protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on Sca-1⁺ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPCs) in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging. The mimetic aging mouse model was induced by continuous injection of d-gal for 42 days, and the C57BL/6 mice were respectively treated with ginsenoside Rg1, Vitamin E or normal saline after 7 days of d-gal injection. Compared with those in the d-gal administration alone group, ginsenoside Rg1 protected Sca-1⁺ HSC/HPCs by decreasing SA-β-Gal and enhancing the colony forming unit-mixture (CFU-Mix), and adjusting oxidative stress indices like reactive oxygen species (ROS), total anti-oxidant (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, ginsenoside Rg1 decreased β-catenin and c-Myc mRNA expression and enhanced the phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Moreover, ginsenoside Rg1 down-regulated advanced glycation end products (AGEs), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), phospho-histone H2A.X (r-H2A.X), 8-OHdG, p16(Ink4a), Rb, p21(Cip1/Waf1) and p53 in senescent Sca-1⁺ HSC/HPCs. Our findings indicated that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve the resistance of Sca-1⁺ HSC/HPCs in a mouse model of d-galactose-induced aging through the suppression of oxidative stress and excessive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and reduction of DNA damage response, p16(Ink4a)-Rb and p53-p21(Cip1/Waf1) signaling. PMID:27294914

  12. DNA damage causes TP53-dependent coupling of self-renewal and senescence pathways in embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Thomas R; Salmina, Kristine; Huna, Anda; Inashkina, Inna; Jankevics, Eriks; Riekstina, Una; Kalnina, Zane; Ivanov, Andrey; Townsend, Paul A; Cragg, Mark S; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have highlighted an apparently paradoxical link between self-renewal and senescence triggered by DNA damage in certain cell types. In addition, the finding that TP53 can suppress senescence has caused a re-evaluation of its functional role in regulating these outcomes. To investigate these phenomena and their relationship to pluripotency and senescence, we examined the response of the TP53-competent embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line PA-1 to etoposide-induced DNA damage. Nuclear POU5F1/OCT4A and P21CIP1 were upregulated in the same cells following etoposide-induced G 2M arrest. However, while accumulating in the karyosol, the amount of OCT4A was reduced in the chromatin fraction. Phosphorylated CHK2 and RAD51/γH2AX-positive nuclear foci, overexpression of AURORA B kinase and moderate macroautophagy were evident. Upon release from G 2M arrest, cells with repaired DNA entered mitoses, while the cells with persisting DNA damage remained at this checkpoint or underwent mitotic slippage and gradually senesced. Reduction of TP53 using sh- or si-RNA prevented the upregulation of OCT4A and P21CIP1 and increased DNA damage. Subsequently, mitoses, micronucleation and senescence were all enhanced after TP53 reduction with senescence confirmed by upregulation of CDKN2A/P16INK4A and increased sa-β-galactosidase positivity. Those mitoses enhanced by TP53 silencing were shown to be multicentrosomal and multi-polar, containing fragmented and highly deranged chromosomes, indicating a loss of genome integrity. Together, these data suggest that TP53-dependent coupling of self-renewal and senescence pathways through the DNA damage checkpoint provides a mechanism for how embryonal stem cell-like EC cells safeguard DNA integrity, genome stability and ultimately the fidelity of self-renewal. PMID:23287532

  13. The nuclear receptor NR2E1/TLX controls senescence

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Benjamin; Pemberton, Helen; Alonso, Marta M.; Chandler, Hollie; Brookes, Sharon; Parrinello, Simona; Peters, Gordon; Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor NR2E1 (also known as TLX or tailless) controls the self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs) and has been implied as an oncogene which initiates brain tumours including glioblastomas. Despite NR2E1 regulating targets like p21CIP1 or PTEN we still lack a full explanation for its role in NSC self-renewal and tumorigenesis. We know that Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC) also control stem cell self-renewal and tumorigenesis, but so far, no formal connection has been established between NR2E1 and PRCs. In a screen for transcription factors regulating the expression of the Polycomb protein CBX7, we identified NR2E1 as one of its more prominent regulators. NR2E1 binds at the CBX7 promoter, inducing its expression. Notably CBX7 represses NR2E1 as part of a regulatory loop. Ectopic NR2E1 expression inhibits cellular senescence, extending cellular lifespan in fibroblasts via CBX7-mediated regulation of p16INK4a and direct repression of p21CIP1. In addition NR2E1 expression also counteracts oncogene-induced senescence (OIS). The importance of NR2E1 to restrain senescence is highlighted through the process of knocking down its expression, which causes premature senescence in human fibroblasts and epithelial cells. We also confirmed that NR2E1 regulates CBX7 and restrains senescence in NSCs. Finally, we observed that the expression of NR2E1 directly correlates with that of CBX7 in human glioblastoma multiforme. Overall we identified control of senescence and regulation of Polycomb action as two possible mechanisms that can join those so far invoked to explain the role of NR2E1 in control of NSC self-renewal and cancer. PMID:25328137

  14. Comparison of the cytotoxicity of cladribine and clofarabine when combined with fludarabine and busulfan in AML cells: Enhancement of cytotoxicity with epigenetic modulators.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Benigno C; Li, Yang; Murray, David; Ji, Jie; Liu, Yan; Popat, Uday; Champlin, Richard E; Andersson, Borje S

    2015-06-01

    Clofarabine (Clo), fludarabine (Flu), and busulfan (Bu) combinations are efficacious in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for myeloid leukemia. We sought to determine whether the more affordable drug cladribine (Clad) can provide a viable alternative to Clo, with or without panobinostat (Pano) and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). Both Clad+Flu+Bu and Clo+Flu+Bu combinations showed synergistic cytotoxicity in KBM3/Bu250(6), HL60, and OCI-AML3 cell lines. Cell exposure to these drug combinations resulted in 60%-80% inhibition of proliferation; activation of the ATM pathway; increase in histone modifications; decrease in HDAC3, HDAC4, HDAC5 and SirT7 proteins; decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential; activation of apoptosis and stress signaling pathways; and downregulation of the AKT pathway. These drug combinations activated DNA-damage response and apoptosis in primary cell samples from AML patients. At lower concentrations of Clad/Clo, Flu, and Bu, inclusion of Pano and DAC enhanced cell killing, increased histone modifications and DNA demethylation, and increased the levels of P16/INK4a, P15/INK4b and P21/Waf1/Cip1 proteins. The observed DNA demethylating activity of Clad and Clo may complement DAC activity; increase demethylation of the gene promoters for SFRP1, DKK3, and WIF1; and cause degradation of β-catenin in cells exposed to Clad/Clo+Flu+Bu+DAC+Pano. The overlapping activities of Clad/Clo+Flu+Bu, Pano, and DAC in DNA-damage formation and repair, histone modifications, DNA demethylation, and apoptosis may underlie their synergism. Our results provide a basis for supplanting Clo with Clad and for including epigenetic modifiers in the pre-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation conditioning regimen for myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:25704054

  15. Cdkn2a is an atherosclerosis modifier locus that regulates monocyte/macrophage proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chao-Ling; Murphy, Andrew J.; Sayers, Scott; Li, Rong; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Davis, Jaeger Z.; Krishnamurthy, Janakiraman; Liu, Yan; Puig, Oscar; Sharpless, Norman E.; Tall, Alan R.; Welch, Carrie L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Common genetic variants in a 58-kilobase region of chr 9p21, near the CDKN2A/CDKN2B tumor suppressor locus, are strongly associated with coronary artery disease. However, the underlying mechanism of action remains unknown. Methods and Results We previously reported a congenic mouse model harboring an atherosclerosis susceptibility locus and the region of homology with the human 9p21 locus. Microarray and transcript-specific expression analyses showed markedly decreased Cdkn2a expression, including both p16INK4a and p19ARF, but not Cdkn2b (p15INK4b), in macrophages derived from congenic mice compared to controls. Atherosclerosis studies in subcongenic strains revealed genetic complexity and narrowed one locus to a small interval including Cdkn2a/b. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation studies implicated myeloid lineage cells as the culprit cell type rather than resident vascular cells. To directly test the role of BM-derived Cdkn2a transcripts in atherogenesis and inflammatory cell proliferation, we performed a transplantation study utilizing Cdkn2a+/− cells in the Ldlr−/− mouse model. Cdkn2a-deficient BM recipients exhibited accelerated atherosclerosis, increased Ly6Chi pro-inflammatory monocytes and increased monocyte/macrophage proliferation compared to controls. Conclusions These data provide a plausible mechanism for accelerated atherogenesis in susceptible congenic mice, involving decreased expression of Cdkn2a and increased proliferation of monocyte/macrophages, with possible relevance to the 9p21 human locus. PMID:21868699

  16. Influence of common genetic variation on lung cancer risk: meta-analysis of 14 900 cases and 29 485 controls

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Maria N.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Christiani, David C.; Field, John K.; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; McKay, James D.; Wang, Yufei; Dai, Juncheng; Gaborieau, Valerie; McLaughlin, John; Brenner, Darren; Narod, Steven A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Albanes, Demetrius; Thun, Michael; Eisen, Timothy; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Rosenberger, Albert; Han, Younghun; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Dakai; Spitz, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Pande, Mala; Zhao, Yang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Krokan, Hans E.; Gabrielsen, Maiken Elvestad; Skorpen, Frank; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary; Lathrop, Mark; Benhamou, Simone; Vooder, Tõnu; Välk, Kristjan; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Andres; Raji, Olaide; Chen, Ying; Gosney, John; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Muley, Thomas; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Shen, Hongbing; Stefansson, Kari; Brennan, Paul; Amos, Christopher I.; Houlston, Richard; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified common genetic variants at 5p15.33, 6p21–6p22 and 15q25.1 associated with lung cancer risk. Several other genetic regions including variants of CHEK2 (22q12), TP53BP1 (15q15) and RAD52 (12p13) have been demonstrated to influence lung cancer risk in candidate- or pathway-based analyses. To identify novel risk variants for lung cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 GWASs, totaling 14 900 cases and 29 485 controls of European descent. Our data provided increased support for previously identified risk loci at 5p15 (P = 7.2 × 10−16), 6p21 (P = 2.3 × 10−14) and 15q25 (P = 2.2 × 10−63). Furthermore, we demonstrated histology-specific effects for 5p15, 6p21 and 12p13 loci but not for the 15q25 region. Subgroup analysis also identified a novel disease locus for squamous cell carcinoma at 9p21 (CDKN2A/p16INK4A/p14ARF/CDKN2B/p15INK4B/ANRIL; rs1333040, P = 3.0 × 10−7) which was replicated in a series of 5415 Han Chinese (P = 0.03; combined analysis, P = 2.3 × 10−8). This large analysis provides additional evidence for the role of inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and insight into biological differences in the development of the different histological types of lung cancer. PMID:22899653

  17. Long noncoding RNA, polycomb, and the ghosts haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a expression.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J

    2011-08-15

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15(INK4b), p14(ARF), and p16(INK4a), and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  18. Long Noncoding RNA, Polycomb, and the Ghosts Haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15INK4b, p14ARF, and p16INK4a, and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  19. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities

    PubMed Central

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-01-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents’ lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2+/−) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2+/− mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2+/− mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15Ink4b, p16Ink4a and p19Arf or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2+/− mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation. PMID:17272307

  20. Altered microRNA Expression Profiles and Regulation of INK4A/CDKN2A Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Breast Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Lutful Kabir, Farruk Mohammad; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, Richard Curtis

    2015-12-01

    microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of cancer versus normal cells may reveal the characteristic regulatory features that can be correlated to altered gene expression in both human and animal models of cancers. In this study, the comprehensive expression profiles of the 277 highly characterized miRNAs from the canine genome were evaluated in spontaneous canine mammary tumor (CMT) models harboring defects in a group of cell cycle regulatory and potent tumor suppressor genes of INK4/CDKN2 family including p16/INK4A, p14ARF, and p15/INK4B. A large number of differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in three CMT cell lines to potentially target oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cancer biomarkers. A group of the altered miRNAs were identified by miRNA target prediction tools for regulation of the INK4/CDKN2 family tumor suppressor genes. miRNA-141 was experimentally validated for INK4A 3'-UTR target binding in the CMT cell lines providing an essential mechanism for the post-transcriptional regulation of the INK4A tumor suppressor gene in CMT models. A well-recognized group of miRNAs including miR-21, miR-155, miR-9, miR-34a, miR-143/145, and miR-31 were found to be altered in both CMTs and human breast cancer. These altered miRNAs might serve as potential targets for advancing the development of future therapeutic reagents. These findings further strengthen the validity and use of canine breast cancers as appropriate models for the study of human breast cancers. PMID:26095675

  1. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Retards the Natural Senescence of Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyu; Liu, Di; Li, Shuang; Chang, Lingling; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Ruixue; Sun, Fei; Duan, Wenqi; Du, Weijie; Wu, Yanping; Zhao, Tianyang; Xu, Chaoqian

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to offer a wide variety of cellular functions including the protective effects on damaged hearts. Here we investigated the antiaging properties of BMSCs and the underlying mechanism in a cellular model of cardiomyocyte senescence and a rat model of aging hearts. Neonatal rat ventricular cells (NRVCs) and BMSCs were cocultured in the same dish with a semipermeable membrane to separate the two populations. Monocultured NRVCs displayed the senescence-associated phenotypes, characterized by an increase in the number of β-galactosidase-positive cells and decreases in the degradation and disappearance of cellular organelles in a time-dependent manner. The levels of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde were elevated, whereas the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased, along with upregulation of p53, p21Cip1/Waf1, and p16INK4a in the aging cardiomyocytes. These deleterious alterations were abrogated in aging NRVCs cocultured with BMSCs. Qualitatively, the same senescent phenotypes were consistently observed in aging rat hearts. Notably, BMSC transplantation significantly prevented these detrimental alterations and improved the impaired cardiac function in the aging rats. In summary, BMSCs possess strong antisenescence action on the aging NRVCs and hearts and can improve cardiac function after transplantation in aging rats. The present study, therefore, provides an alternative approach for the treatment of heart failure in the elderly population. PMID:25855590

  2. Loss of JUNB/AP-1 promotes invasive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, M K; Bakiri, L; Hasenfuss, S C; Wu, H; Morente, M; Wagner, E F

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequent cause of male death in the Western world. Relatively few genetic alterations have been identified, likely owing to disease heterogeneity. Here, we show that the transcription factor JUNB/AP-1 limits prostate cancer progression. JUNB expression is increased in low-grade prostate cancer compared with normal human prostate, but downregulated in high-grade samples and further decreased in all metastatic samples. To model the hypothesis that this downregulation is functionally significant, we genetically inactivated Junb in the prostate epithelium of mice. When combined with Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue) loss, double-mutant mice were prone to invasive cancer development. Importantly, invasive tumours also developed when Junb and Pten were inactivated in a small cell population of the adult anterior prostate by topical Cre recombinase delivery. The resulting tumours displayed strong histological similarity with human prostate cancer. Loss of JunB expression led to increased proliferation and decreased senescence, likely owing to decreased p16Ink4a and p21CIP1 in epithelial cells. Furthermore, the tumour stroma was altered with increased osteopontin and S100 calcium-binding protein A8/9 expression, which correlated with poor prognoses in patients. These data demonstrate that JUNB/AP-1 cooperates with PTEN signalling as barriers to invasive prostate cancer, whose concomitant genetic or epigenetic suppression induce malignant progression. PMID:25526087

  3. Loss of JUNB/AP-1 promotes invasive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, M K; Bakiri, L; Hasenfuss, S C; Wu, H; Morente, M; Wagner, E F

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequent cause of male death in the Western world. Relatively few genetic alterations have been identified, likely owing to disease heterogeneity. Here, we show that the transcription factor JUNB/AP-1 limits prostate cancer progression. JUNB expression is increased in low-grade prostate cancer compared with normal human prostate, but downregulated in high-grade samples and further decreased in all metastatic samples. To model the hypothesis that this downregulation is functionally significant, we genetically inactivated Junb in the prostate epithelium of mice. When combined with Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue) loss, double-mutant mice were prone to invasive cancer development. Importantly, invasive tumours also developed when Junb and Pten were inactivated in a small cell population of the adult anterior prostate by topical Cre recombinase delivery. The resulting tumours displayed strong histological similarity with human prostate cancer. Loss of JunB expression led to increased proliferation and decreased senescence, likely owing to decreased p16(Ink4a) and p21(CIP1) in epithelial cells. Furthermore, the tumour stroma was altered with increased osteopontin and S100 calcium-binding protein A8/9 expression, which correlated with poor prognoses in patients. These data demonstrate that JUNB/AP-1 cooperates with PTEN signalling as barriers to invasive prostate cancer, whose concomitant genetic or epigenetic suppression induce malignant progression. PMID:25526087

  4. Long Term Exposure to Polyphenols of Artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) Exerts Induction of Senescence Driven Growth Arrest in the MDA-MB231 Human Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mileo, Anna Maria; Di Venere, Donato; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Miccadei, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenolic extracts from the edible part of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) have been shown to be potential chemopreventive and anticancer dietary compounds. High doses of polyphenolic extracts (AEs) induce apoptosis and decrease the invasive potential of the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB231. However, the molecular mechanism underlying AEs antiproliferative effects is not completely understood. We demonstrate that chronic and low doses of AEs treatment at sublethal concentrations suppress human breast cancer cell growth via a caspases-independent mechanism. Furthermore, AEs exposure induces a significant increase of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining and upregulation of tumour suppressor genes, p16INK4a and p21Cip1/Waf1 in MDA-MB231 cells. AEs treatment leads to epigenetic alterations in cancer cells, modulating DNA hypomethylation and lysine acetylation levels in total proteins. Cell growth arrest correlates with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in AEs treated breast cancer cells. Inhibition of ROS generation by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuates the antiproliferative effect. These findings demonstrate that chronic AEs treatment inhibits breast cancer cell growth via the induction of premature senescence through epigenetic and ROS-mediated mechanisms. Our results suggest that artichoke polyphenols could be a promising dietary tool either in cancer chemoprevention or/and in cancer treatment as a nonconventional, adjuvant therapy. PMID:26180585

  5. Long Term Exposure to Polyphenols of Artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) Exerts Induction of Senescence Driven Growth Arrest in the MDA-MB231 Human Breast Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Mileo, Anna Maria; Di Venere, Donato; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Miccadei, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenolic extracts from the edible part of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) have been shown to be potential chemopreventive and anticancer dietary compounds. High doses of polyphenolic extracts (AEs) induce apoptosis and decrease the invasive potential of the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB231. However, the molecular mechanism underlying AEs antiproliferative effects is not completely understood. We demonstrate that chronic and low doses of AEs treatment at sublethal concentrations suppress human breast cancer cell growth via a caspases-independent mechanism. Furthermore, AEs exposure induces a significant increase of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining and upregulation of tumour suppressor genes, p16(INK4a) and p21(Cip1/Waf1) in MDA-MB231 cells. AEs treatment leads to epigenetic alterations in cancer cells, modulating DNA hypomethylation and lysine acetylation levels in total proteins. Cell growth arrest correlates with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in AEs treated breast cancer cells. Inhibition of ROS generation by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuates the antiproliferative effect. These findings demonstrate that chronic AEs treatment inhibits breast cancer cell growth via the induction of premature senescence through epigenetic and ROS-mediated mechanisms. Our results suggest that artichoke polyphenols could be a promising dietary tool either in cancer chemoprevention or/and in cancer treatment as a nonconventional, adjuvant therapy. PMID:26180585

  6. Loss of MT1-MMP causes cell senescence and nuclear defects which can be reversed by retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Soria-Valles, Clara; Osorio, Fernando G; Gutiérrez-Abril, Jesús; Garabaya, Cecilia; Aguirre, Alina; Fueyo, Antonio; Fernández-García, María Soledad; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos

    2015-07-14

    MT1-MMP (MMP14) is a collagenolytic enzyme located at the cell surface and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Mmp14(-/-) mice present dwarfism, bone abnormalities, and premature death. We demonstrate herein that the loss of MT1-MMP also causes cardiac defects and severe metabolic changes, and alters the cytoskeleton and the nuclear lamina structure. Moreover, the absence of MT1-MMP induces a senescent phenotype characterized by up-regulation of p16(INK4a) and p21(CIP1/WAF) (1), increased activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, generation of a senescence-associated secretory phenotype, and somatotroph axis alterations. Consistent with the role of retinoic acid signaling in nuclear lamina stabilization, treatment of Mmp14(-/-) mice with all-trans retinoic acid reversed the nuclear lamina alterations, partially rescued the cell senescence phenotypes, ameliorated the pathological defects in bone, skin, and heart, and extended their life span. These results demonstrate that nuclear architecture and cell senescence can be modulated by a membrane protease, in a process involving the ECM as a key regulator of nuclear stiffness under cell stress conditions. PMID:25991604

  7. G1/S Cell Cycle Arrest Provides Anoikis Resistance through Erk-Mediated Bim Suppression†

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicole L.; Reginato, Maurico J.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; LaBaer, Joshua; Brugge, Joan S.

    2005-01-01

    Proper attachment to the extracellular matrix is essential for cell survival. Detachment from the extracellular matrix results in an apoptotic process termed anoikis. Anoikis induction in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells is due not only to loss of survival signals following integrin disengagement, but also to consequent downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and loss of EGFR-induced survival signals. Here we demonstrate that G1/S arrest by overexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a, p21Cip1, or p27Kip1 or by treatment with mimosine or aphidicolin confers anoikis resistance in MCF-10A cells. G1/S arrest-mediated anoikis resistance involves suppression of the BH3-only protein Bim. Furthermore, in G1/S-arrested cells, Erk phosphorylation is maintained in suspension and is necessary for Bim suppression. Following G1/S arrest, known proteins upstream of Erk, including Raf and Mek, are not activated. However, retained Erk activation under conditions in which Raf and Mek activation is lost is observed, suggesting that G1/S arrest acts at the level of Erk dephosphorylation. Thus, anoikis resistance by G1/S arrest is mediated by a mechanism involving Bim suppression through maintenance of Erk activation. These results provide a novel link between cell cycle arrest and survival, and this mechanism could contribute to the survival of nonreplicating, dormant tumor cells that avert apoptosis during early stages of metastasis. PMID:15923641

  8. Structural and dynamical characterization of the Miz-1 zinc fingers 5-8 by solution-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bernard, David; Bédard, Mikaël; Bilodeau, Josée; Lavigne, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz-1) is a BTB/POZ transcription factor that activates the transcription of cytostatic genes, such as p15(INK4B) or p21(CIP1). The C-terminus of Miz-1 contains 13 consensus C2H2 zinc finger domains (ZF). ZFs 1-4 have been shown to interact with SMAD3/4, while the remaining ZFs are expected to bind the promoters of target genes. We have noted unusual features in ZF 5 and the linker between ZFs 5 and 6. Indeed, a glutamate is found instead of the conserved basic residue two positions before the second zinc-coordinating histidine on the ZF 5 helix, and the linker sequence is DTDKE in place of the classical TGEKP sequence. In a canonical ββα fold, such unusual primary structure elements should cause severe electrostatic repulsions. In this context, we have characterized the structure and the dynamics of a Miz-1 construct comprising ZFs 5-8 (Miz 5-8) by solution-state NMR. Whilst ZFs 5, 7 and 8 were shown to adopt the classical ββα fold for C2H2 ZFs, the number of long-range NOEs was insufficient to define a classical fold for ZF 6. We show by using (15)N-relaxation dispersion experiments that this lack of NOEs is due to the presence of extensive motions on the μs-ms timescale. Since this negatively charged region would have to be located near the phosphodiester backbone in a DNA complex, we propose that in addition to promoting conformational searches, it could serve as a hinge region to keep ZFs 1-4 away from DNA. PMID:23975355

  9. Molecular and functional consequences of Smad4 C-terminal missense mutations in colorectal tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Bosscher, Karolien; Hill, Caroline S; Nicolás, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    Smad4 is an essential signal transducer of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signalling pathway and has been identified as a tumour suppressor, being mutated in approx. 50% of pancreatic cancers and approx. 15% of colorectal cancers. Two missense mutations in the C-terminal domain of Smad4, D351H (Asp351-->His) and D537Y (Asp537-->Tyr), have been described recently in the human colorectal cancer cell lines CACO-2 and SW948 respectively [Woodford-Richens, Rowan, Gorman, Halford, Bicknell, Wasan, Roylance, Bodmer and Tomlinson (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 9719-9723]. Previous work in vitro suggested that only Asp-351 was required for interaction with Smad2 [Wu, Fairman, Penry and Shi (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 20688-20694]. In the present study, we investigate the functional consequences of these point mutations in vivo. We demonstrate that neither of these colorectal cancer cells undergo growth arrest in response to TGF-beta, which can be explained, at least in part, by their inability to up-regulate cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 (CIP1 ) or p15 ( INK4b) after TGF-beta stimulation. Although the point-mutated Smad4s are expressed at normal levels in these colorectal cancer cells, they cannot interact with either TGF-beta-induced phosphorylated Smad2 or Smad3. As a result, these Smad4 mutants do not accumulate in the nucleus after TGF-beta stimulation, are not recruited to DNA by relevant Smad-binding transcription factors and cannot generate transcriptionally active DNA-bound complexes. Therefore both these colorectal tumour cells completely lack functional Smad4 activity owing to the missense mutations. Given the location of these mutations in the three-dimensional structure of the Smad4 C-terminal domain, the results also give us significant insights into Smad complex formation. PMID:14715079

  10. Cellular senescence and aging: the role of B-MYB

    PubMed Central

    Mowla, Sophia N; Lam, Eric W-F; Jat, Parmjit S

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable cell cycle arrest, caused by insults, such as: telomere erosion, oncogene activation, irradiation, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and viral infection. Extrinsic stimuli such as cell culture stress can also trigger this growth arrest. Senescence is thought to have evolved as an example of antagonistic pleiotropy, as it acts as a tumor suppressor mechanism during the reproductive age, but can promote organismal aging by disrupting tissue renewal, repair, and regeneration later in life. The mechanisms underlying the senescence growth arrest are broadly considered to involve p16INK4A-pRB and p53-p21CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 tumor suppressor pathways; but it is not known what makes the senescence arrest stable and what the critical downstream targets are, as they are likely to be key to the establishment and maintenance of the senescent state. MYB-related protein B (B-MYB/MYBL2), a member of the myeloblastosis family of transcription factors, has recently emerged as a potential candidate for regulating entry into senescence. Here, we review the evidence which indicates that loss of B-MYB expression has an important role in causing senescence growth arrest. We discuss how B-MYB acts, as the gatekeeper, to coordinate transit through the cell cycle, in conjunction with the multivulval class B (MuvB) complex and FOXM1 transcription factors. We also evaluate the evidence connecting B-MYB to the mTOR nutrient signaling pathway and suggest that inhibition of this pathway leading to an extension of healthspan may involve activation of B-MYB. PMID:24981831

  11. The Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway can mediate growth inhibitory and differentiation signaling via androgen receptor downregulation in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Lin, Ming-Fong; Park, Jong-In

    2011-01-01

    Upregulated ERK1/2 activity is correlated with androgen receptor (AR) downregulation in certain prostate cancer (PCa) that exhibits androgen deprivation-induced neuroendocrine differentiation, but its functional relevance requires elucidation. We found that sustained ERK1/2 activation using active Raf or MEK1/2 mutants is sufficient to induce AR downregulation at mRNA and protein levels in LNCaP. Downregulation of AR protein, but not mRNA, was blocked by proteasome inhibitors, MG132 and bortezomib, indicating that the pathway regulation is mediated at multiple points. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active AR inhibited Raf/MEK/ERK-mediated regulation of the differentiation markers, neuron-specific enolase and neutral endopeptidase, and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p16INK4A and p21CIP1, but not Rb phosphorylation and E2F1 expression, indicating that AR has a specific role in the pathway-mediated differentiation and growth inhibitory signaling. However, despite the sufficient role of Raf/MEK/ERK, its inhibition using U0126 or ERK1/2 knockdown could not block androgen deprivation-induced AR downregulation in an LNCaP neuroendocrine differentiation model, suggesting that additional signaling pathways are involved in the regulation. We additionally report that sustained Raf/MEK/ERK activity can downregulate full length as well as hormone binding domain-deficient AR isoforms in androgen-refractory C4-2 and CWR22Rv1, but not in LAPC4 and MDA-PCa-2b. Our study demonstrates a novel role of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in regulating AR expression in certain PCa types and provides an insight into PCa responses to its aberrant activation. PMID:21871886

  12. Lung Tumorigenesis in a Conditional Cul4A Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Lin; Hung, Ming-Szu; Wang, Yang; Ni, Jian; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hsieh, David; Au, Alfred; Kumar, Atul; Quigley, David; Fang, Li Tai; Yeh, Che-Chung; Xu, Zhidong; Jablons, David M.; You, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Cullin4A (Cul4A) is a scaffold protein that assembles cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (E3) complexes and regulates many cellular events, including cell survival, development, growth, and cell cycle control. Our previous study suggested that Cul4A is oncogenic in vitro, but its oncogenic role in vivo has not been studied. Here, we used a Cul4A transgenic mouse model to study the potential oncogenic role of Cul4A in lung tumor development. After Cul4A overexpression was induced in the lungs for 32 weeks, atypical epithelial cells were observed. After 40 weeks, lung tumors were visible and were characterized as Grade I or II adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed decreased levels of Cul4A associated proteins p21CIP1 and tumor suppressor p19ARF in the lung tumors, suggesting Cul4A regulated their expression in these tumors. Increased levels of p27KIP1 and p16INK4a were also detected in these tumors. Moreover, protein level of DNA replication licensing factor CDT1 was decreased. Genomic instability in the lung tumors was further analyzed by the results from pericentrin protein expression and array Comparative Genomic Hybridization analysis. Furthermore, knocking down Cul4A expression in lung cancer H2170 cells increased their sensitivity to the chemotherapy drug cisplatin in vitro, suggesting that Cul4A overexpression is associated with cisplatin resistance in the cancer cells. Our findings indicate that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo, and this Cul4A mouse model is a tool in understanding the mechanisms of Cul4A in human cancers and for testing experimental therapies targeting Cul4A. PMID:24648314

  13. Targeting lysophosphatidic acid signaling retards culture-associated senescence of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Ohkouchi, Shinya; Shibahara, Taizou; Tode, Naoki; Santoso, Arif; Daito, Hisayoshi; Ohta, Hiromitsu; Tamada, Tsutomu; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from mesenchymal tissues can propagate in vitro to some extent and differentiate into various tissue lineages to be used for cell-based therapies. Cellular senescence, which occurs readily in continual MSC culture, leads to loss of these characteristic properties, representing one of the major limitations to achieving the potential of MSCs. In this study, we investigated the effect of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a ubiquitous metabolite in membrane phospholipid synthesis, on the senescence program of human MSCs. We show that MSCs preferentially express the LPA receptor subtype 1, and an abrogation of the receptor engagement with the antagonistic compound Ki16425 attenuates senescence induction in continually propagated human MSCs. This anti-aging effect of Ki16425 results in extended rounds of cellular proliferation, increased clonogenic potential, and retained plasticity for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Expressions of p16(Ink4a), Rb, p53, and p21(Cip1), which have been associated with cellular senescence, were all reduced in human MSCs by the pharmacological inhibition of LPA signaling. Disruption of this signaling pathway was accompanied by morphological changes such as cell thinning and elongation as well as actin filament deformation through decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Prevention of LPA receptor engagement also promoted ubiquitination-mediated c-Myc elimination in MSCs, and consequently the entry into a quiescent state, G(0) phase, of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results highlight the potential of pharmacological intervention against LPA signaling for blunting senescence-associated loss of function characteristic of human MSCs. PMID:22359668

  14. Restricted Heterochromatin Formation Links NFATc2 Repressor Activity With Growth Promotion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    BAUMGART, SANDRA; GLESEL, ELISABETH; SINGH, GARIMA; CHEN, NAI-MING; REUTLINGER, KRISTINA; ZHANG, JINSAN; BILLADEAU, DANIEL D.; FERNANDEZ-ZAPICO, MARTIN E.; GRESS, THOMAS M.; SINGH, SHIV K.; ELLENRIEDER, VOLKER

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Transcriptional silencing of the p15INK4b tumor suppressor pathway overcomes cellular protection against unrestrained proliferation in cancer. Here we show a novel pathway involving the oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c2 targeting a p15INK4b-mediated failsafe mechanism to promote pancreatic cancer tumor growth. METHODS Immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used for expression studies. Cancer growth was assessed in vitro by [3H]thymidine incorporation, colony formation assays, and in vivo using xenograft tumor models. Protein-protein interactions, promoter regulation, and local histone modifications were analyzed by immunoprecipitation, DNA pull-down, reporter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS Our study uncovered induction of NFATc2 in late-stage pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions with increased expression in tumor cell nuclei of advanced cancers. In the nucleus, NFATc2 targets the p15INK4b promoter for inducible heterochromatin formation and silencing. NFATc2 binding to its cognate promoter site induces stepwise recruitment of the histone methyltransferase Suv39H1, causes local H3K9 trimethylation, and allows docking of heterochromatin protein HP1γ to the repressor complex. Conversely, inactivation of NFATc2 disrupts this repressor complex assembly and local heterochromatin formation, resulting in restoration of p15INK4b expression and inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Here we describe a novel mechanism for NFATc2-mediated gene regulation and identify a functional link among its repressor activity, the silencing of the suppressor pathway p15INK4b, and its pancreatic cancer growth regulatory functions. Thus, we provide evidence that inactivation of oncogenic NFATc2 might be an attractive strategy in treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22079596

  15. CDKN2A Germline Mutations in Familial Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Detlef K.; Sina-Frey, Mercedes; Lang, Sven; Wild, Anja; Gerdes, Berthold; Barth, Peter; Kress, Ralf; Grützmann, Robert; Colombo-Benkmann, Mario; Ziegler, Andreas; Hahn, Stephan A.; Rothmund, Matthias; Rieder, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of mutations in the CDKN2A gene encoding p16INK4a and p14ARF in familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). Summary Background Data The genetic basis of FPC is still widely unknown. Recently, it has been shown that germline mutations in the p16INK4a tumor suppressor gene can predispose to pancreatic cancer. The presence of p14ARF germline mutations has yet not been determined in this setting. Methods Eighteen families with at least two first-degree relatives with histologically confirmed pancreatic cancer and five families with at least one patient with pancreatic cancer and another first-degree relative with malignant melanoma of the German National Case Collection for Familial Pancreatic Cancer were analyzed for CDKN2A germline mutations including p16INK4a and p14ARF by direct DNA sequencing. All participating family members were genetically counseled and evaluated by a three-generation pedigree. Results None of 18 FPC families without malignant melanoma revealed p16INK4a mutations, compared to 2 of 5 families with pancreatic cancer and melanoma. Truncating p16INK4a germline mutations Q50X and E119X were identified in the affected patients of pancreatic cancer plus melanoma families. None of the 23 families revealed p14ARF germline mutations. Conclusions CDKN2A germline mutations are rare in FPC families. However, these data provide further evidence for a pancreatic cancer–melanoma syndrome associated with CDKN2A germline mutations affecting p16INK4a. Thus, all members of families with combined occurrence of pancreatic cancer and melanoma should be counseled and offered screening for p16INK4a mutations to identify high-risk family members who should be enrolled in a clinical screening program. PMID:12454511

  16. The H3K27me3 demethylase JMJD3 contributes to the activation of the INK4A–ARF locus in response to oncogene- and stress-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Karl; Cloos, Paul A.C.; Rudkjær, Lise; Williams, Kristine; Andersen, Gitte; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor proteins p16INK4A and p14ARF, encoded by the INK4A–ARF locus, are key regulators of cellular senescence. The locus is epigenetically silenced by the repressive H3K27me3 mark in normally growing cells, but becomes activated in response to oncogenic stress. Here, we show that expression of the histone H3 Lys 27 (H3K27) demethylase JMJD3 is induced upon activation of the RAS–RAF signaling pathway. JMJD3 is recruited to the INK4A–ARF locus and contributes to the transcriptional activation of p16INK4A in human diploid fibroblasts. Additionally, inhibition of Jmjd3 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts results in suppression of p16Ink4a and p19Arf expression and in their immortalization. PMID:19451217

  17. Regulation of CDK4 activity by a novel CDK4-binding protein, p34SEI-1

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masataka; Nakamura, Takeshi; Ohtani, Naoko; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N.; Shimamoto, Akira; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Okumura, Ko; Niwa, Shinichiro; Taya, Yoichi; Hara, Eiji

    1999-01-01

    The p16INK4a tumor suppressor inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6). Here we report the isolation of a novel gene, SEI-1, whose product (p34SEI-1) appears to antagonize the function of p16INK4a. Addition of p34SEI-1 to cyclin D1–CDK4 renders the complex resistant to inhibition by p16INK4a. Expression of SEI-1 is rapidly induced on addition of serum to quiescent fibroblasts, and ectopic expression of p34SEI-1 enables fibroblasts to proliferate even in low serum concentrations. p34SEI-1 seems to act as a growth factor sensor and may facilitate the formation and activation of cyclin D–CDK complexes in the face of inhibitory levels of INK4 proteins. PMID:10580009

  18. Two inhibitory systems and CKIs regulate cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes after birth.

    PubMed

    Tane, Shoji; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Amemiya, Yuki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2015-10-16

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which they exit their cell cycle after birth, and the exit is maintained. Previously, we showed that two inhibitory systems (the G1-phase inhibitory system: repression of cyclin D1 expression; the M-phase inhibitory system: inhibition of CDK1 activation) maintain the cell cycle exit of mouse adult cardiomyocytes. We also showed that two CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1), regulate the cell cycle exit in a portion of postnatal cardiomyocytes. It remains unknown whether the two inhibitory systems are involved in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes and whether p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) also inhibit entry to M-phase. Here, we showed that more than 40% of cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by induction of cyclin D1 expression at postnatal stages, but M-phase entry was inhibited in the majority of cardiomyocytes. Marked cell cycle progression and endoreplication were observed in cardiomyocytes of p21(Cip1) knockout mice at 4 weeks of age. In addition, tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased significantly in p21(Cip1) knockout mice. These data showed that the G1-phase inhibitory system and two CKIs (p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1)) inhibit entry to an additional cell cycle in postnatal cardiomyocytes, and that the M-phase inhibitory system and p21(Cip1) inhibit M-phase entry of cardiomyocytes which have entered the additional cell cycle. PMID:26363457

  19. Gene-specific promoter methylation is associated with micronuclei frequency in urothelial cells from individuals exposed to organic solvents and paints.

    PubMed

    Hoyos-Giraldo, L S; Escobar-Hoyos, L F; Saavedra-Trujillo, D; Reyes-Carvajal, I; Muñoz, A; Londoño-Velasco, E; Tello, A; Cajas-Salazar, N; Ruíz, M; Carvajal, S; Santella, R M

    2016-05-01

    Sufficient epidemiologic evidence has established an etiologic link between bladder cancer risk and occupational exposure as a painter to organic solvents. Currently, it remains to be established whether gene-specific promoter methylation contributes to bladder cancer development, including by enhancing chromosome breakage or loss. We investigated the effect of chronic exposure to organic solvents and paints on DNA methylation profiles in the promoter regions of four genes (GSTP1, p16(INK4a), APC and CDH1) and micronucleus (MN) frequency in exfoliated urothelial cells from voided urine from Colombian male non-smoking car painters and age-matched unexposed individuals. The exposed group had a higher percentage of individuals with >2 MNs/2000 cells compared with the unexposed group (P=0.04). Gene-specific analysis showed a significantly higher percentage of individuals with methylated GSTP1, p16(INK4a) and APC in the exposed group. Poisson regression analysis indicated that exposed individuals with methylated GSTP1 and p16(INK4a) promoters were more than twofold more likely to have an increase in MN frequency as compared with the reference. Finally, among exposed individuals with GSTP1 and p16(INK4a) methylated promoters, those with a greater age had a higher RR of increased MN frequency compared with younger exposed individuals with methylated promoters. These results support the conclusion that gene-specific promoter methylation may increase MN frequency in a dependent or independent interaction with occupational exposure to organic solvents. PMID:25993025

  20. Genetic and epigenetic changes in mammary epithelial cells identify a subpopulation of cells involved in early carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Berman, H; Zhang, J; Crawford, Y G; Gauthier, M L; Fordyce, C A; McDermott, K M; Sigaroudinia, M; Kozakiewicz, K; Tlsty, T D

    2005-01-01

    Morphologically normal foci of epithelial cells exhibiting p16 inactivation have been found in several tissues and may be precursors to cancer. Our previous work demonstrates that cells lacking p16(INK4A) activity exhibit phenotypes associated with malignancy (Romanov et al. 2001). The acquisition of genomic instability occurs through the activation of telomeric and centrosomal dysfunction. Additionally, the activation of stress pathways such as COX-2 provides these cells with the mutagenic potential to survive adverse environments as well as the ability to migrate, evade apoptosis and immune surveillance, and summon sustaining vasculature. Examination of archived tissue from women with DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) reveals epithelial cells that overexpress markers of premalignant stress activation pathways and mirror the distinctive expression patterns of these markers observed in vitro. These epithelial cells are found within the premalignant lesion as well as in the field of morphologically normal tissue that surrounds the lesion. Here, we show that p16(INK4A)-silenced vHMEC cells exhibit a gene expression profile which is distinct, reproducible, and extends beyond the changes mediated by p16(INK4A) inactivation. The present work suggests that cells lacking p16(INK4A) activity exhibit critical activities which allow cells to evade differentiation processes that would be expected to terminate proliferation. All of these properties are critical to malignancy. These events may be useful biomarkers to detect the earliest events in breast cancer. PMID:16869768

  1. Simultaneous knockdown of BRAF and expression of INK4A in melanoma cells leads to potent growth inhibition and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanhua; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhen; Li, Albert; Dong, Jianli

    2008-06-01

    Abnormal BRAF and p16INK4A co-exist in 60% of melanomas. BRAF mutation also occurs in 80% of benign nevi where it turns-on p16INK4A resulting in proliferative senescence; loss of p16INK4A removes the inhibitory block leading to melanoma development. Since only melanomas with wild-type BRAF have amplified CDK4 and cyclin D1 genes, p16INK4A-CDK4/6-cyclin D pathway is viewed as linearly downstream of BRAF. Thus, co-occurrence of aberrant BRAF and INK4A may be remnant of changes during melanoma formation without functional significance. To explore this notion, we simultaneously knocked down BRAF (via siRNA) and expressed INK4A cDNA in melanoma cells and observed enhanced growth inhibition. Notably, although each alone had no statistically significant effect on apoptosis, co-expression of BRAF siRNA and INK4A cDNA caused potent apoptosis, which was associated with up-regulation of BIM and down-regulation of BCL2. Our results suggest that aberrant BRAF and INK4A cooperate to promote proliferation and survival of melanoma cells. PMID:18402768

  2. Human papillomavirus status in young patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van Monsjou, H S; van Velthuysen, M L F; van den Brekel, M W M; Jordanova, E S; Melief, C J M; Balm, A J M

    2012-04-15

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) development has been recognized only in the last decade. Although younger patients develop HNSCC associated with HPV, the incidence in young patients has not been studied. Forty-five young HNSCC patients (<40 years) were tested for HPV and the expression of p16(ink4a) and p53 in tumor biopsies. The presence of HPV was correlated with the absence and presence of alcohol and tobacco exposure. Paraffin-embedded, archival biopsy materials from HNSCC of 45 patients younger than 40 years were analyzed. HPV subtypes were identified by PCR followed by genotyping. Expression of p16(ink4a) and p53 were determined by immunohistochemistry. Fourteen (31%) of the HNSCC specimens from 45 patients unequivocally exhibited HPV16 positivity. Sixty percentage of the oropharyngeal tumors and 5% of the oral cavity tumors were HPV16 positive. P16(ink4a) overexpression was detected in 93% of the HPV16-positive tumors. None of the HPV16 tumors showed p53 overexpression. There was no association of HPV positivity with (lack of) exposure to alcohol and smoking. HPV association was not exclusively detected in nonsmoking, nondrinking young HNSCC patients. The presence of p16(ink4a) accumulation and the absence of p53 overexpression are good surrogate markers for HPV-associated HNSCC. PMID:21607949

  3. Simultaneous knockdown of BRAF and expression of INK4A in melanoma cells leads to potent growth inhibition and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yanhua; Zhang Yan; Yang Zhen; Li, Albert; Dong Jianli

    2008-06-06

    Abnormal BRAF and p16INK4A co-exist in 60% of melanomas. BRAF mutation also occurs in 80% of benign nevi where it turns-on p16INK4A resulting in proliferative senescence; loss of p16INK4A removes the inhibitory block leading to melanoma development. Since only melanomas with wild-type BRAF have amplified CDK4 and cyclin D1 genes, p16INK4A-CDK4/6-cyclin D pathway is viewed as linearly downstream of BRAF. Thus, co-occurrence of aberrant BRAF and INK4A may be remnant of changes during melanoma formation without functional significance. To explore this notion, we simultaneously knocked down BRAF (via siRNA) and expressed INK4A cDNA in melanoma cells and observed enhanced growth inhibition. Notably, although each alone had no statistically significant effect on apoptosis, co-expression of BRAF siRNA and INK4A cDNA caused potent apoptosis, which was associated with up-regulation of BIM and down-regulation of BCL2. Our results suggest that aberrant BRAF and INK4A cooperate to promote proliferation and survival of melanoma cells.

  4. Identification of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas with active HPV16 involvement by immunohistochemical analysis of the retinoblastoma protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dana; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Henfling, Nataly; Kaden, Ines; Grabe, Niels; Lahrmann, Bernd; Schmitt, Markus; Hess, Jochen; Pawlita, Michael; Bosch, Franz X

    2013-09-15

    Viral oncogene RNA expression is regarded as reliable biomarker to identify oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) with active HPV16 involvement. This study addressed whether the expression profile of the cellular proteins p16(INK4a), pRb, Cyclin D1 and p53 provide surrogate marker combinations that identify OPSCC with active HPV16 in situations where only formalin-fixed biopsies are available. Protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays created from 188 OPSCC of which the HPV16 DNA and RNA status had been established previously from snap-frozen biopsies. Associations of single markers and of marker combinations with HPV16 DNA, viral RNA expression patterns and overall survival as primary end point were evaluated by statistical analysis. Most tumors with active HPV16 involvement (RNA(+) group; n = 40) showed a specific protein pattern, that is, high p16(INK4a) (80%), low pRb (85%), low Cyclin D1 (95%) and normal p53 (73%). This pattern was significantly different from the pattern observed in HPV DNA-negative tumors (HPV(-) group) and in HPV16 DNA-positive tumors lacking viral RNA expression patterns (RNA(-) group). The combination of high p16(INK4a) and low pRb levels was distinctly superior to p16(INK4a) alone; it was strongly associated with RNA(+) tumors (OR 41.4, 95%CI 10.7-162.5), with improved survival (HR 0.37, 95%CI 0.2-0.8) and had best predictive values (78% sensitivity, 93% specificity, 78% PPV, 93% NPV). In conclusion, if only formalin-fixed biopsy material is available, the marker combination high p16(INK4a) /low pRb is well suited to identify OPSCC with biologically active HPV16 which represent a distinct OPSCC entity with improved prognosis. PMID:23457055

  5. Accelerated cellular senescence in degenerate intervertebral discs: a possible role in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Freemont, Anthony John; Hoyland, Judith Alison

    2007-01-01

    Current evidence implicates intervertebral disc degeneration as a major cause of low back pain, although its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Numerous characteristic features of disc degeneration mimic those seen during ageing but appear to occur at an accelerated rate. We hypothesised that this is due to accelerated cellular senescence, which causes fundamental changes in the ability of disc cells to maintain the intervertebral disc (IVD) matrix, thus leading to IVD degeneration. Cells isolated from non-degenerate and degenerate human tissue were assessed for mean telomere length, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), and replicative potential. Expression of P16INK4A (increased in cellular senescence) was also investigated in IVD tissue by means of immunohistochemistry. RNA from tissue and cultured cells was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis for matrix metalloproteinase-13, ADAMTS 5 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 5), and P16INK4A. Mean telomere length decreased with age in cells from non-degenerate tissue and also decreased with progressive stages of degeneration. In non-degenerate discs, there was an age-related increase in cellular expression of P16INK4A. Cells from degenerate discs (even from young patients) exhibited increased expression of P16INK4A, increased SA-β-gal staining, and a decrease in replicative potential. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between P16INK4A and matrix-degrading enzyme gene expression. Our findings indicate that disc cell senescence occurs in vivo and is accelerated in IVD degeneration. Furthermore, the senescent phenotype is associated with increased catabolism, implicating cellular senescence in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. PMID:17498290

  6. Accelerated cellular senescence in degenerate intervertebral discs: a possible role in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Freemont, Anthony John; Hoyland, Judith Alison

    2007-01-01

    Current evidence implicates intervertebral disc degeneration as a major cause of low back pain, although its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Numerous characteristic features of disc degeneration mimic those seen during ageing but appear to occur at an accelerated rate. We hypothesised that this is due to accelerated cellular senescence, which causes fundamental changes in the ability of disc cells to maintain the intervertebral disc (IVD) matrix, thus leading to IVD degeneration. Cells isolated from non-degenerate and degenerate human tissue were assessed for mean telomere length, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal), and replicative potential. Expression of P16INK4A (increased in cellular senescence) was also investigated in IVD tissue by means of immunohistochemistry. RNA from tissue and cultured cells was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis for matrix metalloproteinase-13, ADAMTS 5 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 5), and P16INK4A. Mean telomere length decreased with age in cells from non-degenerate tissue and also decreased with progressive stages of degeneration. In non-degenerate discs, there was an age-related increase in cellular expression of P16INK4A. Cells from degenerate discs (even from young patients) exhibited increased expression of P16INK4A, increased SA-beta-gal staining, and a decrease in replicative potential. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between P16INK4A and matrix-degrading enzyme gene expression. Our findings indicate that disc cell senescence occurs in vivo and is accelerated in IVD degeneration. Furthermore, the senescent phenotype is associated with increased catabolism, implicating cellular senescence in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration. PMID:17498290

  7. Delayed cell cycle progression in selenoprotein W depleted cells is regulated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4–p38–p53 pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a ubiquitous, highly conserved thioredoxin-like protein whose depletion causes a p53- and p21Cip1-dependent G1-phase cell cycle arrest in breast and prostate epithelial cells. SEPW1 depletion increases phosphorylation of Ser33 in p53, which is associated with decreased p53...

  8. Novel and recurrent p14 mutations in Italian familial melanoma.

    PubMed

    Binni, F; Antigoni, I; De Simone, P; Majore, S; Silipo, V; Crisi, A; Amantea, A; Pacchiarini, D; Castori, M; De Bernardo, C; Catricalà, C; Grammatico, P

    2010-06-01

    CDKN2A and CDK4 are the only known high-penetrant genes conferring proneness to cutaneous melanoma. The CDKN2A locus consists of four exons and encodes several alternate transcripts, two of which are p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF), and originate from different open reading frames. Exon 1alpha is specific for p16(INK4a), while exon 1beta characterizes p14(ARF). Most CDKN2A mutations are located in exons 1alpha and 2, while exon 1beta variations have been identified in rare melanoma-prone pedigrees. In a previous study, we investigated 155 Italian melanoma cases, including 94 familial melanomas (FAMs) and 61 sporadic multiple primary melanomas (MPMs), for p16(INK4a)/CDK4 germline alterations and identified 15 p16(INK4a) and 1 CDK4 point mutations. In the present work, we extended our search to p14(ARF) mutations and CDKN2A deletions in the remaining samples. We identified the recurrent g.193+1G> A mutation in two FAM cases, while an additional pedigree displayed the previously undescribed variant g.161G> A. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) screening for copy variations resulted negative in all cases. In Italy, the overall frequency of p14(ARF) mutations is 3.2% in FAM and 0% in sporadic MPM. Re-evaluation of our patients' cohort emphasizes that the chance of identifying CDKN2A/CDK4 mutations in FAM is mainly influenced by the number of affected family members and the presence of one or more MPM cases. Accordingly, mutation rate rises to 61% in selected cases. Further studies are expected in order to investigate CDKN2A rarer mutations, including atypical deletions and inherited epimutations. PMID:20132244

  9. Mucosal alpha-papillomaviruses are not associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinomas: Lack of mechanistic evidence from South Africa, China and Iran and from a world-wide meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Egger, Sam; Abnet, Christian C; Babb, Chantal; Dawsey, Sanford M; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Gheit, Tarik; Hale, Martin; Holzinger, Dana; Malekzadeh, Reza; Taylor, Philip R; Tommasino, Massimo; Urban, Margaret I; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Sitas, Freddy

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiological and mechanistic evidence on the causative role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is unclear. We retrieved alcohol- and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded ESCC tissues from 133 patients seropositive for antibodies against HPV early proteins, from high-incidence ESCC regions: South Africa, China and Iran. With rigorous care to prevent nucleic acid contamination, we analyzed these tissues for the presence of 51 mucosotropic human alpha-papillomaviruses by two sensitive, broad-spectrum genotyping methods, and for the markers of HPV-transformed phenotype: (i) HPV16/18 viral loads by quantitative real-time PCR, (ii) type-specific viral mRNA by E6*I/E6 full-length RT-PCR assays and (iii) expression of cellular protein p16(INK4a). Of 118 analyzable ESCC tissues, 10 (8%) were positive for DNA of HPV types: 16 (4 tumors); 33, 35, 45 (1 tumor each); 11 (2 tumors) and 16, 70 double infection (1 tumor). Inconsistent HPV DNA+ findings by two genotyping methods and negativity in qPCR indicated very low viral loads. A single HPV16 DNA+ tumor additionally harbored HPV16 E6*I mRNA but was p16(INK4a) negative (HPV16 E1 seropositive patient). Another HPV16 DNA+ tumor from an HPV16 E6 seropositive patient showed p16(INK4a) upregulation but no HPV16 mRNA. In the tumor tissues of these serologically preselected ESCC patients, we did not find consistent presence of HPV DNA, HPV mRNA or p16(INK4a) upregulation. These results were supported by a meta-analysis of 14 other similar studies regarding HPV-transformation of ESCC. Our study does not support the etiological role of the 51 analyzed mucosotropic HPV types in the ESCC carcinogenesis. PMID:26529033

  10. Viral RNA patterns and high viral load reliably define oropharynx carcinomas with active HPV16 involvement.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dana; Schmitt, Markus; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Benner, Axel; Pawlita, Michael; Bosch, Franz X

    2012-10-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) that are associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection carry a more favorable prognosis than those that are HPV-negative. However, it remains unclear which biomarker(s) can reliably determine which OPSCC specimens are truly driven by HPV infection. In this study, we analyzed 199 fresh-frozen OPSCC specimens for HPV DNA, viral load, RNA expression patterns typical for cervical carcinomas (CxCaRNA(+)), and the HPV-targeted tumor suppressor protein p16(INK4a) as markers for HPV infection. In this set of specimens, there was a 49% prevalence of DNA for the cancer-associated HPV type 16 (HPV(+)). However, there was only a 16% prevalence of high viral load and only a 20% prevalence of CxCaRNA(+), a marker of HPV16 carcinogenic activity. Among the CxCaRNA(+) tumors, 78% of the specimens exhibited overexpression of p16(INK4a), which also occurred in 14% of the HPV-negative tumors. Using a multivariate survival analysis with HPV negativity as the reference group, CxCaRNA(+) as a single marker conferred the lowest risk of death [HR = 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.13-0.61] from oropharyngeal cancer, closely followed by high viral load (HR = 0.32, 95% CI, 0.14-0.73). In contrast, a weaker inverse association was found for OPSCC that were HPV(+) and p16(INK4a) high (HR = 0.55, 95% CI, 0.29-1.08). In summary, our findings argued that viral load or RNA pattern analysis is better suited than p16(INK4a) expression to identify HPV16-driven tumors in OPSCC patient populations. PMID:22991302

  11. Repeated lipopolysaccharide stimulation promotes cellular senescence in human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs).

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingmei; Feng, Guijuan; Xing, Jing; Shen, Biyu; Tan, Wei; Huang, Dan; Lu, Xiaohui; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Jinlong; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2014-05-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are a type of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characterized by multi-lineage differentiation making it an attractive choice for tissue regeneration. However, before DPSCs can be used for cell-based therapy, we have to understand their biological properties in response to intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). DPSCs were therefore stimulated with LPS and senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, with cell number and cell-cycle arrest being examined by BrdU assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The morphology of DPSCs was characterized by their flat shape, increased size and increased SA-β-gal activity after repeated stimulation (3 or 6 times) with LPS. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed that the number of ROS-stained cells and the DCFH fluorescent level were higher in the LPS-treated DPSCs compared with those in the untreated DPSCs. Protein and mRNA expression levels of γ-H2A.X and p16(INK4A) were also increased in DPSCs with repeated LPS stimulation. We found that the LPS bound with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and that TLR4 signaling accounted for p16(INK4A) expression. Further results indicated that the senescence of DPSCs stimulated repeatedly with LPS was reversed by p16(INK4A) short interfering RNA. The DNA damage response and p16(INK4A) pathways might be the main mediators of DPSC senescence induced by repeated LPS stimulation. Thus, DPSCs tend to undergo senescence after repeated activation, implying that DPSC senescence starts after many inflammatory challenges. Ultimately, these findings should lead to a better understanding of DPSC-based clinical therapy. PMID:24676500

  12. Taspase1-dependent TFIIA cleavage coordinates head morphogenesis by limiting Cdkn2a locus transcription

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shugaku; Sasagawa, Satoru; Oyama, Toshinao; Searleman, Adam C.; Westergard, Todd D.; Cheng, Emily H.; Hsieh, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Head morphogenesis requires complex signal relays to enable precisely coordinated proliferation, migration, and patterning. Here, we demonstrate that, during mouse head formation, taspase1-mediated (TASP1-mediated) cleavage of the general transcription factor TFIIA ensures proper coordination of rapid cell proliferation and morphogenesis by maintaining limited transcription of the negative cell cycle regulators p16Ink4a and p19Arf from the Cdkn2a locus. In mice, loss of TASP1 function led to catastrophic craniofacial malformations that were associated with inadequate cell proliferation. Compound deficiency of Cdkn2a, especially p16Ink4a deficiency, markedly reduced the craniofacial anomalies of TASP1-deficent mice. Furthermore, evaluation of mice expressing noncleavable TASP1 targets revealed that TFIIA is the principal TASP1 substrate that orchestrates craniofacial morphogenesis. ChIP analyses determined that noncleaved TFIIA accumulates at the p16Ink4a and p19Arf promoters to drive transcription of these negative regulators. In summary, our study elucidates a regulatory circuit comprising proteolysis, transcription, and proliferation that is pivotal for construction of the mammalian head. PMID:25664857

  13. Comparative study of the expression of cellular cycle proteins in cervical intraepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Conceição; Silva, Tânia Correia; Alves, Venâncio A F; Villa, Luisa L; Costa, Maria Cecília; Travassos, Ana Gabriela; Filho, José Bouzas Araújo; Studart, Eduardo; Cheto, Tatiana; de Freitas, Luiz Antonio R

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of human papilloma virus oncoproteins E6 and E7 with cell cycle proteins leads to disturbances of the cell cycle mechanism and subsequent alteration in the expression of some proteins, such as p16INK4a, cyclin D1, p53 and KI67. In this study, we compared alterations in the expression of these proteins during several stages of intraepithelial cervical carcinogenesis. Accordingly, an immunohistochemical study was performed on 50 cervical biopsies, including negative cases and intraepithelial neoplasias. The expression patterns of these markers were correlated with the histopathological diagnosis and infection with HPV. The p16INK4a, followed by Ki67, showed better correlation with cancer progression than p53 and cyclin D1, which recommends their use in the evaluation of cervical carcinogenesis. These monoclonal antibodies can be applied to cervical biopsy specimens to identify lesions transformed by oncogenic HPV, separating CIN 1 (p16INK4a positive) and identifying high-grade lesions by an increase in the cellular proliferation index (Ki67). In this way, we propose immunomarkers that can be applied in clinical practice to separate patients who need a conservative therapeutic approach from those who require a more aggressive treatment. PMID:16979303

  14. Roles of Foxp3 in the occurrence and development of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingshuang; Zhang, Shulan; Wei, Heng; Pang, Xiaoao; Zhang, Huijie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression and clinicopathological characteristics of cervical cancer and to explore the influence of Foxp3 on the biological behaviors of cervical cancer cells. Methods: In this study, immunohistochemistry, lentivirus mediated transfection, Transwell assay; CCK-8 assay, real-time PCR and flow cytometry were employed to confirm the roles of Foxp3 in the occurrence and development of cervical cancer. Results: Foxp3 and p16INK4a were highly expressed in the cervical cancer and their expressions were related to the FIGO stage, tumor size, lymph node metastasis and serum SCC. Foxp3 had a high expression in the cervical cancer cells, tumor interstitium and metastatic lymph nodes. Foxp3 expression was positively related to p16INK4a expression in the cervical cancer. Foxp3 expression in the cervical cancer was negatively related to the prognosis: high Foxp3 expression predicted a poor prognosis. Silencing of Foxp3 was able to inhibit the proliferation and invasiveness of cervical cancer cells, promote their apoptosis, and induce the change in cell cycle. Silencing of Foxp3 also reduced the mRNA and protein expressions of p16INK4a in cervical cancer cells. Conclusion: Foxp3 is highly expressed in the cervical cancer, and able to facilitate the proliferation and invasiveness of cervical cancer, change cell cycle and inhibit their apoptosis, resulting in the occurrence, development and metastasis of cervical cancer. PMID:26464616

  15. Fully automated screening of immunocytochemically stained specimens for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, André A.; Schneider, Timna E.; Müller-Frank, Dirk A. C.; Meyer-Ebrecht, Dietrich; Böcking, Alfred; Aach, Til

    2007-03-01

    Cytopathological cancer diagnoses can be obtained less invasive than histopathological investigations. Cells containing specimens can be obtained without pain or discomfort, bloody biopsies are avoided, and the diagnosis can, in some cases, even be made earlier. Since no tissue biopsies are necessary these methods can also be used in screening applications, e.g., for cervical cancer. Among the cytopathological methods a diagnosis based on the analysis of the amount of DNA in individual cells achieves high sensitivity and specificity. Yet this analysis is time consuming, which is prohibitive for a screening application. Hence, it will be advantageous to retain, by a preceding selection step, only a subset of suspicious specimens. This can be achieved using highly sensitive immunocytochemical markers like p16 ink4a for preselection of suspicious cells and specimens. We present a method to fully automatically acquire images at distinct positions at cytological specimens using a conventional computer controlled microscope and an autofocus algorithm. Based on the thus obtained images we automatically detect p16 ink4a-positive objects. This detection in turn is based on an analysis of the color distribution of the p16 ink4a marker in the Lab-colorspace. A Gaussian-mixture-model is used to describe this distribution and the method described in this paper so far achieves a sensitivity of up to 90%.

  16. A nucleolin-DNMT1 regulatory axis in acute myeloid leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Na; Yan, Fei; Pang, Jiuxia; Wu, Lai-Chu; Al-Kali, Aref; Litzow, Mark R; Liu, Shujun

    2014-07-30

    Nucleolin overexpression and DNA hypermethylation have been implicated in cancer pathogenesis, but whether and how these aberrations cooperate in controlling leukemia cell fate remains elusive. Here, we provide the first mechanistic insights into the role of nucleolin in leukemogenesis through creating a DNA hypermethylation profile in leukemia cells. We found that, in leukemia patients, nucleolin levels are significantly elevated and nucleolin overexpression strongly associates with DNMT upregulation and shorter survival. Enforced nucleolin expression augmented leukemia cell proliferation, whereas nucleolin dysfunction by RNA interference and inhibitory molecule AS1411 blocked leukemia cell clonogenic potential in vitro and impaired tumorigenesis in vivo. Mechanistic investigations showed that nucleolin directly activates NFκB signaling, and NFκB activates its downstream effector, DNA methylation machinery. Indeed, nucleolin overexpression increased NFκB phosphorylation and upregulated DNMT1 that is followed by DNA demethylation; by contrast, nucleolin dysfunction dephosphorylated NFκB and abrogated DNMT1 expression, which resulted in decreased global DNA methylation, restored p15INK4B expression and DNA hypomethylation on p15INK4B promoter. Notably, NFκB inactivation diminished, whereas NFκB overexpression enhanced DNMT1 promoter activity and endogenous DNMT1 expression. Collectively, our studies identify nucleolin as an unconventional epigenetic regulator in leukemia cells and demonstrate nucleolin-NFκB-DNMT1 axis as a new molecular pathway underlying AML leukemogenesis. PMID:25015109

  17. A nucleolin-DNMT1 regulatory axis in acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jiuxia; Wu, Lai-Chu; Al-Kali, Aref; Litzow, Mark R.; Liu, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Nucleolin overexpression and DNA hypermethylation have been implicated in cancer pathogenesis, but whether and how these aberrations cooperate in controlling leukemia cell fate remain elusive. Here, we provide the first mechanistic insights into the role of nucleolin in leukemogenesis through creating a DNA hypermethylation profile in leukemia cells. We found that, in leukemia patients, nucleolin levels are significantly elevated and nucleolin overexpression strongly associates with DNMT upregulation and shorter survival. Enforced nucleolin expression augmented leukemia cell proliferation, whereas nucleolin dysfunction by RNA interference and inhibitory molecule AS1411 blocked leukemia cell clonogenic potential in vitro and impaired tumorigenesis in vivo. Mechanistic investigations showed that nucleolin directly activates NFκB signaling, and NFκB activates its downstream effector, DNA methylation machinery. Indeed, nucleolin overexpression increased NFκB phosphorylation and upregulated DNMT1 that is followed by DNA hypermethylation; by contrast, nucleolin dysfunction dephosphorylated NFκB and abrogated DNMT1 expression, which resulted in decreased global DNA methylation, restored p15INK4B expression and DNA hypomethylation on p15INK4B promoter. Notably, NFκB inactivation diminished, whereas NFκB overexpression enhanced DNMT1 promoter activity and endogenous DNMT1 expression. Collectively, our studies identify nucleolin as an unconventional epigenetic regulator in leukemia cells and demonstrate nucleolin-NFκB-DNMT1 axis as a new molecular pathway underlying AML leukemogenesis. PMID:25015109

  18. Stratification of HPV-Induced Cervical Pathology using the Virally-Encoded Molecular Marker E4 in Combination with p16 or MCM

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Heather; Soneji, Yasmina; Van Baars, Romy; Arora, Rupali; Jenkins, David; van de Sandt, Miekel; Wu, Zhonglin; Quint, Wim; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Singer, Albert; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    High-risk HPV types cause cervical lesions of varying severity, ranging from transient productive infections to high-grade neoplasia. Disease stratification requires the examination of lesional pathology, and possibly also the detection of biomarkers. P16INK4a and MCM are established surrogates of high-risk HPV E6/E7 activity, and can be extensively expressed in high-grade lesions. Here we have combined these two cellular biomarkers with detection of the abundant HPV-encoded E4 protein in order to identify both productive and transforming lesions. This approach has allowed us to distinguish true papillomavirus infections from similar pathologies, and has allowed us to divide the heterogeneous CIN2 category into those that are CIN1-like and express E4, and those that more closely resemble non-productive CIN3. To achieve this, 530 lesional areas were evaluated according to standard pathology criteria and by using a multiple staining approach that allows us to superimpose biomarker patterns either singly or in combination onto an annotated haematoxylin & eosin image. Conventional grading of neoplasia was established by review panel, and compared directly to the composite molecular pathology visualised on the same tissue section. The detection of E4 coincided with the onset of vacuolation, becoming abundant in koilocytes as the MCM marker declined and cells lost their defined nuclear margins as visualised by standard H&E staining. Of the dual marker approaches, p16INK4a and E4 appeared most promising, with E4 generally identifying areas of low-grade disease even when p16INK4a was present. Extensive p16INK4a expression usually coincided with an absence of E4 expression or its focal retention in sporadic cells within the lesion. Our results suggest that a straightforward molecular evaluation of HPV life-cycle deregulation in cervical neoplasia may help improve disease stratification, and that this can be achieved using complementary molecular biomarker pairs such as MCM

  19. Efficiency alleles of the Pctr1 modifier locus for plasmacytoma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S L; DuBois, W; Ramsay, E S; Bliskovski, V; Morse, H C; Taddesse-Heath, L; Vass, W C; DePinho, R A; Mock, B A

    2001-01-01

    The susceptibility of BALB/c mice to pristane-induced plasmacytomas is a complex genetic trait involving multiple loci, while DBA/2 and C57BL/6 strains are genetically resistant to the plasmacytomagenic effects of pristane. In this model system for human B-cell neoplasia, one of the BALB/c susceptibility and modifier loci, Pctr1, was mapped to a 5.7-centimorgan (cM) chromosomal region that included Cdkn2a, which encodes p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF), and the coding sequences for the BALB/c p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF) alleles were found to be polymorphic with respect to their resistant Pctr1 counterparts in DBA/2 and C57BL/6 mice (45). In the present study, alleles of Pctr1, Cdkn2a, and D4Mit15 from a resistant strain (BALB/cDAG) carrying DBA/2 chromatin were introgressively backcrossed to the susceptible BALB/c strain. The resultant C.DAG-Pctr1 Cdkn2a D4Mit15 congenic was more resistant to plasmacytomagenesis than BALB/c, thus narrowing Pctr1 to a 1.5-cM interval. Concomitantly, resistant C57BL/6 mice, from which both gene products of the Cdkn2a gene have been eliminated, developed pristane-induced plasma cell tumors over a shorter latency period than the traditionally susceptible BALB/cAn strain. Biological assays of the p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF) alleles from BALB/c and DBA/2 indicated that the BALB/c p16(INK4a) allele was less active than its DBA/2 counterpart in inducing growth arrest of mouse plasmacytoma cell lines and preventing ras-induced transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, while the two p19(ARF) alleles displayed similar potencies in both assays. We propose that the BALB/c susceptibility/modifier locus, Pctr1, is an "efficiency" allele of the p16(INK4a) gene. PMID:11113205

  20. Molecular analysis of the effect of short-chain fatty acids on intestinal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Blottière, Hervé M; Buecher, Bruno; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Cherbut, Christine

    2003-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), particularly butyrate, were shown to regulate cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, butyrate is the major fuel for colonic epithelial cells, and it can influence cell proliferation through the release of growth factors or gastrointestinal peptides such as gastrin, or through modulation of mucosal blood flow. Lastly, SCFA can act directly on genes regulating cell proliferation, and butyrate is the main SCFA to display such an effect. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase, which will allow histone hyperacetylation. Such hyperacetylation leads to transcription of several genes, including p21/Cip1. Moreover, it will allow cyclin D3 hyper-expression by inhibiting its degradation. The induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory protein p21/Cip1 accounts for cell arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, in the absence of p21 other mechanisms are initiated, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation. PMID:12740064

  1. Disruption of G1-phase phospholipid turnover by inhibition of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 induces a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest in G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu Hannah; Zhao, Chunying; Seleznev, Konstantin; Song, Keying; Manfredi, James J; Ma, Zhongmin Alex

    2006-03-15

    The G1 phase of the cell cycle is characterized by a high rate of membrane phospholipid turnover. Cells regulate this turnover by coordinating the opposing actions of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase and the group VI Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2). However, little is known about how such turnover affects cell-cycle progression. Here, we show that G1-phase phospholipid turnover is essential for cell proliferation. Specific inhibition of iPLA2 arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This G1-phase arrest was associated with marked upregulation of the tumour suppressor p53 and the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1. Inactivation of iPLA2 failed to arrest p53-deficient HCT cells in the G1 phase and caused massive apoptosis of p21-deficient HCT cells, suggesting that this G1-phase arrest requires activation of p53 and expression of p21cip1. Furthermore, downregulation of p53 by siRNA in p21-deficient HCT cells reduced the cell death, indicating that inhibition of iPLA2 induced p53-dependent apoptosis in the absence of p21cip1. Thus, our study reveals hitherto unrecognized cooperation between p53 and iPLA2 to monitor membrane-phospholipid turnover in G1 phase. Disrupting the G1-phase phospholipid turnover by inhibition of iPLA2 activates the p53-p21cip1 checkpoint mechanism, thereby blocking the entry of G1-phase cells into S phase. PMID:16492706

  2. Transcription factor LSF (TFCP2) inhibits melanoma growth.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuji; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Asami; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Inoue, Yuji; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Kyoya, Mikiko; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Bennett, Dorothy C; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-19

    Late SV40 factor 3 (LSF), a transcription factor, contributes to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, decreased expression level of LSF in skin melanoma compared to that in benign melanocytic tumors and nevi in mice and humans was found in this study. Anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of melanoma cells was suppressed by LSF overexpression through an increased percentage of G1 phase cells and an increased p21CIP1 expression level in vitro and in vivo. Anchorage-dependent growth in LSF-overexpressed melanoma cells was promoted by depletion of LSF in the LSF-overexpressed cells. Integrated results of our EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed binding of LSF within a 150-bp upstream region of the transcription start site of p21CIP1 in melanoma cells. Taken together, our results suggest potential roles of LSF as a growth regulator through control of the transcription of p21CIP1 in melanocytes and melanoma cells as well as a biomarker for nevus. PMID:26506241

  3. Transcription factor LSF (TFCP2) inhibits melanoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuji; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Asami; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Inoue, Yuji; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Kyoya, Mikiko; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Late SV40 factor 3 (LSF), a transcription factor, contributes to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, decreased expression level of LSF in skin melanoma compared to that in benign melanocytic tumors and nevi in mice and humans was found in this study. Anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of melanoma cells was suppressed by LSF overexpression through an increased percentage of G1 phase cells and an increased p21CIP1 expression level in vitro and in vivo. Anchorage-dependent growth in LSF-overexpressed melanoma cells was promoted by depletion of LSF in the LSF-overexpressed cells. Integrated results of our EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed binding of LSF within a 150-bp upstream region of the transcription start site of p21CIP1 in melanoma cells. Taken together, our results suggest potential roles of LSF as a growth regulator through control of the transcription of p21CIP1 in melanocytes and melanoma cells as well as a biomarker for nevus. PMID:26506241

  4. CDC20 maintains tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Mack, Stephen C.; Yang, Kailin; Kim, Leo; Hubert, Christopher G.; Flavahan, William A.; Chu, Chengwei; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and lethal primary intrinsic brain tumor. Glioblastoma displays hierarchical arrangement with a population of self-renewing and tumorigenic glioma tumor initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells. While non-neoplastic neural stem cells are generally quiescent, glioblastoma TICs are often proliferative with mitotic control offering a potential point of fragility. Here, we interrogate the role of cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), an essential activator of anaphase-promoting complex (APC) E3 ubiquitination ligase, in the maintenance of TICs. By chromatin analysis and immunoblotting, CDC20 was preferentially expressed in TICs relative to matched non-TICs. Targeting CDC20 expression by RNA interference attenuated TIC proliferation, self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth. CDC20 disruption mediated its effects through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression. CDC20 maintains TICs through degradation of p21CIP1/WAF1, a critical negative regulator of TICs. Inhibiting CDC20 stabilized p21CIP1/WAF1, resulting in repression of several genes critical to tumor growth and survival, including CDC25C, c-Myc and Survivin. Transcriptional control of CDC20 is mediated by FOXM1, a central transcription factor in TICs. These results suggest CDC20 is a critical regulator of TIC proliferation and survival, linking two key TIC nodes – FOXM1 and p21CIP1/WAF1 — elucidating a potential point for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25938542

  5. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  6. Expression of the MOZ-TIF2 oncoprotein in mice represses senescence

    PubMed Central

    Largeot, Anne; Perez-Campo, Flor Maria; Marinopoulou, Elli; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    The MOZ-TIF2 translocation, which fuses monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (MOZ) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with the nuclear co-activator TIF2, is associated with the development of acute myeloid leukemia. We recently found that in the absence of MOZ HAT activity, p16INK4a transcriptional levels are significantly increased, triggering an early entrance into replicative senescence. Because oncogenic fusion proteins must bypass cellular safeguard mechanisms, such as senescence and apoptosis, to induce leukemia, we hypothesized that this repressive activity of MOZ over p16INK4a transcription could be preserved, or even reinforced, in MOZ leukemogenic fusion proteins, such as MOZ-TIF2. We describe here that, indeed, MOZ-TIF2 silences expression of the CDKN2A locus (p16INK4a and p19ARF), inhibits the triggering of senescence and enhances proliferation, providing conditions favorable to the development of leukemia. Furthermore, we describe that abolishing the MOZ HAT activity of the fusion protein leads to a significant increase in expression of the CDKN2A locus and the number of hematopoietic progenitors undergoing senescence. Finally, we report that inhibition of senescence by MOZ-TIF2 is associated with increased apoptosis, suggesting a role for the fusion protein in p53 apoptosis-versus-senescence balance. Our results underscore the importance of the HAT activity of MOZ, preserved in the fusion protein, for repression of the CDKN2A locus transcription and the subsequent block of senescence, a necessary step for the survival of leukemic cells. PMID:26854485

  7. miR-146b-5p mediates p16-dependent repression of IL-6 and suppresses paracrine procarcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence support the critical roles of active stromal fibroblasts in breast cancer development and spread. However, the mediators and the mechanisms of regulation are still not well defined. We have shown here that the tumor suppressor p16INK4A protein inhibits the pro-carcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts through repressing the expression/secretion of IL-6. Indeed, p16INK4A suppresses IL-6 at the mRNA and protein levels. This effect is mediated trough miR-146b-5p, which inhibits IL-6 expression through a specific sequence at the IL-6 3′UTR. In addition, we present clear evidence that miR-146b-5p inhibition is sufficient to transactivate breast stromal fibroblasts, which promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition in breast cancer cells in a paracrine manner. By contrast, ectopic expression of miR-146b-5p in active fibroblasts abrogated their pro-carcinogenic effects. The physiological importance of miR-146b-5p inhibition was revealed by showing that the levels of pre-miR-146b-5p as well as its mature form are reduced in cancer-associated fibroblasts as compared with their normal adjacent counterparts from cancer-free tissues isolated from the same patients. Interestingly, treatment of active breast stromal fibroblasts with curcumin increased the level of the p16INK4A coding CDKN2A mRNA and miR-146b-5p and suppressed IL-6, which confirms the repressive effect of these two tumor suppressor molecules on IL-6, and shows the possible “normalization” of cancer-related active fibroblasts. These results show that miR-146b-5p has non-cell-autonomous tumor suppressor function through inhibition of IL-6, suggesting that targeting this microRNA in breast stromal fibroblasts could be of great therapeutic value. PMID:26338965

  8. Disentangling the aneuploidy and senescence paradoxes: a study of triploid breast cancers non-responsive to neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, B I; Salmina, K; Eglitis, J; Huna, A; Grjunberga, V; Erenpreisa, J

    2016-04-01

    Aneuploid cells should have a reduced proliferation rate due to difficulty in proceeding through mitosis. However, contrary to this, high aneuploidy is associated with aggressive tumour growth and poor survival prognosis, in particular in triploid breast cancer. A further paradox revolves around the observation that, while cell senescence should inhibit proliferation, the senescence marker p16INK4a correlates with poor treatment outcome in patients with a very aggressive triple-negative breast carcinoma (TNBC). In this study, we aim to pour light on the possible relationship of these conundrums with polyploidy of tumour cells. We performed detailed analysis of DNA histogram profiles in diagnostic core biopsies of 30 cases of operable breast cancer and found that near triploidy in TNBC and other forms correlated with weak or no response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as scored by Miller-Payne index. Polyploid cells in operation samples from tumours that were non-responsive to NAC treatment were Ki67 and CD44 positive. In addition, polyploid cells were positive for markers of embryonic stemness (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG) and senescence (p16INK4a). The relationship patterns between p16INK4a and NANOG were heterogeneous, with predominantly mutually exclusive expression but also synergistic and intermediate variants in the same samples. We conclude that the aneuploidy and senescence paradoxes can be explained by the mutual platform of polyploidy, conferring genomic and epigenetic instability as a survival advantage. Such cells are able to bypass aneuploidy restrictions of conventional mitosis and overcome the barrier of senescence by a shift to self-renewal, resulting in progression of cancer. PMID:26860864

  9. Comparison of liver oncogenic potential among human RAS isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook In; Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Kim, Dae Yeong; Cho, Kyung Joo; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Calvisi, Diego F.; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in one of three RAS genes (i.e., HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) leading to constitutive activation of RAS signaling pathways is considered a key oncogenic event in human carcinogenesis. Whether activated RAS isoforms possess different oncogenic potentials remains an unresolved question. Here, we compared oncogenic properties among RAS isoforms using liver-specific transgenesis in mice. Hydrodynamic transfection was performed using transposons expressing short hairpin RNA downregulating p53 and an activated RAS isoform, and livers were harvested at 23 days after gene delivery. No differences were found in the hepatocarcinogenic potential among RAS isoforms, as determined by both gross examination of livers and liver weight per body weight ratio (LW/BW) of mice expressing HRASQ61L, KRAS4BG12V and NRASQ61K. However, the tumorigenic potential differed significantly between KRAS splicing variants. The LW/BW ratio in KRAS4AG12V mice was significantly lower than in KRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.001), and KRAS4AG12V mice lived significantly longer than KRRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.0001). Notably, tumors from KRAS4AG12V mice displayed higher expression of the p16INK4A tumor suppressor when compared with KRAS4BG12V tumors. Forced overexpression of p16INK4A significantly reduced tumor growth in KRAS4BG12V mice, suggesting that upregulation of p16INK4A by KRAS4AG12V presumably delays tumor development driven by the latter oncogene. PMID:26799184

  10. Hypersensitivity to contact inhibition provides a clue to cancer resistance of naked mole-rat.

    PubMed

    Seluanov, Andrei; Hine, Christopher; Azpurua, Jorge; Feigenson, Marina; Bozzella, Michael; Mao, Zhiyong; Catania, Kenneth C; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-11-17

    The naked mole-rat is the longest living rodent with a maximum lifespan exceeding 28 years. In addition to its longevity, naked mole-rats have an extraordinary resistance to cancer as tumors have never been observed in these rodents. Furthermore, we show that a combination of activated Ras and SV40 LT fails to induce robust anchorage-independent growth in naked mole-rat cells, while it readily transforms mouse fibroblasts. The mechanisms responsible for the cancer resistance of naked mole-rats were unknown. Here we show that naked mole-rat fibroblasts display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition, a phenomenon we termed "early contact inhibition." Contact inhibition is a key anticancer mechanism that arrests cell division when cells reach a high density. In cell culture, naked mole-rat fibroblasts arrest at a much lower density than those from a mouse. We demonstrate that early contact inhibition requires the activity of p53 and pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Inactivation of both p53 and pRb attenuates early contact inhibition. Contact inhibition in human and mouse is triggered by the induction of p27(Kip1). In contrast, early contact inhibition in naked mole-rat is associated with the induction of p16(Ink4a). Furthermore, we show that the roles of p16(Ink4a) and p27(Kip1) in the control of contact inhibition became temporally separated in this species: the early contact inhibition is controlled by p16(Ink4a), and regular contact inhibition is controlled by p27(Kip1). We propose that the additional layer of protection conferred by two-tiered contact inhibition contributes to the remarkable tumor resistance of the naked mole-rat. PMID:19858485

  11. Expression of the MOZ-TIF2 oncoprotein in mice represses senescence.

    PubMed

    Largeot, Anne; Perez-Campo, Flor Maria; Marinopoulou, Elli; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The MOZ-TIF2 translocation, which fuses monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (MOZ) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with the nuclear co-activator TIF2, is associated with the development of acute myeloid leukemia. We recently found that in the absence of MOZ HAT activity, p16(INK4a) transcriptional levels are significantly increased, triggering an early entrance into replicative senescence. Because oncogenic fusion proteins must bypass cellular safeguard mechanisms, such as senescence and apoptosis, to induce leukemia, we hypothesized that this repressive activity of MOZ over p16(INK4a) transcription could be preserved, or even reinforced, in MOZ leukemogenic fusion proteins, such as MOZ-TIF2. We describe here that, indeed, MOZ-TIF2 silences expression of the CDKN2A locus (p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF)), inhibits the triggering of senescence and enhances proliferation, providing conditions favorable to the development of leukemia. Furthermore, we describe that abolishing the MOZ HAT activity of the fusion protein leads to a significant increase in expression of the CDKN2A locus and the number of hematopoietic progenitors undergoing senescence. Finally, we report that inhibition of senescence by MOZ-TIF2 is associated with increased apoptosis, suggesting a role for the fusion protein in p53 apoptosis-versus-senescence balance. Our results underscore the importance of the HAT activity of MOZ, preserved in the fusion protein, for repression of the CDKN2A locus transcription and the subsequent block of senescence, a necessary step for the survival of leukemic cells. PMID:26854485

  12. Delineating transcriptional networks of prognostic gene signatures refines treatment recommendations for lymph node-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, Fiona; Brien, Gerard L; Fan, Yue; Madden, Stephen F; Jerman, Emilia; Maratha, Ashwini; Aloraifi, Fatima; Hokamp, Karsten; Dunne, Eiseart J; Lohan, Amanda J; Flanagan, Louise; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha R; Fridberg, Marie; Jirstrom, Karin; Quinn, Cecily M; Loftus, Brendan; Gallagher, William M; Geraghty, James; Bracken, Adrian P

    2015-09-01

    The majority of women diagnosed with lymph node-negative breast cancer are unnecessarily treated with damaging chemotherapeutics after surgical resection. This highlights the importance of understanding and more accurately predicting patient prognosis. In the present study, we define the transcriptional networks regulating well-established prognostic gene expression signatures. We find that the same set of transcriptional regulators consistently lie upstream of both 'prognosis' and 'proliferation' gene signatures, suggesting that a central transcriptional network underpins a shared phenotype within these signatures. Strikingly, the master transcriptional regulators within this network predict recurrence risk for lymph node-negative breast cancer better than currently used multigene prognostic assays, particularly in estrogen receptor-positive patients. Simultaneous examination of p16(INK4A) expression, which predicts tumours that have bypassed cellular senescence, revealed that intermediate levels of p16(INK4A) correlate with an intact pRB pathway and improved survival. A combination of these master transcriptional regulators and p16(INK4A), termed the OncoMasTR score, stratifies tumours based on their proliferative and senescence capacity, facilitating a clearer delineation of lymph node-negative breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence, and thus requiring chemotherapy. Furthermore, OncoMasTR accurately classifies over 60% of patients as 'low risk', an improvement on existing prognostic assays, which has the potential to reduce overtreatment in early-stage patients. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into the transcriptional regulation of cellular proliferation in breast cancer and provides an opportunity to enhance and streamline methods of predicting breast cancer prognosis. PMID:26094870

  13. Dietary choline deficiency alters global and gene-specific DNA methylation in the developing hippocampus of mouse fetal brains.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Zeisel, Steven H

    2006-01-01

    The availability of choline during critical periods of fetal development alters hippocampal development and affects memory function throughout life. Choline deficiency during fetal development reduces proliferation and migration of neuronal precursor cells in the mouse fetal hippocampus and these changes are associated with modifications in the protein levels of some cell cycle regulators and early differentiation markers. We fed C57 BL/6 mouse dams diets deficient or normal in choline content from days 12 to 17 of pregnancy, and then collected fetal brains on embryonic day 17. Using laser-capture micro-dissection we harvested cells from the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn and from the prime germinal zone of the dentate gyrus (hippocampus). In the ventricular and subventricular zones from the choline-deficient group, we observed increased protein levels for kinase-associated phosphatase (Kap) and for p15(INK4b) (two cell cycle inhibitors). In the dentate gyrus, we observed increased levels of calretinin (an early marker of neuronal differentiation). In fetal brain from mothers fed a choline-deficient diet, DNA global methylation was decreased in the ventricular and subventricular zones of Ammon's horn. We also observed decreased gene-specific DNA methylation of the gene (Cdkn3) that encodes for Kap, correlating with increased expression of this protein. This was not the case for p15(INK4b) or calretinin (Cdkn2b and Calb2, respectively). These data suggest that choline deficiency-induced changes in gene methylation could mediate the expression of a cell cycle regulator and thereby alter brain development. PMID:16394266

  14. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji; Lee, Hui-Young; Hong, Suntaek; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2013-06-14

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H2O2 are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H2O2 on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H2O2 (0.05-0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15(INK4B) expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H2O2 selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H2O2 increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H2O2 on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15(INK4B)-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H2O2 as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing a potential mechanism whereby H2O2 antagonizes the cytostatic function of TGF-β1. PMID:23685151

  15. Tumor suppressor ASXL1 is essential for the activation of INK4B expression in response to oncogene activity and anti-proliferative signals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Bekker-Jensen, Ida Holst; Christensen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler; Sidoli, Simone; Qi, Yan; Kong, Yu; Wang, Xi; Cui, Yajuan; Xiao, Zhijian; Xu, Guogang; Williams, Kristine; Rappsilber, Juri; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Winther, Ole; Jensen, Ole N; Helin, Kristian

    2015-11-01

    ASXL1 mutations are frequently found in hematological tumors, and loss of Asxl1 promotes myeloid transformation in mice. Here we present data supporting a role for an ASXL1-BAP1 complex in the deubiquitylation of mono-ubiquitylated lysine 119 on Histone H2A (H2AK119ub1) in vivo. The Polycomb group proteins control the expression of the INK4B-ARF-INK4A locus during normal development, in part through catalyzing mono-ubiquitylation of H2AK119. Since the activation of the locus INK4B-ARF-INK4A plays a fail-safe mechanism protecting against tumorigenesis, we investigated whether ASXL1-dependent H2A deubiquitylation plays a role in its activation. Interestingly, we found that ASXL1 is specifically required for the increased expression of p15(INK4B) in response to both oncogenic signaling and extrinsic anti-proliferative signals. Since we found that ASXL1 and BAP1 both are enriched at the INK4B locus, our results suggest that activation of the INK4B locus requires ASXL1/BAP1-mediated deubiquitylation of H2AK119ub1. Consistently, our results show that ASXL1 mutations are associated with lower expression levels of p15(INK4B) and a proliferative advantage of hematopoietic progenitors in primary bone marrow cells, and that depletion of ASXL1 in multiple cell lines results in resistance to growth inhibitory signals. Taken together, this study links ASXL1-mediated H2A deubiquitylation and transcriptional activation of INK4B expression to its tumor suppressor functions. PMID:26470845

  16. Increased size of solid organs in patients with Chuvash polycythemia and in mice with altered expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Donghoon; Okhotin, David V.; Kim, Bumjun; Okhotina, Yulia; Okhotin, Daniel J.; Miasnikova, Galina Y.; Sergueeva, Adelina I.; Polyakova, Lydia A.; Maslow, Alexei; Lee, Yonggu; Semenza, Gregg L.; Prchal, Josef T.

    2010-01-01

    Chuvash polycythemia, the first hereditary disease associated with dysregulated oxygen-sensing to be recognized, is characterized by a homozygous germ-line loss-of-function mutation of the VHL gene (VHLR200W) resulting in elevated hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α levels, increased red cell mass and propensity to thrombosis. Organ volume is determined by the size and number of cells, and the underlying molecular control mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Work from several groups has demonstrated that the proliferation of cells is regulated in opposite directions by HIF-1α and HIF-2α. HIF-1α inhibits cell proliferation by displacing MYC from the promoter of the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21Cip1, thereby inducing its expression. In contrast, HIF-2α promotes MYC activity and cell proliferation. Here we report that the volumes of liver, spleen, and kidneys relative to body mass were larger in 30 individuals with Chuvash polycythemia than in 30 matched Chuvash controls. In Hif1a+/− mice, which are heterozygous for a null (knockout) allele at the locus encoding HIF-1α, hepatic HIF-2α mRNA was increased (2-fold) and the mass of the liver was increased, compared with wild-type littermates, without significant difference in cell volume. Hepatic p21Cip1 mRNA levels were 9.5-fold lower in Hif1a+/− mice compared with wild-type littermates. These data suggest that, in addition to increased red cell mass, the sizes of liver, spleen, and kidneys are increased in Chuvash polycythemia. At least in the liver, this phenotype may result from increased HIF-2α and decreased p21Cip1 levels leading to increased hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:20140661

  17. NF-κB hyper-activation by HTLV-1 tax induces cellular senescence, but can be alleviated by the viral anti-sense protein HBZ.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Huijun; Yang, Liangpeng; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Ho, Yik-Khuan; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2011-04-01

    Activation of I-κB kinases (IKKs) and NF-κB by the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, is thought to promote cell proliferation and transformation. Paradoxically, expression of Tax in most cells leads to drastic up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1), which cause p53-/pRb-independent cellular senescence. Here we demonstrate that p21(CIP1/WAF1)-/p27(KIP1)-mediated senescence constitutes a checkpoint against IKK/NF-κB hyper-activation. Senescence induced by Tax in HeLa cells is attenuated by mutations in Tax that reduce IKK/NF-κB activation and prevented by blocking NF-κB using a degradation-resistant mutant of I-κBα despite constitutive IKK activation. Small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown indicates that RelA induces this senescence program by acting upstream of the anaphase promoting complex and RelB to stabilize p27(KIP1) protein and p21(CIP1/WAF1) mRNA respectively. Finally, we show that down-regulation of NF-κB by the HTLV-1 anti-sense protein, HBZ, delay or prevent the onset of Tax-induced senescence. We propose that the balance between Tax and HBZ expression determines the outcome of HTLV-1 infection. Robust HTLV-1 replication and elevated Tax expression drive IKK/NF-κB hyper-activation and trigger senescence. HBZ, however, modulates Tax-mediated viral replication and NF-κB activation, thus allowing HTLV-1-infected cells to proliferate, persist, and evolve. Finally, inactivation of the senescence checkpoint can facilitate persistent NF-κB activation and leukemogenesis. PMID:21552325

  18. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:18599613

  19. Increased size of solid organs in patients with Chuvash polycythemia and in mice with altered expression of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Donghoon; Okhotin, David V; Kim, Bumjun; Okhotina, Yulia; Okhotin, Daniel J; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Polyakova, Lydia A; Maslow, Alexei; Lee, Yonggu; Semenza, Gregg L; Prchal, Josef T; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2010-05-01

    Chuvash polycythemia, the first hereditary disease associated with dysregulated oxygen-sensing to be recognized, is characterized by a homozygous germ-line loss-of-function mutation of the VHL gene (VHL(R200W)) resulting in elevated hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha and HIF-2alpha levels, increased red cell mass and propensity to thrombosis. Organ volume is determined by the size and number of cells, and the underlying molecular control mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Work from several groups has demonstrated that the proliferation of cells is regulated in opposite directions by HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha. HIF-1alpha inhibits cell proliferation by displacing MYC from the promoter of the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21(Cip1), thereby inducing its expression. In contrast, HIF-2alpha promotes MYC activity and cell proliferation. Here we report that the volumes of liver, spleen, and kidneys relative to body mass were larger in 30 individuals with Chuvash polycythemia than in 30 matched Chuvash controls. In Hif1a(+/-) mice, which are heterozygous for a null (knockout) allele at the locus encoding HIF-1alpha, hepatic HIF-2alpha mRNA was increased (2-fold) and the mass of the liver was increased, compared with wild-type littermates, without significant difference in cell volume. Hepatic p21(Cip1) mRNA levels were 9.5-fold lower in Hif1a(+/-) mice compared with wild-type littermates. These data suggest that, in addition to increased red cell mass, the sizes of liver, spleen, and kidneys are increased in Chuvash polycythemia. At least in the liver, this phenotype may result from increased HIF-2alpha and decreased p21(Cip1) levels leading to increased hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:20140661

  20. DPY30 regulates pathways in cellular senescence through ID protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Simboeck, Elisabeth; Gutierrez, Arantxa; Cozzuto, Luca; Beringer, Malte; Caizzi, Livia; M Keyes, William; Di Croce, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an intrinsic defense mechanism to various cellular stresses: while still metabolically active, senescent cells stop dividing and enter a proliferation arrest. Here, we identify DPY30, a member of all mammalian histone H3K4 histone methyltransferases (HMTases), as a key regulator of the proliferation potential of human primary cells. Following depletion of DPY30, cells show a severe proliferation defect and display a senescent phenotype, including a flattened and enlarged morphology, elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased SA-β-galactosidase activity, and formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHFs). While DPY30 depletion leads to a reduced level of H3K4me3-marked active chromatin, we observed a concomitant activation of CDK inhibitors, including p16INK4a, independent of H3K4me3. ChIP experiments show that key regulators of cell-cycle progression, including ID proteins, are under direct control of DPY30. Because ID proteins are negative regulators of the transcription factors ETS1/2, depletion of DPY30 leads to the transcriptional activation of p16INK4a by ETS1/2 and thus to a senescent-like phenotype. Ectoptic re-introduction of ID protein expression can partially rescue the senescence-like phenotype induced by DPY30 depletion. Thus, our data indicate that DPY30 controls proliferation by regulating ID proteins expression, which in turn lead to senescence bypass. PMID:23872946

  1. Role of Ink4a/Arf Locus in Beta Cell Mass Expansion under Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Elisabet; Rabhi, Nabil; Froguel, Philippe; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The ARF/INK4A (Cdkn2a) locus includes the linked tumour suppressor genes p16INK4a and p14ARF (p19ARF in mice) that trigger the antiproliferative activities of both RB and p53. With beta cell self-replication being the primary source for new beta cell generation in adult animals, the network by which beta cell replication could be increased to enhance beta cell mass and function is one of the approaches in diabetes research. In this review, we show a general view of the regulation points at transcriptional and posttranslational levels of Cdkn2a locus. We describe the molecular pathways and functions of Cdkn2a in beta cell cycle regulation. Given that aging reveals increased p16Ink4a levels in the pancreas that inhibit the proliferation of beta cells and decrease their ability to respond to injury, we show the state of the art about the role of this locus in beta cell senescence and diabetes development. Additionally, we focus on two approaches in beta cell regeneration strategies that rely on Cdkn2a locus negative regulation: long noncoding RNAs and betatrophin. PMID:24672805

  2. The FBXO4 Tumor Suppressor Functions as a Barrier to BrafV600E-Dependent Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric K.; Lian, Zhaorui; D'Andrea, Kurt; Letrero, Richard; Sheng, WeiQi; Liu, Shujing; Diehl, J. Nathaniel; Pytel, Dariusz; Barbash, Olena; Schuchter, Lynn; Amaravaradi, Ravi; Xu, Xiaowei; Herlyn, Meenhard; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin D1–cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) dysregulation is a major contributor to melanomagenesis. Clinical evidence has revealed that p16INK4A, an allosteric inhibitor of CDK4/6, is inactivated in over half of human melanomas, and numerous animal models have demonstrated that p16INK4A deletion promotes melanoma. FBXO4, a specificity factor for the E3 ligase that directs timely cyclin D1 proteolysis, has not been studied in melanoma. We demonstrate that Fbxo4 deficiency induces Braf-driven melanoma and that this phenotype depends on cyclin D1 accumulation in mice, underscoring the importance of this ubiquitin ligase in tumor suppression. Furthermore, we have identified a substrate-binding mutation, FBXO4 I377M, that selectively disrupts cyclin D1 degradation while preserving proteolysis of the other known FBXO4 substrate, TRF1. The I377M mutation and Fbxo4 deficiency result in nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1, a key transforming neoplastic event. Collectively, these data provide evidence that FBXO4 dysfunction, as a mechanism for cyclin D1 overexpression, is a contributor to human malignancy. PMID:24019069

  3. Promoter CpG methylation of multiple genes in pituitary adenomas: frequent involvement of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Bello, M Josefa; De Campos, Jose M; Isla, Alberto; Casartelli, Cacilda; Rey, Juan A

    2006-02-01

    The epigenetic changes in pituitary adenomas were identified by evaluating the methylation status of nine genes (RB1, p14(ARF), p16(INK4a), p73, TIMP-3, MGMT, DAPK, THBS1 and caspase-8) in a series of 35 tumours using methylation-specific PCR analysis plus sequencing. The series included non-functional adenomas (n=23), prolactinomas (n=6), prolactinoma plus thyroid-stimulating hormone adenoma (n=1), growth hormone adenomas (n=4), and adrenocorticotropic adenoma (n=1). All of the tumours had methylation of at least one of these genes and 40% of samples (14 of 35) displayed concurrent methylation of at least three genes. The frequencies of aberrant methylation were: 20% for RB1, 17% for p14(ARF), 34% for p16(INK4a), 29% for p73, 11% for TIMP-3, 23% for MGMT, 6% for DAPK, 43% for THBS1 and 54% for caspase-8. No aberrant methylation was observed in two non-malignant pituitary samples from healthy controls. Although some differences in the frequency of gene methylation between functional and non-functional adenomas were detected, these differences did not reach statistical significance. Our results suggest that promoter methylation is a frequent event in pituitary adenoma tumourigenesis, a process in which inactivation of apoptosis-related genes (DAPK, caspase-8) might play a key role. PMID:16391867

  4. Oxidative stress-associated senescence in dermal papilla cells of men with androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Upton, James H; Hannen, Rosalind F; Bahta, Adiam W; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Philpott, Michael P

    2015-05-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) taken from male androgenetic alopecia (AGA) patients undergo premature senescence in vitro in association with the expression of p16(INK4a), suggesting that DPCs from balding scalp are more sensitive to environmental stress than nonbalding cells. As one of the major triggers of senescence in vitro stems from the cell "culture shock" owing to oxidative stress, we have further investigated the effects of oxidative stress on balding and occipital scalp DPCs. Patient-matched DPCs from balding and occipital scalp were cultured at atmospheric (21%) or physiologically normal (2%) O2. At 21% O2, DPCs showed flattened morphology and a significant reduction in mobility, population doubling, increased levels of reactive oxygen species and senescence-associated β-Gal activity, and increased expression of p16(INK4a) and pRB. Balding DPCs secreted higher levels of the negative hair growth regulators transforming growth factor beta 1 and 2 in response to H2O2 but not cell culture-associated oxidative stress. Balding DPCs had higher levels of catalase and total glutathione but appear to be less able to handle oxidative stress compared with occipital DPCs. These in vitro findings suggest that there may be a role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AGA both in relation to cell senescence and migration but also secretion of known hair follicle inhibitory factors. PMID:25647436

  5. Penile cutaneous horn ten years after treatment of verrucous squamous cell carcinoma on penile glans: case report.

    PubMed

    Mokos, Ivica; Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Ljubojević, Suzana; Corić, Marijana; Grce, Magdalena; Michal, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Penile cutaneous horn is a clinical term that describes protruding hyperkeratosis, usually conical in shape, located on penile glans. Penile localization of this lesion, predominantly located on sun-exposed areas, is very rare. The association with malignancy on the penis makes proper identification of these lesions essential. We present a 45-year-old man with a cutaneous horn, 25 mm in size, located on the basis of penile glans. The patient had a history of phimosis, pseudoepitheliomatous balanoposthitis, surgical excision of penile verrucous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and postoperative radiotherapy of carcinoma in situ on the same localization, ten years before. Complete surgical removal of the horn with separate excision of the margins and base was done. Pathologic examination revealed squamous hyperplasia with suspicion of carcinoma in situ. Additional negative p16(INK4a) immunohistochemical analysis confirmed benign proliferative lesion. DNA polymerase chain reaction for human papilloma virus infection was negative. These findings suggested sparing surgical procedure in our patient, without indication for partial penile amputation, but with mandatory follow-up. Our case confirmed the association of pseudoepitheliomatous balanoposthitis with verrucous SCC, as well as the possible influence of radiotherapy on the development of penile cutaneous horn. Additionally, we showed the important role p16(INK4a) immunohistochemical analysis in the differential diagnosis of alterations adjacent to invasive SCC of the penis. PMID:22507472

  6. Loss of ARF sensitizes transgenic BRAFV600E mice to UV-induced melanoma via suppression of XPC

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chi; Sheng, Jinghao; Hu, Miaofen G.; Haluska, Frank G.; Cui, Rutao; Xu, Zhengping; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Hu, Guo-fu; Hinds, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    Both genetic mutations and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can predispose individuals to melanoma. Although BRAFV600E is the most prevalent oncogene in melanoma, the BRAFV600E mutant is not sufficient to induce tumors in vivo. Mutation at the CDKN2A locus is another melanoma-predisposing event that can disrupt the function of both p16INK4a and ARF. Numerous studies have focused on the role of p16INK4a in melanoma, but the involvement of ARF, a well-known p53 activator, is still controversial. Using a transgenic BRAFV600E mouse model previously generated in our laboratory, we report that loss of ARF is able to enhance spontaneous melanoma formation and cause profound sensitivity to neonatal UVB exposure. Mechanistically, BRAFV600E and ARF deletion synergize to inhibit nucleotide excision repair by epigenetically repressing XPC and inhibiting the E2F4/DP1 complex. We suggest that the deletion of ARF promotes melanomagenesis not by abrogating p53 activation but by acting in concert with BRAFV600E to increase the load of DNA damage caused by UV irradiation. PMID:23650282

  7. The Ink4a/Arf Locus Is a Barrier to Direct Neuronal Transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Price, James D.; Park, Ki-Youb; Chen, Jiadong; Salinas, Ryan D.; Cho, Mathew J.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2014-01-01

    Non-neurogenic cell types, such as cortical astroglia and fibroblasts, can be directly converted into neurons by the overexpression of defined transcription factors. Normally, the cellular phenotype of such differentiated cells is remarkably stable and resists direct cell transdifferentiation. Here we show that the Ink4a/Arf (also known as Cdkn2a) locus is a developmental barrier to direct neuronal transdifferentiation induced by transcription factor overexpression. With serial passage in vitro, wild-type postnatal cortical astroglia become progressively resistant to Dlx2-induced neuronal transdifferentiation. In contrast, the neurogenic competence of Ink4a/Arf-deficient astroglia is both greatly increased and does not diminish through serial cell culture passage. Electrophysiological analysis further demonstrates the neuronal identity of cells induced from Ink4a/Arf-null astroglia, and short hairpin RNA-mediated acute knockdown of p16Ink4a and p19Arf p16Ink4a and p19Arf indicates that these gene products function postnatally as a barrier to cellular transdifferentiation. Finally, we found that mouse fibroblasts deficient for Ink4a/Arf also exhibit greatly enhanced transcription factor-induced neuronal induction. These data indicate that Ink4a/Arf is a potent barrier to direct neuronal transdifferentiation and further suggest that this locus functions normally in the progressive developmental restriction of postnatal astrocytes. PMID:25209293

  8. Oxindole alkaloids from Uncaria tomentosa induce apoptosis in proliferating, G0/G1-arrested and bcl-2-expressing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Nicole; Tiefenthaler, Martin; Sturm, Sonja; Stuppner, Hermann; Ausserlechner, Michael J; Kofler, Reinhard; Konwalinka, Günther

    2006-03-01

    Natural products are still an untapped source of promising lead compounds for the generation of antineoplastic drugs. Here, we investigated for the first time the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of highly purified oxindole alkaloids, namely isopteropodine (A1), pteropodine (A2), isomitraphylline (A3), uncarine F (A4) and mitraphylline (A5) obtained from Uncaria tomentosa, a South American Rubiaceae, on human lymphoblastic leukaemia T cells (CCRF-CEM-C7H2). Four of the five tested alkaloids inhibited proliferation of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Furthermore, the antiproliferative effect of the most potent alkaloids pteropodine (A2) and uncarine F (A4) correlated with induction of apoptosis. After 48 h, 100 micromol/l A2 or A4 increased apoptotic cells by 57%. CEM-C7H2 sublines with tetracycline-regulated expression of bcl-2, p16ink4A or constitutively expressing the cowpox virus protein crm-A were used for further studies of the apoptosis-inducing properties of these alkaloids. Neither overexpression of bcl-2 or crm-A nor cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase by tetracycline-regulated expression of p16INK4A could prevent alkaloid-induced apoptosis. Our results show the strong apoptotic effects of pteropodine and uncarine F on acute leukaemic lymphoblasts and recommend the alkaloids for further studies in xenograft models. PMID:16445836

  9. Role of Ink4a/Arf locus in beta cell mass expansion under physiological and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisabet; Rabhi, Nabil; Froguel, Philippe; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The ARF/INK4A (Cdkn2a) locus includes the linked tumour suppressor genes p16INK4a and p14ARF (p19ARF in mice) that trigger the antiproliferative activities of both RB and p53. With beta cell self-replication being the primary source for new beta cell generation in adult animals, the network by which beta cell replication could be increased to enhance beta cell mass and function is one of the approaches in diabetes research. In this review, we show a general view of the regulation points at transcriptional and posttranslational levels of Cdkn2a locus. We describe the molecular pathways and functions of Cdkn2a in beta cell cycle regulation. Given that aging reveals increased p16Ink4a levels in the pancreas that inhibit the proliferation of beta cells and decrease their ability to respond to injury, we show the state of the art about the role of this locus in beta cell senescence and diabetes development. Additionally, we focus on two approaches in beta cell regeneration strategies that rely on Cdkn2a locus negative regulation: long noncoding RNAs and betatrophin. PMID:24672805

  10. Concurrent loss of the PTEN and RB1 tumor suppressors attenuates RAF dependence in melanomas harboring V600EBRAF

    PubMed Central

    Xing, F; Persaud, Y; Pratilas, CA; Taylor, BS; Janakiraman, M; She, Q-B; Gallardo, H; Liu, C; Merghoub, T; Hefter, B; Dolgalev, I; Viale, A; Heguy, A; De Stanchina, E; Cobrinik, D; Bollag, G; Wolchok, J; Houghton, A; Solit, DB

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the spectrum of genetic alterations that cooperate with critical oncogenes to promote transformation provides a foundation for understanding the diversity of clinical phenotypes observed in human cancers. Here, we performed integrated analyses to identify genomic alterations that co-occur with oncogenic BRAF in melanoma and abrogate cellular dependence upon this oncogene. We identified concurrent mutational inactivation of the PTEN and RB1 tumor suppressors as a mechanism for loss of BRAF/MEK dependence in melanomas harboring V600EBRAF mutations. RB1 alterations were mutually exclusive with loss of p16INK4A, suggesting that whereas p16INK4A and RB1 may have overlapping roles in preventing tumor formation, tumors with loss of RB1 exhibit diminished dependence upon BRAF signaling for cell proliferation. These findings provide a genetic basis for the heterogeneity of clinical outcomes in patients treated with targeted inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Our results also suggest a need for comprehensive screening for RB1 and PTEN inactivation in patients treated with RAF and MEK-selective inhibitors to determine whether these alterations are associated with diminished clinical benefit in patients whose cancers harbor mutant BRAF. PMID:21725359

  11. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  12. Decreased RARβ expression induces abundant inflammation and cervical precancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Albino-Sanchez, M E; Vazquez-Hernandez, J; Ocadiz-Delgado, R; Serafin-Higuera, N; León-Galicia, I; Garcia-Villa, E; Hernandez-Pando, R; Gariglio, P

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that vitamin A and its receptors protect against cancer development and that Retinoid Acid Receptor β (RARβ) is epigenetically silenced during tumoral progression. Cervical Cancer (CC) has been causally linked to high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection. However, host factors are important in determining the outcome of persistent HR-HPV infection as most cervical precancerous lesions containing HR-HPVs do not progress to invasive carcinomas. Increasing evidence suggests that low diet in vitamin A and their receptors participate in the development of CC. The aim of this study has been to investigate the effects of abated RARβ expression in the development of cervical premalignant lesions in 4 month-old conditional mice (RARβ(L-/L-)). Results demonstrated the development of spontaneous squamous metaplasia, inflammatory infiltrate, enhanced mitotic activity, loss of cell differentiation, as well as decreased apoptosis and p16(INK4a) protein levels in RARβ(L-/L-) mice cervix. All these changes are hallmarks of moderate dysplasia. Importantly, our results suggest that the low expression of RARβ, may induce the down regulation of p16(INK4a), chronic inflammation and decreased apoptosis and may be involved in vulnerability to HR-HPV and early stage cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:27207583

  13. Cellular senescence limits regenerative capacity and allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Braun, Heidi; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Raiss, Mirja; Baisantry, Arpita; Mircea-Constantin, Dan; Wang, Shijun; Gross, Marie-Luise; Serrano, Manuel; Schmitt, Roland; Melk, Anette

    2012-09-01

    Long-term graft survival after kidney transplantation remains unsatisfactory and unpredictable. Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy are major contributors to late graft loss; features of tubular cell senescence, such as increased p16(INK4a) expression, associate with these tubulointerstitial changes, but it is unknown whether the relationship is causal. Here, loss of the INK4a locus in mice, which allows escape from p16(INK4a)-dependent senescence, significantly reduced interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and associated with improved renal function, conservation of nephron mass, and transplant survival. Compared with wild-type controls, kidneys from INK4a(-/-) mice developed significantly less interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Consistently, mice that received kidney transplants from INK4a/ARF(-/-) donors had significantly better survival 21 days after life-supporting kidney transplantation and developed less tubulointerstitial changes. This correlated with higher proliferative rates of tubular cells and significantly fewer senescent cells. Taken together, these data suggest a pathogenic role of renal cellular senescence in the development of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and kidney graft deterioration by preventing the recovery from injury. Inhibiting premature senescence could have therapeutic benefit in kidney transplantation but has to be balanced against the risks of suspending antitumor defenses. PMID:22797186

  14. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  15. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infection leads to arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meihong; Yang, Liangpeng; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Baoying; Merling, Randall; Xia, Zheng; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2008-09-01

    Infection by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is thought to cause dysregulated T-cell proliferation, which in turn leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Early cellular changes after HTLV-1 infection have been difficult to study due to the poorly infectious nature of HTLV-1 and the need for cell-to-cell contact for HTLV-1 transmission. Using a series of reporter systems, we show that HeLa cells cease proliferation within one or two division cycles after infection by HTLV-1 or transduction of the HTLV-1 tax gene. HTLV-1-infected HeLa cells, like their tax-transduced counterparts, expressed high levels of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1), developed mitotic abnormalities, and became arrested in G(1) in senescence. In contrast, cells of a human osteosarcoma lineage (HOS) continued to divide after HTLV-1 infection or Tax expression, albeit at a reduced growth rate and with mitotic aberrations. Unique to HOS cells is the dramatic reduction of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) expression, which is in part associated with the constitutive activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) pathway. The loss of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) in HOS cells apparently allows HTLV-1- and Tax-induced G(1) arrest to be bypassed. Finally, HTLV-1 infection and Tax expression also cause human SupT1 T cells to arrest in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that productive HTLV-1 infection ordinarily leads to Tax-mediated G(1) arrest. However, T cells containing somatic mutations that inactivate p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) may continue to proliferate after HTLV-1 infection and Tax expression. These infected cells can expand clonally, accumulate additional chromosomal abnormalities, and progress to cancer. PMID:18596104

  16. Heregulin Co-opts PR Transcriptional Action Via Stat3 Role As a Coregulator to Drive Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Cecilia J; Izzo, Franco; Díaz Flaqué, María Celeste; Cordo Russo, Rosalía; Venturutti, Leandro; Mercogliano, María Florencia; De Martino, Mara; Pineda, Viviana; Muñoz, Sergio; Guzmán, Pablo; Roa, Juan C; Schillaci, Roxana; Elizalde, Patricia V

    2015-10-01

    Accumulated findings have demonstrated the presence of bidirectional interactions between progesterone receptor (PR) and the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases signaling pathways in breast cancer. We previously revealed signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) as a nodal convergence point between said signaling pathways proving that Stat3 is activated by one of the ErbBs' ligands, heregulin (HRG)β1 via ErbB2 and through the co-option of PR as a signaling molecule. Here, we found that HRGβ1 induced Stat3 recruitment to the promoters of the progestin-regulated cell cycle modulators Bcl-XL and p21(CIP1) and also stimulated Stat3 binding to the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter, which carries consensus progesterone response elements. Interestingly, HRGβ1-activated Stat3 displayed differential functions on PR activity depending on the promoter bound. Indeed, Stat3 was required for PR binding in bcl-X, p21(CIP1), and c-myc promoters while exerting a PR coactivator function on the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. Stat3 also proved to be necessary for HRGβ1-induced in vivo tumor growth. Our results endow Stat3 a novel function as a coregulator of HRGβ1-activated PR to promote breast cancer growth. These findings underscore the importance of understanding the complex interactions between PR and other regulatory factors, such as Stat3, that contribute to determine the context-dependent transcriptional actions of PR. PMID:26340407

  17. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D).We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen.In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2. PMID:27121132

  18. Effect of Crocin on Cell Cycle Regulators in N-Nitroso-N-Methylurea-Induced Breast Cancer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mahboobeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Abroun, Saeid; Azizian, Mahshid

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed the anticancer effect of crocin, a saffron carotenoid, in both breast and gastric cancers in animal models, but its mechanism of action is not clearly known, yet. In this study, the effect of crocin on cell cycle regulators is investigated. Female Wistar Albino rats were divided into two groups, with or without N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) injection. After tumor formation, each group of rats was divided into two subgroups, receiving crocin or vehicle only. After 5 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the tumors were retained for pathologic investigation and determination of the parameters. Before crocin treatment, the tumor volumes were 13.27±3.77 and 12.37±1.88, but at the end of the experiment, they were 23.66±8.82 and 11.91±2.27 in the control and crocin-treated groups, respectively. Pathologic investigation indicated the adenocarcinoma induction by NMU. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed overexpression of cyclin D1 and p21(Cip1) in the NMU-induced breast tumors; however, the expression of both of them suppressed by crocin treatment. The previous studies indicated that crocin induces apoptosis in tumor tissue. In this study, we show that it also suppresses tumor growth and induces cell cycle arrest by downregulation of cyclin D1. In addition, crocin suppressed p21(Cip1) in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:26394119

  19. Effect of Crocin on Cell Cycle Regulators in N-Nitroso-N-Methylurea-Induced Breast Cancer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Mahboobeh; Abroun, Saeid; Azizian, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed the anticancer effect of crocin, a saffron carotenoid, in both breast and gastric cancers in animal models, but its mechanism of action is not clearly known, yet. In this study, the effect of crocin on cell cycle regulators is investigated. Female Wistar Albino rats were divided into two groups, with or without N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) injection. After tumor formation, each group of rats was divided into two subgroups, receiving crocin or vehicle only. After 5 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and the tumors were retained for pathologic investigation and determination of the parameters. Before crocin treatment, the tumor volumes were 13.27±3.77 and 12.37±1.88, but at the end of the experiment, they were 23.66±8.82 and 11.91±2.27 in the control and crocin-treated groups, respectively. Pathologic investigation indicated the adenocarcinoma induction by NMU. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed overexpression of cyclin D1 and p21Cip1 in the NMU-induced breast tumors; however, the expression of both of them suppressed by crocin treatment. The previous studies indicated that crocin induces apoptosis in tumor tissue. In this study, we show that it also suppresses tumor growth and induces cell cycle arrest by downregulation of cyclin D1. In addition, crocin suppressed p21Cip1 in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:26394119

  20. Inhibitory effect of mimosine on proliferation of human lung cancer cells is mediated by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Lee, T H; Chuang, L Y; Yen, M H; Hung, W C

    1999-10-18

    The plant amino acid mimosine has been reported to block cell cycle progression in the late G1 phase. A recent study showed that mimosine might induce growth arrest by activating the expression of p21CIP1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI), and by inhibiting the activity of cyclin E-associated kinases in human breast cancer cells. However, mimosine at higher concentrations also blocked proliferation of p21-/- cells by unknown mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of mimosine on the expression of cyclins and CDKIs in human lung cancer cells. We found that mimosine specifically inhibited cyclin D1 expression in H226 cells. The expression of another G1 cyclin, cyclin E, was not regulated by mimosine in all lung cancer cell lines examined. Moreover, mimosine induced p21CIP1 expression in H226 and H358 cells, while it activated p27KIP1 expression in H322 cells. However, mimosine does not affect transcription of these genes directly because significant changes in cyclin D1 or CDKI expression were observed at 12-24 h after drug addition. Our results indicate that mimosine may block cell proliferation by multiple mechanisms and this amino acid is a useful agent for the study of cell cycle control. PMID:10530763

  1. Cadmium Impairs p53 Activity in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Urani, C; Melchioretto, P; Fabbri, M; Bowe, G; Maserati, E; Gribaldo, L

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium and cadmium compounds are contaminants of the environment, food, and drinking water and are important constituents of cigarette smoke. Cd exposure has also been associated with airborne particulate CdO and with Cd-containing quantum dots in medical therapy. Adverse cadmium effects reported in the literature have stimulated during recent years an ongoing discussion to better elucidate cadmium outcomes at cell and molecular level. The present work is designed to gain an insight into the mechanism of p53 impairment at gene and protein level to understand Cd-induced resistance to apoptosis. We used a hepatoma cell line (HepG2) derived from liver, known to be metal responsive. At genotoxic cadmium concentrations no cell cycle arrest was observed. The p53 at gene and protein level was not regulated. Fluorescence images showed that p53 was correctly translocated into the nucleus but that the p21(Cip1/WAF-1), a downstream protein of p53 network involved in cell cycle regulation, was not activated at the highest cadmium concentrations used. The miRNAs analysis revealed an upregulation of mir-372, an miRNA able to affect p21(Cip1/WAF-1) expression and promote cell cycle progression and proliferation. The role of metallothioneins and possible conformational changes of p53 are discussed. PMID:25101185

  2. Estrogen receptor-β mediates the inhibition of DLD-1 human colon adenocarcinoma cells by soy isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Agnieszka; Roberts, Jennifer; Mehta, Rekha; Raju, Jayadev

    2011-01-01

    To understand the relationship between the role of soy isoflavones and estrogen receptor (ER)-β in colon tumorigenesis, we investigated the cellular effects of soy isoflavones (composed of genistein, daidzein, and glycitein) in DLD-1 human colon adenocarcinoma cells with or without ER-β gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi). Soy isoflavones decreased the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2, AKT, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Soy isoflavones dose-dependently caused G2/M cell cycle arrest and downregulated the expression of cyclin A. This was associated with inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK)-4 and up-regulation of its inhibitor p21(cip1) expressions. ER-β gene silencing lowered soy isoflavone-mediated suppression of cell viability and proliferation. ERK-1/2 and AKT expressions were unaltered and NF-κB was modestly upregulated by soy isoflavones after transient knockdown of ER-β expression. Soy isoflavone-mediated arrest of cells at G2/M phase and upregulation of p21(cip1) expression were not observed when ER-β gene was silenced. These findings suggest that maintaining the expression of ER-β is crucial in mediating the growth-suppressive effects of soy isoflavones against colon tumors. Thus upregulation of ER-β status by specific food-borne ER-ligands such as soy isoflavones could potentially be a dietary prevention or therapeutic strategy for colon cancer. PMID:21161820

  3. BTB-ZF Protein Znf131 Regulates Cell Growth of Developing and Mature T Cells.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Tomohiro; Aoki, Kazuhisa; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Taoka, Masato; Taya, Choji; Yoshitani, Hiroshi; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Koiwai, Osamu; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Masai, Hisao; Miyatake, Shoichiro

    2015-08-01

    Many members of the BTB-ZF family have been shown to play important roles in lymphocyte development and function. The role of zinc finger Znf131 (also known as Zbtb35) in T cell lineage was elucidated through the production of mice with floxed allele to disrupt at different stages of development. In this article, we present that Znf131 is critical for T cell development during double-negative to double-positive stage, with which significant cell expansion triggered by the pre-TCR signal is coupled. In mature T cells, Znf131 is required for the activation of effector genes, as well as robust proliferation induced upon TCR signal. One of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21(Cip1) encoded by cdkn1a gene, is one of the targets of Znf131. The regulation of T cell proliferation by Znf131 is in part attributed to its suppression on the expression of p21(Cip1). PMID:26136427

  4. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Teresa L.F.; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Blow, J. Julian; Sale, Julian E.; Watson, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability. PMID:27149840

  5. Two distinct mechanisms control the accumulation of cyclin B1 and Mos in Xenopus oocytes in response to progesterone.

    PubMed

    Frank-Vaillant, M; Jessus, C; Ozon, R; Maller, J L; Haccard, O

    1999-10-01

    Progesterone-induced meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes requires the synthesis of new proteins, such as Mos and cyclin B. Synthesis of Mos is thought to be necessary and sufficient for meiotic maturation; however, it has recently been proposed that newly synthesized proteins binding to p34(cdc2) could be involved in a signaling pathway that triggers the activation of maturation-promoting factor. We focused our attention on cyclin B proteins because they are synthesized in response to progesterone, they bind to p34(cdc2), and their microinjection into resting oocytes induces meiotic maturation. We investigated cyclin B accumulation in response to progesterone in the absence of maturation-promoting factor-induced feedback. We report here that the cdk inhibitor p21(cip1), when microinjected into immature Xenopus oocytes, blocks germinal vesicle breakdown induced by progesterone, by maturation-promoting factor transfer, or by injection of okadaic acid. After microinjection of p21(cip1), progesterone fails to induce the activation of MAPK or p34(cdc2), and Mos does not accumulate. In contrast, the level of cyclin B1 increases normally in a manner dependent on down-regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase but independent of cap-ribose methylation of mRNA. PMID:10512866

  6. Two Distinct Mechanisms Control the Accumulation of Cyclin B1 and Mos in Xenopus Oocytes in Response to Progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Frank-Vaillant, Marie; Jessus, Catherine; Ozon, René; Maller, James L.; Haccard, Olivier

    1999-01-01

    Progesterone-induced meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes requires the synthesis of new proteins, such as Mos and cyclin B. Synthesis of Mos is thought to be necessary and sufficient for meiotic maturation; however, it has recently been proposed that newly synthesized proteins binding to p34cdc2 could be involved in a signaling pathway that triggers the activation of maturation-promoting factor. We focused our attention on cyclin B proteins because they are synthesized in response to progesterone, they bind to p34cdc2, and their microinjection into resting oocytes induces meiotic maturation. We investigated cyclin B accumulation in response to progesterone in the absence of maturation-promoting factor–induced feedback. We report here that the cdk inhibitor p21cip1, when microinjected into immature Xenopus oocytes, blocks germinal vesicle breakdown induced by progesterone, by maturation-promoting factor transfer, or by injection of okadaic acid. After microinjection of p21cip1, progesterone fails to induce the activation of MAPK or p34cdc2, and Mos does not accumulate. In contrast, the level of cyclin B1 increases normally in a manner dependent on down-regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase but independent of cap-ribose methylation of mRNA. PMID:10512866

  7. Differential regulation of Cdc2 and Cdk2 by RINGO and cyclins.

    PubMed

    Karaiskou, A; Perez, L H; Ferby, I; Ozon, R; Jessus, C; Nebreda, A R

    2001-09-21

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are key regulators of the eukaryotic cell division cycle. Cdk1 (Cdc2) and Cdk2 should be bound to regulatory subunits named cyclins as well as phosphorylated on a conserved Thr located in the T-loop for full enzymatic activity. Cdc2- and Cdk2-cyclin complexes can be inactivated by phosphorylation on the catalytic cleft-located Thr-14 and Tyr-15 residues or by association with inhibitory subunits such as p21(Cip1). We have recently identified a novel Cdc2 regulator named RINGO that plays an important role in the meiotic cell cycle of Xenopus oocytes. RINGO can bind and activate Cdc2 but has no sequence homology to cyclins. Here we report that, in contrast with Cdc2- cyclin complexes, the phosphorylation of Thr-161 is not required for full activation of Cdc2 by RINGO. We also show that RINGO can directly stimulate the kinase activity of Cdk2 independently of Thr-160 phosphorylation. Moreover, RINGO-bound Cdc2 and Cdk2 are both less susceptible to inhibition by p21(Cip1), whereas the Thr-14/Tyr-15 kinase Myt1 can negatively regulate the activity of Cdc2-RINGO with reduced efficiency. Our results indicate that Cdk-RINGO complexes may be active under conditions in which cyclin-bound Cdks are inhibited and can therefore play different regulatory roles. PMID:11461916

  8. Melanoma susceptibility genes and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Marzuka-Alcalá, Alexander; Gabree, Michele Jacobs; Tsao, Hensin

    2014-01-01

    Familial melanoma accounts for approximately a tenth of all melanoma cases. The most commonly known melanoma susceptibility gene is the highly penetrant CDKN2A (p16INK4a) locus, which is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion and accounts for approximately 20-50 % of familial melanoma cases. Mutated p16INK4a shows impaired capacity to inhibit the cyclin D1-CDK4 complex, allowing for unchecked cell cycle progression. Mutations in the second protein coded by CDKN2A, p14ARF, are much less common and result in proteasomal degradation of p53 with subsequent accumulation of DNA damage as the cell progresses through the cell cycle without a functional p53-mediated DNA damage response. Mutations in CDK4 that impair the inhibitory interaction with p16INK4a also increase melanoma risk but these mutations are extremely rare. Genes of the melanin biosynthetic pathway, including MC1R and MITF, have also been implicated in melanomagenesis. MC1R variants were traditionally thought to increase risk for melanoma secondary to intensified UV-mediated DNA damage in the setting of absent photoprotective eumelanin. Accumulation of pheomelanin, which appears to have a carcinogenic effect regardless of UV exposure, may be a more likely mechanism. Impaired SUMOylation of the E318K variant of MITF results in increased transcription of genes that confer melanocytes with a pro-malignant phenotype. Mutations in the tumor suppressor BAP1 enhance the metastatic potential of uveal melanoma and predispose to cutaneous/ocular melanoma, atypical melanocytic tumors, and other internal malignancies (COMMON syndrome). Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous low-risk alleles. Although several melanoma susceptibility genes have been identified, risk assessment tools have been developed only for the most common gene implicated with hereditary melanoma, CDKN2A. MelaPRO, a validated model that relies on Mendelian inheritance and Bayesian probability theories, estimates carrier

  9. No Viral Association Found in a Set of Differentiated Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia Cases by Human Papillomavirus and Pan-Viral Microarray Testing

    PubMed Central

    Saglam, Ozlen; Samayoa, Erik; Somasekar, Sneha; Naccache, Samia; Iwasaki, Akiko; Chiu, Charles Y

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia (VIN) is the precursor lesion of Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma (VSCC), and the differentiated type (dVIN) is more frequently observed in relation to VSCC. In contrast to usual-type VIN (uVIN), which is related to infection by human papillomavirus (HPV), a germline mutation in the p53 gene is thought to be associated with ~90% of dVIN cases. To date, no infectious agent has been identified in association with dVIN, and studies investigating this possibility have been hindered by the difficulty in accurately diagnosing dVIN from small biopsies. Here, we used immunostaining for p16ink4a, a biomarker for HPV infection, to study 14 uVIN high-grade VIN and 14 dVIN cases, and to select 10 dVIN cases to broadly screen for all known viruses using a pan-viral microarray platform (ViroChip). All of the uVIN tissue samples, including 8 warty and 6 basaloid cases, showed positivity with the p16ink4a immunostain. The staining pattern was full-thickness for all except two cases in which positive staining was localized in the lower 1/3 of the epidermis. In contrast, immunostaining for p16ink4a was negative in all dVIN cases. ViroChip analysis of 10 pure dVIN samples confirmed the absence of human papillomavirus subtypes or any other virus with the exception of a single sample that showed a weak microarray signature to a porcine herpesvirus. Follow-up PCR testing of the sample was negative for herpesvirus, and in-depth metagenomic next-generation sequencing revealed only sequences corresponding to non-pathogenic viral flora and bacterial contamination. In this study, we demonstrated lack of a virus association in 10 dVIN cases. Alternative pathways for carcinogenesis such as the p53 mutation should be considered for investigation of potential treatment options in dVIN. PMID:25894343

  10. Dysregulated ΔNp63α Inhibits Expression of Ink4a/arf, Blocks Senescence, and Promotes Malignant Conversion of Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Linan; Ponnamperuma, Roshini M.; Jay, Steven; Ricci, M. Stacey; Weinberg, Wendy C.

    2011-01-01

    p63 is critical for squamous epithelial development, and elevated levels of the ΔNp63α isoform are seen in squamous cell cancers of various organ sites. However, significant controversy exists regarding the role of p63 isoforms as oncoproteins or tumor suppressors. Here, lentiviruses were developed to drive long-term overexpression of ΔNp63α in primary keratinocytes. Elevated levels of ΔNp63α in vitro promote long-term survival and block both replicative and oncogene-induced senescence in primary keratinocytes, as evidenced by the expression of SA-β-gal and the presence of nuclear foci of heterochromatin protein 1γ. The contribution of ΔNp63α to cancer development was assessed using an in vivo grafting model of experimental skin tumorigenesis that allows distinction between benign and malignant tumors. Grafted lenti-ΔNp63α keratinocytes do not form tumors, whereas lenti-GFP/v-rasHa keratinocytes develop well-differentiated papillomas. Lenti-ΔNp63α/v-rasHa keratinocytes form undifferentiated carcinomas. The average volume of lenti-ΔNp63α/v-rasHa tumors was significantly higher than those in the lenti-GFP/v-rasHa group, consistent with increased BrdU incorporation detected by immunohistochemistry. The block in oncogene-induced senescence corresponds to sustained levels of E2F1 and phosphorylated AKT, and is associated with loss of induction of p16ink4a/p19arf. The relevance of p16ink4a/p19arf loss was demonstrated in grafting studies of p19arf-null keratinocytes, which develop malignant carcinomas in the presence of v-rasHa similar to those arising in wildtype keratinocytes that express lenti-ΔNp63α and v-rasHa. Our findings establish that ΔNp63α has oncogenic activity and its overexpression in human squamous cell carcinomas contributes to the malignant phenotype, and implicate its ability to regulate p16ink4a/p19arf in the process. PMID:21789189