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Sample records for p450bm3 oxygen activation

  1. Peptide-Mediated Specific Immobilization of Catalytically Active Cytochrome P450 BM3 Variant.

    PubMed

    Zernia, Sarah; Ott, Florian; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Frank, Ronny; Klenner, Marcus; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg; Prager, Andrea; Abel, Bernd; Robitzki, Andrea; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2016-04-20

    Cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102A1) from Bacillus megaterium is an interesting target for biotechnological applications, because of its vast substrate variety combined with high P450 monooxygenase activity. The low stability in vitro could be overcome by immobilization on surfaces. Here we describe a novel method for immobilization on metal surfaces by using selectively binding peptides. A P450 BM3 triple mutant (3M-P450BM3: A74G, F87V, L188Q) was purified as protein thioester and ligated to indium tin oxide or gold binding peptides (BP) named HighSP-BP and Cys-BP, respectively. The ligation products were characterized by Western Blot and tryptic digestion combined with mass spectrometry, and displayed high affinity binding on the depicted surfaces. Next, we could demonstrate by benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation assay (BROD assay) that the activity of immobilized ligation products is higher than for the soluble form. The study provides a new tool for selective modification and immobilization of P450 variants. PMID:26967204

  2. Peroxidase activity stabilization of cytochrome P450(BM3) by rational analysis of intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Águila, Sergio; Ayala, Marcela; Batista, Cesar V; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2013-05-01

    Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations were used to explore the electron pathway involved in the suicide inactivation of cytochrome P450BM3 from Bacillus megaterium. The suicide inactivation is a common phenomenon observed for heme peroxidases, in which the enzyme is inactivated as a result of self-oxidation mediated by highly oxidizing enzyme intermediates formed during the catalytic cycle. The selected model was a mutant comprising only the heme domain (CYPBM3 21B3) that had been previously evolved to efficiently catalyze hydroxylation reactions with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as electron acceptor. An extensive mapping of residues involved in electron transfer routes was obtained from density functional calculations on activated heme (i.e. Compound I) and selected amino acid residues. Identification of oxidizable residues (electron donors) was performed by selectively activating/deactivating different quantum regions. This method allowed a rational identification of key oxidizable targets in order to replace them for less oxidizable residues by site-directed mutagenesis. The residues W96 and F405 were consistently predicted by the QM/MM electron pathway to hold high spin density; single and double mutants of P450BM3 on these positions (W96A, F405L, W96A/F405L) resulted in a more stable variants in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, displaying a similar reaction rate than P450BM3 21B3. Furthermore, mass spectrometry confirmed these oxidation sites and corroborated the possible routes described by QM/MM electron transfer (ET) pathways. PMID:23425936

  3. Active site substitution A82W improves the regioselectivity of steroid hydroxylation by cytochrome P450 BM3 mutants as rationalized by spin relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Rea, V; Kolkman, A J; Vottero, E; Stronks, E J; Ampt, K A M; Honing, M; Vermeulen, N P E; Wijmenga, S S; Commandeur, J N M

    2012-01-24

    Cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium is a monooxygenase with great potential for biotechnological applications. In this paper, we present engineered drug-metabolizing P450 BM3 mutants as a novel tool for regioselective hydroxylation of steroids at position 16β. In particular, we show that by replacing alanine at position 82 with a tryptophan in P450 BM3 mutants M01 and M11, the selectivity toward 16β-hydroxylation for both testosterone and norethisterone was strongly increased. The A82W mutation led to a ≤42-fold increase in V(max) for 16β-hydroxylation of these steroids. Moreover, this mutation improves the coupling efficiency of the enzyme, which might be explained by a more efficient exclusion of water from the active site. The substrate affinity for testosterone increased at least 9-fold in M11 with tryptophan at position 82. A change in the orientation of testosterone in the M11 A82W mutant as compared to the orientation in M11 was observed by T(1) paramagnetic relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance. Testosterone is oriented in M11 with both the A- and D-ring protons closest to the heme iron. Substituting alanine at position 82 with tryptophan results in increased A-ring proton-iron distances, consistent with the relative decrease in the level of A-ring hydroxylation at position 2β. PMID:22208729

  4. Application of a cocktail approach to screen cytochrome P450 BM3 libraries for metabolic activity and diversity.

    PubMed

    Reinen, Jelle; Postma, Geert; Tump, Cornelis; Bloemberg, Tom; Engel, Jasper; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M; Honing, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the validity of using a cocktail screening method in combination with a chemometrical data mining approach to evaluate metabolic activity and diversity of drug-metabolizing bacterial Cytochrome P450 (CYP) BM3 mutants was investigated. In addition, the concept of utilizing an in-house-developed library of CYP BM3 mutants as a unique biocatalytic synthetic tool to support medicinal chemistry was evaluated. Metabolic efficiency of the mutant library towards a selection of CYP model substrates, being amitriptyline (AMI), buspirone (BUS), coumarine (COU), dextromethorphan (DEX), diclofenac (DIC) and norethisterone (NET), was investigated. First, metabolic activity of a selection of CYP BM3 mutants was screened against AMI and BUS. Subsequently, for a single CYP BM3 mutant, the effect of co-administration of multiple drugs on the metabolic activity and diversity towards AMI and BUS was investigated. Finally, a cocktail of AMI, BUS, COU, DEX, DIC and NET was screened against the whole in-house CYP BM3 library. Different validated quantitative and qualitative (U)HPLC-MS/MS-based analytical methods were applied to screen for substrate depletion and targeted product formation, followed by a more in-depth screen for metabolic diversity. A chemometrical approach was used to mine all data to search for unique metabolic properties of the mutants and allow classification of the mutants. The latter would open the possibility of obtaining a more in-depth mechanistic understanding of the metabolites. The presented method is the first MS-based method to screen CYP BM3 mutant libraries for diversity in combination with a chemometrical approach to interpret results and visualize differences between the tested mutants. PMID:26753974

  5. Activation of phosphorothionate pesticides based on a cytochrome P450 BM-3 (CYP102 A1) mutant for expanded neurotoxin detection in food using acetylcholinesterase biosensors.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Holger; Schmid, Rolf D; Bachmann, Till T

    2004-03-15

    A novel enzymatic in vitro activation method for phosphorothionates has been developed to allow their detection with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensors. Activation is necessary because this group of insecticides shows nearly no inhibitory effect toward AChE in their pure nonmetabolized form. In contrast, they exert a strong inhibitory effect on AChE after oxidation as it takes place by metabolic activation in higher organisms. Standard chemical methods to oxidize phosphorothionates showed inherent disadvantages that impede their direct use in food analysis. In contrast, a genetically engineered triple mutant of P450 BM-3 (CYP102 A1) could convert the two frequently used insecticides parathion and chlorpyrifos into their oxo variants as was confirmed by GC/MS measurements. The wild-type protein was unable to do so. In the case of chlorpyrifos, the enzymatic activation was as good as the chemical oxidation. In the case of parathion, the P450 activation was more efficient than the oxidation by NBS but neither activation method yielded an AChE inhibition that was as high as with paraoxon. The application of the method to infant food in combination with a disposable AChE biosensor enabled detection of chlorpyrifos and parathion at concentrations down to 20 microg/kg within an overall assay time of 95 min. PMID:15018574

  6. Engineering bacterial cytochrome P450 (P450) BM3 into a prototype with human P450 enzyme activity using indigo formation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Dooil; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Jung, Heung-Chae; Pan, Jae-Gu; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Donghak; Yun, Chul-Ho

    2010-05-01

    Human cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes metabolize a variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including steroids, drugs, and environmental chemicals. In this study, we examine the possibility that bacterial P450 BM3 (CYP102A1) mutants with indole oxidation activity have the catalytic activities of human P450 enzymes. Error-prone polymerase chain reaction was carried out on the heme domain-coding region of the wild-type gene to generate a CYP102A1 DNA library. The library was transformed into Escherichia coli for expression of the P450 mutants. A colorimetric colony-based method was adopted for primary screening of the mutants. When the P450 activities were measured at the whole-cell level, some of the blue colonies, but not the white colonies, possessed apparent oxidation activity toward coumarin and 7-ethoxycoumarin, which are typical human P450 substrates that produce fluorescent products. Coumarin is oxidized by the CYP102A1 mutants to produce two metabolites, 7-hydroxycoumarin and 3-hydroxycoumarin. In addition, 7-ethoxycoumarin is simultaneously oxidized to 7-hydroxycoumarin by O-deethylation reaction and to 3-hydroxy,7-ethoxycoumarin by 3-hydroxylation reactions. Highly active mutants are also able to metabolize several other human P450 substrates, including phenacetin, ethoxyresorufin, and chlorzoxazone. These results indicate that indigo formation provides a simple assay for identifying CYP102A1 mutants with a greater potential for human P450 activity. Furthermore, our computational findings suggest a correlation between the stabilization of the binding site and the catalytic efficiency of CYP102A1 mutants toward coumarin: the more stable the structure in the binding site, the lower the energy barrier and the higher the catalytic efficiency. PMID:20100815

  7. Kinetics and Activation Parameters for Oxidations of Styrene by Compounds I from Cytochrome P450BM-3 (CYP102A1) Heme Domain and from CYP119†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xinting; Wang, Qin; Horner, John H.; Sheng, Xin; Newcomb, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP or P450) enzymes are ubiquitous in nature where they catalyze a vast array of oxidation reactions. The active oxidants in P450s have long been assumed to be iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical cations termed Compounds I, but P450 Compounds I have proven difficult to prepare. The recent development of an entry to these transients by photo-oxidation of the corresponding iron(IV)-oxo neutral porphyrin species (Compounds II) permits spectroscopic and kinetic studies. We report here application of the photo-oxidation method for production of Compound I from the heme domain of CYP102A1 (cytochrome P450BM-3), and product and kinetic studies of reactions of styrene with this Compound I transient and also Compound I from CYP119. The studies were performed at low temperatures in 1:1 (v:v) mixtures of glycerol--phosphate buffer. Single turnover reactions at 0 °C gave styrene oxide in good yields. In kinetic studies conducted between −10 and −50 °C, both Compounds I displayed saturation kinetics permitting determinations of binding constants and first-order oxidation rate constants. Temperature-dependent functions for the binding constants and rate constants were determined for both Compounds I. In the temperature range studied, the Compound I transient from CYP102A1 heme domain bound styrene more strongly than Compound I from CYP119, but the rate constants for oxidations of styrene by the latter were somewhat larger than those for the former. The temperature dependent functions for the first-order oxidation reactions are log k = 13.2 – 15.2/2.303RT and log k = 13.3 – 14.6/2.303RT (kcal/mol) for Compounds I from CYP102A1 heme domain and CYP119, respectively. PMID:19708688

  8. Subtle structural changes in the Asp251Gly/Gln307His P450 BM3 mutant responsible for new activity toward diclofenac, tolbutamide and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Dell'Angelo, Valentina; Catucci, Gianluca; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2016-07-15

    This paper reports the structure of the double mutant Asp251Gly/Gln307His (named A2) generated by random mutagenesis, able to produce 4'-hydroxydiclofenac, 2-hydroxyibuprofen and 4-hydroxytolbutamide from diclofenac, ibuprofen and tolbutamide, respectively. The 3D structure of the substrate-free mutant shows a conformation similar to the closed one found in the substrate-bound wild type enzyme, but with a higher degree of disorder in the region of the G-helix and F-G loop. This is due to the mutation Asp251Gly that breaks the salt bridge between Aps251 on I-helix and Lys224 on G-helix, allowing the G-helix to move away from I-helix and conferring a higher degree of flexibility to this element. This subtle structural change is accompanied by long-range structural rearrangements of the active site with the rotation of Phe87 and a reorganization of catalytically important water molecules. The impact of these structural features on thermal stability, reduction potential and electron transfer is investigated. The data demonstrate that a single mutation far from the active site triggers an increase in protein flexibility in a key region, shifting the conformational equilibrium toward the closed form that is ready to accept electrons and enter the P450 catalytic cycle as soon as a substrate is accepted. PMID:26718083

  9. Insights into electron leakage in the reaction cycle of cytochrome P450 BM3 revealed by kinetic modeling and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joseph B; Barker, Kimberly A; Eller, Kristen A; Jiang, Linda; Molina, Veronica; Saifee, Jessica F; Sikes, Hadley D

    2015-11-01

    As a single polypeptide, cytochrome P450 BM3 fuses oxidase and reductase domains and couples each domain's function to perform catalysis with exceptional activity upon binding of substrate for hydroxylation. Mutations introduced into the enzyme to change its substrate specificity often decrease coupling efficiency between the two domains, resulting in unproductive consumption of cofactors and formation of water and/or reactive species. This phenomenon can correlate with leakage, in which P450 BM3 uses electrons from NADPH to reduce oxygen to water and/or reactive species even without bound substrate. The physical basis for leakage is not yet well understood in this particular member of the cytochrome P450 family. To clarify the relationship between leakage and coupling, we used simulations to illustrate how different combinations of kinetic parameters related to substrate-free consumption of NADPH and substrate hydroxylation can lead to either minimal effects on coupling or a dramatic decrease in coupling as a result of leakage. We explored leakage in P450 BM3 by introducing leakage-enhancing mutations and combining these mutations to assess whether doing so increases leakage further. The variants in this study provide evidence that while a transition to high spin may be vital for coupled hydroxylation, it is not required for enhanced leakage; substrate binding and the consequent shift in spin state are not necessary as a redox switch for catalytic oxidation of NADPH. Additionally, the variants in this study suggest a tradeoff between leakage and stability and thus evolvability, as the mutations we investigated were far more deleterious than other mutations that have been used to change substrate specificity. PMID:26311413

  10. Chromogenic nitrophenolate-based substrates for light-driven hybrid P450 BM3 enzyme assay.

    PubMed

    Lam, Quan; Cortez, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Truc; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The incorporation of a p-nitrophenoxy moiety in substrates has enabled the development of colorimetric assays to rapidly screen for O-demethylation activity of P450 enzymes. For the light-driven hybrid P450 BM3 enzymes, where a Ru(II) photosensitizer powers the enzyme upon visible light irradiation, we have investigated a family of p-nitrophenoxy derivatives as useful chromogenic substrates compatible with the light-driven approach. The validation of this assay and its adaptability to a 96-well plate format will enable the screening of the next generation of hybrid P450 BM3 enzymes towards C-H bond functionalization of non-natural substrates. PMID:26712653

  11. Biotransformation of the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene by cytochrome P450cam and P450BM-3.

    PubMed

    Sowden, Rebecca J; Yasmin, Samina; Rees, Nicholas H; Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2005-01-01

    The sesquiterpenoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds with biological functions and desirable properties. Oxidation of the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene by wild type and mutants of P450cam from Pseudomonas putida, and of P450BM-3 from Bacillus megaterium, have been investigated as a potential route to (+)-nootkatone, a fine fragrance. Wild type P450cam did not oxidise (+)-valencene but the mutants showed activities up to 9.8 nmol (nmol P450)(-1) min(-1), with (+)-trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone constituting >85% of the products. Wild type P450BM-3 and mutants had higher activities (up to 43 min(-1)) than P450cam but were much less selective. Of the many products, cis- and trans-(+)-nootkatol, (+)-nootkatone, cis-(+)-valencene-1,10-epoxide, trans-(+)-nootkaton-9-ol, and (+)-nootkatone-13S,14-epoxide were isolated from whole-cell reactions and characterised. The selectivity patterns suggest that (+)-valencene has one binding orientation in P450cam but multiple orientations in P450BM-3. PMID:15602599

  12. A Novel Semi-biosynthetic Route for Artemisinin Production Using Engineered Substrate-Promiscuous P450BM3

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Fisher, Karl; Woolard, Frank; Ockey, Denise; McPhee, Derek; Renninger, Neil; Chang, Michelle; Baker, David; Keasling, Jay

    2009-11-30

    Production of fine heterologus pathways in microbial hosts is frequently hindered by insufficient knowledge of the native metabolic pathway and its cognate enzymes; often the pathway is unresolved and enzymes lack detailed characterization. An alternative paradigm to using native pathways is de novo pathway design using well-characterized, substrate-promiscuous enzymes. We demonstrate this concept using P450BM3 from Bacillus megaterium. Using a computer model, we illustrate how key P450BM3 activ site mutations enable binding of non-native substrate amorphadiene, incorporating these mutations into P450BM3 enabled the selective oxidation of amorphadiene arteminsinic-11s,12-epoxide, at titers of 250 mg L"1 in E. coli. We also demonstrate high-yeilding, selective transformations to dihydroartemisinic acid, the immediate precursor to the high value anti-malarial drug artemisinin.

  13. Effect of Mutation and Substrate Binding on the Stability of Cytochrome P450BM3 Variants.

    PubMed

    Geronimo, Inacrist; Denning, Catherine A; Rogers, W Eric; Othman, Thaer; Huxford, Tom; Heidary, David K; Glazer, Edith C; Payne, Christina M

    2016-06-28

    Cytochrome P450BM3 is a heme-containing enzyme from Bacillus megaterium that exhibits high monooxygenase activity and has a self-sufficient electron transfer system in the full-length enzyme. Its potential synthetic applications drive protein engineering efforts to produce variants capable of oxidizing nonnative substrates such as pharmaceuticals and aromatic pollutants. However, promiscuous P450BM3 mutants often exhibit lower stability, thereby hindering their industrial application. This study demonstrated that the heme domain R47L/F87V/L188Q/E267V/F81I pentuple mutant (PM) is destabilized because of the disruption of hydrophobic contacts and salt bridge interactions. This was directly observed from crystal structures of PM in the presence and absence of ligands (palmitic acid and metyrapone). The instability of the tertiary structure and heme environment of substrate-free PM was confirmed by pulse proteolysis and circular dichroism, respectively. Binding of the inhibitor, metyrapone, significantly stabilized PM, but the presence of the native substrate, palmitic acid, had no effect. On the basis of high-temperature molecular dynamics simulations, the lid domain, β-sheet 1, and Cys ligand loop (a β-bulge segment connected to the heme) are the most labile regions and, thus, potential sites for stabilizing mutations. Possible approaches to stabilization include improvement of hydrophobic packing interactions in the lid domain and introduction of new salt bridges into β-sheet 1 and the heme region. An understanding of the molecular factors behind the loss of stability of P450BM3 variants therefore expedites site-directed mutagenesis studies aimed at developing thermostability. PMID:27267136

  14. Colorimetric high-throughput assay for alkene epoxidation catalyzed by cytochrome P450 BM-3 variant 139-3.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel; Farinas, Edgardo T; Arnold, Frances H

    2004-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 BM-3 variant 139-3 is highly active in the hydroxylation of alkanes and fatty acids (AGlieder, ET Farinas, and FH Arnold, Nature Biotech 2002;20:1135-1139); it also epoxidizes various alkenes, including styrene. Here the authors describe a colorimetric, high-throughput assay suitable for optimizing this latter activity by directed evolution. The product of styrene oxidation by 139-3, styrene oxide, reacts with the nucleophile gamma-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) to form a purple-colored precursor dye, which can be monitored spectrophotometrically in cell lysates. The sensitivity limit of this assay is 50-100 microM of product, and the detection limit for P450 BM-3 139-3 is ~0.2 microM of enzyme. To validate the assay, activities in a small library of random mutants were compared to those determined using an NADPH depletion assay for initial turnover rates. PMID:15006137

  15. Crystal Structure of Inhibitor-Bound P450BM-3 Reveals Open Conformation of Substrate Access Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, Donovan C.; Chen, Baozhi; Tomchick, Diana R.; Bondlela, Muralidhar; Hegde, Amita; Machius, Mischa; Peterson, Julian A.

    2008-08-19

    P450BM-3 is an extensively studied P450 cytochrome that is naturally fused to a cytochrome P450 reductase domain. Crystal structures of the heme domain of this enzyme have previously generated many insights into features of P450 structure, substrate binding specificity, and conformational changes that occur on substrate binding. Although many P450s are inhibited by imidazole, this compound does not effectively inhibit P450BM-3. {omega}-Imidazolyl fatty acids have previously been found to be weak inhibitors of the enzyme and show some unusual cooperativity with the substrate lauric acid. We set out to improve the properties of these inhibitors by attaching the {omega}-imidazolyl fatty acid to the nitrogen of an amino acid group, a tactic that we used previously to increase the potency of substrates. The resulting inhibitors were significantly more potent than their parent compounds lacking the amino acid group. A crystal structure of one of the new inhibitors bound to the heme domain of P450BM-3 reveals that the mode of interaction of the amino acid group with the enzyme is different from that previously observed for acyl amino acid substrates. Further, required movements of residues in the active site to accommodate the imidazole group provide an explanation for the low affinity of imidazole itself. Finally, the previously observed cooperativity with lauric acid is explained by a surprisingly open substrate-access channel lined with hydrophobic residues that could potentially accommodate lauric acid in addition to the inhibitor itself.

  16. High throughput assay for cytochrome P450 BM3 for screening libraries of substrates and combinatorial mutants.

    PubMed

    Tsotsou, Georgia Eleni; Cass, Anthony Edward George; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2002-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying compounds that are potential substrates for the drug metabolising enzyme cytochrome P450 is described. The strategy is based on the detection of a degradation product of NAD(P)H oxidation during substrate turnover by the enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli cells spontaneously lysed under the experimental conditions. The performance of the method has been tested on two known substrates of the wild-type cytochrome P450 BM3, arachidonic (AA) and lauric (LA) acids, and two substrates with environmental significance, the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the solvent 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE). The minimal background signal given from cells expressing cytochrome P450 BM3 in the absence of added substrate is only 3% of the signal in the presence of saturating substrate. Control experiments have proven that this method is specifically detecting NADPH oxidation by catalytic turnover of P450 BM3. The assay has been adapted to a microtitre plate format and used to screen a series of furazan derivatives as potential substrates. Three derivatives were identified as substrates. The method gave a significant different signal for two isomeric furazan derivatives. All results found on the cell lysate were verified and confirmed with the purified enzyme. This strategy opens the way to automated high throughput screening of NAD(P)H-linked enzymatic activity of molecules of pharmacological and biotechnological interest and libraries of random mutants of NAD(P)H-dependent biocatalysts. PMID:11742743

  17. Regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation of 10-undecenoic acid with a light-driven P450 BM3 biocatalyst yielding a valuable synthon for natural product synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mallory; Nguyen, Daniel; Gonzalez, Melissa; Cortez, Alejandro; Mullen, Sarah E.; Cheruzel, Lionel E.

    2014-01-01

    We report herein the selective hydroxylation of 10-undecenoic acid with a light-activated hybrid P450 BM3 enzyme. Under previously developed photocatalytic reaction conditions, only a monohydroxylated product is detected by gas chromatography. Hydroxylation occurs exclusively at the allylic position as confirmed from a synthesized authentic standard. Investigation into the stereochemistry of the reaction indicates that the R enantiomer is obtained in 85% ee. The (R)-9-hydroxy-10-undecenoic acid obtained enzymatically is a valuable synthon en route to various natural products further expanding the light-activated P450 BM3 biocatalysis and highlighting the advantages over traditional methods. PMID:24938497

  18. Cytochrome P450BM-3 reduces aldehydes to alcohols through a direct hydride transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspera, Ruediger; Sahele, Tariku; Lakatos, Kyle; Totah, Rheem A.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytochrome P450BM-3 reduced aldehydes to alcohols efficiently (k{sub cat} {approx} 25 min{sup -1}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction is a direct hydride transfer from R-NADP{sup 2}H to the carbonyl moiety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P450 domain variants enhance reduction through potential allosteric/redox interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reaction will have implications for metabolism of xenobiotics. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450BM-3 catalyzed the reduction of lipophilic aldehydes to alcohols efficiently. A k{sub cat} of {approx}25 min{sup -1} was obtained for the reduction of methoxy benzaldehyde with wild type P450BM-3 protein which was higher than in the isolated reductase domain (BMR) alone and increased in specific P450-domain variants. The reduction was caused by a direct hydride transfer from preferentially R-NADP{sup 2}H to the carbonyl moiety of the substrate. Weak substrate-P450-binding of the aldehyde, turnover with the reductase domain alone, a deuterium incorporation in the product from NADP{sup 2}H but not D{sub 2}O, and no inhibition by imidazole suggests the reductase domain of P450BM-3 as the potential catalytic site. However, increased aldehyde reduction by P450 domain variants (P450BM-3 F87A T268A) may involve allosteric or redox mechanistic interactions between heme and reductase domains. This is a novel reduction of aldehydes by P450BM-3 involving a direct hydride transfer and could have implications for the metabolism of endogenous substrates or xenobiotics.

  19. Key Mutations Alter the Cytochrome P450 BM3 Conformational Landscape and Remove Inherent Substrate Bias*

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher F.; Peet, Caroline; Mason, Amy E.; Voice, Michael W.; Leys, David; Munro, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) have enormous potential in the production of oxychemicals, due to their unparalleled regio- and stereoselectivity. The Bacillus megaterium P450 BM3 enzyme is a key model system, with several mutants (many distant from the active site) reported to alter substrate selectivity. It has the highest reported monooxygenase activity of the P450 enzymes, and this catalytic efficiency has inspired protein engineering to enable its exploitation for biotechnologically relevant oxidations with structurally diverse substrates. However, a structural rationale is lacking to explain how these mutations have such effects in the absence of direct change to the active site architecture. Here, we provide the first crystal structures of BM3 mutants in complex with a human drug substrate, the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. Supported by solution data, these structures reveal how mutation alters the conformational landscape and decreases the free energy barrier for transition to the substrate-bound state. Our data point to the importance of such “gatekeeper” mutations in enabling major changes in substrate recognition. We further demonstrate that these mutants catalyze the same 5-hydroxylation reaction as performed by human CYP2C19, the major human omeprazole-metabolizing P450 enzyme. PMID:23828198

  20. Induction of cytochrome P-450 BM-3 (CYP 102) by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    English, N; Hughes, V; Wolf, C R

    1996-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium contains a cytochrome P-450 fatty acid mono-oxygenase which is inducible with barbiturate drugs. We have demonstrated that this enzyme system is inducible with peroxisome proliferators. In mammals, peroxisome proliferators also induce mono-oxygenases in the CYP4A gene family. In this paper we demonstrate that the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen, ketoprofen and indomethacin are potent inducers of fatty acid mono-oxygenase activity as well as of P-450BM-3 protein in B. megaterium. The levels of induction of P-450 protein were 11.8-, 3.9- and 3.0-fold respectively. In addition, we demonstrate that these inducing agents interact with a transcriptional repressor, Bm3R1, which leads to its dissociation from its operator sequence. This provides a rational mechanism for the induction process. This is the first report which demonstrates that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can interact directly with a transcription factor to initiate gene expression, and further substantiates the structure-activity relationships that identify inducers of cytochrome P-450BM-3 and compounds that have the potential to act as peroxisome proliferators and induce CYP4A expression in mammals. PMID:8645218

  1. Probing Steroidal Substrate Specificity of Cytochrome P450 BM3 Variants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Wang, Zhi-Biao; Wang, Ya-Nan; Kong, Jian-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    M01A82W, M11A82W and M01A82WS72I are three cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102A1) variants. They can catalyze the hydroxylation of testosterone (TES) and norethisterone at different positions, thereby making them promising biocatalysts for steroid hydroxylation. With the aim of obtaining more hydroxylated steroid precursors it is necessary to probe the steroidal substrate diversity of these BM3 variants. Here, three purified BM3 variants were first incubated with eight steroids, including testosterone (TES), methyltestosterone (MT), cholesterol, β-sitosterol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), diosgenin, pregnenolone and ergosterol. The results indicated that the two 3-keto-Δ⁴-steroids TES and MT can be hydroxylated at various positions by the three BM3 mutants, respectively. On the contrary, the three enzymes displayed no any activity toward the remaining six 3-hydroxy-Δ⁵-steroids. This result indicates that the BM3 mutants prefer 3-keto-Δ⁴-steroids as hydroxylation substrates. To further verify this notion, five other substrates, including two 3-hydroxy-Δ⁵-steroids and three 3-keto-Δ⁴-steroids, were carefully selected to incubate with the three BM3 variants. The results indicated the three 3-keto-Δ⁴-steroids can be metabolized to form hydroxysteroids by the three BM3 variants. On the other hand, the two 3-hydroxy-Δ⁵-steroids cannot be hydroxylated at any position by the BM3 mutants. These results further support the above conclusion, therefore demonstrating the 3-keto-Δ⁴-steroid substrate preference of BM3 mutants, and laying a foundation for microbial production of more hydroxylated steroid intermediates using BM3 variants. PMID:27294908

  2. Structure, dynamics, and function of the monooxygenase P450 BM-3: insights from computer simulations studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatano, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    The monooxygenase P450 BM-3 is a NADPH-dependent fatty acid hydroxylase enzyme isolated from soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium. As a pivotal member of cytochrome P450 superfamily, it has been intensely studied for the comprehension of structure-dynamics-function relationships in this class of enzymes. In addition, due to its peculiar properties, it is also a promising enzyme for biochemical and biomedical applications. However, despite the efforts, the full understanding of the enzyme structure and dynamics is not yet achieved. Computational studies, particularly molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have importantly contributed to this endeavor by providing new insights at an atomic level regarding the correlations between structure, dynamics, and function of the protein. This topical review summarizes computational studies based on MD simulations of the cytochrome P450 BM-3 and gives an outlook on future directions.

  3. Optimization of the Bacterial Cytochrome P450 BM3 System for the Production of Human Drug Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Drug metabolism in human liver is a process involving many different enzymes. Among them, a number of cytochromes P450 isoforms catalyze the oxidation of most of the drugs commercially available. Each P450 isoform acts on more than one drug, and one drug may be oxidized by more than one enzyme. As a result, multiple products may be obtained from the same drug, and as the metabolites can be biologically active and may cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs), the metabolic profile of a new drug has to be known before this can be commercialized. Therefore, the metabolites of a certain drug must be identified, synthesized and tested for toxicity. Their synthesis must be in sufficient quantities to be used for metabolic tests. This review focuses on the progresses done in the field of the optimization of a bacterial self-sufficient and efficient cytochrome P450, P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium, used for the production of metabolites of human enzymes. The progress made in the improvement of its catalytic performance towards drugs, the substitution of the costly NADPH cofactor and its immobilization and scale-up of the process for industrial application are reported. PMID:23443101

  4. Molecular Dynamics and QM/MM Calculations Predict the Substrate-Induced Gating of Cytochrome P450 BM3 and the Regio- and Stereoselectivity of Fatty Acid Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Kshatresh Dutta; Wang, Binju; Shaik, Sason

    2016-01-27

    Theory predicts herein enzymatic activity from scratch. We show that molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum-mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations of the fatty acid hydroxylase P450 BM3 predict the binding mechanism of the fatty acid substrate and its enantio/regioselective hydroxylation by the active species of the enzyme, Compound I. The MD simulations show that the substrate's entrance involves hydrogen-bonding interactions with Pro25, Glu43, and Leu188, which induce a huge conformational rearrangement that closes the substrate channel by pulling together the A helix and the β1 sheet to the F/G loop. In turn, at the bottom of the substrate's channel, residue Phe87 controls the regioselectivity by causing the substrate's chain to curl up and juxtapose its CH2 positions ω-1/ω-2/ω-3 to Compound I while preventing access to the endmost position, ω-CH3. Phe87 also controls the stereoselectivity by the enantioselective steric blocking of the pro-S C-H bond, thus preferring R hydroxylation. Indeed, the MD simulations of the mutant Phe87Ala predict predominant ω hydroxylation. These findings, which go well beyond the X-ray structural data, demonstrate the predictive power of theory and its insight, which can potentially be used as a partner of experiment for eventual engineering of P450 BM3 with site-selective C-H functionalization capabilities. PMID:26716578

  5. CO photodissociation dynamics in cytochrome P450BM3 studied by subpicosecond visible and mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rupenyan, Alisa; Commandeur, Jan; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-07-01

    Cytochrome P450BM3 is a bacterial enzyme with a heme cofactor that binds small diatomic ligands. Here we report the first study of carbon monoxide (CO) photodissociation and rebinding in ferrous P450BM3 on an ultrafast time scale. We monitored dissociation of carbon monoxide upon Soret band excitation using visible and infrared femtosecond spectroscopy between 100 fs and 4 ns. The dynamics of the ferric P450 was probed for reference in the visible spectral region. In the photodissociated ferrous P450-CO complex, the vibrational hot deligated ground state is populated in 0.2 ps and relaxes on a picosecond time scale. The onset of geminate recombination of CO with the heme is observed on a nanosecond time scale. In the mid-infrared spectral region, the bleached absorption due to the bound C=O stretch vibration is constant on the picosecond to 1 ns time scale, indicating that the photodissociation yield is 100% and that rebinding occurs after 1 ns. In the infrared absorption difference spectra, we additionally resolve two small bands of dissociated CO molecules at 2092 and 2114 cm(-1). This indicates that the escape of photolyzed CO to solvent and the geminate recombination are preceded by transient docking within the protein in a manner similar to that of globins. The bands partially decay with a time constant of 1 ps, possibly due to a relaxation of the protein around the CO docking site, allowing for greater orientational freedom of the CO molecules. PMID:19492790

  6. The role of tryptophan 97 of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium in catalytic function. Evidence against the 'covalent switching' hypothesis of P-450 electron transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A W; Malarkey, K; McKnight, J; Thomson, A J; Kelly, S M; Price, N C; Lindsay, J G; Coggins, J R; Miles, J S

    1994-01-01

    The 'Covalent Switching' hypothesis suggests that a strongly conserved tryptophan residue acts as a mediator of electron-transfer flow between redox partners in cytochrome P-450 systems [Baldwin, Morris and Richards (1991) Proc. R. Soc. London B 245, 43-51]. We have investigated the effect of alteration of the conserved tryptophan (Trp-97) in cytochrome P-450 BM3 (P-450 102) from Bacillus megaterium. Replacement of Trp-97 with Ala, Phe or Tyr results in a decrease in the natural haem content and alters the resting spin state of the remaining haem in the purified mutant enzymes. However, kinetic analyses indicate that the mutant enzymes retain high levels of catalytic activity. C.d. and e.p.r. spectroscopy also reveal little alteration in secondary structure or change in the pattern of haem ligation. These findings cast doubt on the covalent switching mechanism of intermolecular electron flow in the P-450s, but indicate that this residue plays a role in the association of the haem prosthetic group. PMID:7980400

  7. Subzero-temperature stabilization and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) oxygenase domain and holoenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Roshan; Sono, Masanori; Raner, Gregory M.; Dawson, John H. . E-mail: dawson@sc.edu

    2005-12-09

    We describe herein for the first time the formation and spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous oxyferrous complexes of the cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102) holoenzyme and heme domain (BMP) at -55 {sup o}C using a 70/30 (v/v) glycerol/buffer cryosolvent. The choice of buffer is a crucial factor with Tris [tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane] buffer being significantly more effective than phosphate. The oxyferrous complexes have been characterized with magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and the resulting spectra compared to those of the more well-characterized oxyferrous cytochrome P450-CAM. The formation of a stable substrate-bound oxyferrous CYP BM3 holoenzyme, despite the fact that it has the necessary reducing equivalents for turnover, indicates that electron transfer from the flavin domain to the oxyferrous center is very slow at this temperature. The ability to prepare stable homogeneous oxyferrous derivatives of both BMP and the CYP BM3 holoenzyme will enable these species to be used as starting materials for mechanistic investigation of dioxygen activation.

  8. Enzyme-substrate complementarity governs access to a cationic reaction manifold in the P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Cryle, Max J; Hayes, Patricia Y; De Voss, James J

    2012-12-01

    The products of cytochrome P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl-containing dodecanoic acids are consistent with the presence of a cationic reaction intermediate, which results in efficient dehydrogenation of the rearranged probes by the enzyme. These results highlight the importance of enzyme-substrate complementarity, with a cationic intermediate occurring only when the probes used begin to diverge from ideal substrates for this enzyme. This also aids in reconciling literature reports supporting the presence of cationic intermediates with certain cytochrome P450 enzyme/substrate pairs. PMID:23109039

  9. Kinetics of electron transfer in the complex of cytochrome P450 3A4 with the flavin domain of cytochrome P450BM-3 as evidence of functional heterogeneity of the heme protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Harshica; Halpert, James R.; Davydov, Dmitri R.

    2008-01-01

    We used a rapid scanning stop-flow technique to study the kinetics of reduction of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) by the flavin domain of cytochrome P450-BM3 (BMR), which was shown to form a stoichiometric complex (KD = 0.48 µM) with CYP3A4. In the absence of substrates only about 50% of CYP3A4 was able to accept electrons from BMR. Whereas the high-spin fraction was completely reducible, the reducibility of the low-spin fraction did not exceed 42%. Among four substrates tested (testosterone, 1-pyrenebutanol, bromocriptine, or α-naphthoflavone (ANF)) only ANF is capable of increasing the reducibility of the low-spin fraction to 75%. Our results demonstrate that the pool of CYP3A4 is heterogeneous, and not all P450 is competent for electron transfer in the complex with reductase. The increase in the reducibility of the enzyme in the presence of ANF may represent an important element of the mechanism of action of this activator. PMID:18086551

  10. The role of Barbie box sequences as cis-acting elements involved in the barbiturate-mediated induction of cytochromes P450BM-1 and P450BM-3 in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Liang, Q; He, J S; Fulco, A J

    1995-03-01

    In a previous publication (He, J.-S., and Fulco, A. J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 7864-7869), we reported that a 15-17-base pair DNA sequence (designated a Barbie box element) in the 5'-regulatory regions of cytochrome P450BM-1 and P450BM-3 genes from Bacillus megaterium was recognized by a barbiturate-regulated protein. It is now recognized that essentially all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes whose 5'-flanking regions are known and that encode barbiturate-inducible proteins contain the Barbie box element. A 4-base pair sequence (AAAG) is found in the same relative position in all Barbie box elements. In B. megaterium, mutation of the Barbie box located in the P450BM-1 gene leads to the constitutive synthesis of cytochrome P450BM-1 and a 10-fold increase of expression of Bm1P1, a small gene located upstream of the P450BM-1 gene, that encodes a putative regulatory protein. Mutation of the P450BM-3 Barbie box significantly increased the expression of both P450BM-3 and Bm3P1 (another small gene located upstream of the P450BM-3 gene that encodes a second putative regulatory protein) in response to pentobarbital induction but left the basal levels unaffected. In gel mobility shift assays, Bm3R1, a repressor of the P450BM-3 gene, was found to specifically interact with the Barbie box sequences of the B. megaterium P450 genes. Mutated Barbie boxes showed a decreased binding affinity for Bm3R1 compared to their wild type (unmutated) counterparts. Barbie box sequences were also shown to specifically interact with putative positive regulatory factors of B. megaterium cells. These putative positive factors were induced by pentobarbital and were also present at high levels during late stationary phase of B. megaterium cell cultures grown in the absence of barbiturates. The mutated Barbie box sequences had greater binding affinity for these positive factors than did unmutated Barbie box sequences. DNase I footprinting analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the P450BM-1 gene

  11. In vivo roles of Bm3R1 repressor in the barbiturate-mediated induction of the cytochrome P450 genes (P450(BM-3) and P450(BM-)1) of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Liang, Q; Chen, L; Fulco, A J

    1998-04-10

    We previously showed [Q. Liang, A.J. Fulco, J. Biol. Chem., 270 (1995) 18606-18614) that the binding of Bm3R1 repressor to Barbie box elements and operator sites in the 5'-flanking regions of the P450BM-3 and P450BM-1 (CYP102 and CYP106) genes in Bacillus megaterium was a critical factor in their regulation at the level of transcription. We now describe experiments that delineate specific roles for Bm3R1 in the barbiturate-mediated induction of these genes. We directly demonstrate the interaction of Bm3R1 with Barbie box and operator sequences and show that high in vivo levels of Bm3R1 prevent putative positive factors from binding to Barbie box elements, strongly inhibit the expression of the P450 genes, prolong the lag phase of growth in Bacillus megaterium cultures and increase the sensitivity of the cells to the growth-inhibitory effects of barbiturates. Finally, our data suggest that there may be two forms of Bm3R1, either of which can interact with OIII, the bicistronic operator sequence. PMID:9565684

  12. Engineering cytochrome P450 BM3 of Bacillus megaterium for terminal oxidation of palmitic acid.

    PubMed

    Brühlmann, Fredi; Fourage, Laurent; Ullmann, Christophe; Haefliger, Olivier P; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Dubois, Cédric; Wahler, Denis

    2014-08-20

    Directed evolution via iterative cycles of random and targeted mutagenesis was applied to the P450 domain of the subterminal fatty acid hydroxylase CYP102A1 of Bacillus megaterium to shift its regioselectivity towards the terminal position of palmitic acid. A powerful and versatile high throughput assay based on LC-MS allowed the simultaneous detection of primary and secondary oxidation products, which was instrumental for identifying variants with a strong preference for the terminal oxidation of palmitic acid. The best variants identified acquired up to 11 amino acid alterations. Substitutions at F87, I263, and A328, relatively close to the bound substrate based on available crystallographic information contributed significantly to the altered regioselectivity. However, non-obvious residues much more distant from the bound substrate showed surprising strong contributions to the increased selectivity for the terminal position of palmitic acid. PMID:24833423

  13. Improved cyclopropanation activity of histidine-ligated cytochrome P450 enables the enantioselective formal synthesis of levomilnacipran.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Jane; Renata, Hans; Peck, Nicole E; Farwell, Christopher C; Coelho, Pedro S; Arnold, Frances H

    2014-06-23

    Engineering enzymes capable of modes of activation unprecedented in nature will increase the range of industrially important molecules that can be synthesized through biocatalysis. However, low activity for a new function is often a limitation in adopting enzymes for preparative-scale synthesis, reaction with demanding substrates, or when a natural substrate is also present. By mutating the proximal ligand and other key active-site residues of the cytochrome P450 enzyme from Bacillus megaterium (P450-BM3), a highly active His-ligated variant of P450-BM3 that can be employed for the enantioselective synthesis of the levomilnacipran core was engineered. This enzyme, BM3-Hstar, catalyzes the cyclopropanation of N,N-diethyl-2-phenylacrylamide with an estimated initial rate of over 1000 turnovers per minute and can be used under aerobic conditions. Cyclopropanation activity is highly dependent on the electronic properties of the P450 proximal ligand, which can be used to tune this non-natural enzyme activity. PMID:24802161

  14. Free radicals and activated oxygen.

    PubMed

    Famaey, J P

    1982-01-01

    Superoxide anion (0(-2)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) are products of the biological reduction of 0(2). They are very reactive and poorly tolerated within living systems and enzymes that catalytically scavenge these products have been evolved as defense mechanisms. These include superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase and peroxidases. Large amounts of O-2 are produced by different enzymatic and non enzymatic biological processes. Large amounts of activated oxygens are produced by phagocytosing cells such as macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells. This production is associated with the bactericidal actions of these cells but it also largely contributes to exacerbate and sustain the inflammation where these cells congregate. The arachidonic acid pathway triggered by the inflammatory stimuli is also a source for these oxidizing radicals. The production of activated oxygens has been associated with the normal aging process but also with various toxic reactions (e.g. the toxicity of the herbicide paraquat, of the ionizing radiations, of certain antibiotics such as streptonigrin, etc. . . .). O-2 induces the depolymerization of hyaluronic acid which lends viscosity and lubricating properties to synovial fluids. SOD possess antiinflammatory properties and a bovine SOD, orgotein, has now been largely investigated by intramuscular and intraarticular injections in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Various antiinflammatory compounds (e.g. the salicylates) are able either to inhibit the production of these oxygen radicals or to scavenge them which seems of importance for their antiinflammatory properties. Singlet oxygen, another activated oxygen, might also play a role in the inflammatory process. PMID:6295769

  15. Active oxygen doctors the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló, Ana; Francès, Francesc; Corella, Dolores; Verdú, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    Investigation at the scene of a crime begins with the search for clues. In the case of bloodstains, the most frequently used reagents are luminol and reduced phenolphthalein (or phenolphthalin that is also known as the Kastle-Meyer colour test). The limitations of these reagents have been studied and are well known. Household cleaning products have evolved with the times, and new products with active oxygen are currently widely used, as they are considered to be highly efficient at removing all kinds of stains on a wide range of surfaces. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of these new cleaning products on latent bloodstains that may be left at a scene of a crime. To do so, various fabrics were stained with blood and then washed using cleaning agents containing active oxygen. The results of reduced phenolphthalein, luminol and human haemoglobin tests on the washed fabrics were negative. The conclusion is that these new products alter blood to such an extent that it can no longer be detected by currently accepted methods employed in criminal investigations. This inability to locate bloodstains means that highly important evidence (e.g. a DNA profile) may be lost. Consequently, it is important that investigators are aware of this problem so as to compensate for it.

  16. Constrained water access to the active site of cytochrome P450 from the piezophilic bacterium Photobacterium profundum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sineva, Elena V.; Davydov, Dmitri R.

    2010-12-01

    Living species inhabiting ocean deeps must adapt to high hydrostatic pressure. This adaptation, which must enable functioning under conditions of promoted protein hydration, is especially important for proteins such as cytochromes P450 that exhibit functionally important hydration-dehydration dynamics. Here we study the interactions of substrates with cytochrome P450-SS9, a putative fatty acid hydroxylase from the piezophilic bacterium Photobacterium profundum SS9, and characterize the protein's barotropic properties. Comparison of P450-SS9 with cytochrome P450BM-3, a mesophilic fatty acid hydroxylase, suggests that P450-SS9 is characterized by severely confined accessibility and low water occupancy of the active site. This feature may reveal a mechanism for the structural adaptation of the piezophilic enzyme. We also demonstrate that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids exert opposite effects on solvent accessibility and hydration of the active site. Modulation of the protein conformation by fatty acids is hypothesized to have an important physiological function in the piezophile.

  17. Biochar activated by oxygen plasma for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mukul; Kharel, Parashu; Gu, Zhengrong; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-01

    Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a byproduct of biomass pyrolysis. As a low-cost, environmental-friendly material, biochar has the potential to replace more expensive synthesized carbon nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) for use in future supercapacitors. To achieve high capacitance, biochar requires proper activation. A conventional approach involves mixing biochar with a strong base and baking at a high temperature. However, this process is time consuming and energy inefficient (requiring temperatures >900 °C). This work demonstrates a low-temperature (<150 °C) plasma treatment that efficiently activates a yellow pine biochar. Particularly, the effects of oxygen plasma on the biochar microstructure and supercapacitor characteristics are studied. Significant enhancement of the capacitance is achieved: 171.4 F g-1 for a 5-min oxygen plasma activation, in comparison to 99.5 F g-1 for a conventional chemical activation and 60.4 F g-1 for untreated biochar. This enhancement of the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of a broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. The plasma activation mechanisms in terms of the evolution of the biochar surface and microstructure are further discussed.

  18. SAFETY ASPECTS OF OXYGEN AERATION ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was carried out to assess the impact of the use of oxygen and oxygen-enriched air for aeration of activated sludge systems on the safety of municipal waste-water treatment plants and their personnel. The tasks included (1) determination of oxygen combustion hazards f...

  19. Henry's Law Activity of Oxygen in Molten Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. W.

    2015-09-01

    A model is proposed for the solubility of oxygen in molten iron in dilute solutions in which the oxygen exists in two states, free and associated. Only the free oxygen has thermodynamic activity in the sense of interaction with an electrochemical cell to produce the voltage described by the Nernst equation.

  20. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  1. PARALLEL EVALUATION OF AIR- AND OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To provide data on the relative merits of air and oxygen in the activated sludge process, two 1900-cu m/day (0.5-mgd) activated sludge pilot plant, one air and one oxygen system, were operated side-by-side at the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant, Carson, California. Both of th...

  2. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  3. Oxygen-independent induction of enzyme activities related to oxygen metabolism in yeast by copper.

    PubMed

    Galiazzo, F; Schiesser, A; Rotilio, G

    1988-04-14

    Aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of CuSO4 (between 0.1 and 1 mM) caused a generalized induction of major enzyme activities involved in 'housekeeping' routes of oxygen metabolism (cytochrome oxidase, glutathione peroxidases and catalase) which were comparable to or higher than that observed with Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase. Fumarase and glutathione transferase, tested as controls for oxygen-unrelated activities, were found to decrease under the same conditions. In the absence of oxygen, copper addition to yeast resulted in significant increases of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidases and a slight increase of cytochrome oxidase, with catalase remaining undetectable irrespective of whether or not copper was present. Other metal ions tested (Mn2+, Co2+) were unable to produce such effects. It is concluded that copper has a general inducing effect on enzymes related to metabolism of oxygen and oxygen derivatives, which is mediated neither by formation of O2-. and H2O2 nor by interaction with copper-specific apoproteins. These results point to a general role of copper as regulator of the expression of major enzyme activities involved in biological oxygen activation. PMID:2831994

  4. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  5. Leukocytic oxygen activation and microbicidal oxidative toxins.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J K; Barrette, W C

    1989-01-01

    Following a brief introduction of cellular response to stimulation comprising leukocyte activation, three major areas are discussed: (1) the neutrophil oxidase; (2) myeloperoxidase (MPO)-dependent oxidative microbicidal reactions; and (3) MPO-independent oxidative reactions. Topics included in section (A) are current views on the activation mechanism, redox composition, structural and topographic organization of the oxidase, and its respiratory products. In section (B), emphasis is placed on recent research on cidal mechanisms of HOCl, including the oxidative biochemistry of active chlorine compounds, identification of sites of lesions in bacteria, and attendant metabolic consequences. In section (C), we review the (bio)chemistry of H2O2 and .OH microbicidal reactions, with particular attention being given to addressing the controversial issue of probe methods to identify .OH radical and critical assessment of the recent proposal that MPO-independent killing arises from site-specific metal-catalyzed Fenton-type chemistry. PMID:2548810

  6. OXYGEN UTILIZATION IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE PLANTS: SIMULATION AND MODEL CALIBRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the research described in the report is to apply recent advances in activated sludge process modeling to the simulation of oxygen utilization rates in full scale activated sludge treatment plants. This is accomplished by calibrating the International Association ...

  7. Oxygen tension limits nitric oxide synthesis by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C C; Li, W P; Calero, M

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have established that constitutive calcium-dependent ('low-output') nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is regulated by oxygen tension. We have investigated the role of oxygen tension in the synthesis of NO by the 'high-output' calcium-independent NOS in activated macrophages. Hypoxia increased macrophage NOS gene expression in the presence of one additional activator, such as lipopolysaccharide or interferon-gamma, but not in the presence of both. Hypoxia markedly reduced the synthesis of NO by activated macrophages (as measured by accumulation of nitrite and citrulline), such that, at 1% oxygen tension, NO accumulation was reduced by 80-90%. The apparent K(m) for oxygen calculated from cells exposed to a range of oxygen tensions was found to be 10.8%, or 137 microM, O(2) This value is considerably higher than the oxygen tension in tissues, and is virtually identical to that reported recently for purified recombinant macrophage NOS. The decrease in NO synthesis did not appear to be due to diminished arginine or cofactor availability, since arginine transport and NO synthesis during recovery in normoxia were normal. Analysis of NO synthesis during hypoxia as a function of extracellular arginine indicated that an altered V(max), but not K(m)(Arg), accounted for the observed decrease in NO synthesis. We conclude that oxygen tension regulates the synthesis of NO in macrophages by a mechanism similar to that described previously for the calcium-dependent low-output NOS. Our data suggest that oxygen tension may be an important physiological regulator of macrophage NO synthesis in vivo. PMID:10970783

  8. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Activation of a Dormant Singlet Oxygen Photosensitizer: From Autocatalytic Singlet Oxygen Amplification to Chemicontrolled Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Durantini, Andrés M; Greene, Lana E; Lincoln, Richard; Martínez, Sol R; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-02-01

    Here we show the design, preparation, and characterization of a dormant singlet oxygen ((1)O2) photosensitizer that is activated upon its reaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS), including (1)O2 itself, in what constitutes an autocatalytic process. The compound is based on a two segment photosensitizer-trap molecule where the photosensitizer segment consists of a Br-substituted boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye. The trap segment consists of the chromanol ring of α-tocopherol, the most potent naturally occurring lipid soluble antioxidant. Time-resolved absorption, fluorescence, and (1)O2 phosphorescence studies together with fluorescence and (1)O2 phosphorescence emission quantum yields collected on Br2B-PMHC and related bromo and iodo-substituted BODIPY dyes show that the trap segment provides a total of three layers of intramolecular suppression of (1)O2 production. Oxidation of the trap segment with ROS restores the sensitizing properties of the photosensitizer segment resulting in ∼40-fold enhancement in (1)O2 production. The juxtaposed antioxidant (chromanol) and prooxidant (Br-BODIPY) antagonistic chemical activities of the two-segment compound enable the autocatalytic, and in general ROS-mediated, activation of (1)O2 sensitization providing a chemical cue for the spatiotemporal control of (1)O2.The usefulness of this approach to selectively photoactivate the production of singlet oxygen in ROS stressed vs regular cells was successfully tested via the photodynamic inactivation of a ROS stressed Gram negative Escherichia coli strain. PMID:26789198

  10. Prolyl Hydroxylase PHD3 Activates Oxygen-dependent Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Rantanen, Krista; Pursiheimo, Juha; Högel, Heidi; Himanen, Virpi; Metzen, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs/EGLNs) are central regulators of the molecular responses to oxygen availability. One isoform, PHD3, is expressed in response to hypoxia and causes apoptosis in oxygenated conditions in neural cells. Here we show that PHD3 forms subcellular aggregates in an oxygen-dependent manner. The aggregation of PHD3 was seen under normoxia and was strongly reduced under hypoxia or by the inactivation of the PHD3 hydroxylase activity. The PHD3 aggregates were dependent on microtubular integrity and contained components of the 26S proteasome, chaperones, and ubiquitin, thus demonstrating features that are characteristic for aggresome-like structures. Forced expression of the active PHD3 induced the aggregation of proteasomal components and activated apoptosis under normoxia in HeLa cells. The apoptosis was seen in cells prone to PHD3 aggregation and the PHD3 aggregation preceded apoptosis. The data demonstrates the cellular oxygen sensor PHD3 as a regulator of protein aggregation in response to varying oxygen availability. PMID:18337469

  11. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  12. Early oxygen-utilization and brain activity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Alderliesten, Thomas; de Vries, Linda S; Groenendaal, Floris; Toet, Mona C; Lemmers, Petra M A; Vosse van de, Renè E; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon J N L

    2015-01-01

    The combined monitoring of oxygen supply and delivery using Near-InfraRed spectroscopy (NIRS) and cerebral activity using amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) could yield new insights into brain metabolism and detect potentially vulnerable conditions soon after birth. The relationship between NIRS and quantitative aEEG/EEG parameters has not yet been investigated. Our aim was to study the association between oxygen utilization during the first 6 h after birth and simultaneously continuously monitored brain activity measured by aEEG/EEG. Forty-four hemodynamically stable babies with a GA < 28 weeks, with good quality NIRS and aEEG/EEG data available and who did not receive morphine were included in the study. aEEG and NIRS monitoring started at NICU admission. The relation between regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction (cFTOE), and quantitative measurements of brain activity such as number of spontaneous activity transients (SAT) per minute (SAT rate), the interval in seconds (i.e. time) between SATs (ISI) and the minimum amplitude of the EEG in μV (min aEEG) were evaluated. rScO2 was negatively associated with SAT rate (β=-3.45 [CI=-5.76- -1.15], p=0.004) and positively associated with ISI (β=1.45 [CI=0.44-2.45], p=0.006). cFTOE was positively associated with SAT rate (β=0.034 [CI=0.009-0.059], p=0.008) and negatively associated with ISI (β=-0.015 [CI=-0.026- -0.004], p=0.007). Oxygen delivery and utilization, as indicated by rScO2 and cFTOE, are directly related to functional brain activity, expressed by SAT rate and ISI during the first hours after birth, showing an increase in oxygen extraction in preterm infants with increased early electro-cerebral activity. NIRS monitored oxygenation may be a useful biomarker of brain vulnerability in high-risk infants. PMID:25965343

  13. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James W A; Richmond, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  14. Changes to coral health and metabolic activity under oxygen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    On Hawaiian reefs, the fast-growing, invasive algae Gracilaria salicornia overgrows coral heads, restricting water flow and light, thereby smothering corals. Field data shows hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen (DO2) < 2 mg/L) occurring underneath algal mats at night, and concurrent bleaching and partial tissue loss of shaded corals. To analyze the impact of nighttime oxygen-deprivation on coral health, this study evaluated changes in coral metabolism through the exposure of corals to chronic hypoxic conditions and subsequent analyses of lactate, octopine, alanopine, and strombine dehydrogenase activities, critical enzymes employed through anaerobic respiration. Following treatments, lactate and octopine dehydrogenase activities were found to have no significant response in activities with treatment and time. However, corals subjected to chronic nighttime hypoxia were found to exhibit significant increases in alanopine dehydrogenase activity after three days of exposure and strombine dehydrogenase activity starting after one overnight exposure cycle. These findings provide new insights into coral metabolic shifts in extremely low-oxygen environments and point to ADH and SDH assays as tools for quantifying the impact of hypoxia on coral health. PMID:27114888

  15. Activated oxygen alters cerebral microvascular responses in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Leffler, C.W.; Busiia, D.W.; Armstead, W.M.; Mirro, R.; Thelin, O. )

    1990-02-26

    In piglets, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion blocks prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilation to hypercapnia (CO{sub 2}) and hypotension but not prostanoid independent dilation to isoproterenol (Isu) or constriction to norepinephrine (NE). Ischemia/reperfusion increases activated-O{sub 2} production by piglet brains. Using cranial windows in piglets, the authors investigated the hypothesis that activated oxygen can block prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension without altering responses to Isu and NE. Exposure to an activated oxygen generating system of xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, and Fe that made about 3 times the activated-O{sub 2} on the brain surface as ischemia/reperfusion caused reversible pial arteriolar dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation was reduced to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but not to Isu. NE constrictor responses were also unaltered. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe caused constriction followed by reversible dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation in response to CO{sub 2} and hypotension was not altered. However, addition of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe totally eliminated pial arteriolar dilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but did not decrease dilation caused by Isu or constriction caused by NE. The authors conclude that activated oxygen could produce the altered prostanoid dependent pial arteriolar responses observed following ischemia in piglets.

  16. Activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on oxide supported Au catalysts.

    PubMed

    Widmann, D; Behm, R J

    2014-03-18

    Although highly dispersed Au catalysts with Au nanoparticles (NPs) of a few nanometers in diameter are well-known for their high catalytic activity for several oxidation and reduction reactions already at rather low temperatures for almost 30 years, central aspects of the reaction mechanism are still unresolved. While most studies focused on the active site, the active Au species, and the effect of the support material, the most crucial step during oxidation reactions, the activation of molecular oxygen and the nature of the resulting active oxygen species (Oact), received more attention just recently. This is topic of this Account, which focuses on the formation, location, and nature of the Oact species present on metal oxide supported Au catalysts under typical reaction conditions, at room temperature and above. It is mainly based on quantitative temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor measurements, which different from most spectroscopic techniques are able to detect and quantify these species even at the extremely low concentrations present under realistic reaction conditions. Different types of pulse experiments were performed, during which the highly dispersed, realistic powder catalysts are exposed to very low amounts of reactants, CO and/or O2, in order to form and reactively remove Oact species and gain information on their formation, nature, and the active site for Oact formation. Our investigations have shown that the active oxygen species for CO oxidation on Au/TiO2 for reaction at 80 °C and higher is a highly stable atomic species, which at 80 °C is formed only at the perimeter of the Au-oxide interface and whose reactive removal by CO is activated, but not its formation. From these findings, it is concluded that surface lattice oxygen represents the Oact species for the CO oxidation. Accordingly, the CO oxidation proceeds via a Au-assisted Mars-van Krevelen mechanism, during which surface lattice oxygen close to the Au NPs is removed by reaction

  17. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  18. Charge transfer induced activity of graphene for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Anli; Xia, Weijun; Zhang, Lipeng; Dou, Shuo; Xia, Zhenhai; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-05-01

    Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), with its strong electron-accepting ability, was used to dope graphene as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The charge transfer process was observed from graphene to TCNE by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman characterizations. Our density functional theory calculations found that the charge transfer behavior led to an enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity for the ORR.

  19. Effects of MCI-186 upon neutrophil-derived active oxygens.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, K; Shishido, N; Aizawa, H; Hasebe, N; Kikuchi, K; Nakamura, M

    2007-01-01

    Reactions of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazoline-5-one (MCI-186) with hypochlorous acid and superoxide were analysed by spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry. The results were applied to the neutrophil system to evaluate the scavenging activity of neutrophil-derived active oxygen species by MCI-186. MCI-186 reacted rapidly with hypochlorous acid (1 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1)) to form a chlorinated intermediate, followed by a slow conversion to a new spectrum. MCI-186 consumed 3 moles of hypochlorous acid and did not react with superoxide. The newly synthesized fluorescence probes, 2-[6-(4'-amino)-phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl]benzoic acid (APF) and 2-[6-(4'-hydroxy)phenoxy-3H-anthen-3-on-9-yl]benzoic acid (HPF) successfully detected neutrophil-derived active oxygens (Setsukinai K, Urano Y, Kakinuma K, Majima HJ, Nagano T. Development of novel fluorescence probes that can reliably detect reactive oxygen species and distinguish specific species. J Biol Chem 2003; 278: 3170-3175). The rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with MCI-186 and fluorescence probes was in the order of MCI-186 > APF > HPF. Fluorescence due to the oxidation of APF and HPF was observed with the stimulated neutrophils. The result that the intensity from APF oxidation was higher than that from HPF oxidation is compatible with reports that APF selectively reacts with hypochlorous acid. Fluorescence due to oxidation of both APF and HPF decreased when the reactions were carried out in the presence of a fluorescence probe and MCI-186 in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that MCI-186 effectively scavenges neutrophil-derived hypochlorous acid and other active oxygens. PMID:17705989

  20. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general. PMID:21423188

  1. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayssilov, Georgi N.; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P.; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C.; MatolíN, VladimíR.; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general.

  2. On the determination of oxygen abundances in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Micela, G.

    2004-08-01

    We discuss oxygen abundances derived from [O I] λ6300s and the O I triplet in stars spanning a wide range in chromospheric activity level, and show that these two indicators yield increasingly discrepant results with higher chromospheric/coronal activity measures. While the forbidden and permitted lines give fairly consistent results for solar-type disk dwarfs, spuriously high O I triplet abundances are observed in young Hyades and Pleiades stars, as well as in individual components of RS CVn binaries (up to 1.8 dex). The distinct behaviour of the [O I]-based abundances which consistently remain near-solar suggests that this phenomenon mostly results from large departures from LTE affecting the O I triplet at high activity level that are currently unaccounted for, but also possibly from a failure to adequately model the atmospheres of K-type stars. These results suggest that some caution should be exercised when interpreting oxygen abundances in active binaries or young open cluster stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Proposals 64.L-0249 and 071.D-0260). Table \\ref{tab_data} is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  3. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  4. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  5. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  6. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  7. The interrelationship between muscle oxygenation, muscle activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake to incremental ramp exercise: influence of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Boone, Jan; Barstow, Thomas J; Celie, Bert; Prieur, Fabrice; Bourgois, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle and ventilatory responses to incremental ramp exercise would be influenced by aerobic fitness status by means of a cross-sectional study with a large subject population. Sixty-four male students (age: 21.2 ± 3.2 years) with a heterogeneous peak oxygen uptake (51.9 ± 6.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), range 39.7-66.2 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed an incremental ramp cycle test (20-35 W·min(-1)) to exhaustion. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was recorded, and muscle activation and oxygenation were measured with surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The integrated electromyography (iEMG), mean power frequency (MPF), deoxygenated [hemoglobin and myoglobin] (deoxy[Hb+Mb]), and total[Hb+Mb] responses were set out as functions of work rate and fitted with a double linear function. The respiratory compensation point (RCP) was compared and correlated with the breakpoints (BPs) (as percentage of peak oxygen uptake) in muscle activation and oxygenation. The BP in total[Hb+Mb] (83.2% ± 3.0% peak oxygen uptake) preceded (P < 0.001) the BP in iEMG (86.7% ± 4.0% peak oxygen uptake) and MPF (86.3% ± 4.1% peak oxygen uptake), which in turn preceded (P < 0.01) the BP in deoxy[Hb+Mb] (88.2% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake) and RCP (87.4% ± 4.5% peak oxygen uptake). Furthermore, the peak oxygen uptake was significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated to the BPs and RCP, indicating that the BPs in total[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.66; P < 0.001), deoxy[Hb+Mb] (r = 0.76; P < 0.001), iEMG (r = 0.61; P < 0.001), MPF (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), and RCP (r = 0.75; P < 0.001) occurred at a higher percentage of peak oxygen uptake in subjects with a higher peak oxygen uptake. In this study a close relationship between muscle oxygenation, activation, and pulmonary oxygen uptake was found, occurring in a cascade of events. In subjects with a higher aerobic fitness level this cascade occurred at a higher relative intensity. PMID:26701120

  8. Activated carbon becomes active for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuecheng; Jia, Yi; Odedairo, Taiwo; Zhao, Xiaojun; Jin, Zhao; Zhu, Zhonghua; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-21

    We utilized a facile method for creating unique defects in the activated carbon (AC), which makes it highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The ORR activity of the defective AC (D-AC) is comparable to the commercial Pt/C in alkaline medium, and the D-AC also exhibits excellent HER activity in acidic solution. PMID:27277286

  9. Production and Characterization of Active Transparent PET Films for Oxygen Sensitive Foods Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaria Galdi, Maria; Incarnato, Loredana

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate possible solutions to realize active, transparent PET film suitable for packaging oxygen sensitive foods. At this purpose, monolayer active PET films at different oxygen scavenger concentrations and multilayer active ones were produced by cast extrusion laboratory scale equipments. To assess their activity and to verify the efficacy of such solutions, O2 absorption analyses were carried out in continuous by an innovative oxygen meter.

  10. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible. PMID:27020398

  11. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen–oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O–O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described. PMID:17971328

  12. Oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt{111} surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Ye, Jin-Yu; Morgan, David; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2014-07-21

    PtM overlayers (where M=Fe, Co or Ni) supported on Pt{111} are prepared via thermal annealing in either a nitrogen/water or hydrogen ambient of dilute aqueous droplets containing M(Z+) cations directly attached to the electrode. Two different PtM phases are detected depending on the nature of the post-annealing cooling environment. The first of these consists of small (<20 nm), closely packed microcrystals comprised of a central metallic core and a shell (several monolayers thick) of mixed metal oxides/hydroxides. The second type of PtM phase is prepared by cooling in a stream of hydrogen gas. Although this second phase also consists of numerous microcrystals covering the Pt{111} electrode surface, these are both flatter than before and moreover are entirely metallic in character. A positive shift in the onset of PtM oxide formation correlates with increased activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which we ascribe to the greater availability of platinum metallic sites under ORR conditions. PMID:24986646

  13. New platform for cytochrome p450 reaction combining in situ immobilization on biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyung; Nam, Dong Heon; Lee, Sahng Ha; Park, Jong Hyun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Chan Beum; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2014-12-17

    We describe an efficienct chemical conversion platform with in situ immobilization of P450-BM3 on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) granules. Through fusion with phasin, P450-BM3 is easily immobilized on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) granules in Escherichia coli. In our work, the immobilized P450 exhibited higher stability and catalytic activity compared to free P450 against changes of pH, temperature, and concentrations of urea and ions. Through quick recovery of immobilized enzyme, the P450-P(3HB) complex successfully catalyzed an O-dealkylation reaction several times with maintained activity. Using the robust P450-P(3HB) complex, we performed a P450-catalyzed reaction on a preparative reactor scale (100 mL) and high-level production (12.3 μM) of 7-hydroxycoumarine from 7-ethoxycoumarin could be achieved. PMID:25322062

  14. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  15. Exploring the Electron Transfer Properties of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase by Reversal of the FMN Redox Potential*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiying; Das, Aditi; Sibhatu, Hiruy; Jamal, Joumana; Sligar, Stephen G.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    In nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) the FMN can exist as the fully oxidized (ox), the one-electron reduced semiquinone (sq), or the two-electron fully reduced hydroquinone (hq). In NOS and microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase the sq/hq redox potential is lower than that of the ox/sq couple, and hence it is the hq form of FMN that delivers electrons to the heme. Like NOS, cytochrome P450BM3 has the FAD/FMN reductase fused to the C-terminal end of the heme domain, but in P450BM3 the ox/sq and sq/hq redox couples are reversed, so it is the sq that transfers electrons to the heme. This difference is due to an extra Gly residue found in the FMN binding loop in NOS compared with P450BM3. We have deleted residue Gly-810 from the FMN binding loop in neuronal NOS (nNOS) to give ΔG810 so that the shorter binding loop mimics that in cytochrome P450BM3. As expected, the ox/sq redox potential now is lower than the sq/hq couple. ΔG810 exhibits lower NO synthase activity but normal levels of cytochrome c reductase activity. However, unlike the wild-type enzyme, the cytochrome c reductase activity of ΔG810 is insensitive to calmodulin binding. In addition, calmodulin binding to ΔG810 does not result in a large increase in FMN fluorescence as in wild-type nNOS. These results indicate that the FMN domain in ΔG810 is locked in a unique conformation that is no longer sensitive to calmodulin binding and resembles the “on” output state of the calmodulin-bound wild-type nNOS with respect to the cytochrome c reduction activity. PMID:18852262

  16. Molecular dioxygen enters the active site of 12/15-lipoxygenase via dynamic oxygen access channels.

    PubMed

    Saam, Jan; Ivanov, Igor; Walther, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2007-08-14

    Cells contain numerous enzymes that use molecular oxygen for their reactions. Often, their active sites are buried deeply inside the protein, which raises the question whether there are specific access channels guiding oxygen to the site of catalysis. Choosing 12/15-lipoxygenase as a typical example for such oxygen-dependent enzymes, we determined the oxygen distribution within the protein and defined potential routes for oxygen access. For this purpose, we have applied an integrated strategy of structural modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic measurements. First, we computed the 3D free-energy distribution for oxygen, which led to identification of four oxygen channels in the protein. All channels connect the protein surface with a region of high oxygen affinity at the active site. This region is localized opposite to the nonheme iron providing a structural explanation for the reaction specificity of this lipoxygenase isoform. The catalytically most relevant path can be obstructed by L367F exchange, which leads to a strongly increased Michaelis constant for oxygen. The blocking mechanism is explained in detail by reordering the hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules. Our results provide strong evidence that the main route for oxygen access to the active site of the enzyme follows a channel formed by transiently interconnected cavities whereby the opening and closure are governed by side chain dynamics. PMID:17675410

  17. A mechanism of oxygen sensing in yeast. Multiple oxygen-responsive steps in the heme biosynthetic pathway affect Hap1 activity.

    PubMed

    Hon, Thomas; Dodd, Athena; Dirmeier, Reinhard; Gorman, Nadia; Sinclair, Peter R; Zhang, Li; Poyton, Robert O

    2003-12-12

    Heme plays central roles in oxygen sensing and utilization in many living organisms. In yeast, heme mediates the effect of oxygen on the expression of many genes involved in using or detoxifying oxygen. However, a direct link between intracellular heme level and oxygen concentration has not been vigorously established. In this report, we have examined the relationships among oxygen levels, heme levels, Hap1 activity, and HAP1 expression. We found that Hap1 activity is controlled in vivo by heme and not by its precursors and that heme activates Hap1 even in anoxic cells. We also found that Hap1 activity exhibits the same oxygen dose-response curves as Hap1-dependent aerobic genes and that these dose-response curves have a sharp break at approximately 1 microM O2. The results show that the intracellular signaling heme level, reflected as Hap1 activity, is closely correlated with oxygen concentration. Furthermore, we found that bypass of all heme synthetic steps but ferrochelatase by deuteroporphyrin IX does not circumvent the need for oxygen in Hap1 full activation by heme, suggesting that the last step of heme synthesis, catalyzed by ferrochelatase, is also subjected to oxygen control. Our results show that multiple heme synthetic steps can sense oxygen concentration and provide significant insights into the mechanism of oxygen sensing in yeast. PMID:14512429

  18. Cell death induced by direct laser activation of singlet oxygen at 1270 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anquez, F.; El Yazidi Belkoura, I.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Courtade, E.

    2013-02-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a major role in many chemical and biological photo-oxidation processes. It has a high chemical reactivity, which is commonly harnessed for therapeutic issues. Indeed, singlet oxygen is recognized as the major cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. In this treatment of cancer, singlet oxygen is created, among other reactive species, by an indirect transfer of energy from light to molecular oxygen via excitation of a photosensitizer. In this paper, we show that the conventional singlet oxygen production scheme can be simplified. Production of singlet oxygen is achieved in living cells from photosensitizer-free 1270 nm laser excitation of the electronic ground state of molecular oxygen. The quantity of singlet oxygen produced in this way is sufficient to induce an oxidative stress leading to cell death. Other effects such as thermal stress are discriminated, and we conclude that cell death is only due to singlet oxygen creation. This new simplified scheme of singlet oxygen activation can be seen as a breakthrough for phototherapies of malignant diseases and/or as a non-invasive possibility to generate reactive oxygen species in a tightly controlled manner.

  19. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  20. The Effect of 30% Oxygen on Visuospatial Performance and Brain Activation: An Fmri Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, S.C.; Tack, G.R.; Lee, B.; Eom, G.M.; Lee, S.Y.; Sohn, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that administration of the air with 30% oxygen compared with normal air (21% oxygen) enhances cognitive functioning through increased activation in the brain. A visuospatial task was presented while brain images were scanned by a 3 T fMRI system. The results showed that there was an improvement in…

  1. Atmospheric oxygen plasma activation of silicon (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Sara B.; Gonzalez, Eleazar II; Hicks, Robert F.

    2010-05-15

    Silicon (100) surfaces were converted to a hydrophilic state with a water contact angle of <5 deg. by treatment with a radio frequency, atmospheric pressure helium, and oxygen plasma. A 2 in. wide plasma beam, operating at 250 W, 1.0 l/min O{sub 2}, 30 l/min He, and a source-to-sample distance of 3{+-}0.1 mm, was scanned over the sample at 100{+-}2 mm/s. Plasma oxidation of HF-etched silicon caused the dispersive component of the surface energy to decrease from 55.1 to 25.8 dyn/cm, whereas the polar component of the surface energy increased from 0.3 to 42.1 dyn/cm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the treatment generated a monolayer of covalently bonded oxygen on the Si(100) surface 0.15{+-}0.10 nm thick. The surface oxidation kinetics have been measured by monitoring the change in water contact angle with treatment time, and are consistent with a process that is limited by the mass transfer of ground-state oxygen atoms to the silicon surface.

  2. Design of high pressure oxygen filter for extravehicular activity life support system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The experience of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with extravehicular activity life support emergency oxygen supply subsystems has shown a large number of problems associated with particulate contamination. These problems have resulted in failures of high pressure oxygen component sealing surfaces. A high pressure oxygen filter was designed which would (a) control the particulate contamination level in the oxygen system to a five-micron glass bead rating, ten-micron absolute condition (b) withstand the dynamic shock condition resulting from the sudden opening of 8000 psi oxygen system shutoff valve. Results of the following program tasks are reported: (1) contaminant source identification tests, (2) dynamic system tests, (3) high pressure oxygen filter concept evaluation, (4) design, (5) fabrication, (6) test, and (7) application demonstration.

  3. Reactive oxygen scavenging activity of matured whiskey and its active polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Taguchi, A; Koshimizu, S; Suwa, Y; Yamada, Y; Shirasaka, N; Yoshizumi, H

    2007-04-01

    The quality of whiskey is known to improve remarkably by its storage over many years. This process is commonly termed "maturing." In this process, polyphenols derived from lignin and tannin of the barrel have an important role in not only forming the matured flavor and taste but also contributing to the advance of clustering ethanol and water in whiskey. It is also likely that polyphenols generally possess reactive oxygen (RO) scavenging activity. The present study evaluated the RO scavenging activity (free-radical scavenging activity, H(2)O(2) reduction activity under peroxidase coculture, and H(2)O(2)scavenging activity) of 24 single malt whiskeys with a maturation age of 10 to 30 y produced in Japanese, Scotch (Islay), or Scotch (Speyside and Highland) regions. Single malt whiskey not only showed RO scavenging activity but there was also a positive correlation between this activity and the maturation age of whiskey exceeding the difference resulting from the manufacturing region. A nonvolatile fraction derived from the barrel was responsible for RO scavenging activity. In particular, the contents of ellagic and gallic acids and lyoniresinol, the main polyphenolic compounds in whiskey, increased with maturation age. For the free-radical scavenging activity per molecule, each compound was 1.68 to 3.14 times that of trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E). The activities of ellagic acid, gallic acid, and lyoniresinol in the whiskey (Yamazaki 18) were equivalent to that of 80.3, 31.2, and 11.1 ppm trolox, respectively. Accordingly, the total activity of these 3 compounds accounted for about 20% of the activity of the whiskey (630.7 ppm trolox). PMID:17995817

  4. Effects of carbohydrate on the internal oxygen concentration, oxygen uptake, and nitrogenase activity in detached pea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    The interaction between carbon substrates and O{sub 2} and their effects on nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were examined in detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle). The internal O{sub 2} concentration was estimated from the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin measured by reflectance spectroscopy. Lowering the endogenous carbohydrate content of nodules by excising the shoots 16 hours before nodule harvest or by incubating detached nodules at 100 kPa O{sub 2} for 2 hours resulted in a 2- to 10-fold increase in internal O{sub 2}, and a decline in nitrogenase activity. Conversely, when detached nodules were supplied with 100 millimolar succinate, the internal O{sub 2} was lowered. Nitrogenase activity was stimulated by succinate but only at high external O{sub 2}. Oxygen uptake increased linearly with external O{sub 2} but was affected only slightly by the carbon treatments. The apparent diffusion resistance in the nodule cortex was similar in all of the treatments. Carbon substrates can thus affect nitrogenase activity indirectly by affecting the O{sub 2} concentration within detached nodules.

  5. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-01

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  6. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  7. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  8. Oxygen activation with transition metal complexes in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bakac, Andreja

    2010-04-12

    Coordination to transition-metal complexes changes both the thermodynamics and kinetics of oxygen reduction. Some of the intermediates (superoxo, hydroperoxo, and oxo species) are close analogues of organic oxygen-centered radicals and peroxides (ROO{sm_bullet}, ROOH, and RO{sm_bullet}). Metal-based intermediates are typically less reactive, but more persistent, than organic radicals, which makes the two types of intermediates similarly effective in their reactions with various substrates. The self-exchange rate constant for hydrogen-atom transfer for the couples Cr{sub aq}OO{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OOH{sup 2+} and L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhOO{sup 2+}/L{sup 1}(H{sub 2}O)RhOOH{sup 2+} was estimated to be 10{sup 1 {+-} 1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The use of this value in the simplified Marcus equation for the Cr{sub aq}O{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OOH{sup 2+} cross reaction provided an upper limit k{sub CrO,CrOH} {le} 10{sup (-2{+-}1)} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for Cr{sub aq}O{sup 2+}/Cr{sub aq}OH{sup 2+} self-exchange. Even though superoxo complexes react very slowly in bimolecular self-reactions, extremely fast cross reactions with organic counterparts, i.e., acylperoxyl radicals, have been observed. Many of the intermediates generated by the interaction of O{sub 2} with reduced metal complexes can also be accessed by alternative routes, both thermal and photochemical.

  9. The effect of mayfly (Hexagenia spp.) burrowing activity on sediment oxygen demand in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, William J.; Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies support the hypothesis that large numbers of infaunal burrow-irrigating organisms in the western basin of Lake Erie may increase significantly the sediment oxygen demand, thus enhancing the rate of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion. We conducted laboratory experiments to quantify burrow oxygen dynamics and increased oxygen demand resulting from burrow irrigation using two different year classes of Hexagenia spp. nymphs from western Lake Erie during summer, 2006. Using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, we simultaneously determined oxygen concentrations and burrow water flow velocities. Burrow oxygen depletion rates ranged from 21.7 mg/nymph/mo for 15 mm nymphs at 23 °C to 240.7 mg/nymph/mo for 23 mm nymphs at 13 °C. Sealed microcosm experiments demonstrated that mayflies increase the rate of oxygen depletion by 2-5 times that of controls, depending on size of nymph and water temperature, with colder waters having greater impact. At natural population densities, nymph pumping activity increased total sediment oxygen demand 0.3-2.5 times compared to sediments with no mayflies and accounted for 22-71% of the total sediment oxygen demand. Extrapolating laboratory results to the natural system suggest that Hexagenia spp. populations may exert a significant control on oxygen depletion during intermittent stratification. This finding may help explain some of the fluctuations in Hexagenia spp. population densities in western Lake Erie and suggests that mayflies, by causing their own population collapse irrespective of other environmental conditions, may need longer term averages when used as a bio-indicator of the success of pollution-abatement programs in western Lake Erie and possibly throughout the Great Lakes.

  10. Inactivation of Pathogenic Bacteria on Seeds by Active Oxygen Species Generated in Low-Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Reoto; Uchida, Shohei; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kosaka, Rina; Soeda, Yasutaka

    2015-09-01

    The inactivation of bacteria on seeds by active oxygen species generated by a low-pressure oxygen plasma is investigated. Species of active oxygen contributing to the inactivation of bacteria are attempted to be identified. Cylindrical stainless chamber with the internal volume of 17 L is used and RF antenna is set inside the chamber. The oxygen gas pressure is 20-100 Pa. RF power of 13.56 MHz is supplied to RF antenna and CCP is generated. After irradiation, bacteria are extracted from seeds and cultivated on nutrient agars. The number of colonies on these agars is counted after 48 h incubation. The number of bacteria on seeds decreases to less than 10-3 after plasma irradiation for 45 min comparing with that of control. The tendency of the reduction rate of bacteria on seeds has positive correlation with that of the light emission intensity of the singlet excited oxygen molecule as the oxygen gas pressure is varied. It is supposed that the singlet excited oxygen molecule would be one of the major factors for the inactivation of bacteria on seeds.

  11. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  12. SIMPLIFIED INJECTION OF OXYGEN GAS INTO AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District conducted a pilot investigation of the Simplox process at their Tapia Water Reclamation Facility in Calabasas, California. The Simplox process, developed by the Cosmodyne Division of Cordon International, involves covering an activated sl...

  13. DESIGN PROCEDURES FOR DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTROL OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents design procedures and guidelines for the selection of aeration equipment and dissolved (DO) control systems for activated sludge treatment plants. Aeration methods, equipment and application techniques are examined and selection procedures offered. Various DO...

  14. Activity-induced tissue oxygenation changes in rat cerebellar cortex: interplay of postsynaptic activation and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Offenhauser, Nikolas; Thomsen, Kirsten; Caesar, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging relies on the robust coupling between neuronal activity, metabolism and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the physiological basis of the neuroimaging signals is still poorly understood. We examined the mechanisms of activity-dependent changes in tissue oxygenation in relation to variations in CBF responses and postsynaptic activity in rat cerebellar cortex. To increase synaptic activity we stimulated the monosynaptic, glutamatergic climbing fibres that excite Purkinje cells via AMPA receptors. We used local field potentials to indicate synaptic activity, and recorded tissue oxygen partial pressure (Ptiss,O2) by polarographic microelectrodes, and CBF using laser-Doppler flowmetry. The disappearance rate of oxygen in the tissue increased linearly with synaptic activity. This indicated that, without a threshold, oxygen consumption increased as a linear function of synaptic activity. The reduction in Ptiss,O2 preceded the rise in CBF. The time integral (area) of the negative Ptiss,O2 response increased non-linearly showing saturation at high levels of synaptic activity, concomitant with a steep rise in CBF. This was accompanied by a positive change in Ptiss,O2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced the initial negative Ptiss,O2 response (‘dip’), while attenuating the evoked CBF increase and positive Ptiss,O2 response equally. This indicates that increases in CBF counteract activity-induced reductions in Ptiss,O2, and suggests the presence of a tissue oxygen reserve. The changes in Ptiss,O2 and CBF were strongly attenuated by AMPA receptor blockade. Our findings suggest an inverse relationship between negative Ptiss,O2 and CBF responses, and provide direct in vivo evidence for a tight coupling between activity in postsynaptic AMPA receptors and cerebellar oxygen consumption. PMID:15774524

  15. Oxygen control of breathing by an olfactory receptor activated by lactate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andy J.; Ortega, Fabian E.; Riegler, Johannes; Madison, Daniel V.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals have evolved homeostatic responses to changes in oxygen availability that act on different time scales. Although the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway that controls long term responses to low oxygen (hypoxia) has been established1, the pathway that mediates acute responses to hypoxia in mammals is not well understood. Here we show that the olfactory receptor Olfr78 is highly and selectively expressed in oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body, a chemosensory organ at the carotid artery bifurcation that monitors blood oxygen and stimulates breathing within seconds when oxygen declines2. Olfr78 mutants fail to increase ventilation in hypoxia but respond normally to hypercapnia. Glomus cells are present in normal numbers and appear structurally intact, but hypoxia-induced carotid body activity is diminished. Lactate, a metabolite that rapidly accumulates in hypoxia and induces hyperventilation3–6, activates Olfr78 in heterologous expression experiments, induces calcium transients in glomus cells, and stimulates carotid sinus nerve activity through Olfr78. We propose that in addition to its role in olfaction, Olfr78 acts as a hypoxia sensor in the breathing circuit by sensing lactate produced when oxygen levels decline. PMID:26560302

  16. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  17. [Effect of substances which change the proton-motive force on activity of methane microbe oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Malashenko, Iu P; Sokolov, I G; Rokitko, P V; Romanovskaia, V A

    2006-01-01

    High extracellular concentration of K+ stimulated methane oxygenation with Methylomonas rubra 15 [Russian character: see text], Methylococcus thermophilus 111 [Russian character: see text] and Methylococcus capsulatus 494 at neutral value of pH. That was determined by K+ arrival to the cells at neutral medium pH that resulted in the increase of pH difference between the exterior and interior sides of the membrane (ApH) and, respectively, in the increase of the methane oxygenation rate. Thus, methane monooxygenation depends on the availability of ion gradients on a membrane. Ionophores valinomycin and monensin inhibited methane oxygenation by the cells of Methylomonas rubra 15 [Russian character: see text] that evidenced for the methane oxygenation dependence on the protone-motive force which could be formed as the result both of protons displacement with oxygenation of methane monooxygenation products and of the gradient of potassium and sodium ions. Protonophore FCCP suppressed completely methane oxygenation in Methylococcus capsulatus 494 and M. thermophilus 111 [Russian character: see text] at neutral pH, and took no effect at the alkaline values of pH. This suggests that FCCP dissipates the proton-motive force and does not inhibit methane monooxygenase activity. The results obtained indicate that the process of methane oxygenation should be combined with energy generation in a form of the transmembrane electric charge (delta psi) and proton gradient (deltapH). PMID:17243361

  18. NADPH Oxidase- and Mitochondria-derived Reactive Oxygen Species in Proinflammatory Microglial Activation: A Bipartisan Affair?

    PubMed Central

    Bordt, Evan A.; Polster, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain and play major roles in central nervous system development, maintenance, and disease. Brain insults cause microglia to proliferate, migrate, and transform into one or more activated states. Classical M1 activation triggers the production of proinflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species which, in excess, can exacerbate brain injury. The mechanisms underlying microglial activation are not fully understood, yet reactive oxygen species are increasingly implicated as mediators of microglial activation. In this review, we highlight studies linking reactive oxygen species, in particular hydrogen peroxide derived from NADPH oxidase-generated superoxide, to the classical activation of microglia. In addition, we critically evaluate controversial evidence suggesting a specific role for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that mediates the production of IL-1β and IL-18. Finally, the limitations of common techniques used to implicate mitochondrial ROS in microglial and inflammasome activation, such as the use of the mitochondrially-targeted ROS indicator MitoSOX and the mitochondrially-targeted antioxidant MitoTEMPO, are also discussed. PMID:25091898

  19. Novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator for intelligent food packaging.

    PubMed

    Vu, Chau Hai Thai; Won, Keehoon

    2013-09-01

    For the first time, alginate polymer has been applied to prevent dyes from leaching out of colorimetric oxygen indicator films, which enable people to notice the presence of oxygen in the package in an economic and simple manner. The dye-based oxygen indicator film suffers from dye leaching upon contact with water. In this work, UV-activated visual oxygen indicator films were fabricated using thionine, glycerol, P25 TiO2, and zein as a redox dye, a sacrificial electron donor, UV-absorbing semiconducting photocatalyst, and an encapsulation polymer, respectively. When this zein-coated film was immersed in water for 24h, the dye leakage was as high as 80.80±0.45%. However, introduction of alginate (1.25%) as the coating polymer considerably diminished the dye leaching to only 5.80±0.06%. This is because the ion-binding ability of alginate could prevent the cation dye from leaching into water. This novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator was also successfully photo-bleached and regained colour fast in the presence of oxygen. PMID:23578614

  20. Active and stable carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoon T.; Won, Jong H.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials, such as nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays, Co3O4/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids and carbon nanotube–graphene complexes have shown respectable oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media. Although certainly promising, the performance of these materials does not yet warrant implementation in the energy conversion/storage devices utilizing basic electrolytes, for example, alkaline fuel cells, metal-air batteries and certain electrolysers. Here we demonstrate a new type of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst obtained from iron acetate as an iron precursor and from cyanamide as a nitrogen and carbon nanotube precursor in a simple, scalable and single-step method. The composite has the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalysts. When used at a sufficiently high loading, this catalyst also outperforms the most active platinum-based catalysts. PMID:23715281

  1. Evaluation of the Catalytic Activity and Cytotoxicity of Palladium Nanocubes. The Role of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photo-excitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB), as well as, analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes’ activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC towards oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electrons oxidation when the surface of PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  2. Evaluation of the catalytic activity and cytotoxicity of palladium nanocubes: the role of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-05-13

    Recently, it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photoexcitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes' activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step, followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC toward the oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electron oxidation when the surface of the PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent, but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  3. Air-activated chemical warming devices: effects of oxygen and pressure.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, G; Rivard, R; Fabus, S

    2005-01-01

    Air-activated chemical warming devices use an exothermic chemical reaction of rapidly oxidizing iron to generate heat for therapeutic purposes. Placing these products in a hyperbaric oxygen environment greatly increases the supply of oxidant and thus increases the rate of reaction and maximum temperature. Testing for auto-ignition and maximum temperatures attained by ThermaCare Heat Wraps, Playtex Heat Therapy, and Heat Factory disposable warm packs under ambient conditions and under conditions similar to those encountered during hyperbaric oxygen treatments in monoplace and multiplace hyperbaric chambers (3 atm abs and > 95% oxygen) revealed a maximum temperature of 269 degrees F (132 degrees C) with no spontaneous ignition. The risk of thermal burn injury to adjacent skin may be increased significantly if these devices are used under conditions of hyperbaric oxygen. PMID:16509287

  4. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts. PMID:26178185

  5. Thermodynamic explanation of the universal correlation between oxygen evolution activity and corrosion of oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binninger, Tobias; Mohamed, Rhiyaad; Waltar, Kay; Fabbri, Emiliana; Levecque, Pieter; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) has attracted increased research interest due to its crucial role in electrochemical energy conversion devices for renewable energy applications. The vast majority of OER catalyst materials investigated are metal oxides of various compositions. The experimental results obtained on such materials strongly suggest the existence of a fundamental and universal correlation between the oxygen evolution activity and the corrosion of metal oxides. This corrosion manifests itself in structural changes and/or dissolution of the material. We prove from basic thermodynamic considerations that any metal oxide must become unstable under oxygen evolution conditions irrespective of the pH value. The reason is the thermodynamic instability of the oxygen anion in the metal oxide lattice. Our findings explain many of the experimentally observed corrosion phenomena on different metal oxide OER catalysts.

  6. Apogossypolone targets mitochondria and light enhances its anticancer activity by stimulating generation of singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yu; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Peng; Yang, Dajun; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Apogossypolone (ApoG2), a novel derivative of gossypol, has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and to have antitumor activity in multiple types of cancer cells. Recent reports suggest that gossypol stimulates the generation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leukemia and colorectal carcinoma cells; however, gossypol-mediated cell death in leukemia cells was reported to be ROS-independent. This study was conducted to clarify the effect of ApoG2-induced ROS on mitochondria and cell viability, and to further evaluate its utility as a treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We tested the photocytotoxicity of ApoG2 to the poorly differentiated NPC cell line CNE-2 using the ROS-generating TL/10 illumination system. The rapid ApoG2-induced cell death was partially reversed by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), but the ApoG2-induced reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was not reversed by NAC. In the presence of TL/10 illumination, ApoG2 generated massive amounts of singlet oxygen and was more effective in inhibiting cell growth than in the absence of illumination. We also determined the influence of light on the anti-proliferative activity of ApoG2 using a CNE-2–xenograft mouse model. ApoG2 under TL/10 illumination healed tumor wounds and suppressed tumor growth more effectively than ApoG2 treatment alone. These results indicate that the ApoG2-induced CNE-2 cell death is partly ROS-dependent. ApoG2 may be used with photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat NPC. PMID:21192843

  7. Antioxidative activity and growth regulation of Brassicaceae induced by oxygen radical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Ono, Reoto; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yonesu, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The growth regulation characteristics of plants are investigated when plant seeds are irradiated with atmospheric discharge plasma. Enhancement of the germination and lengths of the stem and root of plants are observed after seeding. The total length of the stem and root increases approximately 1.6 times after a cultivation period of 72 h. The growth regulation effect is found to be maintained for 80 h of cultivation after seeding. The growth regulation originates from the change in the antioxidative activity of plant cells induced by active oxygen species generated in the oxygen plasma, which leads to the production of growth factor in plants.

  8. REVIEW: Excited states in the active media of oxygen — iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.

    2009-11-01

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen — iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O2 and I2 molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I2 in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended.

  9. The relationship between brain cortical activity and brain oxygenation in the prefrontal cortex during hypergravity exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig; Goswami, Nandu; Robinson, Ryan; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Schneider, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Artificial gravity has been proposed as a method to counteract the physiological deconditioning of long-duration spaceflight; however, the effects of hypergravity on the central nervous system has had little study. The study aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between prefrontal cortex brain activity and prefrontal cortex oxygenation during exposure to hypergravity. Twelve healthy participants were selected to undergo hypergravity exposure aboard a short-arm human centrifuge. Participants were exposed to hypergravity in the +Gz axis, starting from 0.6 +Gz for women, and 0.8 +Gz for men, and gradually increasing by 0.1 +Gz until the participant showed signs of syncope. Brain cortical activity was measured using electroencephalography (EEG) and localized to the prefrontal cortex using standard low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Prefrontal cortex oxygenation was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A significant increase in prefrontal cortex activity (P < 0.05) was observed during hypergravity exposure compared with baseline. Prefrontal cortex oxygenation was significantly decreased during hypergravity exposure, with a decrease in oxyhemoglobin levels (P < 0.05) compared with baseline and an increase in deoxyhemoglobin levels (P < 0.05) with increasing +Gz level. No significant correlation was found between prefrontal cortex activity and oxy-/deoxyhemoglobin. It is concluded that the increase in prefrontal cortex activity observed during hypergravity was most likely not the result of increased +Gz values resulting in a decreased oxygenation produced through hypergravity exposure. No significant relationship between prefrontal cortex activity and oxygenation measured by NIRS concludes that brain activity during exposure to hypergravity may be difficult to measure using NIRS. Instead, the increase in prefrontal cortex activity might be attributable to psychological stress, which could pose a problem for the use of a

  10. Respiratory muscle activity and oxygenation during sleep in patients with muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    White, J E; Drinnan, M J; Smithson, A J; Griffiths, C J; Gibson, G J

    1995-05-01

    Patients with respiratory muscle weakness show nocturnal hypoventilation, with oxygen desaturation particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but evidence in individuals with isolated bilateral diaphragmatic paresis (BDP) is conflicting. The effect of sleep on relative activity of the different respiratory muscles of such patients and, consequently, the precise mechanisms causing desaturation have not been clarified. We have studied eight patients, four with generalized muscle weakness and four with isolated BDP during nocturnal sleep with measurements including oxygen saturation and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of various respiratory muscle groups. Nocturnal oxygenation correlated inversely with postural fall in vital capacity, an index of diaphragmatic strength. During REM sleep, hypopnoea and desaturation occurred particularly during periods of rapid eye movements (phasic REM sleep). In most subjects, such events were "central" in type and associated with marked suppression of intercostal muscle activity, but two subjects had recurrent desaturation due to "obstructive" hypopnoea and/or apnoea. Expiratory activity of the external oblique muscle was present whilst awake and during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in seven of the eight subjects in the semirecumbent posture. This probably represents an "accessory inspiratory" effect, which aids passive caudal diaphragmatic motion as the abdominal muscles relax at the onset of inspiration. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity was suppressed in phasic REM sleep, suggesting that loss of this "accessory inspiratory" effect may contribute to "central" hypopnoea. We conclude that, in patients with muscle weakness, nocturnal oxygenation correlates with diaphragmatic strength.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656954

  11. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  12. Active medium gain study of electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobyanin, Yuriy; Adamenkov, Yuriy; Vyskubenko, Boris; Goryachev, Leonid; Ilyin, Sergey; Kalashnik, Anatoliy; Rakhimova, Tatiana; Rogozhnikov, Georgiy

    2007-05-01

    The paper reports on experimental studies of the active medium gain in supersonic electric-discharge oxygen-iodine laser (DOIL) based on traveling mw discharge. The measurements have included: absolute concentration, yield, and energy efficiency of production of SO in pure oxygen and oxygen-helium mixes at an oxygen partial pressure 3 to 15 Torr. For the gas flow to get rid of atomic oxygen, both heterogeneous mercury oxide coatings of the tube walls and homogeneous additives to the work mix, such as nitrogen oxide, have been used. The active medium of DOIL was formed using a nozzle array of the type of ejector sized as 10*50 mm2. The singlet oxygen-helium mix was supplied through three rows of sonic cylindrical nozzles, while the iodine-carrier gas mix - through two rows of supersonic conical nozzles with a half-opening angle of 10°(arc). The gas-phase iodine was produced in a quartz cell filled with iodine crystals. Room-temperature iodine vapors were picked up with a carrier gas (nitrogen or helium) and thus delivered into the nozzle array. The active medium was investigated by the high-resolution laser diode spectroscopy approach that used the laser type Vortex 6025 purchased from New Focus, Inc. The laser medium gain factor was determined by the intra-cavity approach having a sensitivity about 1*10 -6 cm -1. The static temperature of the medium was determined from the measurements of gain half-width. The gain of the active medium of electric-discharge OIL has been investigated. The DOIL in use was operating on a mix composed as O II:He=1:1 at a total pressure of 6 Torr and flowrate - about 1 mmol/s. With helium as an iodine carrier gas at a flowrate ~3 mmol/s, we have recorded a positive gain in the DOIL medium.

  13. FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF OPEN TANK OXYGEN ACTIVATED SLUDGE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an operating summary of a full-scale demonstration of the FMC open tank pure oxygen (FMC O2) activated sludge system, conducted at the facilities of the Metropolitan Denver Sewage Disposal District No. 1 (Metro) in Denver, Colorado. The system was operated ov...

  14. In vivo imaging of brain metabolism activity using a phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probe

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Borisov, Sergei; Pumbo, Elena; Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2013-01-01

    Several approaches have been adopted for real-time imaging of neural activity in vivo. We tested a new cell-penetrating phosphorescent oxygen-sensitive probe, NanO2-IR, to monitor temporal and spatial dynamics of oxygen metabolism in the neocortex following peripheral sensory stimulation. Probe solution was applied to the surface of anesthetized mouse brain; optical imaging was performed using a MiCAM-02 system. Trains of whisker stimuli were delivered and associated changes in phosphorescent signal were recorded in the contralateral somatosensory (“barrel”) cortex. Sensory stimulation led to changes in oxygenation of activated areas of the barrel cortex. The oxygen imaging results were compared to those produced by the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. While the signals emitted by the two probes differed in shape and amplitude, they both faithfully indicated specific whisker evoked cortical activity. Thus, NanO2-IR probe can be used as a tool in visualization and realtime analysis of sensory- evoked neural activity in vivo. PMID:23624034

  15. OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE PLANT COMPLETES TWO YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed report of the conversion to and operational performance of an oxygen-activated sludge system at the Westgate wastewater treatment plant in Fairfax County, Virginia, is given in this report. It is presented in the form of a case history including the time span leading u...

  16. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  17. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  18. Activation of Methanogenesis in Arid Biological Soil Crusts Despite the Presence of Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Matthies, Diethart; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Methanogenesis is traditionally thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. Wetland and rice field soils are well known sources for atmospheric methane, while aerated soils are considered sinks. Although methanogens have been detected in low numbers in some aerated, and even in desert soils, it remains unclear whether they are active under natural oxic conditions, such as in biological soil crusts (BSCs) of arid regions. To answer this question we carried out a factorial experiment using microcosms under simulated natural conditions. The BSC on top of an arid soil was incubated under moist conditions in all possible combinations of flooding and drainage, light and dark, air and nitrogen headspace. In the light, oxygen was produced by photosynthesis. Methane production was detected in all microcosms, but rates were much lower when oxygen was present. In addition, the δ13C of the methane differed between the oxic/oxygenic and anoxic microcosms. While under anoxic conditions methane was mainly produced from acetate, it was almost entirely produced from H2/CO2 under oxic/oxygenic conditions. Only two genera of methanogens were identified in the BSC-Methanosarcina and Methanocella; their abundance and activity in transcribing the mcrA gene (coding for methyl-CoM reductase) was higher under anoxic than oxic/oxygenic conditions, respectively. Both methanogens also actively transcribed the oxygen detoxifying gene catalase. Since methanotrophs were not detectable in the BSC, all the methane produced was released into the atmosphere. Our findings point to a formerly unknown participation of desert soils in the global methane cycle. PMID:21655270

  19. Activation energies for oxygen reduction on platinum alloys: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alfred B; Roques, Jérôme; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Murthi, Vivek S; Markovic, Nenad M; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2005-01-27

    A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the electrode potential dependencies of activation energies is presented for the first step in oxygen reduction over platinum and platinum alloy catalysts in both polycrystalline and carbon supported form. Tafel data for several of the catalysts are used to predict potential-dependent activation energies for oxygen reduction over the 0.6-0.9 V range in strong and weak acid. Comparisons with the theoretical curve show good agreement above 0.8 V, suggesting a fairly constant preexponential factor. Arrhenius determinations of activation energies over the 0.7-0.9 V range yield little trend for weak acid, possibly because of the larger uncertainties in the Arrhenius fits, but the strong acid results have smaller uncertainties and for them the measured activation energies trend up with potential. PMID:16851081

  20. In Situ Observation of Active Oxygen Species in Fe-Containing Ni-Based Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: The Effect of pH on Electrochemical Activity.

    PubMed

    Trześniewski, Bartek J; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Vermaas, David A; Longo, Alessandro; Bras, Wim; Koper, Marc T M; Smith, Wilson A

    2015-12-01

    Ni-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OECs) are cost-effective and very active materials that can be potentially used for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion process toward sustainable energy generation. We present a systematic spectroelectrochemical characterization of two Fe-containing Ni-based OECs, namely nickel borate (Ni(Fe)-B(i)) and nickel oxyhydroxide (Ni(Fe)OOH). Our Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy results show that both OECs are chemically similar, and that the borate anions do not play an apparent role in the catalytic process at pH 13. Furthermore, we show spectroscopic evidence for the generation of negatively charged sites in both OECs (NiOO(-)), which can be described as adsorbed "active oxygen". Our data conclusively links the OER activity of the Ni-based OECs with the generation of those sites on the surface of the OECs. The OER activity of both OECs is strongly pH dependent, which can be attributed to a deprotonation process of the Ni-based OECs, leading to the formation of the negatively charged surface sites that act as OER precursors. This work emphasizes the relevance of the electrolyte effect to obtain catalytically active phases in Ni-based OECs, in addition to the key role of the Fe impurities. This effect should be carefully considered in the development of Ni-based compounds meant to catalyze the OER at moderate pHs. Complementarily, UV-vis spectroscopy measurements show strong darkening of those catalysts in the catalytically active state. This coloration effect is directly related to the oxidation of nickel and can be an important factor limiting the efficiency of solar-driven devices utilizing Ni-based OECs. PMID:26544169

  1. Unciaphenol, an Oxygenated Analogue of the Bergman Cyclization Product of Uncialamycin Exhibits Anti-HIV Activity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David E; Bottriell, Helen; Davies, Julian; Tietjen, Ian; Brockman, Mark A; Andersen, Raymond J

    2015-11-01

    Unciaphenol (2), an oxygenated analogue of the Bergman cyclization product of the enediyne uncialamycin (1), has been isolated along with 1 from cultures of the actinomycete Streptomyces uncialis. It is proposed that the C-22 OH substituent in 2 might arise from the attack of a nucleophilic oxygen species on the p-benzyne diradical intermediate IA in the Bergman cyclization of 1. 2 shows in vitro anti-HIV activity against viral strains that are resistant to clinically utilized anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:26465962

  2. Highly oxygenated triterpenoids from the roots of Schisandra chinensis and their anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiu-Yan; Gao, Kun; Nan, Zhi-Biao

    2016-01-01

    A new highly oxygenated triterpenoid, schinchinenlactone D (1), and three known compounds (2-4) were isolated from the roots of Schisandra chinensis. Their structures were determined by combining the spectroscopic analysis with the theoretical computations. The anti-inflammatory activities of compounds 1-4 were evaluated, and compound 3 exhibits the most significant activity in the inhibition of NO production with an IC50 value of 10.6 μM. PMID:26313467

  3. Tuning the activity of Pt(111) for oxygen electroreduction by subsurface alloying.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Ifan E L; Bondarenko, Alexander S; Perez-Alonso, Francisco J; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Bech, Lone; Johansson, Tobias P; Jepsen, Anders K; Frydendal, Rasmus; Knudsen, Brian P; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2011-04-13

    To enable the development of low temperature fuel cells, significant improvements are required to the efficiency of the Pt electrocatalysts at the cathode, where oxygen reduction takes place. Herein, we study the effect of subsurface solute metals on the reactivity of Pt, using a Cu/Pt(111) near-surface alloy. Our investigations incorporate electrochemical measurements, ultrahigh vacuum experiments, and density functional theory. Changes to the OH binding energy, ΔE(OH), were monitored in situ and adjusted continuously through the subsurface Cu coverage. The incorporation of submonolayer quantities of Cu into Pt(111) resulted in an 8-fold improvement in oxygen reduction activity. The most optimal catalyst for oxygen reduction has an ΔE(OH) ≈ 0.1 eV weaker than that of pure Pt, validating earlier theoretical predictions. PMID:21417329

  4. Effects of oxygen concentration on the nitrifying activity of an aerobic hybrid granular sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Filali, Ahlem; Bessiere, Yolaine; Sperandio, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to quantify the influence of the simultaneous presence of flocs and granules in the nitrifying activity in a sequencing batch airlift reactor (SBAR). The nitrification rate and oxygen limitation of flocs, granules and hybrid sludge was investigated using respirometric assays at different dissolved oxygen concentrations. The spatial distribution of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) was investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results showed that the nitrification rate was much less sensitive to oxygen limitation in systems containing a fraction of flocs than in pure granular sludge. Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) were found to be distributed in similar quantities in flocs and granules whereas the Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB) were located preferentially in granules. This study showed that the presence of flocs with granules could increase the robustness of the process to transitory reductions of aeration. PMID:22233907

  5. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  6. Increased oxygen consumption following activation of brain: theoretical footnotes using spectroscopic data from barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, J; Johnston, D; Martindale, J; Jones, M; Berwick, J; Zheng, Y

    2001-06-01

    Optical imaging spectroscopy (OIS) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) data sequences from anesthetized rats were used to determine the relationship between changes in oxy-and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration and changes in blood volume and flow in the presence and absence of stimulation. The data from Jones et al. (accompanying paper) were used to explore the differences between two theoretical models of flow activation coupling. The essential difference between the two models is the extension of the model of Buxton and Frank by Hyder et al. (1998, J. Appl. Physiol. 85: 554--564) to incorporate change in capillary diffusivity coupled to flow. In both models activation-increased flow changes increase oxygen transport from the capillary; however, in Hyder et al.'s model the diffusivity of the capillary itself is increased. Hyder et al. proposed a parameter (Omega), a scaling "constant" linking increased blood flow and oxygen "diffusivity" in the capillary bed. Thus, in Buxton and Frank's theory, Omega = 0; i.e., there are no changes in diffusivity. In Hyder et al.'s theory, 0 < Omega < 1, and changes in diffusivity are assumed to be linearly related to flow changes. We elaborate the theoretical position of both models to show that, in principle, the different predictions from the two theories can be evaluated using optical imaging spectroscopy data. We find that both theoretical positions have limitations when applied to data from brief stimulation and when applied to data from mild hypercapnia. In summary, the analysis showed that although Hyder et al.'s proposal that diffusivity increased during activation did occur; it was shown to arise from an implementation of Buxton and Frank's theory under episodes of brief stimulation. The results also showed that the scaling parameter Omega is not a constant as the Hyder et al. model entails but in fact varies over the time course of the flow changes. Data from experiments in which mild hypercapnia was administered also

  7. Scavenging activity of "beta catechin" on reactive oxygen species generated by photosensitization of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Yoneda, T; Hiramatsu, M

    1996-05-01

    "beta CATECHIN", a preparation containing green tea extract, ascorbic acid, sunflower seed extract, dunaliella carotene and natural vitamin E, has been designed as a model "universal antioxidant" that offers protection via its scavenging action on a wide range of free radicals, both water-soluble and fat-soluble. Reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, are often generated in biological systems during photosensitized oxidation reactions. We report on the simultaneous effect of "beta CATECHIN" on active oxygen species generated during the photosensitized oxidation of riboflavin using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone (TMPD) as a "spin-trapping" agent. The intensities of the resulting stable nitroxide radical adduct, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Results show simultaneous, nonspecific and complete scavenging action of reactive oxygen species generated in our in vitro model system by "beta CATECHIN". It is therefore suggested that "beta CATECHIN" could offer protection against free radical insult and in preventing cancer and other diseases that are mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:8739038

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  9. [Light-induced production and consumption of oxygen by chloroplasts: activation and inhibition].

    PubMed

    Chan Van, N i; Nikandrov, V V; Brin, G P; Krasnovskii, A A

    1977-07-01

    Light-induced production and consumption of oxygen by pea chloroplasts are activated at certain concentrations of the solvents (diethyl ester, methyl alcohol, dimethylsulfoxide) and detergent Triton X-100. At higher concentrations of the compounds studied both reactions are inhibited. The uncouplers (methylamine and carbonyl cyanide-3-chlorophenylhydrazone) activate these processes. The agents studied have a similar effect on the processes of light-induced production and consumption of oxygen, which are limited by a common link bound to the phosphorylation site in photosystem I. The effects observed suggest that the inhibition may be due to inhibition of photosystem II, whereas the activation may be largely due to an action on photosystem I. PMID:907797

  10. LASERS: Efficient chemical oxygen — iodine laser with a high total pressure of the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Nikolaev, V. D.; Svistun, M. I.; Khvatov, N. A.; Heiger, G. D.; Madden, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    A new concept of obtaining a high total pressure of the active medium of a chemical oxygen — iodine laser (OIL) is proposed and verified. The nozzle unit of the laser consists of the alternating vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to produce high-pressure nitrogen jets, plane slotted nozzles for the flow of O2(1Δ) oxygen, and vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to inject the N2 — I2 mixture between the first two streams. For a molar chlorine flow rate of 39.2 mmol s-1, the output power was 700 W and the chemical efficiency was 19.7 %. The combined use of the ejector nozzle unit proposed to obtain the active medium and a super-sonic diffuser allows a significant simplification of the ejection system for the exhaust active medium of the OIL.

  11. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications. PMID:22044022

  12. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  13. Improved oxygen reduction activity on Pt3Ni(111) via increased surface site availability.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Fowler, Ben; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Wang, Guofeng; Ross, Philip N; Lucas, Christopher A; Marković, Nenad M

    2007-01-26

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is the main limitation for automotive applications. We demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) surface is 10-fold more active for the ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and 90-fold more active than the current state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts for PEMFC. The Pt3Ni(111) surface has an unusual electronic structure (d-band center position) and arrangement of surface atoms in the near-surface region. Under operating conditions relevant to fuel cells, its near-surface layer exhibits a highly structured compositional oscillation in the outermost and third layers, which are Pt-rich, and in the second atomic layer, which is Ni-rich. The weak interaction between the Pt surface atoms and nonreactive oxygenated species increases the number of active sites for O2 adsorption. PMID:17218494

  14. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  15. Applications of microbial cytochrome P450 enzymes in biotechnology and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Girvan, Hazel M; Munro, Andrew W

    2016-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) are a superfamily of monooxygenase enzymes with enormous potential for synthetic biology applications. Across Nature, their substrate range is vast and exceeds that of other enzymes. The range of different chemical transformations performed by P450s is also substantial, and continues to expand through interrogation of the properties of novel P450s and by protein engineering studies. The ability of P450s to introduce oxygen atoms at specific positions on complex molecules makes these enzymes particularly valuable for applications in synthetic biology. This review focuses on the enzymatic properties and reaction mechanisms of P450 enzymes, and on recent studies that highlight their broad applications in the production of oxychemicals. For selected soluble bacterial P450s (notably the high-activity P450-cytochrome P450 reductase enzyme P450 BM3), variants with a multitude of diverse substrate selectivities have been generated both rationally and by random mutagenesis/directed evolution approaches. This highlights the robustness and malleability of the P450 fold, and the capacity of these biocatalysts to oxidise a wide range of chemical scaffolds. This article reviews recent research on the application of wild-type and engineered P450s in the production of important chemicals, including pharmaceuticals and drug metabolites, steroids and antibiotics. In addition, the properties of unusual members of the P450 superfamily that do not follow the canonical P450 catalytic pathway are described. PMID:27015292

  16. Oxygen deficient ZnO 1-x nanosheets with high visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong-Li; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Xie, Xiao; Xu, An-Wu

    2015-04-28

    Zinc oxide is one of the most important wide-band-gap (3.2 eV) materials with versatile properties, however, it can not be excited by visible light. In this work, we have developed an exquisite and simple way to prepare oxygen-deficient ZnO 1-x nanosheets with a gray-colored appearance and excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. Detailed analysis based on UV-Vis absorption spectra, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and photoluminescence (PL) spectra confirms the existence of oxygen vacancies in ZnO 1-x. The incorporation of oxygen defects could effectively extend the light absorption of ZnO 1-x into the visible-light region due to the fact that the energy of the localized state is located in the forbidden gap. Thus, our obtained ZnO 1-x shows a higher photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) compared to defect-free ZnO under visible light illumination. Additionally, the high content of ˙OH radicals with a strong photo-oxidation capability over the ZnO 1-x nanosheets significantly contributes to the improvement in the photocatalytic performance. Our oxygen deficient ZnO 1-x sample shows a very high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO even after 5 cycles without any obvious decline. The results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the optoelectronic and photocatalytic performances of nanomaterials. PMID:25812132

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen preserves neurotrophic activity of carbon monoxide-exposed astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jurič, Damijana M; Šuput, Dušan; Brvar, Miran

    2016-06-24

    In astrocytes, carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by caspase and calpain activation. Impairment in astrocyte function can be time-dependently reduced by hyperbaric (3bar) oxygen (HBO). Due to the central role of astrocytes in maintaining neuronal function by offering neurotrophic support we investigated the hypothesis that HBO therapy may exert beneficial effect on acute CO poisoning-induced impairment in intrinsic neurotrophic activity. Exposure to 3000ppm CO in air followed by 24-72h of normoxia caused a progressive decline of gene expression, synthesis and secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to different extent. 1h treatment with 100% oxygen disclosed a pressure- and time-dependent efficacy in preserving astrocytic neurotrophic support. The beneficial effect was most evident when the astrocytes were exposed to HBO 1-5h after exposure to CO. The results further support an active role of hyperbaric, not normobaric, oxygenation in reducing dysfunction of astrocytes after acute CO poisoning. By preserving endogenous neurotrophic activity HBO therapy might promote neuronal protection and thus prevent the occurrence of late neuropsychological sequelae. PMID:27113706

  18. Effect of KOH activation on the formation of oxygen structure in activated carbons synthesized from polymeric precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jung, Woo-Young

    2002-06-01

    In this work, the influence of KOH activation on the surface chemistry of activated carbons (ACs) synthesized from polystyrene-based cation exchangeable resin (PSI) has been investigated. The surface chemistry of ACs has been characterized by using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pH measurement, and Boehm's titration method. As a result, PSI can be successfully converted into ACs with high porosities. The total oxygen content on the ACs studied increases with increasing the KOH-to-PSI ratio. FT-IR and XPS analyses show that the resulting carbons possess a number of oxygen surface functional groups, such as carbonyl, quinone, phenol, ether, and carboxylic acid groups. The highest oxygen content and acid value are observed at a KOH-to-PSI ratio of 4 (KPS-4). However, its pH and surface basicity are higher than those of a KOH-to-PSI ratio of 2 (KPS-2), indicating the formation of basic species, such as quinone and pyrone groups. Although the oxygen-containing groups with basic character exist in the resulting carbons, all the samples are still acidic in character. PMID:16290638

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Potato Tuber Mitochondria Is Modulated by Mitochondrially Bound Hexokinase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Meyer, Laudiene Evangelista; Machado, Lilia Bender; Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Galina, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria (PTM) have a mitochondrially bound hexokinase (HK) activity that exhibits a pronounced sensitivity to ADP inhibition. Here we investigated the role of mitochondrial HK activity in PTM reactive oxygen species generation. Mitochondrial HK has a 10-fold higher affinity for glucose (Glc) than for fructose (KMGlc = 140 μm versus KMFrc = 1,375 μm). Activation of PTM respiration by succinate led to an increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release that was abrogated by mitochondrial HK activation. Mitochondrial HK activity caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in oxygen consumption by PTM. Inhibition of Glc phosphorylation by mannoheptulose or GlcNAc induced a rapid increase in H2O2 release. The blockage of H2O2 release sustained by Glc was reverted by oligomycin and atractyloside, indicating that ADP recycles through the adenine nucleotide translocator and F0F1ATP synthase is operative during the mitochondrial HK reaction. Inhibition of mitochondrial HK activity by 60% to 70% caused an increase of 50% in the maximal rate of H2O2 release. Inhibition in H2O2 release by mitochondrial HK activity was comparable to, or even more potent, than that observed for StUCP (S. tuberosum uncoupling protein) activity. The inhibition of H2O2 release in PTM was two orders of magnitude more selective for the ADP produced from the mitochondrial HK reaction than for that derived from soluble yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) HK. Modulation of H2O2 release and oxygen consumption by Glc and mitochondrial HK inhibitors in potato tuber slices shows that hexoses and mitochondrial HK may act as a potent preventive antioxidant mechanism in potato tubers. PMID:19109413

  20. Selective nitrogen doping in graphene: Enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Huang, Sheng-Feng; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Boero, Mauro; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki; Miyata, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of N-doped zigzag graphene ribbons with various ratios of dihydrogenated to monohydrogenated edge carbons are investigated within the density functional theory framework. We find that the stability of graphitic N next to the edge, which is claimed to play important roles in the catalytic activity in our previous work, will be enhanced with increasing the concentration of dihydrogenated carbons. Furthermore, the dihydrogenated edge carbons turn out to be easily converted into monohydrogenated ones in the presence of oxygen molecules at room temperature. Based on our results, we propose a possible way to enhance the oxygen reduction catalytic activity of N-doped graphene by controlling the degrees of hydrogenation of edge carbons. The characteristic features in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra for each specific N site considered here will also be given.

  1. Doped LaFeO3 as SOFC Catalysts: Control of Oxygen Mobility Oxidation Activity

    SciTech Connect

    N Lakshminarayanan; J Kuhn; S Rykov; J Millet; U Ozkan; T Rao; J Smedley; E Wang; E Muller; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The bulk structure and surface properties of Fe-based perovskite-type oxides with the formula La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-{delta}} for y = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 have been investigated. The properties were found to strongly depend upon Co content, temperature, and environment. The materials were selected due to their potential use as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The intermediate Co loading formed oxygen vacancies most easily and several other properties including oxidation activity and surface sites showed a similar non-linear trend. Trends are related to a possible transition in electronic structure. Activity for oxidation of methane, oxygen storage and chemical compatibility was shown to be superior to that of the La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3}.

  2. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  3. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  4. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  5. Highly branched PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites with superior electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Shi, Qiurong; Xia, Haibing; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-01

    Morphology control is a promising strategy to improve the catalytic performance of Pt-based catalysts. In this work, we reported a facile synthesis of PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites using Brij 58 as a template. The highly branched structures and porous features offer relatively large surface areas, which is beneficial to the enhancement of the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells. In addition, the elimination of carbon supports showed an important effect on the stability of the catalysts. By tuning the ratio of Pt and Cu precursors, PtCu nanodendrites were almost four times more active on the basis of an equivalent Pt mass for oxygen reduction reactions than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.Morphology control is a promising strategy to improve the catalytic performance of Pt-based catalysts. In this work, we reported a facile synthesis of PtCu bimetallic alloy nanodendrites using Brij 58 as a template. The highly branched structures and porous features offer relatively large surface areas, which is beneficial to the enhancement of the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells. In addition, the elimination of carbon supports showed an important effect on the stability of the catalysts. By tuning the ratio of Pt and Cu precursors, PtCu nanodendrites were almost four times more active on the basis of an equivalent Pt mass for oxygen reduction reactions than the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07682j

  6. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR. PMID:26459261

  7. Enhanced oxygen evolution activity of IrO2 and RuO2 (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael D; Christen, Hans M; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active than the (110) surface that has been traditionally explored by density functional theory studies. The relation between the OER activity and density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites exposed on each rutile crystallographic facet is discussed. The surface-orientation dependent activities can guide the design of high-surface-area catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  8. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  9. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity.

  10. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  11. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Oxygen Electroreduction Activities of Carbon-Supported PtW Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Liufeng; More, Karren Leslie; He, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtW (PtW/C) alloy nanoparticle catalysts with well-controlled particle size, dispersion, and composition uniformity, have been synthesized by wet chemical methods of decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes, hydrolysis of metal salts, and chemical reactions within a reverse microemulsion. The synthesized PtW/C catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygen electroreduction activities were measured by the hydrodynamic rotating disk electrode technique in an acidic electrolyte. The influence of the synthesis method on PtW particle size, size distribution, composition uniformity, and catalytic oxygen electroreduction activity, have been investigated. Among the synthesis methods studied, PtW/C catalysts prepared by the decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes displayed the best platinum mass activity for oxygen reduction reaction under the current small scale production; a 3.4-fold catalytic enhancement was achieved in comparison to a benchmark Pt/C standard.

  13. Phenol degradation in heterogeneous system generating singlet oxygen employing light activated electropolymerized phenothiazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowar, Katarzyna; Blacha-Grzechnik, Agata; Bernas, Paulina; Zak, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    Five selected amine-derivatives of phenothiazine were electropolymerized on an ITO/glass substrate and then used in the daylight-activated process to produce in situ singlet oxygen which degrades phenol in a solution. The phenothiazines were immobilized in a simple electrochemical procedure in an acidic solution which led to the formation of an ultrathin transparent polymeric film. All films obtained on the ITO substrate including azure A (AA), azure C (AC), methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue (TBO), and thionine (Th) had a comparable surface coverage at the level of picomoles/cm2. The activity of these materials was then compared and presented in terms of an efficiency of the phenol degradation process in an aqueous solution by photogenerated singlet oxygen. That efficiency was determined by the UV-vis spectroscopy employing a phenol/4-aminoantipyrine complex. All the phenothiazine ultrathin polymeric films were capable of generating the singlet oxygen in the aqueous solution under daylight activation, which was used in the consecutive process of phenol degradation. The highest efficiency at a level of 51.4% and 45.4% was found for the AC/ITO and MB/ITO layers, respectively.

  14. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  15. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst. PMID:25229121

  16. Stable platinum nanoclusters on genomic DNA–graphene oxide with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Jitendra N.; Nath, Krishna; Kumar, Susheel; Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Kemp, K. Christian; Le, Nhien H.; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kwang S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize platinum clusters with small diameters of 2–4 nm are known to be excellent catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The inherent catalytic activity of smaller platinum clusters has not yet been reported due to a lack of preparation methods to control their size (<2 nm). Here we report the synthesis of platinum clusters (diameter ≤1.4 nm) deposited on genomic double-stranded DNA–graphene oxide composites, and their high-performance electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. The electrochemical behaviour, characterized by oxygen reduction reaction onset potential, half-wave potential, specific activity, mass activity, accelerated durability test (10,000 cycles) and cyclic voltammetry stability (10,000 cycles) is attributed to the strong interaction between the nanosize platinum clusters and the DNA–graphene oxide composite, which induces modulation in the electronic structure of the platinum clusters. Furthermore, we show that the platinum cluster/DNA–graphene oxide composite possesses notable environmental durability and stability, vital for high-performance fuel cells and batteries. PMID:23900456

  17. Oxygen activation in NO synthases: evidence for a direct role of the substrate.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Albane; Lang, Jérôme; Couture, Manon; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and the other reactive nitrogen species (RNOS) play crucial patho-physiological roles at the interface of oxidative stress and signalling processes. In mammals, the NO synthases (NOSs) are the source of these reactive nitrogen species, and so to understand the precise biological role of RNOS and NO requires elucidation of the molecular functioning of NOS. Oxygen activation, which is at the core of NOS catalysis, involves a sophisticated sequence of electron and proton transfers. While electron transfer in NOS has received much attention, the proton transfer processes has been scarcely investigated. Here, we report an original approach that combines fast-kinetic techniques coupled to resonance Raman spectroscopy with the use of synthetic analogues of NOS substrate. We characterise Fe(II)-O2 reaction intermediates in the presence of L-arginine (Arg), alkyl- and aryl-guanidines. The presence of new reaction intermediates, such as ferric haem-peroxide, that was formerly postulated, was tracked by analysing the oxygen activation reaction at different times and with different excitation wavelengths. Our results suggest that Arg is not a proton donor, but indirectly intervenes in oxygen activation mechanism by modulating the distal H-bond network and, in particular, by tuning the position and the role of the distal water molecule. This report supports a catalytic model with two proton transfers in step 1 (Arg hydroxylation) but only one proton transfer in step 2 (N(ω)-hydroxy-L-arginine oxidation). PMID:27419044

  18. Inhibitory activities of soluble and bound millet seed phenolics on free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara, Anoma; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    Oxidative stress, caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), is responsible for modulating several pathological conditions and aging. Soluble and bound phenolic extracts of commonly consumed millets, namely, kodo, finger (Ravi), finger (local), foxtail, proso, little, and pearl, were investigated for their phenolic content and inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and ROS, namely, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). Inhibition of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals was detrmined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The peroxyl radical inhibitory activity was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The scavenging of H(2)O(2), HOCl, and (1)O(2) was evaluated using colorimetric methods. The results were expressed as micromoles of ferulic acid equivalents (FAE) per gram of grain on a dry weight basis. In addition, major hydroxycinnamic acids were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS). All millet varieties displayed effective radical and ROS inhibition activities, which generally positively correlated with phenolic contents, except for hydroxyl radical. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of ferulic and p-coumaric acids as major hydroxycinnamic acids in phenolic extract and responsible for the observed effects. Bound extracts of millet contributed 38-99% to ROS scavenging, depending on the variety and the test system employed. Hence, bound phenolics must be included in the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of millets and other cereals. PMID:21133411

  19. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  20. Adair-based hemoglobin equilibrium with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen ion activity.

    PubMed

    Mateják, Marek; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    As has been known for over a century, oxygen binding onto hemoglobin is influenced by the activity of hydrogen ions (H⁺), as well as the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). As is also known, the binding of both CO₂and H⁺ on terminal valine-1 residues is competitive. One-parametric situations of these hemoglobin equilibria at specific levels of H⁺, O₂or CO₂are also well described. However, we think interpolating or extrapolating this knowledge into an 'empirical' function of three independent variables has not yet been completely satisfactory. We present a model that integrates three orthogonal views of hemoglobin oxygenation, titration, and carbamination at different temperatures. The model is based only on chemical principles, Adair's oxygenation steps and Van't Hoff equation of temperature dependences. Our model fits the measurements of the Haldane coefficient and CO₂hemoglobin saturation. It also fits the oxygen dissociation curve influenced by simultaneous changes in H⁺, CO₂and O₂, which makes it a strong candidate for integration into more complex models of blood acid-base with gas transport, where any combination of mentioned substances can appear. PMID:25594800

  1. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  2. Oxygen activation and intramolecular C-H bond activation by an amidate-bridged diiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew B; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hagen, Karl S; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-07-18

    A diiron(II) complex containing two μ-1,3-(κN:κO)-amidate linkages has been synthesized using the 2,2',2''-tris(isobutyrylamido)triphenylamine (H(3)L(iPr)) ligand. The resulting diiron complex, 1, reacts with dioxygen (or iodosylbenzene) to effect intramolecular C-H bond activation at the methine position of the ligand isopropyl group. The ligand-activated product, 2, has been isolated and characterized by a variety of methods including X-ray crystallography. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy of 2 prepared from(18)O(2) was used to confirm that the oxygen atom incorporated into the ligand framework is derived from molecular oxygen. PMID:21667986

  3. Microbial activities and phosphorus cycling: An application of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Lisa M.; Joshi, Sunendra R.; Kana, Todd M.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms carry out biochemical transformations of nutrients that make up their cells. Therefore, understanding how these nutrients are transformed or cycled in natural environments requires knowledge of microbial activity. Commonly used indicators for microbial activity typically include determining microbial respiration by O2/CO2 measurements, cell counts, and measurement of enzyme activities. However, coupled studies on nutrient cycling and microbial activity are not given enough emphasis. Here we apply phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18OP) as a tool for measurement of microbial activity and compare the rate of isotope exchange with methods of measuring microbial activities that are more commonly applied in environmental studies including respiration, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell counts. Our results show that different bacteria may have different strategies for P uptake, storage and release, their respiration and consequently expression of DHA and APase activities, but in general the trend of their enzyme activities are comparable. Phosphate δ18OP values correlated well with these other parameters used to measure microbial activity with the strongest linear relationships between δ18OP and CO2 evolution (r = -0.99). Even though the rate of isotope exchange for each microorganism used in this study is different, the rate per unit CO2 respiration showed one general trend, where δ18OP values move towards equilibrium while CO2 is generated. While this suggests that P cycling among microorganisms used in this study can be generalized, further research is needed to determine whether the microorganism-specific isotope exchange trend may occur in natural environments. In summary, phosphate oxygen isotope measurements may offer an alternative for use as a tracer to measure microbial activity in soils, sediments, and many other natural environments.

  4. Reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Jixueteng evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and photon emission.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Toshizo; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takamichi, Maomi; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Maehata, Yojiro; Sugiyama, Shuta; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Todoki, Kazuo; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2014-12-01

    Jixueteng, the dried stem of Spatholobus suberectus Dunn (Leguminosae), is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine that is commonly classified as a herb that promotes blood circulation and can be used to treat blood stasis. The aim of this study was to examine the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity of Jixueteng and other herbal medicines. The ROS scavenging activities of the water extracts of Jixueteng, Cnidium officinale and Salvia miltiorrhiza were examined using an electron spin resonance (ESR) technique and faint luminescence measurement. The ESR signal intensities of the superoxide anion (O2·) and hydroxyl radical (HO·) were reduced more by Jixueteng than the other herbal medicines we tested. High photon emission intensity to hydrogen peroxide (H202) and HO· was observed in Jixueteng using the XYZ chemiluminescence system that was used as faint luminescence measurement and analysis. The results of the present study revealed that the ROS scavenging activity of 8% Jixueteng was the strongest among the herbal medicines we tested. It has been reported that Jixueteng includes various polyphenols. In the ROS scavenging activity by Jixueteng, it is supposed that the antioxidant activity caused by these polyphenols would contribute greatly. In conclusion, a water extract component of Jixueteng had potent free radical scavenging activity and an antioxidative effect that inhibited the oxidative actions of O2·⁻, H2O2 and HO·. Therefore, Jixueteng represents a promising therapeutic drug for reactive oxygen-associated pathologies. PMID:25632478

  5. Pt5Gd as a highly active and stable catalyst for oxygen electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Escribano, María; Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Malacrida, Paolo; Grønbjerg, Ulrik; Knudsen, Brian P; Jepsen, Anders K; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-10-10

    The activity and stability of Pt(5)Gd for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied, using a combination of electrochemical measurements, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), and density functional theory calculations. Sputter-cleaned, polycrystalline Pt(5)Gd shows a 5-fold increase in ORR activity, relative to pure Pt at 0.9 V, approaching the most active in the literature for catalysts prepared in this way. AR-XPS profiles after electrochemical measurements in 0.1 M HClO(4) show the formation of a thick Pt overlayer on the bulk Pt(5)Gd, and the enhanced ORR activity can be explained by means of compressive strain effects. Furthermore, these novel bimetallic electrocatalysts are highly stable, which, in combination with their enhanced activity, makes them very promising for the development of new cathode catalysts for fuel cells. PMID:22998588

  6. Evidence that reactive oxygen species do not mediate NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Makio; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Isao; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hideyo; Karin, Michael; Kikugawa, Kiyomi

    2003-01-01

    It has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as second messengers leading to nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. This hypothesis is mainly based on the findings that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), compounds recognized as potential antioxidants, can inhibit NF-κB activation in a wide variety of cell types. Here we reveal that both NAC and PDTC inhibit NF-κB activation independently of antioxidative function. NAC selectively blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signaling by lowering the affinity of receptor to TNF. PDTC inhibits the IκB–ubiquitin ligase activity in the cell-free system where extracellular stimuli-regulated ROS production does not occur. Furthermore, we present evidence that endogenous ROS produced through Rac/NADPH oxidase do not mediate NF-κB signaling, but instead lower the magnitude of its activation. PMID:12839997

  7. Coupling of total hemoglobin concentration, oxygenation, and neural activity in rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K; Andermann, Mark L; Ulbert, Istvan; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M

    2003-07-17

    Recent advances in brain imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), offer great promise for noninvasive mapping of brain function. However, the indirect nature of the imaging signals to the underlying neural activity limits the interpretation of the resulting maps. The present report represents the first systematic study with sufficient statistical power to quantitatively characterize the relationship between changes in blood oxygen content and the neural spiking and synaptic activity. Using two-dimensional optical measurements of hemodynamic signals, simultaneous recordings of neural activity, and an event-related stimulus paradigm, we demonstrate that (1) there is a strongly nonlinear relationship between electrophysiological measures of neuronal activity and the hemodynamic response, (2) the hemodynamic response continues to grow beyond the saturation of electrical activity, and (3) the initial increase in deoxyhemoglobin that precedes an increase in blood volume is counterbalanced by an equal initial decrease in oxyhemoglobin. PMID:12873390

  8. A Strategy to Promote the Electrocatalytic Activity of Spinels for Oxygen Reduction by Structure Reversal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangping; Wang, Jun; Ding, Wei; Nie, Yao; Li, Li; Qi, Xueqiang; Chen, Siguo; Wei, Zidong

    2016-01-22

    The electrocatalytic performance of a spinel for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be significantly promoted by reversing its crystalline structure from the normal to the inverse. As the spinel structure reversed, the activation and cleavage of O-O bonds are accelerated owing to a dissimilarity effect of the distinct metal atoms co-occupying octahedral sites. The Co(II)Fe(III)Co(III)O4 spinel with the Fe and Co co-occupying inverse structure exhibits an excellent ORR activity, which even exceeds that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C by 42 mV in alkaline medium. PMID:26663768

  9. Structure-activity relationship in high-performance iron-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ping; Wang, Ying; Pan, Jing; Xu, Weilin; Zhuang, Lin

    2015-12-01

    A sustainable Iron (Fe), Nitrogen (N) co-doped high performance Fe-Nx/C electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is synthesized simply based on nitric acid oxidation of cheap carbon black. The obtained optimal nonprecious metal electrocatalyst shows high ORR performance in both alkaline and acidic conditions and possesses appreciable performance/price ratio due to its low cost. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship of different active sites on Fe-Nx/C is revealed systematically: Fe-N4/2-C > Fe4-N-C > N-C >> Fe4-C ≥ C, from both experimental and theoretical points of view.

  10. Transcript levels of antioxidative genes and oxygen radical scavenging enzyme activities in chilled zucchini squash in response to superatmospheric oxygen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcript levels of antioxidative genes including Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), Cu/Zn SOD, ascorbate peroxidise (APX), and catalase (CAT) do not vary significantly during storage at 5 °C with high oxygen treatment in freshly harvested zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Elite). However, ...

  11. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Manivannan, A; Balasubramanian, M; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.

  12. Khat (Catha edulis) generates reactive oxygen species and promotes hepatic cell apoptosis via MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Abid, Morad Dirhem Naji; Chen, Juan; Xiang, Min; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xiaoping; Gong, Feili

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have suggested an association between khat (Catha edulis) chewing and acute liver lesions or chronic liver disease. However, little is known about the effects of khat on hepatic cells. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism behind khat-induced apoptosis in the L02 human hepatic cell line. We used cell growth inhibition assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining to measure hepatocyte apoptosis induced by khat. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression levels of caspase-8 and -9, as well as those of Bax and Bcl-2. We also measured reactive oxygen species production. The results indicated that khat induced significant hepatocyte apoptosis in L02 cells. We found that khat activated caspase-8 and -9, upregulated Bax protein expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression levels, which resulted in the coordination of apoptotic signals. Khat-induced hepatocyte apoptosis is primarily regulated through the sustained activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and only partially via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Furthermore, the khat-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activation of the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), attenuated the khat-induced activation of JNK and ERK. Our results demonstrate that khat triggers the generation of intracellular ROS and sequentially induces the sustainable activation of JNK, which in turn results in a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis. PMID:23708648

  13. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-11-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology.

  14. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology. PMID:24264379

  15. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  16. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response. PMID:24392654

  17. Tuning the surface oxygen concentration of {111} surrounded ceria nanocrystals for enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Kaneti, Yusuf Valentino; Li, Sean

    2015-12-01

    For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile, green hydrothermal method for the investigation of photocatalytic activities. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the crystal phase and morphology of the as-prepared nanocrystals. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques were implemented to investigate the presence and variations in oxygen vacancy concentration in un-doped and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals. The photocatalytic activity results revealed that 10 at% doping is the optimal indium doping level to demonstrate superior dye removal efficiency (~40%) over un-doped and doped CeO2 NCs. Moreover, the 10% In-doped CeO2 nanocrystals expressed excellent cycling stability and superior photocatalytic performance toward other dye pollutants. Finally, on the basis of our findings, a possible photocatalytic mechanism in which indium doping can generate more surface oxygen vacancies in the ceria lattice which delay the electron-hole recombination rates, thus increasing the lifetime of electron-hole separation for enhanced photocatalytic performances was proposed.For oxide semiconductors, the morphology, particle size and oxygen vacancies are usually considered as key influential parameters for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants/dyes. It is widely accepted that cation doping not only modifies their phase and microstructures but also introduces variations in oxygen vacancy concentration. Herein, we report the fabrication of sub-10 nm sized pure and indium doped CeO2 nanocrystals (NCs) via a facile

  18. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  19. High performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Clement, Jason T.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-10-01

    The roundtrip electrochemical energy efficiency is improved from 63% to 76% at a current density of 200 mA cm-2 in an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) by utilizing modified carbon paper electrodes in the high-performance no-gap design. Heat treatment of the carbon paper electrodes in a 42% oxygen/58% nitrogen atmosphere increases the electrochemically wetted surface area from 0.24 to 51.22 m2 g-1, resulting in a 100-140 mV decrease in activation overpotential at operationally relevant current densities. An enriched oxygen environment decreases the amount of treatment time required to achieve high surface area. The increased efficiency and greater depth of discharge doubles the total usable energy stored in a fixed amount of electrolyte during operation at 200 mA cm-2.

  20. Effect of surface phosphorus functionalities of activated carbons containing oxygen and nitrogen on electrochemical capacitance

    PubMed Central

    Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa; Seredych, Mykola; Lu, Gao Qing; Kodiweera, N.K.A.C.; Stallworth, Phillip E.; Greenbaum, Steven; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2009-01-01

    Micro/mesoporous activated carbons containing oxygen and phosphorus heteroatoms were modified by incorporation of nitrogen using melamine and urea precursors. The surface chemistry was analyzed by the means of elemental analysis, XPS, and 31P MAS NMR. The results indicate that upon the incorporation of nitrogen at high temperatures not only new species involving carbon/nitrogen/oxygen are formed but also the phosphorous environment is significantly altered. Both urea and melamine precursors have similar effects on formation of P–N and P–C bonds. These compounds, although present in small but measurable quantities seem to affect the performance of carbons in electrochemical capacitors. With an increase in the heterogeneity of phosphorus containing species and with a decrease in the content pyrophosphates the capacitance increases and the retention ratio of the capacitor is improved. PMID:20354586

  1. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON THE ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER IN OHIO RIVER WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently published data show that the adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon for phenois increases significantly in the presence of molecular oxygen (Vidic, Suidan,Traegner and Nakhla, 1990). in this study, the effect of molecular oxygen on the adsorptive capacity of a...

  2. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  3. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  4. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments.

    PubMed

    Thureborn, Petter; Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  5. Involvement of Activated Oxygen in Nitrate-Induced Senescence of Pea Root Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Escuredo, P. R.; Minchin, F. R.; Gogorcena, Y.; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, I.; Klucas, R. V.; Becana, M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of short-term nitrate application (10 mM, 0-4 d) on nitrogenase (N2ase) activity, antioxidant defenses, and related parameters was investigated in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Frilene) nodules. The response of nodules to nitrate comprised two stages. In the first stage (0-2 d), there were major decreases in N2ase activity and N2ase-linked respiration and concomitant increases in carbon cost of N2ase and oxygen diffusion resistance of nodules. There was no apparent oxidative damage, and the decline in N2ase activity was, to a certain extent, reversible. The second stage (>2 d) was typical of a senescent, essentially irreversible process. It was characterized by moderate increases in oxidized proteins and catalytic Fe and by major decreases in antioxidant enzymes and metabolites. The restriction in oxygen supply to bacteroids may explain the initial decline in N2ase activity. The decrease in antioxidant protection is not involved in this process and is not specifically caused by nitrate, since it also occurs with drought stress. However, comparison of nitrate- and drought-induced senescence shows an important difference: there is no lipid degradation or lipid peroxide accumulation with nitrate, indicating that lipid peroxidation is not necessarily involved in nodule senescence. PMID:12226252

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Alter Sympathetic Activity During Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Josiane C.; Flôr, Atalia F. L.; França-Silva, Maria S.; Balarini, Camille M.; Braga, Valdir A.

    2015-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II), which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs), mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO). Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS): dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin, and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS. PMID:26779026

  7. Reconstructing ecosystem functions of the active microbial community of the Baltic Sea oxygen depleted sediments

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, Andrea; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöling, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Baltic Sea deep water and sediments hold one of the largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic areas in the world. High nutrient input and low water exchange result in eutrophication and oxygen depletion below the halocline. As a consequence at Landsort Deep, the deepest point of the Baltic Sea, anoxia in the sediments has been a persistent condition over the past decades. Given that microbial communities are drivers of essential ecosystem functions we investigated the microbial community metabolisms and functions of oxygen depleted Landsort Deep sediments by metatranscriptomics. Results show substantial expression of genes involved in protein metabolism demonstrating that the Landsort Deep sediment microbial community is active. Identified expressed gene suites of metabolic pathways with importance for carbon transformation including fermentation, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and methanogenesis were identified. The presence of transcripts for these metabolic processes suggests a potential for heterotrophic-autotrophic community synergism and indicates active mineralisation of the organic matter deposited at the sediment as a consequence of the eutrophication process. Furthermore, cyanobacteria, probably deposited from the water column, are transcriptionally active in the anoxic sediment at this depth. Results also reveal high abundance of transcripts encoding integron integrases. These results provide insight into the activity of the microbial community of the anoxic sediment at the deepest point of the Baltic Sea and its possible role in ecosystem functioning. PMID:26823996

  8. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co(3+/4+) ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  9. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions.

  10. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  11. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  12. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  13. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s −0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol−1s−1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material–over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  14. Singlet molecular oxygen-quenching activity of carotenoids: relevance to protection of the skin from photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Junji; Minami, Yuko; Bando, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O2 (1Δg)]. Solar light-induced photooxidative stress causes skin photoaging by accelerating the generation of reactive oxygen species via photodynamic actions in which O2 (1Δg) can be generated by energy transfer from excited sensitizers. Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin. An in vivo study using hairless mice clarified that a O2 (1Δg) oxygenation-specific peroxidation product of cholesterol, cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, accumulates in skin lipids due to ultraviolet-A exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, a metalloproteinase family enzyme responsible for the formation of wrinkles and sagging, was enhanced in the skin of ultraviolet-A -irradiated hairless mice. The activation of metalloproteinase-9 and the accumulation of 5α-hydroperoxide, as well as formation of wrinkles and sagging, were lowered in mice fed a β-carotene diet. These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin. Intake of β-Carotene therefore appears to be helpful in slowing down ultraviolet-A -induced photoaging in human skin by acting as a O2 (1Δg) quencher. PMID:21297913

  15. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Charlette M; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A; Mudalige, Thilak K; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material's -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 10(6) mol(-1)s(-1) was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  16. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  17. In situ x-ray, electrochemical, and modeling investigation of the oxygen electrode activation.

    SciTech Connect

    Yildiz, B.; Chang, K.-C.; Meyers, D.; Carter, J. D.; You, H.

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen electrodes of solid oxide electrochemical cells have been shown to improve under strong cathodic and anodic polarization. Our study investigates the mechanism causing such improvement, using in situ x-ray and electrochemical characterization and electrochemical impedance modeling of the oxygen electrodes. Several porous and dense thin-film model electrodes of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LCM) on single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes have been analyzed in situ at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) using x-ray reflectivity and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) at the Mn K-edge and La LII-edge. In situ x-ray reflectivity analysis show that no clear correlation between the polarization of the electrode and any further changes in the roughness of the LSM/YSZ interface exist. XANES measurements illustrate that the cathodic or anodic dc polarization at high temperature induces no detectable changes in Mn chemical state either in the bulk or at the surface of the LCM and LSM electrodes on YSZ, while the La chemical state changes reversibly at the electrode surface. This field-induced chemical change of La at the surface of electrodes is assumed to be a cause of the electrochemical activation through enhanced surface exchange of oxygen on the doped lanthanum manganite electrodes.

  18. Phosphate oxygen isotopic evidence for a temperate and biologically active Archaean ocean.

    PubMed

    Blake, Ruth E; Chang, Sae Jung; Lepland, Aivo

    2010-04-15

    Oxygen and silicon isotope compositions of cherts and studies of protein evolution have been interpreted to reflect ocean temperatures of 55-85 degrees C during the early Palaeoarchaean era ( approximately 3.5 billion years ago). A recent study combining oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of cherts, however, makes a case for Archaean ocean temperatures being no greater than 40 degrees C (ref. 5). Ocean temperature can also be assessed using the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate. Recent studies show that (18)O:(16)O ratios of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta(18)O(P)) reflect ambient seawater temperature as well as biological processing that dominates marine phosphorus cycling at low temperature. All forms of life require and concentrate phosphorus, and as a result of biological processing, modern marine phosphates have delta(18)O(P) values typically between 19-26 per thousand (VSMOW), highly evolved from presumed source values of approximately 6-8 per thousand that are characteristic of apatite in igneous rocks and meteorites. Here we report oxygen isotope compositions of phosphates in sediments from the 3.2-3.5-billion-year-old Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We find that delta(18)O(P) values range from 9.3 per thousand to 19.9 per thousand and include the highest values reported for Archaean rocks. The temperatures calculated from our highest delta(18)O(P) values and assuming equilibrium with sea water with delta(18)O = 0 per thousand (ref. 12) range from 26 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The higher delta(18)O(P) values are similar to those of modern marine phosphate and suggest a well-developed phosphorus cycle and evolved biologic activity on the Archaean Earth. PMID:20393560

  19. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resulting in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.

  20. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  1. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  2. Antioxidant Activity of Oxygen Evolving Enhancer Protein 1 Purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Young; Choi, Youn Hee; Lee, Jung Im; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the antioxidant activity of a protein purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens. The purification steps included sodium acetate (pH 6) extraction and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, reversed phase Shodex C4P-50 column chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the purified protein was 33 kDa. The N-terminus and partial peptide amino acid sequence of this protein was identical to the sequence of oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE) 1 protein. The antioxidant activity of the OEE 1 was determined in vitro using a scavenging test with 4 types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). OEE 1 had higher H2 O2 scavenging activity, which proved to be the result of enzymatic antioxidants rather than nonenzymatic antioxidants. In addition, OEE 1 showed less H2 O2 -mediated ROS formation in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that OEE 1 purified from C. fulvescens is an excellent antioxidant. PMID:25944160

  3. Activity-stability relationship in the surface electrochemistry of the oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seo Hyoung; Connell, Justin G; Danilovic, Nemanja; Subbaraman, Ram; Chang, Kee-Chul; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Markovic, Nenad M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the functional links between the stability and reactivity of oxide materials during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is one key to enabling a vibrant hydrogen economy capable of competing with fossil fuel-based technologies. In this work, by focusing on the surface chemistry of monometallic Ru oxide in acidic and alkaline environments, we found that the kinetics of the OER are almost entirely controlled by the stability of the Ru surface atoms. The same activity-stability relationship was found for more complex, polycrystalline and single-crystalline SrRuO(3) thin films in alkaline solutions. We propose that the electrochemical transformation of either water (acidic solutions) or hydroxyl ions (alkaline solutions) to di-oxygen molecules takes place at defect sites that are inherently present on every electrode surface. During the OER, surface defects are also created by the corrosion of the Ru ions. The dissolution is triggered by the potential-dependent change in the valence state (n) of Ru: from stable but inactive Ru(4+) to unstable but active Ru(n>4+). We conclude that if the oxide is stable then it is completely inactive for the OER. A practical consequence is that the best materials for the OER should balance stability and activity in such a way that the dissolution rate of the oxide is neither too fast nor too slow. PMID:25490237

  4. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  5. Electrochemical activation of commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Xia, Guangsen; Liu, Haining; Xia, Shuwei; Lu, Yonghong

    2015-03-28

    Nitrogen (N)-doped carbon and its non-noble metal composite replacing platinum-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts still have some fundamental problems that remain. Here the micron-sized commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber (PAN-CF) electrode was modified using an electrochemical method, converting its inherent pyridinic-N into 2-pyridone (or 2-hydroxyl pyridine) functional group existing in three-dimensional active layers with remarkable ORR catalytic activity and stability. The carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms is prone to act as an active site to efficiently catalyze a two-electron ORR process. However, after coordinating pyridone to the Cu(2+) ion, together with the electrochemical reaction, the chemical redox between Cu(+) and ORR intermediates synergistically tends towards a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. In different medium, the complexation and dissociation can induce the charge transfer and reconstruction among proton, metal ion and pyridone functionalities, eventually leading to the changes of ORR performance. PMID:25712410

  6. Testing and Oxygen Assessment Results for a Next Generation Extravehicular Activity Portable Life Support System Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Rivera, Fatonia L.; Martin, Devin

    2011-01-01

    NASA is designing a next generation Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use in future surface exploration endeavors. To meet the new requirements for ventilation flow at nominal and buddy modes, a fan has been developed and tested. This paper summarizes the results of the performance and life cycle testing efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Additionally, oxygen compatibility assessment results from an evaluation conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) are provided, and lessons learned and future recommendations are outlined.

  7. Evaluation of the persistence of micropollutants through pure-oxygen activated sludge nitrification and denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, A.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Kish, G.

    2006-01-01

    The persistence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and household and industrial chemicals through a pure-oxygen activated sludge, nitrification, denitrification wastewater treatment facility was evaluated. Of the 125 micropollutants that were tested in this study, 55 compounds were detected in the untreated wastewater, and 27 compounds were detected in the disinfected effluent. The persistent compounds included surfactants, fire-retardant chemicals, pesticides, fragrance compounds, hormones, and one pharmaceutical. Physical-chemical properties of micropollutants that affected partitioning onto wastewater solids included vapor pressure and octanol-water partition coefficients.

  8. An ultrastable bimetallic carbide as platinum electrocatalyst support for highly active oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Zhang, Mingmei; Xie, Jimin; Shen, Pei Kang

    2015-11-01

    Stable bimetallic carbide (Fe2MoC) with graphitized carbon (GC) as matrix has been synthesized through an ion-exchange method. The Pt nanoparticles are loaded on the GC-Fe2MoC composite to form Pt/GC-Fe2MoC electrocatalyst which shows much higher activity and stability than those of commercial Pt/C for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media. The excellent performances of Pt/GC-Fe2MoC are mainly due to the inherent stability of GC-Fe2MoC and the promotion effect between Fe2MoC and Pt.

  9. Catalytic activity of metal oxides in hydrogen sulfide oxidation by oxygen and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marshneva, V.I.; Mokrinskii, V.V.

    1989-02-01

    Separate investigations have been made of the catalytic activities of a wide range of oxides by groups I-VIII metals in the Claus reaction and oxidation of H/sub 2/S by oxygen. Only 9 of 21 oxides used in the Claus reaction exhibit stable activity. The remaining oxides are deactivated, mainly by absorbing H/sub 2/S and being converted into sulfides. There are similar tendencies in the changes of sulfur formation specific velocities in both processes in the series of stable oxides V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, TiO/sub 2/, Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgO, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Vanadium pentoxide is the most active catalyst in the total and partial oxidations of H/sub 2/S and the Claus reaction.

  10. Elucidating the activity of stepped Pt single crystals for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S; Hansen, Heine A; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L

    2014-07-21

    The unexpectedly high measured activity of Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystal surfaces towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is explained utilizing the hydroxyl binding energy as the activity descriptor. Using this descriptor (estimated using experimental data obtained by different groups), a well-defined Sabatier-type volcano is observed for the activities measured for the Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystals, in remarkable agreement with earlier theoretical studies. We propose that the observed destabilisation of *OH species at these surfaces is due to the decreased solvation of the adsorbed hydroxyl intermediates on adjacent terrace sites. PMID:24643715

  11. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity during epididymal sperm maturation in Corynorhinus mexicanus bats.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Ríos, Edith; Rosado García, Adolfo; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Königsberg, Mina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Rodríguez-Tobón, Ahiezer; Fuentes-Mascorro, Gisela; León-Galván, Miguel Angel

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged sperm storage in the epididymis of Corynorhinus mexicanus bats after testicular regression has been associated with epididymal sperm maturation in the caudal region, although the precise factors linked with this phenomenon are unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in antioxidant enzymatic activity occurring in the spermatozoa and epididymal fluid over time, in sperm maturation and storage in the caput, corpus and cauda of the bat epididymis. Our data showed that an increment in ROS production coincided with an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in epididymal fluid and with a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the spermatozoa in at different time points and epididymal regions. The increase in ROS production was not associated with oxidative damage measured by lipid peroxidation. The results of the current study suggest the existence of a shift in the redox balance, which might be associated with sperm maturation and storage. PMID:26952757

  12. Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption on Activated Carbon through Manipulation of Surface Oxygen Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John; Qu, Deyang; Foster, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    Passive energy storage is a necessary component for balancing the lifecycle budget with new forms of green energy. The work presented describes how surface oxygen groups (SOG) on granulated activated carbon have been manipulated using Nitric Acid in a controlled, stepwise fashion. The structure and surface functionality of the activated carbon samples were characterized using DRIFTS, Raman Spectroscopy and Porosimetry. Total surface area was found to increase proportionally with the removal of heteroatom material, exposing previously insulated active sites responsible for SOG attachment. Broad oxide peaks were deconvoluted and analyzed, allowing for absolute identification of evolving functionality at each oxidation stage. SOGs were maximized on the third oxidation cycle with the presence of conjugated aromatic, phenol, lactone, and carboxylic acid groups. FSN Zonyl nonionic was applied to all oxidized samples at various concentrations. Total adsorbed surfactant was quantified for each concentration / oxidation scheme using attenuated total reflection. The relative quantity and polarity of chemisorbed surfactant were qualitatively assessed for each equilibrium concentration.

  13. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  14. Palladium-platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-01

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  15. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  16. Oxygenator Is the Main Responsible for Leukocyte Activation in Experimental Model of Extracorporeal Circulation: A Cautionary Tale

    PubMed Central

    Rungatscher, Alessio; Tessari, Maddalena; Stranieri, Chiara; Solani, Erika; Linardi, Daniele; Milani, Elisabetta; Montresor, Alessio; Merigo, Flavia; Salvetti, Beatrice; Menon, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess mechanisms underlying inflammatory activation during extracorporeal circulation (ECC), several small animal models of ECC have been proposed recently. The majority of them are based on home-made, nonstandardized, and hardly reproducible oxygenators. The present study has generated fundamental information on the role of oxygenator of ECC in activating inflammatory signaling pathways on leukocytes, leading to systemic inflammatory response, and organ dysfunction. The present results suggest that experimental animal models of ECC used in translational research on inflammatory response should be based on standardized, reproducible oxygenators with clinical characteristics. PMID:26063972

  17. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  18. Inhibition of histone deacetylase activity in reduced oxygen environment enhances the osteogenesis of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Hammerick, Kyle E; James, Aaron W; Carre, Antoine L; Leucht, Philipp; Giaccia, Amato J; Longaker, Michael T

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxygen tension has a great impact on the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal cells derived from adipose tissue: reduced oxygen impedes osteogenesis. We have found that expansion of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (mASCs) in reduced oxygen tension (10%) results in increased cell proliferation along with induction of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. In this study, we utilized two HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), sodium butyrate (NaB) and valproic acid (VPA), and studied their effects on mASCs expanded in various oxygen tensions (21%, 10%, and 1% O(2)). Significant growth inhibition was observed with NaB or VPA treatment in each oxygen tension. Osteogenesis was enhanced by treatment with NaB or VPA, particularly in reduced oxygen tensions (10% and 1% O(2)). Conversely, adipogenesis was decreased with treatments of NaB or VPA at all oxygen tensions. Finally, NaB- or VPA-treated, reduced oxygen tension-exposed (1% O(2)) ASCs were grafted into surgically created mouse tibial defects and resulted in significantly increased bone regeneration. In conclusion, HDACi significantly promote the osteogenic differentiation of mASCs exposed to reduced oxygen tension; HDACi may hold promise for future clinical applications of ASCs for skeletal regeneration. PMID:19505250

  19. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Reduced Oxygen Environment Enhances the Osteogenesis of Mouse Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yue; Hammerick, Kyle E.; James, Aaron W.; Carre, Antoine L.; Leucht, Philipp; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxygen tension has a great impact on the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal cells derived from adipose tissue: reduced oxygen impedes osteogenesis. We have found that expansion of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (mASCs) in reduced oxygen tension (10%) results in increased cell proliferation along with induction of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. In this study, we utilized two HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), sodium butyrate (NaB) and valproic acid (VPA), and studied their effects on mASCs expanded in various oxygen tensions (21%, 10%, and 1% O2). Significant growth inhibition was observed with NaB or VPA treatment in each oxygen tension. Osteogenesis was enhanced by treatment with NaB or VPA, particularly in reduced oxygen tensions (10% and 1% O2). Conversely, adipogenesis was decreased with treatments of NaB or VPA at all oxygen tensions. Finally, NaB- or VPA-treated, reduced oxygen tension–exposed (1% O2) ASCs were grafted into surgically created mouse tibial defects and resulted in significantly increased bone regeneration. In conclusion, HDACi significantly promote the osteogenic differentiation of mASCs exposed to reduced oxygen tension; HDACi may hold promise for future clinical applications of ASCs for skeletal regeneration. PMID:19505250

  20. Measuring the activities of higher organisms in activated sludge by means of mechanical shearing pretreatment and oxygen uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-07-01

    A pretreatment method was developed to assess the activities of higher organisms. The method is based on mechanical shearing to damage the large cells of the protozoan and metazoan community in activated sludge. The procedure was confirmed through experimentation to be effective in determining the activities of higher organisms by comparing oxygen uptake rates (OURs) before and after the higher organisms were eradicated. Shearing led to disintegration of flocs, which could be effectively reconstituted by centrifugation. The reconstitution of the sludge flocs was essential since otherwise the activity of the floc mass would be too high due to lack of diffusion limitation. Mechanical shearing had no influence on the morphology, quantity and specific activity of yeasts, and it was inferred that bacteria smaller than yeasts in size would also not be influenced by the applied shearing procedure. Moreover, the effect of filamentous organisms on the measured activities of higher organisms was experimentally demonstrated and analyzed, and determined to be so weak that it could be ignored. Based on these tests, five typical activated sludge processes were selected to measure the contribution of higher organisms to the original OUR. The measured activities of higher organisms ranged from 9.4 to 25.0% of the original OURs. PMID:20605188

  1. Maximal Oxygen Intake and Maximal Work Performance of Active College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Susanne L.

    Maximal oxygen intake and associated physiological variables were measured during strenuous exercise on women subjects (N=20 physical education majors). Following assessment of maximal oxygen intake, all subjects underwent a performance test at the work level which had elicited their maximal oxygen intake. Mean maximal oxygen intake was 41.32…

  2. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  3. Oxygenation, EMG and position sense during computer mouse work. Impact of active versus passive pauses.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, A G; Djupsjöbacka, M; Svedmark, A

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effects of active versus passive pauses implemented during computer mouse work on muscle oxygenation and EMG of the forearm extensor carpi radialis muscle, and on wrist position sense. Fifteen healthy female subjects (age: 19-24 years) performed a 60-min mouse-operated computer task, divided into three 20 min periods, on two occasions separated by 3-6 days. On one occasion a passive pause (subjects resting) was implemented at the end of each 20-min period, and on another occasion an active pause (subjects performed a number of high intensity extensions of the forearm) was implemented. Also at the end of each 20-min period, test contractions were conducted and subjective ratings of fatigue and stress were obtained. Another parameter of interest was total haemoglobin calculated as the summation of oxy-and deoxy-haemoglobin, since it reflects blood volume changes. The most interesting findings were an overall increasing trend in total haemoglobin throughout the mouse work (P<0.001), and that this trend was greater for the active pause as compared to the passive pause (P<0.01). These data were accompanied by an overall increase in oxygen saturation (P<0.001), with a tendency, albeit not significant, toward a higher increase for the active pause (P=0.13). EMG amplitude and median frequency tended to decrease (P=0.08 and 0.05, respectively) during the mouse work but was not different between pause types. Borg ratings of forearm fatigue showed an overall increase during the activity (P<0.001), but the perceptions of stress did not change. Position sense did not change due to the mouse work for either pause type. While increasing trends were found for both pause types, the present study lends support to the hypothesis of an enhancement in oxygenation and blood volume for computer mouse work implemented with active pauses. However, a presumption of an association between this enhancement and attenuated fatigue during the mouse work was not supported

  4. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-10-01

    For oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over alloy electrocatalysts, the understanding of how the atomic arrangement of the metal species in the nanocatalysts is responsible for the catalytic enhancement is challenging for achieving better design and tailoring of nanoalloy catalysts. This paper reports results of an investigation of the atomic structures and the electrocatalytic activities of ternary and binary nanoalloys, aiming at revealing a fundamental insight into the unique atomic-scale structure-electrocatalytic activity relationship. PtIrCo catalyst and its binary counterparts (PtCo and PtIr) are chosen as a model system for this study. The effect of thermochemical treatment temperature on the atomic-scale structure of the catalysts was examined as a useful probe to the structure-activity correlation. The structural characterization of the binary and ternary nanoalloy catalysts was performed by combining surface sensitive techniques such as XPS and 3D atomic ordering sensitive techniques such as high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis (HE-XRD/PDFs) and computer simulations. The results show that the thermal treatment temperature tunes the nanoalloy’s atomic and chemical ordering in a different way depending on the chemical composition, leading to differences in the nanoalloy’s mass and specific activities. A unique structural tunability of the atomic ordering in a platinum-iridium-cobalt nanoalloy has been revealed for enhancing greatly the electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction, which has significant implication for rational design and nanoengineering of advanced catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

  5. Biomass Oxidation: Formyl C-H Bond Activation by the Surface Lattice Oxygen of Regenerative CuO Nanoleaves.

    PubMed

    Amaniampong, Prince N; Trinh, Quang Thang; Wang, Bo; Borgna, Armando; Yang, Yanhui; Mushrif, Samir H

    2015-07-27

    An integrated experimental and computational investigation reveals that surface lattice oxygen of copper oxide (CuO) nanoleaves activates the formyl C-H bond in glucose and incorporates itself into the glucose molecule to oxidize it to gluconic acid. The reduced CuO catalyst regains its structure, morphology, and activity upon reoxidation. The activity of lattice oxygen is shown to be superior to that of the chemisorbed oxygen on the metal surface and the hydrogen abstraction ability of the catalyst is correlated with the adsorption energy. Based on the present investigation, it is suggested that surface lattice oxygen is critical for the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, without further breaking down the glucose molecule into smaller fragments, because of C-C cleavage. Using CuO nanoleaves as catalyst, an excellent yield of gluconic acid is also obtained for the direct oxidation of cellobiose and polymeric cellulose, as biomass substrates. PMID:26119659

  6. Metal-Oxygen Bond Ionicity as an Efficient Descriptor for Doped NiOOH Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zaffran, Jeremie; Toroker, Maytal Caspary

    2016-06-01

    The computational design of solid catalysts has become a very "hot" field during the last decades, especially with the recent increase in computational tool performance. However, theoretical techniques are still very time demanding because they require the consideration of many adsorption configurations of the reaction intermediates on the surface. Herein, we propose to use the metal-oxygen (M-O) bond ionicity as a descriptor for the photocatalytic activity of one of the best catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Ionicity is a bulk property and thus carries the advantage of being easily obtainable from a simple Bader charge analysis by using density functional theory (DFT). We will show that this criterion can be used successfully to design efficient dopants for NiOOH material. This catalyst is known to exhibit interesting photoelectrochemical properties for OER if it is doped with specific transition metals. Finally, we demonstrate that other electronic properties that relate to bulk calculation, such as oxidation states and density of states, are not alone sufficient to explain the photocatalytic activity of the material. Thus, M-O bond ionicity attracts significant interest compared with other bulk observables obtained by using DFT computations. PMID:26945687

  7. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  8. Ni- and Mn-Promoted Mesoporous Co3O4: A Stable Bifunctional Catalyst with Surface-Structure-Dependent Activity for Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqiao; Ren, Zheng; Chen, Sheng-Yu; Meng, Yongtao; Biswas, Sourav; Nandi, Partha; Elsen, Heather A; Gao, Pu-Xian; Suib, Steven L

    2016-08-17

    Efficient bifunctional catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are highly desirable due to their wide applications in fuel cells and rechargeable metal air batteries. However, the development of nonprecious metal catalysts with comparable activities to noble metals is still challenging. Here we report a one-step wet-chemical synthesis of Ni-/Mn-promoted mesoporous cobalt oxides through an inverse micelle process. Various characterization techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N2 sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirm the successful incorporation of Ni and Mn leading to the formation of Co-Ni(Mn)-O solid solutions with retained mesoporosity. Among these catalysts, cobalt oxide with 5% Ni doping demonstrates promising activities for both ORR and OER, with an overpotential of 399 mV for ORR (at -3 mA/cm(2)) and 381 mV (at 10 mA/cm(2)) for OER. Furthermore, it shows better durability than precious metals featuring little activity decay throughout 24 h continuous operation. Analyses of cyclic voltammetry (CV), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and O2-temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD) reveal that redox activity of Co(3+) to Co(4+) is crucial for OER performance, while the population of surface oxygen vacancies and surface area determine ORR activities. The comprehensive investigation of the intrinsic active sites for ORR and OER by correlating different physicochemical properties to the electrochemical activities is believed to provide important insight toward the rational design of high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR and OER reactions. PMID:27458646

  9. NQO1-induced activation of AMPK contributes to cancer cell death by oxygen-glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemi; Oh, Eun-Taex; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Park, Moon-Taek; Lee, Ja-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Seon; Park, Heon Joo

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) due to insufficient blood circulation can decrease cancer cell survival and proliferation in solid tumors. OGD increases the intracellular [AMP]/[ATP] ratio, thereby activating the AMPK. In this study, we have investigated the involvement of NQO1 in OGD-mediated AMPK activation and cancer cell death. We found that OGD activates AMPK in an NQO1-dependent manner, suppressing the mTOR/S6K/4E-BP1 pathway, which is known to control cell survival. Thus, the depletion of NQO1 prevents AMPK-induced cancer cell death in OGD. When we blocked OGD-induced Ca2+/CaMKII signaling, the NQO1-induced activation of AMPK was attenuated. In addition, when we blocked the RyR signaling, the accumulation of intracellular Ca2+ and subsequent activation of CaMKII/AMPK signaling was decreased in NQO1-expressing cells under OGD. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CD38 abrogated the OGD-induced activation of Ca2+/CaMKII/AMPK signaling. Taken together, we conclude that NQO1 plays a key role in the AMPK-induced cancer cell death in OGD through the CD38/cADPR/RyR/Ca2+/CaMKII signaling pathway. PMID:25586669

  10. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids. PMID:25176328

  11. Segregated Pt on Pd nanotubes for enhanced oxygen reduction activity in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W; Dyck, Ondrej; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Papandrew, Alexander B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscaled Pt domains were integrated with Pd nanotubes via vapor deposition to yield a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The surface-area-normalized ORR activity of these bi-metallic Pt-on-Pd nanotubes (PtPdNTs) was nearly 6× the corresponding carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) activity at 0.9 V vs. RHE (1.5 vs. 0.24 mA cmmetal(-2), respectively). Furthermore, the high specific activity of the PtPdNTs was achieved without sacrificing mass-normalized activity, which is more than twice that of Pt/C (0.333 A mgPtPdNT(-1)vs. 0.141 A mgPt/C(-1)) and also greater than that of Pd/C (0.221 A mgPd/C(-1)). We attribute the enhancements in specific and mass activity to modifications of the segregated Pt electronic structure and to nanoscale porosity, respectively. PMID:26553367

  12. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiuli; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuang; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-17

    Developing inexpensive and non-precious metal electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is among the major goals in fuel cells. Herein, by using density-functional theory calculations, we show that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids exhibit unexpectedly high ORR catalytic activity-even comparable to that of the Pt(111) surface. Both graphitic-type and pyridine-type N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids are highly active for the ORR and have good CO tolerance. The formation of the second H2O molecule is the rate-determining step for the ORR with the graphitic-type hybrid, whereas on the pyridine-type hybrid, it is the formation of OOH. Note that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrid materials combine the high reactivity of olympicene and the high electrical conductivity of graphene, which allows them to be potentially used as low-cost and non-precious-metal ORR catalysts. PMID:27499058

  13. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode. PMID:25686380

  14. Porous Dendritic Platinum Nanotubes with Extremely High Activity and Stability for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaixia; Sun, Shuhui; Cai, Mei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Porous dendritic Pt nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a facile, cost-effective aqueous solution method at room temperature in large scale. These unique structures are porous, hollow, hierarchical, and single crystalline, which not only gives them a large surface area with high catalyst utilization, but also improves mass transport and gas diffusion. These novel Pt structures exhibited significantly improved catalytic activity (4.4 fold) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and greatly enhanced durability (6.1 fold) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. This work provides a promising approach to the design of highly efficient next-generation electrocatalysts. PMID:23524665

  15. Rationalizing the Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution Reaction Activity of Two-Dimensional Hydrogenated Silicene and Germanene.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Caroline J; Chakraborty, Sudip; Anversa, Jonas; Baierle, Rogério J; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-20

    We have undertaken first-principles electronic structure calculations to show that the chemical functionalization of two-dimensional hydrogenated silicene (silicane) and germanene (germanane) can become a powerful tool to increase the photocatalytic water-splitting activity. Spin-polarized density functional theory within the GGA-PBE and HSE06 types of exchange correlation functionals has been used to obtain the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicane and germanane functionalized with a series of nonmetals (N, P, and S), alkali metals (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline-earth metals (Mg and Ca). The surface-adsorbate interaction between the functionalized systems with H2 and O2 molecules that leads to envisaged hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity has been determined. PMID:26704530

  16. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  17. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials. PMID:27351805

  18. Oxidative DNA adducts after Cu(2+)-mediated activation of dihydroxy PCBs: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Wendy A; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2009-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic industrial chemicals, complete carcinogens, and efficacious tumor promoters. However, the mechanism(s) of PCB-mediated carcinogenicity remains largely undefined. One likely pathway by which these agents may play a role in carcinogenesis is the generation of oxidative DNA damage by redox cycling of dihydroxylated PCB metabolites. We have now employed a new (32)P-postlabeling system to examine novel oxidative DNA lesions induced by Cu(2+)-mediated activation of PCB metabolites. (32)P postlabeling of DNA incubated with various PCB metabolites resulted in over a dozen novel polar oxidative DNA adducts that were chromatographically similar for all active agents. The most potent metabolites tested were the hydroquinones (hydroxyl groups arranged para to each other), yielding polar oxidative adduct levels ranging from 55 to 142 adducts/10(6) nucleotides. PCB catechols, or ortho-dihydroxy metabolites, were up to 40% less active than their corresponding hydroquinone congeners, whereas monohydroxylated and quinone metabolites did not produce detectable oxidative damage over that of vehicle. With the exception of 2,4,5-Cl-2',5'-dihydroxybiphenyl, this oxidative DNA damage seemed to be inversely related to chlorine content: no chlorine approximately mono->di->trichlorinated metabolites. Importantly, copper, but not iron, was essential for activation of the PCB metabolites to these polar oxidative DNA adducts, because in its absence or in the presence of the Cu(+)-specific scavenger bathocuproine, no adducts were detected. Intervention studies with known reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifiers suggested that H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and superoxide may also be involved in this PCB-mediated oxidative DNA damage. These data indicate a mechanistic role for several ROS, in addition to copper, in PCB-induced DNA damage and provide further support for oxidative DNA damage in PCB-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19233261

  19. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center. PMID:11468361

  20. Intensity of daily physical activity is associated with central hemodynamic and leg muscle oxygen availability in COPD.

    PubMed

    Louvaris, Zafeiris; Kortianou, Eleni A; Spetsioti, Stavroula; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Nasis, Ioannis; Asimakos, Andreas; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), daily physical activity is reported to be adversely associated with the magnitude of exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle weakness. There is limited evidence whether central hemodynamic, oxygen transport, and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities also contribute to reduced daily physical activity. Nineteen patients with COPD (FEV1, 48 ± 14% predicted) underwent a treadmill walking test at a speed corresponding to the individual patient's mean walking intensity, captured by a triaxial accelerometer during a preceding 7-day period. During the indoor treadmill test, the individual patient mean walking intensity (range, 1.5 to 2.3 m/s2) was significantly correlated with changes from baseline in cardiac output recorded by impedance cardiography (range, 1.2 to 4.2 L/min; r = 0.73), systemic vascular conductance (range, 7.9 to 33.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1); r = 0.77), systemic oxygen delivery estimated from cardiac output and arterial pulse-oxymetry saturation (range, 0.15 to 0.99 L/min; r = 0.70), arterio-venous oxygen content difference calculated from oxygen uptake and cardiac output (range, 3.7 to 11.8 mlO2/100 ml; r = -0.73), and quadriceps muscle fractional oxygen saturation assessed by near-infrared spectrometry (range, -6 to 23%; r = 0.77). In addition, mean walking intensity significantly correlated with the quadriceps muscle force adjusted for body weight (range, 0.28 to 0.60; r = 0.74) and the ratio of minute ventilation over maximal voluntary ventilation (range, 38 to 89%, r = -0.58). In COPD, in addition to ventilatory limitations and peripheral muscle weakness, intensity of daily physical activity is associated with both central hemodynamic and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities regulating the adequacy of matching peripheral muscle oxygen availability by systemic oxygen transport. PMID:23845982

  1. Metal Ion Adsorption by Activated Carbons Made from Pecan Shells: Effect of Oxygen Level During Activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this presenta...

  2. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Laura A.; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A.; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T.; Licht, Jonathan D.; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, however the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism, in the absence of glucose metabolism, was sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs−/− mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, however Uqcrfs1−/− T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1−/− T cells were not lacking bioenergetically, but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through production of complex III ROS. PMID:23415911

  3. Activity and stability trends of perovskite oxides for oxygen evolution catalysis at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Binghong; Risch, Marcel; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Ling, Chen; Jia, Hongfei; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Perovskite oxides (ABO3) have been studied extensively to promote the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline electrolytes. However, developing highly active catalysts for OER at near-neutral pH is desirable for many photoelectrochemical/electrochemical devices. In this paper, we systematically studied the activity and stability of well-known perovskite oxides for OER at pH 7. Previous activity descriptors established for perovskite oxides at pH 13, such as having an eg occupancy close to unity or having an O p-band center close to Fermi level, were shown to scale with OER activity at pH 7. Stability was a greater challenge at pH 7 than at pH 13, where two different modes of instability were identified from combined transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory analyses. Perovskites with O p-band close to Fermi level showed leaching of A-site atoms and surface amorphization under all overpotentials examined at pH 7, while those with O p-band far from Fermi level were stable under low OER current/potential but became unstable at high current/potential accompanied by leaching of B-site atoms. Therefore, efforts are needed to enhance the activity and stability of perovskites against A-site or B-site loss if used at neutral pH. PMID:26271910

  4. Activity and stability of the oxygen evolution reaction on electrodeposited Ru and its thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Choi, Jihui; Kim, Ho Young; Hwang, Eunkyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2015-12-01

    The activity and stability of Ru metal and its thermal oxide films for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) were investigated. The metallic Ru films were prepared by electrodeposition on a Ti substrate and then thermally oxidized at various temperatures under atmospheric conditions. During long-term operation of the OER with cyclic voltammetry (CV) in H2SO4 electrolyte, changes in the properties of the Ru and its thermal oxides were monitored in terms of their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic structure. In the initial stages of the OER, all of the Ru thermal oxide films underwent an activation process that was related to the continuous removal of low-activity Ru oxides from the surface. With further cycling, the OER activity decreased. The rate of decrease was different for each Ru film and was related to the annealing temperatures. Monitoring of material properties indicates that the amount of stable anhydrous RuO2 is important for OER stability because it prevents both the severe dissolution of metallic Ru beneath the oxide surface and the formation of a less active hydrous RuO2 at the surface.

  5. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; et al

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  6. A Clark-type oxygen chip for in situ estimation of the respiratory activity of adhering cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Chou; Luk, Hsiang-Ning; Lin, Yen-Ting Tsai; Yuan, Chia-Yin

    2010-04-15

    A Clark-type oxygen chip consisting of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) reservoir containing an amino group-modified PDMS oxygen-permeable membrane (OPM) and a glass substrate containing a three-electrode detector has been constructed by using microfabrication techniques, and it is utilized for in situ measurement of the respiration activity of adhering cells. Use of the alginate sol electrolyte and the electroplating Ag/AgCl pseudo-reference electrode can effectively diminish the crosstalk between the electrochemical electrodes and supply a stable potential for the detection of dissolved oxygen, respectively. The Clark-type oxygen chips possess only 1.00% residual current, response time of 13.4s and good linearity with a correlation coefficient of 0.9933. The modification of amino groups for the OPM obviously facilitates the adhesion of HeLa cells onto the PDMS OPM surface and allows the cells to spread after 2h of incubation. The oxygen consumption of the cells in the cell-adhesion process increases with the adhesion time, and the increment of cellular oxygen consumption per minute reaches a maximum after 30 min of incubation. Moreover, the change in the respiration activity of adhering HeLa cells stimulated by the high concentration of glucose or propofol anaesthetic can be monitored in real time with the Clark-type oxygen chip. PMID:20188913

  7. Asymmetric Enzymatic Synthesis of Allylic Amines: A Sigmatropic Rearrangement Strategy.

    PubMed

    Prier, Christopher K; Hyster, Todd K; Farwell, Christopher C; Huang, Audrey; Arnold, Frances H

    2016-04-01

    Sigmatropic rearrangements, while rare in biology, offer opportunities for the efficient and selective synthesis of complex chemical motifs. A "P411" serine-ligated variant of cytochrome P450BM3 has been engineered to initiate a sulfimidation/[2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement sequence in whole E. coli cells, a non-natural function for any enzyme, providing access to enantioenriched, protected allylic amines. Five mutations in the enzyme substantially enhance its activity toward this new function, demonstrating the evolvability of the catalyst toward challenging nitrene transfer reactions. The evolved catalyst additionally performs the highly enantioselective imidation of non-allylic sulfides. PMID:26970325

  8. A method to determine photosynthetic activity from oxygen microsensor data in biofilms subjected to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Podola, Björn; de Beer, Dirk; Melkonian, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Phototrophic biofilms are widely distributed in nature and their ecological importance is well recognized. More recently, there has been a growing interest in using artificial phototrophic biofilms in innovative photobioreactors for production of microalgal biomass in biotechnological applications. To study physiological processes within these biofilms, microsensors have been applied in several studies. Here, the 'light-dark shift method' relies on measurement of photosynthetic activity in terms of light-induced oxygen production. However, when applied to non-submerged biofilms that can be found in numerous locations in nature, as well as in some types of photobioreactors, limitations of this approach are obvious due to rapid removal of gaseous species at the biofilm surface. Here, we introduce a mathematical correction to recover the distribution of the actual photosynthetic activity along the depth gradient in the biofilm, based on a numerical solution of the inversed diffusion equation of oxygen. This method considers changes in mass transport during the measurement period as can found on biofilms possessing a thin flow/mass transfer boundary layer (e. g., non-submerged biofilms). Using both simulated and real microsensor data, the proposed method was shown to be much more accurate than the classical method, which leads to underestimations of rates near the biofilm surface. All test profiles could be recovered with a high fit. According to our simulated microsensor measurements, a depth resolution of ≤20 μm is recommended near the surface. We conclude that our method strongly improves the quality of data acquired from light-dark measurements of photosynthetic activity in biofilms. PMID:26232709

  9. Human autonomic activity and its response to acute oxygen supplement after high altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuping; Kennedy, Brian P; Hopkins, Susan R; Bogaard, Harm J; Wagner, Peter D; Ziegler, Michael G

    2002-11-29

    It is well established that after acclimatization at high altitude, many sympathetic pathways are hyperactive yet heart rate (HR) remains unchanged. In this study, we attempted to determine if this unchanged heart rate is due to compensatory mechanisms such as changes in parasympathetic activity or levels of receptors for autonomic neurotransmitters. We also examined the role played by hypoxia in these autonomic adaptations to high altitude. Three experiments were carried out on five healthy lowlanders both at sea level (SL) and after 2 weeks of acclimatization at 3800 m (Post-Ac) with: (a) placebo (control); (b) acute beta-adrenergic receptor blockade by propranolol (PRO), or (c) acute parasympathetic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate (GLY). Compared with SL control values, post-Ac venous norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine increased by 96% (p < 0.001) and 55% (p < 0.05), but epinephrine and HR did not change. PRO resulted in a smaller decrease in HR (bpm) Post-Ac than at SL (15 +/- 6 vs. 21 +/- 6, p < 0.05), while GLY caused a greater increase in HR Post-Ac than at SL (59 +/- 8 vs. 45 +/- 6, p < 0.05). Breathing oxygen at SL concentration while at altitude did not decrease NE, or alter the effect of PRO on HR, but reduced the chronotropic effect of GLY by 14% (p < 0.05). These results suggest that after acclimatization to altitude, increased parasympathetic neurotransmitter release and decreased beta-adenoreceptor activity account for the unchanged HR despite enhanced sympathetic activity. Acute oxygen replacement rapidly counteracted the parasympathetic, but not sympathetic hyperactivity that occurs at high altitude. PMID:12492136

  10. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  11. Abundance ratios of oxygen, neon, and magnesium in solar active regions and flares: The FIP effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Feldman, U.

    1995-01-01

    Relative abundances of oxygen, neon, and magnesium have been derived for a sample of nine solar active regions, flares, and an erupting prominance by combining plots of the ion differential emission measures. The observations were photographed in the 300-600 A range by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) spectroheliograph on Skylab. Methods for deriving the Mg/Ne abundance ratio-which measures the separation between the low- first ionization potential (FIP) and high-FIP abundnace plateaus-have been described in previous papers. In this paper we describe the spectroscopic methods for deriving the O/Ne abundance ratio, which gives the ratio between two high-FIP elements. The plot of the O/Ne ratio versus the Mg/Ne ratio in the sample of nine Skylab events is shown. The variation in the Mg/Ne ratio by a factor of 6 is associated with a much smaller range in the O/Ne ratio. This is broadly consistent with the presence of the standard FIP pattern of abundances in the outer atmosphere of the Sun. However, a real change in the relative abundances of oxygen and neon by a factor of 1.5 cannot be excluded.

  12. Oxygen-activated growth and bandgap tunability of large single-crystal bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yufeng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yuanyue; Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaohan; Tan, Cheng; Nie, Shu; Suk, Ji Won; Jiang, Tengfei; Liang, Tengfei; Xiao, Junfeng; Ye, Wenjing; Dean, Cory R; Yakobson, Boris I; McCarty, Kevin F; Kim, Philip; Hone, James; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2016-05-01

    Bernal (AB)-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose bandgap can be tuned by a transverse electric field, making it a unique material for a number of electronic and photonic devices. A scalable approach to synthesize high-quality BLG is therefore critical, which requires minimal crystalline defects in both graphene layers and maximal area of Bernal stacking, which is necessary for bandgap tunability. Here we demonstrate that in an oxygen-activated chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process, half-millimetre size, Bernal-stacked BLG single crystals can be synthesized on Cu. Besides the traditional 'surface-limited' growth mechanism for SLG (1st layer), we discovered new microscopic steps governing the growth of the 2nd graphene layer below the 1st layer as the diffusion of carbon atoms through the Cu bulk after complete dehydrogenation of hydrocarbon molecules on the Cu surface, which does not occur in the absence of oxygen. Moreover, we found that the efficient diffusion of the carbon atoms present at the interface between Cu and the 1st graphene layer further facilitates growth of large domains of the 2nd layer. The CVD BLG has superior electrical quality, with a device on/off ratio greater than 10(4), and a tunable bandgap up to ∼100 meV at a displacement field of 0.9 V nm(-1). PMID:26828845

  13. Adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds onto modified activated carbons: effect of oxygen functional groups.

    PubMed

    Vega, Esther; Lemus, Jesús; Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Palomar, José; Martin, María J

    2013-08-15

    The effect of physical and chemical properties of activated carbon (AC) on the adsorption of ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide was investigated by treating a commercial AC with nitric acid and ozone. The chemical properties of ACs were characterised by temperature programme desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AC treated with nitric acid presented a larger amount of oxygen functional groups than materials oxidised with ozone. This enrichment allowed a significant improvement on adsorption capacities for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide but not for dimethyl disulphide. In order to gain a deeper knowledge on the effect of the surface chemistry of AC on the adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds, the quantum-chemical COSMO-RS method was used to simulate the interactions between AC surface groups and the studied volatile sulphur compounds. In agreement with experimental data, this model predicted a greater affinity of dimethyl disulphide towards AC, unaffected by the incorporation of oxygen functional groups in the surface. Moreover, the model pointed out to an increase of the adsorption capacity of AC by the incorporation of hydroxyl functional groups in the case of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide due to the hydrogen bond interactions. PMID:23708449

  14. Surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-09-13

    The surface structure of a-Cr2O3(0001) before and after exposure to activated oxygen from an ECR plasma source was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). Epitaxial Cr2O3(0001) thin films were deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). When cooled or annealed in vacuum, strong evidence for a Cr-Cr-O3- termination was obtained by comparing the Cr3+ XPD azimuthal scan to single scattering simulations. However, after plasma exposure, a high binding energy feature was observed in the Cr 2p XPS spectrum that possesses an ordered structure distinct from the underlying Cr3+ of Cr2O3, which remains Cr-Cr-O3-like. Investigation of this new surface structure with simulations of various candidate structures tentatively rules out CrO2-like configurations. The high binding energy feature likely arises from a higher oxidation state of Cr. One possibility is the oxidation of the surface layer of Cr to Cr6- with a double chromyl structure (O=Cr=O).

  15. Surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-12-01

    The surface structure of α-Cr2O3(0001) before and after exposure to activated oxygen from an ECR plasma source was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). Epitaxial Cr2O3(0001) thin films were deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). When cooled or annealed in vacuum, strong evidence for a Crsbnd Crsbnd O3sbnd termination was obtained by comparing the Cr3 + XPD azimuthal scan to single scattering simulations. However, after plasma exposure, a high binding energy feature was observed in the Cr 2p XPS spectrum that possesses an ordered structure distinct from the underlying Cr3 + of Cr2O3, which remains Cr-Cr-O3-like. Investigation of this new surface structure with simulations of various candidate structures tentatively rules out CrO2-like configurations. The high binding energy feature likely arises from a higher oxidation state of Cr. One possibility is the oxidation of the surface layer of Cr to Cr6 - δ with a double chromyl structure (Odbnd Crdbnd O).

  16. Oxygen-activated growth and bandgap tunability of large single-crystal bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yufeng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yuanyue; Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaohan; Tan, Cheng; Nie, Shu; Suk, Ji Won; Jiang, Tengfei; Liang, Tengfei; Xiao, Junfeng; Ye, Wenjing; Dean, Cory R.; Yakobson, Boris I.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2016-05-01

    Bernal (AB)-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose bandgap can be tuned by a transverse electric field, making it a unique material for a number of electronic and photonic devices. A scalable approach to synthesize high-quality BLG is therefore critical, which requires minimal crystalline defects in both graphene layers and maximal area of Bernal stacking, which is necessary for bandgap tunability. Here we demonstrate that in an oxygen-activated chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process, half-millimetre size, Bernal-stacked BLG single crystals can be synthesized on Cu. Besides the traditional ‘surface-limited’ growth mechanism for SLG (1st layer), we discovered new microscopic steps governing the growth of the 2nd graphene layer below the 1st layer as the diffusion of carbon atoms through the Cu bulk after complete dehydrogenation of hydrocarbon molecules on the Cu surface, which does not occur in the absence of oxygen. Moreover, we found that the efficient diffusion of the carbon atoms present at the interface between Cu and the 1st graphene layer further facilitates growth of large domains of the 2nd layer. The CVD BLG has superior electrical quality, with a device on/off ratio greater than 104, and a tunable bandgap up to ∼100 meV at a displacement field of 0.9 V nm‑1.

  17. Carbothermal synthesis of titanium oxycarbide as electrocatalyst support with high oxygen evolution reaction activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K; Li, YF; Xing, YC

    2012-11-09

    Carbothermal reduction of semiconducting TiO2 into highly conductive titanium oxycarbide (TiOxCy) was investigated. The thermally produced uniform carbon layer on TiO2 (Degussa P25) protects the TiO2 nanoparticles from sintering and, at the same time, supplies the carbon source for doping TiO2 with carbon. At low temperatures (e. g., 700 degrees C), carbon only substitutes part of the oxide and distorts the TiO2 lattice to form TiO2-xCx with only substitutional carbon. When the carbon-doped TiO2 is annealed at a higher temperature (1100 degrees C), x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that TiOxCy, a solid solution of TiO and TiC, was formed, which displays different diffraction peaks and binding energies. It was shown that TiOxCy has much better oxygen revolution reaction activity than TiO2 or TiO2-xCx. Further studies showed that the TiOxCy obtained can be used as a support for metal electrocatalyst, leading to a bifunctional catalyst effective for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions.

  18. Low Oxygen Tension Enhances Expression of Myogenic Genes When Human Myoblasts Are Activated from G0 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Nielsen, Joachim; Hejbøl, Eva Kildall; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Most cell culture studies have been performed at atmospheric oxygen tension of 21%, however the physiological oxygen tension is much lower and is a factor that may affect skeletal muscle myoblasts. In this study we have compared activation of G0 arrested myoblasts in 21% O2 and in 1% O2 in order to see how oxygen tension affects activation and proliferation of human myoblasts. Materials and Methods Human myoblasts were isolated from skeletal muscle tissue and G0 arrested in vitro followed by reactivation at 21% O2 and 1% O2. The effect was assesses by Real-time RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results and Conclusions We found an increase in proliferation rate of myoblasts when activated at a low oxygen tension (1% O2) compared to 21% O2. In addition, the gene expression studies showed up regulation of the myogenesis related genes PAX3, PAX7, MYOD, MYOG (myogenin), MET, NCAM, DES (desmin), MEF2A, MEF2C and CDH15 (M-cadherin), however, the fraction of DES and MYOD positive cells was not increased by low oxygen tension, indicating that 1% O2 may not have a functional effect on the myogenic response. Furthermore, the expression of genes involved in the TGFβ, Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were also up regulated in low oxygen tension. The differences in gene expression were most pronounced at day one after activation from G0-arrest, thus the initial activation of myoblasts seemed most sensitive to changes in oxygen tension. Protein expression of HES1 and β-catenin indicated that notch signaling may be induced in 21% O2, while the canonical Wnt signaling may be induced in 1% O2 during activation and proliferation of myoblasts. PMID:27442119

  19. ACROLEIN ACTIVATES MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES BY INCREASING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Timothy E.; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+]I with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+]I, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure. PMID:19371603

  20. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i)), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+](I) with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+](I), leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure. PMID:19371603

  1. A unique platinum-graphene hybrid structure for high activity and durability in oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengming; Ma, Liang; Liao, Lingwen; Bai, Song; Long, Ran; Zuo, Ming; Xiong, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    It remains a grand challenge to achieve both high activity and durability in Pt electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Here we develop a class of Pt highly concave cubic (HCC) nanocrystals, which are enriched with high-index facets, to enable high ORR activity. The durability of HCC nanocrystals can be significantly improved via assembly with graphene. Meanwhile, the unique hybrid structure displays further enhanced specific activity, which is 7-fold greater than the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts. Strikingly, it exhibits impressive performance in terms of half-wave potential (E1/2). The E1/2 of 0.967 V at the Pt loading as low as 46 μg cm−2, which stands as 63 mV higher than that of the Pt/C catalysts, is slightly superior to the record observed for the most active porous Pt-Ni catalyst in literature. This work paves the way to designing high-performance electrocatalysts by modulating their surface and interface with loading substrates. PMID:23999570

  2. Role of Oxygen as Surface-Active Element in Linear GTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadaiah, Nirsanametla; Bag, Swarup

    2013-11-01

    Although the surface-active elements such as oxygen and sulfur have an adverse effect on momentum transport in liquid metals during fusion welding, such elements can be used beneficially up to a certain limit to increase the weld penetration in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The fluid flow pattern and consequently the weld penetration and width change due to a change in coefficient of surface tension from a negative value to a positive value. The present work is focused on the analysis of possible effects of surface-active elements to change the weld pool dimensions in linear GTA welding. A 3D finite element-based heat transfer and fluid flow model is developed to study the effect of surface-active elements on stainless steel plates. A velocity in the order of 180 mm/s due to surface tension force is estimated at an optimum concentration of surface-active elements. Further, the differential evolution-based global optimization algorithm is integrated with the numerical model to estimate uncertain model parameters such as arc efficiency, effective arc radius, and effective values of material properties at high temperatures. The effective values of thermal conductivity and viscosity are estimated to be enhanced nine and seven times, respectively, over corresponding room temperature values. An error analysis is also performed to find out the overall reliability of the computed results, and a maximum reliability of 0.94 is achieved.

  3. Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Activation of the Primary Visual Cortex Predicts Size Adaptation Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Pooresmaeili, Arezoo; Arrighi, Roberto; Biagi, Laura; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    In natural scenes, objects rarely occur in isolation but appear within a spatiotemporal context. Here, we show that the perceived size of a stimulus is significantly affected by the context of the scene: brief previous presentation of larger or smaller adapting stimuli at the same region of space changes the perceived size of a test stimulus, with larger adapting stimuli causing the test to appear smaller than veridical and vice versa. In a human fMRI study, we measured the blood oxygen level-dependent activation (BOLD) responses of the primary visual cortex (V1) to the contours of large-diameter stimuli and found that activation closely matched the perceptual rather than the retinal stimulus size: the activated area of V1 increased or decreased, depending on the size of the preceding stimulus. A model based on local inhibitory V1 mechanisms simulated the inward or outward shifts of the stimulus contours and hence the perceptual effects. Our findings suggest that area V1 is actively involved in reshaping our perception to match the short-term statistics of the visual scene. PMID:24089504

  4. Platinum multicubes prepared by ni(2+) -mediated shape evolution exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Chengming; Xia, Bao Yu; Mao, Keke; He, Jiawei; Wu, Xiaojun; Xiong, Yujie; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-05-01

    Pt(100) facets are generally considered less active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Reported herein is a unique Pt-branched structure, a multicube, whose surface is mostly enclosed by {100} facets but contains high-index facets at the small junction area between the adjacent cubic components. The synthesis is accomplished by a Ni(2+) -mediated facet evolution from high-index {311} to {100} facets on the frameworks of multipods. Despite the high {100} facet coverage, the Pt multicubes exhibit impressive ORR activity in terms of half-wave potential and current density nearly to the level of the most active Pt-based catalysts, while the durability of catalysts is well retained. The facet evolution creates a set of samples with tunable ratios of high-index to low-index facets. The results reveal that the excellent ORR performance of Pt multicubes is a combined result of active sites by high-index facets and low resistance by flat surface. It is anticipated that this work will offer a new approach to facet-controlled synthesis and ORR catalysts design. PMID:25756931

  5. Ultrathin Icosahedral Pt-Enriched Nanocage with Excellent Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity.

    PubMed

    He, Dong Sheng; He, Daping; Wang, Jing; Lin, Yue; Yin, Peiqun; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2016-02-10

    Cost-efficient utilization of Pt in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great importance for the potential industrial scale demand of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. Designing a hollow structure of a Pt catalyst offers a great opportunity to enhance the electrocatalytic performance and maximize the use of precious Pt. Herein we report a routine to synthesize ultrathin icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocages. In detail, the Pt atoms were conformally deposited on the surface of Pd icosahedral seeds, followed by selective removal of the Pd core by a concentrated HNO3 solution. The icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocage that is a few atomic layers thick includes the merits of abundant twin defects, an ultrahigh surface/volume ratio, and an ORR-favored Pt{111} facet, all of which have been demonstrated to be promoting factors for ORR. With a 10 times higher specific activity and 7 times higher mass activity, this catalyst shows more extraordinary ORR activity than the commercial Pt/C. The ORR activity of icosahedral Pt-enriched nanocages outperforms the cubic and octahedral nanocages reported in the literature, demonstrating the superiority of the icosahedral nanocage structure. PMID:26808073

  6. Nrf2 activation in astrocytes contributes to spinal cord ischemic tolerance induced by hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Guoyang; Zhang, Kun; Sun, Jinchuan; Xu, Tao; Li, Runping; Tao, Hengyi; Xu, Weigang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we investigated whether nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation in astrocytes contributes to the neuroprotection induced by a single hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (SCIR) injury. In vivo: At 24 h after a single HBO-PC at 2.5 atmospheres absolute for 90 min, the male ICR mice underwent SCIR injury by aortic cross-clamping surgery and observed for 48 h. HBO-PC significantly improved hindlimb motor function, reduced secondary spinal cord edema, ameliorated the reactivity of spinal motor-evoked potentials, and slowed down the process of apoptosis to exert neuroprotective effects against SCIR injury. At 12 h or 24 h after HBO-PC without aortic cross-clamping surgery, Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, realtime-polymerase chain reaction and double-immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the Nrf2 activity of spinal cord tissue, such as mRNA level, protein content, DNA binding activity, and the expression of downstream gene, such as glutamate-cysteine ligase, γ-glutamyltransferase, multidrug resistance protein 1, which are key proteins for intracellular glutathione synthesis and transit. The Nrf2 activity and downstream genes expression were all enhanced in normal spinal cord with HBO-PC. Glutathione content of spinal cord tissue with HBO-PC significantly increased at all time points after SCIR injury. Moreover, Nrf2 overexpression mainly occurs in astrocytes. In vitro: At 24 h after HBO-PC, the primary spinal astrocyte-neuron co-cultures from ICR mouse pups were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 90 min to simulate the ischemia-reperfusion injury. HBO-PC significantly increased the survival rate of neurons and the glutathione content in culture medium, which was mainly released from asctrocytes. Moreover, the Nrf2 activity and downstream genes expression induced by HBO-PC were mainly enhanced in astrocytes, but not in neurons. In

  7. Structure of RdxA: an oxygen insensitive nitroreductase essential for metronidazole activation in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Rojas, Adriana L.; Olekhnovich, Igor; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Hoffman, Paul S.; Sancho, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The RdxA oxygen insensitive nitroreductase of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the susceptibility of this organism to the redox active prodrug metronidazole (MTZ). Loss-of-function mutations in rdxA are primarily responsible for resistance to this therapeutic. RdxA exhibits potent NADPH oxidase activity under aerobic conditions and metronidazole reductase activity under strictly anaerobic conditions. Here we report the crystal structure of RdxA, which is a homodimer exhibiting domain swapping and containing two molecules of FMN bound at the dimer interface. We have found a gap between the side chain of Tyr47 and the isoalloxazine ring of FMN that seems appropriate for substrate binding. The structure does not include residues 97–128, which corresponds to a locally unstable part of the NTR from E. coli, and might be involved in cofactor binding. Comparison of H pylori RdxA to other oxidoreductases of known structure suggests RdxA may belong to a new subgroup of oxidoreductases in which a cysteine sidechain close to the FMN cofactor could be involved in the reductive activity. In this respect, mutation of C159 to A or S (C159A/S) has resulted in loss of MTZ reductase activity, but not NADPH oxidase activity. The RdxA structure allows interpretation of the many loss-of-function mutations previously described, including those affecting C159, a residue whose interaction with FMN is required for nitroreduction of MTZ. Our studies provide unique insights into the redox behavior of the flavin in this key enzyme for metronidazole activation, and with potential use in gene therapy. PMID:23039228

  8. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA weremore » more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.« less

  9. Highly active cobalt phosphate and borate based oxygen evolving catalysts operating in neutral and natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, AJ; Surendranath, Y; Reece, SY; Nocera, DG

    2011-02-01

    A high surface area electrode is functionalized with cobalt-based oxygen evolving catalysts (Co-OEC = electrodeposited from pH 7 phosphate, Pi, pH 8.5 methylphosphonate, MePi, and pH 9.2 borate electrolyte, Bi). Co-OEC prepared from MePi and operated in Pi and Bi achieves a current density of 100 mA cm(-2) for water oxidation at 442 and 363 mV overpotential, respectively. The catalyst retains activity in near-neutral pH buffered electrolyte in natural waters such as those from the Charles River (Cambridge, MA) and seawater (Woods Hole, MA). The efficacy and ease of operation of anodes functionalized with Co-OEC at appreciable current density together with its ability to operate in near neutral pH buffered natural water sources bodes well for the translation of this catalyst to a viable renewable energy storage technology.

  10. Singlet oxygen scavenging activity of tocopherol and plastochromanol in Arabidopsis thaliana: relevance to photooxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Yadav, Deepak Kumar; Szymańska, Renata; Kruk, Jerzy; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, singlet oxygen (¹O₂) scavenging activity of tocopherol and plastochromanol was examined in tocopherol cyclase-deficient mutant (vte1) of Arabidopsis thaliana lacking both tocopherol and plastochromanol. It is demonstrated here that suppression of tocopherol and plastochromanol synthesis in chloroplasts isolated from vte1 Arabidopsis plants enhanced ¹O₂ formation under high light illumination as monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy. The exposure of vte1 Arabidopsis plants to high light resulted in the formation of secondary lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde as determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Furthermore, it is shown here that the imaging of ultra-weak photon emission known to reflect oxidation of lipids was unambiguously higher in vte1 Arabidopsis plants. Our results indicate that tocopherol and plastochromanol act as efficient ¹O₂ scavengers and protect effectively lipids against photooxidative damage in Arabidopsis plants. PMID:23848570

  11. Genetic damage in CHO cells exposed to enzymically generated active oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Phillips, B J; James, T E; Anderson, D

    1984-05-01

    The genetic toxicity of active oxygen species produced during the enzymic oxidation of xanthine has been investigated using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Incubation of cells with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase resulted in extensive chromosome breakage and sister-chromatid exchange and gave a small increase in frequency of thioguanine-resistant cells (HGPRT test). Inclusion of superoxide dismutase or catalase in the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system inhibited chromosome breakage, whereas only catalase prevented SCE and mutant induction. It is concluded that hydrogen peroxide is responsible for most of the genetic effects observed in CHO cells exposed to xanthine/xanthine oxidase but that superoxide plays a key role in chromosome breakage. PMID:6325900

  12. Nitride stabilized PtNi core-shell nanocatalyst for high oxygen reduction activity.

    PubMed

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Choi, Yongman; Su, Dong; Liu, Ping; Adzic, Radoslav R

    2012-12-12

    We describe a route to the development of novel PtNiN core-shell catalysts with low Pt content shell and inexpensive NiN core having high activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The PtNiN synthesis involves nitriding Ni nanoparticles and simultaneously encapsulating it by 2-4 monolayer-thick Pt shell. The experimental data and the density functional theory calculations indicate nitride has the bifunctional effect that facilitates formation of the core-shell structures and improves the performance of the Pt shell by inducing both geometric and electronic effects. Synthesis of inexpensive NiN cores opens up possibilities for designing of various transition metal nitride based core-shell nanoparticles for a wide range of applications in energy conversion processes. PMID:23194259

  13. Short Self-Assembling Peptides Are Able to Bind to Copper and Activate Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Makhlynets, Olga V; Gosavi, Pallavi M; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2016-07-25

    We have shown that de novo designed peptides self-assemble in the presence of copper to create supramolecular assemblies capable of carrying out the oxidation of dimethoxyphenol in the presence of dioxygen. Formation of the supramolecular assembly, which is akin to a protein fold, is critical for productive catalysis since peptides possessing the same functional groups but lacking the ability to self-assemble do not catalyze substrate oxidation. The ease with which we have discovered robust and productive oxygen activation catalysts suggests that these prion-like assemblies might have served as intermediates in the evolution of enzymatic function and opens the path for the development of new catalyst nanomaterials. PMID:27276534

  14. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA were more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.

  15. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON ADSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF GRANULATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THREE ORTHO-SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorptive capacity of activated carbon for several organic compounds was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of molecular oxygen. This influence is manifested by the polymerization of adsorbate on the surface of activated carbon. As a result, GAC exhibits much high...

  16. Student Responses to a Hands-On Kinesthetic Lecture Activity for Learning about the Oxygen Carrying Capacity of Blood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breckler, Jennifer; Yu, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a new hands-on, or "kinesthetic," activity for use in a physiology lecture hall to help students comprehend an important concept in cardiopulmonary physiology known as oxygen carrying capacity. One impetus for designing this activity was to address the needs of students who have a preference for kinesthetic learning and to…

  17. Probenecid protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury in primary astrocytes by regulating inflammasome activity.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhihong; Ding, Shuai; Deng, Hongping; Wang, Jun; Yi, Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Shengmei; Gu, Lijuan; Xiong, Xiaoxing

    2016-07-15

    Inflammation is extremely important in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Pannexin 1 (Panx1) channel has been reported to activate inflammasome in astrocytes and be involved in ischemic injury, but this damage effect is reversed by a Panx1 inhibitor-probenecid. However, the mechanism of probenecid protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury remains unclear. In present study, we hypothesized that probenecid protected astrocytes from ischemia/reperfusion injury in vitro by modulating the inflammasome. Primary cultured neocortical astrocytes were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/RX) and probenecid was added in this model. Viability and nuclear morphology of astrocytes, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein expressions of NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor protein 3), caspase-1, and AQP4 (Aquaporins 4), as well as release of cellular HMGB1 and IL-1β were observed to evaluate the effect and mechanisms of probenecid on OGD/reoxygenated astrocytes. Probenecid did not affect cell viability at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, and 100μM but induced significant astrocytes death at 500μM. Probenecid inhibited cell death and ROS generation in astrocytes subjected to 6h of OGD and 24h of reoxygenation. The expression levels of NLRP3, caspase-1, and AQP4 increased after 6h of OGD, but probenecid treatment attenuated this increase. Moreover, the extracellular release of IL-1β and HMGB1 from OGD/reoxygenated astrocytes increased significantly. However, treatment by probenecid resulted in substantial reduction of these proteins levels in extracellular space. In conclusion, The Panx1 inhibitor, probenecid, which was administered before OGD, provided protective effects on the OGD/reoxygenation model of cultured astrocytes by modulating inflammasome activity and downregulating AQP4 expression. PMID:27154322

  18. Labor Contractions Enhance Oxygenation and Behavioral Activity of Newborn Rat Pups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, N. A.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.; Balton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Labor contractions help instigate behavioral responses at birth (viz., breathing and suckling) that are vital for the newborn's adaptation to the extrauterine world (Ronca et al., 1996). In the present study, we analyzed the role of labor contractions in postpartum oxygenation and behavioral activity of newborn rat pups. Newborns were observed following either vaginal (V) or cesarean delivery. For cesarean delivery, day 21 pregnant dams' were administered a spinal transaction to eliminate lower body sensation, a laparotomy was performed and the uterus was maintained in a heated (37.5 C) bath. Four rat fetuses in one of the dams' paired uterine horn were compressed (C) to Simulate labor contractions (20 sec/min for 10 min) while four fetuses in the opposite horn were not compressed (NC). Fetuses were surgically removed from the uterus, stroked with a soft brush to mimic postnatal licking by the dam, the umbilical cord occluded. Pups were exposed to room temperature (22 C) for one hr, then nest temperature (33 C) for one hr. PO2, CO2, and O2, saturation were determined at 0, 30, 60, or 120 min post delivery using a blood gas analyzer. V and C delivered neonates showed comparable rates of PO2, CO2 and O2 saturation whereas NC neonates showed depressed levels at all time points (p<0.05). Respiratory rates of V, C and NC neonates increased significantly (p<0.05) over the first two postpartum hrs and did not differ across groups. Postpartum behavioral activity was significantly greater in V and C conditions and positively correlated with postnatal oxygenation. These findings provide further evidence for importance of labor contractions in early postpartum adaptation.

  19. Regulation of IDO activity by oxygen supply: inhibitory effects on antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Silvia K; Ebel, Sebastian; Keil, Eric; Woite, Claudia; Ernst, Joachim F; Benzin, Anika E; Rupp, Jan; Däubener, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid for human beings as well as for some microorganisms. In human cells the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) reduces local tryptophan levels and is therefore able to mediate broad-spectrum effector functions: IDO activity restricts the growth of various clinically relevant pathogens such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. On the other hand, it has been observed that IDO has immunoregulatory functions as it efficiently controls the activation and survival of T-cells. Although these important effects have been analysed in much detail, they have been observed in vitro using cells cultured in the presence of 20% O₂ (normoxia). Such high oxygen concentrations are not present in vivo especially within infected and inflamed tissues. We therefore analysed IDO-mediated effects under lower oxygen concentrations in vitro and observed that the function of IDO is substantially impaired in tumour cells as well as in native cells. Hypoxia led to reduced IDO expression and as a result to reduced production of kynurenine, the downstream product of tryptophan degradation. Consequently, effector functions of IDO were abrogated under hypoxic conditions: in different human cell lines such as tumour cells (glioblastoma, HeLa) but also in native cells (human foreskin fibroblasts; HFF) IDO lost the capacity to inhibit the growth of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), parasites (Toxoplasma gondii) or viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1). Additionally, IDO could no longer efficiently control the proliferation of T-cells that have been co-cultured with IDO expressing HFF cells in vitro. In conclusion, the potent antimicrobial as well as immunoregulatory functions of IDO were substantially impaired under hypoxic conditions that pathophysiologically occurs in vivo. PMID:23675474

  20. Regulation of IDO Activity by Oxygen Supply: Inhibitory Effects on Antimicrobial and Immunoregulatory Functions

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Eric; Woite, Claudia; Ernst, Joachim F.; Benzin, Anika E.; Rupp, Jan; Däubener, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid for human beings as well as for some microorganisms. In human cells the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) reduces local tryptophan levels and is therefore able to mediate broad-spectrum effector functions: IDO activity restricts the growth of various clinically relevant pathogens such as bacteria, parasites and viruses. On the other hand, it has been observed that IDO has immunoregulatory functions as it efficiently controls the activation and survival of T-cells. Although these important effects have been analysed in much detail, they have been observed in vitro using cells cultured in the presence of 20% O2 (normoxia). Such high oxygen concentrations are not present in vivo especially within infected and inflamed tissues. We therefore analysed IDO-mediated effects under lower oxygen concentrations in vitro and observed that the function of IDO is substantially impaired in tumour cells as well as in native cells. Hypoxia led to reduced IDO expression and as a result to reduced production of kynurenine, the downstream product of tryptophan degradation. Consequently, effector functions of IDO were abrogated under hypoxic conditions: in different human cell lines such as tumour cells (glioblastoma, HeLa) but also in native cells (human foreskin fibroblasts; HFF) IDO lost the capacity to inhibit the growth of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), parasites (Toxoplasma gondii) or viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1). Additionally, IDO could no longer efficiently control the proliferation of T-cells that have been co-cultured with IDO expressing HFF cells in vitro. In conclusion, the potent antimicrobial as well as immunoregulatory functions of IDO were substantially impaired under hypoxic conditions that pathophysiologically occurs in vivo. PMID:23675474

  1. Shoulder and forearm oxygenation and myoelectric activity in patients with work-related muscle pain and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Elcadi, Guilherme H; Forsman, Mikael; Aasa, Ulrika; Fahlstrom, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G

    2013-05-01

    We tested hypotheses of (a) reduced oxygen usage, oxygen recovery, blood flow and oxygen consumption; and (b) increased muscle activity for patients diagnosed with work-related muscle pain (WRMP) in comparison to healthy controls. Oxygenation was measured with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and muscle activity with EMG for the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius descendens (TD) muscles. Eighteen patients with diffuse neck-shoulder-arm pain and 17 controls (matched in age and sex) were equipped with NIRS and EMG probes. After determining an individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force, short-term (20 s) isometric contractions for the ECR and TD of 10, 30, 50 and 70 % MVC generated ∆StO₂ and StO₂% recovery (Rslope) from NIRS, and RMS%max from EMG signals. In addition, upper arm venous (VO) and arterial (AO) occlusions generated slopes of total hemoglobin (HbTslope) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHbslope) for the resting ECR as surrogates of blood flow and oxygen consumption, respectively. Mixed model analyses, t tests, and Mann-Whitney test were used to assess differences between groups. There was no significant difference in MVC between groups for either muscle. Also, ∆StO₂%, Rslope for either muscle, and ECR-HbTslope were not different between groups, thus our hypotheses of reduced oxygen use, recovery, and blood flow for patients were not confirmed. However, patients had a significantly lower ECR-HHbslope confirming our hypothesis of reduced consumption. Further, there was no difference in RMS%max during contractions meaning that the hypothesis of increased activity for patients was not confirmed. When taking into account the number of NIRS variables studied, differences we found between our patient group and healthy controls (i.e., in forearm oxygen consumption and shoulder oxygen saturation level) may be considered modest. Overall our findings may have been impacted by the fact that our patients and controls were similar in muscle strength

  2. Reactive oxygen species mediate TNFR1 increase after TRPV1 activation in mouse DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Liping; Westlund, Karin N

    2009-01-01

    Background Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is activated by low pH/protons and is well known to be involved in hyperalgesia during inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in nociceptive responses causing hyperalgesia through TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1) activation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is also prominently increased in inflamed tissue. The present study investigated TNFR1 receptors in primary cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after TRPV1 activation and the involvement of ROS. C57BL/6 mice, both TRPV1 knockout and wild type, were used for immunofluorescent and live cell imaging. The L4 and L5 DRGs were dissected bilaterally and cultured overnight. TRPV1 was stimulated with capsaicin or its potent analog, resiniferatoxin. ROS production was measured with live cell imaging and TNFR1 was detected with immunofluorescence in DRG primary cultures. The TRPV1 knockout mice, TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, and ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN), were employed to explore the functional relationship among TRPV1, ROS and TNFR1 in these studies. Results The results demonstrate that TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 receptors and ROS generation in primary cultures of mouse DRG neurons. Activated increases in TNFR1 receptors and ROS production are absent in TRPV1 deficient mice. The PBN blocks increases in TNFR1 and ROS production induced by capsaicin/resiniferatoxin. Conclusion TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 in cultured mouse DRG neurons through a ROS signaling pathway, a novel sensitization mechanism in DRG neurons. PMID:19531269

  3. Effects of oxygen functional groups on the enhancement of the hydrogen spillover of Pd-doped activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tsui-Yun; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Tseng, Hui-Ping; Chen, Chien-Hung; Yu, Ming-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    The hydrogen storage performance of Pd-doped oxidized activated carbon (Pd/AC-ox) with various oxygen contents or functional groups was investigated. The surface chemistry of the Pd/AC-ox sample was modified by treatment with hydrogen gas. Temperature-programmed desorption was performed to characterize the oxygen functional groups in each sample. In this study, low- and high-pressure hydrogen adsorption isotherm experiments were conducted using a static volumetric measurement at room temperature (RT) and pressures of up to 8 MPa. The results showed that increasing the oxygen content and functional groups on the surface of the Pd/AC-ox significantly improved the reversible RT hydrogen storage capacity due to the spillover effect. The hydrogen spillover enhancement factors at 0.12 MPa were greater than 100% for all samples. The hydrogen uptake of Pd/AC-ox1 at RT and 8 MPa with an oxygen content of 8.94 wt.% was 0.37 wt.%, which was 48% greater than that of Pd-free AC-ox (0.25 wt.%). In addition, the hydrogen uptake of Pd/AC-ox3 with lower oxygen contents demonstrates that the hydrogen spillover enhancement gradually disappears when the pressure is increased to more than 2 MPa (i.e., a transition from spillover to physisorption). The surface diffusion, or reversible adsorption, of the spiltover H atoms, which is enhanced by oxygen functional groups, was affected by a threshold amount of oxygen groups (such as hydroxyl groups). PMID:25490569

  4. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; et al

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  5. Iridium-Tin oxide solid-solution nanocatalysts with enhanced activity and stability for oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangfu; Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Donglei; Chi, Jun; Wang, Xunying; Sun, Shucheng; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2016-09-01

    Addressing major challenges from the material cost, efficiency and stability, it is highly desirable to develop high-performance catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Herein we explore a facile surfactant-assisted approach for fabricating Irsbnd Sn (Ir/Sn = 0.6/0.4, by mol.) nano-oxide catalysts with good morphology control. Direct proofs from XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate hydrophilic triblock polymer (TBP, like Pluronic® F108) surfactant can boost the formation of stable solid-solution structure. With the TBP hydrophilic and block-length increase, the fabricated Irsbnd Sn oxides undergoing the rod-to-sphere transition obtain the relatively lower crystallization, decreased crystallite size, Ir-enriched surface and incremental available active sites, all of which can bolster the OER activity and stability. Meanwhile, it is observed that the coupled Ir oxidative etching takes a crucial role in determining the material structure and performance. Compared with commercial Ir black, half-cell tests confirm F108-assistant catalysts with over 40 wt% Ir loading reduction show 2-fold activity enhancement as well as significant stability improvement. The lowest cell voltage using 0.88 mg cm-2 Ir loading is only 1.621 V at 1000 mA cm-2 and 80 °C with a concomitant energy efficiency of 75.8% which is beyond the DOE 2017 efficiency target of 74%.

  6. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg(2+) ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn(2+)); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg(2+) causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn(2+) release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn(2+) or Hg(2+). Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg(2+)-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg(2+) that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system. PMID:20951154

  7. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  8. Synthesis of highly active and dual-functional electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Geng; Xu, Guangran; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Gong, Xia; Zheng, Dafang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qin

    2016-12-01

    The promising Pt-based ternary catalyst is crucial for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to improving catalytic activity and durability for both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction. In this work, a facile strategy is used for the synthesis ternary RuMPt (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) nanodendrities catalysts. The ternary RuMPt alloys exhibit enhanced specific and mass activity, positive half-wave potential, and long-term stability, compared with binary Pt-based alloy and the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which is attributed to the high electron density and upshifting of the d-band center for Pt atoms, and synergistic catalytic effects among Pt, M, and Ru atoms by introducing a transition metal. Impressively, the ternary RuCoPt catalyst exhibits superior mass activity (801.59 mA mg-1) and positive half-wave potential (0.857 V vs. RHE) towards MOR and ORR, respectively. Thus, the RuMPt nanocomposite is a very promising material to be used as dual electrocatalyst in the application of PEMFCs.

  9. In Situ Probing of the Active Site Geometry of Ultrathin Nanowires for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M; Crooks, Richard M; Adzic, Radoslav R; Liu, Ping; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-10-01

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (∼2 nm) core-shell Pt∼Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu∼Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Hence, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general. PMID:26402364

  10. [Relationship between the oxidation-reduction system of astrocytes with production of active forms of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Semenkova, G N; Kvacheva, Z B; Obydennikova, S V; Cherenkevich, S N; Titov, L P

    1998-01-01

    Cells of neuroglia--the astrocytes are of interest from the point of view of their participation in phagocytosis. Phagocyte ability to generate active oxygen forms (AOF) as used as the basic criterion of the estimation of their functional activity. For the purpose to clear up molecular and cellular mechanisms of phagocytosis a study of astrocyte redox-systems, participating in production of AOF, was undertaken. Registration of AOF in astrocytes was carried out using a method of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Primary culture of guinea pig astrocytes was used. Spontaneous chemiluminescence of low intensity was found for the astrocytes at the presence of luminol. The destruction of the cells was accompanied by a significant growth of the intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence. Suspension of endocutosis inductors, particle of latex and phytohemagglutinin, added to astrocytes did not result in formation of AOF, characteristic for other cells, possessing phagocytosis. It was established, that addition of hydrogen peroxide destroys astrocytes at the presence of luminol and gives rise to the emission. Chemiluminescence was not observed in similar experiments with intact cells. A conclusion was made that inside astrocytes there are structures, which show peroxidase-like activity. PMID:9848214

  11. Palladium-platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-01-01

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability. PMID:26133469

  12. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; et al

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can bemore » attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.« less

  13. Effect of surface area and chemisorbed oxygen on the SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether activated char produced from Illinois coal could be used effectively to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. Chars were prepared from a high-volatile Illinois bituminous coal under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. A novel char preparation technique was developed to prepare chars with SO2 adsorption capacities significantly greater than that of a commercial activated carbon. In general, there was no correlation between SO2 adsorption capacity and surface area. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to determine the nature and extent of carbon-oxygen (C-O) complexes formed on the char surface. TPD data revealed that SO2 adsorption was inversely proportional to the amount of C-O complex. The formation of a stable C-O complex during char preparation may have served only to occupy carbon sites that were otherwise reactive towards SO2 adsorption. A fleeting C(O) complex formed during SO2 adsorption is postulated to be the reaction intermediate necessary for conversion of SO2 to H2SO4. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Bleaching in coral reef anthozoans: effects of irradiance, ultraviolet radiation, and temperature on the activities of protective enzymes against active oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. P.; Stochaj, W. R.; Tapley, D. W.; Shick, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    Recent widespread bleaching of coral reef anthozoans has been observed on the Great Barrier Reef, the Pacific coast of Panama, and in the Caribbean Sea. Bleaching events have been correlated with anomalously high sea surface temperatures which are presumed to cause the expulsion of zooxanthellae from their hosts. Our experimental results show that increases in temperature significantly reduce the total number of zooxanthellae per polyp. At the same time temperature, irradiance (photosynthetically active radiation=PAR), and ultraviolet radiation (UV) independently increase the activities of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase within the zooxanthellae of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum. Enzyme activities within the host are only suggestive of similar changes. These enzymes are responsible for detoxifying active forms of oxygen, and their elevated activities indirectly indicate an increase in the production of active oxygen species by increases in these environmental factors. Historically, bleaching has been attributed to changes in temperature, salinity, and UV. Increases in temperature or highly energetic UV radiation can increase the flux of active forms of oxygen, particularly at the elevated oxygen concentrations that prevail in the tissues during photosynthesis, with oxygen toxicity potentially mediating the bleaching event. Additionally, the concentration of UV absorbing compounds within the symbiosis is inversely related to temperature, potentially increasing exposure of the host and zooxanthellae to the direct effects of UV.

  15. Determination of reactive oxygen species from ZnO micro-nano structures with shape-dependent photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    He, Weiwei; Zhao, Hongxiao; Jia, Huimin; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Zhi

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with shape dependent photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction. The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were identified precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Highlights: • ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies were prepared by solvothermal reaction. • Multi-pod like ZnO structures exhibited superior photocatalytic activity. • The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were characterized precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. • The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies have been prepared by the changing solvents used during their synthesis by solvothermal reaction. Three typical shapes of ZnO structures including hexagonal, bell bottom like and multi-pod formed and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multi pod like ZnO structures exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity toward degradation of methyl orange. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping techniques, we demonstrate an effective way to identify precisely the generation of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and singlet oxygen from the irradiated ZnO multi pod structures. The type of reactive oxygen species formed was predictable from the band gap structure of ZnO. These results indicate that the shape of micro-nano structures significantly affects the photocatalytic activity of ZnO, and demonstrate the value of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for characterizing the type of reactive oxygen species formed during photoexcitation of semiconductors.

  16. A key parameter on the adsorption of diluted aniline solutions with activated carbons: The surface oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Beatrice; Ferrer, Nabí; Sempere, Julià; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    A total of 11 different commercial activated carbons (AC) with well characterized textural properties and oxygen surface content were tested as adsorbents for the removal of aniline as a target water pollutant. The maximum adsorption capacity of aniline for the studied AC was from 138.9 to 257.9 mg g(-1) at 296.15 K and it was observed to be strongly related to the textural properties of the AC, mainly with the BET surface area and the micropore volume. It was not observed any influence of the oxygen surface content of the AC on the maximum adsorption capacity. However, it was found that at low aniline aqueous concentration, the presence of oxygen surface groups plays a dominant role during the adsorption. A high concentration of oxygen surface groups, mainly carboxylic and phenolic groups, decreases the aniline adsorption regardless of the surface area of the AC. PMID:27497348

  17. Reactive Oxygene Species and Thioredoxin Activity in Plants at Development of Hypergravity and Oxidative Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    Early increasing of reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, including H2O2, occurs in plant cells under various impacts and than these ROS can function as signaling molecules in starting of cell stress responses. At the same time thioredoxins (TR) are significant ROS and H2O2 sensors and transmitters to activation of various redox sensitive proteins, transcription factors and MAP kinases. This study was aimed to investigate early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents and TR activity in the pea roots and in tissue culture under hypergravity and oxidative stresses. Pea roots of 3-5 days old seedlings and 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pea seedlings were grown on wet filter paper and the tissue culture was grown on MS medium in dark conditions under 24oC. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 15 g. Chemiluminescence (ChL) intensity for ROS concentration, H2O2 content and TR activity were determined. All experiments were repeated by 3-5 times. Early and reliable increasing of ChL intensity and H2O2 contents in the pea roots and in the tissue culture took place under hypergravity and oxidative stresses to 30, 60 and 90 min. At the same time TR activity increased on 11 and 19 percents only to 60 and 90 min. Thus under hypergravity and oxidative stresses in both investigated plants take place early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents which as second messengers lead to increasing of TR activity with creating of ROS-TR stress signaling pathway.

  18. Density Functional Theory Study of Oxygen Reduction Activity on Ultrathin Platinum Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2012-07-13

    The structure, stability, and catalytic activity of a number of single- and double-wall platinum (n,m) nanotubes ranging in diameter from 0.3 to 2.0 nm were studied using plane-wave based density functional theory in the gas phase and water environment. The change in the catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the size and chirality of the nanotube was studied by calculating equilibrium adsorption potentials for ORR intermediates and by constructing free energy diagrams in the ORR dissociative mechanism network. In addition, the stability of the platinum nanotubes is investigated in terms of electrochemical dissolution potentials and by determining the most stable state of the material as a function of pH and potential, as represented in Pourbaix diagrams. Our results show that the catalytic activity and the stability toward electrochemical dissolution depend greatly on the diameter and chirality of the nanotube. On the basis of the estimated overpotentials for ORR, we conclude that smaller, approximately 0.5 nm in diameter single-wall platinum nanotubes consistently show a huge, up to 400 mV larger overpotential than platinum, indicating very poor catalytic activity toward ORR. This is the result of substantial structural changes induced by the adsorption of any chemical species on these tubes. Single-wall n = m platinum nanotubes with a diameter larger than 1 nm have smaller ORR overpotentials than bulk platinum for up to 180 mV and thus show improved catalytic activity relative to bulk. We also predict that these nanotubes can endure the highest cell potentials but dissolution potentials are still for 110 mV lower than for the bulk, indicating a possible corrosion problem.

  19. Lewis Acid Pairs for the Activation of Biomass-derived Oxygenates in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Yuriy

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project is to understand the mechanistic aspects behind the cooperative activation of oxygenates by catalytic pairs in aqueous media. Specifically, we will investigate how the reactivity of a solid Lewis acid can be modulated by pairing the active site with other catalytic sites at the molecular level, with the ultimate goal of enhancing activation of targeted functional groups. Although unusual catalytic properties have been attributed to the cooperative effects promoted by such catalytic pairs, virtually no studies exist detailing the use heterogeneous water-tolerant Lewis pairs. A main goal of this work is to devise rational pathways for the synthesis of porous heterogeneous catalysts featuring isolated Lewis pairs that are active in the transformation of biomass-derived oxygenates in the presence of bulk water. Achieving this technical goal will require closely linking advanced synthesis techniques; detailed kinetic and mechanistic investigations; strict thermodynamic arguments; and comprehensive characterization studies of both materials and reaction intermediates. For the last performance period (2014-2015), two technical aims were pursued: 1) C-C coupling using Lewis acid and base pairs in Lewis acidic zeolites. Tin-, zirconium-, and hafnium containing zeolites (e.g., Sn-, Zr-, and Hf-Beta) are versatile solid Lewis acids that selectively activate carbonyl functional groups. In this aim, we demonstrate that these zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. 2) One-pot synthesis of MWW zeolite nanosheets for activation of bulky substrates. Through

  20. Low effective activation energies for oxygen release from metal oxides: evidence for mass-transfer limits at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Jian, Guoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas W; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen release from metal oxides at high temperatures is relevant to many thermally activated chemical processes, including chemical-looping combustion, solar thermochemical cycles and energetic thermite reactions. In this study, we evaluated the thermal decomposition of nanosized metal oxides under rapid heating (~10(5) K s(-1)) with time-resolved mass spectrometry. We found that the effective activation-energy values that were obtained using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa isoconversional method are much lower than the values found at low heating rates, indicating that oxygen transport might be rate-determining at a high heating rate. PMID:24619858

  1. Origin of Active Oxygen in a Ternary CuOx /Co3O4–CeO 2 Catalyst for CO Oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Zili; Peng, Xihong; Binder, Andrew; Chai, Songhai; Dai, Sheng

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we have studied CO oxidation over a ternary CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst and employed the techniques of N2 adsorption/desporption, XRD, TPR, TEM, in situ DRIFTS and QMS (Quadrupole mass spectrometer) to explore the origin of active oxygen. DRIFTS-QMS results with labeled 18O2 indicate that the origin of active oxygens in CuOx/Co3O4-CeO2 obeys a model, called as queue mechanism. Namely gas-phase molecular oxygens are dissociated to atomic oxygens and then incorporate in oxygen vacancies located at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2 to form active crystalline oxygens, and these active oxygens diffuse to the CO-Cu+ sites thanks to the oxygen vacancy concentrationmore » magnitude and react with the activated CO to form CO2. This process, obeying a queue rule, provides active oxygens to form CO2 from gas-phase O2 via oxygen vacancies and crystalline oxygen at the interface of Co3O4-CeO2.« less

  2. Enhancement of activity of RuSex electrocatalyst by modification with nanostructured iridium towards more efficient reduction of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembinska, Beata; Kiliszek, Malgorzata; Elzanowska, Hanna; Pisarek, Marcin; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    2013-12-01

    Electrocatalytic activity of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) supported selenium-modified ruthenium, RuSex/C, nanoparticles for reduction of oxygen was enhanced through intentional decoration with iridium nanostructures (dimensions, 2-3 nm). The catalytic materials were characterized in oxygenated 0.5 mol dm-3 H2SO4 using cyclic and rotating ring disk voltammetric techniques as well as using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with X-ray dispersive analyzer. Experiments utilizing gas diffusion electrode aimed at mimicking conditions existing in the low-temperature fuel cell. Upon application of our composite catalytic system, the reduction of oxygen proceeded at more positive potentials, and higher current densities were observed when compared to the behavior of the simple iridium-free system (RuSex/C) investigated under the analogous conditions. The enhancement effect was more pronounced than that one would expect from simple superposition of voltammetric responses for the oxygen reduction at RuSex/C and iridium nanostructures studied separately. Nanostructured iridium acted here as an example of a powerful catalyst for the reduction of H2O2 (rather than O2) and, when combined with such a moderate catalyst as ruthenium-selenium (for O2 reduction), it produced an integrated system of increased electrocatalytic activity in the oxygen reduction process. The proposed system retained its activity in the presence of methanol that could appear in a cathode compartment of alcohol fuel cell.

  3. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Timothy E. Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I}, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  4. Identification of oxygen-19 during in vivo neutron activation analysis of water phantoms.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Syed N A; Chettle, David R

    2015-12-01

    Hand bone equivalent phantoms (250 ml) carrying selenium in various amounts were irradiated and counted for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) by employing a 4π NaI(TI) based detection system. During the analysis of counting data, a feature at a higher energy than the gamma ray peak from (77m)Se (0.162 MeV) was observed at 0.197 MeV. Further investigations were made by preparing water phantoms containing only de-ionized water in 250 ml and 1034 ml quantities. Neutrons were produced by the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction using the high beam current Tandetron accelerator. Phantoms were irradiated at a fixed proton energy of 2.3 MeV and proton currents of 400 μA and 550 μA for 30 s and 22 s respectively. The counting data saved using the 4π NaI(TI) detection system for 10 s intervals in anticoincidence, coincidence and singles modes of detection were analyzed. Areas under gamma peaks at energies 0.197 MeV and 1.357 MeV were computed and half-lives from the number of counts for the two peaks were established. It was concluded that during neutron activation of water phantoms, oxygen-18 is activated, producing short-lived radioactive (19)O having T1/2  =  26.9 s. Induced activity from (19)O may contribute spectral interference in the gamma ray spectrum. This effect may need to be taken into account by researchers while carrying out IVNAA of biological subjects. PMID:26502270

  5. The ancestral activation promiscuity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in algae and plants. In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, ADP-Glc PPase is mainly activated by 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) and to a lesser extent by other metabolites. In this work, we analyzed the activation promiscuity of ADP-Glc PPase subunits from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, the green alga Ostreococcus tauri, and potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber by comparing a specificity constant for 3-PGA, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. Results The 3-PGA specificity constant for the enzymes from Anabaena (homotetramer), O. tauri, and potato tuber was considerably higher than for other activators. O. tauri and potato tuber enzymes were heterotetramers comprising homologous small and large subunits. Conversely, the O. tauri small subunit (OtaS) homotetramer was more promiscuous because its FBP specificity constant was similar to that for 3-PGA. To explore the role of both OtaS and OtaL (O. tauri large subunit) in determining the specificity of the heterotetramer, we knocked out the catalytic activity of each subunit individually by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, the mutants OtaSD148A/OtaL and OtaS/OtaLD171A had higher specificity constants for 3-PGA than for FBP. Conclusions After gene duplication, OtaS seemed to have lost specificity for 3-PGA compared to FBP. This was physiologically and evolutionarily feasible because co-expression of both subunits restored the specificity for 3-PGA of the resulting heterotetrameric wild type enzyme. This widespread promiscuity seems to be ancestral and intrinsic to the enzyme family. Its presence could constitute an efficient evolutionary mechanism to accommodate the ADP-Glc PPase regulation to different metabolic needs. PMID:23433303

  6. Catalytic Activity of Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (hIDO1) at Low Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Ayodele O.; Hixon, Brian P.; Dameron, Laura S.; Chrisman, Ian M.; Smirnov, Valeriy V.

    2015-01-01

    A cytokine-inducible extrahepatic human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (hIDO1) catalyzes the first step of the kynurenine pathway. Immunosuppressive activity of hIDO1 in tumor cells weakens host T-cell immunity, contributing to the progression of cancer. Here we report on enzyme kinetics and catalytic mechanism of hIDO1, studied at varied levels of dioxygen (O2) and L-tryptophan (L-Trp). Using a cytochrome b5-based activating system, we measured the initial rates of O2 decay with a Clark-type oxygen electrode at physiologically-relevant levels of both substrates. Kinetics was also studied in the presence of two substrate analogs: 1-methyl-L-tryptophan and norharmane. Quantitative analysis supports a steady-state rather than a rapid equilibrium kinetic mechanism, where the rates of individual pathways, leading to a ternary complex, are significantly different, and the overall rate of catalysis depends on contributions of both routes. One path, where O2 binds to ferrous hIDO1 first, is faster than the second route, which starts with the binding of L-Trp. However, L-Trp complexation with free ferrous hIDO1 is more rapid than that of O2. As the level of L-Trp increases, the slower route becomes a significant contributor to the overall rate, resulting in observed substrate inhibition. PMID:25712221

  7. p53 activation contributes to patulin-induced nephrotoxicity via modulation of reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huan; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Zhang, Enxiang; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Patulin is a major mycotoxin found in fungal contaminated fruits and their derivative products. Previous studies showed that patulin was able to induce increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress was suggested to play a pivotal role in patulin-induced multiple toxic signaling. The objective of the present study was to investigate the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. Our study demonstrated that higher levels of ROS generation and DNA damage were induced in wild-type p53 cell lines than that found in either knockdown or knockout p53 cell lines in response to patulin exposure, suggesting p53 activation contributed to patulin-induced ROS generation. Mechanistically, we revealed that the pro-oxidant role of p53 in response to patulin was attributed to its ability to suppress catalase activity through up-regulation of PIG3. Moreover, these in vitro findings were further validated in the p53 wild-type/knockout mouse model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report addressing the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. The findings of the present study provided novel insights into understanding mechanisms behind oxidative stress in response to patulin exposure. PMID:27071452

  8. Oxygen uptake and energy expenditure for children during rock climbing activity.

    PubMed

    Watts, Phillip Baxter; Ostrowski, Megan L

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure oxygen uptake and energy expenditure in children during rock climbing activity. 29 children (age = 10.9 ± 1.7 yr) participated in the study. A commercially available rock climbing structure with ample features for submaximal effort climbing provided continuous terrain. Participants were instructed to climb at a comfortable pace. Following an initial 5-min rest, each child climbed one sustained 5-min bout followed by 5-min sitting recovery for a total of 10 min (SUS). This was immediately followed by five 1-min climbing + 1-min recovery intervals for a second total of 10 min (INT). Expired air was analyzed continuously. Energy expenditure (EE) was determined via the Weir method for 10-s intervals throughout the full protocol. The total energy expenditure in kilocalories during the 10-min SUS period was 34.3 ± 11.3 kcal. Energy expenditure during the 10-min INT period averaged 39.3 ± 13.1 kcal and was significantly higher than during SUS (p < .05). The mean total EE for SUS + INT was 73.7 ± 24.2 kcal. EE was correlated with body mass; r = .86. The rock climbing tasks employed in this study produced EE levels similar to what have been reported in children for stair climbing, sports/games activities, and easy jogging. PMID:24018310

  9. Caveolin-1 is involved in reactive oxygen species-induced SHP-2 activation in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ji Hee; Park, Soo Jung; Jo, Ara; Jou, Ilo; Park, Jung Soo

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a neuroprotective role of Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) against ischemic brain injury. However, the molecular mechanisms of SHP-2 activation and those governing how SHP-2 exerts its function under oxidative stress conditions are not well understood. Recently we have reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress promotes the phosphorylation of endogenous SHP-2 through lipid rafts, and that this phosphorylation strongly occurs in astrocytes, but not in microglia. To investigate the molecules involved in events leading to phosphorylation of SHP-2, raft proteins were analyzed using astrocytes and microglia. Interestingly, caveolin-1 and -2 were detected only in astrocytes but not in microglia, whereas flotillin-1 was expressed in both cell types. To examine whether the H2O2-dependent phosphorylation of SHP-2 is mediated by caveolin-1, we used specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) to downregulate caveolin-1 expression. In the presence of caveolin-1 siRNA, the level of SHP-2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was significantly decreased, compared with in the presence of control siRNA. Overexpression of caveolin-1 effectively increased H2O2-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation in microglia. Lastly, H2O2 induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in astrocytes through caveolin-1. Our results suggest that caveolin-1 is involved in astrocyte-specific intracellular responses linked to the SHP-2-mediated signaling cascade following ROS-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21918362

  10. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  11. Mineralization of naphtenic acids with thermally-activated persulfate: The important role of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiyan; Pliego, Gema; Zazo, Juan A; Casas, Jose A; Rodriguez, Juan J

    2016-11-15

    This study reports on the mineralization of model naphtenic acids (NAs) in aqueous solution by catalyst-free thermally-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation. These species are found to be pollutants in oil sands process-affected waters. The NAs tested include saturated-ring (cyclohexanecarboxylic and cyclohexanebutyric acids) and aromatic (2-naphthoic and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acids) structures, at 50mgL(-1)starting concentration. The effect of PS dose within a wide range (10-100% of the theoretical stoichiometric) and working temperature (40-97°C) was investigated. At 80°C and intitial pH=8 complete mineralization of the four NAs was achieved with 40-60% of the stoichiometric PS dose. This is explained because of the important contribution of oxygen, which was experimentally verified and was found to be more effective toward the NAs with a single cyclohexane ring than for the bicyclic aromatic-ring-bearing ones. The effect of chloride and bicarbonate was also checked. The former showed negative effect on the degradation rate of NAs whereas it was negligible or even positive for bicarbonate. The rate of mineralization was well described by simple pseudo-first order kinetics with values of the rate constants normalized to the PS dose within the range of 0.062-0.099h(-1). Apparent activation energy values between 93.7-105.3kJmol(-1) were obtained. PMID:27442986

  12. Mechanism of dark decomposition of iodine donor in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, A I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2002-06-30

    A scheme is proposed that describes the dark decomposition of iodide - the donor of iodine - and the relaxation of singlet oxygen in the chlorine-containing active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL). For typical compositions of the active media of pulsed COILs utilising CH{sub 3}I molecules as iodine donors, a branching chain reaction of the CH{sub 3}I decomposition accompanied by the efficient dissipation of singlet oxygen is shown to develop even at the stage of filling the active volume. In the active media with CF{sub 3}I as the donor, a similar chain reaction is retarded due to the decay of CF{sub 3} radicals upon recombination with oxygen. The validity of this mechanism is confirmed by a rather good agreement between the results of calculations and the available experimental data. The chain decomposition of alkyliodides accompanied by an avalanche production of iodine atoms represents a new way of efficient chemical production of iodine for a COIL. (active media)

  13. Effects of nitrogen- and oxygen-containing functional groups of activated carbon nanotubes on the electrochemical performance in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiyan; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhang, Su; Zhou, Jisheng; Ma, Zhaokun

    2015-07-01

    A kind of nitrogen- and oxygen-containing activated carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) has been prepared by carbonization and activation of polyaniline nanotubes obtained by rapidly mixed reaction. The ACNTs show oxygen content of 15.7% and nitrogen content of 2.97% (atomic ratio). The ACNTs perform high capacitance and good rate capability (327 F g-1 at the current density of 10 A g-1) when used as the electrode materials for supercapacitors. Hydrogen reduction has been further used to investigate the effects of surface functional groups on the electrochemical performance. The changes for both structural component and electrochemical performance reveal that the quinone oxygen, pyridinic nitrogen, and pyrrolic nitrogen of carbon have the most obvious influence on the capacitive property because of their pseudocapacitive contributions.

  14. Comparison of dissolved-organic-carbon residuals from air- and pure-oxygen-activated-sludge sequencing-batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Soto, Mario; Fox, Peter; Westerhoff, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Literature shows that full-scale pure-oxygen activated sludge (O2-AS) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) generate effluents with higher dissolved-organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and larger high-molecular-weight fractions compared to air-activated-sludge (Air-AS) WWTP effluents. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate how gas supplied (air vs. pure oxygen) to sequencing-batch reactors affected DOC transformations. The main conclusions of this paper are (a) O2-AS effluent DOC is more refractory than air-AS effluent DOC; and (b) O2-AS systems may have higher five-day biochemical oxygen demand removals than air-AS systems; however, in terms of COD and DOC removal, air-AS systems are better than O2-AS systems. Analysis of a database from side-by-side O2- and air-AS pilot tests from literature supported these observations. PMID:16629273

  15. Highly-active oxygen evolution electrocatalyzed by a Fe-doped NiSe nanoflake array electrode.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chun; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2016-03-25

    Alkaline water electrolysis offers a simple method for mass production of hydrogen but suffers from the sluggish kinetics of the anodic oxygen evolution reaction (OER), calling for the development of low-cost and durable oxygen evolution electrocatalysts with high activity. In this communication, we report a highly-active robust oxygen evolution electrode, developed by in situ hydrothermal growth of an Fe-doped NiSe nanoflake array directly on a macroporous FeNi foam (Fe-NiSe/FeNi foam). This electrode catalyzes the OER with an onset overpotential as low as 200 mV and needs overpotentials of 245 and 264 mV to achieve 50 and 100 mA cm(-2), respectively, in 1.0 M KOH. Remarkably, it is also highly robust to drive 500 and 1000 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of 246 and 263 mV, respectively, in 30 wt% KOH. PMID:26935420

  16. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  17. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  18. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Abrogation of Oxaliplatin Activity by Cetuximab in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Valeria; Jia, Ruochen; Thompson, Hannah; Nijhuis, Anke; Jeffery, Rosemary; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Silver, Andrew R.; Hartley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antibody cetuximab, targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Clinical trials suggest reduced benefit from the combination of cetuximab with oxaliplatin. The aim of this study was to investigate potential negative interactions between cetuximab and oxaliplatin. Methods: Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Calcusyn software were used to characterize drug interactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction oxidative stress arrays identified genes regulating ROS production. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) measured signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) binding to dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) promoter. SW48, DLD-1 KRAS wild-type cell lines and DLD-1 xenograft models exposed to cetuximab, oxaliplatin, or oxaliplatin + cetuximab (control [saline]; n = 3 mice per treatment group) were used. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Cetuximab and oxaliplatin exhibited antagonistic effects on cellular proliferation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activity reduced by 1.4-fold, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78 to 2.11, P = .003) as opposed to synergistic effects observed with the irinotecan metabolite 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). Although both oxaliplatin and SN-38 produced ROS, only oxaliplatin-mediated apoptosis was ROS dependent. Production of ROS by oxaliplatin was secondary to STAT1-mediated transcriptional upregulation of DUOX2 (3.1-fold, 95% CI = 1.75 to 2.41, P < .001). Inhibition of DUOX2 induction and p38 activation by cetuximab reduced oxaliplatin cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Inhibition of STAT1 and DUOX2-mediated ROS generation by cetuximab impairs p38-dependent apoptosis by oxaliplatin in preclinical models and may contribute to reduced efficacy in clinical settings. Understanding the rationale for unexpected trial results will inform improved rationales for combining EGFR

  19. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  20. Structure-composition-activity relationships in transition-metal oxide and oxyhydroxide oxygen-evolution electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotochaud, Lena

    Solar water-splitting is a potentially transformative renewable energy technology. Slow kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) limit the efficiency of solar-watersplitting devices, thus constituting a hurdle to widespread implementation of this technology. Catalysts must be stable under highly oxidizing conditions in aqueous electrolyte and minimally absorb light. A grand goal of OER catalysis research is the design of new materials with higher efficiencies enabled by comprehensive understanding of the fundamental chemistry behind catalyst activity. However, little progress has been made towards this goal to date. This dissertation details work addressing major challenges in the field of OER catalysis. Chapter I introduces the current state-of-the-art and challenges in the field. Chapter II highlights work using ultra-thin films as a platform for fundamental study and comparison of catalyst activity. Key results of this work are (1) the identification of a Ni0.9Fe0.1OOH catalyst displaying the highest OER activity in base to date and (2) that in base, many transition-metal oxides transform to layered oxyhydroxide materials which are the active catalysts. The latter result is critical in the context of understanding structure-activity relationships in OER catalysts. Chapter III explores the optical properties of these catalysts, using in situ spectroelectrochemistry to quantify their optical absorption. A new figure-of-merit for catalyst performance is developed which considers both optical and kinetic losses due to the catalyst and describes how these factors together affect the efficiency of composite semiconductor/catalyst photoanodes. In Chapter IV, the fundamental structure-composition-activity relationships in Ni1--xFexOOH catalysts are systematically investigated. This work shows that nearly all previous studies of Ni-based catalysts were likely affected by the presence of Fe impurities, a realization which holds significant weight for future study

  1. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas–solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high asmore » 301 mAh g–1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g–1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. Lastly, this study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.« less

  2. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Hy, Sunny; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas-solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g-1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g-1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. This study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.

  3. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Hy, Sunny; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas-solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g(-1) with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g(-1) still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. This study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries. PMID:27363944

  4. Activation of oxygen-mediating pathway using copper ions: fine-tuning of growth kinetics in gold nanorod overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqi; Zhang, Hui; Wen, Tao; Yan, Jiao; Hou, Shuai; Shi, Xiaowei; Hu, Zhijian; Ji, Yinglu; Wu, Xiaochun

    2014-10-21

    Growth kinetics plays an important role in the shape control of nanocrystals (NCs). Herein, we presented a unique way to fine-tune the growth kinetics via oxidative etching activated by copper ions. For the overgrowth of gold nanorods (Au NRs), competitive adsorption of dissolved oxygen on rod surface was found to slow down the overgrowth rate. Copper ions were able to remove the adsorbed oxygen species from the Au surface via oxidative etching, thus exposing more reaction sites for Au deposition. In this way, copper ions facilitated the overgrowth process. Furthermore, Cu(2+) rather than Cu(+) acted as the catalyst for the oxidative etching. Comparative study with Ag(+) indicated that Cu(2+) cannot regulate NC shapes via an underpotential deposition mechanism. In contrast, Ag(+) led to the formation of Au tetrahexahedra (THH) and a slight decrease of the growth rate at similar growth conditions. Combining the distinct roles of the two ions enabled elongated THH to be produced. Copper ions activating the O2 pathway suggested that dissolved oxygen has a strong affinity for the Au surface. Moreover, the results of NC-sensitized singlet oxygen ((1)O2) indicated that the absorbed oxygen species on the surface of Au NCs bounded with low-index facets mainly existed in the form of molecular O2. PMID:25244407

  5. Gas–solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Hy, Sunny; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas–solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g−1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g−1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. This study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries. PMID:27363944

  6. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-d...

  7. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  8. Aligned carbon nanotubes with built-in FeN{sub 4} active sites for electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Liu, D. J.; Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytic site FeN{sub 4}, which is active towards the oxygen reduction reaction, is incorporated into the graphene layer of aligned carbon nanotubes prepared through a chemical vapor deposition process, as is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and other characterization techniques.

  9. Effects of molecular oxygen and pH on the adsorption of aniline to activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.; Pinisetti, K.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines the influence of molecular oxygen and pH on the adsorption of aniline to F-300 Calgon Carbon. Molecular oxygen increased the adsorptive capacity of GAC for anilines by 250--400 % at pH 3, 30--83% at pH 5, 17--42% at pH 9, and B-45% at pH 11 (higher than those obtained in the absence of molecular oxygen). At pH 7, some of the products formed are poorly adsorbed as evidenced by an increase in UV absorbance in the oxic isotherms as compared to the other isotherms. Oxygen uptake measurements revealed significant consumption of molecular oxygen during the adsorption of aniline compounds. It is speculated that the increase in the GAC adsorptive capacity under oxic conditions was due to the polymerization of these adsorbates on the carbon surface.

  10. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Oxidative Stress Using a Reactive Oxygen Species–Activated Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Prunty, Megan C.; Aung, Moe H.; Hanif, Adam M.; Allen, Rachael S.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Thule, Peter M.; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In vivo methods for detecting oxidative stress in the eye would improve screening and monitoring of the leading causes of blindness: diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Methods To develop an in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in the eye, we tested the efficacy of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)–activated, near-infrared hydrocyanine-800CW (H-800CW) fluorescent probe in light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) mouse models. After intravitreal delivery in LIRD rats, fluorescent microscopy was used to confirm that the oxidized H-800CW appeared in the same retinal layers as an established ROS marker (dichlorofluorescein). Results Dose–response curves of increasing concentrations of intravenously injected H-800CW demonstrated linear increases in both intensity and total area of fundus hyperfluorescence in LIRD mice, as detected by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Fundus hyperfluorescence also correlated with the duration of light damage and functional deficits in vision after LIRD. In LIRD rats with intravitreal injections of H-800CW, fluorescent labeling was localized to photoreceptor inner segments, similar to dichlorofluorescein. Conclusions Hydrocyanine-800CW detects retinal ROS in vivo and shows potential as a novel biomarker for ROS levels in ophthalmic diseases. PMID:26348635

  11. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of the dynamics of sanguinarine induced apoptosis via activation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Beilei; Liu, Wei; Dai, Yunpeng; Shi, Yaru; Zeng, Qi; Wang, Fu

    2016-04-19

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs exert their anti-tumor effects primarily by triggering a final pathway leading to apoptosis. Noninvasive imaging of apoptotic events in preclinical models would greatly facilitate the development of apoptosis-inducing compounds and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here we employed a cyclic firefly luciferase (cFluc) reporter to screen potential pro-apoptotic compounds from a number of natural agents. We demonstrated that sanguinarine (SANG) could induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in UM-SCC-22B head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, SANG-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signal pathways. After intravenous administration with SANG in 22B-cFluc xenograft models, a dramatic increase of luminescence signal can be detected as early as 48 h post-treatment, as revealed by longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Remarkable apoptotic cells reflected from ex vivo TUNEL staining confirmed the imaging results. Importantly, SANG treatment caused distinct tumor growth retardation in mice compared with the vehicle-treated group. Taken together, our results showed that SANG is a candidate anti-tumor drug and noninvasive imaging of apoptosis using cFluc reporter could provide a valuable tool for drug development and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. PMID:26968950

  12. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stolbov, Sergey Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-21

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species Affect Transglutaminase Activity and Regulate Hematopoiesis in a Crustacean.

    PubMed

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene; Noonin, Chadanat

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as a prime signal in the commitment to hematopoiesis in both mammals and Drosophila In this study, the potential function of ROS during hematopoiesis in the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus was examined. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was used to decrease ROS in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. An increase in ROS was observed in the anterior proliferation center (APC) after LPS injection. In the absence of NAC, the LPS-induced increase in ROS levels resulted in the rapid restoration of the circulating hemocyte number. In the presence of NAC, a delay in the recovery rate of the hemocyte number was observed. NAC treatment also blocked the spread of APC and other hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, maintaining these cells at an undifferentiated stage. Extracellular transglutaminase (TGase) has been shown previously to play a role in maintaining HPT cells in an undifferentiated form. In this study, we show that extracellular TGase activity increased when the ROS level in HPT or APC cells was reduced after NAC treatment. In addition, collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix and a TGase substrate were co-localized on the HPT cell surface. Taken together, the results of this study show that ROS are involved in crayfish hematopoiesis, in which a low ROS level is required to maintain hematopoietic progenitor cells in the tissue and to reduce hemocyte release. The potential roles of TGase in this process are investigated and discussed. PMID:27339892

  14. Growth and Deposition of Au Nanoclusters on Polymer-wrapped Graphene and Their Oxygen Reduction Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Kim, Chaerin; Hamasaki, Yuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-02-01

    The development of a non-Pt electrocatalyst with a high performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the central issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells science. Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with a diameter of <2 nm are one of the promising substitutes of Pt-NPs; however, it is still a challenge to synthesize such a small-sized Au-NPs with a narrow diameter distribution on a carbon support without using capping agents. We here describe a facile method to deposit uniform Au-NPs (diameter = 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm) on the stacked-graphene (<10 layers) coated with poly[2,2‧-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5‧-bibenzimidazole] without using any capping agents. The obtained Au-NPs exhibit an excellent ORR activity with the onset potential at -0.11 V and -0.09 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm, respectively. On the other hand, inhomogeneous Au-NPs with 4.6 nm in average diameter shows the onset potential at -0.15 V (vs. Ag/AgCl).

  15. Characterization and modelling of the boron-oxygen defect activation in compensated n-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Schön, J.; Niewelt, T.; Broisch, J.; Warta, W.; Schubert, M. C.

    2015-12-28

    A study of the activation of the light-induced degradation in compensated n-type Czochralski grown silicon is presented. A kinetic model is established that verifies the existence of both the fast and the slow components known from p-type and proves the quadratic dependence of the defect generation rates of both defects on the hole concentration. The model allows for the description of lifetime degradation kinetics in compensated n-type silicon under various intensities and is in accordance with the findings for p-type silicon. We found that the final concentrations of the slow defect component in compensated n-type silicon only depend on the interstitial oxygen concentration and on neither the boron concentration nor the equilibrium electron concentration n{sub 0}. The final concentrations of the fast defect component slightly increase with increasing boron concentration. The results on n-type silicon give new insight to the origin of the BO defect and question the existing models for the defect composition.

  16. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m2 g-1) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications.

  17. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of the dynamics of sanguinarine induced apoptosis via activation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Shi, Yaru; Zeng, Qi; Wang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs exert their anti-tumor effects primarily by triggering a final pathway leading to apoptosis. Noninvasive imaging of apoptotic events in preclinical models would greatly facilitate the development of apoptosis-inducing compounds and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here we employed a cyclic firefly luciferase (cFluc) reporter to screen potential pro-apoptotic compounds from a number of natural agents. We demonstrated that sanguinarine (SANG) could induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in UM-SCC-22B head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, SANG-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signal pathways. After intravenous administration with SANG in 22B-cFluc xenograft models, a dramatic increase of luminescence signal can be detected as early as 48 h post-treatment, as revealed by longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Remarkable apoptotic cells reflected from ex vivo TUNEL staining confirmed the imaging results. Importantly, SANG treatment caused distinct tumor growth retardation in mice compared with the vehicle-treated group. Taken together, our results showed that SANG is a candidate anti-tumor drug and noninvasive imaging of apoptosis using cFluc reporter could provide a valuable tool for drug development and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. PMID:26968950

  18. The oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 (OEE) of photosystem II in green algae exhibits thioredoxin activity.

    PubMed

    Heide, Heinrich; Kalisz, Henryk M; Follmann, Hartmut

    2004-02-01

    A thioredoxin-like chloroplast protein of the fructosebisphosphatase-stimulating f-type, but with an unusually high molecular mass of 28 kDa has previously been identified and purified to homogeneity in a fractionation scheme for resolution of the acid- and heat-stable, regular-size (12kDa) thioredoxins of the unicellular green algae, Scenedesmus obliquus. An apparently analogous protein of 26 kDa was described in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp., but no such large thioredoxin species f exists in the thioredoxin profiles of higher plants. The structure of the 28 kDa protein, which had been envisaged to represent a precursor, or fusion product of the two more specialized, common chloroplast thioredoxins f and m has now been determined by amino acid sequencing. Although it exhibits virtually all the properties and enzyme-modulating activities of a thioredoxin proper this algal protein, surprisingly, does not belong to the thioredoxin family of small redox proteins but is identical with OEE (oxygen evolving enhancer) protein 1, an auxiliary component of the photosystem II manganese cluster. Extracts of Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also contain heat-stable protein fractions of 23-26 kDa capable of specifically stimulating chloroplast fructosebisphosphatase in vitro. In contrast, OEE protein 1 from spinach is not able to modulate FbPase or NADP malate dehydrogenase from spinach chloroplasts. A dual function of the OEE protein in algal photosynthesis is envisaged. PMID:15022827

  19. Oncogene-induced reactive oxygen species fuel hyperproliferation and DNA damage response activation

    PubMed Central

    Ogrunc, M; Di Micco, R; Liontos, M; Bombardelli, L; Mione, M; Fumagalli, M; Gorgoulis, V G; d'Adda di Fagagna, F

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed to be signaling molecules that mediate proliferative cues. However, ROS may also cause DNA damage and proliferative arrest. How these apparently opposite roles can be reconciled, especially in the context of oncogene-induced cellular senescence, which is associated both with aberrant mitogenic signaling and DNA damage response (DDR)-mediated arrest, is unclear. Here, we show that ROS are indeed mitogenic signaling molecules that fuel oncogene-driven aberrant cell proliferation. However, by their very same ability to mediate cell hyperproliferation, ROS eventually cause DDR activation. We also show that oncogenic Ras-induced ROS are produced in a Rac1 and NADPH oxidase (Nox4)-dependent manner. In addition, we show that Ras-induced ROS can be detected and modulated in a living transparent animal: the zebrafish. Finally, in cancer we show that Nox4 is increased in both human tumors and a mouse model of pancreatic cancer and specific Nox4 small-molecule inhibitors act synergistically with existing chemotherapic agents. PMID:24583638

  20. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  1. Enhancement of oxygen vacancies and solar photocatalytic activity of zinc oxide by incorporation of nonmetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ashokrao B.; Patil, Kashinath R.; Pardeshi, Satish K.

    2011-12-01

    B-doped ZnO and N-doped ZnO powders have been synthesized by mechanochemical method and characterized by TG-DTA, XRD, SEM-EDX, XPS, UV-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. X-ray diffraction data suggests the hexagonal wurtzite structure for modified ZnO crystallites and the incorporation of nonmetal expands the lattice constants of ZnO. The room temperature PL spectra suggest more number of oxygen vacancies exist in nonmetal-doped ZnO than that of undoped zinc oxide. XPS analysis shows the substitution of some of the O atoms of ZnO by nonmetal atoms. Solar photocatalytic activity of B-doped ZnO, N-doped ZnO and undoped ZnO was compared by means of oxidative photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of Bisphenol A (BPA). B-doped ZnO showed better solar PCD efficiency as compare to N-doped ZnO and undoped ZnO. The PCD of BPA follows first order reaction kinetics. The detail mechanism of PCD of Bisphenol A was proposed with the identification of intermediates such as hydroquinone, benzene-1,2,4-triol and 4-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl) phenol.

  2. Electrocatalytic activities of alkyne-functionalized copper nanoparticles in oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Song, Yang; Chen, Shaowei

    2014-12-01

    Stable alkyne-capped copper nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of copper acetate with sodium borohydride in the presence of alkyne ligands. Transmission electron microscopic measurements showed that nanoparticles were well dispersed with a diameter in the range of 4-6 nm. FTIR and photoluminescence spectroscopic measurements confirmed the successful attachment of the alkyne ligands onto the nanoparticle surface most likely forming Cu-Ctbnd interfacial bonds. XPS measurements indicated the formation of a small amount of CuO in the nanoparticles with a satellite peak where the binding energy red-shifted with increasing Cu(II) concentration. Cu2O was also detected in the nanoparticles. Similar results were observed with commercial CuO nanoparticles. Electrochemical studies showed that the as-prepared alkyne-capped copper nanoparticles exhibited apparent electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction in alkaline media, a performance that was markedly better than those reported earlier with poly- or single-crystalline copper electrodes; and the fraction of peroxides in the final products decreased with decreasing concentration of oxide components in the nanoparticles.

  3. Growth and Deposition of Au Nanoclusters on Polymer-wrapped Graphene and Their Oxygen Reduction Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Kim, ChaeRin; Hamasaki, Yuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-01-01

    The development of a non-Pt electrocatalyst with a high performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the central issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells science. Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with a diameter of <2 nm are one of the promising substitutes of Pt-NPs; however, it is still a challenge to synthesize such a small-sized Au-NPs with a narrow diameter distribution on a carbon support without using capping agents. We here describe a facile method to deposit uniform Au-NPs (diameter = 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm) on the stacked-graphene (<10 layers) coated with poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole] without using any capping agents. The obtained Au-NPs exhibit an excellent ORR activity with the onset potential at −0.11 V and −0.09 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm, respectively. On the other hand, inhomogeneous Au-NPs with 4.6 nm in average diameter shows the onset potential at −0.15 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). PMID:26899591

  4. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  5. Formation of cesium peroxide and cesium superoxide on InP photocathode activated by cesium and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yun; Liu Zhi; Pianetta, Piero; Lee, Dong-Ick

    2007-10-01

    Activation of p-type III-V semiconductors with cesium and oxygen has been widely used to prepare negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathodes. However, the nature of the chemical species on the surface after the activation is not well understood. In this study, InP NEA photocathodes activated with cesium and oxygen are studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy, also called photoemission. Based on the O 1s core level as well as the valence band spectra, Cs peroxide and Cs superoxide are identified on the InP surface. Transformation from Cs peroxide to Cs superoxide is observed after the activation, and is probably the major reason for the decay of the quantum yield of the photocathode. The oxidation of the InP substrate is also observed with elapse of time, adding to the decay of the quantum yield.

  6. Enhancement of oxygen vacancies and solar photocatalytic activity of zinc oxide by incorporation of nonmetal

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Ashokrao B.; Patil, Kashinath R.; Pardeshi, Satish K.

    2011-12-15

    B-doped ZnO and N-doped ZnO powders have been synthesized by mechanochemical method and characterized by TG-DTA, XRD, SEM-EDX, XPS, UV-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. X-ray diffraction data suggests the hexagonal wurtzite structure for modified ZnO crystallites and the incorporation of nonmetal expands the lattice constants of ZnO. The room temperature PL spectra suggest more number of oxygen vacancies exist in nonmetal-doped ZnO than that of undoped zinc oxide. XPS analysis shows the substitution of some of the O atoms of ZnO by nonmetal atoms. Solar photocatalytic activity of B-doped ZnO, N-doped ZnO and undoped ZnO was compared by means of oxidative photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of Bisphenol A (BPA). B-doped ZnO showed better solar PCD efficiency as compare to N-doped ZnO and undoped ZnO. The PCD of BPA follows first order reaction kinetics. The detail mechanism of PCD of Bisphenol A was proposed with the identification of intermediates such as hydroquinone, benzene-1,2,4-triol and 4-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl) phenol. - Graphical Abstract: B-doped ZnO and N-doped ZnO synthesized by mechanochemical method were characterized by various techniques. Solar photocatalytic degradation of Bisphenol-A is in the order of B-ZnO>N-ZnO>ZnO. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-doped ZnO and N-doped ZnO powders have been synthesized by mechanochemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL spectra suggest oxygen vacancies are in order of B-doped ZnO>N-doped ZnO>ZnO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solar PCD efficiency is in order of B-doped ZnO>N-doped ZnO>ZnO for Bisphenol A.

  7. Benthic activity in sediments of the northwestern Adriatic Sea: sediment oxygen consumption, macro- and meiofauna dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moodley, Leon; Heip, Carlo H. R.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    1998-12-01

    Benthic activity was examined at three stations (18 m water depth) in the northwestern Adriatic Sea. Carbon mineralisation rates, as based on sediment oxygen consumption rates, ranged from 54 to 89 g C m -2 y -1. The relatively high carbon mineralisation rates, large macrofaunal biomass (9 to 16 g C m -2) and macrofaunal production (11 to 19 g C m -2 y -1) provide evidence of high organic-matter input and intense benthic-pelagic coupling. This is further supported by the high dominance of the suspension-feeding bivalve Corbula gibba, which accounts for 52 to 63% of the total annual macrofaunal biomass production. Although the infaunal distribution of total macrofauna showed a sharp decline in densities and biomass with depth into the sediment, different patterns within the dominant taxa were observed. Whilst the bivalve Corbula gibba and the amphipod Ampelisca sp. were restricted to the surface layer, other species such as the dominant bivalve Mysella sp. and the gastropod Hyala sp. were not confined to a specific depth level and the majority of the populations occurred deeper than 5 cm into the sediment. Bioturbation, based on the occurrence of macrofauna, extended to at least 20 cm. Nematodes and foraminifera together formed 80 to 90% of the meiofaunal community in the upper 5 cm of the sediment. Annual mean densities ranged from 3.40 to 6.07×10 6 ind. m -2. Maximum abundance of meiofauna was not encountered at the station where maximum macrofaunal activity was recorded, and this could reflect the negative effect of biological interaction on meiofaunal densities in areas that have a high food supply.

  8. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    . Collectively, these results indicate that macrophages isolated from old mice are in a preactivated state that enhances their sensitivities to LPS exposure. The hyper-responsive activation of macrophages in aged animals may act to minimize infection by general bacterial threats that arise due to age-dependent declines in adaptive immunity. Finally, however, this hypersensitivity and the associated increase in the level of formation of reactive oxygen species are likely to contribute to observed age-dependent increases in the level of oxidative damage that underlie many diseases of the elderly.

  9. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity: role of metabolic activation, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, and mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Jack A; Reid, Angela B; McCullough, Sandra S; James, Laura P

    2004-10-01

    Large doses of the analgesic acetaminophen cause centrilobular hepatic necrosis in man and in experimental animals. It has been previously shown that acetaminophen is metabolically activated by CYP enzymes to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. This species is normally detoxified by GSH, but following a toxic dose GSH is depleted and the metabolite covalently binds to a number of different proteins. Covalent binding occurs only to the cells developing necrosis. Recently we showed that these cells also contain nitrated tyrosine residues. Nitrotyrosine is mediated by peroxynitrite, a reactive nitrogen species formed by rapid reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide and is normally detoxified by GSH. Thus, acetaminophen toxicity occurs with increased oxygen/nitrogen stress. This manuscript will review current data on acetaminophen covalent binding, increased oxygen/nitrogen stress, and mitochondrial permeability transition, a toxic mechanism that is both mediated by and leads to increased oxygen/nitrogen stress. PMID:15554248

  10. Influence of uranium (VI) on the metabolic activity of stable multispecies biofilms studied by oxygen microsensors and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Grossmann, Kay; Arnold, Thuro; Hofmann, Susann; Wobus, Axel

    2008-11-01

    The effect of uranium added in ecologically relevant concentrations (1 × 10 -5 and 1 × 10 -6 M) to stable multispecies biofilms was studied by electrochemical oxygen microsensors with tip diameters of 10 μm and by confocal laser fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). The microsensor profile measurements in the stable multispecies biofilms exposed to uranium showed that the oxygen concentration decreased faster with increasing biofilm depth compared to the uranium free biofilms. In the uranium containing biofilms, the oxygen consumption, calculated from the steady-state microprofiles, showed high consumption rates of up to 61.7 nmol cm -3 s -1 in the top layer (0-70 μm) and much lower consumption rates in the lower zone of the biofilms. Staining experiments with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) confirmed the high respiratory activities of the bacteria in the upper layer. Analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that the addition of uranium in ecologically relevant concentrations did not change the bacterial diversity in the stable multispecies biofilms and is therefore not responsible for the different oxygen profiles in the biofilms. The fast decrease in the oxygen concentrations in the biofilm profiles showed that the bacteria in the top region of the biofilms, i.e., the metabolically most active biofilm zone, battle the toxic effects of aqueous uranium with an increased respiratory activity. This increased respiratory activity results in O 2 depleted zones closer to the biofilm/air interface which may trigger uranium redox processes, since suitable redox partners, e.g., extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and other organics (e.g., metabolites), are sufficiently available in the biofilm porewaters. Such redox reactions may lead to precipitation of uranium (IV) solids and consequently to a removal of uranium from the aqueous phase.

  11. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species' formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26185755

  12. Oxygen dependence of the cytotoxicity and metabolic activation of 4-alkylamino-5-nitroquinoline bioreductive drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Siim, B. G.; Atwell, G. J.; Wilson, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    The cytotoxic potency of 4-alkylamino-5-nitroquinoline drugs in AA8 cell cultures is enhanced up to 60-fold under hypoxia, with wide variations in selectivity for hypoxic cells observed for different members of this series. This study uses three representative 5-nitroquinolines to examine whether these differences in hypoxia-selective cytotoxicity are cell line specific, and to explore quantitatively the oxygen dependence of the cytotoxicity and metabolism of these compounds. The parent compound 5NQ, its 5NQ, its 8-methyl analogue (8Me5NQ) and the 8-methylamino analogue (8NHMe-5NQ) each showed similar hypoxic selectivity (ratio of concentration x time for 90% kill for zero versus 20% oxygen of 13-18-, 30-69- and 1.2-1.4-fold respectively in the three cell lines tested (AA8 Chinese hamster ovary, EMT6/Ak mouse mammary tumour and FME human melanoma). The cytotoxicity and metabolism (covalent binding) of radiolabelled 8Me-5NQ was investigated in AA8 cultures over a range of oxygen tensions (0-95%). The oxygen tension in solution required for 50% inhibition of log cell kill or adduct formation observed under anoxia (C50) was 0.01 and 0.02% oxygen respectively, suggesting that bioreductive alkylation is the mechanism of 8Me-5NQ toxicity. The K-value (oxygen concentration for cytotoxic potency equal to the mean of the potencies at zero and infinite oxygen) was similar (0.02% oxygen). Calculations based on measured rate constants for formation of the nitroradical anion of 8Me-5NQ and rates of radical loss through disproportionation or reaction with oxygen, predict a K-value for 8Me-5NQ of 0.025% oxygen, in good agreement with the experimentally determined value. Modelling of cell killing expected by the combination of 8Me-5NQ plus radiation suggested that tumour cells at intermediate oxygen tensions (0.01-1%) will be partially resistant to this treatment, and would limit the use of these 5-nitroquinolines in combination with radiation, unless sufficient drug could be

  13. Spatial location engineering of oxygen vacancies for optimized photocatalytic H2 evolution activity.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wentuan; Ye, Chunmiao; Xiao, Chong; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Shao, Wei; Xie, Yi

    2014-07-23

    Enhanced H2 evolution efficiency is achieved via manipulating the spatial location of oxygen vacancies in niobates. The ultrathin K4 Nb6O17 nanosheets which are rich in surface oxygen vacancies show enhanced optical absorption and band gap narrowing. Meanwhile, the fast charge separation effectively reduces the probability of hole-electron recombination, enabling 20 times hydrogen evolution rate compared with the defect-free bulk counterpart. PMID:24623574

  14. Ventilation rates and activity levels of juvenile jumbo squid under metabolic suppression in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Trübenbach, Katja; Pegado, Maria R; Seibel, Brad A; Rosa, Rui

    2013-02-01

    The Humboldt (jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a part-time resident of the permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and, thereby, it encounters oxygen levels below its critical oxygen partial pressure. To better understand the ventilatory mechanisms that accompany the process of metabolic suppression in these top oceanic predators, we exposed juvenile D. gigas to the oxygen levels found in the OMZ (1% O(2), 1 kPa, 10 °C) and measured metabolic rate, activity cycling patterns, swimming mode, escape jet (burst) frequency, mantle contraction frequency and strength, stroke volume and oxygen extraction efficiency. In normoxia, metabolic rate varied between 14 and 29 μmol O(2) g(-1) wet mass h(-1), depending on the level of activity. The mantle contraction frequency and strength were linearly correlated and increased significantly with activity level. Additionally, an increase in stroke volume and ventilatory volume per minute was observed, followed by a mantle hyperinflation process during high activity periods. Squid metabolic rate dropped more than 75% during exposure to hypoxia. Maximum metabolic rate was not achieved under such conditions and the metabolic scope was significantly decreased. Hypoxia changed the relationship between mantle contraction strength and frequency from linear to polynomial with increasing activity, indicating that, under hypoxic conditions, the jumbo squid primarily increases the strength of mantle contraction and does not regulate its frequency. Under hypoxia, jumbo squid also showed a larger inflation period (reduced contraction frequency) and decreased relaxed mantle diameter (shortened diffusion pathway), which optimize oxygen extraction efficiency (up to 82%/34%, without/with consideration of 60% potential skin respiration). Additionally, they breathe 'deeply', with more powerful contractions and enhanced stroke volume. This deep-breathing behavior allows them to display a stable ventilatory volume per

  15. Phosphate oxygen isotope ratio proxy for specific microbial activity in marine sediments (Peru Margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Blake, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen (O) isotope ratios of biogenic apatites have been widely used as paleotemperature and environmental geochemical proxies. With improved knowledge of the phosphate O isotope effects of different P cycling pathways, the δ18O value of inorganic phosphate (δ18OP) has been proposed as a useful proxy and tracer of biological reactions and P cycling in natural environments[1,2,3,4]. Being the only way of removing P from oceanic water, sedimentary P burial is one of the most important processes during biogeochemical cycling of P. The high concentrations of organic matter and pronounced microbial activity at ODP Site 1230 along the Peru Margin result in unusually high interstitial water phosphate concentrations, which provides a unique opportunity to use δ18OP to investigate inorganic phosphate (Pi) regeneration and P cycling pathways in marine sediments. The isotopic measurements of both dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) and bulk sediment Pi show that DIP δ18OP values are affected by three different processes, which are all induced by specific microbial activities present in the sediments. In sediments at ~ 65 to 120 mbsf, porewater DIP is derived from dissolved organophosphorus compounds (DOP) through enzymatic degradation pathways, evidenced by both DIP δ18OP values and interstitial water chemistry. Measured porewater DIP δ18OP values also suggest that 4 to 8% of interstitial water DIP reflects regeneration of Pi from Porg by microbially-synthesized enzymes. Throughout the sediment column and especially at ~ 120 to 150 mbsf, DIP is released from the sediments by microbially-induced reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides, which contributes to the overall high DIP concentrations at Site 1230. The third and dominant process controlling measured DIP δ18OP values is microbial turnover of regenerated Pi. The presence of high microbial activities in organic-rich Site 1230 sediments promotes the remobilization of P and affects marine P cycling by potentially enhancing

  16. Elaboration of copper-oxygen mediated C-H activation chemistry in consideration of future fuel and feedstock generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-04-01

    To contribute solutions to current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of dioxygen mediated C-H bond cleavage chemistry, for example, selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, potentially affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals. PMID:25756327

  17. Production of active oxygen species by blood phagocytes of pregnant women and their newborns with intrauterine infection.

    PubMed

    Safronova, V G; Matveeva, N K; Lomova, N A; Belyaeva, A S; Vanko, L V

    2013-09-01

    We studied the relationship between changes in the maternal and newborn granulocyte functions under conditions of infection risk and realization. Women with normal gestation and their healthy newborns, pregnant women with a high risk of infection and their newborns, healthy or with intrauterine infection, were examined. Changes in the active oxygen species-dependent phagocytosis system were found in the blood of risk group patients. An inverse relationship between the parameters venous and umbilical cord blood was detected indicating a relationship between changes in functional activities of maternal and newborn granulocytes. The percentage of CD11b(+)cells in venous and umbilical cord blood strictly correlated with the percent of cells that phagocytosed FITC-labeled E. coli. Deviations in the generation of active oxygen species in phagocytosis seemed to be related to the expression of surface receptors in the risk groups. PMID:24288724

  18. Elaboration of Copper-Oxygen Mediated C–H Activation Chemistry in Consideration of Future Fuel and Feedstock Generation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    To contribute solutions for current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of C-H bond cleavage chemistry, e.g., selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals. PMID:25756327

  19. Microvascular oxygen tension and flow measurements in rodent cerebral cortex during baseline conditions and functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Sakadžić, Sava; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Gorczynska, Iwona; Wu, Weicheng; Fujimoto, James G; Boas, David A

    2011-01-01

    Measuring cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism microscopically is important for interpreting macroscopic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and identifying pathological changes associated with stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injury. Here, we present simultaneous, microscopic measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cortical microvessels of anesthetized rats under baseline conditions and during somatosensory stimulation. Using a custom-built imaging system, we measured CBF with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), and vascular pO2 with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy. Cerebral blood flow and pO2 measurements displayed heterogeneity over distances irresolvable with fMRI and positron emission tomography. Baseline measurements indicate O2 extraction from pial arterioles and homogeneity of ascending venule pO2 despite large variation in microvessel flows. Oxygen extraction is linearly related to flow in ascending venules, suggesting that flow in ascending venules closely matches oxygen demand of the drained territory. Oxygen partial pressure and relative CBF transients during somatosensory stimulation further indicate arteriolar O2 extraction and suggest that arterioles contribute to the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent response. Understanding O2 supply on a microscopic level will yield better insight into brain function and the underlying mechanisms of various neuropathologies. PMID:21179069

  20. Oxygen Dependence and Extravascular Transport of Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs: Comparison of the Dinitrobenzamide Mustard PR-104A and Tirapazamine

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Kevin O. Myint, Hilary; Patterson, Adam V.; Pruijn, Frederik B.; Siim, Bronwyn G.; Patel, Kashyap; Wilson, William R.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To compare oxygen dependence and tissue transport properties of a new hypoxia-activated prodrug, PR-104A, with tirapazamine, and to evaluate the implications for antitumor activity when combined with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Oxygen dependence of cytotoxicity was measured by clonogenic assay in SiHa cell suspensions. Tissue transport parameters were determined using SiHa multicellular layers. Spatially resolved pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to predict cell killing in SiHa tumors and tested by clonogenic assay 18 h after treatment with the corresponding phosphate ester, PR-104. Results: The K-value (oxygen concentration to halve cytotoxic potency) of PR-104A was 0.126 {+-} 0.021 {mu}M (10-fold lower than tirapazamine at 1.30 {+-} 0.28 {mu}M). The diffusion coefficient of PR-104A in multicellular layers (4.42 {+-} 0.15 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}) was lower than that of tirapazamine (1.30 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}) but PK modeling predicted better penetration to hypoxic cells in tumors because of its slower metabolism. The tirapazamine PK/PD model successfully predicted the measured activity in combination with single-dose radiation against SiHa tumors, and the PR-104A model underpredicted the activity, which was greater for PR-104 than for tirapazamine (at equivalent host toxicity) both with radiation and as a single agent. Conclusion: PR-104/PR-104A has different PK/PD properties from tirapazamine and superior activity with single-dose radiotherapy against SiHa xenografts. We have inferred that PR-104A is better able to kill cells at intermediate partial pressure of oxygen in tumors than implied by the PK/PD model, most likely because of a bystander effect resulting from diffusion of its activated metabolites from severely hypoxic zones.

  1. Electrocatalytic Activity of Transition Metal Oxide-Carbon Composites for Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Batteries and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Jayachandrababu, KC; Kindler, A; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-06-07

    Conductive transition metal oxides (perovskites, spinels and pyrochlores) are attractive as catalysts for the air electrode in alkaline rechargeable metal-air batteries and fuel cells. We have found that conductive carbon materials when added to transition metal oxides such as calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide, nickel cobalt oxide and calcium-doped lanthanum manganese cobalt oxide increase the electrocatalytic activity of the oxide for oxygen reduction by a factor of five to ten. We have studied rotating ring-disk electrodes coated with (a) various mass ratios of carbon and transition metal oxide, (b) different types of carbon additives and (c) different types of transition metal oxides. Our experiments and analysis establish that in such composite catalysts, carbon is the primary electro- catalyst for the two-electron electro-reduction of oxygen to hydroperoxide while the transition metal oxide decomposes the hydroperoxide to generate additional oxygen that enhances the observed current resulting in an apparent four-electron process. These findings are significant in that they change the way we interpret previous reports in the scientific literature on the electrocatalytic activity of various transition metal oxide- carbon composites for oxygen reduction, especially where carbon is assumed to be an additive that just enhances the electronic conductivity of the oxide catalyst. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. 3D modeling of effects of increased oxygenation and activity concentration in tumors treated with radionuclides and antiangiogenic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerloef, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in response to hypoxia is a fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. However, abnormalities in tumor neovasculature often induce increased interstitial pressure (IP) and further reduce oxygenation (pO{sub 2}) of tumor cells. In radiotherapy, well-oxygenated tumors favor treatment. Antiangiogenic drugs may lower IP in the tumor, improving perfusion, pO{sub 2} and drug uptake, by reducing the number of malfunctioning vessels in the tissue. This study aims to create a model for quantifying the effects of altered pO{sub 2}-distribution due to antiangiogenic treatment in combination with radionuclide therapy. Methods: Based on experimental data, describing the effects of antiangiogenic agents on oxygenation of GlioblastomaMultiforme (GBM), a single cell based 3D model, including 10{sup 10} tumor cells, was developed, showing how radionuclide therapy response improves as tumor oxygenation approaches normal tissue levels. The nuclides studied were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 211}At. The absorbed dose levels required for a tumor control probability (TCP) of 0.990 are compared for three different log-normal pO{sub 2}-distributions: {mu}{sub 1} = 2.483, {sigma}{sub 1} = 0.711; {mu}{sub 2} = 2.946, {sigma}{sub 2} = 0.689; {mu}{sub 3} = 3.689, and {sigma}{sub 3} = 0.330. The normal tissue absorbed doses will, in turn, depend on this. These distributions were chosen to represent the expected oxygen levels in an untreated hypoxic tumor, a hypoxic tumor treated with an anti-VEGF agent, and in normal, fully-oxygenated tissue, respectively. The former two are fitted to experimental data. The geometric oxygen distributions are simulated using two different patterns: one Monte Carlo based and one radially increasing, while keeping the log-normal volumetric distributions intact. Oxygen and activity are distributed, according to the same pattern. Results: As tumor pO{sub 2

  3. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  4. Effect of zinc deficiency on NADPH and cytochrome P-450 dependent active oxygen generation in rat lung and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hammermueller, J.D.; Bray, T.M.; Bettger, W.J.

    1986-03-05

    The cyt. P-450 system and cyt. P-450 reductase are involved in the generation of active oxygen species such as H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short term, severe, dietary zinc deficiency in rats on the formation of active oxygen in vitro. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed egg white-based diets containing less than 1 ppm Zn (ZnD). Controls were fed ad libitum (ZnAl) or pair-fed (ZnPF) a diet containing 100 ppm Zn. After 3 weeks lung and liver microsomes were assayed for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production (pmol H/sub 2/O/sub 2//mg protein/min) and cyt. P-450 reductase activity (nmol cyt. C reduced/mg protein/min). For the measurement of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production exogenous substrate (aminopyrine) and NADPH (cofactor) were provided to drive the cyt. P-450 system and NaN/sub 3/ was used to inhibit catalase. The results showed a significant effect of dietary Zn on NADPH and cyt. P-450 dependent active oxygen generation and support the hypothesis that Zn has a role in the function of biomembranes.

  5. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  6. Activation autoradiography: imaging and quantitative determination of endogenous and exogenous oxygen in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, K.; Iwata, R.; Kogure, K.; Ohtomo, H.; Orihara, H.; Ido, T.

    1987-06-01

    Endogenous and exogenous oxygen in the rat brain were quantitatively determined using an autoradiographic technique. The oxygen images of frozen and dried rat brain sections were obtained as /sup 18/F images by using the /sup 16/O (/sup 3/He,p)/sup 18/F reaction for endogenous /sup 16/O images and the /sup 18/O(p,n)/sup 18/F reaction for endogenous and exogenous /sup 18/O images. These autoradiograms demonstrated the different distribution of oxygen between gray and white matter. These images also allowed differentiation of the individual structures of hippocampal formation, owing to the differing water content of the various structures. Local oxygen contents were quantitatively determined from autoradiograms of brain sections and standard sections with known oxygen contents. The estimated values were 75.6 +/- 4.6 wt% in gray matter and 72.2 +/- 4.0 wt% in white matter. The systematic error in the present method was estimated to be 4.9%.

  7. Abscisic Acid Structure-Activity Relationships in Barley Aleurone Layers and Protoplasts (Biological Activity of Optically Active, Oxygenated Abscisic Acid Analogs).

    PubMed

    Hill, R. D.; Liu, J. H.; Durnin, D.; Lamb, N.; Shaw, A.; Abrams, S. R.

    1995-06-01

    Optically active forms of abscisic acid (ABA) and their oxygenated metabolites were tested for their biological activity by examining the effects of the compounds on the reversal of gibberellic acid-induced [alpha]-amylase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Himalaya) aleurone layers and the induction of gene expression in barley aleurone protoplasts transformed with a chimeric construct containing the promoter region of an albumin storage protein gene. Promotion of the albumin storage protein gene response had a more strict stereochemical requirement for elicitation of an ABA response than inhibition of [alpha]-amylase gene expression. The naturally occurring stereoisomer of ABA and its metabolites were more effective at eliciting an ABA-like response. ABA showed the highest activity, followed by 7[prime]-hydroxyABA, with phaseic acid being the least active. Racemic 8[prime]-hydroxy-2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA, an analog of 8[prime]-hydroxyABA, was inactive, whereas racemic 2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA was as effective as ABA. The differences in response of the same tissue to the ABA enantiomers lead us to conclude that there exists more than one type of ABA receptor and/or multiple signal transduction pathways in barley aleurone tissue. PMID:12228494

  8. Abscisic Acid Structure-Activity Relationships in Barley Aleurone Layers and Protoplasts (Biological Activity of Optically Active, Oxygenated Abscisic Acid Analogs).

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R. D.; Liu, J. H.; Durnin, D.; Lamb, N.; Shaw, A.; Abrams, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Optically active forms of abscisic acid (ABA) and their oxygenated metabolites were tested for their biological activity by examining the effects of the compounds on the reversal of gibberellic acid-induced [alpha]-amylase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Himalaya) aleurone layers and the induction of gene expression in barley aleurone protoplasts transformed with a chimeric construct containing the promoter region of an albumin storage protein gene. Promotion of the albumin storage protein gene response had a more strict stereochemical requirement for elicitation of an ABA response than inhibition of [alpha]-amylase gene expression. The naturally occurring stereoisomer of ABA and its metabolites were more effective at eliciting an ABA-like response. ABA showed the highest activity, followed by 7[prime]-hydroxyABA, with phaseic acid being the least active. Racemic 8[prime]-hydroxy-2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA, an analog of 8[prime]-hydroxyABA, was inactive, whereas racemic 2[prime],3[prime]-dihydroABA was as effective as ABA. The differences in response of the same tissue to the ABA enantiomers lead us to conclude that there exists more than one type of ABA receptor and/or multiple signal transduction pathways in barley aleurone tissue. PMID:12228494

  9. Enzyme-Controlled Nitrogen-Atom Transfer Enables Regiodivergent C–H Amination

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that variants of cytochrome P450BM3 (CYP102A1) catalyze the insertion of nitrogen species into benzylic C–H bonds to form new C–N bonds. An outstanding challenge in the field of C–H amination is catalyst-controlled regioselectivity. Here, we report two engineered variants of P450BM3 that provide divergent regioselectivity for C–H amination—one favoring amination of benzylic C–H bonds and the other favoring homo-benzylic C–H bonds. The two variants provide nearly identical kinetic isotope effect values (2.8–3.0), suggesting that C–H abstraction is rate-limiting. The 2.66-Å crystal structure of the most active enzyme suggests that the engineered active site can preorganize the substrate for reactivity. We hypothesize that the enzyme controls regioselectivity through localization of a single C–H bond close to the iron nitrenoid. PMID:25325618

  10. Photosensitization with anticancer agents. 17. EPR studies of photodynamic action of hypericin: formation of semiquinone radical and activated oxygen species on illumination.

    PubMed

    Diwu, Z; Lown, J W

    1993-02-01

    When hypericin was illuminated with 580 nm light in aqueous solution, the semiquinone radical, singlet oxygen, and superoxide anion radical were detected. The formation of the semiquinone radical and activated oxygen species and the transformation and competition between them depend on the quinone and oxygen concentrations, irradiation time and intensity, and the nature of substrate. In anaerobic solution containing a high concentration of the quinone, the semiquinone radical was predominantly photoproduced. In contrast, in aerobic solution, singlet oxygen is the principal product in the photosensitization of hypericin. Besides singlet oxygen, superoxide anion radical is generated by the quinone on illumination in aerobic solution via the reduction of oxygen by the semiquinone radical, but to a lesser extent than singlet oxygen. The generation of superoxide anion radical is significantly enhanced by the presence of electron donors. PMID:8381107

  11. Density Functional Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity of Ultrathin Platinum Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2013-03-14

    We used density functional theory to study the difference in the structure, stability and catalytic reactivity between ultrathin, 0.5–1.0 nm diameter, platinum nanotubes and nanowires. Model nanowires were formed by inserting an inner chain of platinum atoms in small diameter nanotubes. In this way more stable, non-hollow structures were formed. The difference in the electronic structure of platinum nanotubes and nanowires was examined by inspecting the density of surface states and band structure. Furthermore, reactivity toward the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum nanowires was assessed by studying the change in the chemisorption energies of oxygen, hydroxyl, and hydroperoxyl groups, induced by converting the nanotube models to nanowires. Both ultrathin platinum nanotubes and nanowires show distinct properties compared to bulk platinum. Single-wall nanotubes and platinum nanowires with diameters larger than 1 nm show promise for use as oxygen reduction catalysts.

  12. Theoretical Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity of Ultrathin Platinum Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2012-10-10

    We use density functional theory to study the difference in the structure, stability and catalytic reactivity between ultrathin, 0.5- 1.0 nm diameter, platinum nanotubes and nanowires. Model nanowires were formed by inserting an inner chain of platinum atoms in small diameter nanotubes. In this way more stable, nonhollow structures were formed. The difference in the electronic structure of platinum nanotubes and nanowires was examined by inspecting the density of surface states and band structure. Furthermore, reactivity towards the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum nanowires was addressed by studying the change in the chemisorption energies of oxygen and hydroxyl groups, induced by inserting the inner chain of platinum atoms into the hollow nanotubes. Both ultrathin platinum nanotubes and nanowires show distinct properties compared to bulk platinum. Nanotubes with diameters larger than 1 nm show promise for use as oxygen reduction catalysts.

  13. Clinical evidence on high flow oxygen therapy and active humidification in adults.

    PubMed

    Gotera, C; Díaz Lobato, S; Pinto, T; Winck, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in an alternative to conventional oxygen therapy: the heated, humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC). A number of physiological effects have been described with HFNC: pharyngeal dead space washout, reduction of nasopharyngeal resistance, a positive expiratory pressure effect, an alveolar recruitment, greater humidification, more comfort and better tolerance by the patient, better control of FiO2 and mucociliary clearance. There is limited experience of HFNC in adults. There are no established guidelines or decision-making pathways to guide use of the HFNC therapy for adults. In this article we review the existing evidence of HFNC oxygen therapy in adult patients, its advantages, limitations and the current literature on clinical applications. Further research is required to determine the long-term effect of this therapy and identify the adult patient population to whom it is most beneficial. PMID:23845744

  14. [Active forms of oxygen: cytotoxic effects and methodological approaches to laboratory control of liver lesions (literature review)].

    PubMed

    Matiushin, B N; Loginov, A S

    1996-01-01

    The injurious effects of active oxygen forms (AOF) on the cell caused by destruction of its membranous structures and impairment of their functional characteristics are discussed. Disorders of the processes of formation and inactivation of AOF in hepatocytes may be the metabolic mechanisms mediating the status and development of the pathological process in the liver. The problem of prospective approaches to assessing chronic diseases of the liver at the level of "free-radical pathology" is discussed. PMID:8963562

  15. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bhatter, Purva D.; Gupta, Pooja D.; Birdi, Tannaz J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  16. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays.

    PubMed

    Bhatter, Purva D; Gupta, Pooja D; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  17. Orientation-Dependent Oxygen Evolution Activities of Rutile IrO2 and RuO2.

    PubMed

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael D; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-05-15

    The activities of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts are among the highest known to date. However, the intrinsic OER activities of surfaces with defined crystallographic orientations are not well-established experimentally. Here we report that the (100) surface of IrO2 and RuO2 is more active in alkaline environments (pH 13) than the most thermodynamically stable (110) surface. The OER activity was correlated with the density of coordinatively undersaturated metal sites of each crystallographic facet. The surface-orientation-dependent activities can guide the design of nanoscale catalysts with increased activity for electrolyzers, metal-air batteries, and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. PMID:26270358

  18. Surface Structure Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Co3O4 Anchored on Graphene Sheets toward Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Junwu; Kuang, Qin; Yang, Shihe; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic activity is primarily a surface phenomenon, however, little is known about Co3O4 nanocrystals in terms of the relationship between the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and surface structure, especially when dispersed on a highly conducting support to improve the electrical conductivity and so to enhance the catalytic activity. Herein, we report a controllable synthesis of Co3O4 nanorods (NR), nanocubes (NC) and nano-octahedrons (OC) with the different exposed nanocrystalline surfaces ({110}, {100}, and {111}), uniformly anchored on graphene sheets, which has allowed us to investigate the effects of the surface structure on the ORR activity. Results show that the catalytically active sites for ORR should be the surface Co2+ ions, whereas the surface Co3+ ions catalyze CO oxidation, and the catalytic ability is closely related to the density of the catalytically active sites. These results underscore the importance of morphological control in the design of highly efficient ORR catalysts. PMID:23892418

  19. Pretreatment of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) Suspension Cultures with Methyl Jasmonate Enhances Elicitation of Activated Oxygen Species.

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, H.; Jeblick, W.; Ziegler, J.; Krabler, W.

    1994-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) were used to demonstrate an influence of jasmonic acid methyl ester (JAME) on the elicitation of activated oxygen species. Preincubation of the cell cultures for 1 d with JAME greatly enhanced the subsequent induction by an elicitor preparation from cell walls of Phytophtora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg elicitor) and by the polycation chitosan. Shorter preincubation times with JAME were less efficient, and the effect was saturated at about 5 [mu]M JAME. Treatment of the crude Pmg elicitor with trypsin abolished induction of activated oxygen species, an effect similar to that seen with elicitation of coumarin secretion. These results suggest that JAME conditioned the parsley suspension cells in a time-dependent manner to become more responsive to elicitation, reminiscent of developmental effects caused by JAME in whole plants. It is interesting that pretreatment of the parsley cultures with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic and 5-chlorosalicylic acid only slightly enhanced the elicitation of activated oxygen species, whereas these substances greatly enhanced the elicitation of coumarin secretion. Therefore, these presumed inducers of systemic acquired resistance exhibit a specificity different from JAME. PMID:12232189

  20. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs.

  1. Availability of surface boron species in improved oxygen reduction activity of Pt catalysts: A first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Zhou, Gang

    2016-04-14

    The oxidation process of boron (B) species on the Pt(111) surface and the beneficial effects of boron oxides on the oxygen reduction activity are investigated by first-principles calculations. The single-atom B anchored on the Pt surface has a great attraction for the oxygen species in the immediate environment. With the dissociation of molecular oxygen, a series of boron oxides is formed in succession, both indicating exothermic oxidation reactions. After BO2 is formed, the subsequent O atom immediately participates in the oxygen reduction reaction. The calculated O adsorption energy is appreciably decreased as compared to Pt catalysts, and more approximate to the optimal value of the volcano plot, from which is clear that O hydrogenation kinetics is improved. The modulation mechanism is mainly based on the electron-deficient nature of stable boron oxides, which normally reduces available electronic states of surface Pt atoms that bind the O by facilitating more electron transfer. This modification strategy from the exterior opens the new way, different from the alloying, to efficient electrocatalyst design for PEMFCs. PMID:27083744

  2. A simplified process design for P450 driven hydroxylation based on surface displayed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Frank W; Kranen, Eva; Schrader, Jens; Maas, Ruth; Holtmann, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    New production routes for fine and bulk chemicals are important to establish further sustainable processes in industry. Besides the identification of new biocatalysts and new production routes the optimization of existing processes in regard to an improved utilization of the catalysts are needed. In this paper we describe the successful expression of P450BM3 on the surface of E. coli cells with the Autodisplay system. The successful hydroxylation of palmitic acid by using surface-displayed P450BM3 was shown. Besides optimization of surface protein expression, several cofactor regeneration systems were compared and evaluated. Afterwards, the development of a suitable process for the biocatalytic hydroxylation of fatty acids based on the re-use of the catalysts after a simple centrifugation was investigated. It was shown that the catalyst can be used for several times without any loss in activity. By using surface-displayed P450s in combination with an enzymatic cofactor regeneration system a total turnover number of up to 54,700 could be reached, to the knowledge of the authors the highest value reported for a P450 monooxygenase to date. Further optimizations of the described reaction system can have an enormous impact on the process design for more sustainable bioprocesses. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1225-1233. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26574191

  3. Surprisingly high activity for oxygen reduction reaction of selected oxides lacking long oxygen-ion diffusion paths at intermediate temperatures: a case study of cobalt-free BaFeO(3-δ).

    PubMed

    Dong, Feifei; Chen, Yubo; Chen, Dengjie; Shao, Zongping

    2014-07-23

    The widespread application of solid oxide fuel cell technology requires the development of innovative electrodes with high activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures. Here, we demonstrate that a cobalt-free parent oxide BaFeO(3-δ) (BF), which lacks long-range oxygen-ion diffusion paths, has surprisingly high electrocatalytic activity for ORR. Both in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis on room-temperature powder and transmission electron microscopy on quenched powder are applied to investigate the crystal structure of BF. Despite the lack of long oxygen-ion diffusion paths, the easy redox of iron cations as demonstrated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and oxygen temperature-programmed desorption and the high oxygen vacancy concentration as supported by iodometric titration and TGA benefit the reduction of oxygen to oxygen ions. Moreover, the electrical conductivity relaxation technique in conjunction with a transient thermogravimetric study reveals very high surface exchange kinetics of BF oxide. At 700 °C, the area specific resistance of BF cathode, as expressed by a symmetrical cell configuration, is only ∼0.021 Ω cm(2), and the derived single fuel cell achieves high power output with a peak power density of 870 mW cm(-2). It suggests that an undoped BF parent oxide can be used as a high-efficiency catalyst for ORR. PMID:24978102

  4. Fusion to Hydrophobin HFBI Improves the Catalytic Performance of a Cytochrome P450 System

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Sebastian; Schumacher, Dominik; Raszkowski, Daniel; Girhard, Marco; Urlacher, Vlada B.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450) are heme-containing enzymes that oxidize a broad range of substrates in the presence of molecular oxygen and NAD(P)H. For their activity, most P450s rely on one or two redox proteins responsible for the transfer of electrons from the cofactor NAD(P)H to the heme. One of the challenges when using P450s in vitro, especially when non-physiological redox proteins are applied, is the inefficient transfer of electrons between the individual proteins resulting in non-productive consumption of NAD(P)H – referred to as uncoupling. Herein, we describe the improvement of the coupling efficiency between a P450 and its redox partner – diflavin reductase – by fusing both enzymes individually to the hydrophobin HFBI – a small self-assembling protein of the fungus Trichoderma reesei. The separated monooxygenase (BMO) and reductase (BMR) domains of P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium were chosen as a P450-reductase model system and individually fused to HFBI. The fusion proteins could be expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli. When HFBI-fused BMO and BMR were mixed in vitro, substantially higher coupling efficiencies were measured as compared with the respective non-fused enzymes. Consequently, myristic acid conversion increased up to 20-fold (after 6 h) and 5-fold (after 24 h). Size exclusion chromatography demonstrated that in vitro the hydrophobin-fused enzymes build multimeric protein assemblies. Thus, the higher activity is hypothesized to be due to HFBI-mediated self-assembly arranging BMO and BMR in close spatial proximity in aqueous solution. PMID:27458582

  5. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium–Oxygen Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the “Achilles’ heel” of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that—at 3.1 V—exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble “catalyst” capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li–O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  6. Oxygen-Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous Palladium Nanoparticles as Highly Active Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiling; Jiang, Bo; Imura, Masataka; Umezawa, Naoto; Malgras, Victor; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-12-14

    Mesoporous Pd nanoparticles (MPNs) enclosed by high-index facets have been successfully prepared by taking advantage of successive oxygen adsorption and desorption caused by the oxidative etching effect. The as-prepared MPNs exhibit excellent performance toward formic acid electro-oxidation, which is due to the synergetic effect between the diffusion-feasible tubular mesochannels and the high index facets. PMID:26577468

  7. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF OPEN TANK OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pilot plant for this study consisted of one oxygenation basin and two clarifiers. The system treated primary clarifier effluent from the Englewood, Colorado, treatment facility. The influent flow rate was adjusted to attain average aeration reactor detention times ranging fro...

  8. Production of Energetic Active-Oxygen Species at Atmospheric Pressure by Linear Microplasma Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Wilson; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin; Davis, Steven; Hoskinson, Alan; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Linear arrays of stripline resonators operated at microwave frequencies and low powers provide spatially and temporally continuous micro-discharges with high E/N at atmospheric pressure. When implemented in a discharge-flow reactor, these microplasmas excite metastable singlet molecular oxygen and dissociate oxygen molecules to produce atomic oxygen, with efficiencies comparable to conventional microwave resonant cavities at low pressures. At elevated pressure, production of atomic oxygen leads to prompt formation of ozone immediately downstream of the discharge exit. We have observed and quantified the production of O2(a 1 Δ) metastables and O3 in the effluent of linear microplasma arrays for O2/He, O2/Ar, O2/N2/He,andO2/N2/Ar mixtures as functions of pressure, gas flow rate, and species mixing ratio. We compare results for single-array microplasmas, where the discharge products are formed in a small volume and entrained into the bulk flow, and overlapping dual-array microplasmas which process larger gas flow volumes. Supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory and Department of Energy.

  9. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Dipan; Black, Robert; Adams, Brian; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-12-23

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the "Achilles' heel" of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that-at 3.1 V-exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble "catalyst" capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li-O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  10. Oxygen reduction and evolution at single-metal active sites: Comparison between functionalized graphitic materials and protoporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J. I.; García-Lastra, J. M.; Abad, E.; Koper, M. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    A worldwide spread of clean technologies such as low-temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers depends strictly on their technical reliability and economic affordability. Currently, both conditions are hardly fulfilled mainly due to the same reason: the oxygen electrode, which has large overpotentials and is made of precious materials. A possible solution is the use of non-noble electrocatalysts with single-metal active sites. Here, on the basis of DFT calculations of adsorbed intermediates and a thermodynamic analysis, we compare the oxygen reduction (ORR) and evolution (OER) activities of functionalized graphitic materials and gas-phase porphyrins with late transition metals. We find that both kinds of materials follow approximately the same activity trends, and active sites with transition metals from groups 7 to 9 may be good ORR and OER electrocatalysts. However, spin analyses show more flexibility in the possible oxidation states of the metal atoms in solid electrocatalysts, while in porphyrins they must be + 2. These observations reveal that the catalytic activity of these materials is mainly due to nearest-neighbor interactions. Based on this, we propose that this class of electrocatalysts may be improved by careful selections of the support and the ligand properties close to the active sites and/or the ramifications near them, so that charge is transferred back and forth during adsorption and selective hydrogen bonds are formed.

  11. Influence of Hypoxic Interval Training and Hyperoxic Recovery on Muscle Activation and Oxygenation in Connection with Double-Poling Exercise.

    PubMed

    Zinner, Christoph; Hauser, Anna; Born, Dennis-Peter; Wehrlin, Jon P; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Here, we evaluated the influence of breathing oxygen at different partial pressures during recovery from exercise on performance at sea-level and a simulated altitude of 1800 m, as reflected in activation of different upper body muscles, and oxygenation of the m. triceps brachii. Ten well-trained, male endurance athletes (25.3±4.1 yrs; 179.2±4.5 cm; 74.2±3.4 kg) performed four test trials, each involving three 3-min sessions on a double-poling ergometer with 3-min intervals of recovery. One trial was conducted entirely under normoxic (No) and another under hypoxic conditions (Ho; FiO2 = 0.165). In the third and fourth trials, the exercise was performed in normoxia and hypoxia, respectively, with hyperoxic recovery (HOX; FiO2 = 1.00) in both cases. Arterial hemoglobin saturation was higher under the two HOX conditions than without HOX (p<0.05). Integrated muscle electrical activity was not influenced by the oxygen content (best d = 0.51). Furthermore, the only difference in tissue saturation index measured via near-infrared spectroscopy observed was between the recovery periods during the NoNo and HoHOX interventions (P<0.05, d = 0.93). In the case of HoHo the athletes' Pmean declined from the first to the third interval (P < 0.05), whereas Pmean was unaltered under the HoHOX, NoHOX and NoNo conditions. We conclude that the less pronounced decline in Pmean during 3 x 3-min double-poling sprints in normoxia and hypoxia with hyperoxic recovery is not related to changes in muscle activity or oxygenation. Moreover, we conclude that hyperoxia (FiO2 = 1.00) used in conjunction with hypoxic or normoxic work intervals may serve as an effective aid when inhaled during the subsequent recovery intervals. PMID:26468885

  12. Influence of Hypoxic Interval Training and Hyperoxic Recovery on Muscle Activation and Oxygenation in Connection with Double-Poling Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Zinner, Christoph; Hauser, Anna; Born, Dennis-Peter; Wehrlin, Jon P.; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Here, we evaluated the influence of breathing oxygen at different partial pressures during recovery from exercise on performance at sea-level and a simulated altitude of 1800 m, as reflected in activation of different upper body muscles, and oxygenation of the m. triceps brachii. Ten well-trained, male endurance athletes (25.3±4.1 yrs; 179.2±4.5 cm; 74.2±3.4 kg) performed four test trials, each involving three 3-min sessions on a double-poling ergometer with 3-min intervals of recovery. One trial was conducted entirely under normoxic (No) and another under hypoxic conditions (Ho; FiO2 = 0.165). In the third and fourth trials, the exercise was performed in normoxia and hypoxia, respectively, with hyperoxic recovery (HOX; FiO2 = 1.00) in both cases. Arterial hemoglobin saturation was higher under the two HOX conditions than without HOX (p<0.05). Integrated muscle electrical activity was not influenced by the oxygen content (best d = 0.51). Furthermore, the only difference in tissue saturation index measured via near-infrared spectroscopy observed was between the recovery periods during the NoNo and HoHOX interventions (P<0.05, d = 0.93). In the case of HoHo the athletes’ Pmean declined from the first to the third interval (P < 0.05), whereas Pmean was unaltered under the HoHOX, NoHOX and NoNo conditions. We conclude that the less pronounced decline in Pmean during 3 x 3-min double-poling sprints in normoxia and hypoxia with hyperoxic recovery is not related to changes in muscle activity or oxygenation. Moreover, we conclude that hyperoxia (FiO2 = 1.00) used in conjunction with hypoxic or normoxic work intervals may serve as an effective aid when inhaled during the subsequent recovery intervals. PMID:26468885

  13. Brine shrimp lethality test active constituents and new highly oxygenated seco-prezizaane-type sesquiterpenes from Illicium merrillianum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Mei; Nakade, Kousuke; Kondo, Mamiko; Yang, Chun-Shu; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu

    2002-01-01

    In the study of bioactive substances in Illicium plants, the methanol extract of I. merrillianum showed brine shrimp lethality test (BST) activity at 200 microg/ml. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the BST active fractions resulted in the isolation of 4-O-methyleudesm-11-en-4alpha-ol, eudesmol-11-en-4alpha-ol and (-)-hinokinin as potent BST active compounds. On the other hand, four new highly oxygenated seco-prezizaane-type sesquiterpenes, merrilliortholactone (1), 2alpha-hydroxycycloparvifloralone (2), 2alpha-hydroxycycloparviflorolide (3), and 2alpha-hydroxyanisatin (4) were isolated from the BST-inactive polar fractions. The structures of new compounds were elucidated by extensive analyses of spectral data. Furthermore, the absolute configuration of 3 was established by the modified Mosher's method. Compounds 1--4 showed neither BST activity at 100 microg/ml nor neurite outgrowth-promoting activity. PMID:11824575

  14. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  15. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i. PMID:25592711

  16. Activation of transcription factor AP-2 mediates UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-induced expression of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grether-Beck, S.; Olaizola-Horn, S.; Schmitt, H.; Grewe, M.

    1996-12-10

    UVA radiation is the major component of the UV solar spectrum that reaches the earth, and the therapeutic application of UVA radiation is increasing in medicine. Analysis of the cellular effects of UVA radiation has revealed that exposure of human cells to UVA radiation at physiological doses leads to increased gene expression and that this UVA response is primarily mediated through the generation of singlet oxygen. In this study, the mechanisms by which UVA radiation induces transcriptional activation of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were examined. UVA radiation was capable of inducing activation of the human ICAM-1 promoter and increasing OCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. These UVA radiation effects were inhibited by singlet oxygen quenchers, augmented by enhancement of singlet oxygen life-time, and mimicked in unirradiated cells by a singlet oxygen-generating system. UVA radiation as well as singlet oxygen-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation required activation of the transcription factor AP-2. Accordingly, both stimuli activated AP-2, and deletion of the putative AP-2-binding site abrogated ICAM-1 promoter activation in this system. This study identified the AP-2 site as the UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-responsive element of the human ICAM-1 gene. The capacity of UVA radiation and/or singlet oxygen to induce human gene expression through activation of AP-2 indicates a previously unrecognized role of this transcription factor in the mammalian stress response. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Comparison of V-4 and V-5 Exercise/Oxygen Prebreathe Protocols to Support Extravehicular Activity in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Vann, R. D.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Conkin, Johnny

    2007-01-01

    The Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) used exercise during oxygen prebreathe to reduce necessary prebreathe time prior to depressurizing to work in a 4.3 psi suit during extravehicular activity (EVA). Initial testing produced a two-hour protocol incorporating ergometry exercise and a 30 min cycle of depress/repress to 10.2 psi where subjects breathed 26.5% oxygen/balance nitrogen (Phase II - 10 min at 75% peak oxygen consumption [VO2 peak] followed by 40 min intermittent light exercise [ILE] [approx. 5.8 mL-per kilogram- per minute], then 50 min of rest). The Phase II protocol (0/45 DCS) was approved for operations and has been used on 40 EVAs, providing significant time savings compared to the standard 4 h resting oxygen prebreathe. The Phase V effort focused on performing all light in-suit exercise. Two oxygen prebreathe protocols were tested sequentially: V-4) 160 min prebreathe with 150 min of continuous ILE. The entire protocol was completed at 14.7 psi. All exercise involved upper body effort. Exercise continued until decompression. V-5) 160 min prebreathe with 140 min of ILE - first 40 min at 14.7 psi, then 30 min at 10.2 psi (breathing 26.5% oxygen) after a 20 min depress, simulating a suit donning period. Subjects were then repressed to 14.7 psi and performed another 50 min of lower body ILE, followed by 50 min rest before decompression. The V-4 protocol was rejected with 3 DCS/6 person-exposures. Initial V-5 testing has produced 0 DCS/11 person-exposures (ongoing trials). The difference in DCS rate was significant (Fisher Exact p=0.029). The observations of DCS were significantly lower in early V-5 trials than in V-4 trials. Additional studies are required to evaluate the relative contribution of the variables in exercise distribution, the 10.2 psi depress/repress component, pre-decompression rest, or possible variation in total oxygen consumption.

  18. Structurally ordered intermetallic platinum-cobalt core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced activity and stability as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deli; Xin, Huolin L; Hovden, Robert; Wang, Hongsen; Yu, Yingchao; Muller, David A; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-01-01

    To enhance and optimize nanocatalyst performance and durability for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel-cell applications, we look beyond Pt-metal disordered alloys and describe a new class of Pt-Co nanocatalysts composed of ordered Pt(3)Co intermetallic cores with a 2-3 atomic-layer-thick platinum shell. These nanocatalysts exhibited over 200% increase in mass activity and over 300% increase in specific activity when compared with the disordered Pt(3)Co alloy nanoparticles as well as Pt/C. So far, this mass activity for the oxygen reduction reaction is the highest among the Pt-Co systems reported in the literature under similar testing conditions. Stability tests showed a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles and the ordered core-shell structure was maintained virtually intact, as established by atomic-scale elemental mapping. The high activity and stability are attributed to the Pt-rich shell and the stable intermetallic Pt(3)Co core arrangement. These ordered nanoparticles provide a new direction for catalyst performance optimization for next-generation fuel cells. PMID:23104154

  19. Titanium dioxide induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated Fas upregulation and Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ki-Chun; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kwon, Dongwook; Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Woo, Soo Jung; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung; Suh, Yongjoon; Kim, Min-Jung; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Lee, Su-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been widely used in many areas, including biomedicine, cosmetics, and environmental engineering. Recently, it has become evident that some TiO2 particles have a considerable cytotoxic effect in normal human cells. However, the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity of TiO2 has yet to be defined. Methods and results In this study, we demonstrated that combined treatment with TiO2 nanoparticles sized less than 100 nm and ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-dependent upregulation of Fas and conformational activation of Bax in normal human cells. Treatment with P25 TiO2 nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size distribution centered around 70 nm (TiO2P25–70) together with ultraviolet A irradiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and conformational activation of Bax. In line with these results, knockdown of either Fas or Bax with specific siRNA significantly inhibited TiO2-induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, inhibition of reactive oxygen species with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, clearly suppressed upregulation of Fas, conformational activation of Bax, and subsequent apoptotic cell death in response to combination treatment using TiO2P25–70 and ultraviolet A irradiation. Conclusion These results indicate that sub-100 nm sized TiO2 treatment under ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and activation of the preapoptotic protein, Bax. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which nanosized particles induce activation of cell death signaling pathways would be critical for the development of prevention strategies to minimize the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. PMID:22419868

  20. Binary and ternary doping of nitrogen, boron, and phosphorus into carbon for enhancing electrochemical oxygen reduction activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Park, Sung Hyeon; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2012-08-28

    N-doped carbon, a promising alternative to Pt catalyst for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) in acidic media, is modified in order to increase its catalytic activity through the additional doping of B and P at the carbon growth step. This additional doping alters the electrical, physical, and morphological properties of the carbon. The B-doping reinforces the sp(2)-structure of graphite and increases the portion of pyridinic-N sites in the carbon lattice, whereas P-doping enhances the charge delocalization of the carbon atoms and produces carbon structures with many edge sites. These electrical and physical alternations of the N-doped carbon are more favorable for the reduction of the oxygen on the carbon surface. Compared with N-doped carbon, B,N-doped or P,N-doped carbon shows 1.2 or 2.1 times higher ORR activity at 0.6 V (vs RHE) in acidic media. The most active catalyst in the reaction is the ternary-doped carbon (B,P,N-doped carbon), which records -6.0 mA/mg of mass activity at 0.6 V (vs RHE), and it is 2.3 times higher than that of the N-doped carbon. These results imply that the binary or ternary doping of B and P with N into carbon induces remarkable performance enhancements, and the charge delocalization of the carbon atoms or number of edge sites of the carbon is a significant factor in deciding the oxygen reduction activity in carbon-based catalysts. PMID:22769428

  1. Electrocatalytic activity of alkyne-functionalized AgAu alloy nanoparticles for oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peiguang; Song, Yang; Chen, Limei; Chen, Shaowei

    2015-05-01

    1-Dodecyne-functionalized AgAu alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction of metal salt precursors at varied initial feed ratios. Transmission electron microscopic measurements showed that the nanoparticles were all rather well dispersed with the average core diameter in the narrow range of 3 to 5 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies confirmed the formation of AgAu alloy nanoparticles with the gold concentration ranging from approximately 25 at% to 55 at%. Consistent results were obtained in UV-vis spectroscopic measurements where the nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance red-shifted almost linearly with increasing gold concentrations. The self-assembly of 1-dodecyne ligands on the nanoparticle surface was manifested in infrared spectroscopic measurements. Importantly, the resulting nanoparticles exhibited apparent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction in alkaline media, and the performance was found to show a volcano variation in the Au content in the alloy nanoparticles, with the best performance observed for the samples with ca. 35.5 at% Au. The enhanced catalytic activity, as compared to pure Ag nanoparticles or even commercial Pt/C catalysts, was accounted for by the unique metal-ligand interfacial bonding interactions as well as alloying effects that increased metal-oxygen affinity.1-Dodecyne-functionalized AgAu alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction of metal salt precursors at varied initial feed ratios. Transmission electron microscopic measurements showed that the nanoparticles were all rather well dispersed with the average core diameter in the narrow range of 3 to 5 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies confirmed the formation of AgAu alloy nanoparticles with the gold concentration ranging from approximately 25 at% to 55 at%. Consistent results were obtained in UV-vis spectroscopic measurements where the nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance red-shifted almost linearly with increasing gold

  2. Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Gerardo; Yang, Zhong-jin; Di Tano, Guglielmo; Camporesi, Enrico M; Faralli, Fabio; Savini, Fabio; Landolfi, Angelo; Doria, Christian; Fanò, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation in scuba divers was evaluated. Six volunteers participated in four diving protocols, with 2 wk of recovery between dives. On dive 1, before diving, all divers breathed normally for 20 min at the surface of the sea (Air). On dive 2, before diving, all divers breathed 100% oxygen for 20 min at the surface of the sea [normobaric oxygenation (NBO)]. On dive 3, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 6 m of seawater [msw; hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) 1.6 atmospheres absolute (ATA)]. On dive 4, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 12 msw (HBO 2.2 ATA). Then they dove to 30 msw (4 ATA) for 20 min breathing air from scuba. After each dive, blood samples were collected as soon as the divers surfaced. Bubbles were measured at 20 and 50 min after decompression and converted to bubble count estimate (BCE) and numeric bubble grade (NBG). BCE and NBG were significantly lower in NBO than in Air [0.142+/-0.034 vs. 0.191+/-0.066 (P<0.05) and 1.61+/-0.25 vs. 1.89+/-0.31 (P<0.05), respectively] at 20 min, but not at 50 min. HBO at 1.6 ATA and 2.2 ATA has a similar significant effect of reducing BCE and NBG. BCE was 0.067+/-0.026 and 0.040+/-0.018 at 20 min and 0.030+/-0.022 and 0.020+/-0.020 at 50 min. NBG was 1.11+/-0.17 and 0.92+/-0.16 at 20 min and 0.83+/-0.18 and 0.75+/-0.16 at 50 min. Prebreathing NBO and HBO significantly alleviated decompression-induced platelet activation. Activation of CD62p was 3.0+/-0.4, 13.5+/-1.3, 10.7+/-0.9, 4.5+/-0.7, and 7.6+/-0.8% for baseline, Air, NBO, HBO at 1.6 ATA, and HBO at 2.2 ATA, respectively. The data show that prebreathing oxygen, more effective with HBO than NBO, decreases air bubbles and platelet activation and, therefore, may be beneficial in reducing the development of decompression sickness. PMID:20185629

  3. Oxygen activity dependence of the chromium (IV) population in chromium-doped forsterite crystals grown by the floating zone technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mass, J. L.; Burlitch, J. M.; Markgraf, S. A.; Higuchi, M.; Dieckmann, R.; Barber, D. B.; Pollock, C. R.

    1996-08-01

    The lasing of Cr-doped forsterite, Cr:Mg 2SiO 4, at 1.2 μm has been attributed to the presence of Cr 4+. The goal of this work was to determine the {Cr4+}/{Cr3+} ratios of crystals grown at different oxygen partial pressures and to compare them with a model based on point defect thermodynamics. Cr:forsterite crystals were grown by the floating zone technique with gas atmospheres of 100% Ar, 99% Ar + 1% O 2, 80% Ar + 20% O 2, 33% Ar + 67% O 2, and 100% O 2 at 1 atm total pressure. The {Cr4+}/{Cr3+} ratios, as well as the distribution of the Cr 3+ cations on the M1 and M2 sites, were determined by electron paramagnetic resonance techniques. The fraction of Cr present as Cr 4+ ions as a function of the oxygen activity of the growth environment was well described by the model.

  4. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: Effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bonam, D.; Lehman, L.; Roberts, G.P.; Ludden, P.W.

    1989-06-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of (/sup 35/S)methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase.

  5. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-08-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media.

  6. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media. PMID:26310526

  7. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media. PMID:26310526

  8. Assembly of Modified Ferritin Proteins on Carbon Nanotubes and its Electrocatalytic Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Highly effective dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be made using a commercially available buffer solution. Buffer solutions of 3-(N-morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), which consists of a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms, a charged group, and an alkyl chain greatly enhance the dispersibility and stability of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Additionally, the ability of biomolecules, especially cationized Pt-cored ferritins, to adhere onto the well-dispersed CNTs in the aqueous buffer solution is also improved. This was accomplished without the use of surfactant molecules, which are detrimental to the electrical, mechanical, and other physical properties of the resulting products. The assembled Pt-cored ferritin proteins on the CNTs were used as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

  9. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2013-05-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the difference in the behavior of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to that of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e., insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e., highly soluble regime) for typical atmospheric cloud life cycles.

  10. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the differences of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to the behavior of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e. insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e. highly soluble regime).

  11. Sea urchin-like cobalt-iron phosphide as an active catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Garcia, Adriana; Su, Dong; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-02-14

    Sea urchin-like (CoxFe1-x)2P shows Co/Fe-composition dependent catalysis for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH. The (Co0.54Fe0.46)2P is the most efficient OER catalyst, reaching 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of 0.37 V (vs. RHE). The report offers a new synergistic approach to tune and optimize the electrocatalysis of OER. PMID:26810219

  12. Activation of molecular oxygen, polyoxometalates, and liquid-phase catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Ronny

    2010-04-19

    In this Forum Article, we discuss the use of dioxygen (O(2)) in oxidations catalyzed by polyoxometalates. One- and two-electron-transfer oxidation of organic substrates is catalyzed by H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) and often occurs via an outer-sphere mechanism. The reduced polyoxometalate is reoxidized in a separate step by O(2) with the formation of water. H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) also catalyzes electron transfer-oxygen transfer reactions. Here, in contrast to the paradigm that high-valent oxo species are often stronger oxygen-transfer species than lower-valent species, the opposite occurs. Thus, oxygen transfer from the catalyst is preceded by electron transfer from the organic substrate. The monooxygenase-type reduction of O(2) with polyoxometalates is also discussed based on the formation of a stable iron(III) hydroperoxide compound that may have implications for the oxidation of other lower-valent polyoxometalates such as vanadium(IV)- and ruthenium(II)-substituted polyoxometalates. Finally, the formation of hybrid compounds through the attachment of electron-accepting polyoxometalates to coordination compounds can modify the reactivity of the latter by making higher-valent oxidation states more accessible. PMID:20380461

  13. Understanding the High Activity of Fe-N-C Electrocatalysts in Oxygen Reduction: Fe/Fe3C Nanoparticles Boost the Activity of Fe-N(x).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen-Jie; Gu, Lin; Li, Li; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lin-Juan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Hu, Jin-Song; Wei, Zidong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-03-16

    Understanding the origin of high activity of Fe-N-C electrocatalysts in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is critical but still challenging for developing efficient sustainable nonprecious metal catalysts in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Herein, we developed a new highly active Fe-N-C ORR catalyst containing Fe-N(x) coordination sites and Fe/Fe3C nanocrystals (Fe@C-FeNC), and revealed the origin of its activity by intensively investigating the composition and the structure of the catalyst and their correlations with the electrochemical performance. The detailed analyses unambiguously confirmed the coexistence of Fe/Fe3C nanocrystals and Fe-N(x) in the best catalyst. A series of designed experiments disclosed that (1) N-doped carbon substrate, Fe/Fe3C nanocrystals or Fe-N(x) themselves did not deliver the high activity; (2) the catalysts with both Fe/Fe3C nanocrystals and Fe-N(x) exhibited the high activity; (3) the higher content of Fe-N(x) gave the higher activity; (4) the removal of Fe/Fe3C nanocrystals severely degraded the activity; (5) the blocking of Fe-N(x) downgraded the activity and the recovery of the blocked Fe-N(x) recovered the activity. These facts supported that the high ORR activity of the Fe@C-FeNC electrocatalysts should be ascribed to that Fe/Fe3C nanocrystals boost the activity of Fe-N(x). The coexistence of high content of Fe-N(x) and sufficient metallic iron nanoparticles is essential for the high ORR activity. DFT calculation corroborated this conclusion by indicating that the interaction between metallic iron and Fe-N4 coordination structure favored the adsorption of oxygen molecule. These new findings open an avenue for the rational design and bottom-up synthesis of low-cost highly active ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:26906342

  14. First principles investigation of the activity of thin film Pt, Pd and Au surface alloys for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-05-01

    Further advances in fuel cell technologies are hampered by kinetic limitations associated with the sluggish cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. We have investigated a range of different formulations of binary and ternary Pt, Pd and Au thin films as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction. The most active binary thin films are near-surface alloys of Pt with subsurface Pd and certain PdAu and PtAu thin films with surface and/or subsurface Au. The most active ternary thin films are with pure metal Pt or Pd skins with some degree of Au in the surface and/or subsurface layer and the near-surface alloys of Au with mixed Pt-Pd skins. The activity of the binary and ternary catalysts is explained through weakening of the OH binding energy caused by solute elements. However, given the low alloy formation energies it may be difficult to tune and retain the composition under operating conditions. This is particularly challenging for alloys containing Au due to a high propensity of Au to segregate to the surface. We also show that once Au is on the surface it will diffuse to defect sites, explaining why small amounts of Au retard dissolution of Pt nanoparticles. For the PtPd thin films there is no pronounced driving force for surface segregation, diffusion to defects or surface self-assembling. On the basis of stability and activity analysis we conclude that the near surface alloy of Pd in Pt and some PdAu binary and PtPdAu ternary thin films with a controlled amount of Au are the best catalysts for oxygen reduction. PMID:25865333

  15. Structural and Electrochemical Impacts of Oxygen Doped and Surfactant Coated Activated Carbon Electrodes in Li-ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John; Gourdin, Gerald; Qu, Deyang; Foster, Michelle

    2013-03-01

    Passive charge and discharge dynamics are necessary for advancing Li-ion batteries. Surfactant adsorption on activated carbon has been shown to promote advancements in the discharge capacity, time and cycle-ability of electrochemical systems--specifically by enhancing diffusion pathways for ion insertion/de-insertion and suppressing pore blockage from precipitates known to form during charge/discharge states. Enhancement of surfactant chemisorption on activated carbon is achieved through oxygen doping of the carbon surface. In addition, doping alters the degree of Faradaic processes occurring in solution, resulting in prolonged reduction at the carbon surface. The work presented describes how surface oxygen groups on a granulated activated carbon have been manipulated using nitric acid in a controlled, stepwise fashion. A nonionic surfactant was applied to oxidized and non-oxidized samples at various concentrations. The composition and structure of the activated carbon surface was characterized using DRIFTS, Raman Spectroscopy, SEM and Porosimetry. The charge/discharge Li insertion capacities along with correlating surface microstructure changes were analyzed for all treated electrodes at progressive oxidation stages.

  16. Theoretical Modelling and Facile Synthesis of a Highly Active Boron-Doped Palladium Catalyst for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Wang, Jingbo; Poon, Kee Chun; Tan, Desmond C L; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Su, Haibin; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-06-01

    A highly active alternative to Pt electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is the cathode-electrode reaction of fuel cells, is sought for higher fuel-cell performance. Our theoretical modelling reveals that B-doped Pd (Pd-B) weakens the absorption of ORR intermediates with nearly optimal binding energy by lowering the barrier associated with O2 dissociation, suggesting Pd-B should be highly active for ORR. In fact, Pd-B, facile synthesized by an electroless deposition process, exhibits 2.2 times and 8.8 times higher specific activity and 14 times and 35 times less costly than commercial pure Pd and Pt catalysts, respectively. Another computational result is that the surface core level of Pd is negatively shifted by B doping, as confirmed by XPS, and implies that filling the density of states related to the anti-bonding of oxygen to Pd surfaces with excess electrons from B doping, weakens the O bonding to Pd and boosts the catalytic activity. PMID:27086729

  17. Induction of benzo[a]pyrene Mono-oxygenase in liver cell culture by the photochemical generation of active oxygen species. Evidence for the involvement of singlet oxygen and the formation of a stable inducing intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Paine, A J

    1976-01-01

    1. The photochemical generation of excited states of oxygen in liver cell culture by the mild ilumination of culture medium containing riboflavin, results in stimulation of benzo[a]pyrene 3-mono-oxygenase, a cytochrome P-450-linked mono-oxygenase. 2. The same large increase in mono-oxygenase activity was found when medium containing riboflavin was illuminated in the absence of cells and then stored in the dark for 24h before contact with the cells. From this it may be inferred that stimulation is due to the formation of a stable inducer in the culture medium. Further experiments indicate that the stable inducer is due to the photo-oxidation of an amino acid. 3. Evidence that singlet oxygen is responsible for initiating the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase is based on the use of molecules that scavenge particular active oxygen species. Of all the scavengers tested, only those that scavenge single oxygen inhibited the stimulation. 4. A hypothesis is developed to relate the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase by singlet oxygen in cultured cells to the regulation of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system in vivo. It is suggested that single oxygen generation within cells may be a common factor linking the many structurally diverse inducers of the enzyme system. PMID:962887

  18. Induction of benzo[a]pyrene Mono-oxygenase in liver cell culture by the photochemical generation of active oxygen species. Evidence for the involvement of singlet oxygen and the formation of a stable inducing intermediate.

    PubMed

    Paine, A J

    1976-07-15

    1. The photochemical generation of excited states of oxygen in liver cell culture by the mild ilumination of culture medium containing riboflavin, results in stimulation of benzo[a]pyrene 3-mono-oxygenase, a cytochrome P-450-linked mono-oxygenase. 2. The same large increase in mono-oxygenase activity was found when medium containing riboflavin was illuminated in the absence of cells and then stored in the dark for 24h before contact with the cells. From this it may be inferred that stimulation is due to the formation of a stable inducer in the culture medium. Further experiments indicate that the stable inducer is due to the photo-oxidation of an amino acid. 3. Evidence that singlet oxygen is responsible for initiating the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase is based on the use of molecules that scavenge particular active oxygen species. Of all the scavengers tested, only those that scavenge single oxygen inhibited the stimulation. 4. A hypothesis is developed to relate the stimulation of the mono-oxygenase by singlet oxygen in cultured cells to the regulation of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system in vivo. It is suggested that single oxygen generation within cells may be a common factor linking the many structurally diverse inducers of the enzyme system. PMID:962887

  19. Copper ions strongly activate the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, Elena A; Lordnejad, Mohammad Reza; Schliess, Freimut; Sies, Helmut; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2002-01-15

    Copper is implicated in metabolic disorders, such as Wilson's disease or Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of signaling pathways regulating cellular survival and function in response to a copper stress is crucial for understanding the pathogenesis of such diseases. Exposure of human skin fibroblasts or HeLa cells to Cu(2+) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent activation of the antiapoptotic kinase Akt/protein kinase B, starting at concentrations as low as 3 microM. Only Cu(II), but not Cu(I), had this effect. Activation of Akt was accompanied by phosphorylation of a downstream target of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3. Inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) completely blocked activation of Akt by Cu(2+), indicating a requirement of PI3K for Cu(2+)-induced activation of Akt. Indeed, cellular PI3K activity was strongly enhanced after exposure to Cu(2+). Copper ions may lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide. Activation of Akt by hydrogen peroxide or growth factors is known to proceed via the activation growth factor receptors. In line with this, pretreatment with inhibitors of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases blocked activation of Akt by hydrogen peroxide and growth factors, as did a src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor or the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Activation of Akt by Cu(2+), however, remained unimpaired, implying (i) that tyrosine kinase activation is not involved in Cu(2+) activation of Akt and (ii) that activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway by Cu(2+) is initiated independently of that induced by reactive oxygen species. Comparison of the time course of the oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein in copper-treated cells with that of Akt activation led to the conclusion that production of hydroperoxides cannot be an upstream event in copper-induced Akt activation. Rather, both activation of Akt and generation of ROS are proposed to occur in parallel, regulating cell survival after a

  20. Order of Activity of Nitrogen, Iron Oxide, and FeNx Complexes towards Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Medium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yansong; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In alkaline medium, it seems that both metal-free and iron-containing carbon-based catalysts, such as nitrogen-doped nanocarbon materials, FeOx -doped carbon, and Fe/N/C catalysts, are active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the order of activity of these different active compositions has not been clearly determined. Herein, we synthesized nitrogen-doped carbon black (NCB), Fe3 O4 /CB, Fe3 O4 /NCB, and FeN4 /CB. Through the systematic study of the ORR catalytic activity of these four catalysts in alkaline solution, we confirmed the difference in the catalytic activity and catalytic mechanism for nitrogen, iron oxides, and Fe-N complexes, respectively. In metal-free NCB, nitrogen can improve the ORR catalytic activity with a four-electron pathway. Fe3 O4 /CB catalyst did not exhibit improved activity over that of NCB owing to the poor conductivity and spinel structure of Fe3 O4 . However, FeN4 coordination compounds as the active sites showed excellent ORR catalytic activity. PMID:26609795

  1. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate released from phytic acid by the activity of wheat and Aspergillus niger phytase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sperber, C.; Tamburini, F.; Brunner, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms. Under P-limiting conditions plants and microorganisms can exude extracellular phosphatases that release inorganic phosphate (Pi) from organic phosphorus compounds (Porg). Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, IP6) is an important form of Porg in many soils. The enzymatic hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase yields available Pi and less phosphorylated inositol derivates as products. The hydrolysis of organic P compounds by phosphatases leaves an isotopic imprint on the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of released Pi, which might be used to trace P in the environment. This study aims at determining the effect of phytase on the oxygen isotope composition of released Pi. For this purpose, enzymatic assays with histidine acid phytases from wheat and Aspergillus niger were prepared using IP6, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and glycerophosphate (GPO4) as substrates. For a comparison to the δ18O of Pi released by other extracellular enzymes, enzymatic assays with acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ with IP6 as a substrate were prepared. During the hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase, four of the six Pi were released, and one oxygen atom from water was incorporated into each Pi. This incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi was subject to an apparent inverse isotopic fractionation (ϵ ~ 6 to 10 ‰), which was similar to that imparted by acid phosphatase from potato during the hydrolysis of IP6 (ϵ ~ 7 ‰), where less than three Pi were released. The incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi during the hydrolysis of AMP and GPO4 by phytase yielded a normal isotopic fractionation (ϵ ~ -12 ‰), similar to values reported for acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ. We attribute this similarity in ϵ to the same amino acid sequence motif (RHGXRXP) at the active site of these enzymes, which leads to similar reaction mechanisms. We suggest that the striking

  2. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate released from phytic acid by the activity of wheat and Aspergillus niger phytase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, C. v.; Tamburini, F.; Brunner, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms. Under P-limiting conditions plants and microorganisms can exude extracellular phosphatases that release inorganic phosphate (Pi) from organic phosphorus compounds (Porg). Phytic acid (IP6) is an important form of Porg in many soils. The enzymatic hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase yields plant available inorganic phosphate (Pi) and less phosphorylated inositol derivates as products. The hydrolysis of organic P-compounds by phosphatases leaves an isotopic imprint on the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of released Pi, which might be used to trace P in the environment. This study aims at determining the effect of phytase on the oxygen isotope composition of released Pi. For this purpose, enzymatic assays with histidine acid phytases from wheat and Aspergillus niger were prepared using IP6, adenosine 5'monophosphate (AMP) and glycerophosphate (GPO4) as substrates. For a comparison to the δ18O of Pi released by other extracellular enzymes, enzymatic assays with acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ with IP6 as substrate were prepared. During the hydrolysis of IP6 by phytase, four Pi are released, and one oxygen atom from water is incorporated into each Pi. This incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi is subject to an apparent inverse isotopic fractionation (ϵ ∼ 6 to 10‰), which is similar to that imparted by acid phosphatase from potato during the hydrolysis of IP6 (ϵ ∼ 7‰) where less than three Pi are released. The incorporation of oxygen from water into Pi during the hydrolysis of AMP and GPO4 by phytase yielded a normal isotopic fractionation (ϵ ∼ -12‰), again similar to values reported for acid phosphatases from potato and wheat germ. We attribute this similarity in ɛ to the same amino acid sequence motif (RHGXRXP) at the active site of these enzymes, which leads to similar reaction mechanisms. We suggest that the striking substrate-dependency of

  3. Nitrogen removal from wastewater and bacterial diversity in activated sludge at different COD/N ratios and dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Bernat, Katarzyna; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Sobolewska, Joanna; Wojnowska-Baryła, Irena

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the organic carbon to nitrogen ratio (chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N) in wastewater and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on carbon and nitrogen removal efficiency, and total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) communities in activated sludge in constantly aerated sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was determined. At DO of 0.5 and 1.5 mg O2/L during the aeration phase, the efficiency of ammonia oxidation exceeded 90%, with nitrates as the main product. Nitrification and denitrification achieved under the same operating conditions suggested the simultaneous course of these processes. The most effective nitrogen elimination (above 50%) was obtained at the COD/N ratio of 6.8 and DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. Total bacterial diversity was similar in all experimental series, however, for both COD/N ratios of 6.8 and 0.7, higher values were observed at DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. The diversity and abundance of AOB were higher in the reactors with the COD/N ratio of 0.7 in comparison with the reactors with the COD/N of 6.8. For both COD/N ratios applied, the AOB population was not affected by oxygen concentration. Amplicons with sequences indicating membership of the genus Nitrosospira were the determinants of variable technological conditions. PMID:23505865

  4. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  5. Photothermal sensitisation: evidence for the lack of oxygen effect on the photosensitising activity.

    PubMed

    Camerin, Monica; Rodgers, Michael A J; Kenney, Malcolm E; Jori, Giulio

    2005-03-01

    Irradiation of amelanotic melanoma B78H1 cells in the presence of liposome-delivered Ni(II)-octabutoxy-naphthalocyanine with a Q-switched Ti:sapphire laser operated in a pulsed mode (850 nm, 30 ns pulses, 10 Hz, 120 mJ pulse -1) promotes a photothermal sensitization process leading to extensive cell inactivation. The photoprocess occurs with identical efficiency in N2-saturated and air-equilibrated media, indicating that this photosensitization modality does not require the presence of oxygen. PMID:15738991

  6. Cytotoxicity of, and DNA damage by, active oxygen species produced by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Chiricolo, M; Tazzari, P L; Abbondanza, A; Dinota, A; Battelli, M G

    1991-10-21

    Toxicity to Raji cells of the xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine system is related to the formation of single-strand DNA breaks. DNA damage was proportional to the concentration of xanthine oxidase and to the time of exposure. It was prevented by the absence of hypoxanthine, or by the presence of allopurinol, or both superoxide dismutase and catalase. The release of 51Cr from damaged cells was detectable 12 h after the inhibition of cloning efficiency and the production of DNA breakage. These data suggest that DNA damage induced by the oxygen products precedes the severe lesion to the cellular membrane. PMID:1936259

  7. Oxygen reduction reaction activity and structural stability of Pt-Au nanoparticles prepared by arc-plasma deposition.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Chiba, Hiroshi; Kato, Takashi; Endo, Shota; Hayashi, Takehiro; Todoroki, Naoto; Wadayama, Toshimasa

    2015-07-28

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability of various Au(x)/Pt100 nanoparticles (where x is the atomic ratio of Au against Pt) are evaluated herein. The samples were fabricated on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate at 773 K through sequential arc-plasma depositions of Pt and Au. The electrochemical hydrogen adsorption charges (electrochemical surface area), particularly the characteristic currents caused by the corner and edge sites of the Pt nanoparticles, decrease with increasing Au atomic ratio (x). In contrast, the specific ORR activities of the Au(x)/Pt100 samples were dependent on the atomic ratios of Pt and Au: the Au28/Pt100 sample showed the highest specific activity among all the investigated samples (x = 0-42). As for ORR durability evaluated by applying potential cycles between 0.6 and 1.0 V in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M HClO4, Au28/Pt100 was the most durable sample against the electrochemical potential cycles. The results clearly showed that the Au atoms located at coordinatively-unsaturated sites, e.g. at the corners or edges of the Pt nanoparticles, can improve the ORR durability by suppressing unsaturated-site-induced degradation of the Pt nanoparticles. PMID:26118789

  8. Structural Origin of the Activity in Mn3O4-Graphene Oxide Hybrid Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Zeng, Qingcong; Zhang, Bingsen; Leng, Xue; Su, Dang-Sheng; Gentle, Ian R; Wang, Da-Wei

    2015-10-12

    Non-precious metal oxide/carbon hybrid electrocatalysts are of increasing importance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A synergistic effect is commonly used to explain the superior ORR activity exerted by metal oxide/nanocarbon hybrids, and this effect is attributed to covalently coupled interfaces between the two materials. However, the origin of the high activity, the structure, and the electrocatalytic nature of the interface remain unclear. By combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron far-infrared spectroscopy, we resolved the interface structure between spinel manganese oxide nanocrystals and graphene oxide nanoribbons, and the role of this interface in the promoted ORR. Moreover, we demonstrated the excellent ORR activity by a functional synergism of the hybrid constituents through a series of comparative electrochemical experiments. PMID:26448527

  9. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the interrelationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPCKD) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers. PMID:21167810

  10. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by thesemore » materials.« less

  11. Evaluation of the catalytic activity of Pd-Ag alloys on ethanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Rego, R.; Fernandes, L. S.; Tavares, P. B.

    2011-08-01

    Pd-Ag alloys containing different amounts of Ag (8, 21 and 34 at.%) were prepared in order to evaluate their catalytic activity towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and oxygen reduction (ORR) reactions. A sequential electroless deposition of Ag and Pd on a stainless steel disc, followed by annealing at 650 °C under Ar stream, was used as the alloy electrode deposition process. From half-cell measurements in a 1.0 M NaOH electrolyte at ≅20 °C, it was found that alloying Pd with Ag leads to an increases of the ORR and EOR kinetics, relative to Pd. Among the alloys under study, the 21 at.% Ag content alloy presents the highest catalytic activity for the EOR and the lowest Ag content alloy (8 at.% Ag) shows the highest ORR activity. Moreover, it was found that the selectivity of Pd-Ag alloys towards ORR is sustained when ethanol is present in the electrolyte.

  12. Sea urchin-like cobalt-iron phosphide as an active catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Garcia, Adriana; Su, Dong; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-02-01

    Sea urchin-like (CoxFe1-x)2P shows Co/Fe-composition dependent catalysis for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH. The (Co0.54Fe0.46)2P is the most efficient OER catalyst, reaching 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 0.37 V (vs. RHE). The report offers a new synergistic approach to tune and optimize the electrocatalysis of OER.Sea urchin-like (CoxFe1-x)2P shows Co/Fe-composition dependent catalysis for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH. The (Co0.54Fe0.46)2P is the most efficient OER catalyst, reaching 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 0.37 V (vs. RHE). The report offers a new synergistic approach to tune and optimize the electrocatalysis of OER. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08763e

  13. Surface Acidity as Descriptor of Catalytic Activity for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinzhen; Wang, Fan; Wang, Beizhou; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-10-28

    Unraveling the descriptor of catalytic activity, which is related to physical properties of catalysts, is a major objective of catalysis research. In the present study, the first-principles calculations based on interfacial model were performed to study the oxygen evolution reaction mechanism of Li2O2 supported on active surfaces of transition-metal compounds (TMC: oxides, carbides, and nitrides). Our studies indicate that the O2 evolution and Li(+) desorption energies show linear and volcano relationships with surface acidity of catalysts, respectively. Therefore, the charging voltage and desorption energies of Li(+) and O2 over TMC could correlate with their corresponding surface acidity. It is found that certain materials with an appropriate surface acidity can achieve the high catalytic activity in reducing charging voltage and activation barrier of rate-determinant step. According to this correlation, CoO should have as active catalysis as Co3O4 in reducing charging overpotential, which is further confirmed by our comparative experimental studies. Co3O4, Mo2C, TiC, and TiN are predicted to have a relatively high catalytic activity, which is consistent with the previous experiments. The present study enables the rational design of catalysts with greater activity for charging reactions of Li-O2 battery. PMID:26436336

  14. Strongly coupled Pd nanotetrahedron/tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids with enhanced catalytic activity and stability as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yizhong; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaodan; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-20

    The design and synthesis of highly active oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts with strong durability at low cost is extremely desirable but still remains a significant challenge. Here we develop an efficient strategy that utilizes organopalladium(I) complexes containing palladium-palladium bonds as precursors for the synthesis of strongly coupled Pd tetrahedron-tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids (Pd/W18O49) to improve the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd nanocrystals. The hybrid materials are synthesized by direct nucleation, growth, and anchoring of Pd tetrahedral nanocrystals on the in situ-synthesized W18O49 nanosheets. Compared to supportless Pd nanocrystals and W18O49, their hybrids exhibited not only surprisingly high activity but also superior stability to Pt for the ORR in alkaline solutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical analyses indicated that the enhanced electrocatalytic activity and durability are associated with the increased number and improved catalytic activity of active sites, which is induced by the strong interaction between the Pd tetrahedrons and W18O49 nanosheet supports. The present study provides a novel strategy for synthesizing hybrid catalysts with strong chemical attachment and electrical coupling between nanocatalysts and supports. The strategy is expected to open up exciting opportunities for developing a novel class of metal-support hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts with improved ORR activity and durability for both fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:25054583

  15. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne B; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate, synthase, human, skeletal, muscle, training, not electrical stimulation, not in-vitro, not rats. Studies that reported changes in CS activity and V.O2max were included. Different training types and subject populations were analyzed independently to assess correlation between relative changes in V.O2max and CS activity. 70 publications with 97 intervention groups were included. There was a positive (r = 0.45) correlation (P < 0.001) between the relative change in V.O2max and the relative change in CS activity. All reported absolute values of CS and V.O2max did not correlate (r =- 0.07, n = 148, P = 0.4). Training induced changes in whole body oxidative capacity is matched by changes in muscle CS activity in a nearly 1:1 relationship. Absolute values of CS across different studies cannot be compared unless a standardized analytical method is used by all laboratories. PMID:25057335

  16. Kinetically-controlled growth of cubic and octahedral Rh-Pd alloy oxygen reduction electrocatalysts with high activity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yucong; Zhan, Fangwei; Du, Jingshan; Jiang, Yingying; Jin, Chuanhong; Fu, Maoshen; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren

    2014-11-01

    Rh is a promising candidate as an indispensible component in bimetallic catalysts due to its unique capability to resist against the aggressive corrosion from the reaction medium. However, Rh has a very strong oxygen binding ability and is generally not suitable for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we have demonstrated shape-controlled synthesis of Rh-Pd alloy nanocrystals with high activity and durability for ORR by retarding the reaction kinetics at an ultra-slow injection rate of metal salts using a syringe pump. Under precise control of sluggish reaction kinetics, Pd followed a preferential overgrowth along the <100> direction, whereas the growth behavior of Rh was dominant along the <111> direction. These different kinetically-controlled growth behaviors associated with Rh and Pd were essential for achieving the shape transition between the cube and the octahedron of their alloys. The Rh8Pd92 alloy octahedra exhibited the highest mass activity with a value of 0.18 mA μg-1 in terms of the equivalent Pt cost, and were two-fold higher than that of commercial Pt/C. Significantly, all Rh-Pd alloy nanocrystals were highly stable with only less than 25% loss in mass activity after 30 000 CV cycles in O2 saturated acid solution compared to ~56% loss of the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK). Indeed, the mass activity of Rh8Pd92 was 3.3 times higher than that of commercial Pt/C after the accelerated stability test (ADT). This improvement in activity and durability may arise possibly from synergistic effects between the facet and the surface composition.Rh is a promising candidate as an indispensible component in bimetallic catalysts due to its unique capability to resist against the aggressive corrosion from the reaction medium. However, Rh has a very strong oxygen binding ability and is generally not suitable for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we have demonstrated shape-controlled synthesis of Rh-Pd alloy nanocrystals with high activity and durability for

  17. Enhanced Intrinsic Catalytic Activity of λ-MnO2 by Electrochemical Tuning and Oxygen Vacancy Generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghan; Nam, Gyutae; Sun, Jie; Lee, Jang-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Chen, Wei; Cho, Jaephil; Cui, Yi

    2016-07-18

    Chemically prepared λ-MnO2 has not been intensively studied as a material for metal-air batteries, fuel cells, or supercapacitors because of their relatively poor electrochemical properties compared to α- and δ-MnO2 . Herein, through the electrochemical removal of lithium from LiMn2 O4 , highly crystalline λ-MnO2 was prepared as an efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The ORR activity of the material was further improved by introducing oxygen vacancies (OVs) that could be achieved by increasing the calcination temperature during LiMn2 O4 synthesis; a concentration of oxygen vacancies in LiMn2 O4 could be characterized by its voltage profile as the cathode in a lithiun-metal half-cell. λ-MnO2-z prepared with the highest OV exhibited the highest diffusion-limited ORR current (5.5 mA cm(-2) ) among a series of λ-MnO2-z electrocatalysts. Furthermore, the number of transferred electrons (n) involved in the ORR was >3.8, indicating a dominant quasi-4-electron pathway. Interestingly, the catalytic performances of the samples were not a function of their surface areas, and instead depended on the concentration of OVs, indicating enhancement in the intrinsic catalytic activity of λ-MnO2 by the generation of OVs. This study demonstrates that differences in the electrochemical behavior of λ-MnO2 depend on the preparation method and provides a mechanism for a unique catalytic behavior of cubic λ-MnO2 . PMID:27254822

  18. Photocytotoxic activity of a nitrosyl phthalocyanine ruthenium complex--a system capable of producing nitric oxide and singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Zumira Aparecida; de Moraes, Juliana Cristina Biazzotto; Rodrigues, Fernando Postalli; de Lima, Renata Galvão; Curti, Carlos; da Rocha, Zênis Novaes; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; Formiga, André Luiz Barboza; da Silva, Roberto Santana

    2011-08-01

    The synthesis, structural aspects, pharmacological assays, and in vitro photoinduced cytotoxic properties of [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] (pc=phthalocyanine) are described. Its biological effect on the B16F10 cell line was studied in the presence and absence of visible light irradiation. At comparable irradiation levels, [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] was more effective than [Ru(pc)] at inhibiting cell growth, suggesting that occurrence of nitric oxide release following singlet oxygen production upon light irradiation may be an important mechanism by which the nitrosyl ruthenium complex exhibits enhanced biological activity in cells. Following visible light activation, the [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] complex displayed increased potency in B16F10 cells upon modifications to the photoinduced dose; indeed, enhanced potency was detected when the nitrosyl ruthenium complex was encapsulated in a drug delivery system. The liposome containing the [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] complex was over 25% more active than the corresponding ruthenium complex in phosphate buffer solution. The activity of the complex was directly proportional to the ruthenium amount present inside the cell, as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the photocytotoxic activity was mainly due to apoptosis. Furthermore, the vasorelaxation induced by [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)], proposed as NO carrier, was studied in rat isolated aorta. The observed vasodilation was concentration-dependent. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate that the [Ru(NO)(ONO)(pc)] complex induces vascular relaxation and could be a potent anti-tumor agent. Nitric oxide release following singlet oxygen production upon visible light irradiation on a nitrosyl ruthenium complex produces two radicals and may elicit phototoxic responses that may find useful applications in photodynamic therapy. PMID:21726765

  19. Application of on-line laboratory computer analysis to fast neutron activation oxygen determinations

    SciTech Connect

    James, W.D.; Akanni, M.S.

    1983-04-01

    The development of an on-line laboratory computer analysis system designed for routine high volume oxygen determinations is discussed. The system is based on the detection of /sup 16/N photopeaks from the /sup 16/O(n,p) /sup 16/N reaction occurring during fast neutron irradiation. A system interface has been designed and constructed which is capable of controlling the Kaman 710 neutron generator, the sample transfer system, switching the BF/sub 3/ beam monitor detector or NaI(T1) detector outputs as required to a multichannel scaling MCA, and proper sequencing of the procedure. In addition, specific software has been developed for the control of the system during acquisition as well as evaluation of the MCS spectra generated.

  20. New Highly Oxygenated Germacranolides from Carpesium divaricatum and their Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Si, Jin-Guang; Zhang, Qiu-Bo; Ding, Gang; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Eight highly oxygenated germacranolides (1–8) including four new ones (2–5) were isolated from the whole plant of Carpesium divaricatum. The planar structures and relative configurations of the new compounds were determined by NMR experiment and HRESIMS data. The absolute configuration of 1 was established by circular dichroism (CD) method and X-ray diffraction, and the stereochemistry of the new compounds 2–5 were determined by similar CD spectra with 1. Compound 2 is the first hydroperoxyl germacrane from the genus Carpesium. The 13C NMR data of 1, NMR data of 6–7, and their absolute configurations were reported for the first time. Two new compounds (2 and 4) and two known compounds (6 and 8) exhibited potent cytotoxicity against human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells, superior to that of the positive control doxorubicin. PMID:27265755

  1. Multicopper models for the laccase active site: effect of nuclearity on electrocatalytic oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Tse, Edmund C M; Schilter, David; Gray, Danielle L; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2014-08-18

    Cu complexes of 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA) were prepared and tested as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To study the effect of multinuclearity on the ORR, two Cu-DPA units were connected with a flexible linker, and a third metal-binding pocket was installed in the ligand framework. ORR onset potentials and the diffusion-limited current densities of di- and tricopper complexes of DPA derivatives were found to be comparable to those of the simpler Cu-DPA system. Electrochemical analyses, crystallographic data, and metal-substitution studies suggested that Cu complexes of DPA derivatives reacted with O2 via a binuclear intermolecular pathway but that the Cu center in the third binding site did not participate in the ORR process. This study highlights the viability of Cu-DPA complexes to mimic the T3-site of laccase, and serves as a guide for designing future laccase models. PMID:25072935

  2. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of "laboratory evolved" cytochrome P450cam mutants showing enhanced naphthalene oxygenation activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Koji; Tosha, Takehiko; Yoshioka, Shiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishimori, Koichiro; Morishima, Isao

    2004-10-29

    To elucidate molecular mechanisms for the enhanced oxygenation activity in the three mutants of cytochrome P450cam screened by 'laboratory evolution' [Nature 399 (1999) 670], we purified the mutants and characterized their functional and structural properties. The electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra revealed that the structures of heme binding site of all purified mutants were quite similar to that of the wild-type enzyme, although the fraction of the inactivated form, called "P420," was increased. In the reaction with H(2)O(2), only trace amounts of the naphthalene hydroxylation product were detected by gas chromatography. We, therefore, conclude that the three mutants do not exhibit significant changes in the structural and functional properties from those of wild-type P450cam except for the stability of the axial ligand in the reduced form. The enhanced fluorescence in the whole-cell assay would reflect enhancement in the oxygenation activity below the detectable limit of the gas chromatography and/or contributions of other reactions catalyzed by the heme iron. PMID:15451425

  4. Protection of active aroma compound against moisture and oxygen by encapsulation in biopolymeric emulsion-based edible films.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, Alicia; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Beney, Laurent; Karbowiak, Thomas; Voilley, Andrée

    2008-03-01

    Edible films made of iota-carrageenans display interesting advantages: good mechanical properties, stabilization of emulsions, and reduction of oxygen transfers. Moreover, the addition of lipids to iota-carrageenan-based films to form emulsified films decreases the transfer of water vapor and can be considered to encapsulate active molecules as flavors. The aim of this study was to better understand the influence of the composition and the structure of the carrageenan-based film matrices on its barrier properties and thus on its capacity to encapsulate and to protect active substances encapsulated. Granulometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy characterizations of films with or without flavor and/or fat showed that the flavor compound modifies the film structure because of interactions with the iota-carrageenan chains. The study of the water vapor permeability (WVP), realized at 25 and 35 degrees C and for three relative humidity differentials (30-100%, 30-84%, 30-75%), showed that the flavor compound increases significantly the WVP, especially for the weaker gradients, but has no effect on the oxygen permeability. This study brings new understanding of the role of carrageenan as a film matrix and on its capacity to protect encapsulated flavors. PMID:18257554

  5. Effects of nitrogen dioxide and its acid mist on reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofang; Hou, Fen; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the most common and harmful air pollutants. To analyze the response of plants to NO2 stress, we investigated the morphological change, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant enzyme activity in Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) exposed to 1.7, 4, 8.5, and 18.8 mg/m(3) NO2. The results indicate that NO2 exposure affected plant growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, and increased oxygen free radical (O2(-)) production rate in Arabidopsis shoots. Furthermore, NO2 elevated the levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, accompanied by the induction of antioxidant enzyme activities and change of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) contents. Following this, we mimicked nitric acid mist under experimental conditions, and confirmed the antioxidant mechanism of the plant to the stress. Our results imply that NO2 and its acid mist caused pollution risk to plant systems. During the process, increased ROS acted as a signal to induce a defense response, and antioxidant status played an important role in plant protection against NO2/nitric acid mist-caused oxidative damage. PMID:26257351

  6. The enhanced electrocatalytic activity of okara-derived N-doped mesoporous carbon for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongfang; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Tianbao; Key, Julian; Ma, Yanjiao; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Qizhao; Ji, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon (N-C) catalysts can potentially offer high ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) electrocatalytic activity comparable to Pt/C catalysts. Here, we establish a correlation between N-species (pyridinic-N and graphitic-N) with high ORR activity and a key role for Fe in their preparation. N-C catalysts are prepared from okara (a cheap, nitrogen-rich, biomass precursor) using a facile synthesis method with inclusion of FeCl3 at different steps of synthesis. Mesoporous N-C catalyst is produced that had ORR activity comparable to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. High ORR-activity N-C results from the presence of FeCl3 at a specific step during synthesis. Detailed investigation by XPS reveals that increased levels of pyridinic-N and graphitic-N arose from pyridinic-N-oxide conversion in the presence of Fe. We conclude that transforming inert N species to active N species underlies the increase in active catalytic sites on the carbon surface and offers a means to improve N-C catalyst performance.

  7. Constitutive NF-κB activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-mediated reactive oxygen species production

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Jin Sil; Lee, Sora; Yoo, Young Do

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Romo1 expression is required for constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. • Romo1 depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo. • Romo1 presents a potential therapeutic target for diseases. - Abstract: Deregulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and related pathways contribute to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Mechanisms for constitutive NF-κB activation are not fully explained; however, the underlying defects appear to generate and maintain pro-oxidative conditions. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) correlates positively with tumor size. In the present study, we showed that Romo1 expression is required to maintain constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB and transcriptional activity through constitutive IκBα phosphorylation. Overexpression of Romo1 promoted p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity. We also show that Romo1 depletion suppressed anchorage-independent colony formation by HCC cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Based on these findings, Romo1 may be a principal regulatory factor in the maintenance of constitutive NF-κB activation in tumor cells. In the interest of anti-proliferative treatments for cancer, Romo1 may also present a productive target for drug development.

  8. [Effects of exogenous silicon on active oxygen scavenging systems in chloroplasts of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings under salt stress].

    PubMed

    Qian, Qiong-Qiu; Zai, Wen-San; Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2006-02-01

    With K(2)SiO(4) (1.0 mmol/L) treatment, the effects of Si on the distribution of Na(+), K(+) to chloroplasts and antioxidant system of cucumber leaves under 50 mmol/L NaCl stress were studied. The results showed that there was a selective transport of K(+) into the chloroplasts so that Na(+) content of chloroplasts was lower under Si treatment (Table 1); H(2)O(2) and MDA contents in chloroplasts were significantly decreased (Fig.1), and the activities of SOD, APX, GR and DHAR were increased simultaneity (Fig.2), and AsA, GSH contents were also increased in chloroplasts of salt-stressed cucumber by additional Si treatment (Fig.3). It may be concluded that Si could decrease absorption of Na(+) and increase ability of active oxygen scavenging in chloroplasts, therefore the injury of chloroplast membrane under salinity stress in cucumber was alleviated. PMID:16477139

  9. Surface spectators and their role in relationships between activity and selectivity of the oxygen reduction reaction in acid environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ciapina, Eduardo G.; Lopes, Pietro P.; Subbaraman, Ram; Ticianelli, Edson A.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Strmcnik, Dusan; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2015-11-01

    We use the rotating ring disk (RRDE) method to study activity-selectivity relationships for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt(111) modified by various surface coverages of adsorbed CNad (ΘCNad). The results demonstrate that small variations in ΘCNad have dramatic effect on the ORR activity and peroxide production, resulting in “volcano-like” dependence with an optimal surface coverage of ΘCNad = 0.3 ML. These relationships can be simply explained by balancing electronic and ensemble effects of co-adsorbed CNad and adsorbed spectator species from the supporting electrolytes, without the need for intermediate adsorption energy arguments. Although this study has focused on the Pt(111)-CNad/H2SO4 interface, the results and insight gained here are invaluable for controlling another dimension in the properties of electrochemical interfaces.

  10. [Generation of active oxygen forms in rat thymocytes under action of hydrogen peroxide and fullerene C60].

    PubMed

    Hrebinyk, S M; Hryniuk, I I; Pryluts'ka, S V; Matyshevs'ka, O P

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of active oxygen forms (AOF) generation in rat thymocytes 50 min after treatment with 0.1 and 0.5 mM H2O2 was estimated with the use of fluorescent probe DCFDA. Both enhanced AOF generation, which was dependent on H2O2 concentration, and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activation, followed by a decrease of thymocytes viability were demonstrated. Preincubation of cells with 10(-5) M fullerene C60 was shown not only to prevent H2O2--induced AOF generation but to increase viability of H2O2-treated thymocytes at more prolonged time period. The data obtained indicate to fullerene C60 ability to prevent oxidative stress in thymocytes. PMID:22642121

  11. Titanium oxynitride interlayer to influence oxygen reduction reaction activity and corrosion stability of Pt and Pt-Ni alloy.

    PubMed

    Tan, XueHai; Wang, Liya; Zahiri, Beniamin; Kohandehghan, Alireza; Karpuzov, Dimitre; Lotfabad, Elmira Memarzadeh; Li, Zhi; Eikerling, Michael H; Mitlin, David

    2015-01-01

    A key advancement target for oxygen reduction reaction catalysts is to simultaneously improve both the electrochemical activity and durability. To this end, the efficacy of a new highly conductive support that comprises of a 0.5 nm titanium oxynitride film coated by atomic layer deposition onto an array of carbon nanotubes has been investigated. Support effects for pure platinum and for a platinum (50 at %)/nickel alloy have been considered. Oxynitride induces a downshift in the d-band center for pure platinum and fundamentally changes the platinum particle size and spatial distribution. This results in major enhancements in activity and corrosion stability relative to an identically synthesized catalyst without the interlayer. Conversely, oxynitride has a minimal effect on the electronic structure and microstructure, and therefore, on the catalytic performance of platinum-nickel. Calculations based on density functional theory add insight with regard to compositional segregation that occurs at the alloy catalyst-support interface. PMID:25470445

  12. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  13. Oxidative DNA Adducts Following Cu2+-Mediated Activation of Dihydroxy PCBs: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species1

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Wendy A.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic industrial chemicals, complete carcinogens and efficacious tumor promoters. However, the mechanism(s) of PCB-mediated carcinogenicity remains largely undefined. One likely pathway by which these agents may play a role in carcinogenesis is the generation of oxidative DNA damage by redox cycling of dihydroxylated PCB metabolites. We have now employed a new 32P-postlabeling system to examine novel oxidative DNA lesions induced by Cu2+-mediated activation of PCB metabolites. 32P-Postlabeling of DNA incubated with various PCB metabolites resulted in over a dozen novel polar oxidative DNA adducts that were chromatographically similar for all active agents. The most potent metabolites tested were the hydroquinones (hydroxyl groups arranged para to each other) yielding polar oxidative adduct levels ranging from 55 to 142 adducts/106 nucleotides. PCB catechols, or ortho-dihydroxy metabolites, were up to 40% less active than their corresponding hydroquinone congeners while mono hydroxylated and quinone metabolites did not produce detectable oxidative damage over that of vehicle. With the exception of 2,4,5-Cl-2′,5′-dihydroxybiphenyl, this oxidative DNA damage appeared to be inversely related to chlorine content: no chlorine ≈ mono- > di- > tri-chlorinated metabolites. Importantly, copper, but not iron, was essential for activation of the PCB metabolites to these polar oxidative DNA adducts since in its absence or in the presence of the Cu+-specific scavenger, bathocuproine, no adducts were detected. Intervention studies with known reactive oxygen species (ROS) modifiers suggested that H2O2, singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical and superoxide may also be involved in this PCB-mediated oxidative DNA damage. These data indicate a mechanistic role of several ROS, in addition to copper, in PCB-induced DNA damage and provide further support for oxidative DNA damage in PCB-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:19233261

  14. Activated neutrophils disrupt endothelial monolayer integrity by an oxygen radical-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, J.M.; Schwartz, B.R.; Reidy, M.A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Ochs, H.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1985-02-01

    The effect of activated neutrophils on endothelial monolayer integrity in vitro has been measured by assessing the capacity of endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters to exclude /sup 125/I-albumin. Although formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils failed to induce /sup 51/Cr-release or detachment after 4 hours of incubation with endothelial monolayers cultured in polystyrene wells, FMLP-activated neutrophils produced a marked increase in the passage of /sup 125/I-albumin across bovine aortic or pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters. This effect was evident as early as 30 minutes following the addition of FMLP-activated neutrophils to the monolayer and reached 180% over control values at 2 hours (p . 0.001). Light and transmission electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate filters exposed to FMLP-activated neutrophils revealed focal disruption of the endothelial monolayers. Chronic granulomatous disease neutrophils produced similar disruption of the endothelial monolayer at 2 hours. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase failed to reduce significantly the neutrophil-mediated increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage at 2 hours. Cell-free postsecretory supernatants of FMLP-activated neutrophils, leukotriene C4, and platelet activating factor did not induce a significant increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage across the endothelial monolayers. Of note, FMLP-activated neutrophils from a patient with a congenital abnormality of neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis did not induce disruption of the monolayer or increase /sup 125/I-albumin passage.

  15. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  16. Contribution of transition metals in the reactive oxygen species activity of PM emissions from retrofitted heavy-duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vishal; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2010-12-01

    We assessed the contribution of water-soluble transition metals to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) from four heavy-duty vehicles in five retrofitted configurations (V-SCRT, Z-SCRT, DPX, hybrid, and school bus). A heavy-duty truck without any control device served as the baseline vehicle. Particles were collected from all vehicle-configurations on a chassis dynamometer under three driving conditions: cruise (80 km h -1), transient UDDS, and idle. A sensitive macrophage-based in vitro assay was used to determine the ROS activity of collected particles. The contribution of water-soluble transition metals in the measured activity was quantified by their removal using a Chelex ® complexation method. The study demonstrates that despite an increase in the intrinsic ROS activity (per mass basis) of exhaust PM with use of most control technologies, the overall ROS activity (expressed per km or per h) was substantially reduced for retrofitted configurations compared to the baseline vehicle. Chelex treatment of DEPs water extracts removed a substantial (≥70%) and fairly consistent fraction of the ROS activity, which ascertains the dominant role of water-soluble metals in PM-induced cellular oxidative stress. However, relatively lower removal of the activity in few vehicle-configurations (V-SCRT, DPX and school bus idle), despite a large aggregate metals removal, indicated that not all species were associated with the measured activity. A univariate regression analysis identified several transition metals (Fe, Cr, Co and Mn) as significantly correlated ( R > 0.60; p < 0.05) with the ROS activity. Multivariate linear regression model incorporating Fe, Cr and Co explained 90% of variability in ROS levels, with Fe accounting for the highest (84%) fraction of the variance.

  17. Identification and biological activities of a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Ju Yeol; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} YCG063 was screened as a new angiogenesis inhibitor which suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library. {yields} The compound inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In particular, high levels of mitochondrial ROS in hypoxic cells regulate many angiogenesis-related diseases, including cancer and ischemic disorders. Here we report a new angiogenesis inhibitor, YCG063, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library with an ArrayScan HCS reader. YCG063 suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation under a hypoxic condition in a dose-dependent manner, leading to the inhibition of in vitro angiogenic tube formation and chemoinvasion as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) at non-toxic doses. In addition, YCG063 decreased the expression levels of HIF-1{alpha} and its target gene, VEGF. Collectively, a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial ROS was identified. This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions.

  18. Potential utility of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and propolis in enhancing the leishmanicidal activity of glucantime.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Diana Copi; Fedele, Thiago Antonio; Marcucci, Maria Cristina; Giorgio, Selma

    2011-01-01

    In this study we investigated the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, alone or combined with the pentavalent antimonial glucantime on Leishmania amazonensis infection. In parallel, the effect of Brazilian red propolis gel (propain) alone or combined with glucantime on L. amazonensis infection was evaluated. The inhibition of the infection in macrophages treated with glucantime in combination with HBO exposition was greater than that of macrophages treated with glucantime alone or HBO alone. The susceptible mouse strain BALB/c infected in the shaved rump with L. amazonensis treated with glucantime and exposed to HBO showed: time points in the course of the disease in which lesions were smaller than those of mice treated with glucantime alone and revascularization of the skin in the lesion site; interferon-gamma (IFN-g) levels were not elevated in lymph node cells from these animals. Propain alone was not efficient against lesions, although less exudative lesions were observed in animals treated with propain alone or combined with glucantime. These results reveal the potential value of HBO and red propolis in combination with glucantime for treating cutaneous leishmaniasis and encourage further studies on the effect of more aggressive HBO, propolis and glucantime therapies on different mouse models of leishmaniasis. PMID:22183457

  19. The effects of dopamine on antioxidant enzymes activities and reactive oxygen species levels in soybean roots

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno Ribeiro; Siqueira-Soares, Rita de Cássia; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Marchiosi, Rogério; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated the effects of dopamine, an neurotransmitter found in several plant species on antioxidant enzyme activities and ROS in soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) roots. The effects of dopamine on SOD, CAT and POD activities, as well as H2O2, O2•−, melanin contents and lipid peroxidation were evaluated. Three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution (pH 6.0), without or with 0.1 to 1.0 mM dopamine, in a growth chamber (25°C, 12 h photoperiod, irradiance of 280 μmol m−2 s−1) for 24 h. Significant increases in melanin content were observed. The levels of ROS and lipid peroxidation decreased at all concentrations of dopamine tested. The SOD activity increased significantly under the action of dopamine, while CT activity was inhibited and POD activity was unaffected. The results suggest a close relationship between a possible antioxidant activity of dopamine and melanin and activation of SOD, reducing the levels of ROS and damage on membranes of soybean roots. PMID:25482756

  20. NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later.

    PubMed

    Gloire, Geoffrey; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie; Piette, Jacques

    2006-11-30

    The transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a major role in coordinating innate and adaptative immunity, cellular proliferation, apoptosis and development. Since the discovery in 1991 that NF-kappaB may be activated by H(2)O(2), several laboratories have put a considerable effort into dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying this activation. Whereas early studies revealed an atypical mechanism of activation, leading to IkappaBalpha Y42 phosphorylation independently of IkappaB kinase (IKK), recent findings suggest that H(2)O(2) activates NF-kappaB mainly through the classical IKK-dependent pathway. The molecular mechanisms leading to IKK activation are, however, cell-type specific and will be presented here. In this review, we also describe the effect of other ROS (HOCl and (1)O(2)) and reactive nitrogen species on NF-kappaB activation. Finally, we critically review the recent data highlighting the role of ROS in NF-kappaB activation by proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), two major components of innate immunity. PMID:16723122

  1. Carbonization of self-assembled nanoporous hemin with a significantly enhanced activity for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Tang, Chizhou; Hao, Zhiqiang; Lv, Yang; Yang, Ruixia; Wei, Xuming; Deng, Weiqiao; Wang, Anjie; Yi, Baolian; Song, Yujiang

    2014-01-01

    The scarcity and high cost of Pt-based electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) hinder the practical application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). It is critical to replace platinum with non-noble metal electrocatalysts (NNMEs). Carbonized metalloporphyrins represent an important class of NNMEs, but most metalloporphyrins are costly and the corresponding NNMEs do not possess a high ORR activity. Herein, we report that the self-assembly of inexpensive hemin leads to porous nanomaterials in water under ambient conditions and subsequent heat-treatment of the unprecedented nanoporous hemin results in a magnetic NNME with a much enhanced ORR activity compared with directly carbonized hemin without self-assembly. The improvement of the ORR activity likely originates from the exposure of more ORR active sites, caused by the surface area increase of the nanoporous hemin after carbonization over that of micro-scale pristine hemin crystals. Moreover, the ORR activity of heat-treated nanoporous hemin is actually comparable to that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline solution. Additionally, the carbonized nanoporous hemin is much better than commercial Pt/C in terms of durability and tolerance to methanol. This study opens up a new avenue to the production of inexpensive metalloporphyrin-based NNMEs with a high ORR performance by using a self-assembly method in combination with traditional pyrolysis. PMID:25406677

  2. Low-Level Laser Therapy Activates NF-kB via Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Saleem, Taimur; Mooney, David; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation at a cellular level remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810 nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NF-kB was observed at fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2 and was confirmed by Western blot analysis. NF-kB was activated earlier (1 hour) by LLLT compared to conventional lipopolysaccharide treatment. We also observed that LLLT induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production similar to mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat. Furthermore, we observed similar NF-kB activation with these mitochondrial inhibitors. These results, together with inhibition of laser induced NF-kB activation by antioxidants, suggests that ROS play an important role in the laser induced NF-kB signaling pathways. However, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that LLLT also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. Conclusion We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive NFkB signaling via generation of ROS. Expression of anti-apoptosis and pro-survival genes responsive to NFkB could explain many clinical effects of LLLT. PMID:21814580

  3. Oxygen reduction reaction in a droplet on graphite: direct evidence that the edge is more active than the basal plane.

    PubMed

    Shen, Anli; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Qiang; Dryfe, Robert A W; Huang, Xiaobing; Dou, Shuo; Dai, Liming; Wang, Shuangyin

    2014-09-26

    Carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium have been extensively investigated with the aim of replacing the commercially available, but precious platinum-based catalysts. For the proper design of carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts for the ORR, it would be interesting to identify the active sites of the electrocatalyst. The ORR was now studied with an air-saturated electrolyte solution droplet (diameter ca. 15 μm), which was deposited at a specified position either on the edge or on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Electrochemical measurements suggest that the edge carbon atoms are more active than the basal-plane ones for the ORR. This provides a direct way to identify the active sites of carbon materials for the ORR. Ball-milled graphite and carbon nanotubes with more exposed edges were also prepared and showed significantly enhanced ORR activity. DFT calculations elucidated the mechanism by which the charged edge carbon atoms result in the higher ORR activity. PMID:25124986

  4. Influence of Reactive Oxygen Species on the Enzyme Stability and Activity in the Presence of Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have examined the effect of ammonium and imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs) on the stability and activity of proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin (CT) in the presence of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The present work aims to illustrate the state of art implementing the combined action of ILs and APPJ on the enzyme stability and activity. Our circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence and enzyme activity results of CT have revealed that buffer and all studied ILs {triethylammonium hydrogen sulphate (TEAS) from ammonium family and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]), 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([Mim][Cl]) from imidazolium family} are notable to act as protective agents against the deleterious action of the APPJ, except triethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (TEAP) ammonium IL. However, TEAP attenuates strongly the deleterious action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) created by APPJ on native structure of CT. Further, TEAP is able to retain the enzymatic activity after APPJ exposure which is absent in all the other systems.This study provides the first combined effect of APPJ and ILs on biomolecules that may generate many theoretical and experimental opportunities. Through this methodology, we can utilise both enzyme and plasma simultaneously without affecting the enzyme structure and activity on the material surface; which can prove to be applicable in various fields. PMID:24066167

  5. Promoting Active Species Generation by Plasmon-Induced Hot-Electron Excitation for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigao; Li, Peng; Zhao, Guixia; Wang, Xin; Kong, Jintao; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Huabin; Chang, Kun; Meng, Xianguang; Kako, Tetsuya; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-07-27

    Water splitting represents a promising technology for renewable energy conversion and storage, but it is greatly hindered by the kinetically sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, using Au-nanoparticle-decorated Ni(OH)2 nanosheets [Ni(OH)2-Au] as catalysts, we demonstrate that the photon-induced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) excitation on Au nanoparticles could significantly activate the OER catalysis, specifically achieving a more than 4-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile affording a markedly decreased overpotential of 270 mV at the current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and a small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec(-1) (no iR-correction), which is much better than those of the benchmark IrO2 and RuO2, as well as most Ni-based OER catalysts reported to date. The synergy of the enhanced generation of Ni(III/IV) active species and the improved charge transfer, both induced by hot-electron excitation on Au nanoparticles, is proposed to account for such a markedly increased activity. The SPR-enhanced OER catalysis could also be observed over cobalt oxide (CoO)-Au and iron oxy-hydroxide (FeOOH)-Au catalysts, suggesting the generality of this strategy. These findings highlight the possibility of activating OER catalysis by plasmonic excitation and could open new avenues toward the design of more-energy-efficient catalytic water oxidation systems with the assistance of light energy. PMID:27380539

  6. Role of Oxygen in the Limitation and Inhibition of Nitrogenase Activity and Respiration Rate in Individual Soybean Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, M. M.; Hunt, S.; Layzell, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    Although infected cell O2 concentration (Oi) is known to limit respiration and nitrogenase activity in legume nodules, techniques have not been available to measure both processes simultaneously in an individual legume nodule. Consequently, details of the relationship between nitrogenase activity and Oi are not fully appreciated. For the present study, a probe was designed that allowed open circuit measurements of H2 evolution (nitrogenase activity) and CO2 evolution (respiration rate) in a single attached soybean nodule while simultaneously monitoring fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin (and thereby Oi) with a nodule oximeter. Compared to measurements of whole nodulated roots, use of the probe led to inhibition of nitrogenase activity in the single nodules. During oximetry measurements, total nitrogenase activity (TNA; peak H2 evolution in Ar/O2) in the single nodules was 16% of that in whole nodulated roots and 48% of nodulated root activity when Oi was not being measured simultaneously. This inhibition did not affect the nodules' ability to regulate Oi, because exposure to Ar/O2 (80:20, v/v) caused nitrogenase activity and respiration rate to decline, and this decline was linearly correlated with a concurrent decrease in Oi. When the nodules were subsequently exposed to a linear increase in external pO2 from 20 to 100% O2 at 2.7% O2/min, fractional leghemoglobin oxygenation first increased gradually and then more rapidly, reaching saturation at a pO2 between 76 and 100% O2. Plots of nitrogenase activity and respiration rate against Oi showed that rates increased with Oi up to a value of 57 nM, with half-maximal rates being attained at Oi values between 10 and 14 nM O2. The maximum nitrogenase activity achieved during the increase in pO2 (potential nitrogenase activity) was 30 to 57% of that measured in intact nodulated roots, showing that O2 limitation of nitrogenase activity could account for a significant proportion of the inhibition of TNA associated with

  7. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  8. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    PubMed Central

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date. PMID:25788358

  9. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: role of *OH ligands.

    PubMed

    Holby, Edward F; Taylor, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date. PMID:25788358

  10. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH boundmore » structures have the highest calculated activity to date.« less

  11. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  12. Effects of blood flow restriction duration on muscle activation and microvascular oxygenation during low-volume isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Cayot, Trent E; Lauver, Jakob D; Silette, Christopher R; Scheuermann, Barry W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to observe how varying occlusion durations affected neuromuscular activation and microvascular oxygenation during low-volume isometric knee extension exercise. Healthy, recreationally active males performed isometric knee extension at a variety of submaximal intensities under different blood flow restriction (BFR) occlusion durations. The occlusion pressure (130% SBP) was applied either 5 min prior to exercise (PO), immediately prior to exercise (IO) or not during exercise (CON). Surface electromyography (sEMG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to record the neuromuscular activation and microvascular oxygenation of the knee extensors during exercise. No difference in sEMG was observed in the vastus lateralis or vastus medialis during any exercise condition or any submaximal intensity. PO elicited greater microvascular deoxygenation (deoxy-[Hb + Mb]) compared to CON (P≤0·05) at all submaximal intensities and also compared to IO at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). IO resulted in a greater deoxy-[Hb + Mb] response during low-intensity exercise (20% and 40% MVC) compared to CON (P≤0·05). These findings suggest that applying BFR 5 min before exercise can enhance the exercise-induced metabolic stress (i.e. deoxy-[Hb + Mb]), measured via NIRS, during low-intensity exercise (20% MVC) compared to applying BFR immediately prior to exercise. Furthermore, the increased metabolic stress observed during IO is attenuated during high-intensity (60% MVC, 80% MVC) exercise when compared to CON conditions. Knowledge of the changes in exercise-induced metabolic stress between the various occlusion durations may assist in developing efficient BFR exercise programmes. PMID:25564998

  13. Contribution of Endogenously Produced Reactive Oxygen Species to the Activation of Podocyte NLRP3 Inflammasomes in Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Abais, Justine M.; Xia, Min; Li, Guangbi; Gehr, Todd W. B.; Boini, Krishna M.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys) is an important pathogenic factor contributing to the progression of end-stage renal disease. Recent studies have demonstrated the implication of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the development of podocyte injury and glomerular sclerosis during hHcys. However, it remains unknown which reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for this activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes and how such action of ROS is controlled. The present study tested the contribution of common endogenous ROS including superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (•OH) to the activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes in mouse podocytes and glomeruli. In vitro, confocal microscopy and size exclusion chromatography demonstrated that dismutation of O2•− by 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPOL) and decomposition of H2O2 by catalase prevented Hcys-induced aggregation of NLRP3 inflammasome proteins and inhibited Hcys-induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production in mouse podocytes. However, •OH scavenger tetramethylthiourea (TMTU) had no significant effect on either Hcys-induced NLRP3 inflammasome formation or activation. In vivo, scavenging of O2•− by TEMPOL and removal of H2O2 by catalase substantially inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome formation and activation in glomeruli of hHcys mice as shown by reduced colocalization of NLRP3 with ASC or caspase-1 and inhibition of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production. Furthermore, TEMPOL and catalase significantly attenuated hHcys-induced glomerular injury. In conclusion, endogenously produced O2•− and H2O2 primarily contribute to NLRP3 inflammasome formation and activation in mouse glomeruli resulting in glomerular injury or consequent sclerosis during hHcys. PMID:24140862

  14. Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Arany, Praveen R.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Saleem, Taimur; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810-nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NFkB was observed for fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2. NF-kB activation by laser was detectable at 1-hour time point. Moreover, we demonstrated that laser phosphorylated both IKK α/β and NF-kB 15 minutes after irradiation, which implied that laser activates NF-kB via phosphorylation of IKK α/β. Suspecting mitochondria as the source of NF-kB activation signaling pathway, we demonstrated that laser increased both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy with dichlorodihydrofluorescein and ATP synthesis by luciferase assay. Mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat increased ROS and NF-kB activation but had no effect on ATP. The ROS quenchers N-acetyl-L-cysteine and ascorbic acid abrogated laser-induced NF-kB and ROS but not ATP. These results suggested that ROS might play an important role in the signaling pathway of laser induced NF-kB activation. However, the western blot showed that antimycin A, a mitochondrial inhibitor, did not activate NF-kB via serine phosphorylation of IKK α/β as the laser did. On the other hand, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that light also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. ATP upregulation reached a maximum at 0.3 J/cm2 or higher. We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kB by generating ROS as signaling molecules.

  15. Reactive oxygen species–independent activation of the IL-1β inflammasome in cells from patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Smeekens, Sanne P.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Dinarello, Charles A.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2010-01-01

    Humans with chronic granulomatous diseases (CGDs) due to mutations in p47-phox have defective NADPH activity and thus cannot generate NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of ROS in inflammation is controversial; some in vitro studies suggest that ROS are crucial for secretion of IL-1β via inflammasome activation, whereas mice defective for ROS and patients with CGD have a proinflammatory phenotype. In this study, we evaluated activation of the IL-1β inflammasome in cells from CGD patients. In contrast to previous studies using the small molecule diphenylene iodonium (DPI) as a ROS inhibitor, we found no decrease in either caspase-1 activation or secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in primary CGD monocytes. Moreover, activation of CGD monocytes by uric acid crystals induced a 4-fold higher level of IL-1β secretion compared with that seen in monocytes from unaffected subjects, and this increase was not due to increased synthesis of the IL-1β precursor. In addition, Western blot analysis of CGD cells revealed that caspase-1 activation was not decreased, but rather was increased compared with control cells. Examination of the effects exerted by the inhibition of ROS activity by DPI revealed that the decrease in IL-1β secretion by DPI was actually due to inhibition of IL-1β gene expression. Thus, inconsistent with the proinflammatory role of ROS, the present findings support the concept that ROS likely dampen inflammasome activation. The absence of ROS in CGD monocytes may explain the presence of an inflammatory phenotype characterized by granulomas and inflammatory bowel disease occurring in CGD patients. PMID:20133696

  16. Oxygen-dependent upstream activation sites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c genes are related forms of the same sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cerdan, M.E.; Zitomer, R.S.

    1988-06-01

    In Sacchariomyces cerevisiae, the two genes, CYC1 and CYC7, that encode the isoforms of cytochrome c are expressed at different levels. Oxygen regulation is indicated by the expression of the CYP1 gene, and the CYP1 protein interacts with both CYC1 upstream activation sequence 1 (UAS1) and CYC7 UAS/sub 0/. In this study, the homology between the CYP1-binding sites of both genes was investigated. The most noticeable difference between the CYC1 and CYC7 UASs is the presence of GC base pairs at the same positions in a repeated sequence in CYC7 compared with CG base pairs in CYC1. Directed mutagenesis changing these GC residues to CG residues in CYC7 led to CYC1-like expression of CYC7 both in a CYP1 wild-type strain and in a strain carrying the semidominant mutation CYP1-16 which reverses the oxygen-dependent expression of the two genes. The authors' results strongly support the hypothesis that the CYP1-binding sites in CYC1 and CYC7 are related forms of the same sequence and that the CYP1-16 protein has altered specificity for the variant forms of the concensus sequences in both genes.

  17. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid, C(11)BODIPY(581/591) (BODIPY). ROS was detected by red fluorescence emission from oxidization of HE and membrane lipid peroxidation was detected by green fluorescence emission from oxidation of BODIPY in individual live sperm. Of the reactive oxygen species generators tested, BODIPY oxidation was specific for FeSo4/ascorbate (FeAc), because menadione and H(2)O(2) had little or no effect. The oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium was specific for menadione and H(2)O(2); FeAc had no effect. The incidence of basal or spontaneous ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation were low in boar sperm (<1% of live sperm) in fresh semen or after low temperature storage; however the sperm were quite susceptible to treatment-induced ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:20072917

  18. Zinc wave during the treatment of hypoxia is required for initial reactive oxygen species activation in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Slepchenko, Kira G; Lu, Qiping; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to accumulate during chemical hypoxia, causing adverse effects on cell function and survival. Recent studies show important role zinc accumulation plays in dysfunction associated with hypoxia. It is well known that ROS accumulation also plays a major role in cellular damage by hypoxia. In this study, fluorescent imaging and pharmacological methods were used in live HeLa cells to determine role of zinc in initial ROS accumulation in mitochondria during chemical hypoxia (oxygen glucose depravation with 4 mM sodium dithionite). Accumulation of both was observed as a very rapid phenomenon with initial rapid zinc increase (zinc wave) within 60 seconds of hypoxia onset and ROS increase within 4.5 minutes. Zinc chelation with TPEN removed the initial zinc wave which in turn abolished ROS accumulation. Influx of exogenous zinc induced rapid ROS accumulation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, showed significant and prolonged reduction in zinc induced ROS accumulation. We proposed a novel mechanism of intracellular zinc increase that activates NADPH oxidase which in turn triggers mitochondrial ROS production. PMID:27186322

  19. Probing the interactions of phenol with oxygenated functional groups on curved fullerene-like sheets in activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chun-Yang; Ng, Man-Fai; Goh, Bee-Min; Saunders, Martin; Hill, Nick; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Balach, Juan; El-Harbawi, Mohanad

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism(s) of interactions of phenol with oxygenated functional groups (OH, COO and COOH) in nanopores of activated carbon (AC) is a contentious issue among researchers. This mechanism is of particular interest because a better understanding of the role of such groups in nanopores would essentially translate to advances in AC production and use, especially in regard to the treatment of organic-based wastewaters. We therefore attempt to shed more light on the subject by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations in which fullerene-like models integrating convex or concave structure, which simulate the eclectic porous structures on AC surface, are adopted. TEM analysis, EDS mapping and Boehm titration are also conducted on actual phenol-adsorbed AC. Our results suggest the widely-reported phenomenon of decreased phenol uptake on AC due to increased concentration of oxygenated functional groups is possibly attributed to the increased presence of the latter on the convex side of the curved carbon sheets. Such a system effectively inhibits phenol from getting direct contact with the carbon sheet, thus constraining any available π-π interaction, while the effect of groups acting on the concave part of the curved sheet does not impart the same detriment. PMID:26760531

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning ameliorates hypoxia-ischemia brain damage by activating Nrf2 expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiao; Lin, Han; Chen, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Shi, Jiazi; Chen, Ouyang; Li, Jiasi; Sun, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) could ameliorate hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) by an increase of Nrf2 expression. P7 Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 7 d, n = 195) were used in two in vivo experiments, including BO-PC exposure experiments in non-HIBD models and treatment experiments in HIBD models. 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Nissl Staining, and TUNEL staining were performed. And expressions of Nrf2, HO-1, and GSTs were measured. For in vitro studies, oxygen-glucose deprivation cells were established. Morphological and apoptotic staining and gene silencing of Nrf2 by siRNA transfection were investigated. For exposure experiments, HBO-PC for longer time increased the expression of Nrf2 significantly. And for treatment experiments, HBO-PC treatment significantly decreased infarction area, lessened neuronal injury, reduced apoptosis, and increased both the expression of Nrf2 and activities of its downstream proteins. Cytology tests confirmed effects of HBO-PC treatments. Besides, Nrf2 siRNA significantly reduced protective effects of HBO-PC. These observations demonstrated that an up-regulation of Nrf2 by HBO-PC might play an important role in the generation of tolerance against HIBD. PMID:26729624

  1. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Defense/Stress Responses Activated by Chitosan in Sycamore Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:25642757

  2. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:25642757

  3. Time-resolved chemiluminescence study of the TiO2 photocatalytic reaction and its induced active oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Min, Lingyue; Wu, Xing-Zheng; Tetsuya, Shimada; Inoue, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The time-resolved chemiluminescence (CL) method has been applied to study the TiO(2) photocatalytic reaction on a micros-ms timescale. The experimental set-up for time-resolved CL was improved for confirmation of the unique luminol CL induced by the photocatalytic reaction. The third harmonic light (355 nm) from an Nd:YAG laser was used for the light source of the TiO(2) photocatalytic reaction. Luminol CL induced by this reaction was detected by a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a preamplifier was used for amplifying the CL signal. Experimental conditions affecting the photocatalytically induced CL were discussed in detail. The involvement of active oxygen species such as .OH, O(2) (.-) and H(2)O(2) in the CL was examined by adding their scavengers. It is concluded that .OH was greatly involved in the CL on a micros-ms timescale, especially in time periods <100 micros after illumination of the pulse laser. On the other hand, CL generated by O(2) (.-) began to increase after 100 micros and became dominant after 2.5 ms. A small part of the CL might be generated by H(2)O(2) on the whole micros-ms timescale. A CL reaction mechanism related with .OH and dissolved oxygen was proposed to explain the photocatalytically induced luminol CL on a micros-ms timescale, especially in periods <100 micros. PMID:17089368

  4. Zinc wave during the treatment of hypoxia is required for initial reactive oxygen species activation in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Slepchenko, Kira G; Lu, Qiping; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to accumulate during chemical hypoxia, causing adverse effects on cell function and survival. Recent studies show important role zinc accumulation plays in dysfunction associated with hypoxia. It is well known that ROS accumulation also plays a major role in cellular damage by hypoxia. In this study, fluorescent imaging and pharmacological methods were used in live HeLa cells to determine role of zinc in initial ROS accumulation in mitochondria during chemical hypoxia (oxygen glucose depravation with 4 mM sodium dithionite). Accumulation of both was observed as a very rapid phenomenon with initial rapid zinc increase (zinc wave) within 60 seconds of hypoxia onset and ROS increase within 4.5 minutes. Zinc chelation with TPEN removed the initial zinc wave which in turn abolished ROS accumulation. Influx of exogenous zinc induced rapid ROS accumulation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, showed significant and prolonged reduction in zinc induced ROS accumulation. We proposed a novel mechanism of intracellular zinc increase that activates NADPH oxidase which in turn triggers mitochondrial ROS production. PMID:27186322

  5. Thermally activated surface oxygen defects at the perimeter of Au/TiO2: a DFT+U study.

    PubMed

    Saqlain, Muhammad Adnan; Hussain, Akhtar; Siddiq, Mohammad; Ferreira, Ary R; Leitão, Alexandre A

    2015-10-14

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to examine the formation of oxygen atom vacancies on three model surfaces namely, clean anatase TiO2(001) and, Au3 and Au10 clusters supported on anatase TiO2(001). On the Au/TiO2 systems, three different types of lattice oxygen atoms can be identified: the Ti-O-Au bridge, the Ti-O-Ti bridge in the perimeter of the Au cluster and the Ti-O-Ti bridge away from the Au cluster, the oxygen atoms on the clean surface. The variation in ΔG° with temperature for surface O vacancy formation was calculated for these three situations using total-energy, vibrational structure and optimized geometries of the material surfaces and the O2 molecule. The calculations reveal that the O defect formation on the clean anatase TiO2(001) surface seems very difficult due to the large positive value of ΔG° (290 kJ mol(-1)) from 0 to 650 K. However, the presence of the Au cluster on the TiO2 surface changes the surface chemistry of the TiO2 significantly. We observed that the trend in ΔG° variation for the vacancy formation from the Ti-O-Au bridge is the same as on Au3/TiO2 and Au10/TiO2 systems, almost constant with large positive values of ΔG° around 250 and 350 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The ΔG° for the perimeter defect formation (Ti-O-Ti bridge in the perimeter of the Au cluster) is smaller for Aun/TiO2 systems than the clean TiO2 surface, however, the vacancy formation is possible only for the Au10/TiO2 system (close to 506 K). Finally, extended calculations for other oxygen atoms on the Au10/TiO2 model reveal that the trend in ΔG° variation is similar for all the interface or perimeter O atoms around the Au cluster with marginal differences in the numerical value of ΔG°. Since, the surface O atoms are activated only in the presence of a particular sized Au, we propose that a Au catalyzed Mars-van Krevelen mechanism could be a possible reaction mechanism for CO oxidation on Au/TiO2 catalysts at slightly elevated

  6. Preparation and ozone-surface modification of activated carbon. Thermal sta