Sample records for pacific plate interface

  1. Plate kinematics in the western Pacific derived from geodetic observations

    E-print Network

    Tregoning, Paul

    Tectonophysics: Plate motions­present and recent (3040), 3040 Marine Geology and Geophysics: Plate tectonics (8150, 8155, 8157, 8158); KEYWORDS: GPS, North Bismarck Plate, Australian Plate, Pacific Plate, tectonic spanning the Australian Plate and the western Pacific region to derive new tectonic models of the motions

  2. Reconciling late Neogene Pacific absolute and relative plate motion changes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Wessel; Loren W. Kroenke

    2007-01-01

    New models of Pacific absolute plate motion relative to hot spots and models of relative plate motion involving the Pacific plate all agree there was a significant change in the late Neogene (Chron 3A, ?5.89 Ma), reflecting a more northerly absolute motion than previously determined. As Pacific absolute plate motion became slightly more northerly, left-stepping transform segments came under compression.

  3. Focal Mechanisms and Plate Tectonics of the Southwest Pacific

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy Johnson; Peter Molnar

    1972-01-01

    Ninety-six new focal mechanisms were determined for earthquakes on the belt of seismic activity separating the Pacific and Australian plates. The direction of convergence of these plates varies from Ntg-SW to E-W. The Australian plate underthrusts the Pacific plate to the ENE under the Solomon and New Hebrides islands and overthrusts the Pacific to the east along the Tonga-Kermadec arc

  4. ``Plate-like'' subsidence of the East Pacific RiseSouth Pacific superswell system

    E-print Network

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    ``Plate-like'' subsidence of the East Pacific Rise­­South Pacific superswell system J. K. Hillier significantly, the superswell appears to be part of a large-scale, ``plate-like,'' subsidence that extends to the EPR crest, rather than an isolated shallowing that reverses the subsidence and causes uplift. We

  5. Pacific trench motions controlled by the asymmetric plate configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, T. J.; Ryan, W. B. F.; Malinverno, A.; Buck, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    We present a novel explanation for absolute trench-normal motions of slabs surrounding the Pacific. Rapid retreat on the eastern side and slow advance in the west can result from the large-scale asymmetric plate configuration. We use simple fluid dynamics to explain the mechanical workings of the idea and the results of a simple finite difference scheme to estimate the effect on trench motion velocities. The idea is based on two key assumptions. First, we follow the concept of large-scale horizontal counter flow in the asthenosphere driven by accretion into lithosphere and plate motion. Second, we assume that horizontally wide slabs without large slab windows drift passively in the mantle flow field and do not retreat as a result of flow around the slab. If the asthenosphere transfers flow related horizontal shear stress into deeper levels of the mantle, an asymmetry in the plate configuration leads to different net pressure forces on the oceanward side of the two slabs and thus controls the retreat behavior. In an ocean with an asymmetric ridge position, the slab of the smaller plate should retreat faster than the slab of the larger plate, which may even advance. Our model explains the counterintuitive negative correlation between slab age and retreat velocity observed in the Pacific as well as the topographic asymmetry observed across the Pacific Rise.

  6. The strength of polyaxial locking interfaces of distal radius plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Konrad L. Hoffmeier; Gunther O. Hofmann; Thomas Mückley

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundCurrently available polyaxial locking plates represent the consequent enhancement of fixed-angle, first-generation locking plates. In contrast to fixed-angle locking plates which are sufficiently investigated, the strength of the new polyaxial locking options has not yet been evaluated biomechanically. This study investigates the mechanical strength of single polyaxial interfaces of different volar radius plates.

  7. The relative movement of the North American and Pacific plates in 1984 1985, detected by the Pacific VLBI network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KOSUKE HEKI; Y TAKAHASHI; T KONDO; N KAWAGUCHI; F TAKAHASHI; N KAWANO

    1987-01-01

    Heki, K., Takahashi, Y.. Kondo, T., Kawaguchi. N., Takahashi. F. and Kawano. N.. 1987. The relative movement of the North American and Pacific plates in 1984-1985, detected by the Pacific VLBI network. In: R.L. Wesson. Mechanics of Earthquake Faulting. Tectonophysics. 144: 151-158. Very long basline interferomet~ (VLBI) experiments from stations on the North American and Pacific plates in the period

  8. Relative motions of the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates estimated by the Global Positioning System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristine M. Larson; Jeff Freymueller

    1995-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements spanning approximately 3 years have been used to determine velocities for 7 sites on the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates. The site velocities agree with both plate model predictions and other space geodetic techniques. We find no evidence for internal deformation of the interior of the Australian plate. Wellington, New Zealand, located in the Australian-Pacific

  9. Extension along the Australian-Pacific transpressional transform plate boundary near Macquarie Island

    E-print Network

    Daczko, Nathan

    a preexisting divergent plate boundary and that the overall extensional kinematics shown by faults alongExtension along the Australian-Pacific transpressional transform plate boundary near Macquarie 78712, USA (tameckel@colby.edu) [1] The Australian-Pacific transform plate boundary fault zone along

  10. Pacific-North America Plate Tectonics of the Neogene Southwestern United States: An Update

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanya Atwater; Joann Stock

    1998-01-01

    We use updated rotations within the Pacific-Antarctica-Africa-North America plate circuit to calculate Pacific-North America plate reconstructions for times since chron 13 (33 Ma). The direction of motion of the Pacific plate relative to stable North America was fairly steady between chrons 13 and 4, and then changed and moved in a more northerly direction from chron 4 to the present

  11. Tectonic Fabric of the Cocos Plate and Conjugate Pacific Plate Crust Near Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Existing satellite gravity data, along with publicly available single beam bathymetry, multibeam bathymetry, and shipboard and satellite magnetic anomalies were compiled to make an updated map of tectonic features of the Cocos Plate offshore Mexico and the conjugate crust on the Pacific Plate. The area includes the northern Cocos plate as far south as the Tehuantepec Ridge, and Pacific plate crust on both sides of the Mathematician Rise. This thus includes the modern East Pacific Rise (EPR), the submarine rift margins that bound it - Moctezuma and Manzanillo Troughs - and features previously identified such as the Orozco and O'Gorman Fracture Zones near the Middle America Trench (MAT). The goal was to use existing data to evaluate the likely features that may have existed on the now subducted Cocos Plate crust north of the Clarion Fracture Zone-Tehuantepec Ridge. This can then be compared to seismic imaging of the downgoing slab and geochemical variations along the Mexican Volcanic Arc. Bathymetric slopes were computed automatically from multibeam data gridded at 200 m, 300 m, and 400 m pixel size, and processed to remove signals of circular features such as seamounts, and regions of low slope, while emphasizing higher slopes controlled by linear abyssal hill fabric and fracture zones. Tectonic fabrics at all 3 scales are generally similar. In the resulting tectonic fabric map, the domain of modern East Pacific Rise spreading is clearly visible, truncating older fabrics at the Manzanillo Trough on the east and the Moctezuma Trough on the west. The Orozco Fracture Zone lies entirely within the young part of this crustal province and does not reach the Manzanillo Trough or the MAT. Hence, it is not a feature of the downgoing Cocos Plate and should not be used to explain variations in geochemistry of the arc or geometric variations in the subducted plate. A zone of E-W to ENE-WSW oriented abyssal hills and lineated magnetic anomalies in a bathymetric low between the Moctezuma Trough and the Mathematician Rise forms a separate crustal province, truncated by the Moctezuma Trough. There is a possible conjugate fragment of this older province preserved east of the Manzanillo Trough, next to the MAT. Thus, features of the downgoing Cocos Plate appear to be more complicated than has been envisioned in most previous interpretations.

  12. The nature of the plate interface and driving force of interseismic deformation in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone, revealed by the continuous GPS velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon; Smith, Euan

    2013-06-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation, with displacements on individual faults up to hundreds of kilometers. However, over periods of several years, GPS measurements show a remarkably smooth pattern of velocities. We show here using a new method of back slip analysis, that almost the entire plate-boundary continuous GPS velocity field can be predicted within measurement error from a simple model of elastic distortion due to deep slip on a single plate interface (megathrust in the Hikurangi and Putsegur subduction zones or fault through continental lithosphere beneath the Southern Alps) at the relative plate motion rates. This suggests that the main driving force of plate-boundary deformation is slip on the deeper moving part of the plate interface, without buried creep in localized shear zones beneath individual surface faults. The depth at which this deep slip terminates (locking point line) determines the width of deformation. Along the Hikurangi margin, there is also clockwise rotation of ~150 km long segment of the fore arc (Wairoa domain) at 4.5° ± 1 Ma, relative to the Australian Plate, about a pole in western North Island; model residuals in the velocity field are mainly a result of incomplete averaging of the cycle of slow slip events on the plate interface, downdip of the locking point.

  13. Circum-arctic plate accretion - Isolating part of a pacific plate to form the nucleus of the Arctic Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churkin, M., Jr.; Trexler, J.H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A mosaic of large lithospheric plates rims the Arctic Ocean Basin, and foldbelts between these plates contain numerous allochthonous microplates. A new model for continental drift and microplate accretion proposes that prior to the late Mesozoic the Kula plate extended from the Pacific into the Arctic. By a process of circumpolar drift and microplate accretion, fragments of the Pacific basin, including parts of the Kula plate, were cut off and isolated in the Arctic Ocean, the Yukon-Koyukuk basin in Alaska, and the Bering Sea. ?? 1980.

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy layering and plate motion in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed a three dimensional radially and azimuthally anisotropic model of the upper mantle in north America, using a combination of long-period 3-component surface and overtone waveforms, and SKS splitting measurements (Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010, Yuan et al., 2011). We showed that azimuthal anisotropy is a powerful tool to detect layering in the upper mantle, revealing two domains in the cratonic lithosphere, separated by a sharp laterally varying boundary in the depth range 100-150 km, which seems to coincide with the mid-lithospheric boundary (MLD) found in receiver function studies. Contrary to receiver functions, azimuthal anisotropy also detects the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as manifested by a change in the fast axis direction, which becomes quasi-parallel to the absolute plate motion below ~250 km depth. A zone of stronger azimuthal anisotropy is found below the LAB both in the western US (peaking at depths of 100-150km) and in the craton (peaking at a depth of about 300 km). Here we show preliminary attempts at expanding our approach to the global scale, with a specific goal of determining whether such an anisotropic LAB can also be observed in the Pacific ocean. We started with our most recent global upper mantle radially anisotropic shear velocity model, determined using the Spectral Element Method (SEMum2; French et al., this meeting). We augment the corresponding global surface wave and overtone dataset (period range 60 to 400 s) with deep events and shorter period body waves, in order to ensure optimal deeper depth (>250km) anisotropy recovery due to the paucity of shear wave splitting measurements in the oceans. Our preliminary results, which do not yet incorporate SKS splitting measurements, look promising as they confirm the layering found previously in North America, using a different, global dataset and starting model. In the Pacific, our study confirms earlier azimuthal anisotropy results in the region (e.g. Smith et al. 2004; Maggi et al. 2006) that the shallow upper mantle beneath the ocean basin is strongly stratified. Our results further illustrate that 1) a shallow anisotropy domain (~100 km) is present, which is high in velocity and has in general a northward anisotropy direction where the plate is old (>80 Ma); and 2) there is a deeper domain (100-200 km) with stronger anisotropy, which correlates spatially with the low velocity zone and has a fast axis direction in good agreement with the absolute plate motion direction (HS3 NUVEL-1A). The boundary between the anisotropy domains clearly follows the age progressive deepening of the fast velocity in the shallow domain, suggesting an oceanic LAB that separates the Pacific lithosphere and the underlying asthenosphere.

  15. Relative motions of the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates estimated by the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements spanning approximately 3 years have been used to determine velocities for 7 sites on the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates. The site velocities agree with both plate model predictions and other space geodetic techniques. We find no evidence for internal deformation of the interior of the Australian plate. Wellington, New Zealand, located in the Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, moves 20 +/- 5 mm/yr west-southwest relative to the Australian plate. Its velocity lies midway between the predicted velocities of the two plates. Relative Euler vectors for the Australia-Antarctica and Pacific-Antarctica plates agree within one standard deviation with the NUVEL-1A predictions.

  16. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  17. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perton, M.; Lévesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  18. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M. [National Research Council Canada, 75 de Mortagne Blvd, Boucherville, Quebec, J4B 6Y4 (Canada); Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States)

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  19. A revised kinematic model for the relative motion between Pacific oceanic plates and North America since the Late Cretaceous

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavel V. Doubrovine; John A. Tarduno

    2008-01-01

    The convergence between the Pacific, Farallon, and Kula oceanic plates and the North American plate has provided a driving force for tectonic processes that have shaped the western margin of North America. Yet reconstructions of plate motion in the Pacific basin have traditionally relied on the assumption of fixed hot spots. In the last decade, substantial Cretaceous to Paleogene motion

  20. Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene plate boundaries in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Dietmar Müller, R.; Whittaker, Joanne; Flament, Nicolas; Seton, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The late Cretaceous to mid Eocene history of the southwest and southernmost Pacific has been subject to starkly contrasting interpretations, ranging from relative tectonic quiescence with the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) being part of the Pacific plate to a dynamic subduction setting. In the first scenario the Tasman Sea would have formed as a consequence of divergence between the Pacific and Australian plates, whereas in the second scenario it would have formed as a marginal basin associated with subduction. The first scenario is supported by a number of arguments, including a lack of evidence for deformation and tectonic activity in New Zealand during this period and a geodynamic modelling inference, namely that the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain can be better reproduced if the LHR is part of the Pacific plate. The second scenario is supported by regional plate kinematic models reconciling a variety of observations including back-arc basin formation and destruction through time and the history of arc-continent collisions. The primary problem with the first scenario is the use of a plate circuit that leaves relative motion between East and West Antarctica unconstrained, leading to an improbable history of periodic compression and extension. The main problem with the alternative scenario is a lack of sampled late Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks east of the LHR. We analysed available geological and geophysical data to constrain the locations of and movements along the plate boundaries in the southwest and southern Pacific from the late Cretaceous to mid Eocene, and assessed how Pacific plate motion is best quantified during this period. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that a plate boundary separated the Pacific plate from the LHR. The distribution of lower mantle slab material that is imaged by seismic tomography beneath New Zealand is best explained if subduction occurred to the east of the LHR during the entire late Cretaceous to mid Eocene period. Rocks from ophiolitic nappes in the North Island of New Zealand, New Caledonia and Papua New Guinea show evidence of having formed in a back-arc basin during this period, consistent with a subduction zone near the LHR. Although New Zealand is commonly viewed as tectonically quiescent at this time, deformation at several locations to the east and west of the present-day Alpine Fault suggests that a plate boundary cut through Zealandia during Tasman Sea opening. As the LHR was not attached to the Pacific plate and subduction occurred to the east and north of the LHR we suggest that Pacific plate motion is best quantified using a plate circuit through East and West Antarctica, avoiding this zone of southwest Pacific subduction. Future work should focus on better constraining the location of and motion along the late Cretaceous-mid Eocene plate boundary through New Zealand to enable the use of a plate circuit via Australia.

  1. Tectonic implications of post-30 Ma Pacific and North American relative plate motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.; Parsons, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Pacific plate moved northwest relative to North America since 42 Ma. The rapid half rate of Pacific-Farallon spreading allowed the ridge to approach the continent at about 29 Ma. Extinct spreading ridges that occur offshore along 65% of the margin document that fragments of the subducted Farallon slab became captured by the Pacific plate and assumed its motion proper to the actual subduction of the spreading ridge. This plate-capture process can be used to explain much of the post-29 Ma Cordilleran North America extension, strike slip, and the inland jump of oceanic spreading in the Gulf of California. Much of the post-29 Ma continental tectonism is the result of the strong traction imposed on the deep part of the continental crust by the gently inclined slab of subducted oceanic lithosphere as it moved to the northwest relative to the overlying continent. -from Authors

  2. Pacific trench motions controlled by the asymmetric plate configuration

    E-print Network

    Buck, Roger

    and slow advance in the west can result from the large-scale asymmetric plate configuration. We use simple that horizontally wide slabs without large slab windows drift passively in the mantle flow field and do not retreat forces on the two slabs and thus affects the retreat behavior. In an ocean with an asymmetric ridge

  3. Overview on the Plate Boundaries Along the Western Mexican Pacific Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Bandy, W. L.; Michaud, F.; Ortega Ramírez, J.

    2013-05-01

    The cinematic of the Pacific, Rivera and Cocos oceanic plates have a significant impact on the subduction process and seismic cycles occurring along the western Mexican Pacific margin of the North American and Caribbean plates. Sections of Pacific (PAC), Rivera (RIV), Cocos (COC), North American (NAM) and Caribbean (CAB) plate boundaries along the western margin of Mexico are not well constrained. From north to south: the transform-rift system at Gulf of California has been generally considered as part of PAC-NAM plate boundary. However results of the FAMEX cruise at 2002 evidenced that Tosco-Abreojos Fault System along the western margin of Baja California Peninsula is active. Should this tectonic structure be considered as a plate boundary? At the RIV plate northern corner (including Mazatlan Basin), the scatter seismicity recorded between Tamayo FZ and the Marias Islands restricts the characterization of the plate boundary between the RIV and NAM plates. Some authors have proposed that Tamayo FZ and Marias I. Escarpment are the RIV-NAM plate boundary. Recently other authors have called that RIV-NAM boundary is a geomorphology lineament that runs from a Rivera Rise transform at 23N to the northern end of Marias I. Escarpment. Even so this concept is not sustained with seismic activity. Further this thought would imply that the oceanic lithosphere of Mazatlan Basin would form part of NAM plate. Other thoughts are either that there is a diffuse RIV-NAM plate boundary to the north of the Maria Archipelago, or Middle America Subduction Zone is gradually extending northward of the Maria Is. While the plate boundary at SE corner of the RIV plate is neither well defined morphologically nor seismically constraint, offshore Colima Coast. Some authors have proposed that this zone is a diffuse plate boundary between RIV and COC plates, result of a NE-SW shear plate motion. Other authors have proposed that the RIV-COC boundary extends E-W from the El Gordo Graben (EGG) at the Middle American Trench (MAT) to northern tip of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Results of recently multibeam and magnetic surveys indicate that this boundary is possible segmented as an echelon E-W structure, north of EGG. Clearly these hypotheses on the RIV-COC plate boundary show that its configuration is neither well seismic nor morphology constrained. To the south, the triple junction point of COC, NAM, and CAB plate boundaries is also another case where the boundaries are poorly constrained seismically and morphologically. Traditionally, the COC-NAM-CAB triple junction point has been positioned where the MAT trend bends by the Tehuantepec Ridge (TR) collision, but no offshore geophysical data sustain that NAM-CAB plate boundary extends to MAT-TR point. In the last decade, the Servicio Sismológico Nacional (SSN) has extended its seismic station network at the southern Mexican territory. From this data, the distribution of offshore earthquakes covers a broad marine zone in front the Chiapas and Guatemala coastline and does not show a defined earthquake concentration associated to the proposed offshore extension of the Polochic-Motogua Fault through Guatemala and Mapastepec Fault through Chiapas, Mexico.

  4. Into the subduction plate interface: insights from exhumed terranes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Plunder, A.

    2013-12-01

    In order to place constraints on the still elusive lithological and physical nature of the subduction plate interface, we herein present critical petrological (and modelling) data from intermediate depths along the subduction interface. Their implications, ranging from long-term underplating and exhumation to short-lived seismic events, are confronted with the recent wealth of geophysical/chemical data from the literature. Emphasis is placed on findings from two major localities showing deeply subducted ophiolitic remnants (Zermatt-Saas, Monviso), which crop out in the classic, well-preserved fossil subduction setting of the Western Alps. Both ophiolite remnants in fact represent large, relatively continuous fragments of oceanic lithosphere (i.e., several km-thick tectonic slices across tens of km) exhumed from ~80 km depths and thereby provide important constraints on interplate coupling mechanisms. We show that pervasive hydrothermal processes and seafloor alteration promoting fluid incorporation in both mafic and associated ultramafic rocks was essential, together with the presence of km-thick serpentinite soles, to decrease the density of the tectonic slices and prevent them from an irreversible sinking into the mantle. The Monviso case sudy (particularly the Lago Superiore Unit) provides further insights on both seismicity and fluid flow along the subduction plate interface at ~80 km depths: (1) Eclogite breccias, reported here for the first time, mark the locus of an ancient fault zone associated with intraslab, intermediate-depth earthquakes at ~80 km depth. They correspond to m-sized blocks made of 1-10 cm large fragments of eclogite mylonite later embedded in serpentinite in a ~100m thick eclogite facies shear zone. We suggest that seismic brecciation (possibly at magnitudes Mw ~4) occurred in the middle part of the oceanic crust, accompanied by the input of externally-derived fluids. (2) Prominent fluid-rock interactions, as attested by ubiquitous metasomatic rinds, affected the fragments of mylonitic basaltic eclogites and calcschists dragged and dismembered within serpentinite during eclogite-facies deformation. Detailed petrological and geochemical investigations point to a massive, pulse-like, fluid-mediated element transfer essentially originating from serpentinite. Antigorite breakdown, occurring ca. 15 km deeper than the maximum depth reached by these eclogites, is regarded as the likely source of this highly focused fluid/rock interaction and element transfer. Such a pulse-like, subduction-parallel fluid migration pathway within the downgoing oceanic lithosphere may have been promoted by transient slip behaviour along the LSZ under eclogite-facies conditions. Bi-phase numerical models allowing for fluid migration (driven by concentrations in the rocks, non-lithostatic pressure gradients and deformation), mantle wedge hydration and mechanical weakening of the plate interface indicate that the detachment of such large-scale oceanic tectonic slices is promoted by fluid circulation along the subduction interface (as well as by subducting a strong and originally discontinuous mafic crust).

  5. Constraints on Pacific plate kinematics and dynamics with global positioning system measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.; Golombek, M. P.; Thornton, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    A measurement program designed to investigate kinematic and dynamic aspects of plate tectonics in the Pacific region by means of satellite observations is proposed. Accuracy studies are summarized showing that for short baselines (less than 100 km), the measuring accuracy of global positioning system (GPS) receivers can be in the centimeter range. For longer baselines, uncertainty in the orbital ephemerides of the GPS satellites could be a major source of error. Simultaneous observations at widely (about 300 km) separated fiducial stations over the Pacific region, should permit an accuracy in the centimeter range for baselines of up to several thousand kilometers. The optimum performance level is based on the assumption of that fiducial baselines are known a priori to the centimeter range. An example fiducial network for a GPS study of the South Pacific region is described.

  6. The Baja California Borderland and the Neogene Evolution of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Fletcher; B. W. Eakins

    2001-01-01

    New observational data on Neogene faulting in the borderland of Baja California places important constraints on tectonic models for the evolution of the Pacific-North American (P-NA) plate boundary and rifting in the Gulf of California. Neogene faults in the borderland range from strike slip to normal slip and accommodate integrated transtension. Most have east-facing escarpments and likely reactivate the former

  7. Propagation of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcano chain by Pacific plate cooling stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.D.; Foulger, G.R.; Barall, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lithosphere crack model, the main alternative to the mantle plume model for age-progressive magma emplacement along the Hawaiian-Emperor volcano chain, requires the maximum horizontal tensile stress to be normal to the volcano chain. However, published stress fields calculated from Pacific lithosphere tractions and body forces (e.g., subduction pull, basal drag, lithosphere density) are not optimal for southeast propagation of a stress-free, vertical tensile crack coincident with the Hawaiian segment of the Hawaiian-Emperor chain. Here we calculate the thermoelastic stress rate for present-day cooling of the Pacific plate using a spherical shell finite element representation of the plate geometry. We use observed seafloor isochrons and a standard model for lithosphere cooling to specify the time dependence of vertical temperature profiles. The calculated stress rate multiplied by a time increment (e.g., 1 m.y.) then gives a thermoelastic stress increment for the evolving Pacific plate. Near the Hawaiian chain position, the calculated stress increment in the lower part of the shell is tensional, with maximum tension normal to the chain direction. Near the projection of the chain trend to the southeast beyond Hawaii, the stress increment is compressive. This incremental stress field has the form necessary to maintain and propagate a tensile crack or similar lithosphere flaw and is thus consistent with the crack model for the Hawaiian volcano chain.?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  8. Block kinematics of the PacificNorth America plate boundary in the southwestern United States from inversion of GPS,

    E-print Network

    McCaffrey, Robert

    Block kinematics of the Pacific­­North America plate boundary in the southwestern United States­North America plate boundary in the southwestern United States from inversion of GPS, seismological of the southwestern United States (30°­41°N) is represented by a finite number of rotating, elastic-plastic spherical

  9. Tectonics and plate boundary processes along the Southeast Indian Ridge and the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, James Andrew

    Classical plate tectonics describes crustal deformation in a simple kinematic way, with deformation occurring only at narrow boundaries of plates with rigid interiors. Many dynamic processes at these boundaries are not well understood. There are also apparent deviations from classical plate tectonics where significant intraplate deformation occurs. In this thesis, we analyze and model geophysical data from the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR) to address some of these issues. Hotspots often affect the dynamics of nearby spreading centers. As shown by bathymetry, side-scan sonar, and magnetic anomaly data, the Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) hotspot has altered the spreading history and geometry of nearby SEIR spreading axes. The hotspot thickened the oceanic crust near the spreading center and reorganized the plate boundary through rift propagation and ridge jumps, creating the youngest known transform fault in the process. The region near the ASP plateau has been suggested as where a wide, diffuse, NW-SE trending oceanic plate boundary meets the SEIR. Using data from the SEIR, we perform a statistical analysis and examine predictions of the model to test its validity. The boundary is not confirmed on statistical grounds, but evidence suggests that it does exist. However, it does not extend south of the St. Paul Fracture Zone, narrowing the previously proposed boundary by 800 km where it meets the SEIR. We also test the hypothesis that deformation near the eastern end of the SEIR, including a large intraplate earthquake can be explained by an additional plate boundary. If the earthquake lies on a plate boundary, its sense of slip should be right-lateral rather than the observed left-lateral motion, ruling out the hypothesis. Asymmetric geophysical properties of the EPR near 17°S suggest more melt beneath the Pacific side than the Nazca side. Numerical modeling results indicate that the asymmetry may be produced by pressure-driven across-axis mantle flow from the Pacific superswell. Across-axis flow extends upwelling and melting to the west of the axis, but limits upwelling to the east, shutting off melting and accounting for the observed asymmetry.

  10. Geotectonic bipolarity, evidence from the pattern of active oceanic ridges bordering the Pacific and African plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavoni, N.; Müller, M. V.

    2000-12-01

    Active oceanic ridges are part of the global system of diverging plate boundaries encircling the Earth. They represent weak zones of the lithosphere. They are isostatically equilibrated. The system as a whole is considered to be well adapted to the present field of plate driving forces. The search for regularities in the pattern of active oceanic ridges may, therefore, provide valuable information as to the large-scale characteristics of structures and processes in the Earth's mantle. Two large belts of active oceanic ridges are envisaged: (1) The semi-circular belt bordering the Pacific plate which extends from South of Tasmania to Northwest of Vancouver Island over a length of 20,000 km. It appears to encircle a center P1 in the central Pacific region. (2) The circum-African belt bordering the African plate which extends from the Azores to the Gulf of Aden over a length of 24,000 km. It appears to encircle a center A1 in central Africa. The attempt is made to determine the position of these centers. Extent and position of the ridge systems are described by 34 fixed points. Points R01-R20 mark the circum-African ridge system, points R21-R34 the Pacific ridge system. A least-squares adjustment is used to determine the optimum position of the centers P1 and A1. Center P1 of the Pacific ridge system is located at 169.8°W/2.6°S. Center A1 of the circum-African ridge system is located at 11.6°E/2.4°N. The location error of the centers is less than 2.8°. In view of the great extent of the ridge systems, and considering the fact that the location of P1 and A1 is based on independent data sets, the nearly antipodal and equatorial position of the centers is remarkable. The newly defined centers P1 and A1 are located close to the Pacific pole P, at 170°W/0°N, and the African pole A, at 10°E/0°N. Within the limits of error the center P1 coincides with pole P, the center A1 with pole A. Originally, these poles were introduced in order to describe a fundamental hemispherical symmetry which is apparent in the evolution of the Earth's lithosphere during the last 180 Ma. The new results confirm the unique position of poles P and A in the global tectonic framework.

  11. The 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake related to a large velocity gradient within the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Makoto; Obara, Kazushige

    2015-04-01

    We conduct seismic tomography using arrival time data picked by the high sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). We used earthquakes off the coast outside the seismic network around the source region of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake with the centroid depth estimated from moment tensor inversion by NIED F-net (broadband seismograph network) as well as earthquakes within the seismic network determined by Hi-net. The target region, 20-48N and 120-148E, covers the Japanese Islands from Hokkaido to Okinawa. A total of manually picked 4,622,346 P-wave and 3,062,846 S-wave arrival times for 100,733 earthquakes recorded at 1,212 stations from October 2000 to August 2009 is available for use in the tomographic method. In the final iteration, we estimate the P-wave slowness at 458,234 nodes and the S-wave slowness at 347,037 nodes. The inversion reduces the root mean square of the P-wave traveltime residual from 0.455 s to 0.187 s and that of the S-wave data from 0.692 s to 0.228 s after eight iterations (Matsubara and Obara, 2011). Centroid depths are determined using a Green's function approach (Okada et al., 2004) such as in NIED F-net. For the events distant from the seismic network, the centroid depth is more reliable than that determined by NIED Hi-net, since there are no stations above the hypocenter. We determine the upper boundary of the Pacific plate based on the velocity structure and earthquake hypocentral distribution. The upper boundary of the low-velocity (low-V) oceanic crust corresponds to the plate boundary where thrust earthquakes are expected to occur. Where we do not observe low-V oceanic crust, we determine the upper boundary of the upper layer of the double seismic zone within high-V Pacific plate. We assume the depth at the Japan Trench as 7 km. We can investigate the velocity structure within the Pacific plate such as 10 km beneath the plate boundary since the rays from the hypocenter around the coseismic region of the Tohoku-oki earthquake take off downward and pass through the Pacific plate. The landward low-V zone with a large anomaly corresponds to the western edge of the coseismic slip zone of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The initial break point (hypocenter) is associated with the edge of a slightly low-V and low-Vp/Vs zone corresponding to the boundary of the low- and high-V zone. The trenchward low-V and low-Vp/Vs zone extending southwestward from the hypocenter may indicate the existence of a subducted seamount. The high-V zone and low-Vp/Vs zone might have accumulated the strain and resulted in the huge coseismic slip zone of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. The low-V and low-Vp/Vs zone is a slight fluctuation within the high-V zone and might have acted as the initial break point of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Reference Matsubara, M. and K. Obara (2011) The 2011 Off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku earthquake related to a strong velocity gradient with the Pacific plate, Earth Planets Space, 63, 663-667. Okada, Y., K. Kasahara, S. Hori, K. Obara, S. Sekiguchi, H. Fujiwara, and A. Yamamoto (2004) Recent progress of seismic observation networks in Japan-Hi-net, F-net, K-NET and KiK-net, Research News Earth Planets Space, 56, xv-xxviii.

  12. Holocene Pacific - North American plate interaction in southern Alaska: implications for the Yakataga seismic gap.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahr, J.C.; Plafker, G.

    1980-01-01

    The St. Elias, Alaska, earthquake (magnitude 7.1 MS) on February 28, 1979, occurred along the complex Pacific-North American plate boundary between Yakutat Bay and Prince William Sound, rupturing only a fraction of the seismic gap identified in that region. To aid in evaluating the potential for, and likely site of, a future earthquake occurring in the remainder of the gap, we have formulated a kinematic model of neotectonic deformation in southern Alaska from available geologic and seismic data. In this model the part of the North American plate bordering on the Gulf of Alaska is divided into three subblocks, which are partially coupled to the Pacific plate. On the basis of the model, the gap-filling rupture or ruptures would most likely be along the north-dipping thrust faults of the Pamplona zone between Icy Bay and the eastern end of the Aleutian Trench. If the accumulated strain of 3.8 m postulated for this region were released suddenly in one event involving the remainder of the gap, the result would be an earthquake as large as magnitude 8. -Authors

  13. The recent history of the Galapagos triple junction preserved on the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Montési, Laurent; Zhu, Wenlu

    2013-06-01

    At the Galapagos triple junction, the Cocos and Nazca plates are broken by a succession of transient rifts north and south of the Cocos-Nazca (C-N) Rift. Modeling has suggested that each rift initiated at the East Pacific Rise (EPR), its location controlled by the distance of the C-N Rift tip from the EPR. Evidence on the Pacific plate confirms that each transient rift formed a true RRR triple junction with the EPR and clarifies the history of the region. At ˜1.5 Ma the triple junctions began jumping rapidly toward the C-N Rift suggesting that the C-N Rift tip moved closer to the EPR. Pacific abyssal hills became broad and shallow indicating enhanced magma supply to the region. At ˜1.4 Ma, the Galapagos microplate developed when extension became fixed on the southern transient rift to form the South scarp of the future Dietz rift basin. Lavas flooded the area and a Galapagos-Nazca magmatic spreading center initiated at the EPR. We suggest that a hotspot was approaching the southern triple junction from the west. The hotspot crossed to the Nazca plate ˜1.25 Ma. Dietz seamount formed within the young spreading center, dikes intruded Dietz rift basin, and eruptions built volcanic ridges. Since ˜0.8 Ma magmatic spreading has jumped northward twice, most recently to Dietz volcanic ridge. Amagmatic extension to the east has formed the large North scarp of Dietz rift basin. Northward jumping of the southern triple junction has maintained the microplate boundary close to the proposed hotspot.

  14. Interface-guided mode of Lamb waves in a two-dimensional phononic crystal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping-Ping; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Wu, Fu-Gen; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jing; Hu, Ai-Zhen

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the interface-guided mode of Lamb waves in a phononic crystal heterostructures plate, which is composed of two different semi-infinite phononic crystal (PC) plates. The interface-guided modes of the Lamb wave can be obtained by the lateral lattice slipping or by the interface longitudinal gliding. Significantly, it is observed that the condition to generate the interface-guided modes of the Lamb wave is more demanding than that of the studied fluid–fluid system. The interface-guided modes are strongly affected not only by the relative movement of the two semi-infinite PCs but also by the thickness of the PC plate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374068 and 11374066), the Science & Technology Star of Zhujiang Foundation of Guangzhou, China (Grant No. 2011J2200013), and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong, China (Grant No. S2012020010885).

  15. Seismic velocity structure of the subducting Pacific plate in the Izu-Bonin region

    SciTech Connect

    Iidaka, Takashi; Mizoue, Megumi; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi (Tokyo Univ. (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    Observed travel time residual data from a spatially dense seismic network above deep earthquakes in the Izu-Bonin region are compared with 3D ray tracing calculations. The data are inconsistent with a homogeneous slab model and consistent with a heterogenous slab model with regional velocity variations. The residual data can be explained by a model that has a velocity gradient within the slab. In the subducting Pacific plate, the velocity near the center of the slab is faster than that near the upper boundary, and gradually decreases toward the bottom of the plate. A model with a velocity decrease of 3 percent, as predicted by a thermal profile, explains the observed data. 52 refs.

  16. Structure and deformation of the Kermadec forearc in response to subduction of the Pacific oceanic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funnell, M. J.; Peirce, C.; Stratford, W. R.; Paulatto, M.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2014-11-01

    The Tonga-Kermadec forearc is deforming in response to on-going subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Indo-Australian Plate. Previous research has focussed on the structural development of the forearc where large bathymetric features such as the Hikurangi Plateau and Louisville Ridge seamount chain are being subducted. Consequently, knowledge of the `background' forearc in regions of normal plate convergence is limited. We report on an ˜250-km-long multichannel seismic reflection profile that was shot perpendicular to the Tonga-Kermadec trench at ˜28°S to determine the lateral and temporal variations in the structure, stratigraphy and deformation of the Kermadec forearc resulting solely from Pacific Plate subduction. Interpretation of the seismic profile, in conjunction with regional swath bathymetry data, shows that the Pacific Plate exhibits horst and graben structures that accommodate bending-induced extensional stresses, generated as the trenchward dip of the crust increases. Trench infill is also much thicker than expected at 1 km which, we propose, results from increased sediment flux into and along the trench. Pervasive normal faulting of the mid-trench slope most likely accommodates the majority of the observed forearc extension in response to basal subduction erosion, and a structural high is located between the mid- and upper-trench slopes. We interpret this high as representing a dense and most likely structurally robust region of crust lying beneath this region. Sediment of the upper-trench slope documents depositional hiatuses and on-going uplift of the arc. Strong along-arc currents appear to erode the Kermadec volcanic arc and distribute this sediment to the surrounding basins, while currents over the forearc redistribute deposits as sediment waves. Minor uplift of the transitional Kermadec forearc, observed just to the north of the profile, appears to relate to an underlying structural trend as well as subduction of the Louisville Ridge seamount chain 250 km to the north. Relative uplift of the Kermadec arc is observed from changes in the tilt of upper-trench slope deposits and extensional faulting of the basement immediately surrounding the Louisville Ridge.

  17. The geochemical fingerprint of serpentinite- and crust-dominated plate-interface settings: some tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaò, Enrico; Scambelluri, Marco; Agostini, Samuele; Tonarini, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    The interface between converging plates is made of kilometre-thick domains where slab and upper plate mantle materials are tectonically slicied within a matrix dominated either by (meta)sedimentary/crustal rocks or by serpentinite. The latter may correspond to supra-subduction mantle altered by uprising slab fluids. Once formed, these plate-interface domains act as hydrated low-viscosity layers where tectonic stress and fluid-mediated mass transfer are strongly focussed. Here we present the geochemical study of two plate-interface environments: (1) serpentinite-rich, represented by the high-pressure serpentinites of the Ligurian Alps (Erro-Tobbio and Voltri Units); (2) sediment-dominated top slab mélange, represented by de-serpentinized garnet peridotite and chlorite harzburgite bodies (hosting eclogite and metarodingite) embedded in paragneiss and micaschist from Cima di Gagnone (Adula Unit, Central Alps). The Ligurian serpentinites derive from oceanic and wedge mantle tectonically coupled and dragged to depth during Alpine subduction: they may represent the hydrated precursors of the Cima di Gagnone peridotites. The B, Pb and Sr isotopic composition of the above sets of rocks helps defining tectonic and mass transfer processes during accretion of slab and suprasubduction mantle rocks in plate-interface domains, and to retrieve the imprint of fluids from these settings, which that ultimately affect arc magmatism. The serpentinized peridotites from Erro-Tobbio (ET) show high B (10-30 ppm), delta11B (10-25 per mil), B/Nb ratio (>380) and limited enrichment in 206Pb/204Pb (18.17-18,51) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.7046- 0.7060). Scambelluri & Tonarini (2012) interpreted the B and Sr isotopic imprint of ET as representative of upper plate mantle altered by slab-fluids. The B contents (up to 30 ppm), delta11B (18-30 per mil), B/Nb ratio (>900) and 206Pb/204Pb (18.09-18.22) of the Voltri serpentinites are similar to ET. Their 87Sr/86Sr (0.7079 to 0.7105) is higher than ET. The garnet peridotite and harzburgite from Gagnone have low B (up to 9 ppm), low B/Nb (<100) and high Pb and Sr isotopic ratios (206Pb/204Pb up to 18.84; 87Sr/86Sr 0.7124). Eclogite and HP metarodingite in the Gagnone peridotite show comparable values. The host metasediments and gneiss show higher B (6-16 ppm), 206Pb/204Pb (up to 18.98) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.7275). than peridotites and mafic rocks. All the Gagnone rocks have negative delta11B (ultramafic and mafic rocks = 0 to -10 per mil; country rocks = -3 to -12 per mil). The Gagnone peridotites reveal geochemical mixing between ultramafic and host crustal reservoirs. Considering that these peridotites derive from serpentinized protoliths, we expect that the initial high 11B of serpentinites was modified by two combined processes: (1) serpentine dehydration, releasing heavy B to fluids, and (2) exchange between ultramafic rocks and sediment-derived subduction fluids during burial and exhumation. The geochemical signature of the Voltri serpentinites is indicative of interaction with slab fluids enriched in heavy B-rich and in crust-derived components, such as in mantle rocks which evolved atop of the subducting slab. This implies that the slices of the downgoing slab are emplaced early during their burial history atop of the subducting plate. The geochemical signature of peridotites and host metasediments from Gagnone, points to significant exchange between ultramafic bodies and host rocks during prograde subduction prior to peak metamorphism. This again indicates accretion to the plate interface of slab and wedge materials during an early stage of subduction. Moreover, Voltri and Gagnone represent distinct reservoirs, showing positive versus negative delta11B. Serpentinite-dominated settings, like Voltri, produce high B and 11B fluids which can explain 11B-enrichment of much Pacific arcs. Differently, the sediment- and gneiss-dominated Gagnone mélange shows high B, negative ?11B, high radiogenic Pb and Sr: fluids released from such a mélange fit the composition of lavas from convergent margins affecte

  18. Subcontinental-scale crustal velocity changes along the Pacific-North America plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L; Wernicke, B P; Bisnath, S; Niemi, N A; Elósegui, P

    2006-06-29

    Transient tectonic deformation has long been noted within approximately 100 km of plate boundary fault zones and within active volcanic regions, but it is unknown whether transient motions also occur at larger scales within plates. Relatively localized transients are known to occur as both seismic and episodic aseismic events, and are generally ascribed to motions of magma bodies, aseismic creep on faults, or elastic or viscoelastic effects associated with earthquakes. However, triggering phenomena and systematic patterns of seismic strain release at subcontinental (approximately 1,000 km) scale along diffuse plate boundaries have long suggested that energy transfer occurs at larger scale. Such transfer appears to occur by the interaction of stresses induced by surface wave propagation and magma or groundwater in the crust, or from large-scale stress diffusion within the oceanic mantle in the decades following clusters of great earthquakes. Here we report geodetic evidence for a coherent, subcontinental-scale change in tectonic velocity along a diffuse approximately 1,000-km-wide deformation zone. Our observations are derived from continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) data collected over the past decade across the Basin and Range province, which absorbs approximately 25 per cent of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. The observed changes in site velocity define a sharp boundary near the centre of the province oriented roughly parallel to the north-northwest relative plate motion vector. We show that sites to the west of this boundary slowed relative to sites east of it by approximately 1 mm yr(-1) starting in late 1999. PMID:16810252

  19. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: INstItute for INterfacIaL cataLysIs

    E-print Network

    in studying coal gasification and direct liquefaction to provide power and transportation fuels with minimumM CoaL use While coal is an abundant natural resource, its combustion or gasification produces bothPacific Northwest National Laboratory: INstItute for INterfacIaL cataLysIs Coal

  20. On gravity from SST, geoid from Seasat, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G. (principal investigators)

    1984-01-01

    A composite map produced by combining 90 passes of SST data show good agreement with conventional GEM models. The SEASAT altimeter data were deduced and found to agree with both the SST and GEM fields. The maps are dominated (especially in the east) by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkedly close correlation with plate age. Most anomalies in the east half of the Pacific could be partly caused by regional differences in plate age. The amplitude of these geoid or gravity anomalies caused by age differences should decrease with absolute plate age, and large anomalies (approximately 3 m) over old, smooth sea floor may indicate a further deeper source within or perhaps below the lithosphere. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantle without complete thermal equilibration was considered. A plume emanating from a buoyant layer 100 km thick and 10,000 times less viscous than the surrounding mantle should have a diameter of about 400 km and must ascend at about 10 cm/yr to arrive still anomalously hot in the uppermost mantle.

  1. Active Pacific North America Plate boundary tectonics as evidenced by seismicity in the oceanic lithosphere offshore Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, Egill; Kanamori, Hiroo; Stock, Joann; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Legg, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Pacific Ocean crust west of southwest North America was formed by Cenozoic seafloor spreading between the large Pacific Plate and smaller microplates. The eastern limit of this seafloor, the continent-ocean boundary, is the fossil trench along which the microplates subducted and were mostly destroyed in Miocene time. The Pacific-North America Plate boundary motion today is concentrated on continental fault systems well to the east, and this region of oceanic crust is generally thought to be within the rigid Pacific Plate. Yet, the 2012 December 14 Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred about 275 km west of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, is evidence for continued tectonism in this oceanic part of the Pacific Plate. The preferred main shock centroid depth of 20 km was located close to the bottom of the seismogenic thickness of the young oceanic lithosphere. The focal mechanism, derived from both teleseismic P-wave inversion and W-phase analysis of the main shock waveforms, and the 12 aftershocks of M ˜3-4 are consistent with normal faulting on northeast striking nodal planes, which align with surface mapped extensional tectonic trends such as volcanic features in the region. Previous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements on offshore islands in the California Continental Borderland had detected some distributed Pacific and North America relative plate motion strain that could extend into the epicentral region. The release of this lithospheric strain along existing zones of weakness is a more likely cause of this seismicity than current thermal contraction of the oceanic lithosphere or volcanism. The main shock caused weak to moderate ground shaking in the coastal zones of southern California, USA, and Baja California, Mexico, but the tsunami was negligible.

  2. Cenozoic geological and plate tectonic evolution of SE Asia and the SW Pacific: computer-based reconstructions, model and animations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Hall

    2002-01-01

    A plate tectonic model for the Cenozoic development of the region of SE Asia and the SW Pacific is presented and its implications are discussed. The model is accompanied by computer animations in a variety of formats, which can be viewed on most desktop computers. GPS measurements and present seismicity illustrate the high rates of motions and tectonic complexity of

  3. Mantle Flow Beneath the Juan de Fuca and East Pacific Rise Spreading Centers and Adjacent Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy are a principal means of inferring the direction of mantle flow beneath tectonic plates. Azimuthal anisotropy of mantle head waves (Pn) observed in mid-plate settings, for example, has been used to infer that beneath oceanic crust the mantle flow that is frozen in is parallel to the paleospreading direction. While the agreement between historical measurements of azimuthal anisotropy and paleospreading direction is good, the combined uncertainties in experimental results (many of which date back 30 to 50 years) and in inferring the paleospreading direction are often 10-15°. In contrast to historical results from mid-plate settings, recent studies of Pn anisotropy beneath the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge reveal that the fast-direction of seismic anisotropy - and by inference the direction of mantle flow - is skewed with respect to the current spreading direction. This result indicates that sub-ridge mantle flow is not an entirely passive response to plate spreading. Here we use data from recent active-source seismic experiments to investigate azimuthal anisotropy of Pn arrivals in two near-ridge settings. These modern experiments, which use dense arrays of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) and well-navigated seismic shooting lines, can constrain azimuthal anisotropy to within ±1°. One data set is from the multi-scale Endeavour seismic tomography experiment (ETOMO) that took place in September 2009. Seismic data were collected using 68 four-component OBSs at 64 sites and the 6600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. The study includes 5567 shots covering 90 km along-axis and 50 km across. The second data set is from the UNDERSHOOT experiment, which was conducted at the EPR between the Siqueiros and Clipperton transforms, a section of ridge that is sub-divided by the 9°03'N overlapping spreading center (OSC). Seismic data were collected using a combination of four-component OBSs and single-component hydrophones at 57 sites and the 8500 in3 airgun array of the R/V Maurice Ewing. The study includes ~5000 shots covering 200 km along-axis and 100 km across. For each data set we document evidence for mantle anisotropy using Pn arrivals that propagate beneath the axis of spreading and for paths that sample solely the Pacific, Juan de Fuca and Cocos plates. We also present results for subsets of the data that are grouped geographically. For the EPR we select data subsets that sample three regions, one each north and south of the 9°03'N OSC and one centered on the OSC. For these subsets, the azimuth of anisotropy is effectively identical to that reported previously for the entire data set (~10° anticlockwise of the spreading direction). We thus conclude that the orientation of seismic anisotropy does not vary with local plate boundary geometry, e.g. the trend of ridge segments which differ to either side of the OSC or the presence of the OSC itself. Instead, the anisotropy is a regional-scale signal related to the azimuth of mantle divergence. Our results will further test the hypothesis that beneath spreading centers the axes of mantle upwelling and asthenospheric flow are skewed with respect to the plate spreading direction.

  4. Extensive deposits on the Pacific plate from Late Pleistocene North American glacial lake outbursts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Reid, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the major unresolved issues of the Late Pleistocene catastrophic-flood events in the northwestern United States (e.g., from glacial Lake Missoula) has been what happened when the flood discharge reached the ocean. This study compiles available 3.5-kHz high-resolution and airgun seismic reflection data, long-range sidescan sonar images, and sediment core data to define the distribution of flood sediment in deepwater areas of the Pacific Ocean. Upon reaching the ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River near the present-day upper continental slope, sediment from the catastrophic floods continued flowing downslope as hyperpycnally generated turbidity currents. The turbidity currents resulting from the Lake Missoula and other latest Pleistocene floods followed the Cascadia Channel into and through the Blanco Fracture Zone and then flowed west to the Tufts Abyssal Plain. A small part of the flood sediment, which was stripped off the main flow at a bend in the Cascadia Channel at its exit point from the Blanco Fracture Zone, continued flowing more than 400 km to the south and reached the Escanaba Trough, a rift valley of the southern Gorda Ridge. Understanding the development of the pathway for the Late Pleistocene flood sediment reaching Escanaba Trough provides insight for understanding the extent of catastrophic flood deposits on the Pacific plate.

  5. Slow earthquakes associated with fault healing on a serpentinized plate interface

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ikuo; Iwata, Mutsumi; Okazaki, Keishi; Hirauchi, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Slow earthquakes that occur at subduction zones are distinct from regular earthquakes in terms of their slip behavior. We consider this difference to relate to localized hydration reactions at the plate interface that influence the frictional properties. The results of laboratory friction experiments indicate that simulated serpentine faults are characterized by a low healing rate and large slip-weakening distance compared with unaltered dry fault patches. These results are consistent with the slip mechanism of slow earthquakes, indicating that a locally serpentinized plate interface could trigger slow earthquakes, assisted by pore pressure build-up, whereas unaltered dry patches that remain strongly coupled are potential sites of regular earthquakes.

  6. Thermal study of interface between the Orbiter cold plate and typical Shuttle spacecraft payload flight electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwangbo, H.; Coyle, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    Spacelab provides a set of Freon line plumbing and cold plates for experiment equipments which are located in the Shuttle pallet and which need active thermal control. The reported study deals with the thermal problem of attaching a Command and Data Handling module with various electronic boxes whose combined footprints on the baseplate are much larger than the cold plate. A description of two modules and the cold plate assembly in the pallet is presented and a thermal model description is provided. The method employed in modeling heat pipes-honey-comb matrix is based upon an effective conductance between the heat pipe vapor and the walls of the heat pipe. The considered thermal models and a computer program are used to perform steady-state thermal analyses. The temperature gradients in the large module baseplate attached to the small cold plate are predicted as a function of the interface plate thickness.

  7. Paleomagnetism of Midway Atoll lavas and northward movement of the Pacific plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gromme, S.; Vine, F.J.

    1972-01-01

    Two deep drill holes through the reef limestones of Midway Atoll penetrated 120 m and 19 m of basaltic lavas that were dated by the KAr method at 18 my. Inclinations of natural remanent magnetization have been measured in 173 specimens cut from 57 core samples from 13 of the lava flows. The mean paleomagnetic inclination is 27.6?? ?? 6.8??, corresponding to a paleolatitude of 14.7?? ?? 4.2??. The present latitude of Midway is 28??, suggesting a northward component of motion of the Pacific plate of approximately 13?? or 1400 km in the last 18 my. The paleolatitude of Midway is thus not significantly different from the present latitude (19??) of the active volcanic island of Hawaii. The paleomagnetic data from the Midway basalts thus support the hypothesis of Wilson and Morgan that volcanic heat sources are fixed with respect to the Earth's mantle below the asthenosphere and their apparent migration with time is due to plate motion. ?? 1972.

  8. The northern edge of Pacific plate position near Kamchatka-Aleutian junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeychik, Boris; Churikova, Tatiana; Volynets, Anna; Wörner, Gerhard; Layer, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Two geochemical transects were carried out through Kamchatka: one previously studied SE-NW across the arc and one SW-NE trending along the Sredinny Range (SR) back arc zone. These data with Ar-Ar dating constrain magma source in space and time and allows us to relate these to tectonic position setting of the region at a given time. The cross arc transect from Gamchen volcano in Eastern Volcanic Front (EVF) through Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD) to Ichinsky volcano in SR based on Quaternary rocks showed continuous geochemical zonation from arc front to back arc of present subduction zone, including strong and gradual increase in LILE, LREE and HFSE in whole rocks. The transect along the SR from the Achtang lava field to Tekletunup volcano (the back arc zone) comprises two age groups of volcanic rocks each with uniform in geochemical features. Late Miocene-Pliocene rocks (3-6 Ma) represent voluminous plateau lavas of depleted basalts with low HFSE and HREE. Fluid-mobile elements are enriched and enrichment patterns are in fact similar to the typical arc front lavas. The younger group of Quaternary rocks (<1 Ma) is represented by monogenetic cones and stratovolcanoes that combine the typical LILE/HFSE-enrichment of a subduction setting with enrichment in all incompatible elements. In Eocene-Miocene times SR represented the active volcanic front of the Proto-Kamchatka subduction zone. In later times Kamchatka arc system has been modified by the accretion of the Kronotsky terranes. The time of accretion and the SE-outward 200 km shift of the subduction zone to the presently active EVF has been estimated from 40 to 2 Ma. Our data can help to better constrain the timing of this event by arguing that the systematic change in SR rock geochemistry with time is the result of this arc shift and has been facilitated by a massive slab roll-back event. In this scenario the SR plateau lavas represent the volcanic front until as recently as 3 Ma. The younger Quaternary rocks at SR are the present back arc lavas of the recent subduction zone. Both, the systematic geochemical zonation from contemporary arc front to back arc and the uniformity of geochemistry of young volcanic rocks along the SR show that the volcanism of the region is explained by the only one mechanism - subduction of the Pacific Plate below Kamchatka. A trend is documented from fluid-dominated melting in the EVF, through the upwelling of a strongly fluid-fluxed mantle below the CKD to melting of a fluid-enriched mantle aided by strong upwelling and decompression in the SR back arc zone. Magmatism has continued to be active in SR up to the Holocene even though seismic data today do not show a signal for a downgoing plate below this region. But the absence of the seismicity does not mean the absence of plate because at temperatures higher than 600-700°C seismicity is lost. We argue that the northern edge of the Pacific Plate is represented by a wide (150 km) boundary as a set of transform faults which can be projected on Kamchatka surface from the morphology of the downgoing oceanic plate. Also this edge is marked by the termination of Holocene volcanoes on surface along of SR. The absence of the young volcanism to the north of the on-land projection of the Alpha fault marks the plate boundary at depth.

  9. Structural Response of the Menard Fracture Zone to Changes in Pacific-Antarctic Plate Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croon, M. B.; Cande, S. C.; Stock, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of a reconnaissance survey of swath MultiBeam and magnetic data of the Menard Fracture Zone. These data were mainly collected by the NSF (Office of Polar Programs) operated R/VIB Nathaniel Palmer during transits between Lyttelton, New Zealand and Punta Arenas, Chile between 1997 and 2005. Based on these data we analyzed the tectonic development and structural features of the Menard Fracture Zone. The data enable us to look at the evolution of the structures along the fracture zone between about 45 Ma (anomaly 20y) and the present. The Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge at this latitude nucleated within a propagating rift system that birthed the Hudson microplate and formed the conjugate Henry and Hudson Troughs, which flank the fracture zone on either side (Eakins, 2000). Development of the Menard Fracture Zone resulted from tectonic realignment of the conjugate rifted margins. We used the trends of the Menard Fracture Zone and magnetic anomalies to determine a record of plate-motion changes. The Menard Fracture Zone experienced adaptations to changes in plate motion. We interpret the swathmap bathymetry data to examine how the Menard Fracture Zone evolved in response to these changes. The medium to fast spreading Pacific-Antarctic ridge generated about 1450 km of ocean crust on the east and 1550 km on the west limb. At its initiation there are 2 splays forming a narrow corridor of about 25 km. In this oldest part of the fracture zone volcanic ridges formed by transpression are clearly visible. Between 28 and 23 Ma (anomaly 10 to 6b) an adjustment in spreading direction narrows the corridor to roughly 10 to 15 km width. Roughly at 4 Ma the two splays apparently coalesce into a single offset. The northern fracture zone on the west limb and the fracture zones on the east limb of the Menard Fracture Zone are often barely or not visible on the bathymetry, due to burial by younger volcanism from overshot ridges on the inner volcanic highs. Small adjustments in direction of plate motion are also marked by occasional cross-cutting faults that offset the fracture zone splays up to 5 km.

  10. Accelerated subduction of the Pacific Plate after mega-thrust earthquakes: evidence from GPS and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.; Mitsui, Y.; Matsuo, K.; Tanaka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Interplate thrust earthquakes are often followed by afterslips (Heki et al., 1997; Miyazaki et al., 2004; Ozawa et al., 2012). They let the fore-arc move slowly trenchward and accelerate plate convergence. Accelerated convergence of the oceanic side (including ocean floor and slab) has been suggested by changes of focal mechanisms of earthquakes within oceanic plates after mega-thrust events, i.e. change from trench-normal compression to tension in outer rise regions, and from down-dip tension to compression in intermediate depths (Lay et al., 1989). However, landward acceleration of the oceanic plate has never been observed geodetically due to the scarcity of appropriate islands on oceanic plates near trenches. The westward velocity of GPS stations in NE Japan show gradient decreasing from east to west reflecting the E-W compressional stress built up by the inter-plate coupling. We found that such coupling significantly enhanced after the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake (Mw8.0), Hokkaido, in the segments adjacent to the ruptured fault. The coupling was further enhanced after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0). Movement of the ocean floor benchmark after the 2011 event suggests that the current (i.e. 2011-2012) subduction of the Pacific Plate is about three times as fast as the geological average, e.g. NUVEL-1 (DeMets et al., 1990). Such a temporary acceleration of the subduction would be a response of the subducting slab to the sudden decrease of interplate coupling (decoupling); because slab-pull and ridge-push cannot change, viscous traction has to increase to recover the force balance. We will present a simple physical model assuming a thin low-viscosity layer on the slab surface that has enabled such a rapid adjustment. The accelerated subduction would account for high regional interplate seismicity after mega-thrust earthquakes, especially successive ruptures of remote segments, e.g. the 2003 Tokachi-Oki, 2006 Kuril, and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquakes. GRACE satellite gravimetry revealed coseismic gravity drops in the back-arc regions due to the dilatation of island arc lithosphere for the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman (Han et al., 2005), 2010 Maule (Heki and Matsuo, 2010), and 2011 Tohoku-oki (Matsuo and Heki, 2011) earthquakes. Postseismic slow gravity increase centered in the fore-arc region was first found for the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Ogawa and Heki, 2007). Here we show that similar postseismic gravity increases also followed the other two mega-thrust earthquakes. We assume that they also reflect accelerating subduction of oceanic plates, i.e. episodic convergence at the boundary propagates into oceanic plate interior by stress diffusion (Bott and Dean, 1973), and postseismic thickening of the coseismically thinned lithosphere causes the on-going gravity increases.

  11. Illuminating the plate interface structure beneath Cook Strait, New Zealand, with

    E-print Network

    Sheehan, Anne F.

    Illuminating the plate interface structure beneath Cook Strait, New Zealand, with receiver of the North Island of New Zealand, we image seismic impedance discontinuities in the upper mantle beneath Cook beneath Cook Strait, New Zealand, with receiver functions, J. Geophys. Res., 112, B06310, doi:10

  12. Cenozoic geological and plate tectonic evolution of SE Asia and the SW Pacific: computer-based reconstructions, model and animations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert

    2002-04-01

    A plate tectonic model for the Cenozoic development of the region of SE Asia and the SW Pacific is presented and its implications are discussed. The model is accompanied by computer animations in a variety of formats, which can be viewed on most desktop computers. GPS measurements and present seismicity illustrate the high rates of motions and tectonic complexity of the region, but provide little help in long-term reconstruction. Plate boundaries shifted rapidly in the Cenozoic. During convergence of the major plates, there were numerous important episodes of extension, forming ocean basins and causing subsidence within continental regions, probably driven by subduction. Within eastern Indonesia, New Guinea and the Melanesian arcs, there are multiple Cenozoic sutures, with very short histories compared to most well-known older orogenic belts. They preserve a record of major changes in tectonics, including subduction polarity reversals, elimination of volcanic arcs, changing plate boundaries and extension within an overall contractional setting. Rapid tectonic changes have occurred within periods of less than 5 Ma. Many events would be overlooked or ignored in older orogenic belts, even when evidence is preserved, because high resolution dating is required to identify them, and the inference of almost simultaneous contraction and extension seems contradictory. There were three important periods in regional development: at about 45, 25 and 5 Ma. At these times, plate boundaries and motions changed, probably because of major collision events. The 45 Ma plate reorganisation may be related to India-Asia collision, although some important intra-Pacific events, such as voluminous Eocene boninite magmatism, seem to be older and require other causes. Indentation of Asia by India modified the Asian continent, but there is little indication that India has been the driving force of tectonics in most of SE Asia. The most important Cenozoic plate boundary reorganisation was at about 25 Ma. The New Guinea passive margin collided with the East Philippines-Halmahera-South Caroline Arc system. The Australian margin, in the Bird's Head region, also began to collide with the SE Asian margin in Sulawesi. The Ontong Java Plateau collided with the Melanesian Arc. These collisions caused a major change in the character of plate boundaries between about 25 and 20 Ma. Since 25 Ma, tectonic events east of Eurasia were driven by motion of the Pacific Plate. Further, west, the movement of Australia northwards caused rotations of blocks and accretion of microcontinental fragments to SE Asia. Plate motions and boundaries changed again at about 5 Ma, for uncertain reasons, possibly as a consequence of Pacific Plate motion changes, arc-continent collision in Taiwan, or other boundary changes at the Pacific margin, for example in the Philippines. Areas to the west and east of New Guinea, the Banda Sea and Woodlark Basin, illustrate the speed of change, the unexpected interplay of convergence and extension, and the importance of subduction as the engine of change. Subduction has been the principal driving mechanism for tectonic change, although its manifestations are varied. They include collision-related phenomena, partitioning of oblique convergence, and effects of hinge roll-back and pull forces of subducting slabs. Magmatism is not always associated with subduction, depending on the movement of subduction hinge, and there may be important extension of the upper plate both perpendicular and parallel to the length of subduction zones. Strike-slip faulting is observably very important within the Pacific-Australia-Eurasia convergent setting, yet appears in few tectonic models. Long-term strike-slip deformation can explain some of the complexities of areas such as New Guinea, including magmatism and its absence, and thermo-chronological data showing very young and rapid cooling of the mobile belt and fold belt. The inadequacies of the tectonic model reflect in part the difficulties of applying rigid plate tectonics, when there is clear evidence of changing

  13. A new GPS velocity field for the Pacific Plate - Part 2: implications for fault slip rates in western California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Márquez-Azúa, Bertha; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Lower and upper bounds for present deformation rates across faults in central California between the San Andreas Fault and Pacific coast are estimated from a new Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field for central, western California in light of geodetic evidence presented in a companion paper for slow, but significant deformation within the Pacific Plate between young seafloor in the eastern Pacific and older seafloor elsewhere on the plate. Transects of the GPS velocity field across the San Andreas Fault between Parkfield and San Juan Buatista, where fault slip is dominated by creep and the velocity field thus reveals the off-fault deformation, show that GPS sites in westernmost California move approximately parallel to the fault at an average rate of 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 relative to the older interior of the Pacific Plate, but only 1.8 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 if the Pacific Plate frame of reference is corrected for deformation within the plate. Modelled interseismic elastic deformation from the weakly coupled creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault is an order-of-magnitude too small to explain the southeastward motions of coastal sites in western California. Similarly, models that maximize residual viscoelastic deformation from the 1857 Fort Tejon and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes mismatch both the rates and directions of GPS site motions in central California relative to the Pacific Plate. Neither thus explains the site motions southwest of the San Andreas fault, indicating that the site motions measure deformation across faults and folds outboard of the San Andreas Fault. The non-zero site velocities thus constitute strong evidence for active folding and faulting outboard from the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault and suggest limits of 0-2 mm yr-1 for the Rinconada Fault slip rate and 1.8 ± 0.6 to 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 for the slip rates integrated across near-coastal faults such as the Hosgri, San Gregorio and San Simeon faults.

  14. Rayleigh phase velocities in the upper mantle of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, L.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary, located in Southern California, presents an opportunity to study a unique tectonic process that has been shaping the plate tectonic setting of the western North American and Mexican Pacific margin since the Miocene. This is one of the few locations where the interaction between a migrating oceanic spreading center and a subduction zone can be studied. The rapid subduction of the Farallon plate outpaced the spreading rate of the East Pacific Rise rift system causing it to be subducted beneath southern California and northern Mexico 30 Ma years ago. The details of microplate capture, reorganization, and lithospheric deformation on both the Pacific and North American side of this boundary is not well understood, but may have important implications for fault activity, stresses, and earthquake hazard analysis both onshore and offshore. We use Rayleigh waves recorded by an array of 34 ocean bottom seismometers deployed offshore southern California for a 12 month duration from August 2010 to 2011. Our array recorded teleseismic earthquakes at distances ranging from 30° to 120° with good signal-to-noise ratios for magnitudes Mw ? 5.9. The events exhibit good azimuthal distribution and enable us to solve simultaneously for Rayleigh wave phase velocities and azimuthal anisotropy. Fewer events occur at NE back-azimuths due to the lack of seismicity in central North America. We consider seismic periods between 18 - 90 seconds. The inversion technique considers non-great circle path propagation by representing the arriving wave field as two interfering plane waves. This takes advantage of statistical averaging of a large number of paths that travel offshore southern California and northern Mexico allowing for improved resolution and parameterization of lateral seismic velocity variations at lithospheric and sublithospheric depths. We present phase velocity results for periods sampling mantle structure down to 150 km depth along the west coast margin. With this study, we seek to understand the strength and deformation of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere resulting from plate convergence and subduction beneath Southern California 30 Ma as well as translational stresses present today. We also test for predictions of several geodynamic models which describe the kinematic mantle flow that accompanies plate motion within this area including passive mantle drag due to Pacific plate motion and toroidal flow in the western U.S. region that may extend offshore.

  15. Pacific plate-motion change at the time of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend constrains the viscosity of Earth's asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Lambeck, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Important constraints on asthenospheric viscosity come primarily from modeling the glacial rebound of the past 20 kyr, but remain somewhat loose because of the intrinsic resolving power of these models. We obtain narrower bounds by building on the notion that the asthenosphere also controls the ability to change plate motions over Myr. We focus on the Pacific kinematic change at the time of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend event, which is linked to the coeval inception of subduction in the Western Pacific. We sample plausible asthenospheric viscosity and thickness values by requiring the rate at which torque varied to generate the observed kinematics consistent with the nature of subduction initiation. Uncertainties on the bend event duration and the occurrence of Pacific hot spots drift do not hamper our results that suggest that the asthenosphere viscous response to vertical shear over kyr is consistent with that to horizontal shear over Myr.

  16. GPS measurements of crustal deformation within the Pacific-Australia plate boundary zone in Irian Jaya, Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. s. o. Puntodewo; R. Mccaffreyb; E. Calaisc; Y. Bockc; J. Raisa; C. Subaryaa

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made in 1991, 1992 and 1993 provide preliminary estimates of slip distribution between the Australian and Pacific plates in Irian Jaya, Indonesia. We interpret the GPS results with constraints from earthquake mechanisms and slip vectors, recent marine surveys, and geology. Three GPS sites in southeastern,Irian Jaya show,motions,that are within,10 mm\\/yr,of the expected,motion,of Australia. A

  17. A revised estimate of Pacific-North America motion and implications for Western North America plate boundary zone tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth; Argus, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    Marine magnetic profiles from the Gulf of Californa are studied in order to revise the estimate of Pacific-North America motion. It is found that since 3 Ma spreading has averaged 48 mm/yr, consistent with a new global plate motion model derived without any data. The present data suggest that strike-slip motion on faults west of the San Andreas is less than previously thought, reducing the San Andreas discrepancy with geodetic, seismological, and other geologic observations.

  18. Origin and evolution of marginal basins of the NW Pacific: Diffuse-plate tectonic reconstructions

    E-print Network

    Xu, Junyuan; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Yu, Ho-Shing

    2012-01-01

    Formation of the gigantic linked dextral pull-apart basin system in the NW Pacific is due to NNE- to ENE-ward motion of east Eurasia. This mainly was a response to the Indo-Asia collision which started about 50 Ma ago. The displacement of east Eurasia can be estimated using three aspects: (1) the magnitude of pull-apart of the dextral pull-apart basin system, (2) paleomagnetic data from eastern Eurasia and the region around the Arctic, and (3) the shortening deficits in the Large Tibetan Plateau. All the three aspects indicate that there was a large amount (about 1200 km) of northward motion of the South China block and compatible movements of other blocks in eastern Eurasia during the rifting period of the basin system. Such large motion of the eastern Eurasia region contradicts any traditional rigid plate tectonic reconstruction, but agrees with the more recent concepts of non-rigidity of both continental and oceanic lithosphere over geological times. Based on these estimates, the method developed for resto...

  19. The August and October, 2008 earthquake swarms on the Explorer/Pacific plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoski, P. A.; Trehu, A. M.; Williams, M. C.; Dziak, R. P.; Embley, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    In August and October of 2008, earthquake swarms occurred on the Explorer/Pacific plate boundary. The August swarm lasted for approximately 4 days. Seventy-five earthquakes were reported by the Canadian National Seismograph Nework (CNSN), with the largest having a magnitude of 5.9. The U.S. Navy's Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) hydrophones reported 148 earthquakes. Over 250 earthquakes were recorded on the Central Oregon Locked Zone Array (COLZA), a temporary array of 15 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and hydrophones. The October swarm lasted about 2 days with only one reported CNSN magnitude 4.4 earthquake. This event was also observed with the COLZA network. SOSUS reported 119 earthquakes over the course of two days. In this poster, we use the COLZA T-phase data to better understand the tectonic significance of these swarms. T-phases are generated by earthquakes and converted to acoustic energy at the seafloor. We used the ANSS magnitudes to calibrate an empirical magnitude scale for maximum amplitudes handpicked from the COLZA T-phase observations. This enabled us to lower the magnitude threshold to 2.8. A b-value of 0.78 was obtained for the August swarm suggesting that it may be a tectonic event rather then a magmatic one. Focal mechanisms reported by the Harvard CMT catalog for 3 of the largest events also support strike-slip motion. The reported SOSUS hypocenter locations indicate a linear NE/SW trend west of and parallel to the Explorer Ridge while the ANSS locations are very scattered but suggest a northwest/southeast trend in line with but east of the Dellwood-Revere transform fault. To obtain better-constrained locations, we plan to relocate the events and COLZA T-phase data using cross-correlation techniques developed to locate seismic tremor. We expect the COLZA data will allow us to determine whether activity was primarily focused along the Explorer Ridge axis, along the Dellwood-Revere transform, or within the plate. This investigation could provide us with new insight into the evolution and possible fragmentation of the Explorer Plate.

  20. Cretaceous DSDP and ODP Basalt Cores from the Pacific Plate and Implications for Apparent Polar Wander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, W.; Acton, G.

    2003-04-01

    Uncertainties of the Pacific plate apparent polar wander path continue to have a negative impact on studies of true polar wander, relative motions of hotspots, plate tectonics and the shape of the geomagnetic field. Much debate about the APWP arises because non-traditional methods have been used to get around the fact that oriented paleomagnetic samples are difficult to obtain from beneath the ocean. For ˜32 years DSDP and ODP have recovered basalt cores from the Pacific and these should provide reliable measurements of paleomagnetic inclination (declination being indeterminate in azimuthally-unoriented cores). At the end of DSDP, there were too few cores, and fewer still that were well-dated, to allow precision in determining age and pole location. At the end of ODP can we do better? I have compiled Pacific basalt core data up to Leg 192 and analyzed the inclinations following the methods of Cox and Gordon [Rev. Geophys. Space Phys., 22, p. 47, 1984]. The data come from 35 sites and yield 173 independent units spanning late Jurassic to latest Cretaceous. Data distribution is poor for most of the Jurassic and later Cretaceous. Of 22 time windows, 5-Myr in width, 15 are empty or have only data from one site. Only the period 110--130 Ma has a large number of units and sites (125 and 20, respectively). These data were divided into two groups (110--119 and 122--129 Ma) and combined to determine paleomagnetic poles. Colatitude circles from the 110--119 Ma group are mostly in good agreement and cluster in the North Atlantic at 50--60^o. As expected, control on pole longitude is poor because of the lack of azimuthal orientation. Using paleodeclinations from three dated seamount magnetic anomaly inversions, the longitude errors are cut in half. The result is a pole at 53.9^oN, 334.2^oE (95% confidence ellipse semi-axes: 10.1^o, 5.1^o; major-semi axis azimuth 79^o). At first glance, the scatter in 122--129 Ma paleocolatitude circles seems large (>30^o) and data from Ontong Java Plateau appear inconsistent. However, the colatitude circles fall into two groups. Those that imply more northerly pole locations are from Ontong Java or seamounts, whereas those indicating southerly pole locations are from ocean crust (mostly in the Japanese magnetic lineations). This discrepancy suggests that ocean crust basalts may be biased by rotation of fault blocks away from the spreading axis. Excluding crustal basalts, remaining colatitude circles agree with two dated seamount poles and combine to give a pole at 61.8^oN, 337.2^oE (95% confidence ellipse semi-axes: 6.2^o, 3.6^o; major semi-axis azimuth: 86^o). Error ellipses for the two poles barely overlap and the pole positions imply southward motion of the pole moving forward in time. Late Jurassic data are inconsistent and cannot be interpreted to yield a pole or reliable paleolatitude. Late Cretaceous data are few, but hint at significant polar wander. Colatitude circles of Chron 33r age (79--83 Ma) cluster near previously published latest Cretaceous poles, ˜410^o north of an 82 Ma pole determined from seamounts. The basalt core data agree with skewness and sediment core data of the same age and imply the seamount poles are biased by overprint. The few colatitudes of 88--94 Ma age are consistent with the 110--120 Ma pole, displaced ˜10--15^o southwestward from the Chron 33r data. This gap is consistent with prior findings of rapid polar wander at approximately 84 Ma.

  1. North America-Pacific plate boundary, an elastic-plastic megashear - Evidence from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Steven N.

    1988-01-01

    Data obtained by Mark III VLBI measurements of radio signals from permanent and mobile VLBI sites for 5.5 years of observations, starting in October 1982, were used to derive a picture of the earth crust deformation near the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The data, which included the vector positions of the VLBI sites and their rate of change, were used for comparison with a number of lithospheric deformation models based upon the concept that the motions of points near the North America-Pacific plate boundary are a linear combination of North America and Pacific velocities. The best of these models were found to fit 95 percent of the variance in 139 VLBI length and transverse velocity observations. Instantaneous shear deformation associated with plate tectonics is apparently developing in a zone 450 km wide paralleling the San Andreas Fault; some of this deformation will be recovered through elastic rebound, while the rest will be permanently set through plastic processes. Because the VLBI data have not been collected for a significant fraction of the earthquake cycle, they cannot discriminate between elastic and plastic behaviors.

  2. Using aftershocks to Image the Subducting Pacific Plate in a Region of Deep Slow Slip, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K. M.; Hirschberg, H.; Louie, J. N.; Savage, M. K.; Bannister, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present seismic migrations using aftershocks of two M>6 earthquakes as sources. The Southern Cook Strait earthquake sequence, beginning on 19 July 2013, included the 21 July M=6.5 and 16 August M=6.6 2013 earthquakes, which were the largest shallow earthquakes to strike the Wellington region since 1942. Following the two largest earthquakes we began the Seddon Earthquake Aftershock Structural Investigation (SEASI) and deployed a line of 21 seismometers stretching approximately 400 km along the strike of the Hikurangi subduction zone in order to use aftershocks to illuminate the structure of the subducted Pacific slab. The SEASI line ties into the SAHKE line, which was an array of up to 900 seismometers that recorded air gun and explosion shots in deployments from 2009-2011. The SAHKE project characterized the structures perpendicular to the strike of the subduction zone. Our results use the SAHKE line as a starting point and look for strike-parallel variations in the depth of the Moho and other structures. Previous studies have suggested potential changes along strike in this region, and deep slow slip events (> 35 km) are also observed north of Wellington, further indicating that variation in properties exists along slab strike. We have used 246 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from September 2013 through January 2014 to create common receiver gathers. Multicomponent prestack depth migration of these receiver gathers, with operator antialiasing control and prestack coherency filtering, produces reflectivity sections using a 1-D velocity model derived from the SAHKE project. Relocation of aftershocks of the Seddon earthquakes using the deployment of a temporary array by New Zealand GeoNet facilitates the migration. An initial P-P migration shows a north-dipping reflector at 15-25 km depth under the earthquake sequence, and suggests the Moho at 20-25 km depth. From Wellington, a reflector dips very gently south from 25-35 km depth, which is probably the slab interface. These results are helping to build 3-D information about the plate interface. We hope that this will help us to understand future hazards posed by subduction thrust earthquakes in this region, and the feeding system for deep slow-slip earthquakes.

  3. Simulation of tectonic evolution of the Kanto basin of Japan since 1 Ma due to subduction of the Pacific and Philippine sea plates and collision of the Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashima, Akinori; Sato, Toshinori; Sato, Hiroshi; Asao, Kazumi; Furuya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shuji; Kameo, Koji; Miyauchi, Takahiro; Ito, Tanio; Tsumura, Noriko; Kaneda, Heitaro

    2015-04-01

    The Kanto basin, the largest lowland in Japan, developed by flexure as a result of (1) the subduction of the Philippine Sea (PHS) and the Pacific (PAC) plates and (2) the collision of the Izu-Bonin arc with the Japanese island arc. Geomorphological, geological, and thermochronological data on long-term vertical movements over the last 1 My suggest that subsidence initially affected the entire Kanto basin after which the area of subsidence gradually narrowed until, finally, the basin began to experience uplift. In this study, we modelled the tectonic evolution of the Kanto basin following the method of Matsu'ura and Sato (1989) for a kinematic subduction model with dislocations, in order to quantitatively assess the effects of PHS and PAC subduction. We include the steady slip-rate deficit (permanent locking rate at the plate interface) in our model to account for collision process. We explore how the arc-arc collision process has been affected by a westerly shift in the PHS plate motion vector with respect to the Eurasian plate, thought to have occurred between 1.0-0.5 Ma, using long-term vertical deformation data to constrain extent of the locked zone on the plate interface. We evaluated the change in vertical deformation rate for two scenarios: (1) a synchronous shift in the orientation of the locked zone as PHS plate motion shifts and (2) a delayed shift in the orientation of the locked zone following a change in plate motion. Observed changes in the subsidence/uplift pattern are better explained by scenario (2), suggesting that recent (<1 My) deformation in the Kanto basin shows a lag in crustal response to the shift in plate motion. We also calculated recent stress accumulation rates and found a good match with observed earthquake mechanisms, which shows that intraplate earthquakes serve to release stress accumulated through long-term plate interactions.

  4. Mesozoic plate-motion history below the northeast Pacific Ocean from seismic images of the subducted Farallon slab

    PubMed

    Bunge; Grand

    2000-05-18

    The high-resolution seismic imaging of subducted oceanic slabs has become a powerful tool for reconstructing palaeogeography. The images can now be interpreted quantitatively by comparison with models of the general circulation of the Earth's mantle. Here we use a three-dimensional spherical computer model of mantle convection to show that seismic images of the subducted Farallon plate provide strong evidence for a Mesozoic period of low-angle subduction under North America. Such a period of low-angle subduction has been invoked independently to explain Rocky Mountain uplift far inland from the plate boundary during the Laramide orogeny. The computer simulations also allow us to locate the largely unknown Kula-Farallon spreading plate boundary, the location of which is important for inferring the trajectories of 'suspect' terrain across the Pacific basin. PMID:10830960

  5. Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tremor localize to the plate interface in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Ide, S.; Ohta, K.; Shelly, D.R.; Schwartz, S.Y.; Rabbel, W.; Thorwart, M.; Kao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Deep tremor under Shikoku, Japan, consists primarily, and perhaps entirely, of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as shear slip on the plate interface. Although tremor is observed at other plate boundaries, the lack of cataloged low-frequency earthquakes has precluded a similar conclusion about tremor in those locales. We use a network autocorrelation approach to detect and locate LFEs within tremor recorded at three subduction zones characterized by different thermal structures and levels of interplate seismicity: southwest Japan, northern Cascadia, and Costa Rica. In each case we find that LFEs are the primary constituent of tremor and that they locate on the deep continuation of the plate boundary. This suggests that tremor in these regions shares a common mechanism and that temperature is not the primary control on such activity. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Changes in electrical resistivity track changes in plate coupling of the Hikurangi subduction interface, New Zealand (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, W.; Caldwell, G.; Hill, G.; Bertrand, E. A.; Bennie, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Inter-plate coupling on the Hikurangi subduction margin along the east coast of New Zealand's North Island changes from north to south from almost uncoupled to locked. Magnetotelluric (MT) data from the northern part of the Hikurangi margin show a dipping conductor is present above the subduction interface and is interpreted to mark a layer of fluid and/or clay rich sediments within the subduction interface shear zone. Results from a MT profile in the southern part of the Hikurangi subduction margin, where the plates are locked, show the conductivity structure is markedly different than in the north. Here, no conductor is observed along the plate interface. The difference in plate-coupling and resistivity structure between the northern and southern parts of the Hikurangi margin suggest that the presence of fluid and/or clay rich sediments plays an important role in controlling the frictional processes at the interface and thus the inter-seismic coupling.

  7. Investigation on the Interface Morphologies of Explosive Welding of Inconel 625 to Steel A516 Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Zareie, H. R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this study is to produce composite plates by explosive cladding process. This is a process in which the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored through parallel geometry route with different operational parameters. In this investigation, a two-pronged study was adopted to establish the conditions required for producing successful solid state welding: (a) Analytical calculations to determine the weldability domain or welding window; (b) Metallurgical investigations of explosive welding experiments carried out under different explosive ratios to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. The analytical calculations confirm the experimental results. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth to wavy interface occurs with an increase in explosive ratio. SEM studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials.

  8. The magnetic properties of some DSDP basalts from the North Pacific and inferences for Pacific plate tectonics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monte Marshall

    1978-01-01

    One hundred seven basalt samples from seven DSDP sites in the North Pacific studied for magnetic properties were found to have a mean magnetization of 0.005 emu\\/cm3, a mean susceptibility of 0.001, and a mean Koenigsberger ratio of 10. The mean remanence coercivity as measured by the mean demagnetizing field is 90 Oc. The titanomagnetite in most of these old

  9. Preliminary Investigation to Resolve the Shear Velocity Structure of the Mantle Transition Zone beneath the Caroline Plate, Equatorial Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, K.; Kawai, K.; Fuji, N.; Lee, S.; Geller, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Mantle Transition Zone (MTZ), which lies in the depth range from 410-660 km, is considered to be a region capable of carrying a large amount of water and other volatiles. A unique feature of the MTZ beneath the northwest Pacific rim is the stagnant slab which lies below much of the West Philippine Basin and extends laterally over a distance of thousands of kilometers beneath Korea and northeast China. In recent years, suggestions have been made that explain the seismicity and intra-plate volcanism in this region in terms of hydrous magmatic plumes rising from the MTZ. However, the exact mechanism remains under debate. An equally important, but less well-known, observation is that a stagnant slab appears to exist beneath much of the Caroline Plate in the equatorial western Pacific as well. If a stagnant slab does exist here, it is most likely a result of the long northward migration of the Australian Plate and subduction since its breakaway from the Antarctic. However, due to tectonic complexity and the lack of seismic stations, the structure and properties of the stagnant slab and the MTZ beneath the Caroline plate are not well understood. Also it is unclear if the large volcanic outflows around the Caroline Plate such as the Eurpik Rise can be explained by a hydrous magmatic plume stemming from the MTZ. To understand the shear-wave velocity structure of the MTZ beneath the Caroline Plate, we employ a body wave waveform inversion technique. Fuji et al. (PEPI, 2010) conducted body wave waveform inversion for the mantle transition zone beneath Japan. In this study we present preliminary results for an application of their methods to infer upper mantle and MTZ structure beneath the Caroline plate. We also estimate the resolving power of full-waveform inversion for a dataset obtained from the IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) network for shear velocity structure in the upper mantle, especially for the mantle transition zone beneath the Caroline Plate using transverse component body wave data in order to examine whether it is possible to reliably infer the existence of a high velocity anomaly because the dataset is relatively small and there are not many seismic stations to the east of this region.

  10. The Juan Fernandez microplate north of the Pacific-Nazca-Antarctic plate junction at 35 deg S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francheteau, J.; Yelles-Chaouche, A.; Craig, H.

    1987-12-01

    Evidence for the existence of the Juan Fernandez microplate, just north of the junction between the East Pacific Rise and the Chile Fracture Zone, is adduced from the results of the Pascua 3 expedition. The 'SEABEAM' bathymetric system allows the plate fabric to be revealed along each swath. An analysis of faults, scarps, and submarine volcanoes is conducted for the entire Pascua 3 data set, and the results obtained furnish strong constraints for the kinematic model and geometry of the Juan Fernandez microplate proposed by Anderson-Fontana et al. (1986).

  11. Electromagnetic imaging the of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in central California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelock, B. D.; Constable, S.; Key, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    The continental margin of central California lies adjacent to a segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF) that exhibits a transition between locked behavior south of the town of Cholame, and freely slipping (creeping) behavior north of the town of Parkfield. Recent reports of non-volcanic tremor (NVT) near the town of Cholame represent the first observation of NVT in a strike-slip environment. Dense clusters of tremor episodes located at the northern limit of the locked section of the SAF were found to originate within the ductile lower crust at depths between 15 and 30~km, and have been interpreted as evidence of high pore fluid pressure. An excess of fluids in this region is likely given its history of subduction, which transports large quantities of water into the forearc crust and mantle. We present a study that uses deep electromagnetic imaging methods to estimate the abundance and distribution of pore fluids at depths associated with non-volcanic tremor. This study extends a previously collected terrestrial profile of magnetotelluric (MT) data (Becken et al. 2008, Geophysical Journal International) into the offshore environment. We deployed 21 seafloor instruments that collected controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) and MT data in a line extending from the coast near Morro Bay, across the continental shelf, and out onto the Pacific plate. The marine MT data results in apparent resistivity and phase estimates at periods between 1~s and 20,000~s, sufficient for probing the upper 100~km of regional conductivity. A significant coast effect, marked by asymptotic behavior in the TE mode of the MT responses, is observed at the deep water sites. This necessitates accurate bathymetry modeling when inverting. The CSEM transmitter was towed by all receivers broadcasting a compact broadband binary waveform with a 0.25~Hz fundamental frequency. The controlled-source signal is observed above the noisefloor at source-receiver offsets up to 6~km, which provides constraints on the conductivity structure of the upper 3~km of the crust. By extending the preceding line of terrestrial MT measurements to the west, we are able to constrain any differences in crust and mantle conductivity associated with the transition across the continental boundary. Furthermore, we address whether the deeply-sourced fluids migrating into the root of the SAF identified in Becken et al. (2008) are related to the fossil subduction zone. Inversion of this combined data set aims to detect the source region of these deep fluids, put constraints on their abundance, and further reveal any pathways by which they may reach the San Andreas fault.

  12. Tidal stress influence on slow slip on the deep plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Houston, H.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tectonic tremors and slow earthquakes, which are detected in many subduction zones and transform faults, are characterized by various quantities, such as duration, recurrence interval, and the sensitivity to tidal stress. These characteristic quantities are spatially variable among regions and even within an individual region. It is also known that the seismic energy release by tremor also spatially varies (e.g., Maeda and Obara, 2009; Ando et al., 2012; Yabe and Ide, in review). We interpret the spatial variation in seismic energy rate (amplitude) of tremors to represent the variation of plate-interface strength, in which case the spatial variation of tidal sensitivity might correlate with that of seismic energy rate. To investigate such relation, we have investigated the spatial variation of tidal sensitivity in Nankai and Cascadia subduction zones. Although the spatial variation of tidal sensitivity has been investigated using the frequency spectrum at specific tidal frequency, we calculate the time history of tidal stressing on the plate interface and compare it with tremor activity to investigate their relation. Both body tide and ocean tide are included in the calculation of tidal stress. We calculated Green functions for the spherical Earth based on the method by Okubo and Tsuji (2001). The time history of sea surface level is calculated with the SPOTL program (Agnew, 2012). The fault planes of VLF estimated by Ide and Yabe (2014) are used to calculate stress on the plate interface. Tremors are more likely to occur when tidal shear stress is larger, in the subduction direction. Tremor rate appears to increase exponentially with tidal shear stress, as previously seen by Houston (2013, AGU). Although tidal sensitivity can be seen in many regions, some regions show particularly strong sensitivity. In some regions, tidal sensitivity can be seen clearly during the later portions of large SSEs, consistent with behavior reported by Houston (2013, AGU), while other regions show tidal sensitivity without large SSEs as well. In the regions where tidal sensitivity can be seen, the rake direction of VLF is consistent with the direction of maximum tidal shear stress on that fault plane. This observation might imply that tidal stress significantly modulates the timing of slow slip on the deep plate interface.

  13. Streaking in Cascadia ETS Events and Implications for the Subduction Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, H.; Ghosh, A.

    2011-12-01

    The manner in which episodic tremor and slow slip (ETS) propagates across the subduction plate interface provides constraints on its properties and the physical processes involved. We have been examining catalogs of tremor locations to study propagation patterns during ETS. Tremor in the large Cascadia ETS events propagates mainly via three modes: 1) the slow along-strike advance of ETS, 2) rapid tremor reversals (RTRs) that propagate back from the tremor front in an opposite direction to the along-strike advance, but at speeds 10-40 times faster (Houston et al., Nature Geoscience, 2011), and 3) streaks, even faster migrations of tremor parallel to the plate-convergence direction at speeds ~ 70 km/hr (Ghosh et al., G3, 2011). The UW Seismology group has recently deployed an EarthScope-funded seismic experiment, the Array of Arrays, to image tremor more precisely with eight subarrays. A 15-month catalog of high-resolution tremor locations has been generated based on the triangulation of back-projected beams from the subarrays. We detect tremor streaks in this catalog automatically and systematically determine streak propagation properties. Key issues for constraining streak-generation processes include systematic differences between up- and down-dip traveling streaks, how streak properties may depend on depth, and whether streaks accelerate or decelerate during propagation. Stacking automatically-detected streaks can address some of these issues. Two approaches to automatically detecting streaks have been developed and applied to the M6.8 2010 ETS. One method declares a streak when averaged epicenters continue to move in a roughly constant direction for more than 10 km. The second declares a streak if epicenters during a specified time interval, say 20 min, are sufficiently well-correlated with time. The two methods agree well and detect several streaks per day of 15-30 min duration with speeds consistent with those inferred for the 2008 ETS. Although the detection methods have no azimuthal bias, most of the detected streaks align with one direction; furthermore, that direction lies much closer to the plate convergence direction than directly down-dip (the down-dip and plate convergence directions differ significantly along most of Cascadia). Many more streaks are detected in the actual catalog than in randomized versions, in which the times within each hour are permuted. These results lend substantial credence to convergence-parallel streaks as real features of ETS. Streak propagation patterns suggest the plate interface is anisotropic along the slip direction. The ubiquity of streaking parallel to plate convergence implies control by corrugated or smeared structures on the plate interface. This could occur via such structures controlling the orientation of an advancing slip pulse, which could carry streaks along its peak (Rubin, G3, 2011), or more directly via heterogeneous physical properties (such as rheology or permeability) elongated in the convergence direction. In this connection, we note that daily tremor bands in Cascadia ETS are also often oriented parallel to the convergence direction whether the ETS is advancing north or south, even though the direction of ETS advance would be expected to affect the orientation of a slip pulse on a homogeneous interface.

  14. Localized double-array stacking analysis of PcP: D? and ULVZ structure beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, central Pacific, and north Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin

    2009-01-01

    A large, high quality P-wave data set comprising short-period and broadband signals sampling four separate regions in the lowermost mantle beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, the central Pacific, and the north Pacific is analyzed using regional one-dimensional double-array stacking and modelling with reflectivity synthetics. A data-screening criterion retains only events with stable PcP energy in the final data stacks used for modelling and interpretation. This significantly improves the signal stacks relative to including unscreened observations, allows confident alignment on the PcP arrival and allows tight bounds to be placed on P-wave velocity structure above the core–mantle boundary (CMB). The PcP reflections under the Cocos plate are well modelled without any ultra-low velocity zone from 5 to 20°N. At latitudes from 15 to 20°N, we find evidence for two P-wave velocity discontinuities in the D? region. The first is ?182 km above the CMB with a ?ln Vp of +1.5%, near the same depth as a weaker discontinuity (<+0.5%) observed from 5 to 15°N in prior work. The other reflector is ?454 km above the CMB, with a ?ln Vp of +0.4%; this appears to be a shallower continuation of the joint P- and S-wave discontinuity previously detected south of 15° N, which is presumed to be the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. The data stacks for paths bottoming below Mexico have PcP images that are well matched with the simple IASP91 structure, contradicting previous inferences of ULVZ presence in this region. These particular data are not very sensitive to any D? discontinuities, and simply bound them to be Pacific confirm the presence of a ?15-km thick ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) just above the CMB, with ?ln Vp and ?ln Vs of around ?3 to ?4% and ?4 to ?8%, respectively. The ULVZ models predict previous S-wave data stacks well. The data for this region indicate laterally varying Vp discontinuities in D?, with one subregion having a ?ln Vp of 0.5% 140 km above the CMB. Beneath the north Pacific, the PcP arrivals are compatible with only weak ULVZ (?ln Vp ? 0 to ?3%), and there is a weak D? reflector with ?ln Vp = 0.5%, near 314 km above the CMB. These results indicate localized occurrence of detectable ULVZ structures rather than ubiquitous ULVZ structure and emphasize the distinctiveness between the large low shear velocity province under the central Pacific and circum-Pacific regions.

  15. Tectostratigraphic evidence for Late Paleozoic Pacific plate collision and post-Upper Jurassic transpression in northeastern Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    The rocks of Mina Plomosas, Chihuahua include a structurally complex association of Ordovician to Permian and Upper Jurassic strata. The structural deformation has historically been considered as two-fold including late Paleozoic compression associated with the collision of North and Afro-South America followed by loosely defined Laramide influences. These interpretations, however, are inconsistent with respect to timing, direction and style of deformation and the tectostratigraphic development of northeastern Mexico. Paleozoic strata which are folded, overturned and thrusted to the southwest are in opposition to the predicted, and elsewhere observed, northwestward compression. More likely, deformation is the result of late Paleozoic, northeastward directed Pacific plate collision causing underthrusting of the Paleozoic strata. Typical Laramide deformations are also in question. Upper Jurassic La Casita-equivalent rocks are twisted into distally thrusted, arcuate, en echelon, omega-folded anticlines which rotate into the trend of the suspected continuation of the oblique strike-slip San Marcos Fault. Such structures are diagnostic of transpressive mobile belts. The implications of late Paleozoic Pacific plate interactions and post-middle Paleozoic transpressive tectonics are that northern Mexico was located to the northwest during the Paleozoic and was repositioned following deposition of Upper Jurassic strata.

  16. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  17. Geotectonic bipolarity, evidence from the pattern of active oceanic ridges bordering the Pacific and African plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Pavoni; M. V Müller

    2000-01-01

    Active oceanic ridges are part of the global system of diverging plate boundaries encircling the Earth. They represent weak zones of the lithosphere. They are isostatically equilibrated. The system as a whole is considered to be well adapted to the present field of plate driving forces. The search for regularities in the pattern of active oceanic ridges may, therefore, provide

  18. Plate convergence, transcurrent faults and internal deformation adjacent to Southeast Asia and the western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitch, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    A model for oblique convergence between plates of lithosphere is proposed in which at least a fraction of slip parallel to the plate margin results in transcurrent movements on a nearly vertical fault which is located on the continental side of a zone of plate consumption. In an extreme case of complete decoupling only the component of slip normal to the plate margin can be inferred from underthrusting. Recent movements in the western Sunda region provide the most convincing evidence for decoupling of slip, which in this region is thought to be oblique to the plate margin. A speculative model for convergence along the margins of the Philippine Sea is constructed from an inferred direction of oblique slip in the Philippine region. This model requires that the triple point formed by the junction of the Japanese and Izu-Bonin trenches and the Nankai trough migrate along the Sagami trough.

  19. Faunal breaks and species composition of Indo-Pacific corals: the role of plate tectonics, environment and habitat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keith, S. A.; Baird, A. H.; Hughes, T. P.; Madin, J. S.; Connolly, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Species richness gradients are ubiquitous in nature, but the mechanisms that generate and maintain these patterns at macroecological scales remain unresolved. We use a new approach that focuses on overlapping geographical ranges of species to reveal that Indo-Pacific corals are assembled within 11 distinct faunal provinces. Province limits are characterized by co-occurrence of multiple species range boundaries. Unexpectedly, these faunal breaks are poorly predicted by contemporary environmental conditions and the present-day distribution of habitat. Instead, faunal breaks show striking concordance with geological features (tectonic plates and mantle plume tracks). The depth range over which a species occurs, its larval development rate and genus age are important determinants of the likelihood that species will straddle faunal breaks. Our findings indicate that historical processes, habitat heterogeneity and species colonization ability account for more of the present-day biogeographical patterns of corals than explanations based on the contemporary distribution of reefs or environmental conditions. PMID:23698011

  20. Faunal breaks and species composition of Indo-Pacific corals: the role of plate tectonics, environment and habitat distribution.

    PubMed

    Keith, S A; Baird, A H; Hughes, T P; Madin, J S; Connolly, S R

    2013-07-22

    Species richness gradients are ubiquitous in nature, but the mechanisms that generate and maintain these patterns at macroecological scales remain unresolved. We use a new approach that focuses on overlapping geographical ranges of species to reveal that Indo-Pacific corals are assembled within 11 distinct faunal provinces. Province limits are characterized by co-occurrence of multiple species range boundaries. Unexpectedly, these faunal breaks are poorly predicted by contemporary environmental conditions and the present-day distribution of habitat. Instead, faunal breaks show striking concordance with geological features (tectonic plates and mantle plume tracks). The depth range over which a species occurs, its larval development rate and genus age are important determinants of the likelihood that species will straddle faunal breaks. Our findings indicate that historical processes, habitat heterogeneity and species colonization ability account for more of the present-day biogeographical patterns of corals than explanations based on the contemporary distribution of reefs or environmental conditions. PMID:23698011

  1. Oceanic plate structures beneath the northwestern Pacific Ocean revealed by explosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isse, T.; Shiobara, H.; Shinohara, M.; Yamada, T.; Yagi, T.; Sugioka, H.; Utada, H.

    2014-12-01

    Plate tectonics is based on a concept that a rigid lithosphere moves over a weaker asthenosphere. Understanding of the plate tectonics is important to understand the Earth's system. However, the nature of the lithosphere and asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is not yet well determined. To understand the physical condition for the LAB, we have conduct a seafloor observation called " Normal Oceanic Mantle (NOMan) Project". We focused on the oceanic plate because the nature and evolution history of the oceanic plate is simpler than the continental plate so that it is easier to investigate its nature. To analyze the upper mantle structures around the LAB, we conducted a seismic explosion experiments as a part of NOMan project. Seismic explosion experiments were conducted at four shot sites with ten broadband ocean bottom seismometers and the size of explosions is 400 kg at two sites, and 200 kg at other sites. The profile lengths are about 700 and 400 km, respectively. Previous studies in this area revealed the azimuthal anisotropy in the uppermost lithosphere (Shinohara et al., 2008), a sharp LAB at a depth of ~ 80 km (Kawakatsu et al. 2009), small-scale heterogeneities in the lithosphere (Shito et al., 2013). After explosion experiments, we recovered five BBOBSs. Rest of them will be recovered at this September.

  2. Late cretaceous pelagic sediments, volcanic ASH and biotas from near the Louisville hotspot, Pacific Plate, paleolatitude ?42°S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballance, Peter F.; Barron, John A.; Blome, Charles D.; Bukry, David; Cawood, Peter A.; Chaproniere, George C.H.; Frisch, Robyn; Herzer, Richard H.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Quinterno, Paula; Ryan, Holly F.; Scholl, David W.; Stevenson, Andrew J.; Tappin, David G.; Vallier, Tracy L.

    1989-01-01

    Dredging on the deep inner slope of the Tonga Trench, immediately north of the intersection between the Louisville Ridge hotspot chain and the trench, recovered some Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian) slightly tuffaceous pelagic sediments. They are inferred to have been scraped off a recently subducted Late Cretaceous guyot of the Louisville chain. In the vicinity of the Louisville hotspot (present location 50°26?S, 139°09?W; Late Cretaceous location ?42°S, longitude unknown) Late Cretaceous rich diatom, radiolarian, silicoflagellate, foraminiferal and coccolith biotas, accumulated on the flanks of the guyot and are described in this paper. Rich sponge faunas are not described. ?Inoceramus prisms are present. Volcanic ash is of within-plate alkalic character. Isotope ratios in bulk carbonate ?18O ? 2.63 to + 0.85, ?13C + 2.98 to 3.83) are normal for Pacific Maestrichtian sediments. The local CCD may have been shallower than the regional CCD, because of high organic productivity. In some samples Late Cretaceous materials have been mixed with Neogene materials. Mixing may have taken place on the flanks of the guyot during transit across the western Pacific, or on the trench slope during or after subduction and offscraping about 0.5 Ma.

  3. The Interface of Pacific and Other Knowledges in a Supplementary Education Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbairn-Dunlop, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Because identity (language and culture) are central to Pacific knowledge and knowledge construction processes, Pacific students' educational experiences should be viewed through a cultural lens that sees Pacific knowledge and practices as valid and valued. This study explores the relationship between culture and educational outcomes as seen…

  4. Upper mantle deformation beneath the North American–Pacific plate boundary in California from SKS splitting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mickael Bonnin; Guilhem Barruol; Götz H. R. Bokelmann

    2010-01-01

    In order to constrain the vertical and lateral extent of deformation and the interactions between lithosphere and asthenosphere in a context of a transpressional plate boundary, we performed teleseismic shear wave splitting measurements for 65 permanent and temporary broadband stations in central California. We present evidence for the presence of two anisotropic domains: (1) one with clear E–W trending fast

  5. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  6. Tectonic slicing of subducted oceanic crust along plate interfaces: numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Burov, Evgenii; Gerya, Taras; Agard, Philippe; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia

    2015-04-01

    Remains of high-pressure low-temperature metamorphic oceanic crust are observed within orogenic belts and along recent subduction zones all around the globe. Such blueshist and eclogite "slivers" can strongly vary in extend and experienced P-T-t evolution. To reveal the surficial occurrence of oceanic rocks that occasionally have been at depths down to ~ 80 km within subduction zones, two main processes have to be investigated individually: (i) Detachment of oceanic slivers from the down going plate preventing rocks to be consumed by the mantle, and (ii) exhumation of detached oceanic material to the surface. It has often been stated that the process of slicing and exhumation of oceanic blueshists and eclogites is closely related to continental subduction. Nevertheless, several examples worldwide show exhumation (and therefore latest possible detachment from slab) occurring early or intermediate of the subduction process. We present new insight into the mechanical processes of detachment of oceanic slivers and their exhumation independent of continental collision by using numerical modelling tools. Large-scale thermo-mechanical models (600 * 200 km) based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique, are applied to test how serpentinised upper slab mantle (mantle serpentinisation at oceanic ridges or/and along to outer-rise normal faults) influences shallow and deep crustal detachment. Preliminary results show that a through-going serpentinite layer below the oceanic crust, if serpentinisation exceeds 50%, triggers slicing at wedge depths. Even if mechanical coupling mainly occurs at intermediate depths along the subduction interface, stresses within the oceanic crust are dispersed upward due to the weak, decoupling serpentinite layer. Unconnected patches of serpentinised upper slab mantle eventually lead to deep slicing, depending on upper plate serpentinisation due to slab dewatering. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of pressure-dependent fluid migration and according weakening (increasing fluid pressure) of subducted crust and its implications on slicing.

  7. Seismological investigations of the subduction zone plate interface: New advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, Andreas; Garth, Tom; Hicks, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, huge advances have been made in analysing the slip distribution of large megathrust earthquakes and how slip relates to geodetic locking, shedding light on the character of the seismic cycle in subduction zones. Recently, a number of studies have suggested that at convergent plate boundaries, geodetic locking may be closely related to slip distribution of subsequent large earthquakes, as found recently for the Maule 2010 and Tohoku 2011 earthquakes. However, the physical (e.g. seismic) properties along the subduction zone interface are still poorly constrained, posing a major limitation to our physical understanding of both geodetic locking and earthquake rupture process. Here, we present high-resolution seismic tomography results (P- and S-wave velocity), as well as earthquake locations to make a detailed investigation of seismic properties along the portion of the plate interface that ruptured during the 2010 Maule earthquake. Additionally, to test the robustness of our models, we performed numerous numerical tests including changes to the parameterization, synthetic recovery tests and bootstrap analysis. We find P-wave velocities of about 5.7 km/s at 10 km depth and linearly increasing to 7.5 km/s at a depth of 30 km. Between 30 km and 43 km, P-wave velocities are relatively constant at around 7.5 km/s before a subsequent increase to 8.3 km/s at larger depths (>60 km) is observed. The Poisson's ratio is significantly elevated, at values of up to 0.35 at shallow depths of 10km to 15km, before reaching less elevated values of 0.28-0.29 in the depth range between 20km and 43km. Comparison of these velocities to petrological models shows good agreement below 30 - 50 km depth. At shallower depths though P-wave velocities are significantly lower, which together with the elevated poisons ratio indicates that this portion of the mega thrust is highly hydrated, suggesting that material properties may in part control the seismogenic character of subduction megathrusts Comparison of our findings to other regional tomographic models from other subduction zones worldwide (Japan, Sumatra) shows excellent agreements with our results.

  8. Rheological contrast between serpentines and olivine and weakening of a subducting plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirauchi, K.; Katayama, I.

    2010-12-01

    Recent seismic observations have suggested that water released by dehydration reactions within a subducting slab is transported through the base of the overlying mantle, thereby causing serpentinization. The degrees of viscous coupling between the serpentinite layer and the overlying mantle wedge might influence the style of mantle convection and the thermal state of a subduction zone (Wada et al., 2008). Serpentine minerals (lizardite, chrysotile, and antigorite) are hydrous phyllosilicates (13 wt% H2O). In subduction zone environments, lizardite and chrysotile seem to form at temperatures below 300-400°C, whereas antigorite is stable at higher temperatures of 300 to 600°C. Previous deformation experiments have revealed that the low- and high-temperature serpentine species display intracrystalline plastic flow in the mantle wedge (e.g., Hilairet et al., 2007; Hirauchi et al., 2010). In particular, Hilairet et al. (2007) indicated that the strength of antigorite is an order of magnitude lower than that of olivine at geological time scales: however, the rheological contrast between lizardite/chrysotile and antigorite under the mantle wedge conditions is not directly constrained. We therefore conducted two-layer shear deformation experiments on serpentines and olivine under P-T conditions (P = 1 GPa, T = 250, 300°C) that correspond to the forearc mantle wedge in subduction zones. The experimental results show that strain rates in lizardite/chrysotile are approximately an order of magnitude higher than those in olivine, whereas strain rates in antigorite is only 1 to 2 times higher than those in olivine. The contrasts in strain rates between lizardite/chrysotile and antigorite is represented by a factor of 5 to 6. Based on the results of our experiments, we suggest that the rheology of lizardite/chrysotile can only explain strong decoupling on the subducting plate interface. Our experiments also show that antigorite is not significantly weaker than olivine in the dislocation-accommodated creep regime, as compared to Hilairet et al. (2007), resulting in weak decoupling at the plate interface. Therefore, we suggest that the degrees of viscous coupling in subduction zones are strongly controlled by the serpentine species stable in the base of the mantle wedge, depending on various parameters (e.g., cool vs. warm subduction zones, change with depth).

  9. Plastic Creep and Brittle-Ductile Transition in Hydrated Rocks of the Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, B.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical observations suggest that the formation of hydrous phyllosilicate-bearing rocks such as serpentinites favor aseismic slip on the plate interface. I review our current understanding of deformation of serpentines and similar phyllosilicates in the first 100 km of subduction and discuss some pending questions on measurements and modeling of the behavior and properties of the complex serpentinite rocks. Experimental studies suggest that serpentines have low enough mechanical strength to act as a "stabilizer" of stable creep, but the actual strength of serpentinites will depend on the exact nature of the crystallographic structure and fabric of the stable serpentine variety. Low-temperature, flat-layered lizardite has strong anisotropy in strength. Lizardite-serpentinite strength will depend crystal-preferred orientation (CPO), with isotropic texture having high strength (>300 MPa) and foliated serpentinites having small strength (<100 MPa), independent of temperature, pressure, and strain rate. Thus, the transition between brittle and plastic (or stable creep) behavior may result from progressive deformation. High-temperature serpentine antigorite has a complex corrugated-layered structure, and complex deformation modes were evidenced from experimental studies. Mechanical strength shows a strong stress dependence, suggesting dislocation-creep, and low temperature dependence, suggesting plastic behavior. Extrapolation of experimental results to natural strain rates suggests that antigorite-serpentinites have low strength (<100 MPa or lower), and will favor stable-creep. However, the extrapolation relies on mechanical flow laws that may not apply to serpentine. Electron microscopy observations reveals dislocation-like deformation mechanisms that are not sufficient to explain global deformation of antigorite aggregates, and that are likely accompanied by dissolution-precipitation at low natural strain-rates. Establishing reliable flow laws relevant to the subduction interface in the 30-100 km depth range will require further experimental investigations of such mechanisms.

  10. Fluid content along the subduction plate interface: how it impacts the long- (and short-) term rheology and exhumation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, Philippe; Angiboust, Samuel; Guillot, Stéphane; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, many studies based on field, petrological and geophysical evidence have emphasized the link between mineral reactions, fluid release and seismogenesis, either along the whole plate interface (eg., Hacker et al., 2003) or at specific depths (e.g., ~30 km: Audet et al., 2009; ~70-80 km: Angiboust et al., 2012). Although they argue for a crucial influence of fluids on subduction processes, large uncertainties remain when assessing their impact on the rheology of the plate interface across space and time. Kilometer-scale accreted terranes/units in both ancient and present-day subduction zones potentially allow to track changes in mechanical coupling along the plate interface. Despite some potential biases (exhumation is limited and episodic, lasting no more than a few My if any, from prefered depths -- mainly 30-40 and 70-80 km, and there are so far only few examples precisely located with respect to the plate interface) their record of changes in fluid regime and strain localisation is extremely valuable. One striking example of the role of fluids on plate interface rheology during nascent subduction is provided by metamorphic soles (i.e., ~500 m thick tectonic slices welded to the base of ophiolites). We show that their accretion to the ophiolite indeed only happens across a transient, optimal time-T-P window (after < 1-2 My, at 1±0.2 GPa, 750-850°C) associated with fluid release and infiltration, leading to similar effective rheology on both sides (i.e., downgoing crust and mantle wedge). This maximizes interplate mechanical coupling, as deformation gets distributed over a large band encompassing the plate interface (i.e., a few km), and promotes detachment of the sole from the sinking slab. We also show how tectonic slicing during mature subduction likely relates to short-term fluid release and repeated seismicity, based on the Monviso exposures (W. Alps, a relatively continuous, 15 km long fragment of oceanic lithosphere exhumed from ~80 km depths), which preserve evidence of intraslab fluid flow and eclogitic, intermediate-depth seismicity of Mw ~4. We finally address how, in the long-term and at subduction scale, the overall fluid content and fluid regime may control the slicing, size and metastability of exhumed units. We propose that mechanical coupling varies through time, from weak to strong, as a function of the contrast of effective viscosity on either side of the interface: a young and wet subduction interface will promote the formation of knockers and sole accretion, whereas a fluid-present yet drier and colder one will lead to mainly metasedimentary underplated material and large-scale slivers of (metastable) oceanic lithosphere. This interpretation is supported by bi-phase numerical models (allowing for fluid migration driven by concentrations in the rocks, non-lithostatic pressure gradients and deformation, mantle wedge hydration and mechanical weakening of the plate interface) showing that the detachment of large-scale oceanic tectonic slices is in particular promoted by fluid migration along the subduction interface. [Hacker et al., Journal of Geophysical Research 2003; Audet et al., Nature, 2009; Angiboust et al., Geology 2012

  11. Deformation across the Pacific-North America plate boundary near San Francisco, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Manaker, D.

    2001-01-01

    We have detected a narrow zone of compression between the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley, and we have estimated slip rates for the San Andreas, Rodgers Creek, and Green Valley faults just north of San Francisco. These results are based on an analysis of campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected between 1992 and 2000 in central California. The zone of compression between the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley is 25 km wide. The observations clearly show 3.8??1.5 mm yr-1 of shortening over this narrow zone. The strike slip components are best fit by a model with 20.8??1.9 mm yr-1 slip on the San Andreas fault, 10.3??2.6 mm yr-1 on the Rodgers Creek fault, and 8.1??2.1 mm yr-1 on the Green Valley fault. The Pacific-Sierra Nevada-Great Valley motion totals 39.2??3.8 mm yr-1 across a zone that is 120 km wide (at the latitude of San Francisco). Standard deviations are one ??. The geodetic results suggest a higher than geologic rate for the Green Valley fault. The geodetic results also suggest an inconsistency between geologic estimates of the San Andreas rate and seismologic estimates of the depth of locking on the San Andreas fault. The only convergence observed is in the narrow zone along the border between the Great Valley and the Coast Ranges.

  12. Focal mechanism of a shock at the northwestern boundary of the pacific plate: Extensional feature of the oceanic lithosphere and compressional feature of the continental lithosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kunihiko Shimazaki

    1972-01-01

    First motions of P-wave and S-wave polarization angles for a shallow shock that occurred on July 25, 1965, at about 70 km oceanward from the Kuril trench indicate a double couple dip-slip source with a horizontal tension axis in the direction perpendicular to the trench. This suggests that the Pacific plate in this region is being extended in this direction.

  13. Diffuse Pacific-North American plate boundary: 1000 km of dextral shear inferred from modeling geodetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2011-01-01

    Geodetic measurements tell us that the eastern part of the Basin and Range Province expands in an east-west direction relative to stable North America, whereas the western part of the province moves to the northwest. We develop three-dimensional finite element representations of the western United States lithosphere in an effort to understand the global positioning system (GPS) signal. The models are constrained by known bounding-block velocities and topography, and Basin and Range Province deformation is represented by simple plastic (thermal creep) rheology. We show that active Basin and Range spreading by gravity collapse is expected to have a strong southward component that does not match the GPS signal. We can reconcile the gravitational component of displacement with observed velocity vectors if the Pacific plate applies northwest-directed shear stress to the Basin and Range via the Sierra Nevada block. This effect reaches at least 1000 km east of the San Andreas fault in our models. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  14. Lithospheric Evolution of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary Considered in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, G. P.

    2006-12-01

    Tomographic imaging indicates that the heterogeneity observed in the crust of westernmost North America is underlain by mantle structures of a similar scale and heterogeneity. When likely scaling relationships are used to interpret mantle velocity images, it becomes clear that much of the boundary is explained by mantle lithospheric processes and the crustal evolution is just the surficial expression of strength beneath the surface. The Sierra Nevada block provides something of a Rosetta stone for this interpretation. We note first that Sierra Nevada terrain is not distinguished at the surface from faulted and even shattered batholithic rocks in southern California. It does differ in the upper mantle, because the Sierra Nevada is underlain by a high- velocity root along almost its entire strike. Where that root is missing, roughly south of the White Wolf fault, and east of the Kern Canyon fault, the surface rocks are deforming. The origin of the strong upper mantle component is self-evident near 39.5N latitude, where the contact between the subducting Gorda Slab and the Sierran mantle root can be imaged directly. The upper plate structure dates to latest Mesozoic through Laramide times, with the pattern apparently reinforced on the west to some extent during post-Laramide subduction. Since the genesis of batholithic rocks and the subsequent Laramide history are similar south of the Sierran block, we extrapolate that a similar mantle root would have been present also. This assumption is confirmed with two lines of evidence. First, the mechanical evolution of southern and central California blocks seems to require it. Second, the volumes of the "drips" beneath the Transverse Ranges and southern Sierras exceed reasonable bounds for material scavenged from the mantle lithosphere unless it had distinct initial conditions. The local sources of mantle lithospheric material that could have delaminated around the southern Sierran drip are volumetrically insufficient by a factor of 4 to 7 to account for the drip itself. These problems are resolved if the primary source for southern California drips is Sierran-like mantle roots scavenged from beneath batholithic terrains farther south by dominantly convergence-related plate-boundary processes.

  15. Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, includes a variety of educational sites to visit on plate tectonic theory. Learners can use underwater earthquake data to identify plate boundaries with links to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Acoustic Monitoring Program Ocean Seismicity data. Data from the Northeast Pacific, eastern Equatorial Pacific, and North Atlantic are examined in more detail.

  16. Stress Drops of Earthquakes on the Subducting Pacific Plate in the South-East off Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yamada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes have been occurring repeatedly in the South-East of Hokkaido, Japan, where the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the Okhotsk Plate in the north-west direction. For example, the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3 determined by USGS) took place in the region on September 26, 2003. Yamanaka and Kikuchi (2003) analyzed the slip distribution of the earthquake and concluded that the 2003 earthquake had ruptured the deeper half of the fault plane of the 1952 Tokachi-oki earthquake. Miyazaki et al. (2004) reported that a notable afterslip was observed at adjacent areas to the coseismic rupture zone of the 2003 earthquake, which suggests that there would be significant heterogeneities of strength, stress and frictional properties on the surface of the Pacific Plate in the region. In addition, some previous studies suggest that the region with a large slip in large earthquakes permanently have large difference of strength and the dynamic frictional stress level and that it would be able to predict the spatial pattern of slip in the next large earthquake by analyzing the stress drop of small earthquakes (e.g. Allmann and Shearer, 2007 and Yamada et al., 2010). We estimated stress drops of 150 earthquakes (4.2 ? M ? 5.0), using S-coda waves, or the waveforms from 4.00 to 9.11 seconds after the S wave arrivals, of Hi-net data. The 150 earthquakes were the ones that occurred from June, 2002 to December, 2010 in south-east of Hokkaido, Japan, from 40.5N to 43.5N and from 141.0E to 146.5E. First we selected waveforms of the closest earthquakes with magnitudes between 3.0 and 3.2 to individual 150 earthquakes as empirical Green's functions. We then calculated source spectral ratios of the 150 pairs of interested earthquakes and EGFs by deconvolving the individual S-coda waves. We finally estimated corner frequencies of earthquakes from the spectral ratios by assuming the omega-squared model of Boatwright (1978) and calculated stress drops of the earthquakes by using the model of Madariaga (1976). The estimated values of stress drop range from 1 to 10 MPa with a little number of outliers(Fig.(a)). Fig.(b) shows the spatial distribution of stress drops in south-east off Hokkaido, Japan. We found that earthquakes occurred around 42N 145E had larger stress drops. We are going to analyze smaller earthquakes and investigate the spatial pattern of the stress drop in the future. Fig. (a) Estimated values of stress drop with respect to seismic moments of earthquakes. (b) Spatial distribution of stress drops.

  17. New insights into North America-Pacific plate boundary deformation from Lake Tahoe, Salton Sea and Southern Baja California

    E-print Network

    Brothers, Daniel Stephen

    2009-01-01

    to the Pacifi c Plate: Tectonics, v. 8, p. 99-115. Stock,c North America plate tectonics of the Neogene southwesternplate motion partitioning and the transition to seafl oor spreading in the Gulf of California: Tectonics,

  18. Deformation and Metasomatic Evolution at the Subduction Plate Interface As Viewed from Study of HP/UHP Metamorphic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, G. E.; Penniston-Dorland, S.

    2014-12-01

    We provide a view of lithologic makeup, deformation, and fluid-rock interaction along the deep forearc to subarc plate interface, based on insights gained from study of HP/UHP metamorphic rocks. Exposures of plate-boundary shear zones on which we base our perspective represent 30-80 km depths and are on Catalina Island and at Monviso, Syros, and New Caledonia. Each contains highly deformed zones with schistose matrix, commonly with a large ultramafic component, containing bodies of less deformed mafic, sedimentary, and ultramafic rocks. These "blocks" have varying geometries, are up to km-scale, and can preserve disparate P-T histories reflecting dynamics of incorporation and entrainment. Sheared matrices contain high-variance, hydrous mineral assemblages in some cases resembling metasomatic zones ("rinds") at block-matrix contacts, and rinds and matrices have homogenized isotopic compositions reflecting extensive fluid-rock interaction. Shearing and related physical juxtaposition of disparate metasomatic rocks can result in mixed or 'hybrid' chemical compositions. The chlorite-, talc-, and amphibole-rich schists developed by these processes can stabilize H2O to great depth and influence its cycling. Fluids (hydrous fluids, silicate melts) released within slabs necessarily interact with highly deformed, lithologically hybridized zones at the plate interface as they ascend to potentially enter mantle wedges. Fluids bearing chemical/isotopic signatures of hybrid rocks appear capable of producing arc magma compositions interpreted as reflecting multiple, chemically distinct fluids sources. Geophysical signatures of these rheologically weak zones are equivocal but many recognize the presence of zones of low seismic velocity at/near the top of slabs and attribute them to hydrated rocks. Whether rocks from this interface buoyantly ascend into mantle wedges, indicated in some theoretical models, remains largely untested by field and geophysical observations.

  19. Kinematic framework of the Cocos-Pacific Plate Boundary from 13°N to the Orozco TRANSFORM FAULT: RESULTS FROM AN EXTENSIVE MAGNETIC AND SEAMARC II SURVEY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, John A.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Edwards, Margo H.; Gallo, David G.; Perfit, Michael R.

    1992-05-01

    During the summer of 1987, magnetic anomaly data were collected by surface ship as part of an extensive SeaMARC II investigation of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 13°N to the Orozco transform. The survey extended to either side of the rise axis onto seafloor at least 1.8 million years (m.y.) in age, enabling the recent evolution of the structural and kinematic framework of the plate boundary to be studied in detail. North of 13°50'N there has been a major perturbation in the evolution of the plate boundary. Swaths of lineaments that trend oblique to EPR-parallel topography form a north pointing, V-shaped discordant zone on the Pacific and Cocos plates that is broadly symmetric about the EPR axis. On the Pacific plate a zone of discordant morphology 130 km long and between 6 and 14 km wide with a structural grain that is highly oblique to the present-day spreading direction is observed on seafloor 0.9-1.8 m.y. in age. A similar but more subtle feature of the same age is also present on the Cocos plate. These zones of discordant lineaments can be correlated with changes in the magnetic lineation pattern. On the Pacific plate the disturbed zone lies between anomalies J and 2, creating greater than normal distance between the anomalies. On the Cocos plate the disturbed zone is characterized by a distinct, high-amplitude, northwestward trending magnetic anomaly. The observed structural grain and the changes in the magnetic anomaly patterns associated with the disturbed zones are very similar to those observed at propagating ridges. Based on the magnetic anomalies, a propagation rate of 10.8 cm/yr in a N10°W direction is estimated for the past 1.8 m.y. A detailed examination of the structures developed within the disturbed zone on the Pacifc plate indicates that the rift propagation in this area can best be explained by the model of Wilson (1990) which involves cyclic rift failure with inward curvature of both rift tips. Plate adjustment to the propagation event is ongoing. There is a pronounced change in the morphology of the rise axis with distance from the propagation event. Close to and for ˜100 km behind the propagator tip, the EPR crest is not well developed and is characterized by a series of low (relief of 100-200 m) ridges and troughs with a poorly defined neovolcanic zone. Further away (>100 km) from the propagator tip the rise crest is a single, linear, horst-shaped ridge with a well-developed narrow axial graben at the axis of the ridge. Regional morphologic and magnetic data suggest that this cycle of rift propagation may have begun approximately 2.5 million years before present (m.y.B.P.) near the eastern ridge-transform intersection of the paleo-O'Gorman transform and is continuing today at the Orozco transform.

  20. Contrasting Scavenging Intensities of 210Po and 210Pb at Key Interfaces of the East Pacific Zonal Transect, GEOTRACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermiller, J.; Baskaran, M. M.; Tang, Y.; Stewart, G.

    2014-12-01

    The 210Po - 210Pb pair has been widely utilized in quantification of particulate scavenging and cycling of biogenic and lithogenic particulate matter in marine systems. Samples were collected and vertical profiles of particulate (>51 ?m and 0-51 ?m) and dissolved (< 0.45 ?m) phases from six Super Stations along the East Pacific Zonal Transect of the GEOTRACES cruise were analyzed. The primary objectives of this investigation include: i) to compare the scavenging intensity of 210Po and 210Pb at the high-productivity Peru margin to that in the Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) in the upper 300 m to the mesopelagic waters; ii) to quantify the differences in the scavenging intensity of 210Po and 210Pb between the bottom waters at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) to those in other stations including the station where OMZ were found; and iii) to evaluate the preferential scavenging of 210Po and/or 210Pb, if any, from the dissolved and particulate concentrations of 210Po, 210Pb, Fe, and Mn within the plume of the EPR. From preliminary 210Po results, we report the following: i) both dissolved and particulate 210Po concentrations in the South Pacific appear to be significantly higher than those of the North Atlantic; ii) the maximum concentration of 210Po is generally found between 100 and 200 m, likely due to remineralization of sinking particulate matter with 210Po/210Pb activity ratio of >1.0; and iii) in one third of stations, we observed active scavenging near the sediment-water interface, indicating removal of 210Po (and likely 210Pb) by suspended particulate matter in the bottom nepheloid layer. The preliminary modeling of the particulate and dissolved 210Po and 210Pb, the relative importance of Mn- and Fe-oxides in the EPR plume, differences in the scavenging intensity of these nuclides at critical interfaces such as mesopelagic waters at OMZ, highly productive waters at the Peru margin, and near the sediment-water interface will be presented.

  1. Variation of seismic slip in the Gulf of California and the possible effect on geodetic measurements of Pacific-North American plate motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tajima, Fumiko; Tralli, David M.

    1992-01-01

    A simple dislocation model is used to evaluate the variation of seismic slip in the Gulf of California and the possible effect on geodetic measurements of Pacific-North American plate motion by means of an estimation of the surface displacements due to typical transform events in the gulf. The results of this numerical calculation suggest that if a large transform event (about 1.5 x 10 exp 26 dyne cm) were to occur within 100 to 200 km of a geodetic baseline, the relative distance measurements could be affected by up to 15 mm. This is marginally at the error level of a few millimeters plus 2 parts in 10 exp 8 of baseline length for GOMEX measurements, which thus are sensitive only to the far-field displacement along the plate boundary.

  2. Life and death of the resurrection plate: Evidence for its existence and subduction in the northeastern Pacific in Paleocene-Eocene time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Bradley, D.C.; Wells, R.E.; Miller, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Onshore evidence suggests that a plate is missing from published reconstructions of the northeastern Pacific Ooean in Paleocene- Eocene time. The Resurrection plate, named for the Resurrection Peninsula ophiolite near Seward, Alaska, was located east of the Kula plate and north of the Farallon plate. We interpret coeval near-trench magmatism in southern Alaska and the Cascadia margin as evidence for two slab windows associated with trench-ridge-trench (TRT) triple junctions, which formed the western and southern boundaries of the Resurrection plate. In Alaska, the Sanak-Baranof belt of near-trench intrusions records a west-to-east migration, from 61 to 50 Ma, of the northern TRT triple junction along a 2100-km-long section of coastline. In Oregon, Washington, and southern Vancouver Island, voluminous basaltic volcanism of the Siletz River Volcanics, Crescent Formation, and Metchosin Volcanics occurred between ca. 66 and 48 Ma. Lack of a clear age progression of magmatism along the Cascadia margin suggests that this southern triple junction did not migrate significantly. Synchronous near-trench magmatism from southeastern Alaska to Puget Sound at ca. 50 Ma documents the middle Eocene subduction of a spreading center, the crest of which was subparallel to the margin. We interpret this ca. 50 Ma event as recording the subduction-zone consumption of the last of the Resurrection plate. The existence and subsequent subduction of the Resurrection plate explains (1) northward terrane transport along the southeastern Alaska-British Columbia margin between 70 and 50 Ma, synchronous with an eastward-migrating triple junction in southern Alaska; (2) rapid uplift and voluminous magmatism in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia prior to 50 Ma related to subduction of buoyant, young oceanic crust of the Resurrection plate; (3) cessation of Coast Mountains magmatism at ca. 50 Ma due to cessation of subduction, (4) primitive mafic magmatism in the Coast Mountains and Cascade Range just after 50 Ma, related to slab-window magmatism, (5) birth of the Queen Charlotte transform margin at ca. 50 Ma, (6) extensional exhumation of high-grade metamorphic terranes and development of core complexes in British Columbia, Idaho, and Washington, and extensional collapse of the Cordilleran foreland fold-and-thrust belt in Alberta, Montana, and Idaho after 50 Ma related to initiation of the transform margin, (7) enigmatic 53-45 Ma magmatism associated with extension from Montana to the Yukon Territory as related to slab breakup and the formation of a slab window, (8) right-lateral margin-parallel strike-slip faulting in southern and western Alaska during Late Cretaceous and Paleocene time, which cannot be explained by Farallon convergence vectors, and (9) simultaneous changes in Pacific-Farallon and Pacific-Kula plate motions concurrent with demise of the Kula-Resurrection Ridge.

  3. Did the 2010 Chile earthquake change the locking degree at neighboring plate interface segments of the Andean subduction zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Marcos; Báez, Juan Carlos; Bedford, Jonathan; Quinteros, Javier; Tassara, Andres; Melnick, Daniel; Oncken, Onno; Vigny, Christophe; Bartsch, Mitja; Bevis, Michael; Soto, Hugo; Barrientos, Sergio; Ortega, Ismael; Valderas, Maria

    2014-05-01

    A widely held view is that lateral extents and magnitudes of great earthquakes are fundamentally controlled by the stress build-up along the plate interface as inferred from the degree of locking. Therefore, inferring the distribution of locking and its along-strike variations has become an essential tool for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. Recent studies have explored the main parameters affecting the spatial distribution of locking degree, but the time evolution of locking has not yet been clearly documented. Here we used time-series of continuous GPS at adjacent segments (> 500 km distance) to the rupture zone of the 2010 Chile (Mw=8.8) earthquake to explore the differences in locking degree before (2008-2010) and after (2010-2013) this event. Results suggest that the interseismic velocity (landward displacements) increased both in the northern (27°S-32°S) and southern (41°S-45°S) unruptured segments. The variations of displacements can be explained by an increase and homogenization of the locking degree at areas that were creeping before the 2010 earthquake. The estimated increase of locking degrees have peaks of about 20% and 100% for the northern and southern regions respectively. The b-value, which parameterizes the frequency-magnitude distribution of seismicity, decreased after the 2010 earthquake in the northern segment (in the southern segment there is not enough seismicity for estimating b-value) from 1.2 to 0.7 indicating a tendency for asperities to be brought closer to failure due to increase of shear stresses on the plate interface. By means of a 3D thermo-mechanical subduction model we are able to simulate the dynamic response of the system and study the stress variations before and after the earthquake, supporting the rearrangment of shear stresses at adjacent segments. Our results suggest that locking degree can evolve over a short timescale due to the change of the stress regime induced by great earthquakes. We propose that the seismic cycle along a margin is a self-organized system in the sense of a lateral connected evolution of build-up and release of stress at different seismotectonic segments. Importantly, the 2010 earthquake may have increased the seismic potential of the northern and southern neighboring plate interface segments, which broke last in 1922 and 1960, respectively.

  4. Large-scale right-slip displacement on the East San Francisco Bay Region fault system, California: Implications for location of late Miocene to Pliocene Pacific plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sliter, W.V.; Sorg, D.H.; Russell, P.C.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    A belt of northwardly younging Neogene and Quaternary volcanic rocks and hydrothermal vein systems, together with a distinctive Cretaceous terrane of the Franciscan Complex (the Permanente terrane), exhibits about 160 to 170 km of cumulative dextral offset across faults of the East San Francisco Bay Region (ESFBR) fault system. The offset hydrothermal veins and volcanic rocks range in age from .01 Ma at the northwest end to about 17.6 Ma at the southeast end. In the fault block between the San Andreas and ESFBR fault systems, where volcanic rocks are scarce, hydrothermal vein system ages clearly indicate that the northward younging thermal overprint affected these rocks beginning about 18 Ma. The age progression of these volcanic rocks and hydrothermal vein systems is consistent with previously proposed models that relate northward propagation of the San Andreas transform to the opening of an asthenospheric window beneath the North American plate margin in the wake of subducting lithosphere. The similarity in the amount of offset of the Permanente terrane across the ESFBR fault system to that derived by restoring continuity in the northward younging age progression of volcanic rocks and hydrothermal veins suggests a model in which 80-110 km of offset are taken up 8 to 6 Ma on a fault aligned with the Bloomfield-Tolay-Franklin-Concord-Sunol-Calaveras faults. An additional 50-70 km of cumulative slip are taken up ??? 6 Ma by the Rogers Creek-Hayward and Concord-Franklin-Sunol-Calaveras faults. An alternative model in which the Permanente terrane is offset about 80 km by pre-Miocene faults does not adequately restore the distribution of 8-12 Ma volcanic rocks and hydrothermal veins to a single northwardly younging age trend. If 80-110 km of slip was taken up by the ESFBR fault system between 8 and 6 Ma, dextral slip rates were 40-55 mm/yr. Such high rates might occur if the ESFBR fault system rather than the San Andreas fault acted as the transform margin at this time. Major transpression across the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates at about 3 to 5 Ma would have resulted in the transfer of significant slip back to the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault. Since that time, the ESFBR fault system has continued to slip at rates of 11-14 mm/yr. If this interpretation is valid, the ESFBR fault system was the Pacific-North American plate boundary between 8 and 6 Ma, and this boundary has migrated both eastward and westward with time, in response to changing plate margin geometry and plate motions.

  5. Calculation of interfacial flows and surfactant redistribution as a gas/liquid interface moves between two parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmuth, Fred; Laidlaw, W. G.; Coombe, D. A.

    1993-07-01

    The hydrodynamic equations governing the evolution of the interface of a gas/liquid ``bubble'' as it moves through the space between two plates are solved using a finite difference algorithm defined on a moving deforming surface grid. Particular attention is paid to the redistribution of surfactant as the bubble deforms on squeezing through a constriction. The surfactant redistribution, the surface tangential flows, and the surface normal velocity depend on factors such as bulk viscosity, the bulk/surface surfactant exchange rate, the surface tension dependence on surfactant concentration, and the bulk velocity pattern. Zones of surfactant depletion just behind the bubble front and an accumulation near the bubble front are observed; there are also depletion and accumulation zones associated with the constriction. A variety of other effects are investigated and a detailed analysis permits the generation of schematic representations of the interplay of the coupled bulk and surface hydrodynamic equations for the system.

  6. Iron-rich metalliferous sediments on the East Pacific Rise: prototype of undifferentiated metalliferous sediments on divergent plate boundaries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Marchig; H. Gundlach

    1982-01-01

    Sediments in a zone on the East Pacific Rise with an especially high spreading rate were studied chemically, mineralogically, and microscopically. They consist of a mixture of metalliferous sediments and plankton tests. The metalliferous sediments were formed by an acidic, hydrothermal leaching of tholeiitic basalt with seawater and subsequent precipitation in contact with cold near-bottom seawater. We assume the precipitation

  7. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  8. Kinematic modeling of fault slip rates using new geodetic velocities from a transect across the Pacific-North America plate boundary through the San Bernardino Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Sally F.; Spinler, Joshua C.; McGill, John D.; Bennett, Richard A.; Floyd, Michael A.; Fryxell, Joan E.; Funning, Gareth J.

    2015-04-01

    Campaign GPS data collected from 2002 to 2014 result in 41 new site velocities from the San Bernardino Mountains and vicinity. We combined these velocities with 93 continuous GPS velocities and 216 published velocities to obtain a velocity profile across the Pacific-North America plate boundary through the San Bernardino Mountains. We modeled the plate boundary-parallel, horizontal deformation with 5-14 parallel and one obliquely oriented screw dislocations within an elastic half-space. Our rate for the San Bernardino strand of the San Andreas Fault (6.5 ± 3.6 mm/yr) is consistent with recently published latest Quaternary rates at the 95% confidence level and is slower than our rate for the San Jacinto Fault (14.1 ± 2.9 mm/yr). Our modeled rate for all faults of the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) combined (15.7 ± 2.9 mm/yr) is faster than the summed latest Quaternary rates for these faults, even when an estimate of permanent, off-fault deformation is included. The rate discrepancy is concentrated on faults near the 1992 Landers and 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes; the geodetic and geologic rates agree within uncertainties for other faults within the ECSZ. Coupled with the observation that postearthquake deformation is faster than the pre-1992 deformation, this suggests that the ECSZ geodetic-geologic rate discrepancy is directly related to the timing and location of these earthquakes and is likely the result of viscoelastic deformation in the mantle that varies over the timescale of an earthquake cycle, rather than a redistribution of plate boundary slip at a timescale of multiple earthquake cycles or longer.

  9. The Biggest Plates on Earth: Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students investigate the movement of Earth's tectonic plates, the results of these movements, and how magnetic anomalies present at spreading centers document the motion of the crust. As a result of this activity, students will be able to describe the motion of tectonic plates, differentiate between three types of plate boundaries, infer what type of boundary exists between two tectonic plates, and understand how magnetic anomalies provide a record of geologic history and crustal motion around spreading centers. As an example, they will also describe plate boundaries and tectonic activity in the vicinity of the Juan de Fuca plate adjacent to the Pacific Northwest coast of North America.

  10. Compilation of Surface Creep on California Faults and Comparison of WGCEP 2007 Deformation Model to Pacific-North American Plate Motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wisely, Beth A.; Schmidt, David A.; Weldon, Ray J., II

    2008-01-01

    This Appendix contains 3 sections that 1) documents published observations of surface creep on California faults, 2) constructs line integrals across the WG-07 deformation model to compare to the Pacific ? North America plate motion, and 3) constructs strain tensors of volumes across the WG-07 deformation model to compare to the Pacific ? North America plate motion. Observation of creep on faults is a critical part of our earthquake rupture model because if a fault is observed to creep the moment released as earthquakes is reduced from what would be inferred directly from the fault?s slip rate. There is considerable debate about how representative creep measured at the surface during a short time period is of the whole fault surface through the entire seismic cycle (e.g. Hudnut and Clark, 1989). Observationally, it is clear that the amount of creep varies spatially and temporally on a fault. However, from a practical point of view a single creep rate is associated with a fault section and the reduction in seismic moment generated by the fault is accommodated in seismic hazard models by reducing the surface area that generates earthquakes or by reducing the slip rate that is converted into seismic energy. WG-07 decided to follow the practice of past Working Groups and the National Seismic Hazard Map and used creep rate (where it was judged to be interseismic, see Table P1) to reduce the area of the fault surface that generates seismic events. In addition to following past practice, this decision allowed the Working Group to use a reduction of slip rate as a separate factor to accommodate aftershocks, post seismic slip, possible aseismic permanent deformation along fault zones and other processes that are inferred to affect the entire surface area of a fault, and thus are better modeled as a reduction in slip rate. C-zones are also handled by a reduction in slip rate, because they are inferred to include regions of widely distributed shear that is not completely expressed as earthquakes large enough to model. Because the ratio of the rate of creep relative to the total slip rate is often used to infer the average depth of creep, the ?depth? of creep can be calculated and used to reduce the surface area of a fault that generates earthquakes in our model. This reduction of surface area of rupture is described by an ?aseismicity factor,? assigned to each creeping fault in Appendix A. An aseismicity factor of less than 1 is only assigned to faults that are inferred to creep during the entire interseismic period. A single aseismicity factor was chosen for each section of the fault that creeps by expert opinion from the observations documented here. Uncertainties were not determined for the aseismicity factor, and thus it represents an unmodeled (and difficult to model) source of error. This Appendix simply provides the documentation of known creep, the type and precision of its measurement, and attempts to characterize the creep as interseismic, afterslip, transient or triggered. Parts 2 and 3 of this Appendix compare the WG-07 deformation model and the seismic source model it generates to the strain generated by the Pacific - North American plate motion. The concept is that plate motion generates essentially all of the elastic strain in the vicinity of the plate boundary that can be released as earthquakes. Adding up the slip rates on faults and all others sources of deformation (such as C-zones and distributed ?background? seismicity) should approximately yield the plate motion. This addition is usually accomplished by one of four approaches: 1) line integrals that sum deformation along discrete paths through the deforming zone between the two plates, 2) seismic moment tensors that add up seismic moment of a representative set of earthquakes generated by a crustal volume spanning the plate boundary, 3) strain tensors generated by adding up the strain associated with all of the faults in a crustal volume spanning the plate

  11. An unrecognized major collision of the Okhotomorsk Block with East Asia during the Late Cretaceous, constraints on the plate reorganization of the Northwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-Tai

    2013-11-01

    Interactions at plate boundaries induce stresses that constitute critical controls on the structural evolution of intraplate regions. However, the traditional tectonic model for the East Asian margin during the Mesozoic, invoking successive episodes of paleo-Pacific oceanic subduction, does not provide an adequate context for important Late Cretaceous dynamics across East Asia, including: continental-scale orogenic processes, significant sinistral strike-slip faulting, and several others. The integration of numerous documented field relations requires a new tectonic model, as proposed here. The Okhotomorsk continental block, currently residing below the Okhotsk Sea in Northeast Asia, was located in the interior of the Izanagi Plate before the Late Cretaceous. It moved northwestward with the Izanagi Plate and collided with the South China Block at about 100 Ma. The indentation of the Okhotomorsk Block within East Asia resulted in the formation of a sinistral strike-slip fault system in South China, formation of a dextral strike-slip fault system in North China, and regional northwest-southeast shortening and orogenic uplift in East Asia. Northeast-striking mountain belts over 500 km wide extended from Southeast China to Southwest Japan and South Korea. The peak metamorphism at about 89 Ma of the Sanbagawa high-pressure metamorphic belt in Southwest Japan was probably related to the continental subduction of the Okhotomorsk Block beneath the East Asian margin. Subsequently, the north-northwestward change of motion direction of the Izanagi Plate led to the northward movement of the Okhotomorsk Block along the East Asian margin, forming a significant sinistral continental transform boundary similar to the San Andreas fault system in California. Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks in Southwest Japan were rapidly exhumed through the several-kilometer wide ductile shear zone at the lower crust and upper mantle level. Accretionary complexes successively accumulated along the East Asian margin during the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous were subdivided into narrow and subparallel belts by the upper crustal strike-slip fault system. The departure of the Okhotomorsk Block from the northeast-striking Asian margin resulted in the occurrence of an extensional setting and formation of a wide magmatic belt to the west of the margin. In the Campanian, the block collided with the Siberian margin, in Northeast Asia. At about 77 Ma, a new oceanic subduction occurred to the south of the Okhotomorsk Block, ending its long-distance northward motion. Based on the new tectonic model, the abundant Late Archean to Early Proterozoic detrital zircons in the Cretaceous sandstones in Kamchatka, Southwest Japan, and Taiwan are interpreted to have been sourced from the Okhotomorsk Block basement which possibly formed during the Late Archean and Early Proterozoic. The new model suggests a rapidly northward-moving Okhotomorsk Block at an average speed of 22.5 cm/yr during 89-77 Ma. It is hypothesized that the Okhotomorsk-East Asia collision during 100-89 Ma slowed down the northwestward motion of the Izanagi Plate, while slab pull forces produced from the subducting Izanagi Plate beneath the Siberian margin redirected the plate from northwestward to north-northwestward motion at about 90-89 Ma.

  12. A mega shear zone in the Central Range of Taiwan and it's implication for the Late Mesozoic subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, D. C.; Lin, C. W.

    2012-04-01

    The metamorphic basement "Tananao Complex" exposed in the eastern flank of the Central Range of Taiwan. The ancient Asian continental margin deposited a thick sequence of sandstone, shale, limestone and volcanic rocks that was the protolith of Tananao Complex. In Late Mesozoic Era, the thick sequence of rocks was subjected to several phases of metamorphism and deformation to form the pair metamorphic belts which were the western Tailuko Belt and the eastern Yuli Belt. The Tailuko belt is composed of phyllite, quartzite, quartz-mica schist, meta-conglomerate, gneiss, meta-basite, amphibolite, serpentinite, marble and meta-chert, etc. The Yuli belt is composed of a monotonous assemblage of quartz-mica schist, subordinate meta-basite and serpentinite, etc. It is believed that the boundary of the Tailuko belt and the Yuli belt is a large fault, but the field evidence of the fault has never been found. In this study, meso-scale field investigation of the lithologies and rock fabrics indicate that a mega shear zone, called "The Daguan shear zone", separated the Tailuko belt from the Yuli belt. The Daguan shear zone is a NNE trending and west dipping mega shear zone which is mainly composed of mylonitic dark gray quartz-mica schist and mica schist, intercalated with 1 to 2 centimeters thick of elongated meta-conglomerate band. The shear zone is composed of numerous meso-scale ductile shear zones. Additionally, the shaer zone is characterized by abundant varied quartz veins that have been refolded to lenticular or pod shape and nearly parallel to S2 cleavage. Compaed to the existing geological information of the Central Range, we believe that the Daguan shear zone played a role as the boundary of the subduction zone which the paleo-Pacific Plate subducted into the Eurasian Plate in Late Mesozoic Era.

  13. On gravity from SST, geoid from Seasat, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific. [Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Data from an additional 50 satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) passes were combined with earlier measurements of the high degree and order (n, m, 12) gravity in the central Pacific. A composite map was produced which shows good agreement with conventional GEM models. Data from the Seasat altimeter was reduced and found to agree well with both the SST and the GEM fields. The maps are dominated especially in the east, by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Further comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkably close correlation with plate age. Each anomaly band is framed by those major fracture zones having large offsets. The regular spacing of these fractures seems to account for the fabric in the gravity fields. Other anomalies are accounted for by hot spots. The source of part of these anomalies is in the lithosphere itself. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantle without complete thermal equilibration is considered. Previously announced in STAR as N84-11559

  14. Geochemistry of primitive lavas of the Central Kamchatka Depression: Magma generation at the edge of the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Bindeman, Ilya; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar

    New and published major and trace element and isotope (O, Sr, Nd) compositions of the Late Quaternary rocks from the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD) are used to demonstrate systematic changes in magma genesis along the northern segment of the Kamchatka Arc, above and north of the subducting Pacific slab edge. We envision a number of possible petrologic scenarios for magma generation beneath the CKD and formulate quantitative mass-balance models which lead to three major conclusions departing significantly from previous interpretations of the CKD rocks. First, this study demonstrates that eclogite melts contribute to the composition of virtually all CKD lavas and could be the major agent transferring material from the subducted slab to the mantle wedge, including fluid-mobile elements (e.g., K, Ba). Second, thermal state of the mantle wedge beneath the CKD has primary control on the major composition of primitive magmas, favoring production of low temperature andesitic and dacitic mantle melts toward the slab edge. Third, hydrous slab-fluids might not be required to generate CKD magmatism. Instead, strong enrichment in LILE, high ?18O and 87Sr/86Sr, in some CKD magmas could originate from assimilation of hydrothermally-altered mafic lithosphere. Several concurring factors could facilitate partial melting of the subducting slab beneath the all CKD volcanoes and favor variable modification of the eclogite melts during interaction with the mantle wedge. Large input from slab melting makes CKD magmatism unique in Kamchatka and may contribute to the CKD volcanoes being the most productive arc volcanoes on Earth.

  15. Intraplate Deformation Adjacent to the Macquarie Ridge South of New Zealand - The Tectonic Evolution of a Complex Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, G. P.; Furlong, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    The response of lithospheric plate boundaries to rapid changes in plate motions provide constraints used to determine the manner in which transitions in plate motions and plate boundary configurations can occur. In the case of the Australia - Pacific plate boundary in the Macquarie Ridge region south of New Zealand a substantial change in plate motions has occurred since the Oligocene. Over a period of less than 15Ma, this boundary changed from mid-ocean ridge spreading to simple translation, the record of which is recorded in the fabric and fracture zones of the oceanic lithosphere. Application of available well-constrained plate motions imply that substantial deformation of the oceanic lithosphere must have occurred after fracture zone formation to create the arcuate structure of these fracture zones today. Plate reconstructions of this plate boundary system from the Oligocene through the Early-Mid Miocene are used here to isolate the timing of transitions in plate motion from divergence to translational motion. These reconstructions identify rapid rotations in plate motions after approximately 25Ma. By 20Ma, the majority of crust created along this plate boundary was already in place, and the Australian Plate was translating northwards relative to the Pacific towards New Zealand, where a corner of Australian Plate is ultimately subducted. The timing of this transition in plate motions implies that the onset of subduction at the Puysegur Trench may have been as early as approximately 20Ma. These reconstructions also identify the shape of fracture zones either side of the relic mid-ocean ridge through the time of their formation. Comparison of these restored fracture zones with their present-day appearance delineates a broad zone of deformation extending ~150km into the plate interior from the Macquarie Ridge Complex, the modern plate boundary structure. This area of deformation coincides with a broad distribution of seismicity in the Australian Plate on both inter- and intra-plate structures, including two great (M8+) earthquakes over the past twenty years, one of which occurred over 130km from the plate boundary. The persistence of this deformation through time indicates a link with the evolution of the plate boundary from divergence to translation and subduction, and may be a result of stress build-up within the Australian Plate as a consequence of the impingement of the subducting plate on the thickened lithosphere of southern New Zealand. Such a collision may act as a resisting force to subduction, and if it continues, further deformation internal to the Macquarie Block may lead to a southward migration of the Australia:Pacific subduction interface and the capturing of this section of lithosphere onto the Pacific Plate.

  16. Neotectonic studies of northern Baja California, Mexico, with LANDSAT thematic mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery: Partitioning of dextral and extensional strain at the Pacific-North America plate boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Meghan; Crippen, Robert E.; Dixon, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous studies of active faulting in southern California indicate that the San Jacinto, Elsinore, and adjacent faults west of the San Andreas fault accommodate a significant proportion of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. Because of the complex distribution of slip, little is known about the activities of these and similar structures in northern Baja California and the southward transition to the oceanic ridge transform-fault system in the Gulf of California. SPOT and LANDSAT Thematic Mapper imagery for northern Baja California was processed to optimize discrimination of lithologic and structural features. This data was used to suggest a preliminary kinematic framework for distribution of relative plate motion between 31 and 33 degrees north, in which continental borderland tectonics play an important role in partitioning of plate motion.

  17. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  18. Dynamic instability of a thin circular plate with friction interface and its application to disc brake squeal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jaeyoung; Krousgrill, Charles M.; Sadeghi, Farshid

    2008-09-01

    The mathematical formulation for determining the dynamic instability due to transverse doublet modes in the self-excited vibration of a thin annular plate is presented in this paper. An analytical approach is developed to obtain the stability results from the eigenvalue problem of a stationary disc with a finite contact area. The approach uses the eigenfunctions of transverse doublet modes in classical plate theory and establishes the formulation of modal instability due to the modal-interaction of a doublet mode pair. The one-doublet mode model of a disc and a discrete model equivalent to the one-doublet mode model are proposed for providing a more fundamental understanding of the onset of squeal. The analytical models are validated through a comparison of results from a modal expansion model obtained from finite element component models. Throughout the analytical investigation, the pad arc length is found to be a critical design parameter in controlling squeal propensity.

  19. Suloy, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A demarcation line identifies a convergence in the Pacific Ocean (1.5N, 133.0W) where two open ocean currents have interfaced. This interface phenomena was first observed in the White Sea by Soviet cosmonauts who coined the term `Suloy' to describe the event. At the actual interface, there is usually a slight upwelling as the currents clash, causing a shadow effect that can be observed and an audible hissing sound as the currents meet head on.

  20. Fault kinematics in northern Central America and coupling along the subduction interface of the Cocos Plate, from GPS data in Chiapas (Mexico), Guatemala and El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Lasserre, C.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Kostoglodov, V.; Molina, E.; Guzman-Speziale, M.; Monterosso, D.; Robles, V.; Figueroa, C.; Amaya, W.; Barrier, E.; Chiquin, L.; Moran, S.; Flores, O.; Romero, J.; Santiago, J. A.; Manea, M.; Manea, V. C.

    2012-06-01

    New GPS measurements in Chiapas (Mexico), Guatemala and El Salvador are used to constrain the fault kinematics in the North America (NA), Caribbean (CA) and Cocos (CO) plates triple junction area. The regional GPS velocity field is first analysed in terms of strain partitioning across the major volcano-tectonic structures, using elastic half-space modelling, then inverted through a block model. We show the dominant role of the Motagua Fault with respect to the Polochic Fault in the accommodation of the present-day deformation associated with the NA and CA relative motion. The NA/CA motion decreases from 18-22 mm yr-1 in eastern Guatemala to 14-20 mm yr-1 in central Guatemala (assuming a uniform locking depth of 14-28 km), down to a few millimetres per year in western Guatemala. As a consequence, the western tip of the CA Plate deforms internally, with ?9 mm yr-1 of east-west extension (?5 mm yr-1 across the Guatemala city graben alone). Up to 15 mm yr-1 of dextral motion can be accommodated across the volcanic arc in El Salvador and southeastern Guatemala. The arc seems to mark the northern boundary of an independent forearc sliver (AR), pinned to the NA plate. The inversion of the velocity field shows that a four-block (NA, CA, CO and AR) model, that combines relative block rotations with elastic deformation at the block boundaries, can account for most of the GPS observations and constrain the overall kinematics of the active structures. This regional modelling also evidences lateral variations of coupling at the CO subduction interface, with a fairly high-coupling (?0.6) offshore Chiapas and low-coupling (?0.25) offshore Guatemala and El Salvador.

  1. Investigation of an anisotropic plate model to evaluate the interface adhesion of thin film with cross-sectional nanoindentation method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. J. Zheng; Y. C. Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Cross-sectional nano-indentation is a new technology especially designed for measuring interface adhesion of thin film with nano-indenter and atomic force microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. In the paper, the delamination area induced by nano-indenter pressing on the cross-section of multiple-layer thin film structure was regarded as a semi-circular interfacial crack system, and thin film delaminated from the oxide-layer\\/substrate composite assumed

  2. How Plates Move

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This information on the two major types of plate interaction and the resulting features discusses the Mid Atlantic Ridge and the mid-ocean ridges in connection with divergence and ocean trenches and connects the Pacific Ring of Fire to the concept of subduction. Volcanic activity as a result of subduction is also covered. The site also features links to goals, objectives, and materials for a hands-on lesson on how plates move.

  3. Investigations on the micro-scale surface interactions at the tool and workpiece interface in micro-manufacturing of bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peker, Mevlut Fatih

    Micro-forming studies have been more attractive in recent years because of miniaturization trend. One of the promising metal forming processes, micro-stamping, provides durability, strength, surface finish, and low cost for metal products. Hence, it is considered a prominent method for fabricating bipolar plates (BPP) with micro-channel arrays on large metallic surfaces to be used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). Major concerns in micro-stamping of high volume BPPs are surface interactions between micro-stamping dies and blank metal plates, and tribological changes. These concerns play a critical role in determining the surface quality, channel formation, and dimensional precision of bipolar plates. The surface quality of BPP is highly dependent on the micro-stamping die surface, and process conditions due to large ratios of surface area to volume (size effect) that cause an increased level of friction and wear issues at the contact interface. Due to the high volume and fast production rates, BPP surface characteristics such as surface roughness, hardness, and stiffness may change because of repeated interactions between tool (micro-forming die) and workpiece (sheet blank of interest). Since the surface characteristics of BPPs have a strong effect on corrosion and contact resistance of bipolar plates, and consequently overall fuel cell performance, evolution of surface characteristics at the tool and workpiece should be monitored, controlled, and kept in acceptable ranges throughout the long production cycles to maintain the surface quality. Compared to macro-forming operations, tribological changes in micro-forming process are bigger challenges due to their dominance and criticality. Therefore, tribological size effect should be considered for better understanding of tribological changes in micro-scale. The integrity of process simulation to the experiments, on the other hand, is essential. This study describes an approach that aims to investigate the surface topography changes during long-run micro-stamping of BPPs, and establish relationships between surface roughness--corrosion resistance and surface roughness-contact resistance characteristics of BPPs. Formability levels of formed BPPs and repeatability characteristics of the process were investigated. In addition, blank thickness changes, von-Mises stress, plastic strain levels and distributions of micro-stamping process were determined via finite element analysis (FEA). Test results revealed that the surface roughness change for the stamping dies and BPPs was unsteady (no trend) due to the continuous change of surface topography (i.e. asperity deformation). Sub-micron range local plastic deformations on stamping dies led to surface topography changes on BPP in long-run manufacturing case. As surface defects trigger corrosion, the correlation between surface roughness and corrosion resistance of BPPs was found to be direct. Increasing number of surface irregularities (asperities) lowered contact surface area that resulted in increased contact resistance. ZrN coated BPPs, on the other hand, did not change surface roughness, however; it improved the protection of BPPs against corrosion significantly. In addition, ZrN coating increased the conductivity of BPPs and reduced the contact resistance between BPP and gas diffusion layer (GDL), at certain extent. As dimensional stability and repeatability was confirmed in forming of both uncoated and coated BPPs during the long run manufacturing, different formability levels were achieved for coated and uncoated samples. Lower channel height values were obtained for coated plates because of the different surface hardness of uncoated and coated plates. In tribological size effect part of study, micro stamping experiments using three different dies with distinct channel height values at different stamping force levels were performed. It was concluded that decrease in forming die dimensions led to increase in coefficient of friction as previously reported by other researchers as one of the consequences of tribolog

  4. Plate Tectonics: Plate Interactions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-11-01

    This Science Object is the fourth of five Science Objects in the Plate Tectonic SciPack. It identifies the events that may occur and landscapes that form as a result of different plate interactions. The areas along plate margins are active. Plates pushing against one another can cause earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain formation, and very deep ocean trenches. Plates pulling apart from one another can cause smaller earthquakes, magma rising to the surface, volcanoes, and oceanic valleys and mountains from sea-floor spreading. Plates sliding past one another can cause earthquakes and rock deformation. Learning Outcomes:? Explain why volcanoes and earthquakes occur along plate boundaries. ? Explain how new sea floor is created and destroyed.? Describe features that may be seen on the surface as a result of plate interactions.

  5. Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page consists of two maps of the world, showing how earthquakes define the boundaries of tectonic plates. Volcanoes are also distributed at plate boundaries (the "Ring of Fire" in the Pacific) and at oceanic ridges. It is part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory website, which features written material, images, maps, and links to related topics.

  6. University Center Plated Entrees

    E-print Network

    Lee, Herbie

    , artichokes and herbs served with Crushed Yukon Golds and lemon-caper buerre blanc Pacific Salmon Florentine en Croute $23.95 Salmon filet and lemon creamed spinach wrapped in flaky puff pastry served with lemon-pecan Basmati pilaf and sauce Béarnaise #12;University Center Plated Entrees Poultry Moroccan

  7. Monitoring of slip at the transition zone on the plate interface estimated from non-volcanic deep low-frequency tremors in southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, R.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Obara, K.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    In southwestern Japan, non-volcanic deep low-frequency (DLF) tremors (e.g., Obara, 2002) and short-term slow slip events (S-SSEs; e.g., Obara et al., 2004) occur in temporal and spatial coincidence with the active stages of DLF tremors (Obara et al., 2004). Based on this feature, Hiramatsu et al. (2008) proposed a method to monitor slip at the transition zone between the locked and aseismic slip zones on the plate interface using DLF tremors. In this study, we applied the method as the same way of previous studies (Hiramatsu et al., 2008; Hirose et al., 2010) and estimated the long-term average slip rate at the transition zone from DLF tremors in southwestern Japan. We also estimated the slip distributions of S-SSEs from DLF tremors using the modified envelope correlation method (ECM) tremor catalog (Maeda and Obara, 2009) and the hourly centroid tremor catalog (Obara et al., 2010) along with the ECM tremor catalog (Obara, 2002) in southwestern Japan. The modified ECM applied both the differential travel time and the spatial distribution of mean square amplitudes to estimate a tremor's spatial location and radiation energy. The hourly centroid tremor catalog is constructed using a clustering process to estimate centroid locations, revealing clear depth-dependent behavior of the tremor activity. The cumulative seismic moment from 2001 to 2009 increases at a constant rate, indicating a constant moment release rate in the long-term average. We estimated slip rate at the transition zone using the formula ? {M0} = ? S_? {U}, where ? {M0} is the moment release rate, ? the rigidity, S the fault area that is related to the slip of S-SSEs in each region, and ? {U} the slip rate. We obtained the slip rates of 4.1 ± 0.5 cm/yr, 3.7 ± 0.6 cm/yr, and 2.6 ± 0.2 cm/yr in the western Shikoku, northern Kii peninsula, and Tokai regions, respectively, at the transition zone through the analyzed period. The slip deficit rate at the transition zone in each region is 2.6cm/yr, 2.6cm/yr, and 1.5cm/yr, respectively (Kobayashi and Hashimoto, 2007; Tabei et al., 2007; Suito and Ozawa, 2009). The convergence rate of the Philippine Sea plate in each region is estimated to be 6.3-6.8 cm/yr, 5.0-6.5 cm/yr, and 3.0-4.0 cm/yr (Miyazaki and Heki, 2001; Hori et al., 2004). The estimated slips at the transition zone therefore compensate the difference between the convergence rate at the trench and the slip deficit rate at the transition zone of the subducting Philippine Sea plate. For the slip distributions of the S-SSEs, we assumed sub-faults with uniform slip on the plate interface and estimated the slip from the cumulative seismic moment in each sub-fault. As the result, the slip distribution of most S-SSEs correlates roughly with the slip distribution estimated from the inversion of tilt meter records (Hirose and Obara, 2010), indicating that this procedure is useful to determine the slip distribution of S-SSEs quickly and easily.

  8. Permian geodynamic setting of Northeast China and adjacent regions: closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean and subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-Y. Li

    2006-01-01

    Northeast China and adjacent regions are located in the central East Asian continent and consist tectonically of both the Paleo-Asian and Paleo-Pacific orogens between the Siberian platform and Sino-Korean (North China) block. This paper discusses some hotly-debated issues concerning the Permian geodynamic setting of these regions, based on a comprehensive analysis of available geological, geochemical, paleobiogeographical and paleomagnetic data. Spatial

  9. Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately linked to major changes in the global

    E-print Network

    Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately the Cenozoic the Pacific plate has had a northward component. Thus, the Pacific is unique, in that the thick to drill an age transect ("flow-line") following the position of the paleo- equator in the Pacific

  10. 6, 145, 2014 Pacific slab pull and

    E-print Network

    Müller, Dietmar

    , the space and time de- pendence of intraplate deformation and its relationship with changing plate boundary time on Pacific Plate motion and plate-scale deformation, and how this is linked to intraplate chains of Hawaii, Louisville, Tokelau, and Gilbert during our modelled time period of 62 to 42 Ma. We

  11. Recent plate motions and crustal deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, M. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Reports by U.S. workers on geodetic measurements of recent plate motions or crustal deformation published in 1987-1990 are reviewed. The review begins with global plate motions, proceeds through plate boundaries in California, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest, and finishes with volcanic phenomena, monument stability and longevity, and GPS relative position measurements. 184 refs.

  12. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  13. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J. (Richland, WA); Crowell, Shannon L. (Eltopia, WA)

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  14. California takes earthquakes very seriously. The state straddles two major tectonic plates and is subject to relatively frequent, often major, potentially devastating quakes.

    E-print Network

    California takes earthquakes very seriously. The state straddles two major tectonic plates the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. The Pacific Plate includes a sliver of California and Baja California, as well as Hawaii and most of the Pacific Ocean, while the North American Plate includes

  15. Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics

    E-print Network

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics #12;Plate TectonicsPlate Tectonics · Lithosphere ­ strong, rigid, transform boundaries ­ travel 1 to 11 cm/yr relative to one another #12;14 tectonic plates today #12;Mid asthenosphere that flows · 8 large lithospheric plates and 6 smaller ones ­ separated by divergent, convergent

  16. HMK 1_Plate Boundaries: Present, future, & past

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brian Hampton

    Prior to this homework assignment, students will have been exposed (for ~2-3 in class activities and lectures) to general concepts in plate tectonics, plate boundaries, hot spot volcanoes, use of earthquake/volcano trends at plate boundaries, as well as GPS as a modern use to document plate motion. Students receive this activity as a homework assignment to be completed outside of class. Their task is to use provided topographic/bathymetric data, earthquake and volcano distribution, GPS data, as well as ocean floor and hot spot age trends to characterize plate motion in modern, future, and ancient plate boundaries. This is a three-part exercise that involves a modern plate boundary study form the eastern margin of the Pacific plate, a potential future plate boundary in eastern Africa, and a identification of possible ancient plate boundaries in the Eurasian plate.

  17. The Nature of Tectonic Plates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-12-30

    This lesson provides an overview of the various types of interactions between tectonic plates. The discussion uses the analogy of a cracked egg to describe the tectonic plates composing Earth's crust. Other topics include the concentrated earthquake and volcanic activity associated with plate boundaries, types of interactions at the boundaries, and how plate motions are affecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The lesson includes an activity in which students will use online references to locate a hypothetical nuclear power plant in a geologically safe area, investigate the history of large earthquakes in South Carolina, provide a likely location for a hypothetical geothermal power plant, and others.

  18. Refined Views of Strike-slip Fault Zones, Seismicity, and State of Stress Associated With the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Nicholson, C.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Shearer, P. M.; Sandwell, D. T.; Yang, W.

    2013-12-01

    The mostly strike-slip plate boundary in southern California is expressed as a system of late Quaternary faults or principal slip zones (PSZs), with numerous adjacent smaller slip surfaces. It is complex, even after large cumulative displacements, and consists of major fault systems with multi-stranded, non-planar fault geometry, including some in close proximity to each other. There are also secondary cross faults and low-angle detachments that interact with the PSZs accommodating main plate boundary motion. The loading of plate-tectonic strain causes the largest earthquakes along PSZs, moderate-sized events in their immediate vicinity, and small earthquakes across the whole region. We apply relocated earthquake and refined focal mechanism (1981-2013) catalogs, as well as other geophysical datasets to provide refined views of the 3D fault geometry of these active fault systems. To determine properties of individual fault zones, we measure the Euclidian distance from every hypocenter to the nearest PSZ. In addition, we assign crustal geophysical parameters such as heat flow value and shear or dilatation strain rates to each epicenter. We investigate seismogenic thickness and fault zone width as well as earthquake source processes. We find that the seismicity rate is a function of location, with the rate dying off exponentially with distance from the PSZ. About 80% of small earthquakes are located within 5 km of a PSZ. For small earthquakes, stress drops increase in size with distance away from the PSZs. The magnitude distribution near the PSZs suggests that large earthquakes are more common close to PSZs, and they are more likely to occur at greater depth than small earthquakes. In contrast, small quakes can occur at any geographical location. An optimal combination of heat flow and strain rate is required to concentrate the strain along rheologically weak fault zones, which accommodate the crustal deformation processes, causing seismicity. The regional trend of the focal mechanism-derived SHmax is almost bimodal, trending almost north along the San Andreas system, and to the north-northeast on either side. The transition zones from one state of stress to the other is sharp, following a trend from Yucca Valley to Imperial Valley to the east, and the western edge of the Peninsular Ranges to the west. Other local scale heterogeneities in the SHmax trend include NNW trends along the San Andreas fault near Cajon Pass, Tejon Pass, and the Cucapah Range. The regional variations in the SHmax trends are very similar to the pattern of GPS-measured maximum shortening axes of the surface strain rate tensor field, although the GPS strain field tends to be smoother and appears also to reflect some of the deformation in the upper mantle.

  19. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and bright fault plane reflections that are developed under subduction bending are confined to a region 50-60 km wide offshore Oregon and less than ~45 km wide offshore Washington. Near the deformation front of Oregon margin, bending-related faults cut through the crust and extend to ~6-7 km in the mantle, whereas at Washington margin, faults are confined to upper and middle crust, indicating that Oregon margin has experienced more extensive bend faulting and related alteration. These observations argue against pervasive serpentinization in the slab mantle beneath Washington and suggest mechanisms other than dehydration embrittlement need to be considered to explain the intermediate depth earthquakes found along the Washington margin (Chapter 3). Using MCS images of a ~400 km along-strike profile ~10-15 km from the deformation front, I investigate the along-trench variation of the structure of downgoing JdF plate and its relation to the regional segmentation of Cascadia subduction zone. I observe that the propagator wakes within the oceanic plate are associated with anomalous basement topography and crustal reflectivity. Further landward, segment boundaries of ETS recurrence interval and relative timing align with the propagator traces within the subducting plate. I propose while the upper plate structure or composition may determine the threshold of fluid pore pressure at which ETS occur, the propagators may define barriers for ETS events that occur at the same time. I also observe a change in crustal structure near 45.8°N that is consistent with an increase in bend-faulting and hydration south of 45.8°N;. In addition, four previously mapped oblique strike-slip faults are associated with changes in Moho reflection, indicating that they transect the entire crust and may cause localized mantle hydration (Chapter 4).

  20. On the Paleomagnetism and Paleogeography of the Philippine Sea Plate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Hall; M. Fuller

    2002-01-01

    Lying to the west of the Pacific Plate and surrounded by subduction zones, the Philippine Sea Plate has an enigmatic plate tectonic history. However, there are plentiful paleomagnetic data from DSDP and ODP studies as well from conventional surveys on many of the islands within the plate. There is broad agreement between these studies indicating clockwise rotation about a pole

  1. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple Attenuated Internal Reflection (MAIR-IR) and Microscopic Infrared Spectroscopy for organic surface compositional details, light microscopy for wear area quantification, and profilometry for surface roughness estimation and wear depth quantification. Pin-on-disc dynamic Coefficient of Friction (CoF) measurements provided data relevant to forecasts of seal integrity in dry, wet and biofouling-influenced sliding contact. Actual wear of neoprene seal material against uncoated and coated steel surfaces, wet and dry, was monitored after both rotary and linear cyclic wear testing, demonstrating significant reductions in elastomer wear areas and depths (and resultant volumes) when the coating was present. Coating the steel eliminated a 270% increase in neoprene surface area wear and an 11-fold increase in seal abrasive volume loss associated with underwater rusting in rotary experiments. Linear testing results confirm coating efficacy by reducing wear area in both loading regimes by about half. No coating delamination was observed, apparently due to a differential distribution of silicone and epoxy ingredients at the air-exposed vs. steel-bonded interfaces demonstrated by IR and EDS methods. Frictional testing revealed higher Coefficients of Friction (CoF) associated with the low-speed sliding of Neoprene over coated rather than uncoated steel surfaces in a wet environment, indicating better potential seal adhesion between the hydrophobic elastomer and coating than between the elastomer and intrinsically hydrophilic uncoated steel. When zebra mussel biofouling debris was present in the articulating joints, CoF was reduced as a result of a water channel path produced between the articulating surfaces by the retained biological matter. Easier release of the biofouling from the low-CST coated surfaces restored the seal integrity more rapidly with further water rinsing. Rapid sliding diminished these biofouling-related differences, but revealed a significant advantage in reducing the CoF of the elastomer-on-coating couples to less than 50% of the elastomer-on-steel coupl

  2. Pacific Lamprey

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Pacific Lamprey mouth suckers adhered to the glass at Bonneville Dam fish viewing window. The native Pacific Lamprey uses the fish ladder at Bonneville Dam.  This species plays a significant role in the foodweb and in Tribal

  3. Coseismic slip distribution of the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) refined by means of seafloor geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, T.; Hino, R.; Kido, M.; Inazu, D.; Osada, Y.; Ito, Y.; Ohzono, M.; Tsushima, H.; Suzuki, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miura, S.

    2012-07-01

    On 11 March 2011, the devastating M9.0 Tohoku Earthquake occurred on the interface of the subducting Pacific plate, and was followed by a huge tsunami that killed about 20,000 people. Several geophysical studies have already suggested that the very shallow portion of the plate interface might have played an important role in producing such a large earthquake and tsunami. However, the sparsity of seafloor observations leads to insufficient spatial resolution of the fault slip on such a shallow plate interface. For this reason, the location and degree of the slip has not yet been estimated accurately enough to assess future seismic risks. Thus, we estimated the coseismic slip distribution based on terrestrial GPS observations and all available seafloor geodetic data that significantly improve the spatial resolution at the shallow portion of the plate interface. The results reveal that an extremely large (greater than 50 m) slip occurred in a small (about 40 km in width and 120 km in length) area near the Japan Trench and generated the huge tsunami. The estimated slip distribution and a comparison of it with the coupling coefficient distribution deduced from the analysis of the small repeating earthquakes suggest that the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake released strain energy that had accumulated over the past 1000 years, probably since the Jogan Earthquake in 869. The accurate assessments of seismic risks on very shallow plate interfaces in subduction zones throughout the world can be obtained by improving the quality and quantity of seafloor geodetic observations.

  4. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  5. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon

    2014-05-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plate, with a transition from subduction of Pacific plate oceanic lithosphere in the North, beneath North Island to oblique continental collision in South Island. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone up to 250 km wide, with displacements on individual faults up to 100s of kilometres. Here, I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses, together with simple Airy isostasy, to determine the regional crustal and mantle structure. The buoyancy stress in the deforming layer is calculated by integrating the vertical normal stress with depth. This, in combination with plate-boundary stresses, must drive deformation. Horizontal gradients of buoyancy stress can be compared with horizontal gradients of strain rate, using the method of England & Molnar (1997), in the context of a simple thin sheet model of lithospheric deformation. I derive a velocity field for the New Zealand plate-boundary zone, using the method of Lamb (2000). This is representative of deformation over tens of thousands of years, based on fault slip, strain rate azimuth and paleomagnetic data, in the context of the short term relative plate motions. Comparison of appropriate combinations of horizontal gradients of vorticity and dilatation with horizontal gradients of buoyancy stress shows that deformation has some of the features of a Newtonian fluid. In detail, the minima in buoyancy stress, calculated from the vertical density structure, are offset horizontally from that calculated from gradients of strain rate, suggesting strong lateral contrasts in viscosity if deformation is strongly coupled at all levels in the lithosphere, with viscosities in the range 1 - 10 x 10**21 Pa s. However, subduction of Pacific plate lithosphere along the Hikurangi margin, and evidence for underthrusting beneath the Southern Alps, implies decoupling of deformation at depths > 50 km in these regions. In this case, best-fit viscosities for the top 50 km are in the range 1 - 5 x 10**21 Pa s. Given the characteristic strain rates in the plate-boundary zone, all these viscosities imply plate-boundary deviatoric stresses generally < 20 MPa, and are consistent with previous low estimates of shear stresses on the subduction plate interface based on a simple force balance (Lamb 2006). Fluid-like behaviour of the New Zealand plate-boundary zone is consistent with both geodetic data and the observed pattern of shear wave splitting. References: England, P.C., and P. Molnar, Science, 278, 647-649, 1997. Lamb, S., JGR, 105, 25,627-25,653, 2000. Lamb, S., JGR, 111, B07401, doi:10.1029/2005JB003916, 2006.

  6. Global Plate Velocities from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Philipsen, Steven

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed 204 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the global GPS network spanning January 1991 through March 1996. On the basis of these GPS coordinate solutions, we have estimated velocities for 38 sites, mostly located on the interiors of the Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, Nazca, North America, Pacific, and South America plates. The uncertainties of the horizontal velocity components range from 1.2 to 5.0 mm/yr. With the exception of sites on the Pacific and Nazca plates, the GPS velocities agree with absolute plate model predictions within 95% confidence. For most of the sites in North America, Antarctica, and Eurasia, the agreement is better than 2 mm/yr. We find no persuasive evidence for significant vertical motions (less than 3 standard deviations), except at four sites. Three of these four were sites constrained to geodetic reference frame velocities. The GPS velocities were then used to estimate angular velocities for eight tectonic plates. Absolute angular velocities derived from the GPS data agree with the no net rotation (NNR) NUVEL-1A model within 95% confidence except for the Pacific plate. Our pole of rotation for the Pacific plate lies 11.5 deg west of the NNR NUVEL-1A pole, with an angular speed 10% faster. Our relative angular velocities agree with NUVEL-1A except for some involving the Pacific plate. While our Pacific-North America angular velocity differs significantly from NUVEL-1A, our model and NUVEL-1A predict very small differences in relative motion along the Pacific-North America plate boundary itself. Our Pacific-Australia and Pacific- Eurasia angular velocities are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, predicting more rapid convergence at these two plate boundaries. Along the East Pacific Pise, our Pacific-Nazca angular velocity agrees in both rate and azimuth with NUVFL-1A.

  7. The Indosinian collision-extension event between the South China Block and the Palaeo-Pacific plate: Evidence from Indosinian alkaline granitic rocks in Dashuang, eastern Zhejiang, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jianren; Ye, Haimin; Liu, Kai; Li, Zilong; Takahashi, Yutaka; Zhao, Xilin; Kee, Weon-Seo

    2013-07-01

    This study reports on the first comprehensive analysis of the geology, petrology and origin of the Dashuang pluton in Jinhua, eastern Zhejiang, South China, which is predominantly composed of quartz monzonite and subordinate quartz syenite that includes variable amounts of aegirine-augite. The quartz monzonite has a porphyritic texture defined by K-feldspar phenocrysts, whereas the quartz syenite shows considerable variation in grain size and is categorised into fine- and coarse-grained types. Zircons from the quartz monzonite and fine-grained quartz syenite yield LA-MC-ICP-MS (laser ablation-multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) U-Pb ages of 231.60 ± 0.86 Ma and 231.7 ± 1.1 Ma, respectively, indicating crystallisation in the Middle Triassic. The chemistry of the quartz monzonite indicates a calc-alkaline to alkaline evolutionary trend, which may reflect partial melting of upper mantle contaminated by Proterozoic basement rocks, subjected to fractional crystallisation during ascent. Both the fine- and coarse-grained quartz syenites are alkaline and have high rare earth element (REE) concentrations, especially light rare earth elements (LREE), and are relatively enriched in large ion lithosphere elements (LILE). The Al2O3 and NaO2 contents of the quartz syenite increase proportionally with SiO2, owing to greater amounts of aegirine-augite and feldspar. The fine-grained quartz syenite has the lowest initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio and lowest Nd model age, and the highest ?Nd value compared with the quartz monzonite. The quartz syenite compositions are best explained by fractional crystallisation of an enriched mantle-derived alkaline magma. Slight chemical variations result from source heterogeneities, as well as the spatially variable degrees of melting, assimilation, and other factors. Our new age and geochemical data for the alkaline rocks in eastern Zhejiang, considered together with collisional granites from South Korea, support a history of collision and extension between the Palaeo-Pacific plate and the South China Block during the Indosinian. We use these data to refine the geodynamic model for Indosinian multi-plate convergence in South China.

  8. Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-21

    The Plate Tectonics SciPack explores the various materials that make up Earth and the processes they undergo to provide a framework for understanding how continents are created and change over time. The focus is on Standards and Benchmarks related to Earth's layers, oceanic and continental plates and the interactions between plates.In addition to comprehensive inquiry-based learning materials tied to Science Education Standards and Benchmarks, the SciPack includes the following additional components:? Pedagogical Implications section addressing common misconceptions, teaching resources and strand maps linking grade band appropriate content to standards. ? Access to one-on-one support via e-mail to content "Wizards".? Final Assessment which can be used to certify mastery of the concepts.Learning Outcomes:Plate Tectonics: Layered Earth? Identify that Earth has layers (not necessarily name them), and that the interior is hotter and more dense than the crust.? Identify the crust as mechanically strong, and the underlying mantle as deformable and convecting.Plate Tectonics: Plates? Identify that the outermost layer of Earth is made up of separate plates.? Choose the correct speed of the motion of plates.? Identify the ocean floor as plate, in addition to the continents (to combat the common idea that only continents are plates, floating around on the oceans).? Recognize that oceans and continents can coexist on the same plate.Plate Tectonics: Plate Interactions? Identify the different interactions between plates.? Discuss what happens as a result of those interactions.Plate Tectonics: Consequences of Plate Interactions? Explain why volcanoes and earthquakes occur along plate boundaries. ? Explain how new sea floor is created and destroyed.? Describe features that may be seen on the surface as a result of plate interactions.Plate Tectonics: Lines of Evidence? Use plate tectonics to explain changes in continents and their positions over geologic time.? Provide evidence for the idea of plates, including the location of earthquakes and volcanoes, continental drift, magnetic orientation of rocks in the ocean floor, etc.

  9. High-resolution animated tectonic reconstruction of the South Pacific and West Antarctic Margin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graeme Eagles; Karsten Gohl; Robert D. Larter

    2004-01-01

    An animated reconstruction shows South Pacific plate kinematics between 90 and 45 Ma, using the satellite-derived gravity anomaly field, interpolated isochrons and plate rotation parameters from both published and new work on marine geophysical data. The Great South Basin and Bounty Trough, New Zealand, are shown as the earliest Pacific-Antarctic plate boundary that opened before 83 Ma. The earliest true

  10. High-resolution animated tectonic reconstruction of the South Pacific and West Antarctic Margin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graeme Eagles; Karsten Gohl; Robert D. Larter

    2004-01-01

    An animated reconstruction shows South Pacific plate kinematics between 90 and 45 Ma, using the satellite-derived gravity anomaly field, interpolated isochrons and plate rotation parameters from both published and new work on marine geophysical data. The Great South Basin and Bounty Trough, New Zealand, are shown as the earliest Pacific–Antarctic plate boundary that opened before 83 Ma. The earliest true

  11. Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Rohlfing

    2011-02-03

    Students will go over the main points of plate tectonics, including the theory of continental drift, different types of plate boundaries, seafloor spreading, and convection currents. We have been spending time learning about plate tectonics. We have discussed the theory of continental drift, we have talked about the different types of plate boundaries, we have also learned about seafloor spreading and convection currents. Plate Boundary Diagram Now is your chance ...

  12. Pacific Mountain System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web page guides the user through the Pacific Mountain System geologic province, one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province, which includes parts of Washington, Oregon, and California, provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. One map shows the plate tectonic setting of the Pacific Mountain System which straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates. This province includes the active volcanoes of the Cascade Range and the young, steep mountains of the Pacific Border and the Sierra Nevada. The user can find out more with links to USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory, Seattle region earthquake hazards, or North Cascades National Park geology. Links are provided to a simple shaded relief map and to several other shaded relief maps including ones with National Park locations and with major and subprovince boundaries. Image gallery links are given to several national parks sites: Lassen Volcanic National Park, Yosemite National Park, and North Cascades National Park.

  13. Plate Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides information on plate boundaries, which are found at the edge of the lithospheric plates and are of three types: convergent, divergent and conservative. Wide zones of deformation are usually characteristic of plate boundaries because of the interaction between two plates. The three boundaries are characterized by their distinct motions which are described in the text and depicted with block diagram illustrations, all of which are animated. There are also two maps that show the direction of motion of the plates. Active links lead to more information on plate tectonics.

  14. Is the Pacific splitting in two? 26 January 2008

    E-print Network

    Clouard, Valerie

    Spinning plates Página 1 de 2Is the Pacific splitting in two? - earth - 26 January 2008 - Print Article;Related Articles Did a comet kick-start Earth's plate tectonics? http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg19626333.100 6 December 2007 The day tectonic plates come to rest http://www.newscientist.com/article

  15. Intermittent plate tectonics?

    PubMed

    Silver, Paul G; Behn, Mark D

    2008-01-01

    Although it is commonly assumed that subduction has operated continuously on Earth without interruption, subduction zones are routinely terminated by ocean closure and supercontinent assembly. Under certain circumstances, this could lead to a dramatic loss of subduction, globally. Closure of a Pacific-type basin, for example, would eliminate most subduction, unless this loss were compensated for by comparable subduction initiation elsewhere. Given the evidence for Pacific-type closure in Earth's past, the absence of a direct mechanism for termination/initiation compensation, and recent data supporting a minimum in subduction flux in the Mesoproterozoic, we hypothesize that dramatic reductions or temporary cessations of subduction have occurred in Earth's history. Such deviations in the continuity of plate tectonics have important consequences for Earth's thermal and continental evolution. PMID:18174440

  16. Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Smoothstone

    This interactive Flash explores plate tectonics and provides an interactive map where users can identify plate boundaries with name and velocities as well as locations of earthquakes, volcanoes, and hotspots. The site also provides animations and supplementary information about plate movement and subduction. This resource is a helpful overview or review for introductory level high school or undergraduate physical geology or Earth science students.

  17. Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Walls

    2011-01-30

    Create a poster all about Plate Tectonics! Directions: Make a poster about Plate Tectonics. (20 points) Include at least (1) large picture (15 points) on your poster complete with labels of every part (10 points). (15 points) Include at least three (3) facts about Plate Tectonics. (5 points ...

  18. A plate-tectonic model for the Mesozoic and Early Cenozoic history of the Caribbean plate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Meschede; Wolfgang Frisch

    1998-01-01

    We present a model in which the Caribbean plate is an intra-American feature formed along the Caribbean spreading center as opposed to the current model that considers the Caribbean plate as a far-travelled crustal segment that formed in the Pacific region. Paleomagnetic data, which cover an age range from Jurassic through Paleocene, indicate the ophiolite complexes in Costa Rica and

  19. Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2005-12-17

    This interactive activity adapted from NASA features world maps that identify different sections of the Earth's crust called tectonic plates. The locations of different types of plate boundaries are also identified, including convergent, divergent, and transform boundaries.

  20. A Western Pacific Hotspot?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, C. G.; Hall, R.

    2003-04-01

    The petrology of volcanic rocks from the St. Andrew Strait and helium isotope ratios of backarc lavas from the Manus Basin have been used to propose the existence of an active hotspot beneath the eastern Bismarck Sea (Johnson et al., 1978; Macpherson et al., 1998). The past influence of this hotspot can be assessed by mapping its present location onto a plate tectonic reconstruction of the western Pacific (Macpherson and Hall, 2001). During the Middle Eocene the nascent Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc lay above the hotspot. The volume of magma emplaced at the IBM arc at that time substantially exceeds the average magma production rate for mature island arcs. Furthermore, the ultramafic (boninitic) character of much of this magmatism requires elevated temperatures. The geochemistry of contemporaneous magmatism in the backarc resembles ocean island basalts and much of the backarc region experienced significant uplift at that time. All of these features can be explained by the influx of hot, buoyant, chemically distinct mantle beneath the IBM and its hinterland. The lithosphere lying above the hotspot during the later Eocene was subsequently subducted. During the Oligo-Miocene the hotspot was traversed by parts of the Caroline Plate where the Euripik Rise is found. This is an aseismic rise that possesses the geophysical characteristics of thickened oceanic crust formed by excess, basaltic magmatism and is the type of structure that would result from the passage of relatively young oceanic lithosphere over a mantle hotspot. Plate reconstruction for the western Pacific predicts a hotspot trail that is consistent with the Middle Eocene and Oligo-Miocene geology of the IBM and Caroline Plates, respectively (Macpherson and Hall, 2001). Parts of the trail have been disrupted by subsequent sea-floor spreading or lost through subduction but the remaining vestiges are consistent with the action of a thermal anomaly throughout much of the Cenozoic. More speculatively, buoyancy differences between the IBM, supported by hot mantle, and older, colder lithosphere of the adjacent Pacific Plate may have provided a mechanism to propagate widespread subduction at the nascent IBM arc. Johnson RW, Smith IEM, &Taylor SR, BMR J. Aus. Geol. Geophys. 3, 55-69, (1978). Macpherson CG, Hilton, DR, Sinton, JM, Poreda RJ &Craig H. Geology 26, 1007-1010, (1998). Macpherson CG &Hall R, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 186, 215-230, (2001).

  1. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plate, with a transition from subduction of Pacific oceanic lithosphere beneath North Island, to oblique continental collision in South Island. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone up to 250 km wide, with displacements on individual faults up to 100s of kilometres. Active deformation must be driven by a combination of plate-boundary forces and internal buoyancy forces. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses, together with simple Airy isostasy, to determine regional crustal and mantle structure. Integration of the vertical normal stress to the base of the deforming layer yields the buoyancy stress. Horizontal gradients of this can be compared with horizontal gradients of strain rate, using the method of England & Molnar (1997), in the context of a simple thin sheet model of deformation. Thus, if deformation is that of a Newtonian fluid, then appropriate combinations of the horizontal gradients of vorticity and dilatation are related to gradients of buoyancy stress by the fluid viscosity. However, the short term geodetic deformation is strongly biased by elastic strain accumulation related to locking on the plate interface, and cannot be used to determine the plate-boundary velocity field averaged over many seismic cycles (see Lamb & Smith 2013). Therefore, I derive here a velocity field for the plate-boundary zone, which is representative of deformation over tens of thousands of years. This is based on an inversion of fault slip, strain rate azimuth and paleomagnetic data, in the context of the short term relative plate motions, solved in a network of triangles spanning the plate-boundary, using the method of Lamb (2000). A comparison of gradients of buoyancy stress with the appropriate combinations of gradients of vorticity and dilatation shows that deformation in the plate-boundary zone does have features that are fluid-like, characterized by a variable viscosity in the range 1 - 10 x 10^21 Pa s. Given the strain rates in the plate-boundary zone, viscosities imply plate-boundary deviatoric stresses < 20 MPa, and are consistent with previous low estimates of shear stresses in subduction zones based on a simple force balance (Lamb 2006). References: England, P.C., and P. Molnar, (1997), Science, 278, 647-649. Lamb, S. (2000), J. Geophys. Res., 105, 25,627-25,653. Lamb, S., (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, B07401, doi:10.1029/2005JB003916. Lamb, S., and E. Smith (2013), J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50221.

  2. Present-day kinematics of the Rivera plate and implications for tectonics in southwestern Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Stein, Seth

    1990-01-01

    A model for the present-day motion of the Rivera plate relative to the North America, Cocos, and Pacific plates is derived using new data from the Pacific-Rivera rise and Rivera transform fault, together with new estimates of Pacific-Rivera motions. The results are combined with the closure-consistent NUVEL-1 global plate motion model of DeMets et al. (1990) to examine present-day deformation in southwestern Mexico. The analysis addresses several questions raised in previous studies of the Rivera plate. Namely, do plate motion data from the northern East Pacific rise require a distinct Rivera plate? Do plate kinematic data require the subduction of the Rivera plate along the seismically quiescent Acapulco trench? If so, what does the predicted subduction rate imply about the earthquake recurrence interval in the Jalisco region of southwestern Mexico?

  3. Seismic tomography constraints on reconstructing the Philippine Sea Plate and its margin 

    E-print Network

    Handayani, Lina

    2005-02-17

    tectonic regions on Earth throughout Cenozoic time due to the convergence of Eurasian, Pacific and Indian- Australian plates, numerous convergence zones, back arc basins and many small plates. The history of the Western Pacific region has... driving force for plate motion. The mechanical behavior of lithosphere in the process of subduction has been extensively examined for its importance in understanding mantle dynamics related to plate motion at the Earth?s surface. Subducting...

  4. Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific

    E-print Network

    ) of the Pacific-wide (western-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview

  5. The paleomagnetism of eastern Nazca plate seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, John A.

    1989-12-01

    Paleomagnetism of eastern Nazca plate seamounts defines Nazca and Farallon absolute plate motion during Cenozoic times. Magnetic and bathymetric surveys are presented for two eastern Nazca plate seamounts in the Chile Basin and they are used to calculate paleomagnetic poles with uniform and nonuniform magnetic modeling. The paleopole for Piquero-2 seamount is coincident with the earth's pole, suggesting a young seamount. The paleopole for Piquero-1 seamount indicates that the Nazca plate moved 23° northward during 0-50 ma. This is 13° more latitudinal motion than predicted by a Pacific hotspot reference frame and 20 ° more motion than predicted by DSDP sediment and basalt paleomagnetism.

  6. Pore Fluid Pressure and State of Stress Above the Plate Interface from Observations in a 3 Kilometer Deep Borehole: IODP Site C0002, Nankai Trough Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, H. J.; Saffer, D. M.; Hirose, T.; Castillo, D. A.; Kitajima, H.; Sone, H.

    2014-12-01

    During IODP Expedition 348 from October 2013 to January 2014, Site C0002 was drilled to more than 3000 meters' depth into the inner accretionary wedge at the Nankai Trough, setting a new depth record for scientific ocean drilling. It is the first hole to access the deep interior of an active convergent margin. Site C0002 is part of the NanTroSEIZE project off the Kii-Kumano region of Japan, designed to shed light on plate boundary fault zone processes near the up-dip edge of seismogenic locking and slip. The zone from 865 - 3056 meters below the sea floor was sampled via logging-while-drilling measurements, continuous sampling of drill cuttings, and limited coring. This interval was composed of lithified middle to late Miocene hemipelagic sediments and turbidites that are markedly deformed and dip steeply. P-wave speeds from sonic logs increase with depth to ~ 1600 meters, but are constant to slightly decreasing with depth from 1600 to 3050 meters. We hypothesize that this change in trend indicates the onset of elevated pore fluid pressure, but structural and lithologic factors may also play a role. We explore several methods for quantitative estimation of sonic-derived fluid pressure conditions in the inner wedge. A borehole leak-off test (LOT) and a series of borehole pressurization and injection tests were also performed, which we synthesize to estimate the least principal stress, or Shmin. Furthermore, downhole pressure while drilling (PWD) measurements recorded during borehole packoff events provide information on the maximum principal stress, SHmax. Taken together, the LOT and PWD observations suggest that the inner wedge at ~ 2000 meters depth is currently in a strike-slip stress regime, despite its position as the hanging wall of a main plate boundary thrust. This may be a transitional stress regime between shallow normal and deep thrust, controlled by depth-dependent magnitude of the tectonic convergence-related principal stress. Our results document for the first time the stress conditions and material properties in the deep interior of the upper plate to the shallow seismogenic zone.

  7. Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    In this lesson, students are introduced to the theory of plate tectonics and explore how the theory was developed and supported by evidence. Through class discussion, videos, and activities, students seek connections between tectonic activity and geologic features and investigate how the theory of plate tectonics evolved.

  8. Late Paleocene demise of the Kula-Pacific spreading center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim Byrne

    1979-01-01

    A new plate history for the northeast Pacific, formulated from compiled magnetic-anomaly data, indicates that the Kula-Pacific ridge ceased spreading in late Paleocene time (about 56 to 59 m.y. B.P.). Magnetic anomalies 32 to 25 (70 to 59 m.y. B.P.) show the configuration of the Kula-Pacific-Farallon triple junction. Between anomalies 24 and 22 (56 to 53 m.y. B.P.), the southeast-

  9. Coseismic Slip Distribution of the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Deduced from Land and Seafloor Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, T.; Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Inazu, D.; Ohzono, M.; Tsushima, H.; Hino, R.; Ohta, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miura, S.; Shinohara, M.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) occurred on 11 March 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku district, northeastern Japan, where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the overriding continental plate. A number of models of the coseismic slip distribution of this earthquake have been already proposed based on seismological, geodetic, and tsunami data. Here, we present comprehensive coseismic slip distribution model based not only on land GPS data but also on seafloor geodetic observations, which are obtained through recent observation cruises. We combined displacements at seafloor sites that are deduced from two different types of seafloor observations with the displacements at land GPS stations. One is the seafloor crustal deformation observation with GPS/Acoustic ranging (GPS/A). Horizontal displacements associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake at 2 GPS/A stations are estimated by comparing the station positions deduced from the observations before and after the earthquake. Another type of the seafloor data is seafloor water pressure that is observed by means of ocean bottom pressure gauge (OBP). We analyzed OBP data observed at 2 cabled and 4 self pop-up stations, and estimated vertical displacements due to the main shock. Displacements at 5 GPS/A stations of Japan Coast Guard [Sato et al., 2011, science] are also included to estimate the coseismic slip distribution of the earthquake. Estimated slip distribution of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake shows following features. 1) The area of large slip ( > 20 m) is about 100 km x 200 km on the plate interface shallower than 30 km in depth. 2) There is no large slip occurred off southern Iwate prefecture on the plate interface throughout shallow to deep. 3) The latitudinal range of the area of large slip almost corresponds to the one of the area of strong interplate coupling zone off Miyagi prefecture. 4) Significant slip is estimated around the rupture area of 1978 M7.4 Miyagi-oki earthquake (40 ~ 50 km in depth). 5) No large slip is estimated on the shallow plate interface off Fukushima prefecture. These features clarify that the coseismic rupture of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake is concentrated relatively narrow area off Miyagi prefecture and maximum slip is very large as compared to the empirical scaling law between released moment, fault size, and maximum slip of earthquakes on the subducting plate boundary. The results suggest that most slip occurred on the plate interface where continental crust contacts with the subducting oceanic crust. Off Miyagi prefecture, however, is an exceptional region where coseismic slip also has occurred on the plate interface under the continental mantle. The heterogeneity of the mantle wedge might control this slip heterogeneity in the crust-mantle contact zone. With respect to the shallow plate interface, there is no large slip is estimated off Iwate and Fukushima prefecture. Less accumulated strain due to the weak interplate coupling off Iwate prefecture and strain release due to the slow slip events that are detected by the activity of the small repeating earthquakes (e.g. in 2008) might cause it.

  10. Fundamental processes in ion plating

    SciTech Connect

    Mattox, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Ion plating is a generic term applied to film deposition processes in which the substrate surface and/or the depositing film is subjected to a flux of high energy particles sufficient to cause changes in the interfacial region of film properties compared to a nonbombarded deposition. Ion plating is being accepted as an alternative coating technique to sputter deposition, vacuum evaporation and electroplating. In order to intelligently choose between the various deposition techniques, the fundamental mechanisms, relating to ion plating, must be understood. This paper reviews the effects of low energy ion bombardment on surfaces, interface formation and film development as they apply to ion plating and the implementation and applications of the ion plating process.

  11. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.; Farrell, T.; Goodwin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  12. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    E-print Network

    Lorente, Nuria P F; Goodwin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13 x 61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  13. Using GPS, tide gauge and altimetry data to constrain subduction parameters at the Vanuatu plate boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, V.; Bouin, M.; Baillard, C.; Calmant, S.; Pelletier, B.; Crawford, W. C.; Kanas, T.; Garaebiti, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Vanuatu subduction zone, Southwest Pacific, combines several features that makes it a particularly useful place to study seismic cycles. The convergence rate is high - approximately 12 cm/yr - and the seismic cycle relatively short. Measurements of interseismic motions are helped by relatively high vertical rates, the close proximity of some islands to the plate interface and the existence of very shallow seamounts on either side of the plate interface. The Vanuatu archipelago is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire: the Australian plate subducts eastward beneath the North Fiji basin, on the western border of the Pacific Plate. High topographic features on the diving plate may contribute to locking of the plates, which can play a major role in the genesis of destructive earthquakes. GPS network points were installed in the early 1990s and the geodesy network has been densified through the years, enabling us to map interseismic horizontal and vertical deformation rates throughout the archipelago. More recently, 8 continuous GPS stations were installed, along with 3 continuous seafloor pressure gauges very near to the plate interface. We show results from GPS data collected from 1996 to 2011, that we re-processed and combined into the ITRF2008 reference frame, and altimetry and seafloor pressure data from 1999 to 2010. The GPS results show that vertical deformation rates vary both across and along the archipelago. We believe that these variations result from variable distance to the plate limit and variable locking parameters. In some areas, subsidence rates are close to one centimeter per year. In the Torres islands (at the northern end of the archipelago) where villagers face recurrent coastal flooding, we showed that this flooding is due more to ground motion than to rise in the absolute sea level, even though the sea-level rise rates are locally high and the islands uplift over the long term. In the Central area of Vanuatu, we augmented the on-land network with two offshore sites using absolute pressure gauges. The sites - Wusi and Sabine Banks - are installed beneath altimetry satellite tracks, Wusi Bank on the over-riding plate and Sabine Bank on the subducting plate. The difference in the pressure records between the sites shows that Wusi Bank subsides by 11 +/- 3 mm/yr with respect to Sabine Bank. We combined the water depths derived from the pressure measurements with altimetry-derived sea-surface heights to tie these heights to a global reference frame: Wusi Bank subsides and Sabine Bank's vertical motion is near zero. Using a 2D elastic model and a finite-element code, we used the gradient of vertical deformation between the coast and the Wusi Bank site to discriminate between possible locked zone geometries. The best simple approximation is a 25° dipping, 30 km long fully locked zone, indicating that stress is currently accumulating west of Santo, Central Vanuatu. The movement of Wusi Bank is a key factor in constraining the dip and length of the locked zone, demonstrating the importance of offshore geodesy measurements.

  14. Plate-induced Miocene extension in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, W.D. (Geological Survey, Pasadena, CA (United States) Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Miocene crustal extension in southern California can be explained by the interaction of tectonic plates in relative motion. The Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Farallon (Guadalupe) plates are represented by flat elastic plates surrounded by an infinite elastic plate, the eastern part of which represents the North America plate. Forcing is by assigned subduction pull, and tractions at all plate boundaries satisfy a viscous constitutive law. Plate bottoms are stress-free. In the first part of the solution plate velocities and boundary tractions are found from static equilibrium. Then principal horizontal stresses and strains in plate interiors caused by tractions and subduction pull are found by a boundary element procedure. Using plate boundary geometry from Stock and Hodges for early- and mid-Miocene times, it is found that the portion of the North America plate margin between the Mendocino and Rivera triple junctions has maximum extensional strain directed westward. This result is generally consistent with directions associated with metamorphic core complex formation in southern California. The model is also consistent with extensional strain and rotation sense of crustal blocks in the vicinity of Los Angeles, as inferred by Luyendyk and others from paleomagnetic data. In the model the greatest extensional strain of the North America plate occurs near the Pacific-North America transform, in the area above the absent Farallon slab. Extension direction varies from northwest to southwest according to plate geometry, subduction pull (Juan de Fuca and Guadalupe), and plate boundary tractions.

  15. Plate Tectonics, The Cause of Earthquakes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Louie

    This page provides an overview of the role of plate tectonics in the generation of earthquakes. It provides a map of plate locations and figures that illustrate fault types and tectonic environments (extensional, transform, and compressional). Examples of surface features in the Pacific Northwest, Nevada, Indonesia, the San Andreas Fault, the Red Sea, the Zagoros Mountains in Iran, and on the planet Venus are provided.

  16. Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components

    E-print Network

    Story, Brett Alan

    2009-05-15

    The objective of this research is to improve the railcar/rail truck interface by developing a low maintenance bearing interface with a favorable friction coefficient. Friction and wear at the center bowl/center plate bearing interface cause high...

  17. Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific

    E-print Network

    Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2007. Currently, there are no catch share in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC migrate across international

  18. Western Pacific Regional Summary Western Pacific

    E-print Network

    -central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2007. Currently (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC

  19. Peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babecki, A. J. (inventor); Haehner, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A process for metal plating which comprises spraying a mixture of metallic powder and small peening particles at high velocity against a surface is described. The velocity must be sufficient to impact and bond metallic powder onto the surface. In the case of metal surfaces, the process has as one of its advantages providing mechanical working (hardening) of the surface simultaneously with the metal plating.

  20. High Stress Consolidation, Ultrasonic, and Permeability Measurements: Constraints on Physical Properties and In Situ Stress along the Costa Rica Subduction Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winner, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Valdez, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment permeability and consolidation behavior are key parameters in governing the drainage state and thus potential for excess pore fluid pressure in subduction zones. Elevated pore pressure, in turn, is one important control on the strength and sliding behavior of faults. Along many subduction margins, evidence of elevated, near-lithostatic, in situ pore pressure comes from high seismic reflectivity, low P-wave velocity (Vp), and high Vp/Vs ratios. This inference is broadly supported by numerical modeling studies that indicate elevated pore pressures are likely given high rates of burial and tectonic loading, combined with the low permeability of marine mudstones. Here, we report on a series of high-stress consolidation experiments on sediment core samples from the incoming Cocos plate obtained as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344. Our experiments were designed to measure the consolidation behavior, permeability, and P-wave velocity of the incoming sediments over a range of confining stresses from .5 to 90 MPa. We explore a range of paths,including isostatic loading (?1=?2=?3), K0 consolidation, in which the ratio of ?3/?1 is maintained at ~0.6, and the trixial loading paths designed to maintain a near critical-state failure condition. In our tests, load is increased in a series of steps. After equilibration at each step, we conduct constant head permeability tests, and measure P-wave velocities in a "time of flight" mode. Initial results from isostatic loading tests on hemipelagic mudstone samples from 34 mbsf document consolidation and permeability-porosity trends, in which porosity decreases from 69% to 54% as stress in increased from .5 MPa to 15 MPa, and permeability decreases from 8.1 X 10-18 m2 at 1 MPa to 1.1 X 10-19 m2 at 15 MPa. P-wave velocity increases by 486-568 km/s over this effective stress range. Ultimately, data from our experiments will provide a robust basis for quantifying fluid content and pressure from seismic velocity and fault plane reflectivity at this margin, and provide data to parameterize forward models of fluid flow and consolidation.

  1. Average slip rate at the transition zone on the plate interface in the Nankai subduction zone, Japan, estimated from short-term SSE catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaba, S.; Kimura, T.

    2013-12-01

    Short-term slow slip events (S-SSEs) in the Nankai subduction zone, Japan, have been monitored by borehole strainmeters and borehole accelerometers (tiltmeters) mainly. The scale of the S-SSE in this region is small (Mw5-6), and therefore there were two problems in S-SSE identification and estimation of the fault model. (1) There were few observatories that can detect crustal deformation associated with S-SSEs. Therefore, reliability of the estimated fault model was low. (2) The signal associated with the S-SSE is relatively small. Therefore, it was difficult to detect the S-SSE only from strainmeter and tiltmeter. The former problem has become resolvable to some extent by integrating the data of borehole strainmeter, tiltmeter and groundwater (pore pressure) of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, tiltmeter of the National Research Institute for Earthquake Science and Disaster Prevention and borehole strainmeter of the Japan Meteorological Agency. For the latter, by using horizontal redundant component of a multi-component strainmeter, which consists generally of four horizontal extensometers, it has become possible to extract tectonic deformation efficiently and detect a S-SSE using only strainmeter data. Using the integrated data and newly developed technique, we started to make a catalog of S-SSE in the Nankai subduction zone. For example, in central Mie Prefecture, we detect and estimate fault model of eight S-SSEs from January 2010 to September 2012. According to our estimates, the average slip rate of S-SSE is 2.7 cm/yr. Ishida et al. [2013] estimated the slip rate as 2.6-3.0 cm/yr from deep low-frequency tremors, and this value is consistent with our estimation. Furthermore, the slip deficit rate in this region evaluated by the analysis of GPS data from 2001 to 2004 is 1.0 - 2.6 cm/yr [Kobayashi et al., 2006], and the convergence rate of the Philippine Sea plate in this region is estimated as 5.0 - 7.0 cm/yr. The difference between the slip deficit rate and the convergence rate is 2.4-6.0 cm/yr, and it is comparable to the average slip rate of S-SSE. Consequently, slow earthquakes such as S-SSEs and tremor that we can detect, roughly cover 50-100 % of quasi-static slip in this region.

  2. Pacific Northwest AGU Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, David C.; Beck, Myrl E., Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The 30th AGU Pacific Northwest Regional Meeting was held September 29 to October 1, 1983, on the campus of Western Washington University, Bellingham, Wash. Approximately 125 attended the meeting, and 36 papers were presented. The meeting included two fields trips, five special symposia, and a banquet where keynote speaker Don Swanson presented “Dome building on Mt. St. Helens.”The meeting highlights included a symposium on Tertiary sedimentary basins of Washington and Oregon which revealed the importance of sedimentological studies for deciphering the timing and nature of accretionary processes in tectonically active areas. Geological and geophysical studies on the recent tectonics of the Juan de Fuca plate and nearby continent were presented by workers from the United States and Canada as well as ongoing studies for the evolution and character of the crystalline North Cascades of Washington and British Columbia.

  3. How Shifting Plates Caused the Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    New York Times

    This page features USGS visualizations including a slide show of the sudden movement of the Pacific tectonic plate under the North American plate caused a massive earthquake and a tsunami. It also contains maps of the magnitude of shaking and predicted tsunami wave heights from the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

  4. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Anderson; B. Blackman; J. Eakins; K. Hodgkinson; J. Matykiewicz; F. Boler; M. Beldyk; B. Henderson; B. Hoyt; E. Lee; E. Persson; J. Smith; D. Torrez; J. Wright; M. Jackson; C. Meertens

    2007-01-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser

  5. INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuqing

    INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER APRIL 2004­MARCH 2005 REPORT SCHOOL OF OCEAN AND EARTH RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate Pacific Research Center Design by: Susan Yamamoto Printed by: Hagadone Printing Company Photo: Waikiki

  6. Finite element formulation of orthotropic piezoceramic patch actuator laminated plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ziya Koray Kusculuoglu; Thomas J. Royston

    2004-01-01

    Constitutive and finite element models of a piezoceramic laminated plate are derived using shear deformation (Mindlin plate) theory for each layer, where constraints are added to ensure the elastic deformation continuity at the interface. The major difference of this study compared to previous studies is that the finite element formulation is applicable to both thin and thick laminated plates with

  7. Plating on some difficult-to-plate metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1980-02-01

    Electrodeposition of coatings on metals such as beryllium, beryllium-copper, Kovar, lead, magnesium, thorium, titanium, tungsten, uranium, zirconium, and their alloys can be problematic. This is due in most cases to a natural oxide surface film that readily reforms after being removed. The procedures we recommend for plating on these metals rely on replacing the oxide film with a displacement coating, or etching to allow mechanical keying between the substrate and plated deposit. The effectiveness of the procedures is demonstrated by interface bond strengths found in ring-shear and conical-head tensile tests.

  8. NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St.

    E-print Network

    Lake W ashington Ship Canal NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St. NE Boat St. 15th Ave NE 15thAveNE UniversityWayNE BrooklynAveNE NE Pacific St. MontlakeBlvdNE MontlakeBlvdNE Pacific Place NE University Burke-Gilman Trail METRO NW A CD D EF F GHI H J RR BB CC EE AA Rotunda Cafe Ocean Sciences Hitchcock

  9. Tectonic map of the Circum-Pacific region, Pacific basin sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheibner, E.; Moore, G.W.; Drummond, K.J.; Dalziel, Corvalan Q.J.; Moritani, T.; Teraoka, Y.; Sato, T.; Craddock, C.

    2013-01-01

    Circum-Pacific Map Project: The Circum-Pacific Map Project was a cooperative international effort designed to show the relationship of known energy and mineral resources to the major geologic features of the Pacific basin and surrounding continental areas. Available geologic, mineral, and energy-resource data are being complemented by new, project-developed data sets such as magnetic lineations, seafloor mineral deposits, and seafloor sediment. Earth scientists representing some 180 organizations from more than 40 Pacific-region countries are involved in this work. Six overlapping equal-area regional maps at a scale of 1:10,000,000 form the cartographic base for the project: the four Circum-Pacific Quadrants (Northwest, Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast), and the Antarctic and Arctic Sheets. There is also a Pacific Basin Sheet at a scale of 1:17,000,000. The Base Map Series and the Geographic Series (published from 1977 to 1990), the Plate-Tectonic Series (published in 1981 and 1982), the Geodynamic Series (published in 1984 and 1985), and the Geologic Series (published from 1984 to 1989) all include six map sheets. Other thematic map series in preparation include Mineral-Resources, Energy-Resources and Tectonic Maps. Altogether, more than 50 map sheets are planned. The maps were prepared cooperatively by the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey and are available from the Branch of Distribution, U. S. Geological Survey, Box 25286, Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225, U.S.A. The Circum-Pacific Map Project is organized under six panels of geoscientists representing national earth-science organizations, universities, and natural-resource companies. The six panels correspond to the basic map areas. Current panel chairmen are Tomoyuki Moritani (Northwest Quadrant), R. Wally Johnson (Southwest Quadrant), Ian W.D. Dalziel (Antarctic Region), vacant. (Southeast Quadrant), Kenneth J. Drummond (Northeast Quadrant), and George W. Moore (Arctic Region). Project coordination and final cartography was being carried out through the cooperation of the Office of the Chief Geologist of the U.S. Geological Survey, under the direction of General Chairman, George Gryc of Menlo Park, California. Project headquarters were located at 345 Middlefield Road, MS 952, Menlo Park, California 94025, U.S.A. The framework for the Circum-Pacific Map Project was developed in 1973 by a specially convened group of 12 North American geoscientists meeting in California. The project was officially launched at the First Circum-Pacific Conference on Energy and Mineral Resources, which met in Honolulu, Hawaii, in August 1974. Sponsors of the conference were the AAPG, Pacific Science Association (PSA), and the Coordinating Committee for Offshore Prospecting for Mineral Resources in Offshore Asian Areas (CCOP). The Circum-Pacific Map Project operates as an activity of the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources, a nonprofit organization that promotes cooperation among Circum-Pacific countries in the study of energy and mineral resources of the Pacific basin. Founded by Michel T. Halbouty in 1972, the Council also sponsors conferences, topical symposia, workshops and the Earth Science Series books. Tectonic Map Series: The tectonic maps distinguish areas of oceanic and continental crust. Symbols in red mark active plate boundaries, and colored patterns show tectonic units (volcanic or magmatic arcs, arc-trench gaps, and interarc basins) associated with active plate margins. Well-documented inactive plate boundaries are shown by symbols in black. The tectonic development of oceanic crust is shown by episodes of seafloor spreading. These correlate with the rift and drift sequences at passive continental margins and episodes of tectonic activity at active plate margins. The recognized episodes of seafloor spreading seem to reflect major changes in plate kinematics. Oceanic plateaus and other prominences of greater than normal oceanic crustal thickness such as hotspot traces are also shown. Colored a

  10. PACIFIC COAST SALMON pacific Coast Salmon

    E-print Network

    181 PACIFIC COAST SALMON UNIT 12 pacific Coast Salmon Unit 12 ROBERT G. KOPE NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center Seattle Washington INTRODUCTION Pacific salmon support important commercial and recreational fisheries in Washington, Oregon, and California. Salmon are a vital part of the cul- ture

  11. Relationship between temperatures and fault slips on the upper surface of the subducting Philippine Sea plate beneath the Kanto district, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shoichi; Takagi, Rumi; Matsumoto, Takumi

    2015-05-01

    To elucidate the relationship between interplate temperatures and generation mechanisms for megathrust earthquakes and slow slip events (SSEs) in the Kanto district, central Japan, we performed numerical simulations on the thermal state. For this purpose, we newly developed a 2-D box-type thermal convection model that is able to handle the subduction of two oceanic plates: the young oceanic Philippine Sea (PHS) plate subducts following subduction of the old oceanic Pacific (PAC) plate beneath it. To constrain temperatures on the upper surface of the PHS plate, we used high-density Hi-net heat flow data on land. We found that low heat flow in the Kanto district was caused mostly by subduction of the cold PHS plate. To explain the heat flow distribution in the Kanto district in more detail, we needed to incorporate frictional heating at the plate interface on the seaward side of the corner of the mantle wedge, and temperature changes due to surface erosion and sedimentation associated with crustal deformation during the Quaternary on land into the models. The most suitable pore pressure ratio to explain the heat flow data was 0.98. The thermally estimated seismogenic zone corresponded well to the fault planes of the 1923 Taisho Kanto earthquake and the western half of the 1707 Genroku Kanto earthquake. The eastern half of the fault plane of the 1707 Genroku Kanto earthquake could be divided into two areas; the northwestern fault plane corresponded to the thermally estimated seismogenic zone, whereas the relationship between the southeastern fault plane and interplate temperatures was ambiguous. The off-Boso SSEs occurred on the plate interface at temperatures lower than approximately 250 °C, and the slipped region passed through the 150 °C isotherm, corresponding to the clay mineral phase transformation from smectite to illite. This might suggest that the SSEs occurred in relation to a dehydration process.

  12. Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Continents were once thought to be static, locked tight in their positions in Earth's crust. Similarities between distant coastlines, such as those on opposite sides of the Atlantic, were thought to be the work of a scientist's overactive imagination, or, if real, the result of erosion on a massive scale. This interactive feature shows 11 tectonic plates and their names, the continents that occupy them, and the types of boundaries between them.

  13. Circum-Pacific diatomite deposits

    SciTech Connect

    North, F.K.

    1986-07-01

    Deformed diatomites of assured identification are all Oligocene or younger. They are not to be interpreted with oceanic diatom oozes as analogs, nor with California's Monterey Formation as prototype. All examples, apart from the unique Monterey, are deposits of relatively shallow waters at convergent plate or microplate boundaries: in arc-trench gaps or (less importantly) in immediate back-arc belts. Tethyan examples, along a collision boundary, are now slivers in the late stages of external flysch along the fronts of Alpine thrust belts. Circum-Pacific examples, at ocean-continent subduction boundaries, are preserved only on mountainous islands or peninsulas, the uplift (not folding) of which has protected the diatomites and their overlying evaporites from subduction. The control is tectonic and volcanic, not by water temperature or eustatism. Preserved deposits appear to be restricted to particular segments of the Pacific boundary delineated by Benioff zones having some significant minimum dip. The unique Monterey Formation owes its spectacular development and preservation to the conversion of an arc-trench boundary to a transform boundary, at a triple junction, before the diatomite was deposited. The Monterey's importance as an oil source sediment does not stem from its true diatomite component. Other Circum-Pacific diatomites are of negligible significance to the petroleum geologist, but are potentially minable for other uses in Japan, the Philippines, and Peru, and possibly in Chile.

  14. High-frequency Pn,Sn phases recorded by ocean bottom seismometers on the Cocos plate

    SciTech Connect

    McCreery, C.S.

    1981-05-01

    Data from ocean bottom seismometers located on the Cocos plate indicate that high-frequency Pn,Sn phases are generated by earthquakes along the subducting margin of that plate and are propagated across the plate. The Sn phase appears to be severely attenuated as it approaches the ridge crest. Estimates of Pn velocity are lower than previous extimates for western Pacific paths, which may indicate a relationship between Pn,Sn velocity and lithospheric age. High frequencies found in these phases suggest that Q for Pn,Sn propagation across the Cocos plate is similar to that for the western Pacific.

  15. Origin of the oceanic basalt basement of the Solomon Islands arc and its relationship to the Ontong Java Plateau-insights from Cenozoic plate motion models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic global plate motion models based on a hotspot reference frame may provide a useful framework for analyzing the tectonic evolution of the Solomon Islands convergent margin. A postulated late Miocene collision of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) with a NE-facing arc is consistent with the predicted path of the OJP across the Pacific Basin and its Miocene arrival at the trench. Late-stage igneous activity (65-30 Ma) predicted for the OJP as it rode over the Samoan hotspot occurred in correlative stratigraphic sections on Malaita, the supposed accreted flake of OJP in the Solomon Islands arc. Convergence similar to the present velocities between Australia and the Pacific plates was characteristic of the last 43 million years. Prior to 43 Ma Pacific-Australia plate motions were divergent, seemingly at odds with geologic evidence for early Tertiary convergence, particularly in Papua New Guinea. A postulated South Pacific plate may have existed between Australia and the Pacific plate and would have allowed implied northward subduction along the northeastern Australia plate boundary that lasted into the early Eocene. Subsequent reorganization of plate motions in the middle Eocene correlates with middle Eocene marginal basin formation along ridges oblique to the main plate boundary. Cessation of spreading on the Pacific-South Pacific Ridge and its subsequent subduction beneath Asia followed the change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma. A trapped remnant of the extinct, NW-trending ridge may still lie beneath the western Philippine Sea. The terminal deformation, metamorphism and ophiolite obduction in the Eocene orogen of the southwest Pacific also correlates with the major change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma and the subsequent compression of the dying Eocene arc against outlying continental and oceanic crustal blocks of the Australian plate. The Solomon Islands oceanic basement may represent juxtaposition of oceanic plateaus of the Australian plate beneath overthrust, dismembered ophiolite derived from adjacent marginal basin crust. ?? 1989.

  16. Geodynamics of the Eastern Pacific Region, Caribbean and Scotia Arcs. Volume 9

    SciTech Connect

    Cabre, R.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyze the geodynamic phenomena related to the interaction of the eastern Pacific with the Americas between Canada and the Antarctic peninsula. Studies include the Cordilleran arcs and Juan de Fuca plate.

  17. Tectonic Plates and Plate Boundaries (WMS)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eric Sokolowsky

    2004-06-14

    The earths crust is constantly in motion. Sections of the crust, called plates, push against each other due to forces from the molten interior of the earth. The areas where these plates collide often have increased volcanic and earthquake activity. These images show the locations of the plates and their boundaries in the earths crust. Convergent boundaries are areas where two plates are pushing against each other and one plate may be subducting under another. Divergent boundaries have two plates pulling away from each other and indicate regions where new land could be created. Transform boundaries are places where two plates are sliding against each other in opposite directions, and diffuse boundaries are places where two plates have the same relative motion. Numerous small microplates have been omitted from the plate image. These images have been derived from images made available by the United States Geological Surveys Earthquake Hazards Program.

  18. Global Plate Driving Forces at 50Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, N. P.; Quevedo, L. E.; Müller, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    We apply a novel workflow utilising the BEM-Earth geodynamic software to analyse the global coupled plate-mantle dynamics at 50 Ma. A subduction history model based on kinematic data going as far back as 80 Ma was developed using the GPlates software. Advection of the plates into the mantle takes into account the absolute plate motions and lithospheric thickness derived from its age to produce an estimated density heterogeneity initial model condition in the upper mantle. The resulting global model consists of regions of a mantle viscosity and density structure that is post-processed to ensure smooth non-overlapping 3D surfaces. BEM-Earth is then free to evolve the model toward the 50 Ma solution. The evolution of the model is driven by self-consistent buoyancy driven mantle dynamics. We use the model velocity output to quantify changes in forces driving the plates before and after 50 Ma. We analyse the rapid change in plate motion of India, Africa and plates in the Pacific Ocean basin by considering slab-pull, ridge-push and mantle drag/suction forces that naturally result from such top-down driven mantle flow. We compare the results with plate kinematic reconstructions and other geological observations.

  19. Stochastic modelling of a large subduction interface earthquake in Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois-Holden, C.; Zhao, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Wellington region, home of New Zealand's capital city, is cut by a number of major right-lateral strike slip faults, and is underlain by the currently locked west-dipping subduction interface between the down going Pacific Plate, and the over-riding Australian Plate. A potential cause of significant earthquake loss in the Wellington region is a large magnitude (perhaps 8+) "subduction earthquake" on the Australia-Pacific plate interface, which lies ~23 km beneath Wellington City. "It's Our Fault" is a project involving a comprehensive study of Wellington's earthquake risk. Its objective is to position Wellington city to become more resilient, through an encompassing study of the likelihood of large earthquakes, and the effects and impacts of these earthquakes on humans and the built environment. As part of the "It's Our Fault" project, we are working on estimating ground motions from potential large plate boundary earthquakes. We present the latest results on ground motion simulations in terms of response spectra and acceleration time histories. First we characterise the potential interface rupture area based on previous geodetically-derived estimates interface of slip deficit. Then, we entertain a suitable range of source parameters, including various rupture areas, moment magnitudes, stress drops, slip distributions and rupture propagation directions. Our comprehensive study also includes simulations from historical large world subduction events translated into the New Zealand subduction context, such as the 2003 M8.3 Tokachi-Oki Japan earthquake and the M8.8 2010 Chili earthquake. To model synthetic seismograms and the corresponding response spectra we employed the EXSIM code developed by Atkinson et al. (2009), with a regional attenuation model based on the 3D attenuation model for the lower North-Island which has been developed by Eberhart-Phillips et al. (2005). The resulting rupture scenarios all produce long duration shaking, and peak ground accelerations that, typically range between 0.2-0.7 g in Wellington city. Many of these scenarios also produce long period motions that are currently not captured by the current NZ design spectra.

  20. Influence of sediment input and plate-motion obliquity on basin development along an active oblique-divergent

    E-print Network

    Dorsey, Becky

    an active oblique-divergent plate boundary: Gulf of California and Salton Trough REBECCA J. DORSEYÃ and PAUL floored by normal basaltic crust. Keywords: Gulf of California; oblique-divergent plate boundary; rift ABSTRACT Transtensional basins have formed along the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the Gulf

  1. Revised tectonic boundaries in the Cocos Plate off Costa Rica: Implications for the segmentation of the convergent margin and for plate tectonic models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Udo Barckhausen; Cesar R. Ranero; R. von Huene; Steven C. Cande; Hans A. Roeser

    2001-01-01

    The oceanic Cocos Plate subducting beneath Costa Rica has a complex plate tectonic history resulting in segmentation. New lines of magnetic data clearly define tectonic boundaries which separate lithosphere formed at the East Pacific Rise from lithosphere formed at the Cocos-Nazca spreading center. They also define two early phase Cocos-Nazca spreading regimes and a major propagator. In addition to these

  2. INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuqing

    INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER APRIL 2005­MARCH 2006 REPORT SCHOOL OF OCEAN AND EARTH Center 1 The Year's Highlights 3 Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Influences 10 Asian Ocean Climate: To understand climate variations in the Pacific and Indian oceans on interannual

  3. International Pacific Research Center

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuqing

    International Pacific Research Center APRIL 2007­MARCH 2008 REPORT School of Ocean and Earth Center i Foreword ii iv Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 1 Regional-Ocean Influences 13 Asian by the following broad research themes and goals of the IPRC Science Plan. Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate

  4. INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuqing

    INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER Annual Report April 2006 ­ March 2007 School of Ocean Research Center 1 2 The Year's Highlights 3 Research Accomplishments Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Ocean Climate: To understand climate variations in the Pacific and Indian oceans on inter- annual

  5. Tsunamis and Earthquakes (Local Tsunamis in the Pacific Northwest)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    On the Pacific Northwest an oceanic tectonic plate (Juan de Fuca) is being pulled and driven (subducted) beneath the North American continental plate. Earthquakes generated along that fault may produce local tsunamis. Local tsunamis are those generated by earthquakes near the coast. This site provides links to external webpages describing the physics behind a tsunami. Resources featured in the links include glossary of terms and photo galleries.

  6. Plate Tectonics: Consequences of Plate Interactions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-11-01

    This Science Object is the fourth of five Science Objects in the Plate Tectonic SciPack. It identifies the events that may occur and landscapes that form as a result of different plate interactions. The areas along plate margins are active. Plates pushing against one another can cause earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain formation, and very deep ocean trenches. Plates pulling apart from one another can cause smaller earthquakes, magma rising to the surface, volcanoes, and oceanic valleys and mountains from sea-floor spreading. Plates sliding past one another can cause earthquakes and rock deformation. Learning Outcomes:? Explain why volcanoes and earthquakes occur along plate boundaries. ? Explain how new sea floor is created and destroyed.? Describe features that may be seen on the surface as a result of plate interactions.

  7. Caribbean plate tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sting

    This illustration available at Wikimedia Commons shows the plate tectonic setting in the Caribbean. Plate boundaries are color-coded by margin type and plate motions are noted with direction and magnitude in mm/yr.

  8. Marginal deformation of crustal plates as key to crustal motion, crustal spirals, and the driving force

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.G.M.

    1986-07-01

    Present plate tectonic models concentrate on compressive- and extensive-type plate margins, often incorporating shear margins as a subtype of compressive margins. However, if a single moving plate is considered, it becomes apparent that the leading edge is a compressive margin, the trailing edge is an extensive margin, and the lateral edges are shear margins. Conversely, if a plate's margin can be recognized by identifying areas of subduction (compression), rifting (extension), and strike slip and buckle folding (shearing), then not only can a plate be identified but its motion can also be inferred. The Pacific plate provides an excellent example. It is bounded by subduction trenches along its west-northwest margin, extension rifts along its east-southeast margin, and shear and buckle-fold complexes along its south-southwest and north-northeast margins. A west-northwest motion is inferred. As other major plates are examined, two striking features are revealed. A west-northwest to northwest motion is consistently identified, and the plates line up end to end forming a northwest-spiraling segmented band encircling the globe. The lateral margins of this band form the well-known Tethyan shear system. The plates comprising this band are of varying sizes and composition, and the extent of deformation along a plate margin is directly related to plate size. The Pacific and Eurasian plates dominate in size and marginal deformation. The tail of this north-spiraling ribbon of crustal plates is deformed in the Southern Hemisphere, most notably in the area of the African, Indian, and Australian plates. Each southern plate has a strong north component of motion as well as a counterclockwise spiraling action. The plates appear to have rotated in response to drag along the southern margin of the Pacific and Eurasian plates.

  9. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Anderson; K. Hodgkinson; M. Jackson; J. Wright

    2005-01-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, PBO will install 891 continuous GPS stations, up to 174 borehole strainmeter stations, and five laser strainmeters,

  10. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Anderson; J. Eakins; K. Hodgkinson; J. Matykiewicz; F. Boler; M. Beldyk; B. Hoyt; E. Lee; E. Persson; D. Torrez; J. Wright; M. Jackson; W. Prescott

    2006-01-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 852 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters,

  11. Hybrid finite elements for the computation of sandwich plates

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hybrid finite elements for the computation of sandwich plates Vincent Manet, Woo-Suck Han and Alain sandwich structure in an accurate way, especially at interfaces, where the equilibrium state is satisfied Introduction The sandwich plate have become an important structural component for industrial applications

  12. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  13. Survey of ion plating sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1979-01-01

    Ion plating is a plasma deposition technique where ions of the gas and the evaporant have a decisive role in the formation of a coating in terms of adherence, coherence, and morphological growth. The range of materials that can be ion plated is predominantly determined by the selection of the evaporation source. Based on the type of evaporation source, gaseous media and mode of transport, the following will be discussed: resistance, electron beam sputtering, reactive and ion beam evaporation. Ionization efficiencies and ion energies in the glow discharge determine the percentage of atoms which are ionized under typical ion plating conditions. The plating flux consists of a small number of energetic ions and a large number of energetic neutrals. The energy distribution ranges from thermal energies up to a maximum energy of the discharge. The various reaction mechanisms which contribute to the exceptionally strong adherence - formation of a graded substrate/coating interface are not fully understood, however the controlling factors are evaluated. The influence of process variables on the nucleation and growth characteristics are illustrated in terms of morphological changes which affect the mechanical and tribological properties of the coating.

  14. Elevation of Ridges and Evolution of the Central Eastern Pacific

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John G. Sclater; Roger N. Anderson; M. Lee Bell

    1971-01-01

    An empirical relationship between ridge elevation and age of the oceanic crust is presented for the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. This relationship is accounted for by the thermal contraction of a cooling lithosphere as it moves away from a center of spreading, and thus is compatible with plate theory. Hence, it is possible to use topographic profiles to predict

  15. Copper Map Plate Detail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A portion of the engraving on the plate used to print points, lines, and text in black ink. Engravings on the plate are left-to-right reversed. This plate was cleaned and treated to improve the visibility of the engraving. The plate was used to print the Washington [D.C.] and vicinity, 1:31,680-sca...

  16. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  17. Plate Tectonics Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    Plate tectonics describes the behavior of Earth's outer shell, with pieces (plates) bumping and grinding and jostling each other about. Explore these maps and animations to get a jump start on understanding plate tectonic processes, history, and how motion of the plates affects our planet today.

  18. Estimation of current plate motions in Papua New Guinea from Global Positioning System observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Tregoning; Kurt Lambeck; Art Stolz; Peter Morgan; Simon C. McClusky; Peter van der Beek; Herbert McQueen; Russell J. Jackson; Rodney P. Little; Alex Laing; Brian Murphy

    1998-01-01

    Plate tectonic motions have been estimated in Papua New Guinea from a 20 station network of Global Positioning System sites that has been observed over five campaigns from 1990 to 1996. The present velocities of the sites are consistent with geological models in which the South Bismarck, Woodlark, and Solomon Sea Plates form the principal tectonic elements between the Pacific

  19. The fate of the Juan de Fuca plate: Implications for a Yellowstone plume head

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mei Xue; Richard M. Allen

    2007-01-01

    Beneath the Pacific Northwest the Juan de Fuca plate, a remnant of the Farallon plate, continues subducting beneath the North American continent. To the east of the Cascadia subduction zone lies the Yellowstone Hotspot Track. The origins of this track can be traced back to the voluminous basaltic outpourings in the Columbia Plateau around 17 Ma. If these basalts are the

  20. 17. Photocopy of drawing (original 8 x 101/2 inch plate ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of drawing (original 8 x 10-1/2 inch plate located in: USDA Forest Service, North Pacific Region, recreation handbook, date unknown). COMMUNITY BLDG., PLATE A-9 (enlarged from a 4x5 negative) - Austin Pass Warming Hut, Washington Highway 542, Glacier, Whatcom County, WA

  1. Global plate velocities from the Global Positioning System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristine M. Larson; Jeffrey T. Freymueller; Steven Philipsen

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed 204 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the global GPS network spanning January 1991 through March 1996. On the basis of these GPS coordinate solutions, we have estimated velocities for 38 sites, mostly located on the interiors of the Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, Nazca, North America, Pacific, and South America plates. The uncertainties of the

  2. Seismicity and plate tectonics in south central Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wormer, J. D.; Davies, J.; Gedney, L.

    1974-01-01

    Hypocenter distribution shows that the Benioff zone associated with the Aleutian arc terminates in interior Alaska some 75 km north of the Denali fault. There appears to be a break in the subducting Pacific plate in the Yentna River-Prince William Sound area which separates two seismically independent blocks, similar to the segmented structure reported for the central Aleutian arc.

  3. On the Origin of Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.

    2014-12-01

    The emergence of plate tectonics was Earth's defining moment. How and when platetectonics started is shrouded in mystery because of the paucity of observations in theArchean as well the challenge of understanding how plates are generated. The damage theoryof lithospheric weakening by grain-reduction provides a physical framework for plategeneration. This model builds on grain-scale processes to elucidate planetary-scaletectonics, and is consistent with lab and field observations of polycrystalline rocks andlithospheric shear zones. The grain-damage model accounts for the evolution of damage andhealing (by grain growth) at various planetary conditions, hence predicts plate boundaryformation and longevity, and how they depend on surface environment. For example, the onset of prototectonics is predicted to require clement conditions tokeep healing from erasing weak zones; conversely, cool conditions possibly requiredtectonics to draw down primordial CO2. Thus whether tectonics preceded a cool climate (andwater) or vice versa is immaterial as they likely needed each other or neither wouldexist. Sparse evidence that prototectonics co-initiated with liquid water hints at thelink between tectonics, water and surface conditions. The establishment of wide-spread plate tectonics started between >4Ga and 2.7Ga, and mayhave taken over a billion years to develop. Under Earth-like conditions, combininggrain-damage with intermittent Archean protosubduction produces persistent weak zones thataccumulate to yield well developed plates within 1Gyrs. In contrast, Venus' hottersurface conditions promotes healing and prohibits weak zone accumulation, which explainswhy plate tectonics failed to spread on our sister planet. Damage and weak-zone inheritance may also influence plate evolution and reorganization inthe modern era. Changes in plate direction, such as reflected in the Emperor-Hawaiianbend, leave weak zones misaligned with plate motion, causing oblique plate boundaries thatpersist for the age of the plate. Grain-damage within a cold subducting slab may alsocause its very rapid detachment, and the abrupt loss of the slab-pull force could accountfor precipitous changes in plate motion, such as for the Pacific plate at both 47Ma and6Ma.

  4. Plate Tectonics: The Hawaiian Archipelago

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Since the Hawaiian Islands were all created by volcanic activity, it is somewhat surprising that only the island of Hawaii now possesses any active volcanoes. Why did the volcanoes that built the other islands stop erupting and why are those on the big island still active? This video segment, adapted from a NOVA television broadcast, shows how plumes of hot material rise from the Earth's interior to create 'hot spots' in the crust which are the locations of volcanic activity. Movement of the Pacific Plate causes volcanic islands to continually form, migrate away from the hot spot, and become extinct, forming chains of islands like the Hawaiian Islands. The segment is four minutes thirty-seven seconds in length.

  5. Plate tectonics and the Gulf of California region

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, N.

    1990-11-01

    The geology and tectonism of California have been influenced greatly by the collision and interaction between the Pacific plate and the North American plate. The forces generated by this interaction caused substantial horizontal movement along the San Andreas fault system and created the Gulf of California rift zone. This article summarizes the unique features of the gulf, describes the theory of plate tectonics, explains how tectonism may have affected the geologic evolution and physiography of the gulf, and illustrates the process by which the Colorado River became linked to the gulf.

  6. Mapping Plate Tectonic Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Kerwin

    To prepare for this activity, students do background reading on Plate Tectonics from the course textbook. Students also participate in a lecture on the discovery and formulation of the unifying theory of plate tectonics, and the relationship between plate boundaries and geologic features such as volcanoes. Lastly, in lecture, students are introduced to a series of geologic hazards caused by certain plate tectonic interactions. The activity gives students practices at identifying plate boundaries and allows them to explore lesser known tectonically active regions.

  7. Azimuthal anisotropy of the Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Alessia; Debayle, Eric; Priestley, Keith; Barruol, Guilhem

    2006-10-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy is the dependence of local seismic properties on the azimuth of propagation. We present the azimuthally anisotropic component of a 3D SV velocity model for the Pacific Ocean, derived from the waveform modeling of over 56,000 multi-mode Rayleigh waves followed by a simultaneous inversion for isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic vsv structure. The isotropic vsv model is discussed in a previous paper (A. Maggi, E. Debayle, K. Priestley, G. Barruol, Multi-mode surface waveform tomography of the Pacific Ocean: a close look at the lithospheric cooling signature, Geophys. J. Int. 166 (3) (2006). doi:10.1111/j.1365-246x.2006.03037.x). The azimuthal anisotropy we find is consistent with the lattice preferred orientation model (LPO): the hypothesis of anisotropy generation in the Earth's mantle by preferential alignment of anisotropic crystals in response to the shear strains induced by mantle flow. At lithospheric depths we find good agreement between fast azimuthal anisotropy orientations and ridge spreading directions recorded by sea-floor magnetic anomalies. At asthenospheric depths we find a strong correlation between fast azimuthal anisotropy orientations and the directions of current plate motions. We observe perturbations in the pattern of seismic anisotropy close to Pacific hot-spots that are consistent with the predictions of numerical models of LPO generation in plume-disturbed plate motion-driven mantle flow. These observations suggest that perturbations in the patterns of azimuthal anisotropy may provide indirect evidence for plume-like upwelling in the mantle.

  8. Stop motion microphotography of laser driven plates

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Trott, W.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Laser driven plates have been used for several years for high velocity shock wave and impact studies. Recent questions about the integrity and ablation rates of these plates coupled with an improved capability for microscopic stop motion photography led to this study. For these experiments, the plates were aluminum, coated on the ends of optical fibers. A high power laser pulse in the fiber ionizes the aluminum at the fiber/coating interface. The plasma thus created accelerates the remaining aluminum to high velocities, several kilometers per second. We defined {open_quotes}thick{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}thin{close_quotes} coatings as those where a flying plate (flyer) was launched vs. the material being completely ionized. Here we were specifically interested in the thick/thin boundary to develop data for the numerical models attempting to predict flyer behavior.

  9. Observe animations of processes that occur along plate boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

    2003-01-01

    Here are three animations that reveal how tectonic plates move relative to each other at three types of plate boundaries--transform, convergent, and divergent boundaries. Key features such as the asthenosphere are labeled in the animations. In addition, each animation is equipped with movie control buttons that allow students to play, pause, and move forward and backward through each clip. The animation of a transform boundary shows the North American and Pacific plates sliding past one another, while an oceanic plate subducts under a continental plate producing volcanic activity in the convergent boundary animation. Two coordinated movie clips are used to demonstrate what occurs at a divergent boundary from different viewpoints. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  10. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  11. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  12. Pressurized bellows flat contact heat exchanger interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, Fred E. (inventor); Howell, Harold R. (inventor); Winkler, Roger V. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is an interdigitated plate-type heat exchanger interface. The interface includes a modular interconnect to thermally connect a pair or pairs of plate-type heat exchangers to a second single or multiple plate-type heat exchanger. The modular interconnect comprises a series of parallel, plate-type heat exchangers arranged in pairs to form a slot therebetween. The plate-type heat exchangers of the second heat exchanger insert into the slots of the modular interconnect. Bellows are provided between the pairs of fins of the modular interconnect so that when the bellows are pressurized, they drive the plate-type heat exchangers of the modular interconnect toward one another, thus closing upon the second heat exchanger plates. Each end of the bellows has a part thereof a thin, membrane diaphragm which readily conforms to the contours of the heat exchanger plates of the modular interconnect when the bellows is pressurized. This ensures an even distribution of pressure on the heat exchangers of the modular interconnect thus creating substantially planar contact between the two heat exchangers. The effect of the interface of the present invention is to provide a dry connection between two heat exchangers whereby the rate of heat transfer can be varied by varying the pressure within the bellows.

  13. The PLATES Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the web page for PLATES, a program of research into plate tectonic and geologic reconstructions at the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics. The page contains links to a brief overview of plate tectonics and plate reconstructions using the PLATES Project's global plate reconstruction model, in addition to movies in the format of powerpoint animations which can be downloaded for later use. Models are shown on the evolution of the earth's oceans and the movement of the earth's tectonic plates from the Late Precambrian through the present day, reconstructing (i.e. "predicting") geological environments through geologic history. Maps of the following can be accessed: late Neo-Proterozoic, Silurian, early Jurassic, early Cretaceous, Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary, and Oligocene. Movies are available on the following subjects: global plate motion, Jurassic to present day, opening of the Indian Ocean, and tectonic evolution of the Arctic region.

  14. Understanding Plate Motions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation shows divergent boundaries, convergent boundaries, transform boundaries, and plate boundary zones through a series of diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by a photographs. Accompanying text explains plate movement at each type of boundary.

  15. Portable Plating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, R.

    1984-01-01

    Plating system mounted on portable cart includes 30-gallon (23.5 liter) electrolyte tank, filler pump, heaters, replenishing anodes, plating rectifiers and tank rectifier to continously remove contaminants.

  16. External Resource: Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    This Windows to the Universe interactive webpage connects students to the study and understanding of plate tectonics, the main force that shapes our planets surface. Topics: plate tectonics, lithosphere, subduction zones, faults, ridges.

  17. Plate Tectonics: Further Evidence

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation depicts the spreading of the sea floor along the mid-ocean ridges. The resource generally describes the theory of plate tectonics, including the movement of plates with regard to one another.

  18. Plate Motion and Crustal Deformation Estimated with Geodetic Data from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Heflin, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    We use geodetic data taken over four years with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate: (1) motion between six major plates and (2) motion relative to these plates of ten sites in plate boundary zones. The degree of consistency between geodetic velocities and rigid plates requires the (one-dimensional) standard errors in horizontal velocities to be approx. 2 mm/yr. Each of the 15 angular velocities describing motion between plate pairs that we estimate with GPS differs insignificantly from the corresponding angular velocity in global plate motion model NUVEL-1A, which averages motion over the past 3 m.y. The motion of the Pacific plate relative to both the Eurasian and North American plates is observed to be faster than predicted by NUVEL-1A, supporting the inference from Very Long B ase- line Interferometry (VLBI) that motion of the Pacific plate has speed up over the past few m.y. The Eurasia-North America pole of rotation is estimated to be north of NUVEL-1A, consistent with the independent hypothesis that the pole has recently migrated northward across northeast Asia to near the Lena River delta. Victoria, which lies above the main thrust at the Cascadia subduction zone, moves relative to the interior of the overriding plate at 30% of the velocity of the subducting plate, reinforcing the conclusion that the thrust there is locked beneath the continental shelf and slope.

  19. Plate Tectonic Theory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Louie

    This is the web site for a Plate Tectonics Theory class at The University of Nevada, Reno. The home page/syllabus contains links to several of the topics covered in the course. The topics with web based lecture materials are earthquake seismology, structure of the Earth, composition of the Earth, lithospheric deformation, the plate tectonics paradigm, and the driving mechanisms of plate tectonics.

  20. Paper terahertz wave plates.

    PubMed

    Scherger, Benedikt; Scheller, Maik; Vieweg, Nico; Cundiff, Steven T; Koch, Martin

    2011-12-01

    We present a low-cost terahertz wave plate based on form birefringence fabricated using ordinary paper. Measurements of the transfer function of the wave plate between polarizers closely agree with predictions based on the measured complex indices of refraction of the effective medium. For the design frequency, the dependence on wave plate angle also agrees with theory. PMID:22273881

  1. Laser induced copper plating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Al-Sufi; H. J. Eichler; J. Salk; H. J. Riedel

    1983-01-01

    Argon laser induced plating of copper spots and lines from copper sulfate solutions on glass and phenolic resin paper has been investigated. The substrates had to be precoated with an evaporated copper film. The highest plating rates have been obtained with a small film thickness of 25 nm. Spots with a thickness up to 30 ?m were plated.

  2. Plate Tectonic Primer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lynn Fichter

    This site gives an in-depth look at the theory of plate tectonics and how it works. The structure of the Earth is discussed, with brief rock type descriptions. The structure of the lithosphere, plate boundaries, interplate relationships, and types of plates are all covered in detail.

  3. Earthquakes and Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This article describes the theory of plate tectonics and its relation to earthquakes and seismic zones. Materials include an overview of plate tectonics, a description of Earth's crustal plates and their motions, and descriptions of the four types of seismic zones.

  4. An improved adhesively bonded bi-material beam model for plated beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pizhong Qiao; Fangliang Chen

    2008-01-01

    An improved bi-material beam theory with adhesive interface is presented to study the interface behavior in a conventional material (e.g., wood or concrete) beam reinforced by an externally bonded (e.g., steel or FRP) plate. Both the adherend normal and tangential deformations induced by interface stresses are considered by introducing two interface compliances, from which an improved solution of interface stress

  5. Warping and cracking of the Pacific plate by thermal contraction

    E-print Network

    Fialko, Yuri

    such as the Hawaiian-Emperor seamounts are well explained by the mantle plume model [Morgan, 1971; Sleep, 1992]. (2 motion direction. Also, the chemistry of the dredged basalts is inconsistent with deep melting of plume

  6. An improved plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, John C.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

  7. Angular shear plate

    DOEpatents

    Ruda, Mitchell C. (Tucson, AZ); Greynolds, Alan W. (Tucson, AZ); Stuhlinger, Tilman W. (Tucson, AZ)

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  8. Malachite green photosensitive plates.

    PubMed

    Solano, C

    1989-08-15

    An experimental study of the behavior of malachite green sensitized plates was carried out. The transmittance variation of the irradiated plates was taken as a parameter. It has been observed that photoreduction in the malachite green plates is present only when ammonium dichromate is added to the plates. The introduction of external electron donors does not improve the photochemical reaction. It has been determined that malachite green molecules form a weak complex with the dichromate molecules and this complex can only be destroyed photochemically. This effect can explain the limited response of the malachite green dichromated plates. PMID:20555732

  9. Discovering Plate Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alison Henning

    Students are initially assigned to one of four maps of the world: Seismology, Volcanology, Geochronology or Topography. They are also given a map of the world's plate boundaries and are asked to classify the boundaries based upon the data from their assigned map. Students are then assigned to a tectonic plate, such that each plate group contains at least one "expert" on each map. As a group, they must classify their plate's boundaries using data from all four maps. Recent volcanic and seismic events are discussed in the plate tectonic context. Has minimal/no quantitative component Uses geophysics to solve problems in other fields

  10. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-print Network

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  11. Multicolor printing plate joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J. (inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An upper plate having ink flow channels and a lower plate having a multicolored pattern are joined. The joining is accomplished without clogging any ink flow paths. A pattern having different colored parts and apertures is formed in a lower plate. Ink flow channels each having respective ink input ports are formed in an upper plate. The ink flow channels are coated with solder mask and the bottom of the upper plate is then coated with solder. The upper and lower plates are pressed together at from 2 to 5 psi and heated to a temperature of from 295 F to 750 F or enough to melt the solder. After the plates have cooled and the pressure is released, the solder mask is removed from the interior passageways by means of a liquid solvent.

  12. Geology and plate-tectonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, W.P.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is a transform fault along the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates. Bedrock along the fault includes various lithologic units that range in age from Precambrian to Tertiary and younger. Some bedrock units that can be matched across the fault suggest strike-slip displacement of as much as 560 km. This chapter describes geologic formations of northern and central California, including Franciscan rocks, Coast Range ophiolite, Great Valley sequence, Coast Range thrust, Salinian block, displacement of pre-Quaternary rocks by the San Andreas fault, and the relation of geologic structure to seismic behavior. Formations of southern California which are described are the Transverse Ranges and the Salton Trough and displacement of basement rocks by the San Andreas fault. Plate-tectonic development of the San Andreas fault is also discussed.

  13. How weak is the subduction zone interface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, João. C.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Cruden, Alexander R.

    2015-04-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that subduction zones are weak and that the unique availability of water on Earth is a critical factor in the weakening process. We have evaluated the strength of subduction zone interfaces using two approaches: (i) from empirical relationships between shear stress at the interface and subduction velocity, deduced from laboratory experiments; and (ii) from a parametric study of natural subduction zones that provides new insights on subduction zone interface strength. Our results suggest that subduction is only mechanically feasible when shear stresses along the plate interface are relatively low (less than ~35 MPa). To account for this requirement, we propose that there is a feedback mechanism between subduction velocity, water released from the subducting plate, and weakening of the fore-arc mantle that may explain how relatively low shear stresses are maintained at subduction interfaces globally.

  14. Pacific Journal of Mathematics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The electronic October issue of the Pacific Journal of Mathematics is available as of October, 2000. Articles on Stekloff eigenvalues, Cantor systems, and Bertini Theorems are among those featured. Articles may be viewed in .pdf, hyperdvi, dvi, or .ps format.

  15. The History of the Pacific Superplume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, N.; Utsunomiya, A.; Maruyama, S.

    2001-12-01

    To understand the birth place and episodic activity of the Pacific superplume, we reconstructed the paleogeograhy of continents and oceanic plates from 1.0 Ga supercontinent Rodinia until now by adopting the most confident available data set to determine paleopositions of oceanic plateaus, seamounts, and oceanic arc, in addition to major continents, by using plate trajectory for the last 150Ma and for the farther back to 1.0Ga, by the paleomagnetic constraints tied with geologic connections. Our main focus is the frequency change of ancient activity of plume rocks that are now preserved in the accretionary complex around the circum-Pacific orogenic belts. Several conclusions are led through our reconstruction. (1) Cretaceous oceanic plateaus which present widespread in western Pacific (e.g., Manihiki Plateau, Shatsky Rise, Hess Rise, Mid-Pacific Mountain, Nauru Basin) are traced back and concentrated to the present active region of the Pacific superplume. This suggests that those were once formed a huge composite volcanoes as large as 4000 km x 2400 km across during the Cretaceous by superplume activity. These are equivalent to Australia or Tharsis bulge volcanic complex on Mars. The estimated thickness of oceanic crust ca. 30-40 km suggests that major parts may have been above sea-level during the Cretaceous time. The Cretaceous global warming may be related to this hyper-active superplume event which have carried mantle CO2 to the surface of 3.2 x 1021 g, assuming 0.3 wt% x 350 million km3 (magma volume) x 3.07 g/cm3 during 150-75 Ma. This CO2 output amount occupies as much as 37 wt% among the total output from mantle estimated by using erupted basaltic volume estimated by Larson (1991, Geology, 549-550) and present output rate of CO2. The similar episodic activity of Pacific superplume seems to have occurred at 750-700 Ma, 550-500Ma, 300-250Ma by considering the frequency of occurrences of greenstones in the accretionary complexes of the world. (2) Rodinia rifted and separated at 750Ma on the similar latitude to present active region of the Pacific superplume. This suggests that Pacific superplume may be born at 750Ma to break-up supercontinent Rodinia to support the original idea by Maruyama (1994, J. Geol. Soc. Japan, 100, 24-49) as African superplume may be born at 250-200 Ma to break-up Pangea. (3) At 1000Ma, the Grenvillian orogens cemented amalgamated collisional continents to form the supercontinent Rodinia. This suggests that the large amounts of oceanic slab must have subducted along the Grenvillian sutures and might have caused the birth of Pacific superplume.

  16. Pacific Tsunami Museum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website assists the Pacific Tsunami Museum in its goal "to promote public tsunami education for residents of Hawaii and the Pacific Region." Visitors can learn about the causes of tsunamis, its characteristics, the wrap-around effect, and much more. Teachers and students can discover the museum's education and science programs. Everyone will enjoy the live video stream of Hilo Bay and the abundant tsunami pictures. Interested users can also find out how to become involved with the museum.

  17. Northeast Pacific flatfish management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J Trumble

    1998-01-01

    Exploitation of northeast Pacific flatfish effectively began in the late 1800s with the fishery for Pacific halibut. Harvest of other flatfish occurred on a limited, local basis until foreign fishing fleets came to the area in the late 1950s. When US and Canadian fishermen replaced the foreign fleets in the 1970s and 1980s, a conservation-based management system designed to control

  18. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  19. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  20. Geology - Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Visitors to this site can learn about the theory of plate tectonics, the history of its development, and the mechanisms that drive the formation, movement, and destruction of continents and tectonic plates. A selection of animations depicts the movements of crustal plates and continents through time. Each animation is accompanied by an interactive time scale that provides links to descriptions of the geology and paleontology of the selected era or period.

  1. Morphology of seamounts in the western Pacific and Philippine Basin from multi-beam sonar data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles D. Hollister; Morris F. Glenn; Peter F. Lonsdale

    1978-01-01

    New multi-beam bathymetric data from the Philippine Sea and northwest Pacific Basin reveal linear chains of small (less than 40 km3) domed-shaped volcanoes (Philippine) and coned-shaped volcanoes (Pacific) rising 100-1000 m above the 6 km deep ocean floor. Some appear to have well-developed collapsed calderas and spines. Their morphology suggest recent formation in supposedly stable mid-plate regions and their occurrence

  2. Plate Motion Calculator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lou Estey

    This program calculates tectonic plate motion at any location on Earth using one or more plate motion models. The possible plate motion models are GSRM v1.2 (2004), CGPS (2004), HS3-NUVEL1A, REVEL 2000, APKIM2000.0, HS2-NUVEL1A, NUVEL 1A, NUVEL 1, and two models for ITRF2000. Plates or frames are selected from dropdown lists or can be entered by the user. Position coordinates can be entered in geographic coordinates (decimal degrees, or degrees/minutes/seconds) or in WGS84 cartesian XYZ, as either a single point or multiple points.

  3. Author's personal copy Plate tectonic reconstructions with continuously closing plates$

    E-print Network

    Bower, Dan J.

    Author's personal copy Plate tectonic reconstructions with continuously closing plates$ Michael May 2011 Keywords: Geodynamics Plate tectonics a b s t r a c t We present a new algorithm for modeling margins and plates, traditional global plate tectonic reconstructions have become inadequate

  4. Fracture of composite plates containing periodic buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture of a composite plate which consists of perfectly bonded parallel load carrying laminates and buffer strips is considered. Fatigue cracks appear and spread in main laminates or in buffer strips or in both perpendicular to the interfaces. The external load is applied to the plate parallel to the strips and away from the crack region. The problem is solved for fully imbedded cracks and for broken laminates or strips. Corresponding stress intensity factors are calculated.

  5. Deck view, west approach; former Western Pacific (now Union Pacific) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Deck view, west approach; former Western Pacific (now Union Pacific) Railroad at left; wind turbine generators atop hill in background; view to northeast; 90mm lens - Carroll Overhead Bridge, Altamont Pass Road, Livermore, Alameda County, CA

  6. Internet Geography: Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site is part of GeoNet Internet Geography, a resource for pre-collegiate British geography students and their instructors. This page focuses on the structure of the Earth and the theory of plate tectonics, including continental drift, plate boundaries, the Ring of Fire, and mountains.

  7. How Do Plates Move?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation shows the circulation of convection cells in the mantle related to plate movement. A static cross-sectional diagram and accompanying text illustrates the how material heated by the core rises and then sinks when it eventually cools down and attributes this cycle of heating and cooling to tectonic plate movement.

  8. Deep earthquakes in the southwest Pacific: A tectonic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamburger, M.W.; Isacks, B.L.

    1987-12-10

    This paper examines the spatial distribution deep earthquakes in the Tonga-Fiji-New Hebrides region of the southwest Pacific. Our interpretation emphasizes the complex Cenozoic tectonics of the Pacific/Indo-Australian plate boundary as a primary control on the distribution and deformation of subducted lithosphere. Most deep earthquakes in the interarc region are associated with the contorted Pacific plate lithosphere subducted at the Tonga Trench. However, anomalous groups of deep earthquakes located west of the Tonga zone are unrelated to the present plate configuration. Tectonic reconstructions of the region to 8 m.y. B.P. provide circumstantial evidence that (1) the anomalous events west of the Tonga zone occur in two pieces of detached lithosphere, subducted at the Vitiaz and proto-New Hebrides trenches during the late Miocene, (2) the flattening of the inclined seismic zone in northernmost Tonga is related to the rapid opening of the Lau Basin since 4 m.y. B.P., and (3) the sharp westward curvature of the Tonga seismic zone in this area coincides with a preexisting bend in the late Miocene Vitiaz arc. The sharpness of its present curvature appears to be secondary effect of shear flow in the lower mantle and compression between detached (Vitiaz) and attached (Tonga) lithosphere. Thus much of the contortion of the subducted lithosphere beneath Tonga-Fiji may be produced by local tectonic interactions, rather than collision of the slab with an impenetrable boundary in the midmantle. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  9. Plating To Reinforce Welded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Electrodeposition used to strengthen welded joints gouged, nicked, or suffered other mechanical damage. Plating cell, typically of acrylic plastic such as poly (Methylmetacrylate), is assembled around part to be plated. Areas not to be plated are masked with plater's tape. Weld area is plated in standard nickel-plating process.

  10. Plate Tectonics Prof. Thomas Herring

    E-print Network

    Herring, Thomas

    1 Plate Tectonics Prof. Thomas Herring MIT 05/14/02 Lexington HS Plate tectonics 2 Contact/14/02 Lexington HS Plate tectonics 3 Overview · Development of the Plate tectonic theory · Geological Data ­ Sea-floor spreading ­ Fault types from earthquakes ­ Transform faults ­ Today's measurements of plate tectonics 05

  11. Growth Law of the Oxide Film Formed on the Tin Plated Contact Surface and Its Contact Resistance Characteristic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuuya Nabeta; Yasushi Saitoh; Shigeru Sawada; Yasuhiro Hattori; Terutaka Tamai

    2009-01-01

    Tin plating has been applied widely to electrical connectors to save the cost for electromechanical devices. However, the tin plated surface covered with oxide film is fundamentally different from gold plated surfaces. The oxide film prevents the surface from corrosion. When the film is interposed between contact interface, contact resistance increases. It is necessary to break down mechanically to obtain

  12. The surface and through crack problems in layered orthotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, Fazil; Wu, Binghua

    1991-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for a relatively accurate calculation of Stress Intensity Factors in a laminated orthotropic plate containing a through or part-through crack. The laminated plate is assumed to be under bending or membrane loading and the mode 1 problem is considered. First three transverse shear deformation plate theories (Mindlin's displacement based first-order theory, Reissner's stress-based first-order theory, and a simple-higher order theory due to Reddy) are reviewed and examined for homogeneous, laminated and heterogeneous orthotropic plates. Based on a general linear laminated plate theory, a method by which the stress intensity factors can be obtained in orthotropic laminated and heterogeneous plates with a through crack is developed. Examples are given for both symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated plates and the effects of various material properties on the stress intensity factors are studied. In order to implement the line-spring model which is used later to study the surface crack problem, the corresponding plane elasticity problem of a two-bonded orthotropic plated containing a crack perpendicular to the interface is also considered. Three different crack profiles: an internal crack, an edge crack, and a crack terminating at the interface are considered. The effect of the different material combinations, geometries, and material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors and on the power of stress singularity for a crack terminating at the interface is fully examined. The Line Spring model of Rice and Levy is used for the part-through crack problem. The surface crack is assumed to lie in one of the two-layered laminated orthotropic plates due to the limitation of the available plane strain results. All problems considered are of the mixed boundary value type and are reduced to Cauchy type of singular integral equations which are then solved numerically.

  13. 19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For Renewal of Br. 210-C Near Tehama, Sac. Division, Scale 1' = 40' & 1/4' = 1'-0', Sept. 1927, M.W.D., Drawing 5935, Sheet 2.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  14. PACIFIC HIGHLY MIGR ATORY PEL AGIC FISHERIES pacific highly migratory

    E-print Network

    the Pacific Ocean, from the tropics to temperate latitudes. Many of these fishes routinely travel great highly migratory species throughout the Pacific Ocean. Some of the fleets are capable of operating across the Pacific as well as in other oceans during a single fishing season. These fleets use larger purse

  15. Trench migration and upper plate strain over a convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    Trench motion and upper plate deformation ultimately respond to mantle flow. Herein I build upon the mantle flow model results of Conrad and Behn (2010) and compute the drag forces underneath all plates, and show that they control the dynamics of plates and plate boundaries. The small misfit angle between between the traction azimuths of mantle traction and absolute plate motion corroborates the idea that convective mantle drag is a prominent driver of plate tectonics. Less intuitive is the fact that the interplay between the drag forces from the upper and lower plates, that amounts to -5 to 8.5 × 1012 N m-1 (per unit trench length), dictates both trench migration rates and upper plate deformation. At odds with the classic view that assigns the prime role to the idiosyncrasies of subduction zones (slab age, interplate friction, water content etc), I find that the intrinsic properties of subduction zones in fact only modulate this behavior. More specifically, the mean value of the integrated trenchward mantle drag force from the lower and upper plates (from -2 to 6.5 × 1012 N m-1) controls upper plate deformation. Conversely, it is the difference between the lower and upper plates mantle drag forces (from -3 to 10 × 1012 N m-1) that controls trench migration rates. In addition, I find that a minimum trenchward force of ˜2.5 × 1012 N m-1 must be supplied by mantle drag before trenches can actually advance, and before upper plates undergo compression. This force results from the default tendency of slabs to rollback when solely excited by their own buoyancy, and is thus the effective tensional force that slab pull exerts on the plate interface.

  16. Trench migration and upper plate strain over a convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    Trench motion and upper plate deformation ultimately respond to mantle flow. Herein I build upon the mantle flow model results of Conrad and Behn (2010) and compute the drag forces underneath all plates, and show that they control the dynamics of plates and plate boundaries. The small misfit angle between between the traction azimuths of mantle traction and absolute plate motion corroborates the idea that convective mantle drag is a prominent driver of plate tectonics. Less intuitive is the fact that the interplay between the drag forces from the upper and lower plates, that amounts to -5 to 8.5 TN/m (per unit trench length), dictates both trench migration rates and upper plate deformation. At odds with the classic view that assigns the prime role to the idiosyncrasies of subduction zones (slab age, interplate friction, water content etc), I find that the intrinsic properties of subduction zones in fact only modulate this behavior. More specifically, the mean value of the integrated trenchward mantle drag force from the lower and upper plates (from -2 to 6.5 TN/m) controls upper plate deformation. Conversely, it is the difference between the lower and upper plates mantle drag forces (from -3 to 10 TN/m) that controls trench migration rates. In addition, I find that a minimum trenchward force of ~2.5 TN/m must be supplied by mantle drag before trenches can actually advance, and before upper plates undergo compression. This force results from the default tendency of slabs to rollback when solely excited by their own buoyancy, and is thus the effective tensional force that slab pull exerts on the plate interface.

  17. PLATE TECTONICS USING GIS Understanding plate tectonics using real

    E-print Network

    PLATE TECTONICS USING GIS Understanding plate tectonics using real global data sets pertaining OF THE UPSTATE, SC An afternoon field trip to observe the evidences for plate tectonic history, and to witness

  18. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-print Network

    , for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  19. PACIFIC EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER

    E-print Network

    Adolphs, Ralph

    PACIFIC EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER PEER Testbed Study on a Laboratory Building, Berkeley PEER Report 2005/12 Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center College of Engineering to "exercise" the PEER performance-based earthquake engineering methodology. All projects involved

  20. A new estimate for present-day Cocos-Caribbean plate motion: Implications for slip along the Central American volcanic arc

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles DeMets

    2001-01-01

    Velocities from 153 continuously-operating GPS sites on the Caribbean, North American, and Pacific plates are combined with 61 newly estimated Pacific-Cocos seafloor spreading rates and additional marine geophysical data to derive a new estimate of present-day Cocos-Caribbean plate motion. A comparison of the predicted Cocos-Caribbean direction to slip directions of numerous shallow-thrust subduction earthquakes from the Middle America trench between

  1. Asia-Pacific.com!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Asia-Pacific.com!, an invaluable resource for users interested in business and economics in Asia and the Pacific Rim, offers an informative assortment of resources, news, and data. The site links to respected media sources throughout the region including Singapore Business Times, Jakarta Post, and The Australian, as well as in-depth journal articles, and book reviews, tables of contents, and purchasing information. Data analysis includes links to economic sources, company annual reports, and trade reports. Users are also invited to send their questions and queries to Asia-Pacific.com!'s panel of experts, who include George T. Haley, Associate Professor/ Director of Marketing and International Business Programs at the University of New Haven, Usha C.V. Haley, Associate Professor of Strategy and International Business at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Tan Chin Tiong, Professor and Provost of the new Singapore Management University.

  2. Mapping The Pacific Coast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Maps of the Pacific Coast from the earliest period of European exploration continue to interest cartographers, geographers, and antiquarians. The maps in the Quivira Collection date from 1540 to 1802 and include early depictions of California as an island, Russian cartographic interpretations of the Pacific Coast, and overland maps across the continent westward to the ocean. All told, this online collection includes forty-five maps, books, and illustrations organized into six thematic galleries. Visitors can start by listening to an audio introduction, and then look around through the thematic galleries, which include such intriguing headings as " In the Wake of Captain James Cook" and "Secret Russian Explorations in the Pacific". Of course, visitors must click their way into the "California as an Island" section, if not just for a taste of six examples of what is perhaps one of the best-known cartographic mistakes in the world.

  3. Oregon offers something for everyone who loves the outdoors --especially geologists. Oregon is a land filled with wonder and intrigue. Over the state's long history, plate tectonic and volcanic activity

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    . Oregon is a land filled with wonder and intrigue. Over the state's long history, plate tectonic tectonic plate under- neath the Pacific Ocean produced the Coast Range over millions of years. Hot fluids coming off the diving plate, beginning about 35 million years ago, resulted in the volcanic eruptions

  4. Tsunami Strike! Pacific Edition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2011-08-23

    Tsunami Strike! Pacific Edition is a scenario-based learning experience for kids from middle school through high school (approximate ages 13-17). The scenario tells the story of four main characters at different locations in the Pacific basin who are each impacted by a major tsunami that originates in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands. Over the course of the story, learners not only view the unfolding events and how each of the characters responds, but also observe how warning scientists analyze and communicate the tsunami threat. Fourteen short lessons provide interactive instruction focused on the science, safety, and history of tsunamis.

  5. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  6. The dynamic response of inelastic, delaminated composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.O.; Addessio, F.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.

    1997-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of metal matrix composite (MMC) plates is considered. In particular, the influence of inelastic deformations and delamination at the interfaces of the lamina on the macroscopic and local response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al plates are studied. The work is carried out using a recently developed plate theory which models both delamination and localized history-dependent effects such, as inelasticity. A linear debonding model for the interface is employed for the current work. The theory models both the initiation and growth of delaminations without imposing any restrictions on the location, size, or direction of growth of the delamination. In the current work the response of the individual lamina in the plate are modeled using the Method of Cells (MOC) micromechanical model. The inelastic behavior in the matrix is modeled using the unified viscoplastic theory of Bodner and Partom. The behavior of a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al plate under dynamic cylindrical bending subjected to a ramp and hold type of loading is examined. For simplicity, the plate is assumed to be composed of a cross-ply layup. It is shown that both inelastic deformations and delamination have a strong influence on dynamic plate behavior. The inelastic deformations have strong effect on the axial displacement while delamination has greater influence on the deflection.

  7. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  8. Active Volcanoes and Plate Tectonics, Hot Spots and the Ring of Fire

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This world map shows the major plates and plate boundaries, including such notables as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the San Andreas Fault, and the Java and Aleutian Trenches. The Pacific Ring of Fire is shown, including the Cascade Range. The location of major volcanoes is also depicted. A feature of this site is a black and white version that can be printed out for greater clarity.

  9. Pixelated neutron image plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  10. Plate Tectonics Jigsaw

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Anne Egger

    This activity is a slight variation on an original activity, Discovering Plate Boundaries, developed by Dale Sawyer at Rice University. I made different maps, including more detail in all of the datasets, and used a different map projection, but otherwise the general progression of the activity is the same. More information about jigsaw activities in general can be found in the Jigsaws module. The activity occurs in several sections, which can be completed in one or multiple classes. In the first section, students are divided into "specialist" groups, and each group is given a global map with a single dataset: global seismicity, volcanoes, topography, age of the seafloor, and free-air gravity. Each student is also given a map of plate boundaries. Their task in the specialist group is to become familiar with their dataset and develop categories of plate boundaries based only on their dataset. Each group then presents their results to the class. In the second section, students reorganize into groups with 1-2 of each type of specialist per group. Each new group is given a plate, and they combine their different datasets on that one plate and look for patterns. Again, each plate group presents to the class. The common patterns and connections between the different datasets quickly become apparent, and the final section of the activity involves a short lecture from the instructor about types of plate boundaries and why the common features are generated at those plate boundaries. A follow-up section or class involves using a problem-solving approach to explain the areas that don't "fit" into the typical boundary types - intra-plate volcanism, earthquakes in the Eastern California Shear Zone, etc.

  11. Plate Tectonics at Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a brief description of the results of plate movement according to the Theory of Plate Tectonics. It explains how divergence at the mid-ocean ridges accounts for the discoveries of Harry Hess. The site also refers to the invention of the magnetometer and the discovery of the young age of the ocean floor basalt. It concludes that these are the kinds of discoveries and thinking that ultimately led to the development of the theory of plate tectonics and that in just a few decades, have greatly changed our view of and notions about our planet and the sciences that attempt to explain its existence and development.

  12. Pacific Southwest Forest & Range

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    , ( G) support rod, (H) shaft, ( I) cup shaft, (J) body cover plate, and (K) hub. -2- #12;The body. The magnets are imbedded in an aluminum rotor attached to the anemometer shaft (fig. 2). Four magnets are used

  13. Seismic properties of the Eltanin Transform System, South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, Emile A.; Langenhorst, Amy R.

    2000-05-01

    We present a compilation of the seismic properties of the Eltanin Transform Fault (TF) system, compelled by the recent discovery of the Hollister Ridge and the possibility of a change of plate kinematics pattern in the region. The Hollister Ridge is a major volcanic system located on the Western flank of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge (PAR), immediately south of the Eltanin Fracture Zones (FZs). We find or confirm two anomalous characteristics: the occurrence of seven normal faulting events on the transform segments, expressing extension across the plate boundary in the azimuth N26°W, and more than 90% deficiency in the seismic moment released during strike-slip events on the transforms, as compared to the rate expected from kinematic models. Other seismic properties are typical of the seismicity of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. In particular, we could not document a single teleseismically recorded event on the Hollister Ridge; earthquakes are confined to narrow TFs with no activity present on the ridge segments. The transform events have regular frequency-moment statistics, and we could not document any significantly slow sources. These seismic properties generally support conventional plate tectonics models such as NUVEL-1, and cannot be reconciled with a proposed reorientation of the Pacific plate 4 Ma ago.

  14. Pacific Ocean Victoria Seattle

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Pacific Ocean Victoria Seattle SeymourNarrows Juneau Hubbard Glacier Sitka Icy Strait Point,999 $7,898 F $3,199 OUTSIDE STATEROOM $8,298 E $3,399 $8,498 D $3,499 DELUXE OCEAN VIEW $9,098 C2 $3 vistas of sparkling blue ice. As the towering glacier moves and calves, crashing chunks of ice fall

  15. Joseph Banks: Pacific pictures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Fara

    2003-01-01

    When Joseph Banks sailed to the Pacific with James Cook, two cultures clashed against each other. The Europeans looked down on the islanders as noble savages, but the local people were also amazed by these international encounters. Lacking any innate feelings of inferiority, they negotiated with their strange visitors, and resented attempts to indoctrinate Omai, a Tahitian, with the virtues

  16. A computational model for predicting damage evolution in laminated composite plates 

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Mark Lane

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of producing a model capable of predicting the evolution of interface degradation, matrix cracking, and delimitation at multiple sites in laminated continuous fiber composite plates subjected to monotonic loading, while still being...

  17. Farallon Plate Remnants

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

    This image and short video from the NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio shows the remnants of the Farallon Plate based on seismic tomography studies. The studies were conducted by Hans-Peter Bunge at Princeton University in 2000.

  18. Plate Tectonics Learning Module

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rita Haberlin

    This plate tectonics unit was designed to be used with a college course in physical geography. Subject matter covered includes: the development of the theory including Wegener's Continental Drift Hypothesis and the existence of Pangaea, Harry Hess and his work on sea-floor spreading, and the final theory. It points out that global features such as deep oceanic trenches, mid-ocean ridges, volcanic activity, and the location of earthquake epicenters can now be related to the story of plate tectonics, since most geological activity occurs along plate boundaries. Divergent, convergent and transform plate boundaries are discussed in detail. This module contains a study guide and outline notes, study questions, and practice quizzes. One feature of the module is a web exploration section with links to twelve outside sites that augment the instruction.

  19. elementsair ceramic plate

    E-print Network

    earth elementsair L ceramic plate Thermoelectric Module Construction for Low Temperature Gradient Power Generation Y. Meydbray, R. Singh, Ali Shakouri University of California at Santa Cruz, Electrical related carbon dioxide emissions are the largest contributors to greenhouse gasses [1]. Thermoelectric

  20. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  1. Fractal generalized zone plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omel Mendoza-Yero; Mercedes Fernández-Alonso; Gladys Mínguez-Vega; Jesús Lancis; Vicent Climent; Juan A. Monsoriu

    2009-01-01

    The construction of fractal generalized zone plates (FraGZPs) from a set of periodic diffractive optical elements with circular symmetry is proposed. This allows us to increase the number of foci of a conventional fractal zone plate (FraZP), keeping the self-similarity property within the axial irradiance. The focusing properties of these fractal diffractive optical elements for points not only along but

  2. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  3. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  4. On the Paleomagnetism and Paleogeography of the Philippine Sea Plate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.; Fuller, M.

    2002-12-01

    Lying to the west of the Pacific Plate and surrounded by subduction zones, the Philippine Sea Plate has an enigmatic plate tectonic history. However, there are plentiful paleomagnetic data from DSDP and ODP studies as well from conventional surveys on many of the islands within the plate. There is broad agreement between these studies indicating clockwise rotation about a pole in the vicinity of 10°N and 160°E. This interpretation has been questioned because many of the sites lie close to the eastern margin of the plate and hence may have been affected by deformation at the plate margin. However, results from Halmahera come from a very different tectonic setting and yet agree with the earlier work. Models incorporating the interpretation from paleomagnetic data have a number of favourable consequences. For example, such models are consistent with the subduction and deformation within the Philippine mobile belt to the west. To the south, the model is consistent with the history of docking of New Guinea terranes and the subsequent left lateral shear zone.

  5. A statistical comparison of gold and palladium-nickel plating systems for various fretting parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cai-rie A. Morse; Neil R. Aukland; Harry C. Hardee

    1995-01-01

    An electrodeposited plating system of gold over an 80Pd-20Ni alloy is a promising contact material that potentially offers the advantages of thick gold plate at significantly lower cost. This paper presents the statistical and experimental evaluation of various fretting parameters on the contact resistance stability of a simulated separable connector contact interface. The parameters were: gold bath, gold thickness, amplitude

  6. Fracture of composite orthotropic plates for materials type 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.

    1976-01-01

    The fracture problem of laminated plates which consist of orthotropic layers is considered. Symmetrical cracks are located normal to the bimaterial interfaces. The external loads are applied away from the crack region. Three cases are considered: (a) the case of internal cracks; (b) the case of broken laminates; and (c) case of a crack crossing the interface. A general formulation of the problem is given for plane strain and generalized plane stress cases. The singular behavior of stresses at the crack tips and at the interfaces is studied. In each case the stress intensity factors are computed for various crack geometries.

  7. Shear deformation effect in the dynamic analysis of plates stiffened by parallel beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Sapountzakis; V. G. Mokos

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a general solution for the dynamic analysis of shear-deformable stiffened plates subjected to arbitrary loading\\u000a is presented. According to the proposed model, the arbitrarily placed parallel stiffening beams are isolated from the plate\\u000a by sections in the lower outer surface of the plate, taking into account the arising tractions in all directions at the fictitious\\u000a interfaces. These

  8. Relative motions of hotspots in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans since late Cretaceous time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Molnar; Joann Stock

    1987-01-01

    The history of the motion of the Pacific plate over the Hawaiian hotspot defined by the ages of volcanic rocks along the Hawaiian-Emperor chain is used here to calculate relative positions of hotspots (presumed to be fixed) beneath Iceland, Tristan de Cunha, Reunion, Kerguelen, and St. Paul's Island. The positions are found to lie from several hundred to more than

  9. An Introduction to Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page is a brief introduction to plate tectonics. It starts with a discussion of the evolution of the theory of plate tectonics and the arguments supporting it. It then discusses the processes associated with tectonics and the types of plate boundaries: divergent, convergent and transform boundaries. It concludes with a discussion of the current hypotheses of what causes plates to move.

  10. Caribbean plate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

  11. Engineering surface waves in flat phononic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Candelas, Pilar; Belmar, Francisco; Uris, Antonio; García de Abajo, F. Javier; Meseguer, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic-wave phenomena span a wide range of length scales going from the devastation of earthquakes down to image reconstruction of buried nanostructures. In solid-fluid systems, the so-called Scholte-Stoneley waves (SSWs) dominate the scene at the interface with their evanescent fields decaying away into both media. Understanding and manipulating these waves in patterned surfaces would enable new applications of sound to be devised for imaging and acoustic signal processing, although this task has so far remained elusive. Here, we report SSW modes displaying directional gaps and band folding in fluid-loaded solid phononic plates. The plates are inhomogeneously patterned with in-plane periodic modulations of the elastic constants, but present flat surfaces free of corrugations. We experimentally demonstrate control of SSWs, which opens a promising route toward acoustic fluid sensing, microscopy, and signal processing.

  12. Survey of ion plating sources. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1979-01-01

    Based on the type of evaporation source, gaseous media and mode of transport, the following is discussed: resistance, electron beam, sputtering, reactive and ion beam evaporation. Ionization efficiencies and ion energies in the glow discharge determine the percentage of atoms which are ionized under typical ion plating conditions. The plating flux consists of a small number of energetic ions and a large number of energetic neutrals. The energy distribution ranges from thermal energies up to a maximum energy of the discharge. The various reaction mechanisms which contribute to the exceptionally strong adherence - formation of a graded sustrate/coating interface are not fully understood, however the controlling factors are evaluated. The influence of process variables on the nucleation and growth characteristics are illustrated in terms of morphological changes which affect the mechanical and tribological properties of the coating.

  13. Musical Plates: A Study of Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-01-01

    In this project, students use Real-Time earthquake and volcano data from the Internet to explore the relationship between earthquakes, plate tectonics, and volcanoes. There is a teachers guide that explains how to use real time data, and in the same section, there is a section for curriculum standards, Supplement and enrichment activities, and assessment suggestions. Included on this webpage are four core activities, and three enrichment activities, including an activity where the student writes a letter to the president. There is also a link to reference materials that might also interest you and your students.

  14. A plate tectonic model of the Palaeozoic tectonic history of New South Wales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erwin Scheibner

    1973-01-01

    An updated* tectonic model for the Palaeozoic tectonic history of New South Wales, based on actualistic models of plate tectonics, has resulted from tectonic analyses and syntheses during the compilation of the Tectonic Map of New South Wales.Most emphasis is given to marginal seas, which characterize Pacific marginal mobile zones. Marginal seas form in the regime of lithospheric tension under

  15. Beyond Interface

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Beyond Interface is an exhibition of digital art, created in conjunction with the Museums and the Web 1998 conference held in April. The conference and the Website are coordinated by Archives & Museums Informatics. Beyond Interface is curated by Steve Dietz, who explains, "This online exhibition presents a simple proposition. There is art that is created to 'be' on the Net. After that, it gets more complex very quickly. Beyond Interface explores some of the complicating issues but does not attempt a comprehensive investigation." Users can follow links to the works of 24 net artists, writings on the philosophies of net art, and the complete conference proceedings of Museums and the Web 1998, which include the Best of the Web Award for 1998.

  16. Hyperbolic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Giomi, Luca

    2012-09-28

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets, or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature. PMID:23030106

  17. Interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariglio, S.; Gabay, M.; Mannhart, J.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Low dimensional superconducting systems have been the subject of numerous studies for many years. In this article, we focus our attention on interfacial superconductivity, a field that has been boosted by the discovery of superconductivity at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. We explore the properties of this amazing system that allows the electric field control and on/off switching of superconductivity. We discuss the similarities and differences between bulk doped SrTiO3 and the interface system and the possible role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin-orbit. We also, more briefly, discuss interface superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments, and the recent observation of a high Tc in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO3.

  18. Indentation of the Philippine Sea plate by the Eurasia plate in Taiwan: Details from recent marine seismological experiments

    E-print Network

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    of the Central Range, indents the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) as attested by intra-oceanic slicing and incipient subduction of the PSP beneath the east coast of Taiwan. The westernmost part of the PSP slab is probably by the "collision-free" subduction of the PSP north of 24°30N. The down- faulting of the subduction interface forms

  19. Regional Summary Western Pacific Management Context

    E-print Network

    .5 million pounds) of the Pacific-wide (western-central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean coordinated management between countries with fishing interests in the Pacific Ocean. The annual bigeye tuna

  20. Franciscan complex calera limestones: Accreted remnants of farallon plate oceanic plateaus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarduno, J.A.; McWilliams, M.; Debiche, M.G.; Sliter, W.V.; Blake, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Calera Limestone, part of the Franciscan Complex of northern California, may have formed in a palaeoenvironment similar to Hess and Shatsky Rises of the present north-west Pacific1. We report here new palaeomagnetic results, palaeontological data and recent plate-motion models that reinforce this assertion. The Calera Limestone may have formed on Farallon Plate plateaus, north of the Pacific-Farallon spreading centre as a counterpart to Hess or Shatsky Rises. In one model2, the plateaus were formed by hotspots close to the Farallon_Pacific ridge axis. On accretion to North America, plateau dissection in the late Cretaceous to Eocene (50-70 Myr) could explain the occurrence of large volumes of pillow basalt and exotic blocks of limestone in the Franciscan Complex. Partial subduction of the plateaus could have contributed to Laramide (70-40 Myr) compressional events3. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Changjiang (Yangtze) Pacific Ocean

    E-print Network

    Bohai Sea Yellow Sea East China Sea Pacific Ocean Han River SOUTH KOREA NORTH KOREA Yalu River TAIWAN), and extrapolation toward shore (Mooring 1, dark blue), o#11;-shore (Mooring 3, light blue), and along-shore (Mooring contour levels: -1 (blue) to 0.8 (red) by 0.2 Contours of surf elev Vectors of Vbar yearday=19.5 0.5 m/s 1

  2. Henderson Island, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Henderson Island (24.5S, 128.5W) Pacific Ocean southeast of the Tuamotu Archipelago, is a good example of the many barren islands that but for lack of a source of water could be another lush tropical paradise. The crew of HMS Bounty, in searching for a refuge, sailed past this island but rejected it in favor of nearby Pitcairn Island because of the lack of resources and water.

  3. Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Seattle, Washington, PMEL carries out interdisciplinary scientific investigations in oceanography and atmospheric science. Current programs focus on open ocean observations in support of long-term monitoring and forecasting. A comprehensive site focusing on NOAA research in the Pacific Ocean. Site includes an abundant amount of information, data, publications, and links to additional resources. Features interactive data sets, maps, 3-D visualizations, and video.

  4. Northeast Pacific flatfish management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumble, Robert J.

    1998-03-01

    Exploitation of northeast Pacific flatfish effectively began in the late 1800s with the fishery for Pacific halibut. Harvest of other flatfish occurred on a limited, local basis until foreign fishing fleets came to the area in the late 1950s. When US and Canadian fishermen replaced the foreign fleets in the 1970s and 1980s, a conservation-based management system designed to control foreign fishing was applied to the domestic fleet. Flatfish stock assessment is based on scientific surveys, both trawl and longline, and on catch-age models. In Alaskan waters since 1989 and since 1996 in Canadian waters, mandatory observers collect data on species composition, discards of flatfish and other groundfish, and catch and discards of prohibited species. Fishermen pay observer costs. Most biomass and harvest occurs in the Bering Sea-Aleutian Islands area. Many northeast Pacific flatfish are near record-high abundance, an order of magnitude higher than 20 years ago. Exploitation rates based on F35% or F0.1 generate acceptable biological catch of more than 1 million mt, but annual harvest reaches only 300,000 mt. Total groundfish harvest is limited by an optimum yield limit of 2 million mt in the Bering Sea-Aleutian Islands, where the acceptable biological catch is 3 million mt, and by limits on amounts of Pacific halibut and other prohibited species bycatch. Most flatfish are relatively low-value species, and fishermen chose to fish for more valuable species. A large, powerful fleet which developed under open access in the US saw fishing time decline and economic problems increase as catching capacity grew, while Canada stabilized its fleet with limited entry and catch restrictions for individual vessels.

  5. Cadmium plating replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  6. Plate-mantle coupling from post-Pangea plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Dietmar Müller, R.; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Convection in the Earth's mantle that involves plates at the surfaces gives rise to plate velocities that vary through time and depend on the balance of plate boundary forces, with the present-day providing a snapshot of this ongoing process. However, present-day plate velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative timeframes and thus cannot be used to evaluate factors limiting plate velocities. Previous studies investigated the effects of continental keels on plate speeds by either using the present-day snapshot or a limited number of reconstructed plate configurations, often leading to conflicting results. For example, an early assumption was that continental keels (especially cratons) were unlikely to impede fast plate motions because India's velocity approached ~20 cm/yr in the Eocene prior to the collision with Eurasia. We employ a modern plate reconstruction approach with evolving global topological plate boundaries for the post-Pangea timeframe (since 200 Ma) to evaluate factors controlling plate velocities. Plate boundary configurations and plate velocities are extracted from the open-source and cross-platform plate reconstruction package GPlates (www.gplates.org) at 1 Myr intervals. For each plate, at each timestep, the area of continental and cratonic lithosphere is calculated to evaluate the effect on plate velocities. Our results support that oceanic plates tend to be 2-3 times faster than plates with large portion of continental plate area, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The fastest plates (~8.5 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by oceanic plate area and high subducting portion of plate perimeter, while the slowest plates (~2.6-2.8 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by continental plate area and bounded by transforms and mid-oceanic ridge segments. Importantly, increasing cratonic fractions (both Proterozoic and Archean lithosphere) significantly impede plate velocities, suggesting that deep continental keels impinge on asthenospheric flow to increase shear traction, thus anchoring the plate in the more viscous mantle transition zone. However, plates with significant cratonic fragments exhibit short-lived (~10 Myr) accelerations, such as the rapid motion of the Indian plate that is correlated with plume head arrivals as recorded by large igneous province (LIPs) emplacement, highlighting the necessity to analyse plate velocities over long geological timeframes. By evaluating factors controlling plate velocities in the post-Pangea timeframe, simple principles can be applied to highlight potential plate velocity artefacts for Paleozoic and earlier times for which no hotspot tracks, nor in-situ seafloor spreading histories, are preserved. Based on the post-Pangea timeframe, a principle that can be applied to pre-Pangea times is that plates with less than ~50% continental area can reach RMS velocities of ~20 cm/yr, while plates with more than 50% continental fraction do not exceed RMS velocities of ~10 cm/yr. Similarly, plates with large portions of continental or cratonic area with RMS velocities exceeding ~15 cm/yr for more than ~10 Myr should be flagged as potential artefacts requiring further justification of plate driving forces in such scenarios.

  7. The East Asian Sea: A vanished Cenozoic ocean between the Pacific and Indian oceans revealed by subducted slab constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jonny; Lu, Renqi; Suppe, John; Kanda, Ravi V. S.

    2014-05-01

    We have mapped an extensive 2500 km by 7500 km swath of sub-horizontal slabs at 600 to 1200 km depths that we call the 'East Asian Sea'. The northern margin of the East Asian Sea slabs begin at Taiwan and Japan, and extend south to SE Australia near New Zealand, underlying the Philippine Sea, the Caroline Sea, New Guinea, and northern to eastern Australia. When restored with other mapped slabs under Asia-Oceania, the mapped slabs reveal a vanished ocean that existed between the Pacific and Indian oceans in the Cenozoic. The subduction of the Asian Sea fills a crucial gap in plate tectonic reconstructions of East Asia by accounting for a significant proportion of fast Pacific and Indo-Australian convergence towards Eurasia since 43 Ma, during which time the Pacific moved ~3000 km WNW and Australia moved ~2500 km northward in a near-orthogonal direction relative to a mantle reference. In addition, the Australian plate expanded up to 2000 km at its northern and eastern margins. Slabs were primarily mapped from the MITP08 global P-wave mantle tomographic model (Li et al., 2008) and compared to other global P- and S-wave global tomography. Reconstructed slab lengths were assessed by quantitative flexural slip unfolding of mid-slab surfaces to a spherical Earth surface model. Seismic tomographic volumes were also calculated for selected serial cross-sections. We present a plate tectonic reconstruction with the slab constraints, with the implication that the East Asian Sea was progressively overrun and subducted beneath the Philippine Sea, the Caroline Sea and the expanding Melanesian arcs. Reconstructions to earlier periods indicate the East Asian Sea was originally Pacific or proto-Pacific mantle lithosphere, and was fragmented from the Pacific plate during the major ~45 Ma Eocene motion change. This implies that the East Asian Sea was initially the upper plate of the Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec Western Pacific subduction zones.

  8. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having through-plate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with led spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  9. The Pacific RANET Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postawko, S.; Ah Poe, A.; Morrissey, M.

    2004-12-01

    There are few places in the world more vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change than the island nations of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The region also faces great challenges in communicating the issues related to climate to the general population. Lack of communications infrastructure, multiple languages, and knowledgeable personnel to deliver information, are all challenges for these countries. However, a recently developed international consortium is taking the first steps to addressing these challenges. The RANET (RAdio and interNET communications) project was originally developed for the countries of Africa, with initial funding from NOAA, to make weather, climate, and other environmental information more accessible to remote and resource-poor communities. The program is now expanding into Asia and the Pacific. RANET works to build telecommunication bridges between scientific-based products and remote communities that could benefit from such information.?The RANET project in the Pacific is a consortium of partners from the Pacific Island nations, the U.S., New Zealand, Australia, and others. Coordination of the project is loosely overseen by a Steering Committee, made up of representatives from the various interested partners. For regions where the appropriate technology exists (which includes the capital cities of nearly all of the island states of the Pacific), information is downloaded via a digital satellite receiver. This can then be broadcast within a country by many means, including Community FM Radio stations. The information distributed includes technical information needed by meteorological and related services to improve their own products and services, as well as a second level of information designed to serve communities, including weather forecasts, bulletins, warnings, etc. The primary challenge at this time is developing content that is both relevant and understandable to these remote communities. While some information will be common to all countries, it will be necessary to have more location-specific information as well. In addition to education of the general population, it is hoped that making weather, climate, and environmental information more accessible will encourage students from the islands into the study of these areas in their tertiary education.

  10. Discovering Plate Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rice University's Earth Science Department offers the Discovering Plate Boundaries educational activity. The exercise is described as a "data rich exercise to help students discover the processes that occur at plate tectonic boundaries" and has been used successfully with 5th graders to undergraduates. The site provides the necessary downloads of maps; earthquake, volcanic, seafloor, topographic, and bathymetric data; and teacher guides and complete instructions. Because the activity can be geared towards such a large range of students, is well designed, and is easily accessible, educators will definitely appreciate the site.

  11. Plating under reduced pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Beat, T.G.; Cowden, W.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ryan, L.E.; Hewitt, W.B. [TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Plating under reduced pressure was evaluated for both electroless nickel and electrodeposited copper systems. The objective was to reduce pitting of these coatings thereby further enhancing their usage for diamond turning applications. Cursory experiments with electroless nickel showed reduced porosity when deposition was done at around 500 torr. Detailed experiments with electrodeposited copper at around 100 torr provided similar results. Scanning tunneling microscopy was effectively used to show the improvement in the copper deposits plated under reduced pressure. Benefits included reduced surface roughness and finer and denser grain structure.

  12. Reduced Plating Ignitron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A (Inventor); Pearson, J Boise (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An ignitron apparatus has an airtight tubular housing having a first sealed end and a second sealed end. An anode is connected at the first sealed end, projecting into the housing, and a recess at the second sealed and forms a well which contains a quantity of liquid gallium or gallium alloy making up the cathode. An ignitor projects through the liquid metal and into the housing. The inner surface of the housing includes at least one plating-reduction structure to prevent electrical shorting of the apparatus caused by plating of the liquid metal.

  13. Volcanoes, Plates, and Chains

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson students will discover how seamounts in the Axial-Cobb-Eikelberg-Patton chain were formed. They will learn about the processes that form seamounts, describe the movement of tectonic plates in the Gulf of Alaska region and explain the types of volcanic activity that might be associated with these movements, and describe how a combination of hotspot activity and tectonic plate movement could produce the arrangement of seamounts observed in this chain. This hands-on activity uses online data resources and includes: focus questions, learning objectives, teaching time, audio/visual materials needed, background information, learning procedures, evaluations, extensions, as well as resources and student handouts.

  14. Tectonic Plate Motion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation shows the direction of motion of the Earth's major plates as measured through NASA's satellite laser ranging (SLR) technology. A series of world maps, accompanying text, and the subsequent links explain this technology in great detail. One can click on the Index Map for Satellite Laser Ranging site Velocity and see the vectors (arrows) that indicate the direction and rate of movement of Earth's plates in much more detail. Accompanying text gives a more detailed explanation of what each sub map is showing.

  15. Plate Tectonics and Volcanism

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson where learners explore plate movement and the relationship between plate tectonics and volcanoes. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson five in the Astro-Venture Geology Training Unit that was developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

  16. The East Pacific Rise: An Active Not Passive Spreading System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, D. B.; Rowan, C. J.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Grand, S. P.; Simmons, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional plate tectonic interpretations of mid-oceanic ridges regard spreading as an entirely passive phenomenon. From this one would assume that the oceanic ridges will move over the mantle in response to the geodynamics of the diverging plates, and do not remain fixed spatially over any protracted period of time. An analysis of the kinematics of ridge motions in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference since 83 Ma generally supports this view, with the notable exception of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The Pacific-Nazca/Farallon segment of the EPR north of Easter Island (27°S) is oriented essentially N-S, and has produced more than 9500km of E-W spreading in the past 80 Ma, making it the dominant ridge in the world's plate system over this interval of time. Yet despite the large amount of E-W divergence, the spreading center has maintained its longitudinal position to within <±250 km of the current ridge axis. Global mantle convective flow modeling indicates that the EPR, unlike any other extensive segment of the mid-oceanic ridge system, is underlain by an active upwelling system extending from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. We suggest that the lack of E-W motion of the EPR apparent from the kinematics is a consequence of these mantle dynamics; this ridge is thus not behaving as a passive plate boundary, but is actively and directly linked to, and controlled by, whole mantle upwelling. This observation overturns the notion that ridges are always entirely passive features of the plate system. Subduction of the northern EPR beneath western North America has thus resulted in the overriding of an active upwelling system that has contributed significantly to the evolution of Basin and Range kinematics and superimposed dynamics, including significant contributions from dynamic topography.

  17. Plate Tectonics: Lines of Evidence

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-11-01

    This Science Object is the fifth of five Science Objects in the Plate Tectonics SciPack. It explores the physical, geographical, and geological evidence for the theory of continental drift and plate tectonics. Plate tectonics provide a unifying framework for understanding Earth processes and history, and is supported by many lines of evidence. Over geologic time, plates move across the globe creating different continents (and positions of continents). Learning Outcomes:? Use plate tectonics to explain changes in continents and their positions over geologic time.? Provide evidence for the idea of plates, including the location of earthquakes and volcanoes, continental drift, magnetic orientation of rocks in the ocean floor, etc.

  18. Plate Tectonics Quiz

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This quiz for younger students asks them 10 questions about plate motions, rock types in continental and oceanic crust, crustal formation and mountain building, the supercontinent Pangea, and the theory of continental drift. A link to a page on continental drift provides information to answer the questions.

  19. Aluminium oxide microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delendik, K.; Emeliantchik, I.; Litomin, A.; Rumyantsev, V.; Voitik, O.

    2003-09-01

    Microchannel electron multipliers of a new type are proposed - anodic alumina microchannel plates (MCP). They implement the conventional concept of lead glass microchannel plate with a new material - anodic aluminium oxide. Anodic alumina is a very suitable material for microchannel plates due to presense of natural microchannels. Diameters of these channels lie in the range of 0.02 - 0.5 ?m, channels of greater diameter can be easily produced by means of additional processing based on the presence of intrinsic microchannel structure. We have produced MCPs with channel diameters 0.2 - 8 ?m and thickness 40 - 150 ?m. We have also developed two methods of deposition of conductive and emissive films inside MCP channels: plasma sputtering and liquid-phase deposition from metallo-organic precursors. MCP samples with NiO?MgO and Cu?CuO?BeO?MgO coatings have demonstrated promising results. Alumina MCP potentially have serious advantages over traditional lead glass MCP: they are much cheaper, large area plates (hundreds of cm2) can be easily produced, spatial resolution can be much better (due to smaller channel diameter).

  20. Plate Tectonic Movement Visualizations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection provides a wide array of visual resources and supporting material about plate tectonic movements. Visualizations include simple animations, GIS-based animated maps, paleogeographic maps and globes, and numerous illustrations and photos. This collection is not exhaustive but does represent some of the best sources for teaching. Resources can be incorporated into lectures, labs, or other activities.

  1. The Plate Tectonics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  2. Plate tectonics and crustal deformation around the Japanese Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze over a century of geodetic data to study crustal deformation and plate motion around the Japanese Islands, using the block-fault model for crustal deformation developed by Matsu'ura et al. (1986). We model the area including the Japanese Islands with 19 crustal blocks and 104 faults based on the distribution of active faults and seismicity. Geodetic data are used to obtain block motions and average slip rates of faults. This geodetic model predicts that the Pacific plate moves N deg 69 +/- 2 deg W at about 80 +/- 3 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate which is much lower than that predicted in geologic models. Substantial aseismic slip occurs on the subduction boundaries. The block containing the Izu Peninsula may be separated from the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. The faults on the coast of Japan Sea and the western part of the Median Tectonic Line have slip rates exceeding 4 mm/yr, while the Fossa Magna does not play an important role in the tectonics of the central Japan. The geodetic model requires the division of northeastern Japan, contrary to the hypothesis that northeastern Japan is a part of the North American plate. Owing to rapid convergence, the seismic risk in the Nankai trough may be larger than that of the Tokai gap.

  3. Structural patterns and tectonic history of the Bauer microplate, Eastern Tropical Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, B.W.; Lonsdale, P.F.

    2003-01-01

    The Bauer microplate was an independent slab of oceanic lithosphere that from 17 Ma to 6 Ma grew from 1.4 ?? 105 km2 to 1.2 ?? 106 km2 between the rapidly diverging Pacific and Nazca plates. Growth was by accretion at the lengthening and overlapping axes of the (Bauer-Nazca) Galapagos Rise (GR) and the (Pacific-Bauer) East Pacific Rise (EPR). EPR and GR axial propagation to create and rapidly grow the counter-clockwise spinning microplate occurred in two phases: (1) 17-15Ma, when the EPR axis propagated north and the GR axis propagated south around a narrow (100- to 200-km-wide) core of older lithosphere; and (2) 8-6 Ma, when rapid northward propagation of the EPR axis resumed, overlapping ???400 km of the fast-spreading Pacific-Nazca rise-crest and appending a large (200- to 400-km-wide) area of the west flank of that rise as a 'northern annex' to the microplate. Between 15 and 8 Ma the microplate grew principally by crustal accretion at the crest of its rises. The microplate was captured by the Nazca plate and the Galapagos Rise axis became extinct soon after 6 Ma, when the south end of the Pacific-Bauer EPR axis became aligned with the southern Pacific-Nazca EPR axis and its north end was linked by the Quebrada Transform to the northern Pacific-Nazca EPR axis. Incomplete multibeam bathymetry of the microplate margins, and of both flanks of the Pacific-Bauer and Bauer-Nazca Rises, together with archival magnetic and satellite altimetry data, clarifies the growth and (counter-clockwise) rotation of the microplate, and tests tectonic models derived from studies of the still active, much smaller, Easter and Juan Fernandez microplates. Our interpretations differ from model predictions in that Euler poles were not located on the microplate boundary, propagation in the 15-8 Ma phase of growth was not toward these poles, and microplate rotation rates were small (5??/m.y.) for much of its history, when long, bounding transform faults reduced coupling to Nazca plate motion. Some structures of the Bauer microplate boundary, such as deep rift valleys and a broad zone of thrust-faulted lithosphere, are, however, similar to those observed around the smaller, active microplates. Analysis of how the Bauer microplate was captured when coupling to the Pacific plate was reduced invites speculation on why risecrest microplates eventually lose their independence. ?? Springer 2005.

  4. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The research objectives are the following: (1) to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability; (2) to implement satellite analysis procedures to accomplish (1); (3) to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis/forecast systems at NMC; and (4) to synthesize knowledge gained from satellite observations through diagnosis and numerical models. Significant accomplishments in FY 91/92 are presented and include the following: (1) satellite forecast applications; (2) satellite data analysis; and (3) tropical plume mechanisms.

  5. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, one of nine US Department of Energy multi-program national laboratories, conducts research concerning environmental science and technology. This huge site holds information on research in atmospheric science and climate change, analytic and physical chemistry, computational science and engineering, environmental remediation, statistics, thermal and energy systems, and so much more. Many of the individual research pages contain downloadable publications. Section headings for the site include Energy, Environment, Health and Safety, Information Technology, National Security, and Nuclear Technology, among others. Also included here is the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a facility that conducts "fundamental research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that underpin critical environmental issues."

  6. Plate mode velocities in graphite\\/epoxy plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Prosser; M. R. Gorman

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the velocities of the extensional and flexural plate modes were made along three directions of propagation in four graphite\\/ epoxy composite plates. The acoustic signals were generated by simulated acoustic emission events (pencil lead breaks or Hsu-Neilsen sources) and detected by broad band ultrasonic transducers. The first arrival of the extensional plate mode, which is nondispersive at low

  7. Plate Puzzle Page 1 of 20 Plate Puzzle 1

    E-print Network

    Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

    plotting activities. Good follow-up activities are: plate tectonics flip book, epicenter plotting using tectonics. The map is an attractive display of plate tectonic features such earthquake epicenters boundaries so that one can examine the relationship of the tectonic features to the plate boundaries. The map

  8. Volcanism and vertical tectonics in the Pacific Basin related to global Cretaceous transgressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlanger, Seymour O.; Jenkyns, Hugh C.; Premoli-Silva, Isabella

    1981-02-01

    The dominance of volcanic processes and the importance of vertical tectonics in the geological evolution of the Pacific Basin has been recognised since the time of Charles Darwin. Data gathered on several legs of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and numerous marine expeditions in the past decade have confirmed Menard's postulate that the Pacific Basin was the scene of volcanism on an enormous scale in Mesozoic time. Widespread mid-plate volcanism between ˜110 and 70 m.y. B.P. characterised the area bounded by the Line Islands, the Mid-Pacific Mountains and the Nauru Basin-Marshall Islands. Heating of the Pacific lithospheric plate during this period of volcanism resulted in regional uplift and the bathymetric evolution of the area diverged significantly from a "normal" Parsons-Sclater subsidence curve. The Farallon plate, now almost entirely subducted, was also the scene of mid-plate volcanism that produced such features as the Nicoya Plateau now found as an allochthonous ophiolitic terrain landward of the middle America trench. Large, benthonic, reef-associated foraminifera comprising a pseudorbitoid fauna, hitherto considered to be largely restricted to Central America, have now been additionally recorded from DSDP Sites 165, 315 and 316 in the Line Islands, Site 462 in the Nauru Basin, and in New Guinea. The distribution of this fauna, of Campanian/Maastrichtian age, is interpreted as indicating "stepping stone" connections (aseismic ridges, plateaus and seamounts) between the Caribbean, Farallon, and Pacific plates 70-80 m.y. B.P. Similarities between the geology of the Nauru Basin and the Caribbean Ocean crust reinforce the interpretation of the latter as a former part of the Farallon plate. Estimates of the sea-level and continental freeboard change caused by the thermally induced uplift of the Pacific and Farallon plates, as well as substantial areas in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean Basins, indicate that such shallowing of the sea floor could have been the major factor in causing global Cretaceous transgressions.

  9. Amphibious seismic survey images plate interface at 1960 Chile Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SPOC Team; Krawcyzk, C.

    The southern central Chilean margin at the site of the largest historically recorded earthquake in the Valdivia region, in 1960 (Mw = 9.5), is part of the 5000-km-long active subduction system whose geodynamic evolution is controversially debated and poorly understood. Covering the area between 36° and 40°S, the oceanic crust is segmented by prominent fracture zones. The offshore forearc and its onshore continuation show a complex image with segments of varying geophysical character, and several fault systems active during the past 24 m.y.In autumn 2001, the project SPOC was organized to study the Subduction Processes Off Chile, with a focus on the seismogenic coupling zone and the forearc. The acquired seismic data crossing the Chilean subduction system were gathered in a combined offshore-onshore survey and provide new insights into the lithospheric structure and evolution of active margins with insignificant frontal accretion.

  10. About the REL Pacific Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific, 2014

    2014-01-01

    REL Pacific is one of ten Regional Educational Laboratories established and funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Their region encompasses approximately 4.9 million square miles and serves seven Pacific island entities, including American Samoa; the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; the Federated…

  11. The biogeochemistry of aluminum in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orians, Kristin J.; Bruland, Kenneth W.

    1986-07-01

    Vertical distributions and horizontal surface transects of dissolved and particulate Al at several locations in the Pacific Ocean are presented here. Concentrations of dissolved Al in the Pacific range from 0.3 to 5 nmol/kg in the surface waters, from 0.1 to 1 nmol/kg in mid-depths, and from 0.5 to 2 nmol/kg in the deep waters. From these data and published data from other regions, it is evident that Al has a unique oceanic chemistry relative to that of other metals. External sources and rapid particle scavenging throughout the water column are the major controls on dissolved Al distributions in the oceans. Vertical profiles generally exhibit a surface maximum, a mid-depth minimum, and increasing concentrations toward the sediment-water interface. This suggests two sources of dissolved Al, one to the surface waters and one to the deep waters. Concentrations of dissolved Al in surface waters are lowest within the eutrophic, low-salinity California Current (0.3-1 nmol/kg) and increase westwardly into the subtropical gyre of the North Pacific (˜ 5 nmol/kg). Values in the South Pacific gyre are fivefold lower. These horizontal trends indicate that the primary source of dissolved Al to the surface waters of the central Pacific is from eolian input. Dissolved Al supplied by rivers to the eastern North Pacific appears to be rapidly scavenged in estuaries and/or the highly productive coastal region. The source of dissolved Al to the deep waters is not known, but could be due to a flux out of the sediments or a remineralization process. Suspended particulate Al concentrations increase with depth at all stations and decrease with distance from the ocean boundary. Surface values range from ˜ 1.5 nmol/kg near shore to ˜ 0.3 nmol/kg in the central gyres of the Pacific. Deep water concentrations range from ˜ 22 nmol/kg near shore to ˜ 4 nmol/kg in the North Pacific central gyre, and decrease to ˜ 1.3 nmol/kg in the South Pacific central gyre. Observed distributions indicate that suspended particulate Al varies with the intensity of bottom sediment resuspension and the horizontal mixing of the resulting "nepheloid layer" out from ocean boundary regions. Particle residence times estimated are consistent with other reported values.

  12. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  13. ChooseMyPlate.gov

    MedlinePLUS

    ... foods and 900 physical activities. NEW : High school lesson plans. MyPlate Kids' Place A brand new resource ... MyPlate Videos Healthy Eating on a Budget SuperTracker Lesson Plans 10 Tips Nutrition Education Series Recipes, Cookbooks, ...

  14. Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation shows earthquake and volcanic activity corresponds to plate boundaries. This interactive topographical map with the ocean water removed shows the boundaries of major plates and the locations of major volcanic eruptions and earthquakes worldwide.

  15. Plate heat exchanger design theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. Shah; A. S. Wanniarachchi

    1991-01-01

    Plate heat exchangers are commonly used in hygienic applications as well as in chemical processing and other industrial applications. Pertinent information on plate exchangers from a designer's point of view is summarized to provide a basic insight into performance behavior of chevron plates. Basic design methods are presented and a method of coupling between heat transfer and pressure drop is

  16. Explosive welding of metal plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. A. Akbari-Mousavi; L. M. Barrett; S. T. S. Al-Hassani

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a study of explosive welding of metal plates. The properties of a locally prepared mix of 77\\/23 ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) explosive and the dynamics of the plates are investigated and the results from welding tests presented. The strength of the clad plates is measured and ultrasonic inspection performed to identify and locate defects. The

  17. Lesson 3. Plate Tectonics Overview

    E-print Network

    Chen, Po

    Lesson 3. Plate Tectonics #12;Overview · Prior to the 1970s that with the development of the theory of plate tectonics. · Knowledge of the ocean floors of the Earth #12;Overview · Plate tectonics explains the formaBon of the Earth's two

  18. Tectonic stress in the plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall M. Richardson; Sean C. Solomon; Norman H. Sleep

    1979-01-01

    The state of stress in the lithosphere provides strong constraints on the forces acting on the plates. The directions of principal stresses in the plates as indicated by midplate earthquake mechanisms, in situ stress measurements, and stress-sensitive geological features are used to test plate tectonic driving force models, under the premises that enough data exist in selected areas to define

  19. Roving the Pacific: Pacific Manuscripts Bureau Microfilming in the Pacific Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maidment, Ewan

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of microfilming by the Pacific Manuscripts Bureau (PMB), a non-profit organization established in 1968 to identify and preserve archives, manuscripts, and rare printed documents relating to the South Pacific Islands. Describes a 1997 PMB microfilming expedition to Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. (PEN)

  20. Boundary element method for 3-D cracks in a plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, N.; Li, V. C.

    1988-01-01

    Fundamental solutions which automatically satisfy boundary conditions at the interfaces of an elastic plate perfectly bonded to two elastic halfspaces are implemented in a three-dimensional BEM for crack problems. The BEM features a new integration scheme for highly singular kernels. The capability is achieved through a part analytic and part numerical integration procedure, such that the analytic part of the integration is similar for all slip/opening variations. Part-through elliptic cracks in an elastic plate with traction-free surfaces are analyzed and the SIF values along the crack front are found to compare favorably with the numerical SIF results of Raju and Newman (1979).

  1. Fractal Generalized Zone Plates

    E-print Network

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Minguez-Vega, Gladys; Lancis, Jesus; Climent, Vicent; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2008-01-01

    The construction of fractal generalized zone plates (FraGZPs) from a set of periodic diffractive optical elements with circular symmetry is proposed. This allows us to increase the number of foci of a conventional fractal zone plate (FraZP), keeping the self-similarity property within the axial irradiance. The focusing properties of these fractal diffractive optical elements for points not only along but also in the close vicinity of the optical axis are investigated. In both cases analytical expressions for the irradiance are derived. Numerical simulations of the energetic efficiency of FraGZPs under plane wave illumination are carried out. In addition, some effects on the axial irradiance caused by the variation in area of their transparent rings are shown.

  2. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having throughplate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with lead spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  3. Bipolar battery plate

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlette, J. J.

    1985-09-17

    A liquid-impermeable plate having throughplate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet having a series of spaced perforations each of which contains a metal element sealingly received into the perforation. A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet such as polypropylene with a punching tool, filling the apertures with lead spheres having a diameter smaller than the holes but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres off the sheet with a doctor blade and then pressing a heated platen onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar sealing the metal into the sheet.

  4. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  5. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  6. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  7. Plate Tectonics: The Mechanism

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This text explains how detailed mapping of the ocean floor led scientists like Howard Hess and R. Deitz to revive the Holmes convection theory. Hess and Deitz modified the theory considerably and called their new theory Sea-floor Spreading. Among the seafloor features that supported the sea-floor spreading hypothesis were: mid-oceanic ridges, deep sea trenches, island arcs, geomagnetic patterns, and fault patterns. These features are treated in detail and related to the current Theory of Plate Tectonics.

  8. Martian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1994-03-01

    The northern lowlands of Mars have been produced by plate tectonics. Preexisting old thick highland crust was subducted, while seafloor spreading produced thin lowland crust during late Noachian and Early Hesperian time. In the preferred reconstruction, a breakup margin extended north of Cimmeria Terra between Daedalia Planum and Isidis Planitia where the highland-lowland transition is relatively simple. South dipping subduction occured beneath Arabia Terra and east dipping subduction beneath Tharsis Montes and Tempe Terra. Lineations associated with Gordii Dorsum are attributed to ridge-parallel structures, while Phelegra Montes and Scandia Colles are interpreted as transfer-parallel structures or ridge-fault-fault triple junction tracks. Other than for these few features, there is little topographic roughness in the lowlands. Seafloor spreading, if it occurred, must have been relatively rapid. Quantitative estimates of spreading rate are obtained by considering the physics of seafloor spreading in the lower (approx. 0.4 g) gravity of Mars, the absence of vertical scarps from age differences across fracture zones, and the smooth axial topography. Crustal thickness at a given potential temperature in the mantle source region scales inversely with gravity. Thus, the velocity of the rough-smooth transition for axial topography also scales inversely with gravity. Plate reorganizations where young crust becomes difficult to subduct are another constraint on spreading age. Plate tectonics, if it occurred, dominated the thermal and stress history of the planet. A geochemical implication is that the lower gravity of Mars allows deeper hydrothermal circulation through cracks and hence more hydration of oceanic crust so that more water is easily subducted than on the Earth. Age and structural relationships from photogeology as well as median wavelength gravity anomalies across the now dead breakup and subduction margins are the data most likely to test and modify hypotheses about Mars plate tectonics.

  9. Channel plating. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1985-01-01

    A process was developed for fabricating printed wiring boards with dense (closely spaced, narrow conductors) circuitry. The characteristics of epoxy-glass printed wiring board laminate clad with copper thicknesses of 0.005, 0.009, 0.013, 0.018, and 0.036 mm were compared. The circuitry was defined by a comparatively thick dry-film photoresist which effectively confines the subsequent copper plating for metallization of through-holes) within

  10. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Buckling of trapezoidal plates

    SciTech Connect

    Radloff, H.D. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hyer, M.W. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Nemeth, M.P. [NASA - Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This study focuses on the buckling response of flat composite plates with an isosceles planform, as shown below. The study consisted of both analytical and experimental phases. In the study the parallel edges x = 0 and L were clamped or simply supported. Clamped parallel edges were used in the experimental phase of the study. The nonparallel edges were simply supported. The parallel edges were assumed to remain straight and buckling was assumed to occur because these edges moved toward each other. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach was used, with the finite-element code ABAQUS being used to check specific cases. The buckling displacements were assumed to be in the form of harmonic functions. The prebuckling force resultant N{sub x} was assumed to be given by N{sub x}(x,y) = P/W(x), where P is the applied load and W(x) is the varying width of the plate. N{sub y}(x,y) and N{sub x,y}(x,y) were taken to be zero. Experiments were conducted on a number of laminates and a number of plate geometries, and the results were compared to predictions of the Rayleigh-Ritz scheme. In general correlation was good, though the analysis underpredicted the number of buckling half-waves.

  12. Discovering Plate Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dale Sawyer

    1997-09-15

    Discovering Plate Boundaries is based on 5 world maps containing earthquake, volcano, topography, satellite gravity, and seafloor age data. The novel aspect of the exercise is the "jigsaw" manner in which student groups access the maps and use them to discover, classify, and describe plate boundary types. The exercise is based only on observation and description, which makes it useful at a wide variety of levels; it has been used successfully in 5th grade classes, as well as in non-major earth science classes. The exercise is based on a set of wall maps that are not consumed during the exercise. Other inexpensive materials required include two 11x17 black and white copies per student and colored pencils. Because the exercise is not based on student access to the web, it is not dependent on classroom technology equipment. The exercise takes three 50-minute class periods to complete, and involves the students in making presentations to one another in small groups as well as to the whole class. The students come away from the exercise with knowledge of the key features of each type of plate boundary and a sense of why each looks and acts the way it does.

  13. ICT for Human Development in South Pacific

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduard Babulak

    2010-01-01

    The author worked past year as Professor & Head of School of Computing, Information and Mathematical Sciences and Director of Japan Pacific ICT Centre at the University of South Pacific. The South Pacific Region has many problems related to environmental and economic issues. The University of the South Pacific (USP) is an ideal platform for provision of development of Human

  14. Regional Summary Western Pacific Management Context

    E-print Network

    -central and eastern Pacific Ocean) total of Pacific bigeye tuna landings reported in 2009. Currently (WCPFC) is active in the western and central Pacific Ocean and the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is active in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Species under the purview of the WCPFC and IATTC

  15. Palaeotsunamis in the Pacific Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, J.; Chague-Goff, C.; Dominey-Howes, D.; McAdoo, B.; Cronin, S.; Bonte-Grapetin, Michael, M.; Nichol, S.; Horrocks, M.; Cisternas, M.; Lamarche, G.; Pelletier, B.; Jaffe, B.; Dudley, W.

    2011-01-01

    The recent 29 September 2009 South Pacific and 27 February 2010 Chilean events are a graphic reminder that the tsunami hazard and risk for the Pacific Ocean region should not be forgotten. Pacific Islands Countries (PICs) generally have short (<150 years) historic records, which means that to understand their tsunami hazard and risk researchers must study evidence for prehistoric events. However, our current state of knowledge of palaeotsunamis in PICs as opposed to their circum-Pacific counterparts is minimal at best. We briefly outline the limited extent of our current knowledge and propose an innovative methodology for future research in the Pacific. Each PIC represents a point source of information in the Pacific Ocean and this would allow their palaeotsunami records to be treated akin to palaeo-DART?? (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) buoys. Contemporaneous palaeotsunamis from local, regional and distant sources could be identified by using the spatial distribution of island records throughout the Pacific Ocean in conjunction with robust event chronologies. This would be highly innovative and, more importantly, would help provide the building blocks necessary to achieve more meaningful disaster risk reduction for PICs. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Heat transfer from interrupted plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenka, R. L.; Loehrke, R. I.

    1983-02-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured in single and multiple flat plates equipped with interior heating elements and immersed in low Re flows in a wind tunnel. The plates were located successively in the tunnel and spanned the width of the channel. Attention was initially given to blunt leading edges, which were gradually reshaped in order to study various flow separation conditions over the course of the trials. Each plate was heated to 6 C over room temperature. The average value of a heat transfer coefficient for a single plate was determined to depend on the plate length and thickness, and may be inhibited by the leading edge separation bubble in the case of a blunt leading edge. Higher Re enhances the value of the coefficient. Turbulence induced by the presence of the first plate was observed to enhance heat transfer from the second plate.

  17. Hypervelocity impact on shielded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1993-01-01

    A ballistic limit equation for hypervelocity impact on thin plates is derived analytically. This equation applies to cases of impulsive impact on a plate that is protected by a multi-shock shield, and it is valid in the range of velocity above 6 km/s. Experimental tests were conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center on square aluminum plates. Comparing the center deflections of these plates with the theoretical deflections of a rigid-plastic plate subjected to a blast load, one determines the dynamic yield strength of the plate material. The analysis is based on a theory for the expansion of the fragmented projectile and on a simple failure criterion. Curves are presented for the critical projectile radius versus the projectile velocity, and for the critical plate thickness versus the velocity. These curves are in good agreement with curves that have been generated empirically.

  18. Fuel cell end plate structure

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT); Katz, Murray (Newington, CT); Schroll, Craig R. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1991-04-23

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  19. Analysis on interfacial reactions between Sn–Zn solders and the Au\\/Ni electrolytic-plated Cu pad

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyung-Seob Kim; Jun-Mo Yang; Chong-Hee Yu; In-Ok Jung; Heon-Hee Kim

    2004-01-01

    Interface reactions between Sn–Zn lead-free solders and the Au\\/Ni electrolytic-plated Cu pad after isothermal aging were investigated. The intermetallic compounds at the interface between solder and the Au\\/Ni electrolytic-plated Cu pad were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. During the reflow, Zn firstly reacted with Au and then was transformed to the ?-AuZn (cubic phase, JCPDS

  20. Canadian Pacific Railway Collection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    The Canadian Pacific Railway collection provides access to over 1500 images documenting the company's activities all around British Columbia from the 1880s to the 1950s. The pictures portray railway stations both urban and rural, along with images of workers, buildings, hotels, ships, and yards that were part of the railroad's vast empire. Visitors can click on the Collection area to get started and the search function is another good way to focus in on items of interest. Within the History tab is an elegant and well-developed essay on the company, complete with illustrative images while the Photographers section provides great insight into who exactly took these pictures. And, of course, casual users may just wish to click on the Gallery to get a sampling of the works that make up this archive.

  1. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1991-01-01

    The research objectives were to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability, to implement satellite analysis procedures to accomplish that objective, to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis/forecast systems at the National Meteorological Center (NMC), and to synthesize knowledge gained from satellite observations through diagnosis and numerical models. In the past year, three significant satellite data analysis tasks were accomplished: comparisons for upwelling radiance fields for 1983 and 1984 were completed for the purpose of testing the sensitivity of water vapor/greenhouse feedback to local sea surface temperature variations; the interaction between tropical plumes, wave features over Central America, traveling waves in the upper tropospheric tropics, and the tropical interseasonal oscillation was examined; and planning and early efforts on the construction of a model and the infrared based climatology of daily precipitable water was completed. Research on tropical plume mechanisms included is briefly discussed.

  2. Pacific Rim Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Pacific Rim Archive features archival materials related to America's first century of involvement in and impressions of East Asia, broadly defined as the period from 1840 to 1940. Housed at the University of Southern California Digital Library, the five subcollections here include the Mark L. Moody Collection and the Saidee Pettus Hoose Collection. The Moody Collection contains the most items, featuring hundreds of photographs from around China in the 1920s and 1930s, including many images of Shanghai. As Moody owned a car dealership there, it's not surprising that many of the photos here are of cars, along with motor and gas stations. Additionally, users can browse suggested topics, such as "Marines,� "Chrysler,� and "Trains.�

  3. IPRC: International Pacific Research Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The International Pacific Research Center's (IPRC) website addresses "climate variation and predictability in the Asia-Pacific region, including regional aspects of global environmental change." The site offers the goals and objectives of the research activities in IPRC's four main themes: Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate, Regional Ocean Influences, Asian-Australian Monsoon System, and Impacts of Global Environmental Change. Visitors can find information on the people involved with IPRC, its international meetings and workshops, the latest news, and potential employment opportunities. The website offers downloads of IPRC's annual reports, its semiannual newsletter, _Climate_, and workshop publications.

  4. The Fight Over Pacific Salmon

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Payne, Laura X.

    1998-01-01

    This week's In The News focuses on the recently heightened, ongoing US-Canada controversy over fishing rights. Since the expiration of the Pacific Salmon Treaty in 1994, the United States and Canada have been unable to agree on salmon catch quotas in the north Pacific. With the opening of the fishing season on July 1, 1998, newspapers reported tension at the docks and rumors of protests in British Colombia. The twelve resources listed offer background information on Pacific Salmon and the salmon fisheries controversy, and include several US and Canadian perspectives.

  5. Hydration of the incoming plate in the Kuril subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, G.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, N.; Noguchi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Water supplied from the subducting oceanic plate by dehydration is inferred to cause seismicity and magmatism in subduction zones. It is important, therefore, to reveal the distribution of water within the incoming plate for understanding seismic and volcanic activities in subduction zones. In 2009 and 2010, to reveal the detailed seismic structure and hydration process within the incoming plate, we conducted a wide-angle seismic survey in the Kuril subduction zone, where the old Pacific plate formed in the eastern Pacific ridge is subducting from south to north beneath the island arc of Japan. We designed a north-south 500km-long seismic experimental line to be perpendicular to the Kuril trench. The northern end of our line is located at about 30km south of the trench axis and well-developed horst and graben structure is observed around the northern end. We deployed 80 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) at intervals of 6km and shot a large tuned airgun array towed by R/V Kairei. In addition, we obtained MCS reflection data using a 444-channel hydrophone streamer (6km long) along the same line. We modelled both P-wave and S-wave velocity structures by the traveltime inversion using refraction, reflection and PS-conversion traveltimes. Our results show that P-wave velocity beneath the well-developed horst and graben structure is about 5% lower than that in the south of outer rise. This is consistent with a previous structure study in the Chili subduction zone that shows the P-wave velocity in the vicinity of the trench axis is lower than that of normal oceanic plate. More notable feature of our results is the regional variations of Vp/Vs. The S-wave velocity, as well as P-wave velocity, gradually decreases toward the trench axis. However Vp/Vs is not uniform; Vp/Vs immediately beneath the sediments is remarkably high beneath the well-developed horst and graben structure, and Vp/Vs decreases with depth (high Vp/Vs is confined to the top of the oceanic plate). Since the high Vp/Vs implies the high degree of crustal hydration, one plausible explanation for our Vp/Vs model is that normal faults related to the well-developed horst and graben structure provide pathways for water percolation from sediments to oceanic crust, and lead to crustal hydration of the incoming plate.

  6. 20. 'Portals and Gusset Plates for 3 180'61/2' c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. 'Portals and Gusset Plates for 3 - 180'-6-1/2' c. to c. End Pins Single Track Through Spans, 10th, 11th, & 13th Crossings of Sacramento River, Southern Pacific Co. Sacramento Division, The Phoenix Bridge Co., C.O's. 839, 840 & 841, Drawing #12, Engineer C. Scheidl, Draftsman B. Heald, Scale 1-1/2' = 1'0', April 16th, 1901.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 310.58, Milepost 310.58, Sims, Shasta County, CA

  7. Spot brazing of aluminum to copper with a cover plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Junya; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-01

    It is difficult to join dissimilar metals when an intermetallic compound is formed at the joining interface. Spot brazing can be accomplished in a short time by resistance heating. Therefore, it is said that the formation of a intermetallic compound can be prevented. In this study, aluminum and copper were joined by spot brazing with a cover plate. The cover plate was used to supply heat to base metals and prevent heat dissipation from the base metals. The ability to braze Al and Cu was investigated by observation and analysis. Pure aluminum (A1050) plate and oxygen-free copper (C1020) plate were used as base metals. Cu-Ni-Sn-P brazing filler was used as the brazing filler metal. SPCC was employed as cover plate. Brazing was done with a micro spot welder under an argon gas atmosphere. Brazing ability was estimated by tensile shear strength and cross sectional microstructure observation. Al and Cu can be joined by spot brazing with Cu-Ni-Sn-P brazing filler and cover plate.

  8. Plate-tectonic boundary formation by grain-damage and pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David

    2015-04-01

    Shear weakening in the lithosphere is an essential ingredient for understanding how and why plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. I present continued work on a theoretical model for lithospheric shear-localization and plate generation through damage, grain evolution and Zener pinning in two-phase (polycrystalline) lithospheric rocks. Grain size evolves through the competition between coarsening, which drives grain-growth, with damage, which drives grain reduction. The interface between phases controls Zener pinning, which impedes grain growth. Damage to the interface enhances the Zener pinning effect, which then reduces grain-size, forcing the rheology into the grain-size-dependent diffusion creep regime. This process thus allows damage and rheological weakening to co-exist, providing a necessary shear-localizing feedback. Moreover, because pinning inhibits grain-growth it promotes shear-zone longevity and plate-boundary inheritance. This theory has been applied recently to the emergence of plate tectonics in the Archean by transient subduction and accumulation of plate boundaries over 1Gyr, as well as to rapid slab detachment and abrupt tectonic changes. New work explores the saturation of interface damage at low interface curvature (e.g., because it is associated with larger grains that take up more of the damage, and/or because interface area is reduced). This effect allows three possible equilibrium grain-sizes for a given stress; a small-grain-size high-shear state in diffusion creep, a large grain-size low shear state in dislocation creep, and an intermediate state (often near the deformation map phase-boundary). The low and high grain-size states are stable, while the intermediate one is unstable. This implies that a material deformed at a given stress can acquire two stable deformation regimes, a low- and high- shear state; these are indicative of plate-like flows, i.e, the coexistence of both slowly deforming plates and rapidly deforming plate boundaries.

  9. The Pacific Northwest GPS Velocity Field (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Payne, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Surface velocities derived from GPS observations have allowed high resolution views of the active deformation and rotation of the Cascadia forearc and backarc as well as elastic strain accumulation arising from subduction fault locking. We present an update of the Pacific Northwest GPS velocity field presented earlier by McCaffrey et al. (Geophys. Jour. Int., 2007) and Payne et al. (Geology, 2008). The new velocity field includes more recent survey-mode and continuous observations as well as an expanded area, extending from the Oregon and Washington coasts on the west to Yellowstone on the east. It combines new Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC) daily solutions for 1994-2010 for the Basin and Range Geodetic (BARGN), Eastern Basin and Range - Yellowstone (EBRY), Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA), Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and Western Canada Deformation Array (WCDA) networks (http://sopac.ucsd.edu/processing/gamit) with our solutions using data from surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, National Geodetic Survey, Geologic Survey of Canada, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, US Geological Survey, University of Washington, and others, 1991-2010. The new field reveals that the large-scale clockwise rotation seen in western Washington and Oregon also extends southward into southern Idaho and the Snake River Plain as well as into the northern Basin and Range of Nevada. The axes of rotation generally fall near the Oregon-Washington-Idaho border and the Idaho Batholith. Continued densification of the network around the Snake River Plain is permitting a better view of its relationship to nearby Basin and Range extension. We will present interpretations of the active tectonics of the region based on this new field.

  10. Interface standardization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R.; Wong, V.

    1983-01-01

    Central-station applications create a large and attractive market for photovoltaics in the near future. However, some significant barriers lie between the industry of today and realization of that market. Manufacturing capacity and price are two principal impediments. The Utilities, which are the future system owners, are gaining experience with central-station PV power through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Hesperia and similar small central-station installations. SMUD has recognized that competition must be maintained to help reduce prices. So little standardization exists that the cost is driven upward to redefine mechanical and electrical interfaces for each vendor. New structues are required for each vendor and nonoptimum field geometries result from attempts to include more than one vendor in an array field. Standards at some hardware level are required.

  11. Locking plate technology: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Greiwe, R Michael; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2007-01-01

    The management of fractures with traditional plating techniques has undergone a paradigm shift over the past 20 years. For many fractures, anatomic reduction using a dynamic compression plate has been the gold standard. However, minimally invasive approaches combined with biologically friendly internal fixation have become accepted methods of complex fracture treatment. The orthopedic literature has demonstrated advantages when comparing locking plate techniques with traditional compression plating techniques, particularly in fractures about the knee. The advantages of locking plates apply most directly to cases of highly comminuted fractures, unstable metadiaphyseal segments, and osteoporotic fractures. The biomechanical properties of locking plates have distinguished and defined their clinical use compared to traditional plates. A thorough understanding of these properties will assist the orthopedic surgeon in choosing the appropriate construct when faced with a difficult fracture. Compression plating requires absolute stability for bone healing. In contrast, locking plates function as "internal fixators" with multiple anchor points. This type of fixed-angle device converts axial loads across the bone to compressive forces across fracture sites, minimizing gap length and strain. The strain theory demonstrates that anatomic reduction is not required for bone healing, and that tolerable strain (2%-10%) can promote secondary bone healing. Callus formation is further promoted when biologically friendly surgical approaches are combined with locking plate "internal fixators". In contrast, conventional plates function by creating an environment where primary bone healing occurs. This plate provides "absolute rigidity" and requires anatomic reduction fixed in compression. Primary bone healing occurs in this manner. In highly comminuted, segmentally deficient, or porotic bone, bone quality is poor and "absolute rigidity" does not exist. Furthermore, soft-tissue stripping adds a biologic insult to the poor bone quality. These disadvantages may lead to poor outcomes such as nonunion, implant failure, malunion, or even infection. These disadvantages remain theoretical, as no prospective studies clearly demonstrate a difference between plating methods in difficult metadiaphyseal or osteoporotic fractures. However, the overwhelming biomechanical evidence has led to a more biologically friendly approach to these fractures. The indications for use of locking plates are evolving. The literature demonstrates low rates of nonunion and overall complication rates with locking plates in difficult metaphyseal and diaphyseal fractures. Anatomic reduction of the articular surface remains paramount. Hybrid techniques that combine the benefits of compression plate fixation with the biological and biomechanical advantages of locking plates are the most likely end result of current locking plate applications. PMID:17288090

  12. 2009Asia-Pacific International Chemical Industry Exhibition PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION (BEIJING) CO., LTD.

    E-print Network

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    2009Asia-Pacific International Chemical Industry Exhibition PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION The Sixth Sino-US Chemical Engineering Forum Exhibition Chemical Industry Achievement Exhibition to remember Institution to Host Exhibition: Asian Pacific Confederation of Chemical Engineering Chemical Industry

  13. Terra Australis Orogen: Rodinia breakup and development of the Pacific and Iapetus margins of Gondwana during the Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter A. Cawood

    2005-01-01

    The Pacific Ocean formed through Neoproterozoic rifting of Rodinia and despite a long history of plate convergence, this ocean has never subsequently closed. The record of ocean opening through continental rifting and the inception of ocean convergence through the initiation of subduction are preserved in the Neoproterozoic to late Paleozoic Terra Australis Orogen. The orogen had a pre-dispersal length along

  14. Tethered Triangular Plate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Zhang, Zhenli

    2005-01-31

    Simulation Software: Glotzer Group Code Simulation Method: Brownian Dynamics BD simulation of polymer tethered triangular plates. A system of building blocks of composition P10bT18b at a concentration of 0.20, was run starting at an effectively infinite temperature then instantaneously quenched to a temperature of 0.83. The system was then run for 12,000,000 time steps forming a hexagonally packing twisted columnar phase.The solve was favorable for the tethers. Simulation Model: United Atom Bead Spring with Lennard-Jones and FENE

  15. Plates on the Move

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students create a model of sea floor spreading using two sheets of white paper and a metric ruler. The paper strips are pulled through a slit representing a mid-ocean ridge and divergent plate boundary. The model mimics how molten material rises to the surface and then spreads out in both directions. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA SCI Files: The Case of the Shaky Quake. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

  16. Dynamics of Tectonic Plates

    E-print Network

    Pechersky, E; Sadowski, G; Yambartsev, A

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a model that describes a mutual dynamic of tectonic plates. The dynamic is a sort of stick-slip one which is modeled by a Markov random process. The process defines a microlevel of the dynamic. A macrolevel is obtained by a scaling limit which leads to a system of integro-differential equations which determines a kind of mean field systems. Conditions when Gutenberg-Richter empirical law are presented on the mean field level. These conditions are rather universal and do not depend on features of resistant forces.

  17. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE. U. S. DEPARTMENT;"Rest-Rotation Grazing at Harvey Valley...range, health, cattle gains, costs," by Raymond D, Ratliff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Trends in Range Health and Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

  18. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    E. BURGAN has been on the staff of the Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry since 1969. From 1963., Robert E. Burgan, and Robert E. Nelson 1975. Ohia forest decline: its spread and severity in Hawaii. USDA

  19. Friction and stress coupling on the subduction interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Lavier, L.; van Avendonk, H.

    2011-12-01

    At a subduction zone, the down-going oceanic plate slides underneath the overriding plate. The frictional resistance to the relative motion between the plates generates great earthquakes along the subduction interface, which can cause tremendous damage in the civil life and property. There is a strong incentive to understand the frictional strength of the subduction interface. One fundamental question of mechanics of subuction is the degree of coupling between the plates, which is linked to the size of earthquakes. It has been noted that the trench-parallel (along-strike) gravity variation correlates positively with the trench-parallel topography anomaly and negatively with the activity of great earthquake (Song and Simons, 2003). Regions with a negative trench-parallel gravity anomaly are more likely to have great earthquakes. The interpretation of such correlation is that strong coupling along subduction interface will drag down the for-arc region of the overriding plate, which generates the gravity and topography anomalies, and could store more strain energy to be released during a great earthquake. We developed a 2D numerical thermo-mechanical code for modeling subduction. The numerical method is based on an explicit finite element method similar to the Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC) technique. The constitutive law is visco-elasti-plastic with strain weakening. The cohesion and friction angle are reduced with increasing plastic strain after yielding. To track different petrologic phases, Lagrangian particles are distributed in the domain. Basalt-eclogite, sediment-schist and peridotite-serpentinite phase changes are included in the model. Our numerical models show that the degree of coupling negatively correlates with the coefficient of friction. In the low friction case, the subduction interface has very shallow dipping angle, which helps to elastically couple the downing plate with the overriding plate. The topography and gravity anomalies of the low friction case also indicate strong coupling between plates.

  20. Generation of plate tectonics via grain-damage and pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2012-12-01

    Weakening and shear localization in the lithosphere are essential ingredients for understanding how and whether plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. The grain-damage and pinning mechanism of Bercovici & Ricard (2012) for lithospheric shear--localization proposes that damage to the interface between phases in a polycrystalline material like peridotite (composed primarily of olivine and pyroxene) increases the number of small Zener pinning surfaces that constrain mineral grains to ever smaller sizes regardless of creep mechanism. This effect allows a self-softening feedback in which damage and grain-reduction can co-exist with a grain-size dependent diffusion creep rheology; moreoever, grain growth and weak-zone healing are greatly impeded by Zener pinning thereby leading to long-lived relic weak zones. This mechanism is employed in two-dimensional flow calculations to test its ability to generate toroidal (strike-slip) motion from convective type flow and to influence plate evolution. The fluid dynamical calculations employ source-sink driven flow as a proxy for convective poloidal flow (upwelling/downwelling and divergent/convergent motion), and the coupling of this flow with non-linear rheological mechanisms excites toroidal or strike-slip motion. The numerical experiments show that pure dislocation-creep rheology, and grain-damage without Zener pinning (as occurs in a single-phase assemblages) permit only weak localization and toroidal flow; however, the full grain-damage with pinning readily allows focussed localization and intense, plate-like toroidal motion and strike-slip deformation. Rapid plate motion changes are also tested with abrupt rotations of the source-sink field after a plate-like configuration is developed; the post-rotation flow and material property fields are found to never recover or lose memory of the original configuration, leading to suboptimally aligned plate boundaries (e.g., strike-slip margins non-parallel to plate motion), oblique subduction and highly localized, weak and long lived acute plate-boundary junctions such as at the Aleution-Kurile intersection. The grain-damage and pinning theory therefore readily satisfies key plate-tectonic metrics of localized toroidal motion and plate-boundary inheritance, and thus provides a predictive theory for the generation of plate tectonics on Earth and other planets. References: Bercovici, D., Ricard, Y., 2012. Mechanisms for the generation of plate tectonics by two-phase grain-damage and pinning. Phys. Earth Planet. Int. 202-203, 27--55.

  1. Reynore raper Manufacturing Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    on Manufacturing Interfaces. This working group, which was originally called "Communication Interfaces" has been"). This was illustrated by the groups name change from "Communication Interfaces' to "Manufacturing Interfaces" in AugustReynore raper Manufacturing Interfaces F. J. A. M. van Houten, University of Twente Abstract

  2. Plating on difficult-to-plate metals: what's new

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, H.J.

    1980-07-30

    Some of the changes since 1970 in procedures for plating on such materials as titanium, molybdenum, silicon, aluminum, and gallium arsenide are summarized. While basic procedures for plating some of these materials were developed as many as 30 to 40 years ago, changes in the end uses of the plated products have necessitated new plating processes. In some cases, vacuum techniques - such as ion bombardment, ion implantation, and vacuum metallization - have been introduced to improve the adhesion of electrodeposits. In other cases, these techniques have been used to deposit materials upon which electrodeposits are required.

  3. Seismic evidence for sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries of oceanic plates.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Kumar, Prakash; Takei, Yasuko; Shinohara, Masanao; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Araki, Eiichiro; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    2009-04-24

    The mobility of the lithosphere over a weaker asthenosphere constitutes the essential element of plate tectonics, and thus the understanding of the processes at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is fundamental to understand how our planet works. It is especially so for oceanic plates because their relatively simple creation and evolution should enable easy elucidation of the LAB. Data from borehole broadband ocean bottom seismometers show that the LAB beneath the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates is sharp and age-dependent. The observed large shear wave velocity reduction at the LAB requires a partially molten asthenosphere consisting of horizontal melt-rich layers embedded in meltless mantle, which accounts for the large viscosity contrast at the LAB that facilitates horizontal plate motions. PMID:19390042

  4. Ion plated gold films: Properties, tribological behavior and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1987-01-01

    The glow discharge energizing favorably modifies and controls the coating/substrate adherence and the nucleation and growth sequence of ion plated gold films. As a result the adherence, coherence, internal stresses, and morphology of the films are significantly improved. Gold ion plated films because of their graded coating/substrate interface and fine uniform densely packed microstructure not only improve the tribological properties but also induce a surface strengthening effect which improves the mechanical properties such as yield, tensile, and fatigue strength. Consequently significant improvements in the tribological performance of ion plated gold films as compared to vapor deposited gold films are shown in terms of decreased friction/wear and prolonged endurance life.

  5. Laser-based characterization of nuclear fuel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James A.; Cottle, Dave L.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2014-02-01

    Ensuring the integrity of fuel-clad and clad-clad bonding in nuclear fuels is important for safe reactor operation and assessment of fuel performance, yet the measurement of bond strengths in actual fuels has proved challenging. The laser shockwave technique (LST) originally developed to characterize structural adhesion in composites is being employed to characterize interface strength in a new type of plate fuel being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large-amplitude acoustic waves and is well suited for application to both fresh and irradiated nuclear-fuel plates. This paper will report on initial characterization results obtained from fresh fuel plates manufactured by different processes, including hot isostatic pressing, friction stir welding, and hot rolling.

  6. Laser-Based Characterization of Nuclear Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; David L. Cottle; Barry H. Rabin

    2013-07-01

    Ensuring the integrity of fuel-clad and clad-clad bonding in nuclear fuels is important for safe reactor operation and assessment of fuel performance, yet the measurement of bond strengths in actual fuels has proved challenging. The laser shockwave technique (LST) originally developed to characterize structural adhesion in composites is being employed to characterize interface strength in a new type of plate fuel being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large-amplitude acoustic waves and is well suited for application to both fresh and irradiated nuclear-fuel plates. This paper will report on initial characterization results obtained from fresh fuel plates manufactured by different processes, including hot isostatic pressing, friction stir welding, and hot rolling.

  7. Laser-based characterization of nuclear fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James A.; Cottle, Dave L.; Rabin, Barry H. [Idaho National Laboratory, Fuel Performance and Design, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho, 83415-6188 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Ensuring the integrity of fuel-clad and clad-clad bonding in nuclear fuels is important for safe reactor operation and assessment of fuel performance, yet the measurement of bond strengths in actual fuels has proved challenging. The laser shockwave technique (LST) originally developed to characterize structural adhesion in composites is being employed to characterize interface strength in a new type of plate fuel being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large-amplitude acoustic waves and is well suited for application to both fresh and irradiated nuclear-fuel plates. This paper will report on initial characterization results obtained from fresh fuel plates manufactured by different processes, including hot isostatic pressing, friction stir welding, and hot rolling.

  8. Evolution of the western segment of Juan Fernández Ridge (Nazca Plate): plume vs. plate tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Luis E.; Rodrigo, Cristián; Reyes, Javier; Orozco, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    The Juan Fernandez Ridge (Eastern Pacific, Nazca Plate) is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent age progression observed in 40Ar-39Ar data. However, geological evidence and some thermochronological data suggest a more complex pattern with a rejuvenation stage in Robinson Crusoe Island, the most eroded of the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. In fact, a postshield stage at 900-700 ka separates the underlying shield-related pile from the post-erosional alkaline succession (Ba/Yb=38.15; La/Yb=15.66; Ba/Y=20.27; Ba/Zr=2.31). Shield volcanoes grew at high effusion rate at ca. 5-4 Ma erupting mostly tholeiitic to transitional magmas (Ba/Yb=18.07-8.32; La/Yb=4.59-9.84; Ba/Y=4.24-8.18; Ba/Zr=0.73-1.09). Taken together, shield volcanoes form a continuous plateau with a base at ca. 3900 mbsl. However, a more complex structural pattern can be inferred from geophysical data, which suggest some intracrustal magma storage and a more extended area of magma ascent. A role for the Challenger Fracture Zone is hypothesized fueling the controversy between pristine plume origin and the effect of plate tectonic processes in the origin of intraplate volcanism. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project 1110966.

  9. The science behind Plate Tectonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Weber

    Plate tectonics is a quantitative, robust and testable, geologic model describing the surface motions of Earth's outer skin. It is based on real data and assumptions, and built using the scientific method. New space geodesy data provide important quantitative (and independent) tests of this model. In general, these new data show a close match to model predictions, and suggest that plate motion is steady and uniform over millions of years. Active research continues to refine the model and to better our understanding of plate motion and tectonics. The exercise presented here aims to help students experience the process of doing science and to understand the science underlying the plate tectonic theory. Key words: plate tectonics, global plate motion models, assumptions, geologic data (spreading rates, transform fault azimuths, earthquake slip vectors), space geodesy tests.

  10. Precise hypocenter distribution and earthquake generating and stress in and around the upper-plane seismic belt in the subducting Pacific slab beneath NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Nakajima, J.; Matsuzawa, T.; Uchida, N.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    1. Introduction We found an intraslab seismic belt (upper-plane seismic belt) in the upper plane of the double seismic zone within the Pacific slab, running interface at depths of 70-100km beneath the forearc area. The location of the deeper limits of this belt appears to correspond to one of the facies boundaries (from jadeite lawsonite blueschist to lawsonite amphibole eclogite) in the oceanic crust [Kita et al., 2006, GRL]. In this study, we precisely relocated intraslab earthquakes by using travel time differences calculated by the waveform cross-spectrum analysis to obtain more detailed distribution of the upper plane-seismic belt within the Pacific slab beneath NE Japan. We also discuss the stress field in the slab by examining focal mechanisms of the earthquakes. 2. Data and Method We relocated events at depths of 50-00 km for the period from March 2003 to November 2006 from the JMA earthquake catalog. We applied the double-difference hypocenter location method (DDLM) by Waldhauser and Ellsworth (2000) to the arrival time data of the events. We use relative earthquake arrival times determined both by the waveform cross-spectrum analysis and by the catalog-picking data. We also determine focal mechanisms using the P wave polarity. 3. Spatial distribution of relocated hypocenters In the upper portion of the slab crust, seismicity is very active and distributed relatively homogeneously at depths of about 70-100km parallel to the volcanic front, where the upper-plane seismic belt has been found. In the lower portion of slab crust and/or the uppermost portion of the slab mantle, seismicity is spatially very limited to some small areas (each size is about 20 x 20km) at depths around 65km. Two of them correspond to the aftershock area of the 2003 Miyagi (M7.1) intraslab earthquake and that of the 1987 Iwaizumi (M6.6) intraslab earthquake, respectively. Based on the dehydration embrittelment hypothesis, the difference of the spatial distribution of the seismicity in the slab should correspond to the difference of the spatial distribution of the hydrated minerals and their dehydration reactions. In the upper slab crust, the upper-plane seismic belt is found because the hydrated minerals could be distributed homogeneously and the dehydration reaction (from jadeite lawsonite blueschist to lawsonite amphibole eclogite [Hacker et al., 2003b]) occurs perhaps largely at depth of 70-100km. Our result also suggests that in the lower portion of the slab crust and/or the uppermost portion of the slab mantle, the hydrated minerals could be inhomogeneously distributed and the seismicity occurs at depths around 65km, where another dehydration reaction may exist. 4. Characteristics of the focal mechanisms We examined the stress distribution within the slab by using focal mechanisms of the upper plane, interplane and lower plane events. From the plate interface to about 20 km below it, downdip-compressional (DC) type events are dominant. Below 20km from the plate interface, downdip-tensional (DT) type events are dominant. Many of interplane events have DC type focal mechanisms because of their locations in the uppermost portions of the slab mantle. These results indicate that the stress neutral plane from the DC type to DT type could be located at depth of about 20km from the plate interface.

  11. Epitaxial Growth of Zinc Oxide on Single Crystalline Gold Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Kathryn; Joo, John; Baram, Mor; Clarke, David; Hu, Evelyn

    2012-02-01

    Although metal-oxide interfaces are the critical components of many electronic and optical devices, it is rare to find epitaxial metal-oxide structures. We demonstrate for the first time, a method for the low temperature, epitaxial growth of zinc oxide (ZnO) on single crystalline gold plates. The gold plates, up to 100?m in width, are grown from a gold-surfactant complex. Even with the large lattice mismatch between (111) gold and (0001) ZnO, we are able to form epitaxial zinc oxide at 90^oC on top of the single crystal gold plates. This epitaxial growth is confirmed using transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and electron backscatterer diffraction. Micro-photoluminescence is also performed to investigate the optical properties of the epitaxial zinc oxide. We remove the grown ZnO membranes from the gold plates using a stamping and etching process. These membranes can potentially be used to fabricate high quality microdisks and photonic crystals. The metal-oxide interfaces that we have fabricated may have the ability to be used in a number of technologically important applications, including as better electrical contacts and for improved light extraction from planar LED structures.

  12. At the interface between coastal and global ocean observatories - a regional, cabled observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J.

    2003-04-01

    The planetary sciences are in a transformational period. New approaches made possible by a confluence of technological advances are enabling the examination of entire systems in space and time. These emerging capabilities are fostering a revolution in the exploration, discovery, and understanding of complex, interacting natural processes. The response within the ocean sciences has been the development of initiatives in several countries to create ocean observatories at global, regional, and coastal scales. Regional-scale ocean observatories have a specific and vital role in integrating across the boundaries of coastal and global observatories. To accomplish this integration, regional observatories must 1) span coastal to global systems thereby linking all processes; 2) document variability over many scales of space and time; 3) expand surface (satellite) and point (mooring) coverage to an entire volume; 4) archive data so as to enable modeling and data assimilation; 5) maximize the scientific return from the investment in a regional facility; and, 6) maintain optimal flexibility and expandability to operate for many decades. One example of a regional observatory design is the NEPTUNE facility that will be located in the northeast Pacific Ocean. NEPTUNE is intended to deliver a long-term, real-time, full-ocean presence by providing high-bandwidth communications, abundant power, robotic systems, extensive in situ networks, and real-time control for interactivity. Its 3,000-km heavily instrumented network of fiber-optic/power cables will encircle and cross the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, enabling observations of and experiments with the volume of water above the plate, the seafloor, and the sub-seafloor. By combining earth, ocean, and atmospheric science capabilities and spanning the interface between the highly variable near shore environment and more ponderous deep sea processes NEPTUNE will offer unparalleled opportunities to a broad range of scientific, educational, and public outreach communities.

  13. Tectonic Plate Movements and Hotspots

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ken Rhinehart

    This lesson introduces the idea that rates and directions of plate movements can be measured. The discussion centers on the use of mantle 'hotspots' to determine plate motions. Examples include the Hawaiian Islands, the Galapagos Islands, and the Yellowstone hotspot. The lesson includes an activity in which students use online resources to answer questions about the Galapagos Islands and measure plate movement rates using online data for the Hawaiian Islands hotspot.

  14. Ion plating for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1981-01-01

    The ion plating techniques are classified relative to the instrumental set up, evaporation media and mode of transport. Distinction is drawn between the low vacuum (plasma) and high vacuum (ion beam) techniques. Ion plating technology is discussed at the fundamental and industrial level. At the fundamental level, the capabilities and limitations of the plasma (evaporant flux) and film characteristics are evaluated. On the industrial level, the performance and potential uses of ion plated films are discussed.

  15. Ion plating for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1981-01-01

    The ion plating techniques are classified relative to the instrumental set up, evaporation media, and mode of transport. A distinction is drawn between the low vacuum (plasma) and high vacuum (ion beam) techniques. Ion plating technology is discussed at the fundamental and industrial level. At the fundamental level, the capabilities and limitations of the plasma (evaporant flux) and film characteristics are evaluated. And on the industrial level, the performance and potential uses of ion plated films are discussed.

  16. Global Topography and Tectonic Plates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Greene

    The goal of this activity is to investigate global topographic and tectonic features, especially the tectonic plates and their boundaries. Using a double-page size digital topographic map of the Earth that includes both land and sea floor topography, students are asked to draw plate boundaries, deduce plate motions and interactions, and explore the connections between topography and tectonic processes at the global scale.

  17. Plate T-11: Appalachian Mountains

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Appalachian Mountain landforms clearly demonstrate the relation of plate tectonics and structure to geomorphology. The folded rocks record the convergence of two continental plates in Pennsylvanian/Permian time. This page uses text, maps, and remotely sensed imagery to explain the relationship between plate tectonics, geologic structures, and the resulting landforms. It is part of an out-of-print NASA publication entitled 'Geomorphology from Space'. Links to the rest of the book are provided.

  18. User Interfaces 1 Command Line Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Verschelde, Jan

    to run script by clicking on its icon. Scientific Software (MCS 507 L-11) user interfaces 20 September interfaces 20 September 2013 8 / 39 #12;a top down design Starting at the top we apply stepwise refinement

  19. Corals from a dismembered late Paleozoic paleo-Pacific plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Calvin H.

    1983-10-01

    A coral belonging to the rare Late Mississippian Early Pennsylvanian Family Pseudopavonidae and a specimen of the Permian waagenophyllid coral genus Parawentzelella have been recovered from the Cache Creek assemblage in northern British Columbia and from a small limestone block in southern British Columbia, Canada, respectively. Both of these fossils are closely related to corals known from eastern Japan and western Sze-chuan, China; Parawentzelella also occurs in Indochina. These corals apparently occur in shallow-water carbonates that overlie pieces of oceanic volcanic ridges or plateaus. In both Asia and North America these corals now lie geographically close to coeval, but completely different, coral faunas that lived on shallow carbonate platforms built on continental shelves. This suggests that the circum-Pacific terranes bearing these unusual corals were displaced from a single, shallow-water oceanic region that in late Paleozoic time lay in the paleo-Pacific Ocean far from any continental margin. In Late Permian or early Mesozoic time the region colonized by these fossils was torn apart; the rock masses bearing these fossils were then carried on oceanic plates to subduction zones at continental margins on opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, where they became lodged.

  20. Thermochemical structures beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Allen K; Zhong, Shijie

    2005-10-20

    Large low-velocity seismic anomalies have been detected in the Earth's lower mantle beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean that are not easily explained by temperature variations alone. The African anomaly has been interpreted to be a northwest-southeast-trending structure with a sharp-edged linear, ridge-like morphology. The Pacific anomaly, on the other hand, appears to be more rounded in shape. Mantle models with heterogeneous composition have related these structures to dense thermochemical piles or superplumes. It has not been shown, however, that such models can lead to thermochemical structures that satisfy the geometrical constraints, as inferred from seismological observations. Here we present numerical models of thermochemical convection in a three-dimensional spherical geometry using plate velocities inferred for the past 119 million years. We show that Earth's subduction history can lead to thermochemical structures similar in shape to the observed large, lower-mantle velocity anomalies. We find that subduction history tends to focus dense material into a ridge-like pile beneath Africa and a relatively more-rounded pile under the Pacific Ocean, consistent with seismic observations. PMID:16237440

  1. License Plates of the World

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Whether you're interested in collecting license plates, or are just moving to Andorra and wonder what your car will be wearing when it gets there, this site provided by collector Michael Kustermann can be a handy reference. A winner in the "labor of love" website category, this frames-based directory contains pictures of and descriptive information about a dizzying range of automobile license plates, arranged geographically. Special issue and commemorative plates are also covered, as well as links to collector's clubs and a bibliography about the art and science of license plate hunting and gathering. You'll never look at bumpers quite the same way.

  2. Carbon-assisted flyer plates

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, David B. (Los Alamos, NM); Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A laser driven flyer plate utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited.

  3. Laser-driven flyer plate

    DOEpatents

    Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma.

  4. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  5. Stability of active mantle upwelling revealed by net characteristics of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Steinberger, Bernhard; Torsvik, Trond H

    2013-06-27

    Viscous convection within the mantle is linked to tectonic plate motions and deforms Earth's surface across wide areas. Such close links between surface geology and deep mantle dynamics presumably operated throughout Earth's history, but are difficult to investigate for past times because the history of mantle flow is poorly known. Here we show that the time dependence of global-scale mantle flow can be deduced from the net behaviour of surface plate motions. In particular, we tracked the geographic locations of net convergence and divergence for harmonic degrees 1 and 2 by computing the dipole and quadrupole moments of plate motions from tectonic reconstructions extended back to the early Mesozoic era. For present-day plate motions, we find dipole convergence in eastern Asia and quadrupole divergence in both central Africa and the central Pacific. These orientations are nearly identical to the dipole and quadrupole orientations of underlying mantle flow, which indicates that these 'net characteristics' of plate motions reveal deeper flow patterns. The positions of quadrupole divergence have not moved significantly during the past 250 million years, which suggests long-term stability of mantle upwelling beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean. These upwelling locations are positioned above two compositionally and seismologically distinct regions of the lowermost mantle, which may organize global mantle flow as they remain stationary over geologic time. PMID:23803848

  6. Microstructure at friction stir lap joint interface of pure titanium and steel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinsun Liao; Naotsugu Yamamoto; Hong Liu; Kazuhiro Nakata

    2010-01-01

    A commercially pure titanium plate was lap joined to a structural steel plate via friction stir welding, and the microstructures at the lap joint interface were intensively examined by means of electron backscatter diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Swirling-like macro- and micro-intermixing zones of titanium and steel are formed along the interface, where tiny Fe–Ti intermetallic particles are dispersed

  7. The longevity of the South Pacific isotopic and thermal anomaly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Park, K.-H.; Pringle, M.; Rubenstone, J.L.; Smith, W.H.F.; Zindler, A.

    1991-01-01

    The South Pacific is anomalous in terms of the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios of its hot spot basalts, a thermally enhanced lithosphere, and possibly a hotter mantle. We have studied the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics of 12 Cretaceous seamounts in the Magellans, Marshall and Wake seamount groups (western Pacific Ocean) that originated in this South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). The range and values of isotope ratios of the Cretaceous seamount data are similar to those of the island chains of Samoa, Tahiti, Marquesas and Cook/Austral in the SOPITA. These define two major mantle components suggesting that isotopically extreme lavas have been produced at SOPITA for at least 120 Ma. Shallow bathymetry, and weakened lithosphere beneath some of the seamounts studied suggests that at least some of the thermal effects prevailed during the Cretaceous as well. These data, in the context of published data, suggest: 1. (1)|SOPITA is a long-lived feature, and enhanced heat transfer into the lithosphere and isotopically anomalous mantle appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of the anomaly. 2. (2)|The less pronounced depth anomaly during northwesterly plate motion suggests that some of the expressions of SOPITA may be controlled by the direction of plate motion. Motion parallel to the alignment of SOPITA hot spots focusses the heat (and chemical input into the lithosphere) on a smaller cross section than oblique motion. 3. (3)|The lithosphere in the eastern and central SOPITA appears to have lost its original depleted mantle characteristics, probably due to enhanced plume/lithosphere interaction, and it is dominated by isotopic compositions derived from plume materials. 4. (4)|We speculate (following D.L. Anderson) that the origin of the SOPITA, and possibly the DUPAL anomaly is largely due to focussed subduction through long periods of the geological history of the earth, creating a heterogeneous distribution of recycled components in the lower mantle. ?? 1991.

  8. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  9. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  10. On the Flicker Noise Generated in an Interface Layer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. Hannam; A. Van Der Ziel

    1954-01-01

    It is shown that a large amount of flicker noise is generated in tubes that have developed a high-resistance interface layer between the cathode-nickel and the oxide coating. The equivalent noise resistance Rn of this effect can be represented by the equation Rn=KIp2Ri2?f?, where K is a constant, Ip the plate current, Ri the interface resistance, and f the frequency

  11. Self-interference between forward and backward propagating parts of a single acoustic plate mode.

    PubMed

    Germano, M; Alippi, A; Angelici, M; Bettucci, A

    2002-04-01

    Near and far fields of a particular (S(1)) Lamb mode, generated on a steel plate by means of a wedge transducer, are investigated. These show an oscillating behavior of the radial profile of the acoustic field amplitude that can be interpreted and modelled as interference phenomenon between forward and backward propagating parts of the Lamb mode, simultaneously generated at the interface between transducer and plate. PMID:12006048

  12. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4?billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3?billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1?billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  13. Cenozoic East Asia plate tectonic reconstructions using constraints of mapped and unfolded slabs from mantle seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Kanda, R. V.

    2012-12-01

    Subducted slabs were mapped in the mantle under East Asia using MITP08 global seismic tomography (Li et al., 2008), Benioff zone seismicities and published local tomography. 3D gridded slab surfaces were constructed by manually picking and correlating the midpoint of fast seismic anomalies along variable cross-section orientations. The mapped slabs were structurally 'unfolded' and restored to the spherical Earth surface to assess their pre-subduction geometries. Gplates software was used to constrain plate tectonic reconstructions using the unfolded slabs. The unfolded SE Asia upper mantle slabs reveal a 'picture puzzle' fit along their edges that suggests a larger NE Indo-Australian ocean once existed that included the Philippine Sea, Molucca Sea and Celebes Sea. Deeper lower mantle detached slabs indicate an early to mid-Cenozoic 'East Asia Sea' between east Sundaland and the Pacific that stretched from the Ryukyu Islands north of present-day Taiwan southward to Sulawesi. The unfolded slab constraints produced gap and overlap incompatibilities when used in published plate tectonic reconstructions. Here a plate tectonic reconstruction incorporating the unfolded slab constraints is proposed that has the Philippine Sea, Molucca Sea and Celebes Sea clustered at the northern margin of Australia during the early Cenozoic. At the mid-Cenozoic these plates moved NNE with 'Australia-like' plate motions and overrode the 'East Asia Sea'. Plate motions were accommodated by N-S transforms at the eastern margin of Sundaland. Between 25 to 15 Ma the Philippine Sea, Molucca Sea and Celebes Sea plates were fragmented from the greater Indo-Australian ocean. The Philippine Sea was captured by the Pacific plate and now has Pacific-like westward motions.

  14. Sulfide deposits from the east Pacific rise near 21°N

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Hekinian; M. Fevrier; J. L. Bischoff; P. Picot; W. C. Shanks

    1980-01-01

    Massive sulfide deposits were discovered from the diving saucer Cyana on the accreting plate boundary region of the East Pacific Rise near 21°N. The deposits form conical and tubular structures lying on a basaltic basement. Mineralogical and geochemical analyses showed two main types of intimately associated products: a polymetallic sulfide-rich material composed of pyrite and marcasite in association, zinc-rich phases,

  15. Sub-Plate Overlap Code Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Bucciarelli, B.; Zarate, N.

    1997-01-01

    An expansion of the plate overlap method of astrometric data reduction to a single plate has been proposed and successfully tested. Each plate is (artificially) divided into sub-plates which can then be overlapped. This reduces the area of a 'plate' over which a plate model needs to accurately represent the relationship between measured coordinates and standard coordinates. Application is made to non-astrographic plates such as Schmidt plates and to wide-field astrographic plates. Indeed, the method is completely general and can be applied to any type of recording media.

  16. Deformation across the western United States: A local estimate of Pacific-North America transform deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, Eugene D.; Weldon, Ray J., II

    1994-01-01

    We obtain a locally based estimate of Pacific-North America relative motion and an uncertainly in this estimate by integrating deformation rate along three different paths leading west across southwestern North America from east of the Rio Grande Rift to near the continental escarpment. Data are primarily Quatenary geologic slip rates estimates, and resulting deformation determinations therefore are 'instantaneous' in a geologic sense but 'long term' with respect to earthquake cycles. We deduce a rate of motion of the Pacific plane relative to North America that is 48 +/- 2 mm/yr, a rate indistinguishable from that predicted by the global kinematics models RM2 and NUVEL-1; however, we obtain an orientation that is 5-9 deg counterclockwise of these models. A more westerly motion of the Pacific plate, with respect to North America, is calculated from all three paths. The relatively westerly motion of the Pacific plate is accomodated by deformation in the North American continent that includes slip on relatively counterclockwise-oriented strike-slip faults (including the San Andreas fault), whic is especially relevant in and south of the Transverse Ranges, and a margin-normal component of net extension across the continent, which is especially relevant north of the Transverse Ranges. Deformation of the SW United States occurs in regionally coherent domains within the style of deformation is approximately uniform.

  17. Plate Borders and Mountain Building

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development, Inc.

    This page features animations of four different types of plate boundaries, including one animation of the collision of two pieces of continental crust, forming steep mountain ranges. The animations are all presented in flash, and the plate convergence offers a useful, generic view of orogeny.

  18. Plasma enhanced ion plating system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Axelevitch; E. Rabinovitch; G. Golan

    1996-01-01

    An anode plasma enhanced ion plating deposition system for high quality rapid deposition was constructed and investigated. This system is based on the modified multipurpose vacuum station VUP-5, however may be adopted for any other construction. Vacuum chamber base pressure was kept below 2×10-5 Torr. System configuration of the novel ion plating is similar to the conventional vacuum thermal evaporation

  19. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  20. Flat-plate heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.; Fleischman, G. L. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    Flat plate (vapor chamber) heat pipes were made by enclosing metal wicking between two capillary grooved flat panels. These heat pipes provide a unique configuration and have good capacity and conductance capabilities in zero gravity. When these flat plate vapor chamber heat pipes are heated or cooled, the surfaces are essentially isothermal, varying only 3 to 5 C over the panel surface.

  1. Plate Tectonics: Recycling the Seafloor

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lisa Ayers Lawrence

    2012-12-27

    In this activity, learners work in teams to predict and outline the location of plate boundaries using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Acoustic Monitoring Program's underwater earthquake data. Then, learners compare their estimates to the USGS's map of the plates and discuss.

  2. Subduction Drive of Plate Tectonics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Hamilton

    2003-01-01

    Don Anderson emphasizes that plate tectonics is self-organizing and is driven by subduction, which rights the density inversion generated as oceanic lithosphere forms by cooling of asthenosphere from the top. The following synthesis owes much to many discussions with him. Hinge rollback is the key to kinematics, and, like the rest of actual plate behavior, is incompatible with bottom-up convection

  3. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability; implement satellite analysis procedures in support of this effort, and to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis forecast systems at the National Meteorological Center (NMC). Composite satellite radiance patterns describe features detectable well before the development of synoptic scale tropical plumes. These typical features were extracted from historical files of Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) radiance observations for a pair of tropical plumes which developed during January 1989. Signals were inserted into the NMC operational medium range forecast model and a suite of model integrations were conducted. Many of the 48 h model errors of the historical forecasts were eliminated by the inclusion of more complete satellite observations. Three studies in satellite radiance analysis progressed. An analysis which blended TOVS moisture channels, OLR observations and European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model analysis to generate fields of total precipitable water comparable to those estimated from Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) mu-wave observations. This study demonstrated that a 10 y climatology of precipitable water over the oceans is feasible, using available infrared observations (OLR and TOVS) and model analysis (ECMWF, NMC or similar quality). The estimates are sensitive to model quality and the estimating model must be updated with operational model changes. Coe developed a set of tropical plume and ITCZ composites from TOVS observations, and from NMC and ECMWF analyses which had been passed through a radiative transfer model to simulate TOVS radiances. The composites have been completed as well as many statistical diagnostics of individual TOVS channels. Analysis of the computations is commencing. Chung has initiated a study of the differences between TOVS observed vapor structure during El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (1983) and non-ENSO (1984) years. Preliminary diagnosis demonstrates gross moisture changes between warm and cold sea surface temperature episodes.

  4. How Mantle Slabs Drive Plate Tectonics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clinton P. Conrad; Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni

    2002-01-01

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle

  5. Continuing evolution of the Pacific-Juan de Fuca-North America slab window system-A trench-ridge-transform example from the Pacific Rim

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.; Wilson, D.S.; Stanley, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Many subduction margins that rim the Pacific Ocean contain complex records of Cenozoic slab-window volcanism combined with tectonic disruption of the continental margin. The series of slab windows that opened beneath California and Mexico starting about 28.5 Ma resulted from the death of a series of spreading ridge segments and led to piecewise destruction of a subduction regime. The timing and areal extent of the resultant slab-window volcanism provide constraints on models that depict the subsequent fragmentation and dispersal of the overlying continental margin. The initial Pioneer slab window thermally weakened the overlying western Transverse Ranges and California Borderlands region starting about 28.5 Ma. A second thermal pulse occurred in the same region starting about 19 Ma during growth of the Monterey slab window. This additional heating, combined with the capture of a partially subducted Monterey plate fragment by the Cocos plate, initiated the pulling apart and rotation of the adjacent continental margin. Similarly, the capture of Guadalupe and Magdalena plate fragments by the Pacific plate and initiation of the Guadalupe-Magdalena slab window about 12.5 Ma are coeval with Baja California pulling away from the Mexico continental margin, with the break along the Comondú arc, in crust already thermally weakened by about 10 My of volcanism. In coastal California, distributed crustal extension and subsidence accompanied the new transform plate boundary, and continued until the slab windows cooled and plate motion coalesced along a through-going system of strike-slip faults. The transform boundary continues to evolve, and forward modeling predicts an instability with the current configuration as a result of convergence between the Sierra Nevada and Peninsular Ranges batholiths, starting about 2 My in the future. The instability may be resolved by a shift in the locus of transform motion from the San Andreas fault to the eastern California shear zone, or by breaking off another fragment of the Mojave or southern Sierra Nevada crustal blocks and translating it northward.

  6. Changes in electrical resistivity track changes in tectonic plate coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, Wiebke; Caldwell, T. Grant; Bertrand, Edward A.; Hill, Graham J.; Bennie, Stewart L.; Ogawa, Yasuo

    2013-10-01

    coupling on the Hikurangi subduction margin along the east coast of New Zealand's North Island changes north to south from almost uncoupled to locked. Clay-rich sediments and aqueous fluids at the subduction interface have been invoked as key factors in the frictional processes that control interplate coupling. Here we use magnetotelluric data to show that the subduction interface in the weakly coupled region is electrically conductive but is resistive in the locked region. These results indicate the presence of a layer of fluid- and clay-rich sediments in the weakly coupled region and support the idea that the presence of fluid and hydrated clays at the interface is a major factor controlling plate coupling.

  7. Impact damage of composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, K. M.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model to study low velocity transverse impact of thin plates made of fiber-reinforced composite material, in particular T300/5208 graphite-epoxy was discussed. This model predicts the coefficient of restitution, which is a measure of the energy absorbed by the target during an impact event. The model is constructed on the assumption that the plate is inextensible in the fiber direction and that the material is incompressible in the z-direction. Such a plate essentially deforms by shear, hence this model neglects bending deformations of the plate. The coefficient of restitution is predicted to increase with large interlaminar shear strength and low transverse shear modulus of the laminate. Predictions are compared with the test results of impacted circular and rectangular clamped plates. Experimentally measured values of the coefficient of restitution are found to agree with the predicted values within a reasonable error.

  8. Present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    A data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths and 142 earthquake slip vectors was inverted to yield a new instantaneous plate motion model, designated RM2. The mean averaging interval for the relative motion data was reduced to less than 3 My. A detailed comparison of RM2 with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries indicates that RM2 performs close to optimally in most regions, with several notable exceptions. On the other hand, a previous estimate (RM1) failed to satisfy an extensive set of new data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that RM1 incorrectly predicts the plate kinematics in the South Atlantic because the presently available data are inconsistent with the plate geometry assumed in deriving RM1. It is demonstrated that this inconsistency can be remedied by postulating the existence of internal deformation with the Indian plate, although alternate explanations are possible.

  9. A tale of two arcs? Plate tectonics of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc using subducted slab constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Kanda, R. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    Published plate reconstructions typically show the Izu-Bonin Marianas arc (IBM) forming as a result of long-lived ~50 Ma Pacific subduction beneath the Philippine Sea. These reconstructions rely on the critical assumption that the Philippine Sea was continuously coupled to the Pacific during the lifetime of the IBM arc. Because of this assumption, significant (up to 1500 km) Pacific trench retreat is required to accommodate the 2000 km of Philippine Sea/IBM northward motion since the Eocene that is constrained by paleomagnetic data. In this study, we have mapped subducted slabs of mantle lithosphere from MITP08 global seismic tomography (Li et al., 2008) and restored them to a model Earth surface to constrain plate tectonic reconstructions. Here we present two subducted slab constraints that call into question current IBM arc reconstructions: 1) The northern and central Marianas slabs form a sub-vertical 'slab wall' down to maximum 1500 km depths in the lower mantle. This slab geometry is best explained by a near-stationary Marianas trench that has remained +/- 250 km E-W of its present-day position since ~45 Ma, and does not support any significant Pacific slab retreat. 2) A vanished ocean is revealed by an extensive swath of sub-horizontal slabs at 700 to 1000 km depths in the lower mantle below present-day Philippine Sea to Papua New Guinea. We call this vanished ocean the 'East Asian Sea'. When placed in an Eocene plate reconstruction, the East Asian Sea fits west of the reconstructed Marianas Pacific trench position and north of the Philippine Sea plate. This implies that the Philippine Sea and Pacific were not adjacent at IBM initiation, but were in fact separated by a lost ocean. Here we propose a new IBM arc reconstruction constrained by subducted slabs mapped under East Asia. At ~50 Ma, the present-day IBM arc initiated at equatorial latitudes from East Asian Sea subduction below the Philippine Sea. A separate arc was formed from Pacific subduction below the East Asian Sea. The Philippine Sea plate moved northwards, overrunning the East Asian Sea and the two arcs collided between 15 to 20 Ma. From 15 Ma to the present, IBM arc magmatism was produced by Pacific subduction beneath the Philippine Sea.

  10. Details: Elevation of Plate Typical Bay, SectionThrough Plate Typical Bay, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Details: Elevation of Plate Typical Bay, Section-Through Plate Typical Bay, Section-Through Plate Center Bay, Elevation of Plate Center Bay - Contoocook Covered Bridge, Spanning Contoocook River, Hopkinton, Merrimack County, NH

  11. Photovoltaic array: Power conditioner interface characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The electrical output (power, current, and voltage) of flat plate solar arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as dc-to-ac power conditioners must be capable of accommodating widely varying input levels while maintaining operation at or near the maximum power point of the array. The array operating characteristics and extreme output limits necessary for the systematic design of array load interfaces under a wide variety of climatic conditions are studied. A number of interface parameters are examined, including optimum operating voltage, voltage energy, maximum power and current limits, and maximum open circuit voltage. The effect of array degradation and I-V curve fill factor or the array power conditioner interface is also discussed. Results are presented as normalized ratios of power conditioner parameters to array parameters, making the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes.

  12. Pacific Exploratory Mission in the tropical Pacific: PEM-Tropics A, August–September 1996

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Hoell; D. D. Davis; D. J. Jacob; M. O. Rodgers; R. E. Newell; H. E. Fuelberg; R. J. McNeal; J. L. Raper; R. J. Bendura

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The NASA Pacific Exploratory Mission to the Pacific tropics (PEM-Tropics) is the third major field campaign of NASA' s Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) to study the impact of human and natural processes on the chemistry of the troposphere over the Pacific basin. The first two campaigns, PEM-West A and B were conducted over the northwestern regions of the Pacific

  13. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... twice as likely to have asthma as non-Hispanic whites. National data for this population is very ... had asthma, 2012 Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Non-Hispanic White Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander/ Non-Hispanic White ...

  14. Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders were almost four times more likely to ... data available at this time. HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  15. Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders Among Asian/Pacific ... all older age groups. At a Glance – Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  16. Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander Populations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. According to ... or Other Pacific Islander populations in 2011 were Hawaii (359,000) and California (329,000) . The Native ...

  17. Profile: Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa or other Pacific Islands. According to ... 000 Native Hawaiians or Pacific Islanders reside in Hawaii. Some other states that have a significant Native ...

  18. Transition Fault and the Yakutat-Pacific-North American Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Norton, I. O.; Pavlis, T. L.; Reece, R.; van Avendonk, H.; Worthington, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    In the Gulf of Alaska the Pacific Plate, Yakutat Terrane, and North American Plate interact in a complexly deformed zone on the continental slope near Kayak Island. This zone can be viewed as a fault-trench-trench (FTT) triple junction that can only be stable if the two trench segments are aligned. In this case the trench segments are: the deformation front along which the Pacific Plate subducts beneath North America (the Aleutian Trench) and the deformation front along which the Yakutat Terrane subducts at a more westerly direction (when compared to the Pacific subduction) beneath North America (the Pamplona Zone). These two deformation fronts are, to a first order, locally aligned. The complex member of the system is the Transition Fault which is a long-lived strike-slip fault separating the 15-30 km thick Yakutat oceanic plateau crust from the 5-7 km thick Pacific Plate crust, which is itself deforming along the north-south trending Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). A series of seismic reflection profiles crossing the Transition Fault allow us to examine the evolution of deformation as a function of proximity to the triple junction. East of the triple junction and the GASZ, the Transition Fault is a single near vertical strike-slip zone. Moving west to the area where the GASZ interacts with the Transition Fault, three seismic profiles show that the Fault bifurcates into a southern transpressional strand with a few 100 meters of seafloor relief and a northern strike-slip dominated strand. West of the GASZ and within the region proximal to the triple junction, two seismic lines show that the Transition Fault is expressed as a southern transpressional structure with significant amounts shortening (seafloor expression increased to ~1.8 km) and a northern dominantly strike-slip fault with minor transpression. Mapping the top of basement shows that the southern arm lies within and deforms the Pacific oceanic crust with the top of ocean crust reflection to the north elevated by ~1-3 km. The northern arm of the Transition Fault continues to lie at the boundary of the Pacific and Yakutat crust across which depth to the top of the basement changes by 4-6 km suggest that the outer strand of the Transition Fault has likely stepped southward from the primary fault due to increased convergence west of the GASZ and proximal to the triple junction. This additional transpressional deformation likely occurs within the Pacific Plate due to rheology since the Pacific crust is likely the weakest tectonic member at the triple junction. We will investigate this plate boundary deformation at the Gulf of Alaska triple junction further with improved seismic imaging and integration with gravity modeling in an effort to discuss the plate boundary reorganization that can occur during attempted subduction of buoyant crust such as the Yakutat Terrane.

  19. Asymmetric Mid-Ocean ridges: Interplay Between Plate and Mantle Processes and Consequences for Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesi, L.; Bai, H.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges constitute a fundamental component of the global plate tectonic system. The classical view of ridges is of symmetric system, where plates diverge, generating a mostly passive upwelling immediately underneath the ridge axis. However, observations of mid-ocean ridges draw quite a different picture. At the Southern East Pacific Rise, plate subsidence (related to plate age) occurs at different rates on the Pacific and Nazca plates, implying different rates of accretion on each side of the ridge. At greater depth, the melting region extends much further beneath the Pacific plate than the Nazca plate. Asymmetry is also evident in slow spreading center. For examples, at the 13°N segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, isochrons are more widely spaced on the American side than the European side. Core complexes along the axis are another manifestation of asymmetric accretion at that location. In this contribution, we seek to understand how is the melting system affected by ridge asymmetry. First, we discuss the different ways that an asymmetric ridge may develop. We present an analytical solution of mantle flow in the mantle underneath spreading centers that considers 1) different rates of accretion in on the two plates; 2) migration of the ridge system with respect to the underlying mantle (Couette flow in the asthenosphere); 3) mantle wind (Poiseuille flow in the asthenosphere); 4) different slopes of the lithosphere underneath each plate; and 5) any combination of the above. These solutions assume an isoviscous mantle underneath the lithosphere. Asymmetry in mantle flow is observed in each case. The temperature field associated with each case implies that melting is suppressed by the asymmetric accretion, although deeper processes have little effect on melting. As asymmetric accretion is thought to develop when melt flux to the axis is reduced, there is the possibility of a positive feedback that forces segments to switch between symmetric and asymmetric spreading. However, the effect of asymmetry is reduced in numerical models with temperature-dependent viscosity as the thermally defined slope of the lithosphere counteracts the effect of asymmetric accretion.

  20. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  1. Tropical Storm Iniki, Central Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Tropical Storm Iniki in the North Pacific (40.5N, 152.5W) was dissipating from hurricane status when this photo was taken. Two days prior, as a full fledged hurricane, with winds of about 150 mph and waves of over 15 ft., it swept over the Hawaiian island of Kauai. But, as Iniki moved over the colder waters of the North Pacific, it began to weaken as can be seen by the lack of a tight spiral gyre and the absence of an eye in the center.

  2. ZOOPLANKTON VOLUMES OFF THE PACIFIC COAST, 1956

    E-print Network

    ZOOPLANKTON VOLUMES OFF THE PACIFIC COAST, 1956 Marine Biological Laboratory JAN(i -1958 WOODS HOLE Washingtcxi, D. C» October 1957 #12;Abstract Basic data on volumes of zooplankton off the Pacific coast zooplankton abun- dance by month are included. #12;Zooplankton Volumes off the Pacific Coast, I956 The six

  3. UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute

    E-print Network

    Hall Keller Hall Physical Science Building Pacific Ocean Science & Technology Kuykendall AnnexStairs Pond UH Parking Access & Mid-Pacific Institute Exit M¯anoa Innovation Center and Kau Auxiliary Services Pacific Biomedical Warehouse Agricultural Science Shops Campus Security n Landscaping

  4. Paleoceanography of the Tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard W. Grigg; Richard Hey

    1992-01-01

    The East Pacific Barrier (EPB) is the most effective marine barrier to dispersal of tropical shallow-water fauna in the world today. The fossil record of corals in the eastern Pacific suggests this has been true throughout the Cenozoic. In the Cretaceous, the EPB was apparently less effective in limiting dispersal. Equatorial circulation in the Pacific then appears to have been

  5. Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., <660km depth). Some of the deeply subducted material may indeed be buoyant subducted AUS continental margin (to depths of ~250-300 km), as well as subducted continental material that has reached the point of no return (i.e., > 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

  6. Selecting and Applying Interfacings 

    E-print Network

    2006-05-01

    Selecting and Applying Interfacing E-404 05-06 nterfacing is the layer of fabric between the outer fabric of the garment and its facing. Most garments look more professional and wear longer if they are interfaced. Selecting and using... of loosely woven fabrics. Even simple garment styles need interfacing to add stability to necklines, facings or hems. Interfacing adds body to a garment and keeps it crisp through repeated washings and wearings. All interfacings must be compatible...

  7. Reconciling Surface Plate Motions and Rapid Three-dimensional Mantle Flow around the Southern Alaska Slab Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M.; Billen, M. I.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy indicates that in many subduction zones, the direction of mantle material is non-parallel to the direction of the surface plates. Data also suggests that around subduction zones the speed of the mantle may be faster than that of the surface plates. This implies that, in subduction zones, the mantle is partially decoupled from the plates. We construct three-dimensional high-resolution numerical models of the Alaska subduction-transform plate boundary (~ 100 million nodes with maximum resolution of 2.35 km). The models use a realistic plate geometry and a composite rheology that includes a strain-rate dependent (non-Newtonian) viscosity. The models predict surface plate velocities consistent with the observed motion of the Pacific plate and a complex three-dimensional mantle flow field consistent with observations from seismic anisotropy. Close to the slab, where strain-rates are high and viscosities are low, mantle velocities can be greater than ten times plate motions (i.e., on the order of 100 cm/yr). Far from the subduction zone, mantle flow rates are comparable to surface plate motions. This suggests short slabs, sinking through the upper mantle are in a transient state characterized by steepening of the slab, a minimum in viscous resistance to sinking due to the activation of dislocation creep deformation in the high strain-rate regions around the slab, and localized fast mantle flow rates.

  8. Creep of phyllosilicates at the onset of plate tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Amiguet, Elodie; Reynard, Bruno; Caracas, Razvan; Van de Moortele, Bertrand; Hilairet, Nadege; Wang, Yanbin (ENSL); (UC)

    2012-10-24

    Plate tectonics is the unifying paradigm of geodynamics yet the mechanisms and causes of its initiation remain controversial. Some models suggest that plate tectonics initiates when the strength of lithosphere is lower than 20-200 MPa, below the frictional strength of lithospheric rocks (>700 MPa). At present-day, major plate boundaries such as the subduction interface, transform faults, and extensional faults at mid-oceanic ridge core complexes indicate a transition from brittle behaviour to stable sliding at depths between 10 and 40 km, in association with water-rock interactions forming phyllosilicates. We explored the rheological behaviour of lizardite, an archetypal phyllosilicate of the serpentine group formed in oceanic and subduction contexts, and its potential influence on weakening of the lithospheric faults and shear zones. High-pressure deformation experiments were carried out on polycrystalline lizardite - the low temperature serpentine variety - using a D-DIA apparatus at a variety of pressure and temperature conditions from 1 to 8 GPa and 150 to 400 C and for strain rates between 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -6} s{sup -1}. Recovered samples show plastic deformation features and no evidence of brittle failure. Lizardite has a large rheological anisotropy, comparable to that observed in the micas. Mechanical results and first-principles calculations confirmed easy gliding on lizardite basal plane and show that the flow stress of phyllosilicate is in the range of the critical value of 20-200 MPa down to depths of about 200 km. Thus, foliated serpentine or chlorite-bearing rocks are sufficiently weak to account for plate tectonics initiation, aseismic sliding on the subduction interface below the seismogenic zone, and weakening of the oceanic lithosphere along hydrothermally altered fault zones. Serpentinisation easing the deformation of the early crust and shallow mantle reinforces the idea of a close link between the occurrence of plate tectonics and water at the surface of the Earth.

  9. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 24.3 by 30.2 kilometers (15 by 18.6 miles) Location: 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 4, 2006

  10. Compatibility of perovskite contact layers between cathode and metallic interconnector plates of SOFCs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Quadakkers; H. Greiner; M. Hänsel; A. Pattanaik; A. S. Khanna; W. Malléner

    1996-01-01

    From the viewpoint of corrosion resistance alumina and chromia forming alloys are potential candidate materials for SOFC interconnector plates. However, at the SOFC operating temperatures of around 950 °C the first-mentioned alloy type tends to form electrically insulating oxide scale at the interfaces between the interconnector and the ceramic contact layer, the interface oxide consisting of Al2O3 and M2O3±x-nAl2O3. Chromium-based

  11. Forward Scatter Dose Effect at Metallic Interfaces Irradiated by X and Gamma Ray Therapy Beams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manickam Ravikumar; Ramamoorthy Ravichandran; Sanjay Sudhakar Supe

    2001-01-01

    Aim: In this study forward scattering effects near different metallic interfaces are measured for Co-60 gamma and 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The studied effects are the transport of secondary electrons across the metallic interface and the scattering of photons by the metallic inhomogeneity. Materials and Methods: All measurements were carried out with a PTW thin-window, parallel plate ionisation

  12. Deformation and stress change associated with plate interaction at subduction zones: a kinematic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shaorong; Takemoto, Shuzo

    2000-08-01

    The interseismic deformation associated with plate coupling at a subduction zone is commonly simulated by the steady-slip model in which a reverse dip-slip is imposed on the down-dip extension of the locked plate interface, or by the backslip model in which a normal slip is imposed on the locked plate interface. It is found that these two models, although totally different in principle, produce similar patterns for the vertical deformation at a subduction zone. This suggests that it is almost impossible to distinguish between these two models by analysing only the interseismic vertical deformation observed at a subduction zone. The steady-slip model cannot correctly predict the horizontal deformation associated with plate coupling at a subduction zone, a fact that is proved by both the numerical modelling in this study and the GPS (Global Positioning System) observations near the Nankai trough, southwest Japan. It is therefore inadequate to simulate the effect of the plate coupling at a subduction zone by the steady-slip model. It is also revealed that the unphysical assumption inherent in the backslip model of imposing a normal slip on the locked plate interface makes it impossible to predict correctly the horizontal motion of the subducted plate and the stress change within the overthrust zone associated with the plate coupling during interseismic stages. If the analysis made in this work is proved to be correct, some of the previous studies on interpreting the interseismic deformation observed at several subduction zones based on these two models might need substantial revision. On the basis of the investigations on plate interaction at subduction zones made using the finite element method and the kinematic/mechanical conditions of the plate coupling implied by the present plate tectonics, a synthesized model is proposed to simulate the kinematic effect of the plate interaction during interseismic stages. A numerical analysis shows that the proposed model, designed to simulate the motion of a subducted slab, can correctly produce the deformation and the main pattern of stress concentration associated with plate coupling at a subduction zone. The validity of the synthesized model is examined and partially verified by analysing the horizontal deformation observed by GPS near the Nankai trough, southwest Japan.

  13. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry R. (Palos Heights, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  14. Edge fracture in cone-plate and parallel plate flows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matti Keentok; Shi-Cheng Xue

    1999-01-01

    Edge fracture is an instability of cone-plate and parallel plate flows of viscoelastic liquids and suspensions, characterised\\u000a by the formation of a `crack' or indentation at a critical shear rate on the free surface of the liquid. A study is undertaken\\u000a of the theoretical, experimental and computational aspects of edge fracture. The Tanner-Keentok theory of edge fracture in\\u000a second-order liquids

  15. Dual subduction tectonics and plate dynamics of central Japan shown by three-dimensional P-wave anisotropic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishise, Motoko; Miyake, Hiroe; Koketsu, Kazuki

    2015-07-01

    The central Japanese subduction zone is characterized by a complex tectonic setting affected by the dual subduction of oceanic plates and collisions between the island arcs. To better understand of the subduction system, we performed an anisotropic tomography analysis using P-wave arrival times from local earthquakes to determine the three-dimensional structure of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy in the overriding plate and the Pacific and Philippine Sea (PHS) slabs. The principal characteristics of anisotropy in the subducted and subducting plates are (1) in the overriding plate, the distribution pattern of fast direction of crustal anisotropy coincides with that of the strike of geological structure, (2) in the two oceanic plates, fast propagation directions of P-wave were sub-parallel to the directions of seafloor spreading. Additionally, our tomographic images demonstrate that (1) the bottom of the Median Tectonic Line, the longest fault zone in Japan, reaches to the lower crust, and seems to link to the source region of an inter-plate earthquake along the PHS slab, (2) the segmentation of the PHS slab - the Izu Islands arc, the Nishi-Shichito ridge, and the Shikoku basin - due to the formation history, is reflected in the regional variation of anisotropy. The tomographic study further implies that there might be a fragment of the Pacific slab suggested by a previous study beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area. The overall findings strongly indicate that seismic anisotropy analysis provide potentially useful information to understand a subduction zone.

  16. An adjoint-based FEM optimization of coseismic displacements following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake: new insights for the limits of the upper plate rebound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulvirenti, Fabio; Jin, Shuanggen; Aloisi, Marco

    2014-12-01

    The 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake was the strongest event recorded in recent historic seismicity in Japan. Several researchers reported the deformation and possible mechanism as triggered by a mega thrust fault located offshore at the interface between the Pacific and the Okhotsk Plate. The studies to estimate the deformation in detail and the dynamics involved are still in progress. In this paper, coseismic GPS displacements associated with Tohoku earthquake are used to infer the amount of slip on the fault plane. Starting from the fault displacements configuration proposed by Caltech-JPL ARIA group and Geoazur CNRS, an optimization of these displacements is performed by developing a 3D finite element method (FEM) model, including the data of GPS-acoustic stations located offshore. The optimization is performed for different scenarios which include the presence of topography and bathymetry (DEM) as well as medium heterogeneities. By mean of the optimized displacement distribution for the most complete case (heterogeneous with DEM), a broad slip distribution, not narrowly centered east of hypocenter, is inferred. The resulting displacement map suggests that the beginning of the area of subsidence is not at east of MYGW GPS-acoustic station, as some researchers have suggested, and that the area of polar reversal of the vertical displacement is rather located at west of MYGW. The new fault slip distribution fits well for all the stations at ground and offshore and provides new information on the earthquake generation process and on the kinematics of Northern Japan area.

  17. Plate tectonic reconstruction of South and East Asia since 43 Ma using seismic tomographic constraints: role of the subducted ';East Asia Sea' (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Kanda, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    Lithosphere that subducts at convergent plate boundaries provides a potentially decipherable plate tectonic record. In this study we use global seismic tomography to map subducted slabs in the upper and lower mantle under South and East Asia to constrain plate reconstructions. The mapped slabs include the Pacific, the Indian Ocean and Banda Sea, the Molucca Sea, Celebes Sea, the Philippine Sea and Eurasia, New Guinea and other lower mantle detached slabs. The mapped slabs were restored to the earth surface and used with Gplates software to constrain a globally-consistent, fully animated plate reconstruction of South and East Asia. Three principal slab elements dominate possible plate reconstructions: [1] The mapped Pacific slabs near the Izu-Bonin and the Marianas trenches form a subvertical slab curtain or wall extending down to 1500 km in the lower mantle. The ';slab curtain' geometry and restored slabs lengths indicate that the Pacific subduction zone has remained fixed within +/- 250 km of its present position since ~43 Ma. In contrast, the Tonga Pacific slab curtain records at least 1000 km trench rollback associated with expansion of back-arc basins. [2] West of the Pacific slab curtain, a set of flat slabs exist in the lower mantle and record a major 8000km by 2500-3000km ocean that existed at ~43 Ma. This now-subducted ocean, which we call the ';East Asian Sea', existed between the Ryukyu Asian margin and the Lord Howe hotspot, present-day eastern Australia, and fills a major gap in Cenozoic plate reconstructions between Indo-Australia, the Pacific Ocean and Asia. [3] An observed ';picture puzzle' fit between the restored edges of the Philippine Sea, Molucca Sea and Indian Ocean slabs suggests that the Philippine Sea was once part of a larger Indo-Australian Ocean. Previous models of Philippine Sea plate motions are in conflict with the location of the East Asian Sea lithosphere. Using the mapped slab constraints, we propose the following 43 Ma to 0 plate tectonic reconstruction. At ~43 Ma a major plate reorganization occurred in South and East Asia marked by Indian Ocean Wharton ridge extinction, initiation of Pacific Ocean WNW motions and the rapid northward motion of the Australian plate. The Philippine Sea and Molucca Sea were clustered at the northern margin of Australia, northwest of New Guinea. During the mid-Cenozoic these plates moved NNE with Australia, accommodated by N-S transforms at the eastern margin of Sundaland. The East Asian Sea was subducted under the northward-moving Philippine Sea and Australia plates, and the expanding Melanesian and Shikoku-Parece Vela backarc basins. At ~20 to 25 Ma the Philippine Sea and Molucca Sea were fragmented from Indo-Australia and began to have a westward component of motion due to partial Pacific capture. Around 1-2 Ma the Philippine Sea was more fully captured by the Pacific and now has rapid Pacific-like northwestward motions.

  18. Signals of dynamic coupling between mantle and lithosphere beneath the axis of the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Forte, A. M.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions indicate that the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and its ancestor the Pacific-Farallon Ridge (PFR) have maintained a remarkable longitudinal stability with respect to the mantle over the past 83 Ma, with < 500 km of margin-perpendicular drift of the spreading axis despite very fast spreading rates producing >10,000 km of oceanic crust. Models of mantle convection based on joint seismic and geodynamic tomography inversions indicate that the EPR is also located directly above a long-lived region of strong mantle upwelling that extends from the core mantle boundary (CMB) to the surface. This observation, combined with a slowing of absolute plate velocities as the modelled upward buoyancy flux beneath the EPR has decreased in the past 5-10 Ma, suggests that dynamic coupling between the upwelling mantle and the ridge axis may be a significant factor in maintaining the position of the latter with respect to the former over geologically significant timescales. We use reconstructions of the spreading behaviour of the EPR/PFR system over the past 83 Ma, and its migration in the mantle reference frame, to further examine the signal of this dynamic interaction in order to understand its nature, and its relative contribution to the absolute motions of the Pacific and Nazca plates compared to the slab pull forces that are generally thought to almost completely dominate plate motion. In addition to the longitudinal stability of the ridge, maintained by long-term spreading asymmetry, the position of the instantaneous stage pole is also relatively constant in the mantle reference frame, such that the locus of maximum spreading for the ridge system is always found close to the region of maximum upward buoyancy flux in the underlying mantle. Furthermore, correlations between the spreading rate and net spreading asymmetry of the PFR/EPR and the rate of ridge axis migration in the mantle reference frame, and coupled absolute accelerations and decelerations of the Nazca and Pacific plates in the mantle reference frame, can only be simply explained by changes in forces acting at the ridge axis. Quasi-periodic 15-20 Myr co-variations in these parameters may be linked to changes in upward mantle buoyancy flux, with periods of reduced absolute ridge motion but accelerated absolute Pacific and Nazca motion, faster spreading and increased spreading asymmetry corresponding to periods of stronger dynamic coupling.

  19. Pacific Educational Research Journal, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Kathleen, Ed.; Lai, Morris, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This journal features theoretical, empirical, and applied research with implications for and relevance to education in the Pacific area. This volume contains: (1) "Community Perceptions of Culture and Education on Moloka'i" (Lois A. Yamauchi, William L. Greene, Katherine T. Ratliffe, and Andrea K. Ceppi); (2) "Academic Performance of Asian…

  20. Pacific Islands Region News Release

    E-print Network

    Braun, contract marine mammal veterinarian for the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. The mother at weaning. Hence, the need for additional food provided in a captive situation to increase their chances and NOAA Fisheries Service personnel where they will begin a week of marine debris cleanup on and around

  1. Trade in the Pacific Rim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollar, David

    1988-01-01

    States that international trade is a prime factor linking the Pacific Rim nations. Discusses the differences in each nation's productive factors (land, labor, capital) and examines the emerging technological competition. Concludes that if U.S. firms cannot meet the challenge of foreign competition, then protectionism might limit further economic…

  2. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nate Mantua

    This site hosts a colored picture and graph of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in its warm and cool phases. Supplementary information about the PDO is also included near the bottom of the page and related links to more information are included at the top of the page.

  3. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2010 eastern margin of the Australia plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The eastern margin of the Australia plate is one of the most seismically active areas of the world due to high rates of convergence between the Australia and Pacific plates. In the region of New Zealand, the 3,000 km long Australia-Pacific plate boundary extends from south of Macquarie Island to the southern Kermadec Island chain. It includes an oceanic transform (the Macquarie Ridge), two oppositely verging subduction zones (Puysegur and Hikurangi), and a transpressive continental transform, the Alpine Fault through South Island, New Zealand. Since 1900, there have been 15 M7.5+ earthquakes recorded near New Zealand. Nine of these, and the four largest, occurred along or near the Macquarie Ridge, including the 1989 M8.2 event on the ridge itself, and the 2004 M8.1 event 200 km to the west of the plate boundary, reflecting intraplate deformation. The largest recorded earthquake in New Zealand itself was the 1931 M7.8 Hawke's Bay earthquake, which killed 256 people. The last M7.5+ earthquake along the Alpine Fault was 170 years ago; studies of the faults' strain accumulation suggest that similar events are likely to occur again.

  4. Imaging plate illuminates many fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Amemiya; J. Miyahara

    1988-01-01

    The erasable phosphor imaging plate developed for medical radiography has found new uses in the laboratory. X-ray diffraction, protein crystallography and autoradiography have all benefited from this technology transfer from the clinic.

  5. Quaternions as astrometric plate constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferys, William H.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for solving problems in relative astrometry is proposed. In it, the relationship between the measured quantities and the components of the position vector of a star is modeled using quaternions, in effect replacing the plate constants of a standard four-plate-constant solution with the four components of a quaternion. The method allows a direct solution for the position vectors of the stars, and hence for the equatorial coordinates. Distortions, magnitude, and color effects are readily incorporated into the formalism, and the method is directly applicable to overlapping-plate problems. The advantages of the method include the simplicity of the resulting equations, their freedom from singularities, and the fact that trigonometric functions and tangential point transformations are not needed to model the plate material. A global solution over the entire sky is possible.

  6. Tectonic Plate Movement in Alaska

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-11-04

    In this video adapted from KUAC-TV and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, learn how tectonic plate movement is responsible for building mountains, such as the Wrangell and St. Elias Mountains.

  7. Circum-Pacific seismic potential: 1989-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishenko, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    The seismic potential for 96 segments of simple plate boundaries around the circum-Pacific region is presented in terms of the conditional probability for the occurrence of either large or great interplate earthquakes during the next 5, 10, and 20 years (i.e., 1989-1994, 1989-1999 and 1989-2009). This study represents the first probabilistic summary of seismic potential on this scale, and involves the comparison of plate boundary segments that exhibit varying recurrence times, magnitudes, and tectonic regimes. Presenting these data in a probabilistic framework provides a basis for the uniform comparison of seismic hazard between these differing fault segments, as well as accounting for individual variations in recurrence time along a specific fault segment, and uncertainties in the determination of the average recurrence time. The definition of specific segments along simple plate boundaries relies on the mapping of earthquake rupture zones as defined by the aftershock distributions of prior large and great earthquakes, and historic descriptions of felt intensities and damage areas. The 96 segments are chosen to represent areas likely to be ruptured by "characteristic" earthquakes of a specified size or magnitude. The term characteristic implies repeated breakage of a plate boundary segment by large or great earthquakes whose source dimensions are similar from cycle to cycle. This definition does not exclude the possibility that occasionally adjacent characteristic earthquake segments may break together in a single, larger event. Conversely, a segment may also break in a series of smaller ruptures. Estimates of recurrence times and conditional probabilities for characteristic earthquakes along segments of simple plate boundaries are based on 1) the historic and instrumental record of large and great earthquake occurrence; 2) paleoseismic evidence of recurrence from radiometric dating of Holocene features produced by earthquakes; 3) direct calculations of recurrence time from the size of the most recent characteristic event and the long-term rates of plate motion assuming the validity of the time-predictable model for earthquake recurrence; and 4) the application of a lognormal distribution for the recurrence times of large and great earthquakes. Time-dependent estimates of seismic potential are based on a physical model of earthquake occurrence which assumes that the probability for an earthquake is low immediately following the occurrence of a characteristic earthquake and increases with time as the stress on the fault segment recovers the stress drop of the event. This study updates earlier work on seismic gaps by explicitly including both recurrence time information and the temporal proximity to the next event as factors in describing earthquake hazards. Currently, 11 out of 96 regions have a high (i.e., ???50%) probability of recurrence during the next 10 years and are characterized by either fairly short (i.e., less than 30-40 years) recurrence times or long elapsed times relative to the average recurrence time. The majority of these segments are located in the southwest Pacific (Vanuatu, New Guinea, and Tonga). When a longer time window is considered (e.g., 20 years or 1989-2009), 30 out of 96 regions have a high potential. Many of these regions are located near areas of high population density. These determinations do not preclude rupture of other fault segments, with less than a 50% chance in 10 or 20 years, or large and great earthquakes in areas we have not studied in detail. While this study has summarized the seismic potential for a large number of regions around the circum-Pacific, there are still a number of geographic and seismotectonic regions that need to be considered, including Indonesia, the Philippines, New Zealand, and the countries that surround the Caribbean basin. ?? 1991 Birkha??user Verlag.

  8. Impact on multilayered composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, B. S.; Moon, F. C.

    1977-01-01

    Stress wave propagation in a multilayer composite plate due to impact was examined by means of the anisotropic elasticity theory. The plate was modelled as a number of identical anisotropic layers and the approximate plate theory of Mindlin was then applied to each layer to obtain a set of difference-differential equations of motion. Dispersion relations for harmonic waves and correction factors were found. The governing equations were reduced to difference equations via integral transforms. With given impact boundary conditions these equations were solved for an arbitrary number of layers in the plate and the transient propagation of waves was calculated by means of a Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The multilayered plate problem was extended to examine the effect of damping layers present between two elastic layers. A reduction of the interlaminar normal stress was significant when the thickness of damping layer was increased but the effect was mostly due to the softness of the damping layer. Finally, the problem of a composite plate with a crack on the interlaminar boundary was formulated.

  9. Pacific-North America plate boundary reorganization in response to a change in relative plate motion: Offshore Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. M. Rohr; A. J. Tryon

    2010-01-01

    The transition from subduction in Cascadia to the transform Queen Charlotte fault along western Canada is often drawn as a subduction zone, yet recent studies of GPS and earthquake data from northern Vancouver Island are not consistent with that model. In this paper we synthesize seismic reflection and gravity interpretations with microseismicity data in order to test models of (1)

  10. Preparation of Feeder plates for ES cell culture Gelatinize Tissue Culture Plates

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Preparation of Feeder plates for ES cell culture Gelatinize Tissue Culture Plates Gelatinize plates with 0.1% gelatin at room temperature for two hours. (150 µl/well of 96 well plate; 12 ml/10 cm; 4 ml/6cm. Plate cells in gelatinized plates (150 µl/well of 96 well plate; 12 ml/10 cm; 4 ml/6cm; 2 ml/well of 6

  11. Micromachined devices for interfacing neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Beutel, Hansjoerg; Blau, Cornelia; Meyer, Joerg-Uwe

    1998-07-01

    Micromachining technologies were established to fabricate microelectrode arrays and devices for interfacing parts of the central or peripheral nervous system. The devices were part of a neural prosthesis that allows simultaneous multichannel recording and multisite stimulation of neurons. Overcoming the brittle mechanics of silicon devices and challenging housing demands close to the nerve we established a process technology to fabricate light-weighted and highly flexible polyimide based devices. Platinum and iridium thin-film electrodes were embedded in the polyimide. With reactive ion etching we got the possibility to simply integrate interconnections and to form nearly arbitrary outer shapes of the devices. We designed multichannel devices with up to 24 electrodes in the shape of plates, hooks and cuffs for different applications. In vitro tests exhibited stable electrode properties and no cytotoxicity of the materials and the devices. Sieve electrodes were chronically implanted in rats to interface the regenerating sciatic nerve. After six months, recordings and stimulation of the nerve via electrodes on the micro-device proved functional reinnervation of the limb. Concentric circular structures were designed for a retina implant for the blind. In preliminary studies in rabbits, evoked potentials in the visual cortex corresponded to stimulation sites of the implant.

  12. Eulerian simulation of the perforation of aluminum plates by nondeforming projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.

    1992-03-01

    A new algorithm for the treatment of sliding interfaces between solids with or without friction in an Eulerian wavecode is described. The algorithm has been implemented in the two-dimensional version of the CTH code. The code was used to simulate penetration and perforation of aluminum plates by rigid, conical-nosed tungsten projectiles. Comparison with experimental data is provided.

  13. Geometry and seismic properties of the subducting Cocos plate in central Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Kim; R. W. Clayton; J. M. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    The geometry and properties of the interface of the Cocos plate beneath central Mexico are determined from the receiver functions (RFs) utilizing data from the Meso America Subduction Experiment (MASE). The RF image shows that the subducting oceanic crust is shallowly dipping to the north at 15° for 80 km from Acapulco and then horizontally underplates the continental crust for

  14. Systematic receiver function analysis of the Moho geometry in the southern California plate-boundary region

    E-print Network

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    1 Systematic receiver function analysis of the Moho geometry in the southern California plate, Moho geometry, Southern California region, 3D velocity model, Continental-oceanic crusts, Lithosperic deformation #12;2 ABSTRACT We investigate the geometry of the Moho interface in the southern California region

  15. Hamiltonian system based Saint Venant solutions for multi-layered composite plane anisotropic plates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weian Yao; Haitian Yang

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents Hamiltonian system based Saint Venant solutions for the problem of multi-layered composite plane anisotropic plates. A mixed energy variational principle is proposed, and dual equations are derived in the symplectic space. The schemes of separation of variables and eigenfunction expansion, instead of the traditional semi-inverse method, are implemented, and compatibility conditions at interfaces are formulated by dual

  16. Dissimilar material welding of rapidly solidified foil and stainless steel plate using underwater explosive welding technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuyuki Hokamoto; Kazuhiro Nakata; Akihisa Mori; Shota Tsuda; Takuya Tsumura; Akihisa Inoue

    2009-01-01

    Rapidly solidified amorphous and metallic glass thin foils clad on a stainless steel base plate is attempted by employing underwater shock wave assembly. The conditions of the explosive welding are numerically analyzed and discussed based on the earlier welding limits. The thin foils successfully welded along the length of 50mm show clear waves typically found in explosively welded interface. The

  17. Cultural Visual Interface Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irina Kondratova; Ilia Goldfarb

    In our paper a research study that focuses on the identification, harvesting and analysis of the culture-specific visual web interface design elements is discussed. A new approach to user interface development that utilises a cultural \\

  18. Motions of Australia and surroundings since 43 Ma as recorded by subducted mantle lithosphere--evidence for a lost ocean between the Pacific and Indian Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renqi, L.; Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Kanda, R. V.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known from seafloor spreading and hotspot data that the Australian plate has moved ~2500km northward in a mantle reference frame since 43Ma, during which time the Pacific plate moved approximately orthogonally ~3000km in a WNW direction. In addition the Australian plate has expanded up to 2000 km as a result of back arc spreading associated with evolving subduction systems on its northern and eastern margins. Here we attempt to account for this plate motion and subduction using new quantitative constraints of mapped slabs of subducted mantle lithosphere underlying the Australian plate and its surroundings. We have mapped a large swath of sub-horizontal slabs in the lower mantle under onshore and offshore NE Australia using global mantle seismic tomography. When restored together with other mapped slabs from the Asia Pacific region, these slabs reveal the existence of a major ocean between NE Australia, E. Asian, and the Pacific at 43 Ma, which we call the East Asian Sea. The southern half of this East Asian Sea was overrun and completely subducted by northward-moving Australia and the expanding Melanesian arcs, and the WNW-converging Pacific. This lost ocean fills a major gap in plate tectonic reconstructions and also constraints the possible motion of the Caroline Sea and New Guinea arcs. Slabs were mapped from MITP08 global P-wave seismic tomography data (Li and Hilst, 2008) and the TX2011 S-wave seismic tomography data (Grand and Simmons, 2011) using Gocad software. The mapped slabs were unfolded to the spherical Earth surface to assess their pre-subduction geometry. Gplates software was used to constrain plate tectonic reconstructions within a fully animated, globally consistent framework.

  19. Metal sandwich plates optimized for pressure impulses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. Hutchinson; Zhenyu Xue

    2005-01-01

    Survival of a plate against an intense, short duration impulsive loading requires the circumvention of failure modes, including those associated with excessive overall deflection and shear-off at supports and webs. All-metal sandwich plates have distinct advantages over comparable weight monolithic plates, especially for intense water loadings. A recently developed mechanics of dynamically loaded sandwich plates by N. A. Fleck and

  20. Mantle dynamics with induced plate tectonics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanick Ricard; Christophe Vigny

    1989-01-01

    A new model of mantle dynamics and plate tectonics which takes into account the existence of rigid and independent plates has been developed. These plates, which break the spherical symmetry assumed in all earlier models, modify the mantle circulation and hence the predicted surface observables such as displacement and gravity. This paper uses a very simple two-plate model to explain