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Sample records for pacific plate interface

  1. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  2. Relative motions between oceanic plates of the Pacific Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, David C.; Cox, Allan; Gordon, Richard G.

    1984-11-01

    Appendix tables are available with entire article on microfiche. Order from American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20009. Document B84-012; $2.50. Payment must accompany order. Relative motion poles describing the displacement histories between the Pacific plate and once adjacent oceanic plates (Farallon, Kula, Izanagi I, Izanagi II, and Phoenix) were derived for the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras. Because fracture zone and magnetic anomaly data are generally available from the Pacific plate but not from adjacent plates, a new method of analysis for onesided data was required. This analysis produced stage poles and rates of relative plate motion and estimates of their confidence regions. The following are the main conclusions drawn from our analysis: (1) For time intervals of the order of 107 years, termed stages, relative motion poles for plate pairs remained nearly fixed. Between stages, shifts in poles were commonly both large and abrupt. Within stages, rates of plate motion were commonly observed to change markedly, indicating that plates changed speed more frequently than they changed direction. (2) The relative motions of all of the plates analyzed changed at about chron M11 (135 Ma), chron 34 (85 Ma), and chron 25 (56 Ma). (3) During the Early Cretaceous there were five oceanic plates in the Pacific basin rather than the four recognized by previous workers. (4) To determine the number of Farallon plates that existed to the east of the Pacific plate during the time interval from chron 34 (85 Ma) to chron 25 (56 Ma), fracture zones and magnetic anomalies that record Pacific-Farallon spreading from the northern, central, and southern Pacific plate were analyzed separately and collectively. The analysis shows that a single Pacific-Farallon relative motion pole and a single rate are consistent with all of the data. (5) Spreading rates along the Pacific-Kula ridge decreased markedly between chrons 32b and 25 (72-56 Ma), probably

  3. Pacific Rim and Pacific Plate Tectonism Associated With the Hawaiian Emperor Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A.; Kroenke, L. W.; Wessel, P.; Harada, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Widespread Pacific Rim and Pacific plate tectonism both appear to be closely associated with a pronounced change in Pacific absolute plate motion (APM) that occurred about 43 Ma as revealed by the Hawaiian Emperor Bend. In the Western Pacific prior to the change, as the Pacific plate moved toward the north, Proto Izu -- Bonin -- Mariana (IBM) subduction was already occurring by 49 Ma, perhaps as early as 52 Ma near the northern end of the Proto IBM, evidenced by the emplacement of boninites in the forearc (Cosca et al., 1998). If the Philippine Basin -- Pacific plate circuit is traced though the Coral Sea basin after closing the Ayu and Sorel troughs, it is evident that the alignment of the Proto IBM (Kyushu -- Palau) subduction zone roughly paralleled the Pacific APM during the initiation of subduction. At ~ 43 Ma, Proto-IBM Trench subduction rapidly increased, possibly causing the major change in Pacific (and Australia) APM that produced the prominent bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain. This change also produced a the minor bend in the Louisville chain, as the Pacific plate began to move west-northwestward, as well as at least five more noticeable bends in other seamount chains across the Central Pacific. In the Northeastern Pacific, the expansive magmatic activity, which occurred during the early stage of Aleutian Arc growth between 55--50 Ma, began to wane between 45 and 40 Ma (Scholl et al., 1987). After the 43 Ma change in Pacific APM, the Aleutian subduction zone began to accommodate dextral slip at its western end, as well as continuing convergence at its eastern end. To the south, in the Eastern Pacific, Ridge propagation began about 43 Ma both north and south of the Murray FZ (extending southward to the Clarion FZ). Much farther to the south, changes are also apparent in the Pacific -- Antarctic spreading pattern at ~43 Ma. In the Central Pacific, following the 43 Ma change in Pacific plate motion, intraplate subduction began along the Manus -- North

  4. Physics-Based 3-D Simulation for Earthquake Generation Cycles at Plate Interfaces in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Chihiro; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    The generation of interplate earthquakes can be regarded as a process of tectonic stress accumulation and release, driven by relative plate motion. We completed a physics-based simulation system for earthquake generation cycles at plate interfaces in the Japan region, where the Pacific plate is descending beneath the North American and Philippine Sea plates, and the Philippine Sea plate is descending beneath the North American and Eurasian plates. The system is composed of a quasi-static tectonic loading model and a dynamic rupture propagation model, developed on a realistic 3-D plate interface model. The driving force of the system is relative plate motion. In the quasi-static tectonic loading model, mechanical interaction at plate interfaces is rationally represented by the increase of tangential displacement discontinuity (fault slip) across them on the basis of dislocation theory for an elastic surface layer overlying Maxwell-type viscoelastic half-space. In the dynamic rupture propagation model, stress changes due to fault slip motion on non-planar plate interfaces are evaluated with the boundary integral equation method. The progress of seismic (dynamic) or aseismic (quasi-static) fault slip on plate interfaces is governed by a slip- and time-dependent fault constitutive law. As an example, we numerically simulated earthquake generation cycles at the source region of the 1968 Tokachi-oki earthquake on the North American-Pacific plate interface. From the numerical simulation, we can see that postseismic stress relaxation in the asthenosphere accelerates stress accumulation in the source region. When the stress state of the source region is close to a critical level, dynamic rupture is rapidly accelerated and develops over the whole source region. When the stress state is much lower than the critical level, the rupture is not accelerated. This means that the stress state realized by interseismic tectonic loading essentially controls the subsequent dynamic

  5. Cascadia tremor polarization evidence for plate interface slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, Aaron G.; Creager, Kenneth C.

    2007-11-01

    New seismic measurements of the repeated phenomenon of Episodic Tremor and Slip in northern Cascadia indicate identical source processes of tremor and slow slip. Predicted polarization directions of upgoing S-waves radiated from shear slip on the plate interface align with the relative motion between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. Seismic observations from small-aperture array data on the Olympic Peninsula of the Cascadia subduction zone show uncharacteristically stable linear particle motion coincident with the passage of tremor sources beneath the array. The azimuth of this horizontal ground motion matches expected polarizations from slip on the plate interface. This finding suggests that Cascadia tremor is shear slip on the plate interface, implying that, as in Japan, geodetically observed slow slip and seismically observed tremor are manifestations of the same phenomenon.

  6. Fast Paleogene Motion of the Pacific Hotspots from Revised Global Plate Circuit Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C.; Stock, J.; Cande, S.

    2000-01-01

    Major improvements in late Cretaceous-early Tertiary Pacific-Antarctica plate reconstructions, and new East-West Antarctica rotations, allow a more definitive test of the relative motion between hotspots using global plate circuit reconstructions with quantitative uncertainties.

  7. Pacific-North America plate motions - New results from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Steven N.

    1990-01-01

    The state of Pacific-North America plate interaction is updated using newest VLBI measurements and newly developed rigid plate tectonic models. Particular attention is given to examining the extent of relative motion between the Pacific plate and the North America plate as measured from their stable interiors, the evidence of Pacific plate deformation off the central California coast, and the distribution of path integrated deformaton east of the San Andreas fault. The information obtained on these questions is discussed in the framework of implications for lithospheric rheology and earthquake hazard.

  8. Circum-arctic plate accretion - Isolating part of a pacific plate to form the nucleus of the Arctic Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churkin, M., Jr.; Trexler, J.H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A mosaic of large lithospheric plates rims the Arctic Ocean Basin, and foldbelts between these plates contain numerous allochthonous microplates. A new model for continental drift and microplate accretion proposes that prior to the late Mesozoic the Kula plate extended from the Pacific into the Arctic. By a process of circumpolar drift and microplate accretion, fragments of the Pacific basin, including parts of the Kula plate, were cut off and isolated in the Arctic Ocean, the Yukon-Koyukuk basin in Alaska, and the Bering Sea. ?? 1980.

  9. Azimuthal anisotropy layering and plate motion in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed a three dimensional radially and azimuthally anisotropic model of the upper mantle in north America, using a combination of long-period 3-component surface and overtone waveforms, and SKS splitting measurements (Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010, Yuan et al., 2011). We showed that azimuthal anisotropy is a powerful tool to detect layering in the upper mantle, revealing two domains in the cratonic lithosphere, separated by a sharp laterally varying boundary in the depth range 100-150 km, which seems to coincide with the mid-lithospheric boundary (MLD) found in receiver function studies. Contrary to receiver functions, azimuthal anisotropy also detects the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as manifested by a change in the fast axis direction, which becomes quasi-parallel to the absolute plate motion below ~250 km depth. A zone of stronger azimuthal anisotropy is found below the LAB both in the western US (peaking at depths of 100-150km) and in the craton (peaking at a depth of about 300 km). Here we show preliminary attempts at expanding our approach to the global scale, with a specific goal of determining whether such an anisotropic LAB can also be observed in the Pacific ocean. We started with our most recent global upper mantle radially anisotropic shear velocity model, determined using the Spectral Element Method (SEMum2; French et al., this meeting). We augment the corresponding global surface wave and overtone dataset (period range 60 to 400 s) with deep events and shorter period body waves, in order to ensure optimal deeper depth (>250km) anisotropy recovery due to the paucity of shear wave splitting measurements in the oceans. Our preliminary results, which do not yet incorporate SKS splitting measurements, look promising as they confirm the layering found previously in North America, using a different, global dataset and starting model. In the Pacific, our study confirms earlier azimuthal anisotropy results in the region (e.g. Smith et

  10. 50-Ma initiation of Hawaiian-Emperor bend records major change in Pacific plate motion.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Warren D; Clague, David A

    2006-09-01

    The Hawaiian-Emperor bend has played a prominent yet controversial role in deciphering past Pacific plate motions and the tempo of plate motion change. New ages for volcanoes of the central and southern Emperor chain define large changes in volcanic migration rate with little associated change in the chain's trend, which suggests that the bend did not form by slowing of the Hawaiian hot spot. Initiation of the bend near Kimmei seamount about 50 million years ago (MA) was coincident with realignment of Pacific spreading centers and early magmatism in western Pacific arcs, consistent with formation of the bend by changed Pacific plate motion. PMID:16946069

  11. Plate motion controls on back-arc spreading. [Cenozoic movement in Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fein, J. B.; Jurdy, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The motions of the subducting and the overriding plates influence the spatial and temporal distribution of back-arc spreading. Cenozoic plate motions in hot spot-fixed and no-net-rotation reference frames were studied with attention to correlations between changes in motion and episodes of back-arc spreading in the western Pacific. The results suggest that major back-arc opening occurs when both the overriding plate retreats from the trench in an absolute sense and the subducting plate undergoes a significant speed-up. Neither phenomenon alone is sufficient to initiate spreading. Three major plate velocity increases can be identified in the Cenozoic: (1) the Pacific plate 5-9 Ma; (2) the Indian plate at 27 Ma; and (3) the Pacific plate at 43 Ma, due to its shift from northerly to more westerly motion. At the present time, the Indian and Philippine are the only overriding plates that are retreating from their Pacific trenches and back-arc spreading occurs only on these two retreating plates. Although the Indian plate has been retreating for at least 25 Ma, back-arc spreading began only following the Pacific plate speed-up 5-9 Ma. Earlier, during the Indian plate speed-up, no overriding plates were retreating strongly and no back-arc spreading epsiodes are preserved from this time. For the earliest Pacific plate shift at 43 Ma, the Eurasian plate was not advancing, thus creating the only favorable plate kinematic conditions in the Cenozoic for back-arc basin formation in this region. It is unclear whether extension in the Japan Sea is a result of these conditions.

  12. Ridge-spotting: A new test for Pacific absolute plate motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Relative plate motions provide high-resolution descriptions of motions of plates relative to other plates. Yet geodynamically, motions of plates relative to the mantle are required since such motions can be attributed to forces (e.g., slab pull and ridge push) acting upon the plates. Various reference frames have been proposed, such as the hot spot reference frame, to link plate motions to a mantle framework. Unfortunately, both accuracy and precision of absolute plate motion models lag behind those of relative plate motion models. Consequently, it is paramount to use relative plate motions in improving our understanding of absolute plate motions. A new technique called "ridge-spotting" combines absolute and relative plate motions and examines the viability of proposed absolute plate motion models. We test the method on six published Pacific absolute plate motions models, including fixed and moving hot spot models as well as a geodynamically derived model. Ridge-spotting reconstructs the Pacific-Farallon and Pacific-Antarctica ridge systems over the last 80 Myr. All six absolute plate motion models predict large amounts of northward migration and monotonic clockwise rotation for the Pacific-Farallon ridge. A geodynamic implication of our ridge migration predictions is that the suggestion that the Pacific-Farallon ridge may have been pinned by a large mantle upwelling is not supported. Unexpected or erratic ridge behaviors may be tied to limitations in the models themselves or (for Indo-Atlantic models) discrepancies in the plate circuits used to project models into the Pacific realm. Ridge-spotting is promising and will be extended to include more plates and other ocean basins.

  13. Polar standstill of the mid-cretaceous pacific plate and its geodynamic implications.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, J A; Sager, W W

    1995-08-18

    Paleomagnetic data from the Mid-Cretaceous Mountains suggest that Pacific plate motion during the Early to mid-Cretaceous was slow, less than 0.3 degree per year, resembling the polar standstill observed in coeval rocks of Eurasia and North America. There is little evidence for a change in plate motion that could have precipitated the major volcanic episode of the early Aptian that is marked by the formation of the Ontong Java Plateau. During the volcanism, oceanic plates bordering the Pacific plate moved rapidly. Large-scale northward motion of the Pacific plate began after volcanism ceased. This pattern suggests that mantle plume volcanism exerted control on plate tectonics in the Cretaceous Pacific basin. PMID:17807731

  14. Plate tectonics of the northern part of the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzhbitsky, E. V.; Kononov, M. V.; Kotelkin, V. D.

    2007-10-01

    Geophysical data on the northern part of the Pacific Ocean were systematized to compile a map of geomagnetic and geothermal studies of the Bering Sea. The absence of reliable data about the formation time of the Bering Sea structures of oceanic and continental origins is noted; this hampered the assessment of the geodynamical processes in the North Pacific. Based on the geophysical data, we estimated the age of the structures of the Bering Sea floor such as the Commander Basin (21 My), the Shirshov Ridge (95 and 33 My in the northern and southern parts, respectively), the Aleutian Basin (70 My), the Vitus Arch (44 My), the Bowers Ridge (30 My), and the Bowers Basin (40 My). These values are confirmed by the geological, geophysical, and kinematic data. A numerical modeling of the formation of extensive regional structures (Emperor Fracture Zone, Chinook Trough, and others) in the Northern Pacific is carried out. A conclusion was made on the basis of the geological and geothermal analysis that the northern and southern parts of the Shirshov Ridge have different geological ages and different tectonic structures. The northern part of the ridge is characterized by an upthrust-nappe terrain origin, while the southern part has originated from a torn-away island arc similar to the origin of the Bowers Ridge. The sea floor of the Aleutian Basin represents a detached part of the Upper Cretaceous Kula plate, on which spreading processes took place in the Vitus Arch area in the Eocene. The final activity phase in the Bering Sea began 21 My B.P. by spreading of the ancient oceanic floor of the Commander Basin. Based on the age estimations of the structures of the Bering Sea floor, the results of the modeling of the process of formation of regional fracture zones and of the geomagnetic, geothermal, tectonic, geological, and structural data, we calculated and compiled a kinematic model (with respect to a hot spot reference system) of the northern part of the Pacific Ocean for 21

  15. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  16. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  17. Supraslab earthquakes above the Pacific-plate slab in NE Japan: A possible graveyard of detached seamounts and volcanic ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, S.; Okada, T.; Uchida, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hino, R.

    2005-12-01

    Double-difference relocations of interplate thrust and intraslab earthquakes at depths greater than 35 km under NE Japan indicate that many clusters of earthquakes occur above the interplate thrust zone and hence are no longer part of the sinking Pacific-plate slab. The best examples of such clusters are found at depths of 40 to 60 km near the depth limit of interplate thrust earthquake activity and near the intersection of the forearc Moho with the plate interface. In some clusters, small repeating earthquakes occur on the plate interface below the supraslab clusters. The largest of these clusters have earthquakes that are as much as 25 km shallower than the plate boundary and extend as much as several tens of km in the down-dip direction. Offshore multi-beam sonar bathymetry shows seafloor relief that is dominated by seamounts and guyots, representing Cretaceous intraplate volcanic activity. The Japan inner trench slope is marked by many re-entrants that record past seamount-forearc collisions. Supraslab earthquake clusters may represent earthquake activity inside seamounts that have detached from the underlying Pacific plate along the original sedimented seafloor on which these intraplate shield volcanoes were built. If this interpretation is correct, then supraslab earthquakes may represent a unique cumulative record of past seamount subduction.

  18. Relative motions of the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates estimated by the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements spanning approximately 3 years have been used to determine velocities for 7 sites on the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates. The site velocities agree with both plate model predictions and other space geodetic techniques. We find no evidence for internal deformation of the interior of the Australian plate. Wellington, New Zealand, located in the Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, moves 20 +/- 5 mm/yr west-southwest relative to the Australian plate. Its velocity lies midway between the predicted velocities of the two plates. Relative Euler vectors for the Australia-Antarctica and Pacific-Antarctica plates agree within one standard deviation with the NUVEL-1A predictions.

  19. Linking the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene Pacific plate and the Atlantic bordering continents using plate circuits and paleomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Tarduno, John A.

    2008-07-01

    Late Cretaceous to Paleogene paleomagnetic data from the Pacific plate (the Emperor Seamounts) can be compared with data from the Atlantic bordering continents through the use of plate circuit reconstructions. Here we summarize the uncertainties in all data sets and present formal tests. We report agreement between Late Cretaceous Pacific paleomagnetic data and predictions based on the estimates of non-Pacific pole positions from synthetic apparent polar wander paths. This congruency points to the veracity of the plate circuits and the accuracy of the paleomagnetic estimates. In contrast to the agreement seen for the Late Cretaceous, small discrepancies are observed in the comparisons of the Pacific Paleogene data and predictions from synthetic apparent polar wander paths. Such a disparity in a younger time interval is unexpected, given the agreement of the Late Cretaceous data. The possibility that minor, temporally variable nondipole field components contribute to the discrepancy cannot be completely discounted. However, an alternative and more straightforward explanation is suggested by further comparisons of the mean non-Pacific paleomagnetic data and the highest-quality poles that contribute to the means. In particular, we note that (1) the Pacific Paleogene data are in full agreement with coeval poles from North America meeting strict reliability criteria and (2) the non-Pacific Paleogene poles of synthetic apparent polar wander paths are dominated by results from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), but taken as a whole, the NAIP data fail a paleomagnetic reversal test. Hence, minor discrepancies between Paleocene paleomagnetic data from the Pacific and Atlantic hemispheres may point to limitations of the latter, which incorporate a relatively large number of older, lower-quality data. These findings call for renewed data collections utilizing comprehensive rock magnetic and paleomagnetic (demagnetization) procedures to improve resolution of Paleocene

  20. Fast P wave propagation in subducted Pacific lithosphere: Refraction from the plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gideon; Gubbins, David; Mao, Weijian

    1994-12-01

    P waves traveling from events in the Tonga-Kermadec seismic zone to stations in New Zealand are very fast with highly emergent, dispersed waveforms. Ray tracing has shown the waves to travel close to the subducted Pacific plate throughout their length, and synthetic seismogram calculations have shown the dispersion requires a very thin (8-12 km) fast layer. Previous work has been based on data from analog records and one digital, single-component short-period instrument; no polarization analysis was possible, and measurements of dispersion were limited by the bandwidth. From January 1991 to August 1992 we deployed nine broad band, three-component seismometers in good sites for observing these arrivals; the data are augmented by three-component, short-period digital records from new stations of the New Zealand National Network. In this study we analyze 1191 broad-band and 2076 short period seismograms from 71 events for polarization of the initial P wave. The polarization directions are found to be up to 30 deg off the great circle path and consistently steep (20 deg from vertical). They are too steep to be explained by standard ray paths or refraction from a fast horizontal layer. We invert the polarization directions for a tilted interface beneath the array and use arrival times to control the depth to the interface, which is found to lie close to the top of the subducted plate inferred from the seismicity. We conclude that these precursive, emergent P waves have traveled through a fast layer close to the top of the subducted plate and refract upward to the station. A second arrival, with lower dominant frequency near 1 Hz and normal travel time, is occasionally seen on both broad band and short-time stations. Its polarization direction is similarly steep but difficult to measure; the evidence suggests that it also travels within the plate with similar ray path to the precursor.

  1. Anisotropy from SKS splitting across the Pacific-North America plate boundary offshore southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Joseph; Kohler, Monica D.; Davis, Paul M.; Wang, Xinguo; Holt, William; Weeraratne, Dayanthie S.

    2016-07-01

    SKS arrivals from ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from an offshore southern California deployment are analyzed for shear-wave splitting. The project involved 34 OBSs deployed for 12 months in a region extending up to 500 kilometers west of the coastline into the oceanic Pacific plate. The measurement process consisted of removing the effects of anisotropy using a range of values for splitting fast directions and delay times to minimize energy along the transverse seismometer axis. Computed splitting parameters are unexpectedly similar to onland parameters, exhibiting WSW-ENE fast polarization directions and delays between 0.8 and 1.8 s, even for oceanic plate sites. This is the first SKS splitting study to extend across the entire boundary between the North America and Pacific plates, into the oceanic part of the Pacific plate. The splitting results show that the fast direction of anisotropy on the Pacific plate does not align with absolute plate motion (APM), and they extend the trend of anisotropy in southern California an additional 500 km west, well onto the oceanic Pacific plate. We model the finite strain and anisotropy within the asthenosphere associated with density-buoyancy driven mantle flow and the effects of APM. In the absence of plate motion effects, such buoyancy driven mantle flow would be NE-directed beneath the Pacific plate observations. The best-fit patterns of mantle flow are inferred from the tomography-based models that show primary influences from foundering higher-density zones associated with the history of subduction beneath North America. The new offshore SKS measurements, when combined with measurements onshore within the plate boundary zone, indicate that dramatic lateral variations in density-driven upper mantle flow are required from offshore California into the plate boundary zone in California and western Basin and Range.

  2. Imaging the Subduction Plate Interface Using Low-Frequency Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plourde, A. P.; Bostock, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Low-frequency Earthquakes (LFEs) in subduction zones are commonly thought to represent slip on the plate interface. They have also been observed to lie near or within a zone of low shear-wave velocity, which is modelled as fluid-rich upper oceanic crust. Due to relatively large depth uncertainties in absolute hypocenters of most LFE families, their location relative to an independently imaged subucting plate and, consequently, the nature of the plate boundary at depths between 30-45 km have not been precisely determined. For a selection of LFE families in northern Washington, we measure variations in arrival time of individual LFE detections using multi-channel cross-correlation incorporating both arrivals at the same station and different events (cross-detection data), and the same event but different stations (cross-station data). Employing HypoDD, these times are used to generate relative locations for individual LFE detections. After creating templates from spatial subgroups of detections, network cross-correlation techniques will be used to search for new detections in neighbouring areas, thereby expanding the local catalogue and enabling further subdivision. By combining the source ``arrays'' and the receiver arrays from the Array of Arrays experiment we plan to interrogate plate boundary structure using migration of scattered waves from the subduction complex as previously documented beneath southern Vancouver Island.

  3. Elastostatic bending of a bimaterial plate with a circular interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbonna, Nkem

    2015-08-01

    The elastostatic bending of an arbitrarily loaded bimaterial plate with a circular interface is analysed. It is shown that the deflections in the composite solid are directly related to the deflection in the corresponding homogeneous material by integral and differential operators. It is further shown that, by a simple transformation of elastic constants, the Airy stress function induced in the composite by a stretching singularity can be deduced from the deflection induced by a bending singularity. This result is significant for reduction of mathematical labour and for systematic construction of solutions for more complex structures with circular geometry.

  4. Constraining Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene plate boundaries in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, K. J.; Williams, S.; Whittaker, J. M.; Müller, D.; Clarke, G. L.; Seton, M.; Flament, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    The southwest Pacific has undergone a complex tectonic history since the Late Cretaceous, involving multiple episodes of subduction, back-arc spreading and continental deformation. Starkly contrasting reconstructions have been proposed for this period, ranging from tectonic quiescence with no plate boundary between the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) and Pacific, to widespread subduction and back-arc spreading, and this disparity reflects sparse and ambiguous data. Placing further constraints on these reconstructions is crucial for a variety of applications, from global-scale geodynamic studies using plate circuits to basin-scale studies of paleogeographic evolution and vertical motions. Geologic and kinematic data from the southwest Pacific are reviewed to better constrain the tectonic history of the region from the Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene, including the timing and location of plate boundary activity. This facilitates better constraints on the time-dependent evolution of the southwest Pacific plate circuit so that motion between plate pairs is consistent with geologic data and known tectonic regimes. The southwest Pacific comprised three spreading ridges during this time: in the Southeast Indian Ocean, Tasman Sea and Amundsen Sea. However, at least one, and possibly two other plate boundaries also accommodated relative motions: in the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) and between the LHR and Pacific. Uncertainties in the timing and nature of plate boundaries prevent the construction of a robust reconstruction model and the implementation of a southwest Pacific plate circuit. Some previous plate models include continuous subduction east of the LHR throughout the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic, while an alternative scenario involves the absence of plate boundaries between the LHR and Pacific until 45 Ma. Geologic observations suggests that subduction initiated to the east of New Caledonia at c. 55 Ma, including dyke emplacement and metamorphism in New Caledonia, and arc

  5. Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene plate boundaries in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Dietmar Müller, R.; Whittaker, Joanne; Flament, Nicolas; Seton, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The late Cretaceous to mid Eocene history of the southwest and southernmost Pacific has been subject to starkly contrasting interpretations, ranging from relative tectonic quiescence with the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) being part of the Pacific plate to a dynamic subduction setting. In the first scenario the Tasman Sea would have formed as a consequence of divergence between the Pacific and Australian plates, whereas in the second scenario it would have formed as a marginal basin associated with subduction. The first scenario is supported by a number of arguments, including a lack of evidence for deformation and tectonic activity in New Zealand during this period and a geodynamic modelling inference, namely that the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain can be better reproduced if the LHR is part of the Pacific plate. The second scenario is supported by regional plate kinematic models reconciling a variety of observations including back-arc basin formation and destruction through time and the history of arc-continent collisions. The primary problem with the first scenario is the use of a plate circuit that leaves relative motion between East and West Antarctica unconstrained, leading to an improbable history of periodic compression and extension. The main problem with the alternative scenario is a lack of sampled late Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks east of the LHR. We analysed available geological and geophysical data to constrain the locations of and movements along the plate boundaries in the southwest and southern Pacific from the late Cretaceous to mid Eocene, and assessed how Pacific plate motion is best quantified during this period. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that a plate boundary separated the Pacific plate from the LHR. The distribution of lower mantle slab material that is imaged by seismic tomography beneath New Zealand is best explained if subduction occurred to the east of the LHR during the entire late Cretaceous to mid Eocene period. Rocks

  6. Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Bohai Bay Basin and its coupling relationship with Pacific Plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jintong; Wang, Hongliang; Bai, Ying; Ji, Xinyuan; Duo, Xuemei

    2016-09-01

    The Bohai Bay Basin is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic rift basin in eastern China. Based mainly on a balanced-section analysis, this study compares the spatio-temporal differences of tectonic evolution in relation to strike-slip faults among different depressions within the basin. In combination with the analysis of subsidence characteristics, the study also attempts to clarify the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the basin and its coupling relationship with the subduction of the Pacific Plate. It was found that: (1) the strike-slip faults were activated generally from south to north and from west to east during the Cenozoic; (2) there is a negative correlation between the intensity of tectonic activity in the Bohai Bay Basin and subduction rate of the Pacific Plate; and (3) the migration direction of the basin depocenters is consistent with the direction of Pacific Plate subduction.

  7. Tectonic implications of post-30 Ma Pacific and North American relative plate motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.; Parsons, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Pacific plate moved northwest relative to North America since 42 Ma. The rapid half rate of Pacific-Farallon spreading allowed the ridge to approach the continent at about 29 Ma. Extinct spreading ridges that occur offshore along 65% of the margin document that fragments of the subducted Farallon slab became captured by the Pacific plate and assumed its motion proper to the actual subduction of the spreading ridge. This plate-capture process can be used to explain much of the post-29 Ma Cordilleran North America extension, strike slip, and the inland jump of oceanic spreading in the Gulf of California. Much of the post-29 Ma continental tectonism is the result of the strong traction imposed on the deep part of the continental crust by the gently inclined slab of subducted oceanic lithosphere as it moved to the northwest relative to the overlying continent. -from Authors

  8. Improved Late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic Paleomagnetic apparent polar wander path for the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaman, Melissa; Sager, William W.; Acton, Gary D.; Lanci, Luca; Pares, Josep

    2007-10-01

    Understanding of Pacific plate tectonics and geodynamics is aided by refinement of the plate's apparent polar wander path (APWP). We improved the Late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic APWP by analyzing a large, diverse paleomagnetic data set that combines core sample, seamount magnetic anomaly model, and marine magnetic anomaly skewness data. Our preferred APWP has five mean paleomagnetic poles representing the Oligocene (30 Ma), Late (39 Ma) and Early (49 Ma) Eocene, and Paleocene (61 Ma) epochs and the Maastrichtian (68 Ma) stage. Along with a published 80 Ma pole, the APWP shows a stillstand from ˜ 80 to ˜ 49 Ma punctuating the large overall northward drift of the plate. The two youngest poles imply resumption of northward motion during mid-Eocene time with another change of polar motion after ˜ 30 Ma. If unaffected by other phenomena (e.g., true polar wander or change in time-averaged magnetic field geometry), the stillstand implies negligible northward plate motion during the period of Emperor Seamounts formation, contrary to most accepted plate motion models. The stillstand is consistent with paleomagnetic data from the Emperor Seamounts, which imply southward motion of the Hawaiian melting anomaly. It also implies significant westward drift of the hotspot if the Pacific plate was moving west at rates similar to the later Cenozoic. In addition, changes in polar wander after ˜ 49 Ma are consistent with changes of north Pacific plate boundaries.

  9. Upper mantle structure of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates revealed by seafloor seismic array observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isse, Takehi; Shiobara, Hajime; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Sugioka, Hiroko; Ito, Aki

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography studies have revealed the structure and dynamics of Earth's interior since the 1980s. However, the spatial resolution of the oceanic region is not good enough caused by sparse distribution of the seismic stations. The observations with broadband ocean-bottom seismographs (BBOBSs) since the 2000s enabled us to obtain seismic tomography models with higher spatial resolution. Our Japanese BBOBS group deployed more than 100 BBOBSs in the Pacific Ocean and obtained a high-resolution (300-500 km) three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure in the upper mantle beneath northwestern and south Pacific Ocean by using surface wave tomography technique. In the northwestern Pacific Ocean, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate, we found that the shear wave structure in the Philippine sea plate is well correlated with the seafloor age in the upper 120 km, three separate slow anomalies in the mantle wedge at depth shallower than 100 km beneath the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, which have a close relationship with the three groups of frontal and rear arc volcanoes having distinct Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios, and that the Philippine Sea plate, which is a single plate, shows very large lateral variations in azimuthal and radial anisotropies compared with the Pacific plate. In the South Pacific Ocean, where midplate hotspots are concentrated, we found that the localized slow anomalies are found near hotspots in the upper mantle, estimated thickness of the lithosphere is about 90 km in average and is thinned by ~20 km in the vicinity of hotspots, which may represent thermal erosion due to mantle plumes.

  10. Correlating Volcanism in Coastal California with Slab Windows predicted from Pacific Plate Isochrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. S.; McCrory, P. A.; Stanley, R. G.

    2006-12-01

    The geologic record of coastal California includes evidence of numerous volcanic centers younger than 30 Ma that do not appear to have erupted in an arc setting. By correlating these volcanic centers with specific slab windows predicted from analysis of magnetic anomalies on the Pacific plate, we add new constraints to tectonic reconstructions since 30 Ma. Our correlations -- such as erupting the Morro Rock-Islay Hill complex south of the Pioneer fracture zone and the Iversen Basalt south of the Mendocino fracture zone -- require larger displacements within western North America than advocated by most previous authors. Specifically, we infer at least 315 km of motion between the Sierra Nevada and rigid North America at an azimuth of about N60W, and at least 515 km between Baja California and rigid North America in a similar direction. Alternatively, smaller displacements would require revision of the Pacific-North America global plate circuit. A consequence of inferring a large displacement of Baja California is that the Pacific-North American plate boundary must have developed most of its current form prior to 10 Ma. We interpret a slab window developing between Cocos and Monterey plates after 19 Ma that reconstructs under nearly all of the southern California volcanic centers dated at 18-14 Ma. Reconstructing North American microplates using spherical plate tectonics allows us to animate kinematic models for interaction between oceanic and continental plates.

  11. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded and Bolted Cold Plates with Al/Cu Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Suresh, M.; Sibi Varshan, M.

    2015-05-01

    An attempt is made to design and fabricate a cold plate with aluminum-copper dissimilar interface joined by friction stir welding. Optimum welding conditions for obtaining sound-quality corner and T joints with an aluminum-copper interface were established. Welded cross sections of the friction stir welded cold plate were analyzed to understand the bonding characteristics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to evaluate the fluid-flow characteristics and thermal resistance of friction stir welded cold plate and the resulted are compared with the conventional bolted cold plate configuration. For CFD modeling of a cold plate with a dissimilar interface, a new methodology is proposed. From the CFD analysis and experimental results, it is observed that friction stir welded cold plate offered better thermal performance compared to the bolted cold plate and it is due to the metallurgical bonding at the aluminum-copper interface with the dispersion of copper particles.

  12. Overview on the Plate Boundaries Along the Western Mexican Pacific Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Bandy, W. L.; Michaud, F.; Ortega Ramírez, J.

    2013-05-01

    The cinematic of the Pacific, Rivera and Cocos oceanic plates have a significant impact on the subduction process and seismic cycles occurring along the western Mexican Pacific margin of the North American and Caribbean plates. Sections of Pacific (PAC), Rivera (RIV), Cocos (COC), North American (NAM) and Caribbean (CAB) plate boundaries along the western margin of Mexico are not well constrained. From north to south: the transform-rift system at Gulf of California has been generally considered as part of PAC-NAM plate boundary. However results of the FAMEX cruise at 2002 evidenced that Tosco-Abreojos Fault System along the western margin of Baja California Peninsula is active. Should this tectonic structure be considered as a plate boundary? At the RIV plate northern corner (including Mazatlan Basin), the scatter seismicity recorded between Tamayo FZ and the Marias Islands restricts the characterization of the plate boundary between the RIV and NAM plates. Some authors have proposed that Tamayo FZ and Marias I. Escarpment are the RIV-NAM plate boundary. Recently other authors have called that RIV-NAM boundary is a geomorphology lineament that runs from a Rivera Rise transform at 23N to the northern end of Marias I. Escarpment. Even so this concept is not sustained with seismic activity. Further this thought would imply that the oceanic lithosphere of Mazatlan Basin would form part of NAM plate. Other thoughts are either that there is a diffuse RIV-NAM plate boundary to the north of the Maria Archipelago, or Middle America Subduction Zone is gradually extending northward of the Maria Is. While the plate boundary at SE corner of the RIV plate is neither well defined morphologically nor seismically constraint, offshore Colima Coast. Some authors have proposed that this zone is a diffuse plate boundary between RIV and COC plates, result of a NE-SW shear plate motion. Other authors have proposed that the RIV-COC boundary extends E-W from the El Gordo Graben (EGG) at

  13. Constraints on Pacific plate kinematics and dynamics with global positioning system measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.; Golombek, M. P.; Thornton, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    A measurement program designed to investigate kinematic and dynamic aspects of plate tectonics in the Pacific region by means of satellite observations is proposed. Accuracy studies are summarized showing that for short baselines (less than 100 km), the measuring accuracy of global positioning system (GPS) receivers can be in the centimeter range. For longer baselines, uncertainty in the orbital ephemerides of the GPS satellites could be a major source of error. Simultaneous observations at widely (about 300 km) separated fiducial stations over the Pacific region, should permit an accuracy in the centimeter range for baselines of up to several thousand kilometers. The optimum performance level is based on the assumption of that fiducial baselines are known a priori to the centimeter range. An example fiducial network for a GPS study of the South Pacific region is described.

  14. Propagation of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcano chain by Pacific plate cooling stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.D.; Foulger, G.R.; Barall, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lithosphere crack model, the main alternative to the mantle plume model for age-progressive magma emplacement along the Hawaiian-Emperor volcano chain, requires the maximum horizontal tensile stress to be normal to the volcano chain. However, published stress fields calculated from Pacific lithosphere tractions and body forces (e.g., subduction pull, basal drag, lithosphere density) are not optimal for southeast propagation of a stress-free, vertical tensile crack coincident with the Hawaiian segment of the Hawaiian-Emperor chain. Here we calculate the thermoelastic stress rate for present-day cooling of the Pacific plate using a spherical shell finite element representation of the plate geometry. We use observed seafloor isochrons and a standard model for lithosphere cooling to specify the time dependence of vertical temperature profiles. The calculated stress rate multiplied by a time increment (e.g., 1 m.y.) then gives a thermoelastic stress increment for the evolving Pacific plate. Near the Hawaiian chain position, the calculated stress increment in the lower part of the shell is tensional, with maximum tension normal to the chain direction. Near the projection of the chain trend to the southeast beyond Hawaii, the stress increment is compressive. This incremental stress field has the form necessary to maintain and propagate a tensile crack or similar lithosphere flaw and is thus consistent with the crack model for the Hawaiian volcano chain.?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Petrologic Aspects of Seamount and Guyot Volcanism on the Ancestral Mesozoic Pacific Plate: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of large seamounts and guyots are widely scattered almost in a "shotgun-blast" arrangement in an area about the size of the United States west of the Mississippi River on the Mesozoic Pacific plate between the Mariana Trench and the Gilbert Islands. Most of these formed between ~160-100 Ma while the Pacific plate was surrounded by spreading ridges and growing outward in all directions. There is little to no indication that the seamounts and guyots formed along linear seamount chains; existing radiometric-age data show no age progressions. The volcanoes appear to have formed in response to a uniform stress configuration across the plate, which was either not moving or moving very slowly at the time (1, 2), much like the modern Antarctic plate. When the growing plate started to encounter subduction systems in the western Pacific at ~90 Ma, consistent stress patterns began to develop, and the broad linear Gilbert and Line volcanic ridge systems began to form. Even then, however, considerable overlapping of volcanism occurred, and only the most general age progressions are evident in existing data. Petrologic data from samples obtained from dozens of volcanic summits by dredging and beneath several carbonate platforms by drilling reveal considerable diversity in development of differentiated alkalic magmatic lineages rooted in diverse parental basaltic rocks. These include transitional, alkalic and basanitic compositions, with differentiates of hawaiite, mugearite, trachyte and one phonolite. Many of the basaltic rocks are partly to significantly transformed by alteration under oxidative conditions (dredged rocks) and both oxidative and non-oxidative conditions (drilled rocks). This can make estimations of mantle geochemical provenance difficult. Nevertheless, the province has been linked by backtracking techniques to the modern SOPITA region of the South Pacific (3), and its rocks show enrichments in trace elements and isotopic characteristics similar to

  16. New Evidence that the Emperor Seamount Chain Records Motion of the Pacific Plate Relative to the Deep Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Richard; Seidman, Lily

    2016-04-01

    A key question for Pacific and circum-Pacific tectonics with implications for mantle convection is whether the Emperor seamount chain records the northward motion of the Pacific plate relative to the deep mantle. To investigate this question, we determine a new Pacific plate paleomagnetic pole for ≈60 Ma BP from the analysis of the skewness of marine magnetic anomaly 26r recording Pacific-Farallon motion in low paleolatitudes. We further update a previously published Pacific plate pole for ≈65 Ma from the analysis of anomalies 27r to 31 by incorporating a larger correction for anomalous skewness. These two poles, along with prior poles for 58 Ma and 72 Ma allow us to test how much, if any, the Hawaiian hotspot moved relative to the spin axis for ≈14 Ma of the ≈30 Ma during which the Emperor chain was formed. We find that the Hawaiian hotspot moved insignificantly southward (4 ±17 mm/a (95% confidence limits)) from 72 Ma to 58 Ma while the Pacific plate moved significantly northward (42 ± 17 mm/a (95% confidence limits)). We further compare the apparent polar wander of the Pacific hotspots with that of the Indo-Atlantic hotspots over the past 65 Ma. The two paths indicate a jump of ≈8° in the position of the spin axis relative to global hotspots between ≈60 Ma and ≈45 Ma presumably due to true polar wander.

  17. Role of Transtension in Rifting at the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Transtensional plate motion can be accommodated either in a localized zone of transtensional rifting or over a broader region. Broader zones of deformation can be classified either as diffuse deformation or strain partitioning (one or more major strike-slip shear zones geographically offset from a region of a extensional faulting). The Pacific-North America plate boundary in southwestern North America was transtensional during much of its history and has exhibited the full range of these behaviors at different spatial scales and in different locations, as recorded by fault motions and paleomagnetic rotations. Here we focus on the northern Gulf of California part of the plate boundary (Upper and Lower Delfin basin segments), which has been in a zone of transtensional Pacific-North America plate boundary motion ever since the middle Miocene demise of adjacent Farallon-derived microplates. Prior to the middle Miocene, during the time of microplate activity, this sector of North America experienced basin-and-range normal faults (core complexes) in Sonora. However there is no evidence of continued extensional faulting nor of a Gulf-related topographic depression until after ca 12 Ma when a major ignimbrite (Tuff of San Felipe/ Ignimbrite of Hermosillo) was deposited across the entire region of the future Gulf of California rift in this sector. After 12 Ma, faults disrupted this marker bed in eastern Baja California and western Sonora, and some major NNW-striking right-lateral faults are inferred to have developed near the Sonoran coast causing offset of some of the volcanic facies. However, there are major tectonic rotations of the volcanic rocks in NE Baja California between 12 and 6 Ma, suggesting that the plate boundary motion was still occurring over a broad region. By contrast, after about 6 Ma, diminished rotations in latest Miocene and Pliocene volcanic rocks, as well as fault slip histories, show that plate boundary deformation became localized to a narrower

  18. Investigating the Subduction History of the Southwest Pacific using Coupled Plate Tectonic-Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, K. J.; Flament, N. E.; Williams, S.; Müller, D.; Gurnis, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene (~85-45 Ma) evolution of the southwest Pacific has been the subject of starkly contrasting plate reconstruction models, reflecting sparse and ambiguous data. Disparate models of (1) west-dipping subduction and back-arc basin opening to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, (2) east-dipping subduction and back-arc basin closure to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, and (3) tectonic quiescence with no subduction have all been proposed for this time frame. To help resolve this long-standing problem we test a new southwest Pacific reconstruction using global mantle flow models with imposed plate motions. The kinematic model incorporates east to northeast directed rollback of a west-dipping subduction zone between 85 and 55 Ma, accommodating opening of the South Loyalty back-arc basin to the east of New Caledonia. At 55 Ma there is a plate boundary reorganization in the region. West-dipping subduction and back-arc basin spreading end, and there is initiation of northeast dipping subduction within the back-arc basin. Consumption of South Loyalty Basin seafloor continues until 45 Ma, when obduction onto New Caledonia begins. West-dipping Tonga-Kermadec subduction initiates at this time at the relict Late Cretaceous-earliest Eocene subduction boundary. We use the 3D spherical mantle convection code CitcomS coupled to the plate reconstruction software GPlates, with plate motions and evolving plate boundaries imposed since 230 Ma. The predicted present-day mantle structure is compared to S- and P-wave seismic tomography models, which can be used to infer the presence of slab material in the mantle at locations where fast velocity anomalies are imaged. This workflow enables us to assess the forward-modeled subduction history of the region.

  19. Shrinking of the Cocos and Nazca Plates due to Horizontal Thermal Contraction and Implications for Plate Non-rigidity and the Non-closure of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca Plate Motion Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Kreemer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Plate rigidity is the central tenet of plate tectonics. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that significant intraplate deformation occurs in oceanic lithosphere due to horizontal thermal contraction, the rate of which decreases as ≈ 1/age [Kumar & Gordon 2009]. Support for this hypothesis comes from the azimuths of submarine transform faults, which are fit significantly better assuming shrinking plates than by assuming rigid plates [Mishra & Gordon 2015]. Previously we estimated the intraplate velocity field of the Pacific plate accounting for horizontal thermal contraction. The ≈2 mm/yr southeastward motion predicted for the northeastern part of the plate relative to the Pacific-Antarctic Rise may contribute to the non-closure of the Pacific-North America plate motion circuit. In a reference frame in which fix the oldest portion of the Pacific plate, some sites on the plate move up to ≈2 mm/yr [Kreemer & Gordon 2014]. Here we present intraplate velocity fields of the Cocos and Nazca plates and discuss their implications for the non-rigidity of plates and the non-closure of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca plate circuit, which fails closure by a stunning 14 ±5 mm/yr [DeMets et al. 2010]. If we fix the oldest part of the Cocos plate, intraplate velocities of up to ≈2 mm/yr are estimated, with the fastest motion occurring at the northern end of the plate. If we fix the oldest part of the Nazca plate, displacement rates up to 2 mm/yr are estimated, with the fastest motion occurring in the northeasternmost portion of the plate. In the velocity fields for both plates, the lithosphere adjacent to transform faults along the East Pacific Rise tends to move to the south, which would skew the azimuths of the transform faults clockwise of the values expected for rigid plates, which is the same as the sense of misfit between observed azimuths of transform faults and the azimuths calculated from the MORVEL global set of relative angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]. Direct

  20. Interface-guided mode of Lamb waves in a two-dimensional phononic crystal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping-Ping; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Wu, Fu-Gen; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jing; Hu, Ai-Zhen

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the interface-guided mode of Lamb waves in a phononic crystal heterostructures plate, which is composed of two different semi-infinite phononic crystal (PC) plates. The interface-guided modes of the Lamb wave can be obtained by the lateral lattice slipping or by the interface longitudinal gliding. Significantly, it is observed that the condition to generate the interface-guided modes of the Lamb wave is more demanding than that of the studied fluid-fluid system. The interface-guided modes are strongly affected not only by the relative movement of the two semi-infinite PCs but also by the thickness of the PC plate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374068 and 11374066), the Science & Technology Star of Zhujiang Foundation of Guangzhou, China (Grant No. 2011J2200013), and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong, China (Grant No. S2012020010885).

  1. Constraining porosity of the shallow forearc and plate interface offshore Nicaragua with marine electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naif, S.; Key, K.; Constable, S.; Evans, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    We imaged the electrical resistivity structure of the incoming plate and outer forearc across the Middle America Trench with 2-D inversion of marine controlled-source electromagnetic data. The inverted data reveal a high conductivity channel that is congruent with the geometry of the plate interface, which we infer to be subducted sediments. We used the resistivity model to estimate the porosity of the upper plate and underthrust sediments. The sediment porosity decays exponentially as it is subducted along the plate interface, in good agreement with existing constraints from compaction studies. The plate interface is overlain by an upper plate that is one to two orders of magnitude more resistive, requiring low porosities (<15%) that are consistent with a non-accreting margin composed of crystalline basement or lithified sediments.At 18 to 23 km landward of the trench, the conductive channel diverges from the plate interface and extends 1-2 km into the overlying plate below a cluster of active seafloor seeps. The location of the anomaly at depth is synonymous with a rapid steepening of the seafloor slope. The steepened slope occurs at 15 to 25 km landward of the trench and is extensive, persisting for more than 100 km along the margin. This correlation leads us to conclude that the cause of the conductive feature is sediment underplating. The implications for the 1992 tsunami earthquake will be discussed.

  2. Global Plate Reconstructions, Pacific Plate Apparent Polar Wander, and the Origin of the Bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    A key tectonic event near 50 Ma B.P. is the formation of the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot track. A central question about the formation of the bend is whether it represents a change in plate motion or a change in motion of the Hawaiian hotspot or some combination of the two. In this presentation I will review results of mainly recent work with Rice collaborators and consider the implications for the bend. Koivisto et al. (2011) present an updated test of the fixed-hotspot approximation comparing the observed positions of Indo-Atlantic hotspot tracks with those predicted from Pacific plate hotspot tracks and the global plate motion circuit through Antarctica. This updated study indicates 2 to 5 mm/a motion between hotspots for the past 48 Ma,that is, since the formation of the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain. The confidence limits include zero and thus are consistent with no motion between Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots for the past 48 Ma. This does not necessarily imply that the hotspots are fixed, as the uncertainties allow for motion up to 8 to 12 mm/a, but does exclude higher rates. When we examine predictions for times preceding 48 Ma B.P. we obtain very different results, however, the apparent rates of inter-hotspot motion increase to about 45-55 ± 20 mm/a. One explanation is that hotspots moved rapidly relative to one another before 48 Ma B.P. and then slowed dramatically at roughly the age of the elbow. An alternative explanation is that as we go further back in time the global plate motion circuit through Antarctica is less reliable. The possibility of motion between East and West Antarctica will be considered. Paleomagnetic data can be used to discriminate between these alternatives. The paleomagnetic results of Petronotis & Gordon [1989], Acton & Gordon [1994], Horner-Johnson & Gordon [2010], Zheng et al. [this meeting], and Boswell et al. [this meeting] will be reviewed and implications discussed.

  3. The geochemical fingerprint of serpentinite- and crust-dominated plate-interface settings: some tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaò, Enrico; Scambelluri, Marco; Agostini, Samuele; Tonarini, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    garnet peridotite and harzburgite from Gagnone have low B (up to 9 ppm), low B/Nb (<100) and high Pb and Sr isotopic ratios (206Pb/204Pb up to 18.84; 87Sr/86Sr 0.7124). Eclogite and HP metarodingite in the Gagnone peridotite show comparable values. The host metasediments and gneiss show higher B (6-16 ppm), 206Pb/204Pb (up to 18.98) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.7275). than peridotites and mafic rocks. All the Gagnone rocks have negative delta11B (ultramafic and mafic rocks = 0 to -10 per mil; country rocks = -3 to -12 per mil). The Gagnone peridotites reveal geochemical mixing between ultramafic and host crustal reservoirs. Considering that these peridotites derive from serpentinized protoliths, we expect that the initial high 11B of serpentinites was modified by two combined processes: (1) serpentine dehydration, releasing heavy B to fluids, and (2) exchange between ultramafic rocks and sediment-derived subduction fluids during burial and exhumation. The geochemical signature of the Voltri serpentinites is indicative of interaction with slab fluids enriched in heavy B-rich and in crust-derived components, such as in mantle rocks which evolved atop of the subducting slab. This implies that the slices of the downgoing slab are emplaced early during their burial history atop of the subducting plate. The geochemical signature of peridotites and host metasediments from Gagnone, points to significant exchange between ultramafic bodies and host rocks during prograde subduction prior to peak metamorphism. This again indicates accretion to the plate interface of slab and wedge materials during an early stage of subduction. Moreover, Voltri and Gagnone represent distinct reservoirs, showing positive versus negative delta11B. Serpentinite-dominated settings, like Voltri, produce high B and 11B fluids which can explain 11B-enrichment of much Pacific arcs. Differently, the sediment- and gneiss-dominated Gagnone mélange shows high B, negative δ11B, high radiogenic Pb and Sr: fluids released

  4. Cretaceous Pacific plate movement beneath SE China: Evidence from episodic volcanism and related intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Xu, Xisheng; Xia, Yan

    2014-02-01

    Extensive Late Mesozoic igneous rocks in SE China have been widely considered to be generated under the paleo-Pacific tectonic regime, the plate subduction model, however, remains controversial. This study focuses on the Cretaceous volcanic rocks in northwestern Zhejiang Province. Zircon U-Pb age determination indicates that Cretaceous volcanism in northwestern Zhejiang took place at three episodes of 140-130, 130-127 and 123-118 Ma, in good agreement with the coeval lower volcanic series in southeastern Zhejiang, but lacking the episode at 110-88 Ma corresponding to the upper volcanic series. The Cretaceous volcanic rocks in Zhejiang therefore show an oceanward younging trend. In situ zircon Hf isotope analyses of three episodes of volcanics yield ɛHf(t) values of - 11.2 to - 8.7, -4.8 to - 2.4 and - 4.4 to + 2.2, respectively. The entire sequences display typical isotopic features of magma mixing, implying progressive involvement of juvenile component. Based on systematical researches on the Cretaceous volcanic rocks and a series of granitoid plutons in Zhejiang, it is also identified that the juvenile component involvement gradually occurred from the inland to the coast under an enhanced lithospheric extensional tectonic setting. All the observations in this study indicate the northwestward paleo-Pacific plate subduction with episodic slab rollback which triggered the arc system to retreat towards the Pacific Ocean, rather than the southwestward subduction related to the ridge subduction along the Lower Yangtze River belt.

  5. The 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake related to a large velocity gradient within the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Makoto; Obara, Kazushige

    2015-04-01

    We conduct seismic tomography using arrival time data picked by the high sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). We used earthquakes off the coast outside the seismic network around the source region of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake with the centroid depth estimated from moment tensor inversion by NIED F-net (broadband seismograph network) as well as earthquakes within the seismic network determined by Hi-net. The target region, 20-48N and 120-148E, covers the Japanese Islands from Hokkaido to Okinawa. A total of manually picked 4,622,346 P-wave and 3,062,846 S-wave arrival times for 100,733 earthquakes recorded at 1,212 stations from October 2000 to August 2009 is available for use in the tomographic method. In the final iteration, we estimate the P-wave slowness at 458,234 nodes and the S-wave slowness at 347,037 nodes. The inversion reduces the root mean square of the P-wave traveltime residual from 0.455 s to 0.187 s and that of the S-wave data from 0.692 s to 0.228 s after eight iterations (Matsubara and Obara, 2011). Centroid depths are determined using a Green's function approach (Okada et al., 2004) such as in NIED F-net. For the events distant from the seismic network, the centroid depth is more reliable than that determined by NIED Hi-net, since there are no stations above the hypocenter. We determine the upper boundary of the Pacific plate based on the velocity structure and earthquake hypocentral distribution. The upper boundary of the low-velocity (low-V) oceanic crust corresponds to the plate boundary where thrust earthquakes are expected to occur. Where we do not observe low-V oceanic crust, we determine the upper boundary of the upper layer of the double seismic zone within high-V Pacific plate. We assume the depth at the Japan Trench as 7 km. We can investigate the velocity structure within the Pacific plate such as 10 km beneath the plate boundary since the

  6. Holocene Pacific - North American plate interaction in southern Alaska: implications for the Yakataga seismic gap.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahr, J.C.; Plafker, G.

    1980-01-01

    The St. Elias, Alaska, earthquake (magnitude 7.1 MS) on February 28, 1979, occurred along the complex Pacific-North American plate boundary between Yakutat Bay and Prince William Sound, rupturing only a fraction of the seismic gap identified in that region. To aid in evaluating the potential for, and likely site of, a future earthquake occurring in the remainder of the gap, we have formulated a kinematic model of neotectonic deformation in southern Alaska from available geologic and seismic data. In this model the part of the North American plate bordering on the Gulf of Alaska is divided into three subblocks, which are partially coupled to the Pacific plate. On the basis of the model, the gap-filling rupture or ruptures would most likely be along the north-dipping thrust faults of the Pamplona zone between Icy Bay and the eastern end of the Aleutian Trench. If the accumulated strain of 3.8 m postulated for this region were released suddenly in one event involving the remainder of the gap, the result would be an earthquake as large as magnitude 8. -Authors

  7. Seismic velocity structure of the subducting Pacific plate in the Izu-Bonin region

    SciTech Connect

    Iidaka, Takashi; Mizoue, Megumi; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi )

    1992-10-01

    Observed travel time residual data from a spatially dense seismic network above deep earthquakes in the Izu-Bonin region are compared with 3D ray tracing calculations. The data are inconsistent with a homogeneous slab model and consistent with a heterogenous slab model with regional velocity variations. The residual data can be explained by a model that has a velocity gradient within the slab. In the subducting Pacific plate, the velocity near the center of the slab is faster than that near the upper boundary, and gradually decreases toward the bottom of the plate. A model with a velocity decrease of 3 percent, as predicted by a thermal profile, explains the observed data. 52 refs.

  8. Late cretaceous polar wander of the pacific plate: evidence of a rapid true polar wander event

    PubMed

    Sager; Koppers

    2000-01-21

    We reexamined the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary apparent polar wander path for the Pacific plate using 27 paleomagnetic poles from seamounts dated by (40)Ar/(39)Ar geochronology. The path shows little motion from 120 to 90 million years ago (Ma), northward motion from 79 to 39 Ma, and two groups of poles separated by 16 to 21 degrees with indistinguishable mean ages of 84 +/- 2 Ma. The latter phenomenon may represent a rapid polar wander episode (3 to 10 degrees per million years) whose timing is not adequately resolved with existing data. Similar features in other polar wander paths imply that the event was a rapid shift of the spin axis relative to the mantle (true polar wander), which may have been related to global changes in plate motion, large igneous province eruptions, and a shift in magnetic field polarity state. PMID:10642540

  9. Upper boundary of the Pacific plate subducting beneath Hokkaido, Japan, estimated from ScSp phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Kinue; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Yomogida, Kiyoshi; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas; Jellinek, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Three-dimensional geometry of the upper boundary of the Pacific plate subducting beneath Hokkaido, Japan, was obtained using the ScSp phase: the phase converted from ScS (S wave reflected at the core•mantle boundary) to P wave at the plate boundary. Taking the advantage of a dense seismic network, "Hi-net", recently deployed across the Japanese islands, we applied several seismic array analyses to the recorded waveform data for a large nearby deep earthquake, in order to enhance very weak ScSp signals in the original records. At first, we set up five blocks for the region in plate dip directions. After aligning the travel times of ScS and stacking seismograms among stations in a given sub-block perpendicular to each dip direction, we searched for the optimal plate model (i.e., two-dimensional geometry of the upper boundary) for each block. The model was parameterized by seven depth grids, and seismograms were stacked based on the travel time of ScSp as a time lag of each sub-block, so that the optimal model would yield the maximum spectral energy of ScSp after stacking. This model parameter search was conducted, using ray tracings of ScSp with a reference velocity model and a non-linear inversion scheme (Neighbourhood Algorithm). The optimal model of each block was combined each other by cubic spline interpolation, in order to construct an overall three-dimensional geometry of the upper boundary of the plate. Next, we performed the frequency•wavenumber (f•k) spectral analysis to refine the above result. Assuming each station as a reference point, we made beam output from records of its adjacent stations as a function of wavenumber vector (kx,ky) and frequency. The peak of its power spectrum was considered to represent the wavenumber vector of ScSp, that is, azimuth of arrival and slowness, so that we can estimate the position and depth of the corresponding ScS•ScSp conversion. In the frequency range from 0.5 to 1.5 Hz, we could estimate the conversion

  10. Can clay minerals account for the behavior of non-asperity on the subducting plate interface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ikuo; Kubo, Tatsuro; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Kawai, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Seismicity along the subducting plate interface shows regional variation, which has been explained by the seismic asperity model where large earthquakes occur at strongly coupled patches that are surrounded by weakly coupled regions. This suggests that the subduction plate interface is heterogeneous in terms of frictional properties; however, the mechanism producing the difference between strong and weak couplings remains poorly understood. Here, we propose that the heterogeneity of the fluid pathway and of the spatial distribution of clay minerals plays a key role in the formation of non-asperity at the subducting plate interface. We use laboratory measurements of frictional properties to show that clay minerals on a simulated fault interface are characterized by weak and slow recovery, whereas other materials such as quartz show relatively quick recovery and thereby strong coupling on the fault surface. Aqueous fluids change the mineralogy at the plate interface by producing clay minerals due to hydrate reactions, suggesting that the hydrated weakly coupled regions act as a non-asperity and form a barrier to rupture propagation along the plate boundary at the depths of seismogenic zone.

  11. Preliminary analysis of deformation at the Eurasia-Pacific-North America plate junction from GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, E. I.; Gusev, A. A.; Levin, V. E.; Bakhtiarov, V. F.; Pavlov, V. M.; Chebrov, V. N.; Kasahara, M.

    2001-09-01

    Since 1996, a network of nine permanent GPS receivers has been recording, in continuous mode, the deformation on Kamchatka peninsula. The velocity and direction of the relative displacement of observation points are estimated from the entire data set for 1996-2000. The deformation related to the large Kronotskoe earthquake (Mw=7.8, 1997 December 5) was identified at distances up to a few hundred kilometres. Half a month before this major event, large-amplitude pre-seismic deformation appeared at stations closest to its epicentral area. The deformation corresponds approximately to a double-couple slow event with Mw=7.7 located in the foreshock area, with an orientation that differs significantly from that of the main shock. Clear coseismic displacements were also observed. They match well those predicted by the published Harvard CMT solution. Large-scale post-seismic deformation was also recorded, again with a duration of about half a month, and a cumulative moment comparable to that of the `main' shock. In addition to the transient effects of a large earthquake, data show a secular trend that reflects both the continuous plate motion and the elastic response to interplate coupling. Preliminary estimates of relative plate velocities for the North America, Okhotsk and Beringia plates are given based on the data from stations distant from the most active plate boundaries. Other stations seem to show mainly the elastic response of the Okhotsk and Beringia plates to their coupling with the subducting Pacific plate. At one station at least, the velocity of continuous motion underwent a significant change at the time of the Kronotskoe earthquake, probably indicating a related change in interplate coupling or the effects of mantle rheology.

  12. How do long-offset oceanic transforms adapt to plate motion changes? The example of the Western Pacific-Antarctic plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodolo, Emanuele; Coren, Franco; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2013-03-01

    Oceanic transform faults respond to changes in the direction of relative plate motion. Studies have shown that short-offset transforms generally adjust with slight bends near the ridge axis, while long-offset ones have a remarkably different behavior. The western Pacific-Antarctic plate boundary highlights these differences. A set of previously unpublished seismic profiles, in combination with magnetic anomaly identifications, shows how across a former, ~1250 km long transform (the Emerald Fracture Zone), plate motion changes have produced a complex geometric readjustment. Three distinct sections are recognized along this plate boundary: an eastern section, characterized by parallel, multiple fault strand lineaments; a central section, shallower than the rest of the ridge system, overprinted by a mantle plume track; and a western section, organized in a cascade of short spreading axes/transform lineaments. This configuration was produced by changes that occurred since 30 Ma in the Australia-Pacific relative plate motion, combined with a gradual clockwise change in Pacific-Antarctic plate motion. These events caused extension along the former Emerald Fracture Zone, originally linking the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge system with the Southeast Indian ridge. Then an intra-transform propagating ridge started to develop in response to a ~6 Ma change in the Pacific-Antarctic spreading direction. The close proximity of the Euler poles of rotation amplified the effects of the geometric readjustments that occurred along the transform system. This analysis shows that when a long-offset transform older than 20 Ma is pulled apart by changes in spreading velocity vectors, it responds with the development of multiple discrete, parallel fault strands, whereas in younger lithosphere, locally modified by thermal anisotropies, tensional stresses generate an array of spreading axes offset by closely spaced transforms.

  13. Subcontinental-scale crustal velocity changes along the Pacific-North America plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L; Wernicke, B P; Bisnath, S; Niemi, N A; Elósegui, P

    2006-06-29

    Transient tectonic deformation has long been noted within approximately 100 km of plate boundary fault zones and within active volcanic regions, but it is unknown whether transient motions also occur at larger scales within plates. Relatively localized transients are known to occur as both seismic and episodic aseismic events, and are generally ascribed to motions of magma bodies, aseismic creep on faults, or elastic or viscoelastic effects associated with earthquakes. However, triggering phenomena and systematic patterns of seismic strain release at subcontinental (approximately 1,000 km) scale along diffuse plate boundaries have long suggested that energy transfer occurs at larger scale. Such transfer appears to occur by the interaction of stresses induced by surface wave propagation and magma or groundwater in the crust, or from large-scale stress diffusion within the oceanic mantle in the decades following clusters of great earthquakes. Here we report geodetic evidence for a coherent, subcontinental-scale change in tectonic velocity along a diffuse approximately 1,000-km-wide deformation zone. Our observations are derived from continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) data collected over the past decade across the Basin and Range province, which absorbs approximately 25 per cent of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. The observed changes in site velocity define a sharp boundary near the centre of the province oriented roughly parallel to the north-northwest relative plate motion vector. We show that sites to the west of this boundary slowed relative to sites east of it by approximately 1 mm yr(-1) starting in late 1999. PMID:16810252

  14. Slow earthquakes associated with fault healing on a serpentinized plate interface

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ikuo; Iwata, Mutsumi; Okazaki, Keishi; Hirauchi, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Slow earthquakes that occur at subduction zones are distinct from regular earthquakes in terms of their slip behavior. We consider this difference to relate to localized hydration reactions at the plate interface that influence the frictional properties. The results of laboratory friction experiments indicate that simulated serpentine faults are characterized by a low healing rate and large slip-weakening distance compared with unaltered dry fault patches. These results are consistent with the slip mechanism of slow earthquakes, indicating that a locally serpentinized plate interface could trigger slow earthquakes, assisted by pore pressure build-up, whereas unaltered dry patches that remain strongly coupled are potential sites of regular earthquakes.

  15. Along-trench variation in water contents within the incoming Pacific plate offshore northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, G.; Kodaira, S.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2012-12-01

    In the northern Japan trench subduction zone, a number of great interplate earthquakes, such as the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquakes, have repeatedly occurred. It has been pointed out that the seafloor roughness of the incoming Pacific plate is well correlated with the distribution of large interplate earthquakes in this subduction zone; The region where the seafloor is rough (well-developed horst and graben structure) is correlated with relatively weak interplate coupling, and the region where the seafloor is relatively smooth is correlated with large interplate earthquakes. In 2010, to clarify the regional variation in the seismic structure within the incoming Pacific plate, we conducted an extensive wide-angle seismic reflection and refraction survey in the outer trench region along the northern Japan trench. We established two along-trench seismic experimental lines (about 250 km long) and deployed Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) at intervals of 6 km and fired a large airgun array (total volume 200 L) of the R/V Kairei at 200 m intervals. During the airgun shooting, we towed a 444-channel hydrophone streamer (6km long) and obtained MCS reflection data. We modeled both P-wave and S-wave velocity structures by the traveltime inversion, and calculated the Vp/Vs ratio directly from the Vp and Vs models. Obtained seismic structure models, Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio show significant along-trench variations. As expected, in the region where the seafloor of the incoming plate is rough, seismic velocities within the oceanic crust and oceanic uppermost mantle are low and the Vp/Vs ratio is high. In contrast, in the region where the seafloor is relatively smooth, seismic velocities are relatively high and the Vp/Vs ratio stays normal value. This observation suggests that water contents of the incoming oceanic plate is high in the region where the seafloor is rough, and that the amount of water that is being subducted within the incoming plate is correlated with the

  16. Thermal study of interface between the Orbiter cold plate and typical Shuttle spacecraft payload flight electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwangbo, H.; Coyle, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    Spacelab provides a set of Freon line plumbing and cold plates for experiment equipments which are located in the Shuttle pallet and which need active thermal control. The reported study deals with the thermal problem of attaching a Command and Data Handling module with various electronic boxes whose combined footprints on the baseplate are much larger than the cold plate. A description of two modules and the cold plate assembly in the pallet is presented and a thermal model description is provided. The method employed in modeling heat pipes-honey-comb matrix is based upon an effective conductance between the heat pipe vapor and the walls of the heat pipe. The considered thermal models and a computer program are used to perform steady-state thermal analyses. The temperature gradients in the large module baseplate attached to the small cold plate are predicted as a function of the interface plate thickness.

  17. On gravity from SST, geoid from Seasat, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    A composite map produced by combining 90 passes of SST data show good agreement with conventional GEM models. The SEASAT altimeter data were deduced and found to agree with both the SST and GEM fields. The maps are dominated (especially in the east) by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkedly close correlation with plate age. Most anomalies in the east half of the Pacific could be partly caused by regional differences in plate age. The amplitude of these geoid or gravity anomalies caused by age differences should decrease with absolute plate age, and large anomalies (approximately 3 m) over old, smooth sea floor may indicate a further deeper source within or perhaps below the lithosphere. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantle without complete thermal equilibration was considered. A plume emanating from a buoyant layer 100 km thick and 10,000 times less viscous than the surrounding mantle should have a diameter of about 400 km and must ascend at about 10 cm/yr to arrive still anomalously hot in the uppermost mantle.

  18. Interseismic GPS strain data inversion to estimate slip-deficit rates at plate interfaces: application to the Kanto region, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Akemi; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2013-04-01

    We developed an inversion method to estimate unbiased interseismic slip-deficit rates at plate interfaces from observed GPS velocity data with an elastic dislocation model. In this method, first, we subtract theoretical surface velocities due to known steady relative plate motion from the observed GPS data, and presume the residuals to be caused by slip deficit at plate interfaces. However, the observed GPS data always include rigid block translation and rotation, which cannot be explained by the elastic dislocation model. We treated the rigid block translation and rotation as systematic errors in the analysis, and removed them by transforming the velocity data into the average strain rates of triangle elements composed of adjacent GPS stations. By this transformation, original information about intrinsic deformation is preserved. Applying a unified Bayesian inversion formula to the GPS strain data, we can obtain unbiased slip-deficit rate distribution. We demonstrated the applicability of the method of GPS strain data inversion through the analysis of interseismic GPS velocity data (1996-2000) in the Kanto region, central Japan, where the North American (NAM), Pacific (PAC) and Philippine Sea (PHS) plates are interacting with each other in a complicated way. From this analysis we found a broad and high slip-deficit rate zone on the NAM-PHS plate interface, extending from southeast off the Boso peninsula to the Tokai region through the Izu-Mainland collision zone. Two high slip-deficit rate zones along the Sagami and Suruga troughs correspond to the source regions of the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9) and a potential Tokai earthquake. On the PHS-PAC plate interface, though the estimation errors are large, we found a moderate slip-deficit rate zone far southeast off the Boso peninsula, where an M7.4 earthquake has occurred in 1953.

  19. Active Pacific North America Plate boundary tectonics as evidenced by seismicity in the oceanic lithosphere offshore Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, Egill; Kanamori, Hiroo; Stock, Joann; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Legg, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Pacific Ocean crust west of southwest North America was formed by Cenozoic seafloor spreading between the large Pacific Plate and smaller microplates. The eastern limit of this seafloor, the continent-ocean boundary, is the fossil trench along which the microplates subducted and were mostly destroyed in Miocene time. The Pacific-North America Plate boundary motion today is concentrated on continental fault systems well to the east, and this region of oceanic crust is generally thought to be within the rigid Pacific Plate. Yet, the 2012 December 14 Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred about 275 km west of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, is evidence for continued tectonism in this oceanic part of the Pacific Plate. The preferred main shock centroid depth of 20 km was located close to the bottom of the seismogenic thickness of the young oceanic lithosphere. The focal mechanism, derived from both teleseismic P-wave inversion and W-phase analysis of the main shock waveforms, and the 12 aftershocks of M ˜3-4 are consistent with normal faulting on northeast striking nodal planes, which align with surface mapped extensional tectonic trends such as volcanic features in the region. Previous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements on offshore islands in the California Continental Borderland had detected some distributed Pacific and North America relative plate motion strain that could extend into the epicentral region. The release of this lithospheric strain along existing zones of weakness is a more likely cause of this seismicity than current thermal contraction of the oceanic lithosphere or volcanism. The main shock caused weak to moderate ground shaking in the coastal zones of southern California, USA, and Baja California, Mexico, but the tsunami was negligible.

  20. North american--pacific relative plate motion in southern california from interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lyzenga, G A; Golombek, M P

    1986-09-12

    Very long baseline interferometry measurements of baselines crossing the San Andreas fault zone in southern California have provided observational constraints on rates of elastic tectonic strain accumulation. The single site located near this fault (the Jet Propulsion Laboratory site) moves in a direction concordant with the Pacific plate motion vector but at approximately half the net rate relative to North America. This motion agrees approximately in amount with geologically determined displacement rates on the San Andreas fault alone but not with the local strike of the fault. When considered together with complementary geodetic data, these results suggest a complex relation between the short-term accumulation of elastic strain and its permanent accommodation on existing faults. PMID:17756870

  1. Supraslab earthquakes above the Pacific-plate slab offshore Sanriku, NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, N.; Kirby, S. H.; Okada, T.; Hino, R.; Hasegawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    Double-difference relocation methods using P and S wave arrivals for the forearc earthquakes offshore Sanriku indicate that clusters of earthquakes are located above small repeating earthquakes that delineate the upper boundary of the Pacific plate. To assure good depth control, we restrict our study to events that are close to seismic stations. These "supraslab" earthquake clusters are regional features at depths of 25 to 50 km. The depth distribution of forearc Moho estimated from SP converted waves from repeating earthquake sources shows that the Moho depths becomes shallower from near the coastline (-30km) to the approximate eastern limit of the mantle wedge (-20km) and most of these clusters are below the depth of the forearc Moho. Re-entrants in the inner trench slope indicate that repeated collisions of seamounts have occurred in the past along the Japan trench. Our preliminary interpretation of supraslab clusters is that they represent seismicity in seamounts detached from the Pacific plate during slab descent, driven by the resistance of seamounts to subduction caused by their relief. Detachment during descent probably occurs on the sedimented and hydrothermally altered seafloor on which seamounts were originally constructed since these are known as zones of weakness during active island growth. Seamounts probably also fragment during subduction along weak seamount structures, such as former volcanic rifts and slump-block boundaries. Seamount crust is thus accreted to forearcs, possibly leading to a long-term component of near-coastal uplift. Supraslab earthquake clusters may be our most direct evidence of the fates of seamounts and suggest that tectonic underplating is actively occurring in this subduction system.

  2. Extensive deposits on the Pacific plate from Late Pleistocene North American glacial lake outbursts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Reid, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the major unresolved issues of the Late Pleistocene catastrophic-flood events in the northwestern United States (e.g., from glacial Lake Missoula) has been what happened when the flood discharge reached the ocean. This study compiles available 3.5-kHz high-resolution and airgun seismic reflection data, long-range sidescan sonar images, and sediment core data to define the distribution of flood sediment in deepwater areas of the Pacific Ocean. Upon reaching the ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River near the present-day upper continental slope, sediment from the catastrophic floods continued flowing downslope as hyperpycnally generated turbidity currents. The turbidity currents resulting from the Lake Missoula and other latest Pleistocene floods followed the Cascadia Channel into and through the Blanco Fracture Zone and then flowed west to the Tufts Abyssal Plain. A small part of the flood sediment, which was stripped off the main flow at a bend in the Cascadia Channel at its exit point from the Blanco Fracture Zone, continued flowing more than 400 km to the south and reached the Escanaba Trough, a rift valley of the southern Gorda Ridge. Understanding the development of the pathway for the Late Pleistocene flood sediment reaching Escanaba Trough provides insight for understanding the extent of catastrophic flood deposits on the Pacific plate.

  3. The interface between cultural understandings: negotiating new spaces for Pacific mental health.

    PubMed

    Mila-Schaaf, Karlo; Hudson, Maui

    2009-02-01

    This theoretical paper introduces the concept of the "negotiated space", a model developed by Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Maui Hudson and colleagues describing the interface between different worldviews and knowledge systems. This is primarily a conceptual space of intersection in-between different ways of knowing and meaning making, such as, the i Pacific indigenous reference and the dominant Western mental health paradigm of the bio-psycho-social. When developing Pacific models of care, the "negotiated space" provides room to explore the relationship between different (and often conflicting) cultural understandings of mental health and illness. The "negotiated space" is a place ofp urposive re-encounter reconstructing and re-balancing of ideas and values in complementary realignments that have resonance for Pacific peoples living in Western oriented societies. This requires making explicit the competing epistemologies of the Pacific indigenous worldviews and references alongside the bio-psycho-social and identifying the assumptions implicit in the operating logic ofe ach. This is a precursor to being empowered to negotiate, resolve and better comprehend the cultural conflict between the different understandings. This article theorises multiple patterns of possibility of resolutions and relationships within the negotiated space relevant to research, evaluation, model, service development and quality assurance within Pacific mental health. PMID:19585741

  4. Can clay minerals account for the non-asperity on the subducting plate interface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, I.; Kubo, T.; Sakuma, H.; Kawai, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seismicity along the subducting plate interface shows a regional variation, in which large earthquakes occur repeatedly at the strongly coupled patches that are surrounded by weakly coupled regions. This model suggests that the subduction plate interface is heterogeneous in terms of frictional properties; however, mechanism making the difference in strong and weak coupling is still not well understood. We consider this difference to relate to the alternation of plate interface due to aqueous fluids that result in the spatial distribution of clay minerals. In order to test this hypothesis, we measured frictional healing of clay minerals and discuss whether the frictional properties of clays can account for the weakly coupled non-asperity regions in the subducting plate interface. We carried out a series of slide-hold-slide frictional experiments to examine the time-dependent frictional restrengthening of the simulated fault gouge. In the experiments, the axial loading was interrupted for periods ranging 10 to 3000 s after steady-state friction, and we measured the difference between the steady-state friction and the peak friction after each holding period. The preliminary results show that the frictional strength of clay minerals (saponite, illite and chlorite) slightly increases with holding time; however, the healing rate is significantly smaller than that of dry silicates such as quartz. Similar weak healing rate has been reported in the serpentinized simulated faults (Katayama et al. 2013). These experimental results suggest that the recovery of fault strength is different in materials, in which clay minerals show weak and slow recovery whereas dry materials show relatively quick and thereby strong coupling on the fault surface. Aqueous fluids that are released from the descending plate may change the mineralogy on the plate interface where clay minerals become dominant at the channel of fluid flow surrounding the unaltered dry patches that potentially act as a

  5. Paleomagnetism of Midway Atoll lavas and northward movement of the Pacific plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gromme, S.; Vine, F.J.

    1972-01-01

    Two deep drill holes through the reef limestones of Midway Atoll penetrated 120 m and 19 m of basaltic lavas that were dated by the KAr method at 18 my. Inclinations of natural remanent magnetization have been measured in 173 specimens cut from 57 core samples from 13 of the lava flows. The mean paleomagnetic inclination is 27.6?? ?? 6.8??, corresponding to a paleolatitude of 14.7?? ?? 4.2??. The present latitude of Midway is 28??, suggesting a northward component of motion of the Pacific plate of approximately 13?? or 1400 km in the last 18 my. The paleolatitude of Midway is thus not significantly different from the present latitude (19??) of the active volcanic island of Hawaii. The paleomagnetic data from the Midway basalts thus support the hypothesis of Wilson and Morgan that volcanic heat sources are fixed with respect to the Earth's mantle below the asthenosphere and their apparent migration with time is due to plate motion. ?? 1972.

  6. Role of the eastern California shear zone in accommodating Pacific-North American plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Dokka, R.K.; Travis, C.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The newly recognized Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) of the Mojave Desert-Death Valley region has played a major, but previously underappreciated role in accommodating the dextral shear between the Pacific and North American plates in late Cenozoic time. Comparison of integrated net slip along the shear zone with motion values across the entire transform boundary indicates that between 9% and 23% of the total relative plate motion has occurred along the ECSZ since its probably inception {approximately}10-6 Ma. Long-term integrated shear along the ECSZ (6-12 mm yr{sup {minus}1}) is similar to historic measurements (6.7 {plus minus} 1.3 mm yr{sup {minus}1}). Time-space patterns of faulting suggest that shear was concentrated in the eastern part of the Mojave Desert block and Death Valley during late Miocene and early Pleistocene time, but that the locus of faulting in the south-central Mojave jumped westward between 1.5 and 0.7 Ma.

  7. Linear ridge groups: Evidence for tensional cracking in the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Mary Ann

    1999-12-01

    A new class of oceanic bathymetric feature, discovered in 1987, consists of en-echelon groups of linear ridges. There are now at least three such sets of ridges known, and their remarkable similarity supports the notion that they result from a widespread tectonic process taking place in the interior of plates. In two of these major linear ridge groups, the Crossgrain and Puka Puka ridges, numerous morphologic features indicate that they originated as tension cracks. The form of the individual volcanic structures that make up the ridges correlates with the degree of tension that formed them, and the similar orientation of all ridges in a group indicates that the stress that formed them is relatively widespread geographically and temporally. The ridges show a characteristic sequence of development, beginning with a swath of small volcanoes followed by larger domical volcanoes where the ridge will eventually develop. This paper examines proposed mechanisms of formation and concludes that no single source of tension in the lithosphere could plausibly have caused both the Crossgrain and Puka Puka ridges. The similarity of the orientations of all the groups of en-echelon linear ridges on the Pacific plate suggests that the individual ridges form normal to a least compressive stress direction that is geographically variable in the crust. Parallel ridges constrained to a narrow band then result in an en-echelon arrangement, though some closely spaced, synchronously formed sets of two or three ridge segments may have influenced each other's form.

  8. The northern edge of Pacific plate position near Kamchatka-Aleutian junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeychik, Boris; Churikova, Tatiana; Volynets, Anna; Wörner, Gerhard; Layer, Paul

    2010-05-01

    SR are the present back arc lavas of the recent subduction zone. Both, the systematic geochemical zonation from contemporary arc front to back arc and the uniformity of geochemistry of young volcanic rocks along the SR show that the volcanism of the region is explained by the only one mechanism - subduction of the Pacific Plate below Kamchatka. A trend is documented from fluid-dominated melting in the EVF, through the upwelling of a strongly fluid-fluxed mantle below the CKD to melting of a fluid-enriched mantle aided by strong upwelling and decompression in the SR back arc zone. Magmatism has continued to be active in SR up to the Holocene even though seismic data today do not show a signal for a downgoing plate below this region. But the absence of the seismicity does not mean the absence of plate because at temperatures higher than 600-700°C seismicity is lost. We argue that the northern edge of the Pacific Plate is represented by a wide (150 km) boundary as a set of transform faults which can be projected on Kamchatka surface from the morphology of the downgoing oceanic plate. Also this edge is marked by the termination of Holocene volcanoes on surface along of SR. The absence of the young volcanism to the north of the on-land projection of the Alpha fault marks the plate boundary at depth.

  9. Seismic structure of the North Pacific oceanic crust prior plate bending at the Alaska subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becel, A.; Shillington, D. J.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Kuehn, H.; Webb, S. C.; Holtzman, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic reflection profiles across North Pacific oceanic Plate reveal the internal structure of a mature oceanic crust (42-56Ma) formed at fast (70mm/yr, half rate) to intermediate (28mm/yr, half rate) spreading rates. Data used in this study were collected with the R/V Langseth in summer 2011 as part of the ALEUT (Alaska Langseth Experiment to Understand the megathrust) program. MCS data were acquired with two 8-km streamers and a 6600 cu. in. air gun array. We collected a series of profiles across the subduction zone system but also across the preexisting structures of the oceanic crust before being affected by subduction zone processes. Additionally, two 400-km OBS refraction lines were shot coincident with MCS profiles. The multi-channel seismic (MCS) data across oceanic crust formed at fast spreading rates contain abundant bright reflectors mostly confined in the lower crust above the Moho discontinuity and dipping predominantly toward the paleo-ridge. Along these profiles, the Moho discontinuity is observed as a bright event with remarkable lateral continuity. The lengths of the dipping reflectors are on the order of 5-km, with apparent dips between 10 and 30°. These reflectors represent discrete events, with spacing between 0.3 to 5 km without any obvious regularity. These dipping events appear to sole out within the middle crust (1 to 1.5 s beneath basement) and most of them terminate at the Moho. The Moho is much weaker or absent on the northern profiles acquired across the North Pacific oceanic crust formed at intermediate spreading rates. Basement topography is rougher and no clear dipping events have been imaged suggesting that the spreading rate may be an important factor that controls the strength and abundance of such dipping reflectors and the lateral change in the Moho reflection characters. Lower crustal dipping reflections (LCDR) have been only imaged at very few places across the Pacific oceanic crust: (Eittreim et al., 1988, Reston et al. 1999

  10. GPS measurements of crustal deformation within the Pacific-Australia plate boundary zone in Irian Jaya, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntodewo, S. S. O.; McCaffrey, R.; Calais, E.; Bock, Y.; Rais, J.; Subarya, C.; Poewariardi, R.; Stevens, C.; Genrich, J.; Fauzi; Zwick, P.; Wdowinski, S.

    1994-10-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made in 1991, 1992 and 1993 provide preliminary estimates of slip distribution between the Australian and Pacific plates in Irian Jaya, Indonesia. We interpret the GPS results with constraints from earthquake mechanisms and slip vectors, recent marine surveys, and geology. Three GPS sites in southeastern Irian Jaya show motions that are within 10 mm/yr of the expected motion of Australia. A coast-to-coast N-S baseline along 140.5°E crosses all known onland regions of active deformation but reveals no more than 15 mm/yr of shortening and 20 mm/yr of left-lateral shear in the 27-month period. The remaining 40 mm/yr of expected convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates probably occurs at the New Guinea trough. GPS sites on the island of Biak, at 136°E, and at Sorong, near the western tip of Bird's Head (at 131°E), both move 90-100 mm/yr in a WSW direction relative to Irian Jaya, but less than 15 mm/yr relative to each other. These sites are on either side of the Sorong fault and demonstrate that it is not presently the major boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. Instead the plate boundary is now south of the Sorong and Biak sites. Earthquakes suggest possible structures that accomodate motion between Bird's Head and Australia but the relative importance of them remains uncertain.

  11. A new GPS velocity field for the Pacific Plate - Part 2: implications for fault slip rates in western California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Márquez-Azúa, Bertha; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Lower and upper bounds for present deformation rates across faults in central California between the San Andreas Fault and Pacific coast are estimated from a new Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field for central, western California in light of geodetic evidence presented in a companion paper for slow, but significant deformation within the Pacific Plate between young seafloor in the eastern Pacific and older seafloor elsewhere on the plate. Transects of the GPS velocity field across the San Andreas Fault between Parkfield and San Juan Buatista, where fault slip is dominated by creep and the velocity field thus reveals the off-fault deformation, show that GPS sites in westernmost California move approximately parallel to the fault at an average rate of 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 relative to the older interior of the Pacific Plate, but only 1.8 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 if the Pacific Plate frame of reference is corrected for deformation within the plate. Modelled interseismic elastic deformation from the weakly coupled creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault is an order-of-magnitude too small to explain the southeastward motions of coastal sites in western California. Similarly, models that maximize residual viscoelastic deformation from the 1857 Fort Tejon and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes mismatch both the rates and directions of GPS site motions in central California relative to the Pacific Plate. Neither thus explains the site motions southwest of the San Andreas fault, indicating that the site motions measure deformation across faults and folds outboard of the San Andreas Fault. The non-zero site velocities thus constitute strong evidence for active folding and faulting outboard from the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault and suggest limits of 0-2 mm yr-1 for the Rinconada Fault slip rate and 1.8 ± 0.6 to 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 for the slip rates integrated across near-coastal faults such as the Hosgri, San Gregorio and San Simeon faults.

  12. Rayleigh phase velocities in the upper mantle of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, L.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary, located in Southern California, presents an opportunity to study a unique tectonic process that has been shaping the plate tectonic setting of the western North American and Mexican Pacific margin since the Miocene. This is one of the few locations where the interaction between a migrating oceanic spreading center and a subduction zone can be studied. The rapid subduction of the Farallon plate outpaced the spreading rate of the East Pacific Rise rift system causing it to be subducted beneath southern California and northern Mexico 30 Ma years ago. The details of microplate capture, reorganization, and lithospheric deformation on both the Pacific and North American side of this boundary is not well understood, but may have important implications for fault activity, stresses, and earthquake hazard analysis both onshore and offshore. We use Rayleigh waves recorded by an array of 34 ocean bottom seismometers deployed offshore southern California for a 12 month duration from August 2010 to 2011. Our array recorded teleseismic earthquakes at distances ranging from 30° to 120° with good signal-to-noise ratios for magnitudes Mw ≥ 5.9. The events exhibit good azimuthal distribution and enable us to solve simultaneously for Rayleigh wave phase velocities and azimuthal anisotropy. Fewer events occur at NE back-azimuths due to the lack of seismicity in central North America. We consider seismic periods between 18 - 90 seconds. The inversion technique considers non-great circle path propagation by representing the arriving wave field as two interfering plane waves. This takes advantage of statistical averaging of a large number of paths that travel offshore southern California and northern Mexico allowing for improved resolution and parameterization of lateral seismic velocity variations at lithospheric and sublithospheric depths. We present phase velocity results for periods sampling mantle structure down to 150 km depth along the

  13. Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tremor localize to the plate interface in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Ide, S.; Ohta, K.; Shelly, D.R.; Schwartz, S.Y.; Rabbel, W.; Thorwart, M.; Kao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Deep tremor under Shikoku, Japan, consists primarily, and perhaps entirely, of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as shear slip on the plate interface. Although tremor is observed at other plate boundaries, the lack of cataloged low-frequency earthquakes has precluded a similar conclusion about tremor in those locales. We use a network autocorrelation approach to detect and locate LFEs within tremor recorded at three subduction zones characterized by different thermal structures and levels of interplate seismicity: southwest Japan, northern Cascadia, and Costa Rica. In each case we find that LFEs are the primary constituent of tremor and that they locate on the deep continuation of the plate boundary. This suggests that tremor in these regions shares a common mechanism and that temperature is not the primary control on such activity. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Normalized rupture potential for small and large earthquakes along the Pacific Plate off Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan; Enescu, Bogdan; Woessner, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    We combine temporal variability in local seismic activity rates and size distributions to estimate the evolution of a Gutenberg-Richter-based metric, the normalized rupture potential (NRP), comparing differences between smaller and larger earthquakes. For the Pacific Plate off Japan, we study both complex spatial patterns and how they evolve over the last 18 years, and more detailed temporal characteristics in a simplified spatial selection, i.e., inside and outside the high-slip zone of the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake. We resolve significant changes, in particular an immediate NRP increase for large events prior to the Tohoku event in the subsequent high-slip patch, a very rapid decrease inside this high-stress-release area coupled with a lasting increase of NRP in the immediate surroundings. Even in the center of the Tohoku rupture, the NRP for large magnitudes has not dropped below the 12 year average and is not significantly different from conditions a decade before the M9 event.

  15. Three-dimensional secondary surface geomorphology of submarine landslides on northwest Pacific plate guyots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, N. Christian; King, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Slump and debris slides form on seamounts as they grow, age, and are transported across the sea floor. Slump scars, evident as amphitheater headwalls, are a good morphological indicator where a landslide has occurred. Radical changes in the lower flank slope angles are also good indicators. Debris flows can be surmised by hummocky topography, with the larger blocks being nearer the main edifice. A cursory inspection of the Pacific plate from younger to older shows: (1) the Hawaiian-Emperor Ridge from Loihi to Suiko at 65 Ma, where the lower flank slopes increase with age, (2) Mammerickx seamount in the Mapmakers on 140 Ma crust, out of the fractured region, still showing moats and having no sign of landslides, (3) Castor and Pollux guyots of the Michelson Ridge on 150 Ma crust, where the debris field size is added to or overprinted by later volcanics, to (4) Hunk, Jennings, and Jaybee guyots in the Marcus-Wake seamounts on 160 Ma crust, where later fracture zone formation may have helped form landslides. None of the older seamounts have been dated. Three-dimensional views aid in the location and description of landslides.

  16. On gravity from SST, geoid from SEASAT, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Data from an additional 50 satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) passes were combined with earlier measurements of the high degree and order (n, m, 12) gravity in the central Pacific. A composite map was produced which shows good agreement with conventional GEM models. Data from the SEASAT altimeter was reduced and found to agree well with both the SST and the GEM fields. The maps are dominated especially in the east, by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Further comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkably close correlation with plate age. Each anomaly band is framed by those major fracture zones having large offsets. The regular spacing of these fractures seems to account for the fabric in the gravity fields. Other anomalies are accounted for by hot spots. The source of part of these anomalies is in the lithosphere itself. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantel without complete thermal equilibration is considered.

  17. Investigation on the Interface Morphologies of Explosive Welding of Inconel 625 to Steel A516 Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Zareie, H. R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to produce composite plates by explosive cladding process. This is a process in which the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored through parallel geometry route with different operational parameters. In this investigation, a two-pronged study was adopted to establish the conditions required for producing successful solid state welding: (a) Analytical calculations to determine the weldability domain or welding window; (b) Metallurgical investigations of explosive welding experiments carried out under different explosive ratios to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. The analytical calculations confirm the experimental results. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth to wavy interface occurs with an increase in explosive ratio. SEM studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials.

  18. Investigation on the Interface Morphologies of Explosive Welding of Inconel 625 to Steel A516 Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Zareie, H. R.

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this study is to produce composite plates by explosive cladding process. This is a process in which the controlled energy of explosives is used to create a metallic bond between two similar or dissimilar materials. The welding conditions were tailored through parallel geometry route with different operational parameters. In this investigation, a two-pronged study was adopted to establish the conditions required for producing successful solid state welding: (a) Analytical calculations to determine the weldability domain or welding window; (b) Metallurgical investigations of explosive welding experiments carried out under different explosive ratios to produce both wavy and straight interfaces. The analytical calculations confirm the experimental results. Optical microscopy studies show that a transition from a smooth to wavy interface occurs with an increase in explosive ratio. SEM studies show that the interface was outlined by characteristic sharp transition between two materials.

  19. Pacific plate-motion change at the time of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend constrains the viscosity of Earth's asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Lambeck, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    Important constraints on asthenospheric viscosity come primarily from modeling the glacial rebound of the past 20 kyr, but remain somewhat loose because of the intrinsic resolving power of these models. We obtain narrower bounds by building on the notion that the asthenosphere also controls the ability to change plate motions over Myr. We focus on the Pacific kinematic change at the time of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend event, which is linked to the coeval inception of subduction in the Western Pacific. We sample plausible asthenospheric viscosity and thickness values by requiring the rate at which torque varied to generate the observed kinematics consistent with the nature of subduction initiation. Uncertainties on the bend event duration and the occurrence of Pacific hot spots drift do not hamper our results that suggest that the asthenosphere viscous response to vertical shear over kyr is consistent with that to horizontal shear over Myr.

  20. A revised estimate of Pacific-North America motion and implications for Western North America plate boundary zone tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth; Argus, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    Marine magnetic profiles from the Gulf of Californa are studied in order to revise the estimate of Pacific-North America motion. It is found that since 3 Ma spreading has averaged 48 mm/yr, consistent with a new global plate motion model derived without any data. The present data suggest that strike-slip motion on faults west of the San Andreas is less than previously thought, reducing the San Andreas discrepancy with geodetic, seismological, and other geologic observations.

  1. North America-Pacific plate boundary, an elastic-plastic megashear - Evidence from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Steven N.

    1988-01-01

    Data obtained by Mark III VLBI measurements of radio signals from permanent and mobile VLBI sites for 5.5 years of observations, starting in October 1982, were used to derive a picture of the earth crust deformation near the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The data, which included the vector positions of the VLBI sites and their rate of change, were used for comparison with a number of lithospheric deformation models based upon the concept that the motions of points near the North America-Pacific plate boundary are a linear combination of North America and Pacific velocities. The best of these models were found to fit 95 percent of the variance in 139 VLBI length and transverse velocity observations. Instantaneous shear deformation associated with plate tectonics is apparently developing in a zone 450 km wide paralleling the San Andreas Fault; some of this deformation will be recovered through elastic rebound, while the rest will be permanently set through plastic processes. Because the VLBI data have not been collected for a significant fraction of the earthquake cycle, they cannot discriminate between elastic and plastic behaviors.

  2. Using aftershocks to Image the Subducting Pacific Plate in a Region of Deep Slow Slip, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K. M.; Hirschberg, H.; Louie, J. N.; Savage, M. K.; Bannister, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    interface. These results are helping to build 3-D information about the plate interface. We hope that this will help us to understand future hazards posed by subduction thrust earthquakes in this region, and the feeding system for deep slow-slip earthquakes.

  3. The Magellan seamount trail: implications for Cretaceous hotspot volcanism and absolute Pacific plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Staudigel, Hubert; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Pringle, Malcolm S.

    1998-11-01

    The Magellan Seamount Trail (MST) delineates a northwest trending chain of four Cretaceous guyots in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). Seamount morphology, 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology and Sr-Nd-Pb geochemistry of the MST provides evidence for a hotspot origin between the Samoa, Rarotonga and Society hotspots of the South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). The MST yields an excellent linear age progression of 47.6±1.6 mm/yr ( r2=1.000; MSWD = 0.23; 1 σ SE) including Vlinder guyot (95.1±0.5 Ma, n=5; 2 σ SD), Pako guyot (91.3±0.3 Ma, n=3) and Ioah guyot (87.1±0.3 Ma, n=2). The MST also exhibits a small range in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions indicating enriched mantle sources with an affinity of EMI. Nevertheless, three volcanic events are found out of sequence with linear MST hotspot volcanism: (1) an independent volcanic pedestal was formed 4-7 Myr before shield-volcanism started at Vlinder guyot, (2) a post-erosional volcanic cone was formed at least 20-30 Myr after drowning of Vlinder guyot, and (3) Ita Mai Tai guyot (118.1±0.5 Ma, n=3) was formed 34-36 Myr before the MST hotspot arrived at the predicted location of this guyot. By identifying and ruling out discordant volcanic events, we can use the age progression in MST to test the fixity of its hotspot. When presuming the fixed hotspot hypothesis, the local age progressions of the MST (47.6±1.6 mm/yr) and the copolar Musicians seamount trail (55.8±6.4 mm/yr) are not compatible with their 100-80 Ma Euler pole. We investigate two options: (1) acceptance of a `forced' Euler pole obeying the hotspot hypothesis by using both the age progressions and the azimuths of the studied seamount trails, or (2) acceptance of a `best-fit' Euler pole by using the azimuths of the studied seamount trail exclusively. In the first option, the angular speed of the Pacific plate during the 100-80 Ma stage pole is calculated at 0.502±0.017°/Myr. In the second option, the `best-fit' Euler pole is found

  4. Direct evidence for upper mantle structure in the NW Pacific Plate: Microstructural analysis of a petit-spot peridotite xenolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigane, Yumiko; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Morishita, Tomoaki; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Abe, Natsue; Hirano, Naoto

    2011-02-01

    Petit-spots, the late Miocene alkali basaltic volcanoes on the Early Cretaceous NW Pacific Plate, originate at the base of the lithosphere. The petit-spot volcanic rocks enclose fragments of tholeiitic basalt, dolerite, gabbro, and mantle peridotite, providing a unique window into the entire section of subducting oceanic lithosphere. We provide here the first direct observations on the deep structure of the Pacific lithosphere using microstructural analyses of a petit-spot peridotite xenolith. The xenolith is a lherzolite that consists mainly of coarse- and medium-grained olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene, as well as fine-grained aggregates of spinel and orthopyroxene that probably represent replaced pyrope-rich garnet. A strong deformational fabric is marked by a parallel alignment of millimeter-sized elongate minerals and their crystallographic preferred orientation. The olivine displays a [010] fiber pattern with a girdle of [100] axes and a maximum of [010] perpendicular to the foliation, a pattern which is consistent with a transpressional deformation in high temperature conditions at the base of oceanic lithosphere. Our microstructural observations and seismic data indicate that the lower part of the NW Pacific lithosphere possess an early stage structure of mantle flow at the asthenosphere. This interpretation is compatible with a conventional model in which oceanic lithosphere is thickened during cooling and plate convection. A discrepancy between the weak anisotropy in the petit-spot peridotite and the strong azimuthal anisotropy from the seismic data in the NW Pacific plate implies the existence of a highly anisotropic component in the deep oceanic lithosphere.

  5. Simulation of tectonic evolution of the Kanto Basin of Japan since 1 Ma due to subduction of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates and the collision of the Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashima, Akinori; Sato, Toshinori; Sato, Hiroshi; Asao, Kazumi; Furuya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shuji; Kameo, Koji; Miyauchi, Takahiro; Ito, Tanio; Tsumura, Noriko; Kaneda, Heitaro

    2016-06-01

    The Kanto Basin, the largest lowland in Japan, developed by flexure as a result of (1) the subduction of the Philippine Sea (PHS) and the Pacific (PAC) plates and (2) the repeated collision of the Izu-Bonin arc fragments with the Japanese island arc. Geomorphological, geological, and thermochronological data on vertical movements over the last 1 My suggest that subsidence initially affected the entire basin after which the area of subsidence gradually narrowed until, finally, the basin began to experience uplift. In this study, we modeled the tectonic evolution of the Kanto Basin following the method of Matsu'ura and Sato (1989) for a kinematic subduction model with dislocations, in order to quantitatively assess the effects of PHS and PAC subduction. We include the steady slip-rate deficit (permanent locking rate at the plate interface) in our model to account for collision process. We explore how the latest collision of the Izu Peninsula block has been affected by a westerly shift in the PHS plate motion vector with respect to the Eurasian plate, thought to have occurred between 1.0-0.5 Ma, using long-term vertical deformation data to constrain extent of the locked zone on the plate interface. We evaluated the change in vertical deformation rate for two scenarios: (1) a synchronous shift in the orientation of the locked zone as PHS plate motion shifts and (2) a delayed shift in the orientation of the locked zone following the shift in plate motion. Observed changes in the uplift/subsidence pattern are better explained by scenario (2), suggesting that recent (< 1 My) deformation in the Kanto Basin shows a lag in crustal response to the plate motion shift. We also calculated stress accumulation rates and found a good match with observed earthquake mechanisms, which shows that intraplate earthquakes serve to release stress accumulated through long-term plate interactions.

  6. Tidal stress influence on slow slip on the deep plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Houston, H.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    Tectonic tremors and slow earthquakes, which are detected in many subduction zones and transform faults, are characterized by various quantities, such as duration, recurrence interval, and the sensitivity to tidal stress. These characteristic quantities are spatially variable among regions and even within an individual region. It is also known that the seismic energy release by tremor also spatially varies (e.g., Maeda and Obara, 2009; Ando et al., 2012; Yabe and Ide, in review). We interpret the spatial variation in seismic energy rate (amplitude) of tremors to represent the variation of plate-interface strength, in which case the spatial variation of tidal sensitivity might correlate with that of seismic energy rate. To investigate such relation, we have investigated the spatial variation of tidal sensitivity in Nankai and Cascadia subduction zones. Although the spatial variation of tidal sensitivity has been investigated using the frequency spectrum at specific tidal frequency, we calculate the time history of tidal stressing on the plate interface and compare it with tremor activity to investigate their relation. Both body tide and ocean tide are included in the calculation of tidal stress. We calculated Green functions for the spherical Earth based on the method by Okubo and Tsuji (2001). The time history of sea surface level is calculated with the SPOTL program (Agnew, 2012). The fault planes of VLF estimated by Ide and Yabe (2014) are used to calculate stress on the plate interface. Tremors are more likely to occur when tidal shear stress is larger, in the subduction direction. Tremor rate appears to increase exponentially with tidal shear stress, as previously seen by Houston (2013, AGU). Although tidal sensitivity can be seen in many regions, some regions show particularly strong sensitivity. In some regions, tidal sensitivity can be seen clearly during the later portions of large SSEs, consistent with behavior reported by Houston (2013, AGU), while other

  7. Playing jigsaw with Large Igneous Provinces—A plate tectonic reconstruction of Ontong Java Nui, West Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, Katharina; Gohl, Karsten; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele

    2015-11-01

    The three largest Large Igneous Provinces (LIP) of the western Pacific—Ontong Java, Manihiki, and Hikurangi Plateaus—were emplaced during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron and show strong similarities in their geochemistry and petrology. The plate tectonic relationship between those LIPs, herein referred to as Ontong Java Nui, is uncertain, but a joined emplacement was proposed by Taylor (2006). Since this hypothesis is still highly debated and struggles to explain features such as the strong differences in crustal thickness between the different plateaus, we revisited the joined emplacement of Ontong Java Nui in light of new data from the Manihiki Plateau. By evaluating seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection data along with seismic reflection records of the margins of the proposed "Super"-LIP, a detailed scenario for the emplacement and the initial phase of breakup has been developed. The LIP is a result of an interaction of the arriving plume head with the Phoenix-Pacific spreading ridge in the Early Cretaceous. The breakup of the LIP shows a complicated interplay between multiple microplates and tectonic forces such as rifting, shearing, and rotation. Our plate kinematic model of the western Pacific incorporates new evidence from the breakup margins of the LIPs, the tectonic fabric of the seafloor, as well as previously published tectonic concepts such as the rotation of the LIPs. The updated rotation poles of the western Pacific allow a detailed plate tectonic reconstruction of the region during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron and highlight the important role of LIPs in the plate tectonic framework.

  8. Slab break-off related to the Pacific-Izanagi ridge and the 50 Ma plate reorganization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, J. M.; Seton, M.; Flament, N.; Gurnis, M.; Talsma, A. S.; Müller, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    A hemisphere-wide plate reorganization occurred approximately 50 million years ago, causing a plethora of tectonic events in the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic oceans. The ultimate driver of this reorganization, either a plate tectonic/top-down or a mantle flow/bottom-up mechanism, remains unresolved. Top-down mechanisms often invoke a dramatic change in slab pull due to the arrival of a mid ocean ridge or aseismic ridge at a subduction zone. Bottom-up mechanisms require sudden lateral or vertical changes in mantle flow. We use a combination of surface geology, plate reconstructions, forward geodynamic models and seismic tomography to investigate the effect a slab break-off event related to the intersection of the Pacific-Izanagi ridge and the East Asian subduction zone on the 50 Ma plate reorganization. The intersection of an active mid ocean ridge with a subduction zone commonly results in the formation of a slab window. Surface manifestations of an underlying slab window are observed in the geology of southern and central Japan including: the cessation of a major accretion phase in the late Cretaceous; elevated geothermal gradients and heat flux around 55 Ma; and the emplacement of the Okitsu Melange due to underlying hot, buoyant material at 55 Ma. The cessation of granitic plutonism in Korea suggests that subduction along the margin terminated at around 60-50 Ma before restarting again ~42 Ma. We independently reconstructed the now subducted ocean floor in Panthalassa based on the magnetic lineations preserved in the ocean floor in the western Pacific and following a simple, symmetrical spreading regime with inferred intermediate spreading rates. Our plate reconstructions result in the progressively southward arrival of the Pacific-Izanagi ridge parallel to the East Asian margin between 60-50 Ma, consistent with the geological observations listed above. In addition, we carry out a series of forward geodynamic models with imposed surface plate velocities

  9. Accretion/underplating, detachment and exhumation: short/long-term rheology of the subduction plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, Philippe; Angiboust, Samuel; Plunder, Alexis; Guillot, Stéphane; Yamato, Philippe; Oncken, Onno; Ruh, Jonas; Burov, Evgueni; Bonnet, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    The presence of km-scale accreted terranes/units in both ancient and present-day subduction zones attests to changes in strain localization along the plate interface, whereby these terranes/units get detached from the downgoing slab (or, in places, are eroded away from the tip of the upper plate) and either directly exhumed or accreted/underplated below the upper plate before final exhumation. The rock record (P-T-t data) indicates that, for a given subduction zone, exhumation is episodic: no more than a few My compared to the ~100 My lifetime of typical subduction zones. Not much is known, however, regarding this process and important open questions remain: what exactly is episodic (i.e., detachment from the slab and/or exhumation?), for how long and where? How is mechanical coupling impacted by the initial structure of the incoming plates (structural/lithological heterogeneities, thermo-fluid regime, geodynamic boundary conditions, etc...)? We herein present both new and literature structural and P-T-t data ranging from shallow (i.e., 15-20 km) to intermediate depths (~100 km) along the subduction interface, that span a range from long-term to short-lived events of underplating and/or exhumation, and confront them with the recent wealth of geophysical data gathered on subduction zones. Structural and petrological data indicate that the slicing of km-scale units mostly occurs at specific depths where major mechanical changes occur along the plate interface: at 30-40 km (downdip of the seismogenic zone) and 70-80 km (where mechanical coupling between the two plates resumes and where eclogites get critically dense). This suggests that switches in mechanical coupling (i.e., in the rheology of the material) are key in controlling the ability to detach pieces from the slab (and that later exhumation is rather controlled by large-scale, lithospheric-scale boundary conditions). The study of rock remnants detached from the slab and underplated during subduction infancy (i

  10. Long-term coupling along the subduction plate interface: insights from exhumed rocks and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Guillot, S.; Garcia-Casco, A.

    2012-04-01

    Fragments of subducted oceanic lithosphere returned along the plate interface convey crucial information regarding the thermal and rheological conditions of convergent plate boundaries. Combining evidence from exhumed rocks worldwide and the results of recently published thermo-mechanical models, we herein investigate how long-term mechanical coupling takes place along deep portions of the plate interface (40-80 km depth), for which there is no counterflow (unlike in accretionary prisms) and no other known mechanisms to return eclogites than interplate friction or buoyancy. Geological evidence indicates that, unlike subduction, exhumation is highly discontinuous. Besides, eclogites worldwide are found in essentially two types of tectonic setting, either as large scale (>km) slices with coherent PT estimates (W. Alps) or as isolated fragments (frequently m-hm) in a serpentinite- or sedimentary-rich matrix showing contrasting equilibration depths (with hints of punctuated exhumation and even reburial in some localities; Franciscan, Cuba, Sistan). This latter type tends to show warmer equilibration paths (although minor lawsonite-eclogite blocks can be found), whereas the larger tectonic slices from the former type remain systematically cold. Serpentinites are crucial for both in permitting decoupling and acting as a buoy, and fluid budget is important too in enhancing floatability and allowing large slices to survive. Numerical models implementing free migration of fluids in the subduction zone also show that the plate interface is strongly localized in the absence of fluids: mechanical decoupling efficiently occurs along the sediment veneer and/or at the top of the highly hydrothermalized crust. Whenever fluids are released in greater amounts (depending on initial fluid content and/or thermal structure), deformation becomes much more distributed and affects both the mantle wedge and the top of the downgoing lithosphere (hydrated crust and mantle top), thereby

  11. Continent-continent collision at the Pacific/Australian plate boundary: Lithospheric deformation, mountain building, and subsequent scientific endeavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D. A.; Stern, T. A.; Davey, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Continental collision occurs at strike-slip plate boundaries where transform motion and oblique convergence create processes of surficial mountain building and deformation within the deeper crust and lithospheric mantle. The Pacific/Australian transform plate boundary in South Island, New Zealand, is characterized by active oblique continent-continent collision with an associated Southern Alps orogen that exhibits both high exhumation rates and rapid strike-slip movement. Beginning in the 1990s, this system was the focus of a decade-long collaborative USA-New Zealand multi-disciplinary study to understand lithospheric structure and processes involved in this transpression. Funded primarily by the NSF Continental Dynamics program and the New Zealand Science Foundation, this project known as SIGHT (South Island Geophysical Transect) with its companion SAPSE (Southern Alps Passive Seismic Experiment) included the following disciplines that involved substantial field observation experiments: seismic reflection, explosion refraction, onshore-offshore wide-angle reflection/refraction, regional and teleseismic passive seismology, magnetotellurics, laboratory petrophysics, gravity, regional geological investigations, and rheological analyses. More than fifty scientists and students from both nations participated in the combined set of studies that have led to over forty-five journal publications, an AGU Monograph, and a dozen graduate theses. Primary results of the project indicate the Pacific-Australian strike-slip plate boundary (Alpine fault) is not vertical but is eastward dipping and rheologically weak based on diverse geophysical data. Most deformation is within the Pacific plate that hosts the Southern Alps orogen. High mantle seismic velocities vertically disposed beneath the orogen suggest Pacific and perhaps Australian mantle lithosphere contribute to a zone of plate-boundary-parallel distributed mantle shortening. The crustal root of the overlying Southern Alps

  12. Revised magnetic polarity time scale for the Paleocene and early Eocene and implications for Pacific plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R.F.; Coney, P.J.

    1981-04-01

    Magnetostratiographic studies of a continental sedimentary sequence in the Clark's Fork Basin, Wyoming and a marine sedimentary sequence at Gubbio, Italy indicate that the Paleocene--Eocene boundary occurs just stratigraphically above normal polarity zones correlative with magnetic anomaly 25 chron. These data indicate that the older boundary of anomaly 24 chron is 52.5 Ma. This age is younger than the late Paleocene age assigned by LaBrecque et al. (1977) and also younger than the basal Eocene age assigned by Ness et al. (1980). A revised magnetic polarity time scale for the Paleocene and early Eocene is presented in this paper. Several changes in the relative motion system between the Pacific plate and neighboring plates occurred in the interval between anomaly 24 and anomaly 21. A major change in absolute motion of the Pacific plate is indicated by the bend in the Hawaiian--Emperor Seamount chain at approx.43 Ma. The revised magnetic polarity time scale indicates that the absolute motion change lags the relative motion changes by only approx.3--5 m.y. rather than by >10 m.y. as indicated by previous polarity time scales.

  13. Can Mantle Transition Zone beneath the Caroline Plate, Equatorial Western Pacific Be Resolved Seismologically Using Available Dataset?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.; Konishi, K.; Lee, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Caroline Plate, located in the equatorial Western Pacific, appears to be underlain by a stagnant slab. Even though the plate is surrounded by seismic zones of deep- and intermediate-depth earthquakes (originating from the Philippines, Banda Sea, Mariana and New Britain Island), available seismic dataset of source-receiver pair is limited due to the scarcity of land-based seismic stations. In particular, seismic stations are limited in the western and eastern sides of the Caroline Plate. In this study, we perform investigations on the seismic resolution using waveform inversion approach. Earthquake data sets in the last decade obtained from publicly available seismic stations were used to examine the presumed mantle transition zone (MTZ), whose depth ranges from 410 to 660 km in three dimensions. Our analysis shows that, although the current coverage may be marginally sufficient to assess the presence or absence of stagnant slab, the number of ray paths, especially towards the equator, is too limited to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional structure. Hence, it is important to install additional seismic stations (most likely, in the form of the broadband ocean bottom seismometers) around the Caroline Plate. A number of optimal sites are suggested based on our resolution tests. It is hoped that by placing additional ocean bottom seismometers several important issues regarding the nature of MTZ beneath Caroline Plate can be explored that could not be addressed by global tomography models alone such as its origin.

  14. Anatomy of the western Java plate interface from depth-migrated seismic images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopp, H.; Hindle, D.; Klaeschen, D.; Oncken, O.; Reichert, C.; Scholl, D.

    2009-01-01

    Newly pre-stack depth-migrated seismic images resolve the structural details of the western Java forearc and plate interface. The structural segmentation of the forearc into discrete mechanical domains correlates with distinct deformation styles. Approximately 2/3 of the trench sediment fill is detached and incorporated into frontal prism imbricates, while the floor sequence is underthrust beneath the d??collement. Western Java, however, differs markedly from margins such as Nankai or Barbados, where a uniform, continuous d??collement reflector has been imaged. In our study area, the plate interface reveals a spatially irregular, nonlinear pattern characterized by the morphological relief of subducted seamounts and thicker than average patches of underthrust sediment. The underthrust sediment is associated with a low velocity zone as determined from wide-angle data. Active underplating is not resolved, but likely contributes to the uplift of the large bivergent wedge that constitutes the forearc high. Our profile is located 100 km west of the 2006 Java tsunami earthquake. The heterogeneous d??collement zone regulates the friction behavior of the shallow subduction environment where the earthquake occurred. The alternating pattern of enhanced frictional contact zones associated with oceanic basement relief and weak material patches of underthrust sediment influences seismic coupling and possibly contributed to the heterogeneous slip distribution. Our seismic images resolve a steeply dipping splay fault, which originates at the d??collement and terminates at the sea floor and which potentially contributes to tsunami generation during co-seismic activity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/metal/PZT sandwich plate with imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Ilkay; Akbarov, Surkay D.; Sezer, Semih

    2016-07-01

    The Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/Metal/PZT sandwich plate is investigated by employing the exact linear equations of electro-elastic waves in piezoelectric materials within the scope of the plane-strain state. It is assumed that at the interfaces between the piezoelectric face layers and metal core layer, shear-spring and normal-spring type imperfect conditions are satisfied. The degree of this imperfectness is estimated through the corresponding shear-spring and normal-spring type parameters which appear in the contact condition characterizing the transverse and normal displacements' discontinuity. The corresponding dispersion equation is derived, and as a result of the numerical solution to this equation, the dispersion curves are constructed for the first and second lowest modes in the cases where the material of the face layers is PZT and the material of the middle layer is Steel (St). Consequently, for the PZT/St/PZT sandwich plate, the study of the influence of the problem parameters such as the piezoelectric and dielectric constants, layer thickness ratios, non-dimensional shear-spring, and normal-spring type parameters, is carried out. In particular, it is established that the imperfectness of the contact between the layers of the plate causes a decrease in the values of the wave propagation velocity.

  16. Preliminary Investigation to Resolve the Shear Velocity Structure of the Mantle Transition Zone beneath the Caroline Plate, Equatorial Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, K.; Kawai, K.; Fuji, N.; Lee, S.; Geller, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Mantle Transition Zone (MTZ), which lies in the depth range from 410-660 km, is considered to be a region capable of carrying a large amount of water and other volatiles. A unique feature of the MTZ beneath the northwest Pacific rim is the stagnant slab which lies below much of the West Philippine Basin and extends laterally over a distance of thousands of kilometers beneath Korea and northeast China. In recent years, suggestions have been made that explain the seismicity and intra-plate volcanism in this region in terms of hydrous magmatic plumes rising from the MTZ. However, the exact mechanism remains under debate. An equally important, but less well-known, observation is that a stagnant slab appears to exist beneath much of the Caroline Plate in the equatorial western Pacific as well. If a stagnant slab does exist here, it is most likely a result of the long northward migration of the Australian Plate and subduction since its breakaway from the Antarctic. However, due to tectonic complexity and the lack of seismic stations, the structure and properties of the stagnant slab and the MTZ beneath the Caroline plate are not well understood. Also it is unclear if the large volcanic outflows around the Caroline Plate such as the Eurpik Rise can be explained by a hydrous magmatic plume stemming from the MTZ. To understand the shear-wave velocity structure of the MTZ beneath the Caroline Plate, we employ a body wave waveform inversion technique. Fuji et al. (PEPI, 2010) conducted body wave waveform inversion for the mantle transition zone beneath Japan. In this study we present preliminary results for an application of their methods to infer upper mantle and MTZ structure beneath the Caroline plate. We also estimate the resolving power of full-waveform inversion for a dataset obtained from the IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) network for shear velocity structure in the upper mantle, especially for the mantle transition zone beneath the

  17. Effects of the Yakutat terrane collision with North America on the neighboring Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Barth, G. A.; van Avendonk, H.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetry data show a 30 km N-S trending ridge within the deep-sea Surveyor Fan between the mouths of the Yakutat Sea Valley and Bering Trough in the Gulf of Alaska. The ridge originates in the north, perpendicular to and at the base of the continental slope, coincident with the Transition Fault, the strike-slip boundary between the Yakutat terrane (YAK) and the Pacific plate (PAC). The ridge exhibits greatest relief adjacent to the Transition Fault, and becomes less distinct farther from the shelf edge. Seismic reflection data reveal a sharp basement high beneath the ridge (1.1 sec of relief above "normal" basement in two-way travel time) as well as multiple similarly oriented strike-slip fault segments. The ridge, basement high, and faults are aligned and co-located with an intraplate earthquake swarm on the PAC, which includes four events > 6.5 Mw that occurred from 1987-1992. The swarm is defined by right-lateral strike-slip events, and is collectively called the Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). Based on the extent of historic seismicity, the GASZ extends at least 230 km into the PAC, seemingly ending at the Kodiak-Bowie Seamount Chain. Farther southwest, between the Kodiak-Bowie and Patton-Murray Seamount Chains, there is a large regional bathymetric low with an axis centered along the Aja Fracture Zone, perpendicular to the GASZ and Aleutian Trench. Basement and overlying sediment in the low are irregularly, but pervasively faulted. The GASZ and faulted bathymetric low could represent PAC deformation due to PAC-YAK coupling whereby YAK resistance to subduction is expressed as deformation in the thinner (weaker) PAC crust. The YAK is an allochthonous, basaltic terrane coupled to the PAC that began subducting at a low angle beneath North America (NA) ~25-40 Ma. Due to its 15-25 km thickness, the YAK is resistant to subduction compared to the normal oceanic crust of the PAC. As a result the plates developed differential motion along the

  18. Surface constraints on the temporal and spatial evolution of the Farallon-Pacific-North America plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuarrie, N.; Oskin, M.

    2009-05-01

    Extension and volcanism are two surface derived data sets used to infer mantle processes back in time. We integrate two new large GIS-based datasets to create palinspastic restorations of extension and volcanism allowing us to readdress the relationship between plate-boundary deformation, intra-plate extension and magmatism in western North America. Using ArcGIS and custom software, we retrodeformed the NAVDat (North American Volcanic Database, navdat.geongrid.org) using the western North America reconstruction of McQuarrie and Wernicke (2005). We compare this data to strain rates calculated over a 50 km-grid forward- deformed from 36 Ma to present. With the deformed grid and palinspastically restored volcanic dataset we quantitatively compare rates of magmatism and deformation and evaluate the age, location, and migration of Cenozoic volcanic arcs. A first order conclusion from this study is that magmatism, throughout the Basin and Range, is primarily driven by plate boundary effects. The plate boundary effects include subduction and rollback of the Farallon plate, creation and expansion of slab windows as the Pacific plate intercepts the North American plate and re-establishment of the ancestral Cascade arc along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada at ˜ 15 Ma. Notable exceptions include the Yellowstone hotspot system along the northern boarder of our study area and late-stage (<8 Ma) passive, extension related asthenospheric upwelling that accompanied a thinning lithosphere along the eastern and western margins of the Basin and Range. The palinspastic reconstructions presented here highlight that the classic, high-angle, Basin and Range faulting that comprises most of the physiographic Basin and Range province commenced during a remarkably amagmatic period. These observations largely contradicts the active rifting model where magmatism triggers Basin and Range extension

  19. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Laminated Composite Plates with Locally Delaminated Interface Subjected to Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Abo Sabah, Saddam Hussein; Kueh, Ahmad Beng Hong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of localized interface progressive delamination on the behavior of two-layer laminated composite plates when subjected to low velocity impact loading for various fiber orientations. By means of finite element approach, the laminae stiffnesses are constructed independently from their interface, where a well-defined virtually zero-thickness interface element is discreetly adopted for delamination simulation. The present model has the advantage of simulating a localized interfacial condition at arbitrary locations, for various degeneration areas and intensities, under the influence of numerous boundary conditions since the interfacial description is expressed discretely. In comparison, the model shows good agreement with existing results from the literature when modeled in a perfectly bonded state. It is found that as the local delamination area increases, so does the magnitude of the maximum displacement history. Also, as top and bottom fiber orientations deviation increases, both central deflection and energy absorption increase although the relative maximum displacement correspondingly decreases when in contrast to the laminates perfectly bonded state. PMID:24696668

  1. Predicting earthquakes along the major plate tectonic boundaries in the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1978-01-01

    In an article in the last issue of the Earthquake Information Bulletin ("Earthquakes and Plate Tectonics," by Henry Spall), we saw how 90 percent of the world's earthquakes occur at the margins of the Earth's major crustal plates. however, when we look at the distribution of earthquakes in detail, we see that a number of nearly aseismic regions, or seismic gaps, can be found along the present-day plate boundaries. Why is this? And can we regard these areas as being more likely to be the sites for future larger earthquakes than those segments of the plate boundaries that have ruptured recently. 

  2. Along-Arc Variation in Slab Surface Temperature Caused By 3D Material Circulation at the Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, M.; Van Keken, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    In the northeast Japan arc, we can observe the along-arc variation of Quaternary volcano distribution, topography, seismic wave velocity, and Bouguer gravity anomaly whose characteristic wavelength is ~80 km. These observations may be related to 3D thermal structure in the mantle wedge and/or subducting Pacific slab. As a possible explanation of this, small-scale convection in the mantle wedge of thermal and chemical origin has been proposed so far. In this presentation, we will show another possible explanation for it. It is known mainly based on surface heat flow observation that the mantle wedge in this region is decoupled from the subducting Pacific slab down to ~80 km depth for geological time scale. We also observe that the down-dip limit of low angle thrust type earthquakes in this region is ~50 km depth. These suggest that in the northeast Japan arc, the mantle wedge and the slab decouples by brittle failure down to 50 km depth and by plastic deformation from 50 to 80 km depth. In order to test the effects of the plate interface on the thermal structure in this region, we construct 3D finite element models. The mantle flow is computed only in the mantle wedge, whereas temperature is computed for the whole model domain. We assume a thin, low viscosity layer just above the slab surface from 50 to 80 km depth to decouple the mantle wedge and the slab. We find that the along-arc variation in the slab surface temperature gradually develops with time. Its characteristic wavelength is ~100 km, which is comparable to or slightly higher than that observed. It arises because of the small-scale 3D circulation in the assumed low viscosity layer. The wavelength and the time of onset may depend on the viscosity and dimension of the low viscosity layer. Surface heat flow, on the other hand, does not show significant along-arc variation because forearc mantle is kept cold and hence rigid. These findings suggest that the observed along-arc variation in the northeast Japan

  3. Pelagic and benthic ecology of the lower interface of the Eastern Tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishner, Karen F.; Ashjian, Carin J.; Gelfman, Celia; Gowing, Marcia M.; Kann, Lisa; Levin, Lisa A.; Mullineaux, Lauren S.; Saltzman, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    The distributions of pelagic and benthic fauna were examined in relation to the lower boundary of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on and near Volcano 7, a seamount that penetrates this feature in the Eastern Tropical Pacific. Although the broad, pronounced OMZ in this region is an effective barrier for most zooplankton, zooplankton abundances, zooplankton feeding rates, and ambient suspended particulate organic carbon (POC) peaked sharply in the lower OMZ (about 740-800 m), in association with the minimum oxygen concentration and the increasing oxygen levels just below it. Zooplankton in the lower OMZ were also larger in size, and the pelagic community included some very abundant, possibly opportunistic, species. Elevated POC and scatter in the light transmission data suggested the existence of a thin, particle-rich, and carbon-rich pelagic layer at the base of the OMZ. Gut contents of planktonic detrifvores implied opportunistic ingestion of bacterial aggregates, possibly from this layer. Benthic megafaunal abundances on the seamount, which extended up to 730 m, peaked at about 800 m. There was a consistent vertical progression in the depth of first occurrence of different megafaunal taxa in this depth range, similar to intertidal zonation. Although the vertical gradients of temperature, salinity, and oxygen were gradual at the lower OMZ interface (in contrast to the upper OMZ interface at the thermocline), temporal variability in oxygen levels due to internal wave-induced vertical excursions of the OMZ may produce the distinct zonation in the benthic fauna. The characteristics of the lower OMZ interface result from biological interactions with the chemical and organic matter gradients of the OMZ. Most zooplankton are probably excluded physiologically from pronounced OMZs. The zooplankton abundance peak at the lower interface of the OMZ occurs where oxygen becomes sufficiently high to permit the zooplankton to utilize the high concentrations of organic particles

  4. Localized double-array stacking analysis of PcP: D″ and ULVZ structure beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, central Pacific, and north Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin

    2009-01-01

    A large, high quality P-wave data set comprising short-period and broadband signals sampling four separate regions in the lowermost mantle beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, the central Pacific, and the north Pacific is analyzed using regional one-dimensional double-array stacking and modelling with reflectivity synthetics. A data-screening criterion retains only events with stable PcP energy in the final data stacks used for modelling and interpretation. This significantly improves the signal stacks relative to including unscreened observations, allows confident alignment on the PcP arrival and allows tight bounds to be placed on P-wave velocity structure above the core–mantle boundary (CMB). The PcP reflections under the Cocos plate are well modelled without any ultra-low velocity zone from 5 to 20°N. At latitudes from 15 to 20°N, we find evidence for two P-wave velocity discontinuities in the D″ region. The first is ∼182 km above the CMB with a δln Vp of +1.5%, near the same depth as a weaker discontinuity (<+0.5%) observed from 5 to 15°N in prior work. The other reflector is ∼454 km above the CMB, with a δln Vp of +0.4%; this appears to be a shallower continuation of the joint P- and S-wave discontinuity previously detected south of 15° N, which is presumed to be the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. The data stacks for paths bottoming below Mexico have PcP images that are well matched with the simple IASP91 structure, contradicting previous inferences of ULVZ presence in this region. These particular data are not very sensitive to any D″ discontinuities, and simply bound them to be <∼2%, if present. Data sampling the lowermost mantle beneath the central Pacific confirm the presence of a ∼15-km thick ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) just above the CMB, with δln Vp and δln Vs of around −3 to −4% and −4 to −8%, respectively. The ULVZ models predict previous S-wave data stacks well. The data for this region

  5. Exposed plate interface in the European Alps reveals fabric styles and gradients related to an ancient seismogenic coupling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Raik; Oncken, Onno; Glodny, Johannes; Seifert, Wolfgang; Georgieva, Viktoria; Sudo, Masafumi

    2009-05-01

    We present observations from a continuous exposure of an ancient plate interface in the depth range of its former seismogenic zone in the central Alps of Europe related to Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary subduction and accretion of the South Penninic lower plate underneath the Adriatic upper plate. The material forming the exposed plate interface zone has experienced flow and fracturing over an extended period of time followed by syncollisional exhumation, thus reflecting a multistage evolution. Fabric formation and metamorphism, however, chiefly record the deformation conditions of the precollisional setting along the plate interface. We identify an unstable slip domain from pseudotachylytes occurring in the temperature range between 200 and 300°C. This zone coincides with a domain of intense veining in the subduction mélange with mineral growth into open cavities, indicating fast, possibly seismic, rupture. Evidence for transient near-lithostatic fluid pressure as well as brittle fractures competing with mylonitic shear zones continues into the region below the occurrence of pseudotachylytes, possibly reflecting a zone of conditionally stable slip. The zone above the unstable slip area is devoid of veins but displays ample evidence of fluid-assisted processes similar to the deeper zone: solution-precipitation creep and dehydration reactions in the mélange matrix, hydration, and sealing of the base of the upper plate. Seismic rupture here is possibly expressed by ubiquitous localized deformation zones. We hypothesize that trenchward sealing of parts of the plate interface as well as reaction-enhanced destruction of upper plate permeability is an important component, localizing the unstable slip zone. This relation may result from the competition of the pervasive, presumably interseismic, pressure solution creep destroying permeability and building elevated fluid pressure until the strength threshold is reached with seismic failure.

  6. Plate convergence, transcurrent faults and internal deformation adjacent to Southeast Asia and the western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitch, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    A model for oblique convergence between plates of lithosphere is proposed in which at least a fraction of slip parallel to the plate margin results in transcurrent movements on a nearly vertical fault which is located on the continental side of a zone of plate consumption. In an extreme case of complete decoupling only the component of slip normal to the plate margin can be inferred from underthrusting. Recent movements in the western Sunda region provide the most convincing evidence for decoupling of slip, which in this region is thought to be oblique to the plate margin. A speculative model for convergence along the margins of the Philippine Sea is constructed from an inferred direction of oblique slip in the Philippine region. This model requires that the triple point formed by the junction of the Japanese and Izu-Bonin trenches and the Nankai trough migrate along the Sagami trough.

  7. Real feature of seismicity around Palau trench region, western Pacific: Is Palau trench aseismic silent plate boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Shito, A.; Tanaka, S.; Suetsugu, D.

    2012-12-01

    Palau islands locate around plate converging zone in the western Pacific region. In the east off the Palau islands, obvious trench topography is developed whose bathymetry reaches about 6000 meters. Palau trench locates at the west side of Yap trench. However tectonic activity is quite different in the both trenches. Yap trench has active seismic activity associate with subduction process. Plate motion model shows clear convergent relative motion between Pacific plate and Philippine Sea plate at Yap trench. On the other hand, Palau trench doesn't have active seismicity according to ISC catalogue. In ten years in 2000's, only three small earthquakes are reported in ISC catalogue. Historically any great earthquake also is not reported. Recent plate motion model shows very low convergent motion at Palau trench though developed trench structure. Our group operates broadband seismic station at Palau (station code: PALU) for about 15 years. In our instant monitoring, local earthquakes sometime are recognized. We operated additional stations in Palau islands for six months to detect local earthquake and to locate hypocenters. Our objective of the research is evaluation of real seismicity of Palau region and final major interest is to understand tectonic activity of Palau trench. We install minimum network for hypocenter locating in Koror and Babeldaob islands, Palau that its array dimension is about 20 km. We use broadband seismographs and high resolution data loggers with GPS clock and solar power generators. We succeeded continuous recording without any troubles and clips of mass position. By careful motoring, we pick up greater than 70 local earthquakes in only six months. And we also tried to read the P and S wave arrival times. We succeeded to locate 27 hypocenters. The number of seismic events is much higher than initial estimation. The hypocenters locate east coast side of Palau islands where is trench side. The overview of distribution is parallel to trench

  8. Contact area and static pressure profile at the plate-bone interface in the nonluted and luted bone plate.

    PubMed

    Staller, G S; Richardson, D W; Nunamaker, D M; Provost, M

    1995-01-01

    Contact area and pressure between 6-hole broad dynamic compression plates and 20 pairs of equine third metatarsal bones were measured using nonluted and luted plating techniques. Pressure-sensitive film (pressure ranges 10 to 50 MPa and 50 to 130 MPa) was used as the static pressure transducer. Nonluted and one of two luting techniques were tested on each pair of bones; each luting technique was tested on 20 bones. Quantitative determinations of contact area and pressure were made using computerized image processing techniques. Mean (+/- SD) total contact area for nonluted plates was 18.49% +/- 3.5% of the potential plate-bone contact area. Luting increased (P < .05) total contact area to 25.56% +/- 4.0% and 31.29% +/- 6.6% for the respective luting techniques. The effects of luting on contact area were dependent on the contact pressure. At contact pressure ranges 10 to 20 and 21 to 35 MPa, luting increased contact area. In contact pressure ranges 36 to 45 and 50 to 65 MPa, plate-bone contact was inherently greatest and plate luting had no significant effect on contact area. In contact pressure ranges 66 to 99 and 100 to 126 MPa, luting decreased contact area. Contact area was increased at lower contact pressures at the expense of higher pressure contact. Contact in the middle third of the plate was 20% to 40% of the contact at either end of the plate. Plate luting increased contact area best where plate-bone contour was most similar. PMID:7571381

  9. The March 11, 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake and cascading failure of the plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Eric; Ishii, Miaki

    2012-03-01

    A continuous back-projection analysis using data recorded in North America between March 9, 2011 and April 7, 2011 is applied to the Mw 9.0 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake and the foreshocks and aftershocks of this event. As with the Mw 8.8 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake, back-projection results of the mainshock show variations in rupture behavior when data filtered to different frequency ranges are used. In particular, there is a relationship between the frequency of data used and the position along the dip direction of the energy release, with the highest-frequency result imaging energy at the down-dip edge of the rupture and progressively lower frequencies showing a continuous shift updip. In addition, these results show that late in the rupture (˜200 seconds after the hypocentral time), energy at all frequencies is imaged very close to the trench at about 37°N, which, with the energy imaged near and updip of the epicenter, may have acted as a tsunami source. Comparing the mainshock rupture area to the area that ruptured during M ≥ 6 foreshocks and aftershocks between March 9th and April 7th shows that total failure of the plate interface nearly doubled compared to the mainshock alone. Building upon the idea that the mainshock occurred through interactions between multiple segments, the results imply that the total failure area of the interface may represent the area that can rupture during a single event as a series of in-phase interface segments.

  10. The Interface of Pacific and Other Knowledges in a Supplementary Education Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbairn-Dunlop, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Because identity (language and culture) are central to Pacific knowledge and knowledge construction processes, Pacific students' educational experiences should be viewed through a cultural lens that sees Pacific knowledge and practices as valid and valued. This study explores the relationship between culture and educational outcomes as seen…

  11. Oceanic plate structures beneath the northwestern Pacific Ocean revealed by explosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isse, T.; Shiobara, H.; Shinohara, M.; Yamada, T.; Yagi, T.; Sugioka, H.; Utada, H.

    2014-12-01

    Plate tectonics is based on a concept that a rigid lithosphere moves over a weaker asthenosphere. Understanding of the plate tectonics is important to understand the Earth's system. However, the nature of the lithosphere and asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is not yet well determined. To understand the physical condition for the LAB, we have conduct a seafloor observation called " Normal Oceanic Mantle (NOMan) Project". We focused on the oceanic plate because the nature and evolution history of the oceanic plate is simpler than the continental plate so that it is easier to investigate its nature. To analyze the upper mantle structures around the LAB, we conducted a seismic explosion experiments as a part of NOMan project. Seismic explosion experiments were conducted at four shot sites with ten broadband ocean bottom seismometers and the size of explosions is 400 kg at two sites, and 200 kg at other sites. The profile lengths are about 700 and 400 km, respectively. Previous studies in this area revealed the azimuthal anisotropy in the uppermost lithosphere (Shinohara et al., 2008), a sharp LAB at a depth of ~ 80 km (Kawakatsu et al. 2009), small-scale heterogeneities in the lithosphere (Shito et al., 2013). After explosion experiments, we recovered five BBOBSs. Rest of them will be recovered at this September.

  12. Geometry of Pacific plate in Kuril-Japan trench zones estimated from earthquake distribution using LT-OBS network and seismic structures by marine surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, M.; Yamada, T.; Kuwano, A.; Nakahigashi, K.; Machida, Y.; Mochizuki, K.; Kanazawa, T.; Takanami, T.; Hino, R.

    2009-12-01

    The seismicity of the Japan arc region is as high as that observed in other areas of subduction of oceanic plates. The Japan Trench and Kuril Trench are plate convergent zones where the Pacific Plate is subducting below the Japan island. In addition, the trench is crooked off Erimo cape, Hokkaido. It is considered the bend of the trench causes complex shape of the plate boundary. There is a possibility that an asperity of a large earthquake is controlled by a shape of a plate boundary. Associated with the plate convergence, many earthquakes occur beneath landward slopes of the Japan Trench and the Kuril Trench. Such earthquakes are considered to occur mainly at plate boundary between the Pacific plate and the landward plate in landward slope of the Kuril trench and the Japan trench. Therefore, to obtain precise hypocenter distribution of earthquakes occurring in the regions is essential to estimate geometry of the plate boundary. For several years, we performed dense seafloor earthquake observation using Long-Term Ocean Bottom Seismometers (LT-OBSs) in this region, including the aftershock observation of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquakes which is a large interplate earthquake around the Japan island arc. In the region off Nemuro, dense seafloor observation was carried out from 2005 to 2006 for one year using LT-OBSs. In the region off Aomori, we performed the same type of a seafloor earthquake observation from 2004 to 2007 for two years in total. Ninety-two LT-OBSs were used for the observations, and an interval of the LT-OBS is approximately 20 km. The LT-OBS has three-component seismometer with a natural period of 1 Hz, and reaches a recoding period of 1 year. As a result, we obtained the precise hypocenter distribution from the region off Nemuro to the region off Aomori, and the hypocenter distribution of huge number of earthquakes enables us to estimate the geometry of the plate boundary. Additionally, seismic surveys using OBSs and controlled source were

  13. Evaluation of a new approach for modelling the screw-bone interface in a locking plate fixation: a corroboration study.

    PubMed

    Moazen, Mehran; Mak, Jonathan H; Jones, Alison C; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2013-07-01

    Computational modelling of the screw-bone interface in fracture fixation constructs is challenging. While incorporating screw threads would be a more realistic representation of the physics, this approach can be computationally expensive. Several studies have instead suppressed the threads and modelled the screw shaft with fixed conditions assumed at the screw-bone interface. This study assessed the sensitivity of the computational results to modelling approaches at the screw-bone interface. A new approach for modelling this interface was proposed, and it was tested on two locking screw designs in a diaphyseal bridge plating configuration. Computational models of locked plating and far cortical locking constructs were generated and compared to in vitro models described in prior literature to corroborate the outcomes. The new approach led to closer agreement between the computational and the experimental stiffness data, while the fixed approach led to overestimation of the stiffness predictions. Using the new approach, the pattern of load distribution and the magnitude of the axial forces, experienced by each screw, were compared between the locked plating and far cortical locking constructs. The computational models suggested that under more severe loading conditions, far cortical locking screws might be under higher risk of screw pull-out than the locking screws. The proposed approach for modelling the screw-bone interface can be applied to any fixation involved application of screws. PMID:23636756

  14. Seismological investigations of the subduction zone plate interface: New advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, Andreas; Garth, Tom; Hicks, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, huge advances have been made in analysing the slip distribution of large megathrust earthquakes and how slip relates to geodetic locking, shedding light on the character of the seismic cycle in subduction zones. Recently, a number of studies have suggested that at convergent plate boundaries, geodetic locking may be closely related to slip distribution of subsequent large earthquakes, as found recently for the Maule 2010 and Tohoku 2011 earthquakes. However, the physical (e.g. seismic) properties along the subduction zone interface are still poorly constrained, posing a major limitation to our physical understanding of both geodetic locking and earthquake rupture process. Here, we present high-resolution seismic tomography results (P- and S-wave velocity), as well as earthquake locations to make a detailed investigation of seismic properties along the portion of the plate interface that ruptured during the 2010 Maule earthquake. Additionally, to test the robustness of our models, we performed numerous numerical tests including changes to the parameterization, synthetic recovery tests and bootstrap analysis. We find P-wave velocities of about 5.7 km/s at 10 km depth and linearly increasing to 7.5 km/s at a depth of 30 km. Between 30 km and 43 km, P-wave velocities are relatively constant at around 7.5 km/s before a subsequent increase to 8.3 km/s at larger depths (>60 km) is observed. The Poisson's ratio is significantly elevated, at values of up to 0.35 at shallow depths of 10km to 15km, before reaching less elevated values of 0.28-0.29 in the depth range between 20km and 43km. Comparison of these velocities to petrological models shows good agreement below 30 - 50 km depth. At shallower depths though P-wave velocities are significantly lower, which together with the elevated poisons ratio indicates that this portion of the mega thrust is highly hydrated, suggesting that material properties may in part control the seismogenic character of

  15. Faunal breaks and species composition of Indo-Pacific corals: the role of plate tectonics, environment and habitat distribution.

    PubMed

    Keith, S A; Baird, A H; Hughes, T P; Madin, J S; Connolly, S R

    2013-07-22

    Species richness gradients are ubiquitous in nature, but the mechanisms that generate and maintain these patterns at macroecological scales remain unresolved. We use a new approach that focuses on overlapping geographical ranges of species to reveal that Indo-Pacific corals are assembled within 11 distinct faunal provinces. Province limits are characterized by co-occurrence of multiple species range boundaries. Unexpectedly, these faunal breaks are poorly predicted by contemporary environmental conditions and the present-day distribution of habitat. Instead, faunal breaks show striking concordance with geological features (tectonic plates and mantle plume tracks). The depth range over which a species occurs, its larval development rate and genus age are important determinants of the likelihood that species will straddle faunal breaks. Our findings indicate that historical processes, habitat heterogeneity and species colonization ability account for more of the present-day biogeographical patterns of corals than explanations based on the contemporary distribution of reefs or environmental conditions. PMID:23698011

  16. Faunal breaks and species composition of Indo-Pacific corals: the role of plate tectonics, environment and habitat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keith, S. A.; Baird, A. H.; Hughes, T. P.; Madin, J. S.; Connolly, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Species richness gradients are ubiquitous in nature, but the mechanisms that generate and maintain these patterns at macroecological scales remain unresolved. We use a new approach that focuses on overlapping geographical ranges of species to reveal that Indo-Pacific corals are assembled within 11 distinct faunal provinces. Province limits are characterized by co-occurrence of multiple species range boundaries. Unexpectedly, these faunal breaks are poorly predicted by contemporary environmental conditions and the present-day distribution of habitat. Instead, faunal breaks show striking concordance with geological features (tectonic plates and mantle plume tracks). The depth range over which a species occurs, its larval development rate and genus age are important determinants of the likelihood that species will straddle faunal breaks. Our findings indicate that historical processes, habitat heterogeneity and species colonization ability account for more of the present-day biogeographical patterns of corals than explanations based on the contemporary distribution of reefs or environmental conditions. PMID:23698011

  17. Plastic Creep and Brittle-Ductile Transition in Hydrated Rocks of the Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, B.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical observations suggest that the formation of hydrous phyllosilicate-bearing rocks such as serpentinites favor aseismic slip on the plate interface. I review our current understanding of deformation of serpentines and similar phyllosilicates in the first 100 km of subduction and discuss some pending questions on measurements and modeling of the behavior and properties of the complex serpentinite rocks. Experimental studies suggest that serpentines have low enough mechanical strength to act as a "stabilizer" of stable creep, but the actual strength of serpentinites will depend on the exact nature of the crystallographic structure and fabric of the stable serpentine variety. Low-temperature, flat-layered lizardite has strong anisotropy in strength. Lizardite-serpentinite strength will depend crystal-preferred orientation (CPO), with isotropic texture having high strength (>300 MPa) and foliated serpentinites having small strength (<100 MPa), independent of temperature, pressure, and strain rate. Thus, the transition between brittle and plastic (or stable creep) behavior may result from progressive deformation. High-temperature serpentine antigorite has a complex corrugated-layered structure, and complex deformation modes were evidenced from experimental studies. Mechanical strength shows a strong stress dependence, suggesting dislocation-creep, and low temperature dependence, suggesting plastic behavior. Extrapolation of experimental results to natural strain rates suggests that antigorite-serpentinites have low strength (<100 MPa or lower), and will favor stable-creep. However, the extrapolation relies on mechanical flow laws that may not apply to serpentine. Electron microscopy observations reveals dislocation-like deformation mechanisms that are not sufficient to explain global deformation of antigorite aggregates, and that are likely accompanied by dissolution-precipitation at low natural strain-rates. Establishing reliable flow laws relevant to the

  18. Modeling Thermal and Stress Behavior of the Fuel-clad Interface in Monolithic Fuel Mini-plates

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory K. Miller; Pavel G. Medvedev; Douglas E. Burkes; Daniel M. Wachs

    2010-08-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, a fuel development and qualification program is in process with the objective of qualifying very high density low enriched uranium fuel that will enable the conversion of high performance research reactors with operational requirements beyond those supported with currently available low enriched uranium fuels. The high density of the fuel is achieved by replacing the fuel meat with a single monolithic low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel foil. Doing so creates differences in the mechanical and structural characteristics of the fuel plate because of the planar interface created by the fuel foil and cladding. Furthermore, the monolithic fuel meat will dominate the structural properties of the fuel plate rather than the aluminum matrix, which is characteristic of dispersion fuel types. Understanding the integrity and behavior of the fuel-clad interface during irradiation is of great importance for qualification of the new fuel, but can be somewhat challenging to determine with a single technique. Efforts aimed at addressing this problem are underway within the fuel development and qualification program, comprised of modeling, as-fabricated plate characterization, and post-irradiation examination. An initial finite element analysis model has been developed to investigate worst-case scenarios for the basic monolithic fuel plate structure, using typical mini-plate irradiation conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor. Initial analysis shows that the stress normal to the fuel-clad interface dominates during irradiation, and that the presence of small, rounded delaminations at the interface is not of great concern. However, larger and/or fuel-clad delaminations with sharp corners can create areas of concern, as maximum principal cladding stress, strain, displacement, and peak fuel temperature are all significantly increased. Furthermore, stresses resulting from temperature gradients that cause the plate to bow or buckle in

  19. High Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of the Tuvalu Seamount Chain: Implications for Hotspot Longevity and Pacific Plate Motion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, K.; Finlayson, V. A.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Konter, J.; Jackson, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Tuvalu seamount chain is a Mid-Pacific (4-11oS, 175-179oE) linear volcanic chain that was previously poorly sampled. Absolute plate motion (APM) models predict a long-lived relationship with hotspot activity in French Polynesia. The lack of detailed age data therefore results in a key chronologic gap in the geologic history of this hotspot and current APM models. Depending on the set of assumptions employed, previous APM models have disagreed on which known hotspot chain, if any, the Tuvalu volcanoes are associated with. Based on APM modeling and geochemical affinities (HIMU, 206Pb/204Pb > 20), Konter et al. (2008) argue that Rurutu Island (French Polynesia) represents the modern location of the hotspot that contributed volcanism to the Tuvalu seamounts. This model traces the hotspot chain from Rurutu through the region of modern day Samoa, the Tuvalu seamounts, the Gilbert ridge, and into the North & South Wake islands. This hypothesis suggests that a single HIMU mantle reservoir can exist and remain relatively geochemically consistent over 100 Myrs. On the contrary, the Wessel and Kroenke (2008) APM model suggest the Tuvalu seamounts and N & S Wake are unrelated. This model requires the N & S Wake chains to rotate significantly at the young end of the Gilbert Ridge resulting in a current hotspot location around 13-15oS and 156-155oW, away from any known active volcanism. During the summer of 2013, 25 Tuvaluan seamounts and 9 seamounts near the current Samoan chain were dredged onboard the R.V. Roger Revelle (expedition RR1310). Here we present 43 new 40Ar-39Ar ages covering 19 Tuvaluan seamounts and four seamounts within the Samoan hotspot track. These ages provide insights into the contributing hotspot for Tuvaluan volcanism and provide a new reference frame for constraining Pacific APM models. The corresponding chemical analyses for a subset of these seamounts will be presented by Finlayson et al. (this volume). Konter, J. G. et al. One hundred million

  20. Sub-crustal earthquakes within the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone beneath the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boese, C. M.; Stern, T. A.; Townend, J.; Bourguignon, S.; Sheehan, A.; Smith, E. G. C.

    2013-08-01

    Sub-crustal earthquakes have been observed sporadically for ∼40 years in the central South Island of New Zealand. We report on 20 events recorded between December 2008 and February 2012 near the Alpine Fault in the continental collision zone between the Australian and Pacific plates. A subset of 18 events at depths of 47-74 km occurs south of Mt. Cook and together with recently reported tremor locations indicates along-strike variations in deformation behaviour along the plate boundary. The sub-crustal earthquakes south of Mt. Cook increase in depth, frequency and size southwards towards the Puysegur subduction zone. Focal mechanisms could be determined for 14 earthquakes and exhibit predominantly strike-slip and reverse faulting solutions. Stress inversion analysis of the focal mechanisms yields a stress field favouring oblique-reverse faulting. We interpret the geographic and vertical distributions of these sub-crustal events in relation to a previously proposed tectonic model of a remnant passive margin that formed south of New Zealand in the Eocene and was overridden when dextral strike-slip motion initiated on the Alpine Fault. We infer that sub-crustal earthquakes occur along the leading edge of this structure, which is attached to the continental Australian crust.

  1. Evolution of the Walker Lane: An Incipient Transform Fault and Future Pacific-North America Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulds, J. E.; Henry, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    Since ~30 Ma, western North America has been evolving from an Andean type margin to a dextral transform. Transform growth has been marked by arc retreat, orogenic collapse, and inland steps of the San Andreas fault system (SAF). In the western Great Basin (WGB), a system of dextral faults, known as the Walker Lane (WL) in the north and eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) in the south, currently accommodates ~20% of the Pacific - North America dextral motion. In contrast to the continuous 1100-km-long SAF, discontinuous ~10-250-km-long dextral faults comprise the WL-ECSZ. Displacement across the WL-ECSZ decreases N-ward from ≥60 km in south to E-central California, to ~25 km in NW Nevada, to zero in NE California. Geodetic strain rates are ~10 mm/yr across the WL-ECSZ in the WGB but decrease to <2.5 mm/yr at the NW terminus in NE California. The evolution of the WL-ECSZ is closely linked to events along the SAF. The early Miocene elimination of microplates along the southern California coast, S-ward steps in the Rivera triple junction at 19-16 Ma and 13 Ma, and an increase in plate motions ~12 Ma induced the first major episode of deformation in the WL-ECSZ, which began ~13 Ma along the N60°W-trending Las Vegas shear zone (LVSZ). The LVSZ shear zone paralleled plate motions, formed inboard of where the SAF initially organized into a through-going structure, and accommodated ~60 km of right slip ~13 to 6 Ma. In the late Miocene, the southern part of the transform shifted (~13-6 Ma) east to the Gulf of California (GC), the Big Bend of the SAF developed, and plate motions changed from ~N60°W to N37°W (11-6 Ma). Coincidentally (~11-6 Ma), dextral shear shifted west in the WL-ECSZ from the LVSZ to a NNW belt in the WGB. Dextral shear was favored in the WGB as it paralleled the new plate motion, aligned with the GC, and avoided the Big Bend bottleneck. By ~4 Ma, dextral shear had propagated to the northern WL (NW Nevada - NE California) in concert with the N

  2. Distribution and migration of aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Ogasawara Islands intraplate normal-faulting earthquake related to a fracture zone in the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; No, Tetsuo; Kaiho, Yuka; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamashita, Mikiya; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    describe the aftershocks of a Mw 7.4 intraplate normal-faulting earthquake that occurred 150 km east Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, on 21 December 2010. It occurred beneath the outer trench slope of the Izu-Ogasawara trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Aftershock observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) began soon after the earthquake and multichannel seismic reflection surveys were conducted across the aftershock area. Aftershocks were distributed in a NW-SE belt 140 km long, oblique to the N-S trench axis. They formed three subparallel lineations along a fracture zone in the Pacific plate. The OBS observations combined with data from stations on Chichi-jima and Haha-jima Islands revealed a migration of the aftershock activity. The first hour, which likely outlines the main shock rupture, was limited to an 80 km long area in the central part of the subsequent aftershock area. The first hour activity occurred mainly around, and appears to have been influenced by, nearby large seamounts and oceanic plateau, such as the Ogasawara Plateau and the Uyeda Ridge. Over the following days, the aftershocks expanded beyond or into these seamounts and plateau. The aftershock distribution and migration suggest that crustal heterogeneities related to a fracture zone and large seamounts and oceanic plateau in the incoming Pacific plate affected the rupture of the main shock. Such preexisting structures may influence intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in other regions of plate flexure prior to subduction.

  3. Shape of the plate interface near the Mejillones Peninsula in Northern Chile inferred from high resolution relocation of Tocopilla aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida, A.; Schurr, B.; Lancieri, M.; Madariaga, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The 14 November, Mw 7.8 2007 Tocopilla earthquake broke the southern part of seismic gap of northern Chile. The earthquake broke a rupture area 130 km by 30km along the deep plate interface between the Nazca and South American plates.The aftershock of this event were very well recorded by the IPOC (GFZ-IPGP-DGF) and Task Force networks (GFZ). Since the IPOC network was installed before the main Tocopilla earthquake we could locate the first two weeks of aftershocks with low accuracy.The first two weeks of aftershocks were characterised by a strong seismicity in the southern area starting with two big events of Mw 6.8 and 6.3 one day after the Tocopilla earthquake. On 29 November 2007 a Task Force (TF) Network of 20 short period instruments was installed by the GFZ team in the area of the Mejillones Peninsula. On 16 December a large Mw 6.8 slab push event took place at the center of this network. This event broke the oceanic crust of the subducted Nazca plate.(see Ruiz and Madariaga, this meeting). We have analysed in detail the TF data from its installation to 20 December. Hypocentral locations of the sequence were computed by automatic identification of the aftershocks and careful hand made readings of the arrival times of P and S phases for each seismogram. In a first study, we used the the nonlinear location software,NonLinLoc of Anthony Lomax using both a 1D model proposed by Husen from the study of earlier events in the region and the 2D model proposed by Patzwall et al from seismic profiles across the Mejillones Peninsula. We find that aftershocks were located along a thin, clearly defined zone that we interpret as the plate interface. As expected events situated off-shore of the Mejillones peninsula are less well located by Nonlinloc although our results suggest that several of these events occurred above the plate interface in the South American wedge. In a second step we relocated 850 events using the HypoDD method of Waldhauser et al with time delays

  4. Fluid content along the subduction plate interface: how it impacts the long- (and short-) term rheology and exhumation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, Philippe; Angiboust, Samuel; Guillot, Stéphane; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, many studies based on field, petrological and geophysical evidence have emphasized the link between mineral reactions, fluid release and seismogenesis, either along the whole plate interface (eg., Hacker et al., 2003) or at specific depths (e.g., ~30 km: Audet et al., 2009; ~70-80 km: Angiboust et al., 2012). Although they argue for a crucial influence of fluids on subduction processes, large uncertainties remain when assessing their impact on the rheology of the plate interface across space and time. Kilometer-scale accreted terranes/units in both ancient and present-day subduction zones potentially allow to track changes in mechanical coupling along the plate interface. Despite some potential biases (exhumation is limited and episodic, lasting no more than a few My if any, from prefered depths -- mainly 30-40 and 70-80 km, and there are so far only few examples precisely located with respect to the plate interface) their record of changes in fluid regime and strain localisation is extremely valuable. One striking example of the role of fluids on plate interface rheology during nascent subduction is provided by metamorphic soles (i.e., ~500 m thick tectonic slices welded to the base of ophiolites). We show that their accretion to the ophiolite indeed only happens across a transient, optimal time-T-P window (after < 1-2 My, at 1±0.2 GPa, 750-850°C) associated with fluid release and infiltration, leading to similar effective rheology on both sides (i.e., downgoing crust and mantle wedge). This maximizes interplate mechanical coupling, as deformation gets distributed over a large band encompassing the plate interface (i.e., a few km), and promotes detachment of the sole from the sinking slab. We also show how tectonic slicing during mature subduction likely relates to short-term fluid release and repeated seismicity, based on the Monviso exposures (W. Alps, a relatively continuous, 15 km long fragment of oceanic lithosphere exhumed from ~80 km

  5. The joint impact of ocean circulation and plate tectonics on the glacial South Pacific carbon pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronge, T.; Tiedemann, R.; Lamy, F.; Köhler, P.; Alloway, B.; De Pol-Holz, R.; Pahnke, K.; Southon, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the whereabouts of CO2 during glacials and its pathways during deglacial transitions is one of the main priorities in paleoclimate research. The opposing patterns of atmospheric CO2 and Δ14C suggest that the bulk of CO2 was released from an old and therefore 14C-depleted carbon reservoir. As the modern deep ocean, below ~2000 m, stores up to 60-times more carbon than the entire atmosphere, it is considered to be a major driver of the atmospheric CO2 pattern, storing CO2 during glacials, releasing it during deglacial transitions. We use a South Pacific transect of sediment cores, covering the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW), the Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and the Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW), to reconstruct the spatio-temporal evolution of oceanic Δ14C over the last 30,000 years. During the last glacial, we find significantly 14C-depleted waters between 2000 and 4300 m water depth, indicating a strong stratification and the storage of carbon in these water masses. However, two sediment cores from 2500 m and 3600 m water depth reveal an extreme glacial atmosphere-to-deep-water Δ14C offset of up to -1000‰ and ventilation ages (deep-water to atmosphere 14C-age difference) of ~8000 years. Such old water masses are expected to be anoxic, yet there is no evidence of anoxia in the glacial S-Pacific. Recent studies showed an increase of Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) volcanism during glacials due to the low stand of global sea level. For this reason, we hypothesize that the admixture of 14C-dead carbon via tectonic activity along MORs might have contributed to these extremely low radiocarbon values. With a simple 1-box model, we calculated if the admixture of hydrothermal CO2 has the potential to lower the deep Pacific Δ14C signal. We show that if the oceanic turnover time is at least 2700 years, an increased hydrothermal flux of 1.2 μmol kg-1 yr-1 has the potential to reproduce the extreme radiocarbon values observed in our records.

  6. Thermochemical Analysis of Phases Formed at the Interface of a Mg alloy-Ni-plated Steel Joint during Laser Brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Ali M.; Chartrand, Patrice; Weckman, David C.; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2013-04-01

    The thermodynamic stability of precipitated phases at the steel-Ni-Mg alloy interface during laser brazing of Ni-plated steel to AZ31B magnesium sheet using AZ92 magnesium alloy filler wire has been evaluated using FactSage thermochemical software. Assuming local chemical equilibrium at the interface, the chemical activity-temperature-composition relationships of intermetallic compounds that might form in the steel-Ni interlayer-AZ92 magnesium alloy system in the temperature range of 873 K to 1373 K (600 °C to 1100 °C) were estimated using the Equilib module of FactSage. The results provided better understanding of the phases that might form at the interface of the dissimilar metal joints during the laser brazing process. The addition of a Ni interlayer between the steel and the Mg brazing alloy was predicted to result in the formation of the AlNi, Mg2Ni, and Al3Ni2 intermetallic compounds at the interface, depending on the local maximum temperature. This was confirmed experimentally by laser brazing of Ni electro-plated steel to AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy using AZ92 magnesium alloy filler wire. As predicted, the formation of just AlNi and Mg2Ni from a monotectic and eutectic reaction, respectively, was observed near the interface.

  7. Exhumation and Coupling at the Plate Interface: Large Tectonic Slices V. Melange Formation? Key Contexts and Possible Controlling Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.; Guillot, S.; Garcia-Casco, A.

    2011-12-01

    Fragments of subducted oceanic lithosphere returned along the plate interface convey crucial information regarding the thermal and rheological conditions of convergent plate boundaries. Geological evidence indicate that, unlike subduction, exhumation is non-steady (Agard et al., Earth Sci. Rev. 2009). We herein focus on deep processes along the plate interface (40-80 km depth), for which there is no counterflow (unlike in accretionary prisms) and no other known mechanisms to return eclogites than interplate friction or buoyancy. These eclogites are of two major types: large scale (>km) slices with coherent PT estimates (W. Alps) versus isolated fragments (frequently m-hm) in a serpentinite- or sedimentary-rich matrix showing contrasting equilibration depths (with hints of punctuated exhumation and even reburial; Franciscan, Cuba, Sistan; e.g., Garcia-Casco et al., Geol. Acta 2006). This latter type tends to show warmer equilibration paths, whereas the larger tectonic slices from the former type remain systematically cold. Serpentinites are crucial for both in permitting decoupling and acting as a buoy, and fluid budget is important too in enhancing floatability and allowing large slices to survive (Angiboust and Agard, Lithos 2010). Numerical models implementing free migration of fluids in the subduction zone also show that the plate interface is strongly localized in the absence of fluids: mechanical decoupling efficiently occurs along the sediment veneer and/or at the top of the highly hydrothermalized crust. Whenever fluids are released in greater amounts (depending on initial fluid content and/or thermal structure), deformation becomes much more distributed and affects both the mantle wedge and the top of the downgoing lithosphere (crust and hydrated mantle top), thereby increasing mechanical coupling between the two plates. Based on natural data and numerical modelling we herein propose that rheological contrast chiefly controls mechanical decoupling. On a

  8. Transients in Pacific/North American Plate Boundary Deformation: Synthesis and Modeling of GPS and Borehole Strain Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Frey, H. V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the Final Technical Report on research conducted between 1 June 1997 and 14 September 2001 entitled "Transients in Pacific/North American plate boundary deformation: Synthesis and modeling of GPS and borehole strain observations." As the project title implies, our effort involved a geodetic study of strain transients, i.e., temporal variations in deformation rates, that occur within plate boundary zones and their relationship to earthquakes and plate motions. Important transients occur during and following large earthquakes, and there are also strain transients not apparently associated with earthquakes. A particularly intriguing class of transients, for which there is a modest but growing list of examples, are preseismic anomalies. Such earthquake precursors, if further documented and understood, would have obvious importance for earthquake hazard mitigation. Because the timescales for these diverse transients range over at least 6 orders of magnitude (minutes to years), no single geodetic technique is optimum. We therefore undertook a systematic synthesis of Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) and borehole strainmeter data in three areas in California where there are adequate numbers of both types of instruments (or their equivalent): the San Francisco Bay region (within the Bay Area Regional Deformation network), southern California (within the Southern California Integrated GPS Network), and Parkfield (where a two-color laser system provides a proxy for continuous GPS measurements). An integral component of our study was the elucidation of the physical mechanisms by which such transients occur and propagate. We therefore initiated the development of multiple forward models, using two independent approaches. In the first, we explored the response to specified earthquake slip in viscoelastic models that incorporated failure criteria and the geometry of major faults in California. In the second approach, we examined the dynamical response of a complex

  9. Deformation across the Pacific-North America plate boundary near San Francisco, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Manaker, D.

    2001-01-01

    We have detected a narrow zone of compression between the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley, and we have estimated slip rates for the San Andreas, Rodgers Creek, and Green Valley faults just north of San Francisco. These results are based on an analysis of campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected between 1992 and 2000 in central California. The zone of compression between the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley is 25 km wide. The observations clearly show 3.8??1.5 mm yr-1 of shortening over this narrow zone. The strike slip components are best fit by a model with 20.8??1.9 mm yr-1 slip on the San Andreas fault, 10.3??2.6 mm yr-1 on the Rodgers Creek fault, and 8.1??2.1 mm yr-1 on the Green Valley fault. The Pacific-Sierra Nevada-Great Valley motion totals 39.2??3.8 mm yr-1 across a zone that is 120 km wide (at the latitude of San Francisco). Standard deviations are one ??. The geodetic results suggest a higher than geologic rate for the Green Valley fault. The geodetic results also suggest an inconsistency between geologic estimates of the San Andreas rate and seismologic estimates of the depth of locking on the San Andreas fault. The only convergence observed is in the narrow zone along the border between the Great Valley and the Coast Ranges.

  10. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  11. Novel three-dimensional MALDI plate for interfacing high-capacity LC separations with MALDI-TOF.

    PubMed

    Hattan, Stephen J; Vestal, Marvin L

    2008-12-01

    Novel matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) sample plates employing collimated-hole structures have been developed that allow capture and concentration of samples while simultaneously acting as a sink for carrier solvents. These plates were designed to provide an efficient interface between higher-capacity liquid chromatography (LC) separations and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). LC-MALDI using conventional plates can accommodate the low-flow (< 1 microL/min) separation protocols typically used in on-line LC-MS methods, and can also be used with higher flow rate, larger columns, but are ultimately limited by the capacity of the two-dimensional surface onto which the sample is deposited. Typically, about 1 microL of chromatographic effluent plus 1 microL of matrix solution can be deposited and dried on a ca. 3 mm diameter spot. Deposition rates (spot dwell time) are determined by the chromatographic resolution and the flow rate. To overcome this limitation, a new three-dimensional MALDI sample plate has been developed using collimated-hole structures (CHS) with monolithic chromatography media filling the holes in the collimated-hole structures. These new plates retain all of the required features of conventional sample plates, commonly formed from stainless steel, but provide additional capacity for capturing and concentrating samples. Results are presented from reversed-phase separation of peptides on a 1 mm i.d. column operating at flow rate of 50 microL/min. Typically, 10 microL of effluent can be collected on a single spot, and sample and matrix dried on a 1 mm diameter spot, to yield about 30-fold enrichment of sample concentration in matrix crystals on the surface compared to the conventional plate. Sample loadings ranging from 1 fmol to 10 pmol/spot were investigated. PMID:19551981

  12. Diffuse Pacific-North American plate boundary: 1000 km of dextral shear inferred from modeling geodetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2011-01-01

    Geodetic measurements tell us that the eastern part of the Basin and Range Province expands in an east-west direction relative to stable North America, whereas the western part of the province moves to the northwest. We develop three-dimensional finite element representations of the western United States lithosphere in an effort to understand the global positioning system (GPS) signal. The models are constrained by known bounding-block velocities and topography, and Basin and Range Province deformation is represented by simple plastic (thermal creep) rheology. We show that active Basin and Range spreading by gravity collapse is expected to have a strong southward component that does not match the GPS signal. We can reconcile the gravitational component of displacement with observed velocity vectors if the Pacific plate applies northwest-directed shear stress to the Basin and Range via the Sierra Nevada block. This effect reaches at least 1000 km east of the San Andreas fault in our models. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  13. Exploring the Pacific-Australian transform plate-boundary in central South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T.; Okaya, D.; Davey, F.; Henrys, S.; Little, T.

    2006-12-01

    Lithospheric structure beneath and adjacent to the continental transform of central South Island, New Zealand (the Alpine Fault) has been investigated with both geophysical and geological methods. Principal features that have been seismically imaged include a spectacular example of a lower crustal detachment that separates the obducting greywacke-schist rocks from lower crust and mantle below. This detachment can be seen as a zone of strong reflectivity that is sub-horizontal at 35 km depth beneath the Southern Alps. The detachment then forms a SE-dipping ramp that gets progressively steeper until at a depth of ~15 km it dips at 60 degrees. If the reflectivity that defines the detachment is projected upwards it would intersect with the surface trace of the Alpine Fault. In the hanging wall of the Alpine Fault low P-wave seismic wave speeds and high electrical conductivity are mapped. These properties are interpreted to mean inter-connected fluid, high fluid pressures and reduced effective normal stresses. Consistent with such high fluid pressures are extensive quartz veining and geological evidence for deep crustal embrittlement along vertical shear planes. Mantle deformation adjacent to the Alpine Fault is detected with SKS splitting results and Pn wave speeds from mutually perpendicular, offshore, seismic lines. P-wave anisotropy of up to 13% is seen in the mantle lid within 20 km of the fault. Moreover, combining SKS and Pn observations suggest that the lateral extent of mantle deformation may be as much as 200 km from the Alpine Fault, and that all the anisotropy can be assigned to finite deformation of the lithospheric mantle. Flexural modeling shows the effective elastic thickness (Te) to be vanishingly small beneath the Southern Alps. Beyond the coastlines values of Te are greater than 20 km. We propose that the weakness and the wide zone of deformation are phenomena of plate boundaries where both strike-slip and convergence have persisted for several

  14. Deformation and Metasomatic Evolution at the Subduction Plate Interface As Viewed from Study of HP/UHP Metamorphic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, G. E.; Penniston-Dorland, S.

    2014-12-01

    We provide a view of lithologic makeup, deformation, and fluid-rock interaction along the deep forearc to subarc plate interface, based on insights gained from study of HP/UHP metamorphic rocks. Exposures of plate-boundary shear zones on which we base our perspective represent 30-80 km depths and are on Catalina Island and at Monviso, Syros, and New Caledonia. Each contains highly deformed zones with schistose matrix, commonly with a large ultramafic component, containing bodies of less deformed mafic, sedimentary, and ultramafic rocks. These "blocks" have varying geometries, are up to km-scale, and can preserve disparate P-T histories reflecting dynamics of incorporation and entrainment. Sheared matrices contain high-variance, hydrous mineral assemblages in some cases resembling metasomatic zones ("rinds") at block-matrix contacts, and rinds and matrices have homogenized isotopic compositions reflecting extensive fluid-rock interaction. Shearing and related physical juxtaposition of disparate metasomatic rocks can result in mixed or 'hybrid' chemical compositions. The chlorite-, talc-, and amphibole-rich schists developed by these processes can stabilize H2O to great depth and influence its cycling. Fluids (hydrous fluids, silicate melts) released within slabs necessarily interact with highly deformed, lithologically hybridized zones at the plate interface as they ascend to potentially enter mantle wedges. Fluids bearing chemical/isotopic signatures of hybrid rocks appear capable of producing arc magma compositions interpreted as reflecting multiple, chemically distinct fluids sources. Geophysical signatures of these rheologically weak zones are equivocal but many recognize the presence of zones of low seismic velocity at/near the top of slabs and attribute them to hydrated rocks. Whether rocks from this interface buoyantly ascend into mantle wedges, indicated in some theoretical models, remains largely untested by field and geophysical observations.

  15. Pacific-North American plate motion from very long baseline interferometry compared with motion inferred from magnetic anomalies, transform faults, and earthquake slip vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Gordon, Richard G.

    1990-01-01

    Geodetic VLBI measurements were used to test whether the Pacific-North American plate velocity averaged over several years of direct observation (1984-1987) equals that averaged over millions of years. It was also tested whether this velocity parallels the San Andreas fault, transform faults and earthquake slip vectors in the Gulf of California, and earthquake slip vectors along the Queen Charlotte fault, along the Alaskan peninsula, and along the Kamchatkan peninsula. The VLBI data provide an estimate of the direction of plate motion that is independent of estimates from fault azimuths and earthquake slip vectors. The Euler vector determined from VLBI was found to be nearly identical to the Euler vector of plate motion model NUVEL-1, which is based on the trends of transform faults, earthquake slip vectors, and spreading rates from marine magnetic anomalies that average motion since 3 Ma. The velocity between the Pacific and North American plates averaged over the past several years equals or nearly equals its velocity averaged over the past several million years, the difference along their boundary nowhere exceeding 4 + or - 7 mm/yr.

  16. New insights into North America-Pacific Plate boundary deformation from Lake Tahoe, Salton Sea and southern Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Daniel Stephen

    Five studies along the Pacific-North America (PA-NA) plate boundary offer new insights into continental margin processes, the development of the PA-NA tectonic margin and regional earthquake hazards. This research is based on the collection and analysis of several new marine geophysical and geological datasets. Two studies used seismic CHIRP surveys and sediment coring in Fallen Leaf Lake (FLL) and Lake Tahoe to constrain tectonic and geomorphic processes in the lakes, but also the slip-rate and earthquake history along the West Tahoe-Dollar Point Fault. CHIRP profiles image vertically offset and folded strata that record deformation associated with the most recent event (MRE). Radiocarbon dating of organic material extracted from piston cores constrain the age of the MRE to be between 4.1--4.5 k.y. B.P. Offset of Tioga aged glacial deposits yield a slip rate of 0.4--0.8 mm/yr. An ancillary study in FLL determined that submerged, in situ pine trees that date to between 900-1250 AD are related to a medieval megadrought in the Lake Tahoe Basin. The timing and severity of this event match medieval megadroughts observed in the western United States and in Europe. CHIRP profiles acquired in the Salton Sea, California provide new insights into the processes that control pull-apart basin development and earthquake hazards along the southernmost San Andreas Fault. Differential subsidence (>10 mm/yr) in the southern sea suggests the existence of northwest-dipping basin-bounding faults near the southern shoreline. In contrast to previous models, the rapid subsidence and fault architecture observed in the southern part of the sea are consistent with experimental models for pull-apart basins. Geophysical surveys imaged more than 15 ˜N15°E oriented faults, some of which have produced up to 10 events in the last 2-3 kyr. Potentially 2 of the last 5 events on the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) were synchronous with rupture on offshore faults, but it appears that ruptures on

  17. Intraplate shearing and basin deformation in the Pacific Plate as a result of the Yakutat Block collision with North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Worthington, L. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Yakutat Block (YAK), an allochthonous terrane coupled to the Pacific Plate (PAC), collided with the North American plate ~10Ma and began subducting at the Aleutian Trench. Due to its thickness, the YAK is resistant to subduction compared to the PAC. As a result, the YAK is undergoing flat-slab subduction and now has developed its own vector relative to the PAC. High-resolution bathymetry data shows a 30km N-S trending ridge within the Surveyor Fan between the mouths of the Yakutat Sea Valley and Bering Trough. The ridge originates in the north at the base of the continental slope, which is coincident with the Transition Fault, the strike-slip boundary between the YAK and the PAC. The ridge exhibits greatest relief adjacent to the Transition Fault, and becomes less distinct farther from the shelf edge. As the highest relief feature in this part of the basin, the ridge has completely redefined sediment distribution patterns within the Surveyor Fan. Seismic reflection data reveal a sharp basement high beneath the ridge (1.1 sec of relief above “normal” basement in two-way travel time) as well as multiple strike-slip fault systems that are also N-S oriented. The ridge, basement high, and faults are aligned and co-located with an intraplate earthquake swarm on the PAC, which includes four events > 6.5 Mw that occurred from 1987-1992. This earthquake swarm is defined by mostly right-lateral strike-slip events, and is known as the Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). Based on the extent of seismicity, the GASZ extends 230km into the PAC. Tearing of oceanic crust on this scale is rare. A recent wide-angle seismic study shows the YAK to be a 20-25km thick mafic body while the 30 Myr old Pacific crust in the northern Gulf of Alaska is of normal thickness. Intraplate deformation occurring within the PAC could be the result of PAC-YAK coupling whereby YAK resistance to subduction is expressed as deformation in the thinner (weaker) PAC crust. Although a large tear in

  18. Aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Bonin Islands normal-faulting earthquake: Implication for deformation of the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Takahashi, T.; No, T.; Kaiho, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Sato, T.; Noguchi, N.; Nakamura, T.

    2011-12-01

    A Mw 7.4 normal-faulting earthquake occurred 150 km east of Chichi-jima Island, Bonin Islands, Japan on December 21, 2010 (UTC). This is an earthquake occurred within the Pacific plate beneath the outer trench-slope region along the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. According to Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the associated tsunami was observed over a wide area along the Pacific coast of Japan. Normal faulting earthquakes in outer trench-slope region are a result of the bending of the incoming/subducting oceanic plates. The bending-related normal faults cutting the oceanic plate are likely associated with hydration of the oceanic plate prior to subduction [e.g., Ranero et al., 2003]. The normal faulting earthquakes can be a key to understand deformation and resulting hydration of the oceanic plate. That is also important for consideration of tsunami generation in shallow outer trench-slope region. Aftershock observation of the 2010 Bonin Islands earthquake were conducted by R/V Kairei of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs). First OBS was deployed in the source area on December 25, 2010 and retrieved on January 7, 2011. Other 4 OBSs were deployed on January 6 and 7 and retrieved on March 11 and 12, 2011. Overall aftershocks distributed in a 130 km long area extended in a NW-SE direction although Izu-Bonin trench extends N-S direction in this area. Most of the aftershocks were located at depths shallower than 30 km, corresponding to the oceanic crust and the uppermost mantle of the Pacific plate. The aftershocks show a complicated distribution. In the central part of the aftershock area, aftershocks formed three subparallel lines with roughly 15 km intervals oriented NW-SE direction. In the southeastern part of the aftershock area away from the trench, the aftershocks distributed along ESE-WNW direction. We estimated aftershock

  19. Extraordinary high ductility/strength of the interface designed bulk W-ZrC alloy plate at relatively low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Z. M.; Liu, R.; Miao, S.; Yang, X. D.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Luo, G. N.; Lian, Y. Y.; Liu, X.

    2015-01-01

    The refractory tungsten alloys with high ductility/strength/plasticity are highly desirable for a wide range of critical applications. Here we report an interface design strategy that achieves 8.5 mm thick W-0.5 wt. %ZrC alloy plates with a flexural strength of 2.5 GPa and a strain of 3% at room temperature (RT) and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 100 °C. The tensile strength is about 991 MPa at RT and 582 MPa at 500 °C, as well as total elongation is about 1.1% at RT and as large as 41% at 500 °C, respectively. In addition, the W-ZrC alloy plate can sustain 3.3 MJ/m2 thermal load without any cracks. This processing route offers the special coherent interfaces of grain/phase boundaries (GB/PBs) and the diminishing O impurity at GBs, which significantly strengthens GB/PBs and thereby enhances the ductility/strength/plasticity of W alloy. The design thought can be used in the future to prepare new alloys with higher ductility/strength. PMID:26531172

  20. Extraordinary high ductility/strength of the interface designed bulk W-ZrC alloy plate at relatively low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z. M.; Liu, R.; Miao, S.; Yang, X. D.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Luo, G. N.; Lian, Y. Y.; Liu, X.

    2015-11-01

    The refractory tungsten alloys with high ductility/strength/plasticity are highly desirable for a wide range of critical applications. Here we report an interface design strategy that achieves 8.5 mm thick W-0.5 wt. %ZrC alloy plates with a flexural strength of 2.5 GPa and a strain of 3% at room temperature (RT) and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 100 °C. The tensile strength is about 991 MPa at RT and 582 MPa at 500 °C, as well as total elongation is about 1.1% at RT and as large as 41% at 500 °C, respectively. In addition, the W-ZrC alloy plate can sustain 3.3 MJ/m2 thermal load without any cracks. This processing route offers the special coherent interfaces of grain/phase boundaries (GB/PBs) and the diminishing O impurity at GBs, which significantly strengthens GB/PBs and thereby enhances the ductility/strength/plasticity of W alloy. The design thought can be used in the future to prepare new alloys with higher ductility/strength.

  1. Primary mandibular reconstruction: analysis of 64 cases and evaluation of interface radiation dosimetry on bridging plates

    SciTech Connect

    Gullane, P.J. )

    1991-06-01

    The combination of a myocutaneous flap or free cutaneous tissue transfer with a three-dimensional bendable reconstruction plate either of stainless steel or titanium has provided very satisfactory results in primary restoration of mandibular defects following surgical resections in irradiated patients or in those who require postoperative radiotherapy. Sixty-four cases have been treated and evaluated prospectively using this technique. Fifty-three of the patients had the soft-tissue defect restored with a myocutaneous flap, 8 had a free cutaneous tissue flap, 2 were reconstructed with tongue flaps, and 1 closed primarily. The stainless steel plate of the A.O. type was used in 53 cases and the titanium plate system and hollow screws in the other 11 cases. A success rate of 78.9% was found with a median follow-up of 384 days. Thirty of the 64 cases had preoperative irradiation and 15 were treated postoperatively. A plate failure rate of 23% was encountered in those treated with preoperative irradiation and in 20% with those having postoperative irradiation. Forty-nine of the 64 patients or 76.5% experienced no perioperative complications. Five or 7.8% of the complications were minor. Ten patients or 15.6% experienced a major complication with one death due to a myocardial infarct. A radiation dosimetric model was employed using both stainless steel and titanium. The results from this study showed that, when using a parallel pair of beams, an excess dose of irradiation for the lowest energy cobalt-60 is 13%, for 6 mV it is 15%, and for 18 mV it is 20%. The excess tissue dose, both for stainless steel and titanium plates, extends for about 0.2 mm for cobalt-60, 1.1 mm at 6 mV, and for 25 mm at 18 mV. Patients with plates, therefore, can be treated safely with postoperative irradiation using either cobalt-60 or 6-mV energy.

  2. What is responsible for development of the Asian-Pacific transition zone: The geodynamics of oceanic plates or the Asian continent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    The main unusual feature of tectogenesis of the Asian-Pacific transition zone in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic consists in the formation of left-lateral strike-slip faults, which form the East Asian global shear zone with paragenesis of its constituent variously oriented fault systems. Paragenetic analysis has revealed that continental blocks of the Asian-Pacific transition zone were displaced along systems of transit left-lateral strike-slip faults of the East Asian global shear zone by hundreds of kilometers in the southerly to southwesterly direction due to tectonic activity of the Asian continent, which drifted southwestward. This process was accompanied by the formation of compression and extension structures. Otherwise, it is difficult to explain the structuring of the overhanging margin of the continent by subduction of oceanic lithospheric plates in the northerly to northwesterly direction opposite relative to the displacement of the continental crust as is usually thought.

  3. Project NEPTUNE: an innovative, powered, fibre-optic cabled deep ocean observatory spanning the Juan de Fuca plate, NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C.; Delaney, J.

    2003-04-01

    NEPTUNE is an innovative facility, a deep-water cabled observatory, that will transform marine science. MARS and VENUS are deep and shallow-water test bed facilities for NEPTUNE located in Monterey Canyon, California and in southern British Columbia, respectively; both were funded in 2002. NEPTUNE will be a network of over 30 subsea observatories covering the 200,000 sq. km Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, Northeast Pacific. It will draw power via two shore stations and receive and exchange data with scientists through 3000 km of submarine fiber-optic cables. Each observatory, and cabled extensions, will host and power many scientific instruments on the surrounding seafloor, in seafloor boreholes and buoyed through the water column. Remotely operated and autonomous vehicles will reside at depth, recharge at observatories, and respond to distant labs. Continuous near-real-time multidisciplinary measurement series will extend over 30 years. Free from the limitations of battery life, ship schedules/ accommodations, bad weather and delayed access to data, scientists will monitor remotely their deep-sea experiments in real time on the Internet, and routinely command instruments to respond to storms, plankton blooms, earthquakes, eruptions, slope slides and other events. Scientists will be able to pose entirely new sets of questions and experiments to understand complex, interacting Earth System processes such as the structure and seismic behavior of the ocean crust; dynamics of hot and cold fluids and gas hydrates in the upper ocean crust and overlying sediments; ocean climate change and its effect on the ocean biota at all depths; and the barely known deep-sea ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity. NEPTUNE is a US/Canada (70/30) partnership to design, test, build and operate the network on behalf of a wide scientific community. The total cost of the project is estimated at about U.S. 250 million from concept to operation. Over U.S. 50 million has already been funded for

  4. Geological Observation of the Young Petit-Spot Volcanoes on the Early Cretaceous Pacific Plate using SHINKAI 6500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Hirano, N.; Ingle, S.; Ishii, T.; Abe, N.

    2005-12-01

    Young volcanoes are newly discovered on the cool, thick, and old Pacific Plate approximately 600 km ESE off the northern Japan Trench, during KR04-08 cruise using R/V Kairei (JAMSTEC) in 2004. The site was predicted lava eruption based on previous study for young alkali-basalt lavas (5.95 Ma) on the Japan Trench oceanward slope (the Kaiko knolls lava field). We named the Petit-Spot for such small and young volcanoes. Four SHINKAI 6500 submersible dives (dive #877 to #880) were performed in the Petit-Spot knolls and the Kaiko Knolls lava field during May 2005. Dives were initially targeted in the hopes of finding outcrops of lava flow, sampling rocks, observation of eruptive styles, and discussion of the stratigraphy of the monogenic Petit-Spot volcanoes. Three dives were conducted at the Petit-Spot lava field. One young knoll, named the Yukawa Knoll, discovered by the dredges (D-07, 08) during KR04-08 cruise was selected for dive #877. Two other knolls for dives #878 and #879 show the similar features of bathymetry and acoustic reflectivity to the Yukawa Knoll. In contrast, one site of knoll and fault wall for dive #880 situate in the Kaiko Knolls lava field, the Japan Trench oceanward slope. Dives were planned to ascending the slope from the foot of knoll with continuously observation of lavas and volcaniclastic sequences, and sampling along the slope. The basin or flat floor at the beginning of the dive was fully covered in soft pelagic sediment. We found oblong shaped pillow lavas and the pillow robes outcrops along the slope. However, outcrops are exhibited in limited area around the summit of knoll. Lavas commonly include peperites. Rock fragments sampled appear to be volcanic breccias containing clasts of lava enclosed in sedimentary rock; manganese coating on these breccias is thin, suggesting they were deposited recently. Based on above observation, we assumed that knolls in the Petit-Spot lava field show feeder dike or cryptdome like stratigraphy with some

  5. Investigating crustal deformation associated with the North America-Pacific plate boundary in southern California with GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinler, Joshua C.

    The three largest earthquakes in the last 25 years in southern California occurred on faults located adjacent to the southern San Andreas fault, with the M7.3 1992 Landers and M7.1 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes occurring in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) in the Mojave Desert, and the M7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurring along the Laguna Salada fault in northern Baja California, Mexico. The locations of these events near to but not along the southern San Andreas fault (SSAF) is unusual in that the last major event on the SSAF occurred more than 300 years ago, with an estimated recurrence interval of 215 +/- 25 years. The focus of this dissertation is to address the present-day deformation field along the North America-Pacific plate boundary in southern California and northern Baja California, through the analysis of GPS data, and elastic block and viscoelastic earthquake models to determine fault slip rates and rheological properties of the lithosphere in the plate boundary zone. We accomplish this in three separate studies. The first study looks at how strain is partitioned northwards along-strike from the southern San Andreas fault near the Salton Sea. We find that estimates for slip-rates on the southern San Andreas decrease from ~23 mm/yr in the south to ~8 mm/yr as the fault passes through San Gorgonio Pass to the northwest, while ~13-18 mm/yr of slip is partitioned onto NW-SE trending faults of the ECSZ where the Landers and Hector Mine earthquakes occurred. This speaks directly to San Andreas earthquake hazards, as a reduction in the slip rate would require greater time between events to build up enough slip deficit in order to generate a large magnitude earthquake. The second study focuses on inferring the rheological structure beneath the Salton Trough region. This is accomplished through analysis of postseismic deformation observed using a set of the GPS data collected before and after the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. By

  6. The propagation of in-plane P-SV waves in a layered elastic plate with periodic interface cracks: exact versus spring boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasha, Oleg V.; Boström, Anders; Glushkova, Natalia V.; Glushkov, Evgeny V.

    2011-08-01

    The propagation of in-plane (P-SV) waves in a symmetrically three-layered thick plate with a periodic array of interface cracks is investigated. The exact dispersion relation is derived based on an integral equation approach and Floquet's theorem. The interface cracks can be a model for interface damage, but a much simpler model is a recently developed spring boundary condition. This boundary condition is used for the thick plate and also in the derivation of plate equations with the help of power series expansions in the thickness coordinate. For low frequencies (cracks small compared to the wavelength) the three approaches give more or less coinciding dispersion curves, and this is a confirmation that the spring boundary condition is a reasonable approximation at low frequencies.

  7. A Serial Sample Loading System: Interfacing Multi-well plates with Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Tushar D.; Zec, Helena; Wang, Jeff Tza-Huei

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for novel high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries. The robotic sample handling techniques currently used in these industries, although fast, are still limited to operating in multi-well plates with the sample volumes per reaction in the microliter regime. Digital microfluidics offers an alternative for reduction in sample volume consumption for HTS but lacks a reliable technique for transporting large number of samples to the microfluidic device. In this report, we develop a technique for serial delivery of sample arrays to a microfluidic device from multi-well plates, through a single sample inlet. Under this approach, a serial array of sample plugs, separated by an immiscible carrier fluid, is loaded into a capillary and delivered to a microfluidic device. Similar approaches have been attempted in the past, however, either with a slower sample loading device like syringe pump or vacuum based sample loading with limited driving pressure. We demonstrated the application of our positive pressure based ‘Serial Sample Loading’ (SSL) system to load a series of sample plugs into a capillary. The adaptability of the SSL system to generate sample plugs with a variety of volumes in a predictable manner was also demonstrated. PMID:22885789

  8. Subduction history of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath the Eurasian continent: Evidence from Mesozoic igneous rocks and accretionary complex in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic magmatisms in NE China can be subdivided into seven stages, i.e., Late Triassic, Early Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic, early Early Cretaceous, late Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous. Late Triassic magmatisms consist of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the Erguna Massif, and bimodal igneous rocks in eastern margin of Eurasian continent. The former reveals southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate, the latter reveals an extensional environment (Xu et al., 2013). Early Jurassic magmatisms are composed of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent and the Erguna Massif, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate and southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate (Tang et al., 2015), respectively. Middle Jurassic magmatism only occur in the Great Xing'an Range and the northern margin of the NCC, and consists of adakitic rocks that formed in crustal thickening, reflecting the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk ocean (Li et al., 2015). Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms only occur to the west of the Songliao Basin, and consist of trackyandesite and A-type of rhyolites, revealing an extensional environment related to delamination of thickened crust. The late Early Cretaceous magmatisms are widespread in NE China, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and bimodal volcanics in intracontinent, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. Late Cretaceous magmatisms mainly occur to the east of the Songliao Basin, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and alkaline basalts in intracontinent (Xu et al., 2013), revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. The Heilongjiang complex with Early Jurassic deformation, together with Jurassic Khabarovsk complex in Russia Far East and Mino-Tamba complex in Japan, reveal Early Jurassic accretionary history. Additionally, the Raohe complex with the age of ca. 169 Ma was

  9. Fast Displacement Rate of the Subducting Pacific Plate After the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake Measured by GPS/Acoustic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, F.; Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Iinuma, T.; Hino, R.; Ohta, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake was a huge interplate earthquake, which posed various issues against our previous perceptions on the subduction process. One of the unprecedented ideas is the acceleration of the subducting plate after the earthquake suggested by Heki and Mitsui (2013). They expect that temporal loss of interplate coupling following a huge interplate earthquake will cause acceleration in subducting rate; Onshore GPS observations after the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake also support this hypothesis. However, this is an indirect evidence of the acceleration, and hence direct geodetic evidence is needed to examine this hypothesis. Here, we have challenged to directly detect the subducting rate of the Pacific plate using GPS/Acoustic technique. We show the displacement rate of the site on the Pacific plate, where four times of surveys have been conducted for 1.5 years during Sept., 2012 - Mar., 2014. In each survey, we determine the precise locations of the center of the transponder array. The displacement rate is estimated from the linear regression of time-series of the array positions at four campaigns. This shows clear northwestward movement amount to 17.2±4.3 cm/yr relative to the North American plate. This rate is roughly twice as fast as the global steady motion of 8.3 cm/yr given in MORVAL. However, the observed fast movement can be interpreted not only as the acceleration of the subduction but also as the effect of viscoelastic responses that relax the coseismic elastic deformation. At this moment, we cannot quantitatively distinguish the two interpretations above. According to Heki and Mitsui (2013), the acceleration propagates southern Kuril area. This region would show low effect of viscoelastic relaxation. So, if seafloor observation in this region is conducted, it may reveal the presence or absence of the acceleration. In this presentation, we will show forthcoming seafloor observation data planned to be obtained on this September and discuss

  10. In-situ scanning electron microscopy observations of Li plating and stripping reactions at the lithium phosphorus oxynitride glass electrolyte/Cu interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagane, Fumihiro; Shimokawa, Ryosuke; Sano, Hikaru; Sakaebe, Hikari; Iriyama, Yasutoshi

    2013-03-01

    Morphology variations during electrochemical lithium plating-stripping reactions at the lithium phosphorus oxynitride glass electrolyte (LiPON)/copper current collector (Cu) interface are observed in-situ by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This in-situ SEM observation shows dynamically that the plating reactions at 50 μA cm-2 distribute initial lithium growth sites sparsely at the LiPON/Cu interface, later, local lithium growth occurs from the pre-plated sites through the Cu film, and finally, most of the precipitated lithium grows to be needle-shape with the height of micron order. This local growth rate attains to be 6.8 mA cm-2, about 100 times higher value than applied one. When those precipitated lithium are stripped at 50 μA cm-2, core region of each precipitate is mostly stripped but its degree depends on the length of the precipitate. This dependency will arise from the diffusivity of Li. When this stripping current density is increased to 500 μA cm-2, the coulomb efficiency is further decreased. In-situ SEM observation shows that plated lithium around the interface becomes thin preferentially while that far away from the interface (upper side of plated lithium) remains unchanged. This will isolate most of precipitate lithium from LiPON film electrically, leading to further decreasing of the coulomb efficiency.

  11. Nanoscale investigation of the interface situation of plated nickel and thermally formed nickel silicide for silicon solar cell metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondon, A.; Wang, D.; Zuschlag, A.; Bartsch, J.; Glatthaar, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of nickel silicide formation from plated nickel layers for solar cell metallization, there are several open questions regarding contact adhesion and electrical properties. Nanoscale characterization by transmission electron microscopy has been employed to support these investigations. Interfacial oxides and silicide phases were investigated on differently prepared samples by different analytical methods associated with transmission electron microscopy analysis. Processing variations included the pre-treatment of samples before nickel plating, the used plating solution and the thermal budget for the nickel-silicon solid-state reaction. It was shown that interface oxides of only few nm thickness on both silicon and nickel silicide are present on the samples, depending on the chosen process sequence, which have been shown to play an important role in adhesion of nickel on silicide in an earlier publication. From sample pretreatment variations, conclusions about the role of an interfacial oxide in silicide formation and its influence on phase formation were drawn. Such an oxide layer hinders silicide formation except for pinhole sites. This reduces the availability of Ni and causes a silicide with low Ni content to form. Without an interfacial oxide a continuous nickel silicide of greater depth, polycrystalline modification and expected phase according to thermal budget is formed. Information about the nature of silicide growth on typical solar cell surfaces could be obtained from silicide phase and geometric observations, which were supported by FIB tomography. The theory of isotropic NiSi growth and orientation dependent NiSi2 growth was derived. By this, a very well performing low-cost metallization for silicon solar cells has been brought an important step closer to industrial introduction.

  12. Along-trench variations in the seismic structure of the incoming Pacific plate at the outer rise of the northern Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, Gou; Kodaira, Shuichi; Sato, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate along-trench variations in the seismic structure of the incoming oceanic plate and their effect on water transportation by the oceanic plate, we conducted a wide-angle seismic survey of a trench-parallel transect 270 km long on the outer rise of the northern Japan Trench. The resulting seismic structure models show that the central part of the transect is characterized by rough topography, thick oceanic crust, low seismic velocities, and high Vp/Vs ratios, suggesting pervasive fracturing and high water content (hydration) there. These observations are consistent with the presence of an ancient fracture zone associated with ridge propagation. The trenchward extension of this fracture zone corresponds to an area of low interplate seismicity, low seismic velocities, and high Vp/Vs ratio around the depth of the subduction interface. Our results suggest that this ancient scar on the oceanic plate influences along-trench variations in interplate seismic coupling through its effect on water transportation.

  13. Life and death of the resurrection plate: Evidence for its existence and subduction in the northeastern Pacific in Paleocene-Eocene time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Bradley, D.C.; Wells, R.E.; Miller, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Onshore evidence suggests that a plate is missing from published reconstructions of the northeastern Pacific Ooean in Paleocene- Eocene time. The Resurrection plate, named for the Resurrection Peninsula ophiolite near Seward, Alaska, was located east of the Kula plate and north of the Farallon plate. We interpret coeval near-trench magmatism in southern Alaska and the Cascadia margin as evidence for two slab windows associated with trench-ridge-trench (TRT) triple junctions, which formed the western and southern boundaries of the Resurrection plate. In Alaska, the Sanak-Baranof belt of near-trench intrusions records a west-to-east migration, from 61 to 50 Ma, of the northern TRT triple junction along a 2100-km-long section of coastline. In Oregon, Washington, and southern Vancouver Island, voluminous basaltic volcanism of the Siletz River Volcanics, Crescent Formation, and Metchosin Volcanics occurred between ca. 66 and 48 Ma. Lack of a clear age progression of magmatism along the Cascadia margin suggests that this southern triple junction did not migrate significantly. Synchronous near-trench magmatism from southeastern Alaska to Puget Sound at ca. 50 Ma documents the middle Eocene subduction of a spreading center, the crest of which was subparallel to the margin. We interpret this ca. 50 Ma event as recording the subduction-zone consumption of the last of the Resurrection plate. The existence and subsequent subduction of the Resurrection plate explains (1) northward terrane transport along the southeastern Alaska-British Columbia margin between 70 and 50 Ma, synchronous with an eastward-migrating triple junction in southern Alaska; (2) rapid uplift and voluminous magmatism in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia prior to 50 Ma related to subduction of buoyant, young oceanic crust of the Resurrection plate; (3) cessation of Coast Mountains magmatism at ca. 50 Ma due to cessation of subduction, (4) primitive mafic magmatism in the Coast Mountains and Cascade

  14. Final amalgamation of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in NE China: Paleo-Asian Ocean closure versus Paleo-Pacific plate subduction - A review of the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Simon A.

    2015-11-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) evolved through complex closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean from the Neoproterozoic to the late Phanerozoic. This caused the Chinese cratons to collide with Eurasia and led to the formation of the world's largest Phanerozoic orogenic belt. Ocean closure commenced in the west and was completed in the east near Changchun. Closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in NE China was along the Solonker-Xar Moron-Changchun-Yanji suture and this was likely completed in the Late Permian, although associated activity continued into the Triassic. There was an overlap in the latest Permian-Early Triassic between terminal activity associated with Paleo-Asian Ocean closure and the onset of tectonism associated with subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate. This switch in geodynamic setting occurred at ~ 260-250 Ma, and is reflected by a relaxing of north-south directed compression and the onset of east-west directed processes related to Paleo-Pacific subduction. By the Early Jurassic, events associated with the westward advance of the Paleo-Pacific plate dominated, leading to extensive development of I-type granites as far inland as the Great Xing'an Range. From ~ 140 Ma, the Paleo-Pacific plate retreated eastward, resulting in an extensional setting in the Early Cretaceous, the effects of which were enhanced by regional thinning of the lithosphere, commonly attributed to delamination. Throughout this period, the eastern Asian margin was tectonically complex. The north-south oriented Jiamusi-Khanka(-Bureya) block was rifted away from the eastern margin of the CAOB in the Late Triassic, but was then re-united in the Jurassic by westward-advancing subduction that affected both the western and eastern margins of the block. Accretionary complexes continued to evolve in the Cretaceous along the whole eastern margin of Asia, with final accretion of the Nadanhada Terrane (part of the Sikhote-Alin accretionary terrane) with the CAOB at ~ 130 Ma, followed by the

  15. Metamorphic sole formation and early plate interface rheology: Insights from Griggs apparatus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Hirth, Greg; Yamato, Philippe; Ildefonse, Benoît; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500 m thick highly strained metamorphic rock units found beneath mylonitic banded peridotites at the base of large-scale ophiolites, as exemplified in Oman. Metamorphic soles are mainly composed of metabasalts deriving from the downgoing oceanic lithosphere and metamorphosed up to granulite-facies conditions by heat transfer from the mantle wedge. Pressure-temperature peak conditions are usually estimated at 1.0±0.2 GPa and 800±100°C. The absence of HP-LT metamorphism overprint implies that metamorphic soles have been formed and exhumed during subduction infancy. In this view, metamorphic soles were strongly deformed during their accretion to the mantle wedge (corresponding, now, to the base of the ophiolite). Therefore, metamorphic soles and banded peridotites are direct witnesses of the dynamics of early subduction zones, in terms of thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology evolution across the nascent slab interface. Based on fieldwork and EBSD analyses, we present a detailed (micro-) structural study performed on samples coming from the Sumeini window, the better-preserved cross-section of the metamorphic sole of Oman. Large differences are found in the deformation (CPO, grain size, aspect ratio) of clinopyroxene, amphibole and plagioclase, related to mineralogical changes linked with the distance to the peridotite contact (e.g., hardening due to the appearance of garnet and clinopyroxene). To model the incipient slab interface in laboratory, we carried out 5 hydrostatic annealing and simple-shear experiments on Griggs solid-medium apparatus. Deformation experiments were conducted at axial strain rates of 10-6 s-1. Fine-grained amphibolite was synthetized by adding 1 wt.% water to a (Mid-Ocean Ridge) basalt powder as a proxy for the metamorphic sole (amphibole + plagioclase + clinopyroxene ± garnet assemblage). To synthetize garnet, 2 experiments were carried out in hydrostatic conditions and with deformation at

  16. Cascadia tremor located near plate interface constrained by S minus P wave times.

    PubMed

    La Rocca, Mario; Creager, Kenneth C; Galluzzo, Danilo; Malone, Steve; Vidale, John E; Sweet, Justin R; Wech, Aaron G

    2009-01-30

    Nonvolcanic tremor is difficult to locate because it does not produce impulsive phases identifiable across a seismic network. An alternative approach to identifying specific phases is to measure the lag between the S and P waves. We cross-correlate vertical and horizontal seismograms to reveal signals common to both, but with the horizontal delayed with respect to the vertical. This lagged correlation represents the time interval between vertical compressional waves and horizontal shear waves. Measurements of this interval, combined with location techniques, resolve the depth of tremor sources within +/-2 kilometers. For recent Cascadia tremor, the sources locate near or on the subducting slab interface. Strong correlations and steady S-P time differences imply that tremor consists of radiation from repeating sources. PMID:19179527

  17. Resistivity of bipolar plate materials at the cathode interface in molten carbonate fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaun, T. D.

    1998-11-18

    Measurements of oxide scale resistivity for prospective bipolar plate materials in the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) are coupled with observations of microstructural/compositional change over time. This work searches for a compromise to the high corrosion rate of Type 316L and the high oxide scale resistance of Type 310S. We tested a group of materials having chromium content ranging from 16 to 31 wt%, including Nitronic 50 and NKK, a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy. Chromium content was found to be the primary determinant of oxide scale composition. In the MCFC cathode compartment, stainless steels generally formed a duplex structure with an inner Cr-rich layer and an outer, Fe-rich layer. The composition of the inner Cr-rich layer was related to the base alloy and had a controlling effect on scale resistivity. Oxide scale resistivity was measured for two electrolyte compositions: Li/K and Li/Na carbonates. Changes in the physical/mechanical properties (spallation/cracking) in the oxide scale of Type 316L provided an understanding of its resistivity fluctuations over time.

  18. Tectonic slicing of subducting oceanic crust along plate interfaces: Numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, J. B.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Agard, Ph.; Burov, E.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    Multikilometer-sized slivers of high-pressure low-temperature metamorphic oceanic crust and mantle are observed in many mountain belts. These blueschist and eclogite units were detached from the descending plate during subduction. Large-scale thermo-mechanical numerical models based on finite difference marker-in-cell staggered grid technique are implemented to investigate slicing processes that lead to the detachment of oceanic slivers and their exhumation before the onset of the continental collision phase. In particular, we investigate the role of the serpentinized subcrustal slab mantle in the mechanisms of shallow and deep crustal slicing. Results show that spatially homogeneous serpentinization of the sub-Moho slab mantle leads to complete accretion of oceanic crust within the accretionary wedge. Spatially discontinuous serpentinization of the slab mantle in form of unconnected patches can lead to shallow slicing of the oceanic crust below the accretionary wedge and to its deep slicing at mantle depths depending on the patch length, slab angle, convergence velocity and continental geothermal gradient. P-T paths obtained in this study are compared to natural examples of shallow slicing of the Crescent Terrane below Vancouver Island and deeply sliced crust of the Lago Superiore and Saas-Zermatt units in the Western Alps.

  19. Pacific plate apparent polar wander between 67 Ma and 44 Ma determined from the analysis of the skewness of both vector and scalar magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Gordon, R. G.; Horner-Johnson, B. C.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific plate apparent polar wander between 67 Ma and 44 Ma determined from the analysis of the skewness of both vector and scalar magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading The apparent polar wander (APW) path for the Pacific plate is important to the study of Pacific plate motions and their relation to circum-Pacific tectonics. It can be used to discriminate between alternative plate motion circuits, determine the motion of Pacific hotspots relative to the paleomagnetic axis, and test the fixed hotspot hypothesis. The pioneering investigations of Jean Francheteau and his colleagues of Pacific plate APW through the analysis of magnetic anomalies over seamounts helped to demonstrate that the Pacific plate has had substantial northward motion relative to the spin axis since Cretaceous time. We also investigate the APW of the Pacific plate through analysis of magnetic anomalies. Instead of anomalies over seamounts, however, we investigate the skewness (asymmetry) of magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading. In prior work, skewness analysis of shipboard magnetic profiles has been used to determine Pacific paleomagnetic poles for chron 25r (57 Ma B.P.; Petronotis et al., 1994), chron 27r to 31n (62 to 69 Ma B.P.; Acton and Gordon, 1991) and chron 32n (72 Ma B.P.; Petronotis and Gordon, 1999). Recently, vector aeromagnetic data from low paleolatitudes, combined with shipboard profiles from low paleolatitudes, were used to determine a paleomagnetic pole with compact confidence limits for anomaly 12r (32 Ma B.P.; Horner-Johnson and Gordon, 2010). Here we use the low-paleolatitude shipboard- and vector aero-magnetic profiles to determine new paleomagnetic poles for the Pacific plate. A new feature of our analysis is a correction for the spreading-rate dependence of anomalous skewness (Koivisto et al. 2011). We estimate anomalous skewness as a function of spreading rate for each anomaly by creating many synthetic profiles using the model of Dyment and Arkani

  20. Deep crust and mantle structure linked to subduction of the Pacific plate at a continental margin from an active seismic source study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Okaya, D. A.; Henrys, S. A.; Savage, M. K.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results that bear on mantle structure in a subduction zone of both the down going and over-riding plates. Wellington region, New Zealand, sits on the Australian plate a mere ~ 15-25 km above the subducted Pacific plate. This is rare: most active continental margins have at least 30-50 km of free board above subduction zones (cf, Pacific NW, Honshu). Such a shallow setting offers unusually good conditions for making terrestrial observations of the subduction process. In 2010-11 an active source seismic experiment (SAHKE) was carried out across the Wellington region. Both active and passive seismic methods were used to establish a model of the crustal structure and upper mantle structure beneath SAHKE (Henrys et al , 2013). We recorded 12 x 500 kg dynamite shots on ~ 1000 recorders place at 100 m spacing from coast to coast. These data contain excellent returns from the subduction zone at two-way travel times of 7-15 s, but we also recorded coherent reflection energy down to 30 s two-way-travel-time on vertical recorders and 47 s on horizontal recorders. We performed a low-fold stack of these deep reflections and see two zones. The deepest reflections define a westward 17 degree-dipping zone at ~ 100 km deep that is possibly the base of the subducted Pacific plate. The westward dip on this 100 km deep reflector matches that for the top of the plate. Moreover, the total plate thickness implied is ~ 80 km, which matches that predicted for 100 my old oceanic lithosphere. The other deep reflection zone dips eastward across the shot gathers and is typically seen at two-way travel times of 18-25 s on the vertical phones. We also see the same event as a Vs arrival on horizontal phones at two-way travel times of 34-47s. When migrated these reflections define an east dipping reflector that is within the mantle of the overriding Australian plate, and the surface projection of the reflector is ~ 80 km west of SAHKE line. This finding raises the question of what

  1. Large-scale right-slip displacement on the East San Francisco Bay Region fault system, California: Implications for location of late Miocene to Pliocene Pacific plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sliter, W.V.; Sorg, D.H.; Russell, P.C.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    . Major transpression across the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates at about 3 to 5 Ma would have resulted in the transfer of significant slip back to the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault. Since that time, the ESFBR fault system has continued to slip at rates of 11-14 mm/yr. If this interpretation is valid, the ESFBR fault system was the Pacific-North American plate boundary between 8 and 6 Ma, and this boundary has migrated both eastward and westward with time, in response to changing plate margin geometry and plate motions.

  2. Pore pressure evolution at the plate interface along the Cascadia subduction zone from the trench to the ETS transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, R. M.; Rempel, A. W.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Pore fluid pressures in subduction zones are a primary control on fault strength and slip dynamics. Numerous studies document elevated pore pressures in the outer wedge along several margins. Seismic observations and the occurrence of non-volcanic tremor provide additional evidence for the presence of near-lithostatic pore pressures at the plate interface far down-dip from the trench (~35 km depth). Here we use numerical models in one and two dimensions to evaluate the pore pressure and compaction state of sediments on the subducting Juan de Fuca plate in Cascadia from the trench to the ETS zone. 2-D models allow pressure to diffuse vertically and also laterally normal to strike of the megathrust; 1-D models simulate only vertical diffusion. Model parameters are chosen with reference to two strike-normal profiles: one through central Oregon and one through the Olympic Peninsula of Washington. We examine temporal variations in sediment input to the trench and consider implications for fault strength and permeability as well as the down-dip extent to which compactive dewatering can be considered a significant fluid source. In 1-D, we use a general and fully nonlinear model of sediment compaction derived without making any assumptions regarding stress-strain or porosity-permeability relations and allowing finite strains. In contrast, most previous models of fluid flow in subduction zones have used linear models of diffusion that rely on assumptions of constant sediment permeability and infinitesimal strains for their formulation. Our nonlinear finite-strain model remains valid at greater depths, where stresses and strains are large. Boundary conditions in 1-D are constrained by pore pressure estimates along the megathrust fault that are based on seismic velocities (e.g. Tobin and Saffer, 2010) and data from consolidation tests conducted on sediments gathered during ODP Leg 204 (Tan, 2001). Initial conditions rely on input sediment thickness; while sediment thickness

  3. Seismic and Geodynamic Constraints on Compositional Heterogeneity in the Lower Mantle: Implications for Deeply-Rooted Hot Upwellings Under the African and Pacific Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Glisovic, P.; Rowley, D. B.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.; Lu, C.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of a series of tests that probe the possible existence of compositionally distinct material in the central core of the LLSVPs under the African and Pacific plates using tomography-based mantle flow models that employ several independently-derived viscosity profiles (Mitrovica & Forte 2004, Behn et al. 2004, Steinberger & Calderwood 2006, Forte et al. 2010). We also consider four global tomography models derived from seismic shear velocity data alone (Grand 2002, Panning & Romanowicz 2006, Kustowski et al. 2008, Ritsema et al. 2011). The possible combinations of viscosity and tomography models yield 16 different tests for compositional heterogeneity inside the LLSVPs. In all tests we begin with a mineral physical scaling between lower-mantle shear velocity and density anomalies that assumes thermal effects are dominant everywhere, including within the LLSVPs. We find it is not possible, in any of the tests, to obtain a satisfactory fit to surface geodynamic data, especially the global, long-wavelength gravity anomalies and space-geodetic inferences of excess CMB flattening with a purely thermal interpretation of lower-mantle heterogeneity. If we introduce compositionally-distinct material in the central portions of the LLSVPs, all tests show a notable improvement in the fit to the gravity anomaly and CMB ellipticity data. An optimal reconciliation of the gravity and CMB data is obtained by extending compositional heterogeneity upwards, with maximum-amplitude in the seismic D"-layer and tapering off to negligible values in the mid-mantle. A robust assessment of the dynamical impact of this deeply-rooted compositional heterogeneity is obtained with maps of "mean" convective flow, by averaging the results of all 16 test cases. We find (see map below) dominant lower-mantle upwellings below the axis of the East Pacific Rise (EPR), and under the Caroline Islands in the Western Pacific. Under the African plate we find large-scale upwellings under the

  4. Relationship between compressional-wave velocity and porosity of sediments along subduction plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Hashimoto, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Evolution of physical properties of sediments along subduction interface has effects on wedge strength, wedge geometry, dewatering and dehydration processes, and seismic behavior. Sediments have initially more than 70% of porosity prior to subduction. Through underthrusting and accretion, porosity of sediments decreases by compaction and cementation to be lithified sediments. The purpose of this study is to understand evolution of physical properties from a state before subduction to a state within a wedge using a relationship between compressional-wave velocity and porosity. In this study, we obtained new data for sediments from a reference site in IODP NanTroSEIZE, Expedition 333. In addition to that, we have complied velocity-porosity relationships for the samples and also for previous studies from NanTroSEIZE (off Kumano) (Hashimoto et al., 2010, 2011), ODP Leg 190 (off Shikoku) (Hoffman and Tobin, 2004) and ODP Leg 170 (off Costa Rica) (Gettemy and Tobin, 2003). Velocity measurement procedure in this study to obtain new data is as following: Two pumps were used to control pore fluid pressure and confining pressure. The pore pressure of 1000kPa was kept under drained conditions. Confining (effective) pressure was increased stepwise in the measurements. Velocity measurements were conducted under isotropic pressure conditions. Confining pressure was pressurized in tens seconds and kept for more than 8 hours for next step to obtain equilibrium conditions between effective pressure and sediments strain. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) shear wave transducers (500kHz) were used in a source-receiver pair to measure wave speed. Porosity and P-wave velocity ranges about 27 - 75% and 1.4 - 2.2 km/s in this study, respectively. In the comparison in Vp-porosity relationships between sedimetns from reference sites and others, sediments were classified into two, simply compacted sediments (reference site and slope sediments) and wedge sediments. Different trends in Vp

  5. Empirical Tsunami Hazard Assessment of Near-Field Plate-Boundary and Crustal Fault Sources Demonstrated for the Pacific Coast of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, L. J.; Rogers, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate an empirical method for preliminary tsunami hazard assessment of near-field fault sources that lack long historic records, paleoseismic/paleotsunami data and/or adequate tsunami modelling studies. Along the Pacific coast of Canada, the North America plate boundary is characterized by varying degrees of convergence with adjacent oceanic plates and microplates. The 1700 M~9 Cascadia earthquake ruptured at least the full extent of Juan de Fuca plate subduction as far north as central Vancouver Island; paleoseismic data show that similar events have occurred approximately every 500 years throughout the Holocene, accompanied by large tsunamis. Further north along the margin, the paleoseismic and paleotsunami histories of the Explorer, Winona, and Haida Gwaii segments of the margin are unknown. The Explorer plate is subducting beneath Vancouver Island at about half the rate of the Juan de Fuca plate; this locked segment may rupture independently or it may slip concurrently with the rest of the Cascadia subduction zone system to the south. The tsunamigenic potential of the Winona segment off northern Vancouver Island is poorly understood. The occurrence of the 2012 M7.8 thrust earthquake off southern Haida Gwaii confirmed the tsunamigenic nature of partitioned convergent slip on this dominantly transform margin segment. Parts of the coastline face additional tsunami hazard from submarine crustal faults. For potentially tsunamigenic faults with unknown history, we use (1) geophysical data to constrain fault rupture area, (2) empirical relations to estimate earthquake magnitude from the rupture area, (3) plate motion models and geodetic data to constrain convergence and thrust earthquake recurrence rates, and (4) empirical relations to estimate near-field tsunami runup at coastal sites, given distance from the rupture. The success of this approach is demonstrated by general agreement between expected and observed earthquake magnitude and near-field tsunami

  6. Distribution and mechanism of Neogene to present-day vertical axis rotations, Pacific-Australian Plate Boundary Zone, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Roberts, Andrew P.

    1997-01-01

    Remarkably little knowledge exists about mechanisms of vertical axis rotation in continental crust. Steeply dipping basement rocks in South Island, New Zealand, provide an opportunity to map the distribution of rotations across the Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone, and to delineate boundaries of rotated blocks in unusual detail. We synthesize new structural data with new and existing paleomagnetic data, with geodetic data, and with patterns of Neogene-Quaternary faulting in the strike-slip Marlborough fault system. For the past 20 m.y., vertical axis rotations have been hinged about two crustal-scale boundaries near the east coast. The NE hinge accommodated ˜50° of early-middle Miocene clockwise rotation, which caused deformation of the eastern ends of the Alpine-Wairau and Clarence strike-slip faults. The SW hinge has accommodated a further 30°-50° of finite clockwise rotation since ˜4 Ma and deflects active fault traces. The locus of rotation has shifted southwestward astride a subduction margin that is lengthening in that direction. Rotating rocks are pinned to the south against a locked collision zone where the continental Chatham Rise impinges against the margin. Slip on inland strike-slip faults is transformed seaward across a zone of fault termination into rigid body rotation of a large continental block that has been thrust eastward over the downgoing subducted slab of the Pacific plate. The rotation mechanism is a "migrating hinge," which resembles a flexed telephone book. Strike-slip faults are translated through a brecciated hinge region that does not coincide with a fixed material line in the rock.

  7. Early Miocene transpression across the Pacific-North American plate margin, initiation of the San Andreas fault, and tectonic wedge activation

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, R.J. ); Underwood, M.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Magnetic stripes on the Pacific plate (PAC) indicate that subduction along the North American plate (NAM) margin ceased about 26--28 Ma south of the Mendocino fracture zone (MFZ), when the Pacific-Farallon (PAC-FAR) ridge encountered the NAM. In this area the PAC-FAR ridge apparently was segmented and abandoned as it encountered the margin, and was thrust beneath the western lip of the NAM, possibly due to residual FAR slab-pull. Between [approximately] 26 and 23.5 Ma, compressional tectonism in the distal NAM overlying the hot, buoyant ridge, produced ocean floor volcanism and a series of borderland structural basins that filled with continent-derived clastics. Initiation of the San Andreas transform, and capture of a large segment of the NAM by the PAC appears to have occurred between [approximately] 24 and [approximately] 14 Ma. Beginning at least as early as 18 Ma, northeast of the San Andreas fault, blind thrusts, folding and tilting developed in the roof of a northeastwardly-propagating wedge complex beneath the length of the Coast Ranges. The wedge complex probably was multistage and may have been initiated as early as 70--60 Ma. In the Cape Mendocino and Loma Prieta regions, Miocene or younger northeast-vergent members of the roof thrust system root into the San Andreas fault and characteristically displace deep water marine rocks northeastward over the shallower margin. Total shortening across the transform margin based on deep crustal models must exceed 200 km since 70 Ma and is [ge]50 km since 28 Ma.

  8. Late cretaceous pelagic sediments, volcanic ASH and biotas from near the Louisville hotspot, Pacific Plate, paleolatitude ∼42°S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballance, Peter F.; Barron, John A.; Blome, Charles D.; Bukry, David; Cawood, Peter A.; Chaproniere, George C.H.; Frisch, Robyn; Herzer, Richard H.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Quinterno, Paula; Ryan, Holly F.; Scholl, David W.; Stevenson, Andrew J.; Tappin, David G.; Vallier, Tracy L.

    1989-01-01

    Dredging on the deep inner slope of the Tonga Trench, immediately north of the intersection between the Louisville Ridge hotspot chain and the trench, recovered some Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian) slightly tuffaceous pelagic sediments. They are inferred to have been scraped off a recently subducted Late Cretaceous guyot of the Louisville chain. In the vicinity of the Louisville hotspot (present location 50°26′S, 139°09′W; Late Cretaceous location ∼42°S, longitude unknown) Late Cretaceous rich diatom, radiolarian, silicoflagellate, foraminiferal and coccolith biotas, accumulated on the flanks of the guyot and are described in this paper. Rich sponge faunas are not described. ?Inoceramus prisms are present. Volcanic ash is of within-plate alkalic character. Isotope ratios in bulk carbonate δ18O − 2.63 to + 0.85, δ13C + 2.98 to 3.83) are normal for Pacific Maestrichtian sediments. The local CCD may have been shallower than the regional CCD, because of high organic productivity. In some samples Late Cretaceous materials have been mixed with Neogene materials. Mixing may have taken place on the flanks of the guyot during transit across the western Pacific, or on the trench slope during or after subduction and offscraping about 0.5 Ma.

  9. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  10. Kinematic modeling of fault slip rates using new geodetic velocities from a transect across the Pacific-North America plate boundary through the San Bernardino Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Sally F.; Spinler, Joshua C.; McGill, John D.; Bennett, Richard A.; Floyd, Michael A.; Fryxell, Joan E.; Funning, Gareth J.

    2015-04-01

    Campaign GPS data collected from 2002 to 2014 result in 41 new site velocities from the San Bernardino Mountains and vicinity. We combined these velocities with 93 continuous GPS velocities and 216 published velocities to obtain a velocity profile across the Pacific-North America plate boundary through the San Bernardino Mountains. We modeled the plate boundary-parallel, horizontal deformation with 5-14 parallel and one obliquely oriented screw dislocations within an elastic half-space. Our rate for the San Bernardino strand of the San Andreas Fault (6.5 ± 3.6 mm/yr) is consistent with recently published latest Quaternary rates at the 95% confidence level and is slower than our rate for the San Jacinto Fault (14.1 ± 2.9 mm/yr). Our modeled rate for all faults of the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) combined (15.7 ± 2.9 mm/yr) is faster than the summed latest Quaternary rates for these faults, even when an estimate of permanent, off-fault deformation is included. The rate discrepancy is concentrated on faults near the 1992 Landers and 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes; the geodetic and geologic rates agree within uncertainties for other faults within the ECSZ. Coupled with the observation that postearthquake deformation is faster than the pre-1992 deformation, this suggests that the ECSZ geodetic-geologic rate discrepancy is directly related to the timing and location of these earthquakes and is likely the result of viscoelastic deformation in the mantle that varies over the timescale of an earthquake cycle, rather than a redistribution of plate boundary slip at a timescale of multiple earthquake cycles or longer.

  11. Compilation of Surface Creep on California Faults and Comparison of WGCEP 2007 Deformation Model to Pacific-North American Plate Motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wisely, Beth A.; Schmidt, David A.; Weldon, Ray J., II

    2008-01-01

    This Appendix contains 3 sections that 1) documents published observations of surface creep on California faults, 2) constructs line integrals across the WG-07 deformation model to compare to the Pacific ? North America plate motion, and 3) constructs strain tensors of volumes across the WG-07 deformation model to compare to the Pacific ? North America plate motion. Observation of creep on faults is a critical part of our earthquake rupture model because if a fault is observed to creep the moment released as earthquakes is reduced from what would be inferred directly from the fault?s slip rate. There is considerable debate about how representative creep measured at the surface during a short time period is of the whole fault surface through the entire seismic cycle (e.g. Hudnut and Clark, 1989). Observationally, it is clear that the amount of creep varies spatially and temporally on a fault. However, from a practical point of view a single creep rate is associated with a fault section and the reduction in seismic moment generated by the fault is accommodated in seismic hazard models by reducing the surface area that generates earthquakes or by reducing the slip rate that is converted into seismic energy. WG-07 decided to follow the practice of past Working Groups and the National Seismic Hazard Map and used creep rate (where it was judged to be interseismic, see Table P1) to reduce the area of the fault surface that generates seismic events. In addition to following past practice, this decision allowed the Working Group to use a reduction of slip rate as a separate factor to accommodate aftershocks, post seismic slip, possible aseismic permanent deformation along fault zones and other processes that are inferred to affect the entire surface area of a fault, and thus are better modeled as a reduction in slip rate. C-zones are also handled by a reduction in slip rate, because they are inferred to include regions of widely distributed shear that is not completely

  12. Reconstructing the Cenozoic evolution of the mantle: Implications for mantle plume dynamics under the Pacific and Indian plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2014-03-01

    The lack of knowledge of the initial thermal state of the mantle in the geological past is an outstanding problem in mantle convection. The resolution of this problem also requires the modelling of 3-D mantle evolution that yields maximum consistency with a wide suite of geophysical constraints. Quantifying the robustness of the reconstructed thermal evolution is another major concern. To solve and estimate the robustness of the time-reversed (inverse) problem of mantle convection, we analyse two different numerical techniques: the quasi-reversible (QRV) and the backward advection (BAD) methods. Our investigation extends over the 65 Myr interval encompassing the Cenozoic era using a pseudo-spectral solution for compressible-flow thermal convection in 3-D spherical geometry. We find that the two dominant issues for solving the inverse problem of mantle convection are the choice of horizontally-averaged temperature (i.e., geotherm) and mechanical surface boundary conditions. We find, in particular, that the inclusion of thermal boundary layers that yield Earth-like heat flux at the top and bottom of the mantle has a critical impact on the reconstruction of mantle evolution. We have developed a new regularisation scheme for the QRV method using a time-dependent regularisation function. This revised implementation of the QRV method delivers time-dependent reconstructions of mantle heterogeneity that reveal: (1) the stability of Pacific and African ‘large low shear velocity provinces’ (LLSVP) over the last 65 Myr; (2) strong upward deflections of the CMB topography at 65 Ma beneath: the North Atlantic, the south-central Pacific, the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the eastern Antarctica; (3) an anchored deep-mantle plume ascending directly under the EPR (Easter and Pitcairn hotspots) throughout the Cenozoic era; and (4) the appearance of the transient Reunion plume head beneath the western edge of the Deccan Plateau at 65 Ma. Our reconstructions of Cenozoic mantle

  13. TH-C-19A-09: Quantification of Transmission and Backscatter Factors as a function of Distance to Inhomogeneity Interface for Three Types of Surgical Implant Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D; Mills, M; Wang, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Carbon fiber materials have been increasingly used clinically, mainly in orthopedics, as an alternative to metallic implants because of their minimal artifacts on CT and MRI images. This study characterizes the transmission and backscatter property of carbon fiber plates (CarboFix Orthopedics, Herzeliya, Israel) with measurements for radiation therapy applications, and compares them to traditional Stainless Steel (SS) and Titanium (Ti) metal materials. Methods: For the transmission measurements, 1-mm-thick test plate was placed upstream from a plane parallel Markus chamber, separated by various thicknesses of polystyrene plates in 0.5 cm increments between 0 and 5 cm. With this setup, we quantified the radiation transmission as a function of distance to the inhomogeneity interface. The LINAC source to detector distance was maintained at 100 cm and 200 MU was delivered for each measurement. Two 3-cm solid water phantoms were placed at the top and bottom to provide build up. All the measurements were performed for 6 MV and 18 MV photons. The backscatter measurements had the identical setup, except that the test plate was downstream of the chamber from radiation. Results: The carbon fiber plates did not introduce any measureable inhomogeneity effect on the transmission and backscatter factor because of its low atomic number. In contrast, traditional metal implant materials caused up to 15% dose difference at upstream and 25% backscatter at downstream from radiation. Such differences decrease as the distance to the inhomogeneity interface increases and become unmeasurable at distance of 3 cm and 1 cm for upstream and downstream, respectively. Conclusion: A new type of carbon fiber implant plate was evaluated and found to have minimal inhomogeneity effect in MV radiation beams. Patients would benefit from a carbon based implant over metal for radiation therapy due to their minimal backscatter and imaging artifacts.

  14. SEISMICITY AND VOLCANISM IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: EVIDENCE FOR THE SEGMENTATION OF THE JUAN DE FUCA PLATE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, Craig S.; Michaelson, Caryl A.

    1985-01-01

    The distributions of earthquakes and late Cenozoic and Quaternary volcanism in Washington and northern Oregon change markedly across two northeast-striking lines, one near Mount Rainier and one near Mount Hood. On the basis of these observations and a comparison with the Nazoa subduction zone, we propose that the Juan de Fuca subduction zone is divided into two segments. Landward of the coastal thrust zone, we suggest the Juan de Fuca plate dips more steeply beneath the southern segment than beneath the northern segment. Refs.

  15. An unrecognized major collision of the Okhotomorsk Block with East Asia during the Late Cretaceous, constraints on the plate reorganization of the Northwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-Tai

    2013-11-01

    Interactions at plate boundaries induce stresses that constitute critical controls on the structural evolution of intraplate regions. However, the traditional tectonic model for the East Asian margin during the Mesozoic, invoking successive episodes of paleo-Pacific oceanic subduction, does not provide an adequate context for important Late Cretaceous dynamics across East Asia, including: continental-scale orogenic processes, significant sinistral strike-slip faulting, and several others. The integration of numerous documented field relations requires a new tectonic model, as proposed here. The Okhotomorsk continental block, currently residing below the Okhotsk Sea in Northeast Asia, was located in the interior of the Izanagi Plate before the Late Cretaceous. It moved northwestward with the Izanagi Plate and collided with the South China Block at about 100 Ma. The indentation of the Okhotomorsk Block within East Asia resulted in the formation of a sinistral strike-slip fault system in South China, formation of a dextral strike-slip fault system in North China, and regional northwest-southeast shortening and orogenic uplift in East Asia. Northeast-striking mountain belts over 500 km wide extended from Southeast China to Southwest Japan and South Korea. The peak metamorphism at about 89 Ma of the Sanbagawa high-pressure metamorphic belt in Southwest Japan was probably related to the continental subduction of the Okhotomorsk Block beneath the East Asian margin. Subsequently, the north-northwestward change of motion direction of the Izanagi Plate led to the northward movement of the Okhotomorsk Block along the East Asian margin, forming a significant sinistral continental transform boundary similar to the San Andreas fault system in California. Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks in Southwest Japan were rapidly exhumed through the several-kilometer wide ductile shear zone at the lower crust and upper mantle level. Accretionary complexes successively accumulated along the East

  16. A mega shear zone in the Central Range of Taiwan and it's implication for the Late Mesozoic subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, D. C.; Lin, C. W.

    2012-04-01

    The metamorphic basement "Tananao Complex" exposed in the eastern flank of the Central Range of Taiwan. The ancient Asian continental margin deposited a thick sequence of sandstone, shale, limestone and volcanic rocks that was the protolith of Tananao Complex. In Late Mesozoic Era, the thick sequence of rocks was subjected to several phases of metamorphism and deformation to form the pair metamorphic belts which were the western Tailuko Belt and the eastern Yuli Belt. The Tailuko belt is composed of phyllite, quartzite, quartz-mica schist, meta-conglomerate, gneiss, meta-basite, amphibolite, serpentinite, marble and meta-chert, etc. The Yuli belt is composed of a monotonous assemblage of quartz-mica schist, subordinate meta-basite and serpentinite, etc. It is believed that the boundary of the Tailuko belt and the Yuli belt is a large fault, but the field evidence of the fault has never been found. In this study, meso-scale field investigation of the lithologies and rock fabrics indicate that a mega shear zone, called "The Daguan shear zone", separated the Tailuko belt from the Yuli belt. The Daguan shear zone is a NNE trending and west dipping mega shear zone which is mainly composed of mylonitic dark gray quartz-mica schist and mica schist, intercalated with 1 to 2 centimeters thick of elongated meta-conglomerate band. The shear zone is composed of numerous meso-scale ductile shear zones. Additionally, the shaer zone is characterized by abundant varied quartz veins that have been refolded to lenticular or pod shape and nearly parallel to S2 cleavage. Compaed to the existing geological information of the Central Range, we believe that the Daguan shear zone played a role as the boundary of the subduction zone which the paleo-Pacific Plate subducted into the Eurasian Plate in Late Mesozoic Era.

  17. On gravity from SST, geoid from Seasat, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific. [Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Data from an additional 50 satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) passes were combined with earlier measurements of the high degree and order (n, m, 12) gravity in the central Pacific. A composite map was produced which shows good agreement with conventional GEM models. Data from the Seasat altimeter was reduced and found to agree well with both the SST and the GEM fields. The maps are dominated especially in the east, by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Further comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkably close correlation with plate age. Each anomaly band is framed by those major fracture zones having large offsets. The regular spacing of these fractures seems to account for the fabric in the gravity fields. Other anomalies are accounted for by hot spots. The source of part of these anomalies is in the lithosphere itself. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantle without complete thermal equilibration is considered. Previously announced in STAR as N84-11559

  18. Shear horizontal acoustic waves propagating along two isotropic solid plates bonded with a non-dissipative adhesive layer: Effects of the rough interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, Catherine; Bruneau, Michel; Foze N'Djomo, Ludovic C.; Leduc, Damien; Echcherif Elkettani, Mounsif; Izbicki, Jean-Louis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an analytical contribution which presents the application of shear-horizontal (SH)-guided waves for the characterisation of a bi-layered structure which consists of two isotropic plates adhesively bonded using a non-dissipative thin layer of glue. The thickness of the layer of glue is assumed to be non-negligible, and the interfaces between this layer of glue and the plates are both assumed to be roughened (parallel ridges with complex shape and depth profiles). The basis of the theoretical approach is an extension of the integral formulation, in the frame of SH modal couplings due to the roughness, which has been developed previously for SH-wave propagation over a single plate with a rough surface. This approach assumes that the average roughness height is a small fraction of the thicknesses of the waveguides (the plates) everywhere. The changes, due to the roughness, in the characteristics of the fields created by a harmonic source set at the entrance edge of the structure are expressed through the mapping of the displacement and stress perturbations. Preliminary tests of the effectiveness of the model are given; they rely on the phase-matching effects of periodic profiles and pseudo-random experimental profile.

  19. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Low-enrichment (U-235 < 20%) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing was comprised of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates that were tested in INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. Adjacent to the AA6061 cladding were Mg-rich precipitates, which was in close proximity to the region where Xe is observed to be enriched. In samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface were possible indications of porosity/debonding, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  20. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Low-enrichment (235U < 20 pct) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing consisted of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates were fabricated using a friction bonding process, tested in INL's advanced test reactor (ATR), and then subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. In the samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface, possible indications of porosity/debonding were found, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  1. Geochemical and tectonic implications on plate-interface evolution achieved from high-pressure ultramafic rocks in mélange settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaò, E.; Agostini, S.; Scambelluri, M.; Tonarini, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical studies of fluid-mobile elements (FME) joined with B, Sr and Pb isotopic analyses of high-pressure mélanges terranes help constraining tectonic processes and mass transfer during accretion of slab and suprasubduction mantle in plate-interface domains. Here we focus on ultramafic rocks from two plate interface settings: (I) metasediment-dominated mélange (Cima di Gagnone, CdG, Adula Unit), where eclogite-facies de-serpentinized garnet peridotite and chlorite harzburgite lenses are embedded in paraschist; (II) dominated by high-pressure serpentinite (Erro-Tobbio, ET, and Voltri Units, VU, Ligurian Alps). CdG metaperidotite shows low [B], negative δ 11B and high Sr and Pb isotopic ratios. As, Sb loss from metasediment and gain by garnet and chlorite metaperidotite points to exchange between the two systems. Presence of As and Sb in eclogite-facies peridotite minerals and preferential low-T mobility of such elements suggest that exchange was during early subduction burial and prior to eclogitization. Based on high [B], positive δ11B, oxygen and hydrogen isotope, the ET serpentinties were recently interpreted as supra-subduction mantle flushed by slab fluids (Scambelluri & Tonarini, 2012, Geology, 40, 907-910). Their 206Pb/204Pb and 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios range between 18.300-18.514 and 0.7048-0.7060, respectively. Compared with ET rocks, VU serpentinites have higher As, Sb (up to 1.3 and 0.39 ppm, respectively) and are enriched in radiogenic Sr (up to 0.7105 87Sr/86Sr). This signature reflects interaction with fluids that exchanged with sedimentary rocks, either in outer rise environments or during accretion atop the slab. In the above cases, the serpentinized mantle rocks fingerprint interaction with fluids from different sources, indicating a timing of accretion to plate interface domains. We provide evidence that serpentinized mantle slices of different size and provenance (slab or wedge) accreted to plate interface domains since early subduction

  2. Neotectonic studies of northern Baja California, Mexico, with LANDSAT thematic mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery: Partitioning of dextral and extensional strain at the Pacific-North America plate boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Meghan; Crippen, Robert E.; Dixon, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous studies of active faulting in southern California indicate that the San Jacinto, Elsinore, and adjacent faults west of the San Andreas fault accommodate a significant proportion of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. Because of the complex distribution of slip, little is known about the activities of these and similar structures in northern Baja California and the southward transition to the oceanic ridge transform-fault system in the Gulf of California. SPOT and LANDSAT Thematic Mapper imagery for northern Baja California was processed to optimize discrimination of lithologic and structural features. This data was used to suggest a preliminary kinematic framework for distribution of relative plate motion between 31 and 33 degrees north, in which continental borderland tectonics play an important role in partitioning of plate motion.

  3. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  4. New Insights into Strain Accumulation and Release in the Central and Northern Walker Lane, Pacific-North American Plate Boundary, California and Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Jayne M.

    The Walker Lane is a 100 km-wide distributed zone of complex transtensional faulting that flanks the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada. Up to 25% of the total Pacific-North American relative right-lateral plate boundary deformation is accommodated east of the Sierra Nevada, primarily in the Walker Lane. The results of three studies in the Central and Northern Walker Lane offer new insights into how constantly accumulating plate boundary shear strain is released on faults in the Walker Lane and regional earthquake hazards. This research is based on the collection and analysis of new of geologic and geodetic datasets. Two studies are located in the Central Walker Lane, where plate boundary deformation is accommodated on northwest trending right-lateral faults, east-northeast trending left-lateral faults, and north trending normal faults. In this region, a prominent set of left-stepping, en-echelon, normal fault-bounded basins between Walker Lake and Lake Tahoe fill a gap in Walker Lane strike slip faults. Determining how these basins accommodate shear strain is a primary goal of this research. Paleoseismic and neotectonic observations from the Wassuk Range fault zone in the Walker Lake basin record evidence for at least 3 Holocene surface rupturing earthquakes and Holocene/late Pleistocene vertical slip rates between 0.4-0.7 mm/yr on the normal fault, but record no evidence of right-lateral slip along the rangefront fault. A complementary study presents new GPS velocity data that measures present-day deformation across the Central Walker Lane and infers fault slip and block rotation rates using an elastic block model. The model results show a clear partitioning between distinct zones of strain accommodation characterized by (1) right-lateral translation of blocks on northwest trending faults, (2) left-lateral slip and clockwise block rotations between east and northeast trending faults, and (3) right-lateral oblique normal slip with minor clockwise block rotations

  5. Plating Tank Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  6. Fault kinematics in northern Central America and coupling along the subduction interface of the Cocos Plate, from GPS data in Chiapas (Mexico), Guatemala and El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Lasserre, C.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Kostoglodov, V.; Molina, E.; Guzman-Speziale, M.; Monterosso, D.; Robles, V.; Figueroa, C.; Amaya, W.; Barrier, E.; Chiquin, L.; Moran, S.; Flores, O.; Romero, J.; Santiago, J. A.; Manea, M.; Manea, V. C.

    2012-06-01

    New GPS measurements in Chiapas (Mexico), Guatemala and El Salvador are used to constrain the fault kinematics in the North America (NA), Caribbean (CA) and Cocos (CO) plates triple junction area. The regional GPS velocity field is first analysed in terms of strain partitioning across the major volcano-tectonic structures, using elastic half-space modelling, then inverted through a block model. We show the dominant role of the Motagua Fault with respect to the Polochic Fault in the accommodation of the present-day deformation associated with the NA and CA relative motion. The NA/CA motion decreases from 18-22 mm yr-1 in eastern Guatemala to 14-20 mm yr-1 in central Guatemala (assuming a uniform locking depth of 14-28 km), down to a few millimetres per year in western Guatemala. As a consequence, the western tip of the CA Plate deforms internally, with ≃9 mm yr-1 of east-west extension (≃5 mm yr-1 across the Guatemala city graben alone). Up to 15 mm yr-1 of dextral motion can be accommodated across the volcanic arc in El Salvador and southeastern Guatemala. The arc seems to mark the northern boundary of an independent forearc sliver (AR), pinned to the NA plate. The inversion of the velocity field shows that a four-block (NA, CA, CO and AR) model, that combines relative block rotations with elastic deformation at the block boundaries, can account for most of the GPS observations and constrain the overall kinematics of the active structures. This regional modelling also evidences lateral variations of coupling at the CO subduction interface, with a fairly high-coupling (≃0.6) offshore Chiapas and low-coupling (≃0.25) offshore Guatemala and El Salvador.

  7. The Turbulent Boundary Layer Near the Air-Water Interface on a Surface-Piercing Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuta, Nathan; Masnadi, Naeem; Duncan, James H.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in the vicinity of the water free surface along a flat, vertically oriented surface-piercing plate are studied experimentally using a laboratory-scale experiment. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. This belt device is mounted inside a large water tank with the water level set just below the top edge of the belt. The belt, rollers, and supporting frame are contained within a sheet metal box to keep the device dry except for one 6-meter-long straight test section between rollers. The belt is launched from rest with a 3- g acceleration in order to quickly reach steady state velocity. This creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along a flat-sided ship moving at the same velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region since the belt motion began. Cinematic Stereo PIV measurements are performed in planes parallel to the free surface by imaging the flow from underneath the tank in order to study the modification of the boundary layer flow field due to the effects of the water free surface. The support of the Office of Naval Research under grant N000141110029 is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Investigations on the micro-scale surface interactions at the tool and workpiece interface in micro-manufacturing of bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peker, Mevlut Fatih

    Micro-forming studies have been more attractive in recent years because of miniaturization trend. One of the promising metal forming processes, micro-stamping, provides durability, strength, surface finish, and low cost for metal products. Hence, it is considered a prominent method for fabricating bipolar plates (BPP) with micro-channel arrays on large metallic surfaces to be used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). Major concerns in micro-stamping of high volume BPPs are surface interactions between micro-stamping dies and blank metal plates, and tribological changes. These concerns play a critical role in determining the surface quality, channel formation, and dimensional precision of bipolar plates. The surface quality of BPP is highly dependent on the micro-stamping die surface, and process conditions due to large ratios of surface area to volume (size effect) that cause an increased level of friction and wear issues at the contact interface. Due to the high volume and fast production rates, BPP surface characteristics such as surface roughness, hardness, and stiffness may change because of repeated interactions between tool (micro-forming die) and workpiece (sheet blank of interest). Since the surface characteristics of BPPs have a strong effect on corrosion and contact resistance of bipolar plates, and consequently overall fuel cell performance, evolution of surface characteristics at the tool and workpiece should be monitored, controlled, and kept in acceptable ranges throughout the long production cycles to maintain the surface quality. Compared to macro-forming operations, tribological changes in micro-forming process are bigger challenges due to their dominance and criticality. Therefore, tribological size effect should be considered for better understanding of tribological changes in micro-scale. The integrity of process simulation to the experiments, on the other hand, is essential. This study describes an approach that aims to investigate

  9. Monitoring of slip at the transition zone on the plate interface estimated from non-volcanic deep low-frequency tremors in southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, R.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Obara, K.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    In southwestern Japan, non-volcanic deep low-frequency (DLF) tremors (e.g., Obara, 2002) and short-term slow slip events (S-SSEs; e.g., Obara et al., 2004) occur in temporal and spatial coincidence with the active stages of DLF tremors (Obara et al., 2004). Based on this feature, Hiramatsu et al. (2008) proposed a method to monitor slip at the transition zone between the locked and aseismic slip zones on the plate interface using DLF tremors. In this study, we applied the method as the same way of previous studies (Hiramatsu et al., 2008; Hirose et al., 2010) and estimated the long-term average slip rate at the transition zone from DLF tremors in southwestern Japan. We also estimated the slip distributions of S-SSEs from DLF tremors using the modified envelope correlation method (ECM) tremor catalog (Maeda and Obara, 2009) and the hourly centroid tremor catalog (Obara et al., 2010) along with the ECM tremor catalog (Obara, 2002) in southwestern Japan. The modified ECM applied both the differential travel time and the spatial distribution of mean square amplitudes to estimate a tremor's spatial location and radiation energy. The hourly centroid tremor catalog is constructed using a clustering process to estimate centroid locations, revealing clear depth-dependent behavior of the tremor activity. The cumulative seismic moment from 2001 to 2009 increases at a constant rate, indicating a constant moment release rate in the long-term average. We estimated slip rate at the transition zone using the formula ˙ {M0} = μ S_˙ {U}, where ˙ {M0} is the moment release rate, μ the rigidity, S the fault area that is related to the slip of S-SSEs in each region, and ˙ {U} the slip rate. We obtained the slip rates of 4.1 ± 0.5 cm/yr, 3.7 ± 0.6 cm/yr, and 2.6 ± 0.2 cm/yr in the western Shikoku, northern Kii peninsula, and Tokai regions, respectively, at the transition zone through the analyzed period. The slip deficit rate at the transition zone in each region is 2.6cm/yr, 2

  10. A new regime of slab-mantle coupling at the plate interface and its possible implications for the distribution of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Manabu

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effects of a thin, low viscosity layer just above the subducting slab on 3D thermal and flow structure in the mantle wedge by taking Northeast Japan as an example. The low viscosity layer assumed here is needed to explain the observed low surface heat flow and low seismic attenuation in the forearc by decoupling the mantle from the subducting slab. We find that when the viscosity in the low viscosity layer is sufficiently low, along-arc component of the flow arises inside the layer and produces along-arc temperature variation. It can also be considered as the along-arc changes in the degree of slab-mantle coupling at the plate interface. The onset time and the characteristic wavelength of the 3D flow depend on the viscosity and the extent of the low viscosity layer. In order to explain the observed spatial and temporal changes in the distribution of Quaternary volcanoes in Northeast Japan, the viscosity and the thickness of the low viscosity layer need to be < 5 ×1018 Pas and ˜6 km, respectively. The model proposed here is based on an assumption which is simpler and better constrained by observations compared to previous models. Therefore, it could be an alternative explanation of the distribution of volcanoes in Northeast Japan.

  11. Insights into a fossil plate interface of an erosional subduction zone: a tectono-metamorphic study of the Tianshan metamorphic belt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayet, Lea; Moritz, Lowen; Li, Jilei; Zhou, Tan; Agard, Philippe; John, Timm; Gao, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone seismicity and volcanism are triggered by processes occurring at the slab-wedge interface as a consequence of metamorphic reactions, mass-transfer and deformation. Although the shallow parts of subduction zones (<30-40 km) can be partly accessed by geophysical methods, the resolution of these techniques is insufficient to characterize and image the plate interface at greater depths (>60km). In order to better understand the plate interface dynamics at these greater depths, one has to rely on the rock record from fossil subduction zones. The Chinese Tianshan metamorphic belt (TMB) represents an ideal candidate for such studies, because structures are well exposed with exceptionally fresh high-pressure rocks. Since previous studies from this area focused on fluid-related processes and its metamorphic evolution was assessed on single outcrops, the geodynamic setting of this metamorphic belt is unfortunately heavily debated. Here, we present a new geodynamic concept for the TMB based on detailed structural and petrological investigations on a more regional scale. A ~11km x 13km area was extensively covered, together with E-W and N-S transects, in order to produce a detailed map of the TMB. Overall, the belt is composed of two greenschist-facies units that constitute the northern and southern border of a large high-pressure (HP) to ultra high-pressure (UHP) unit in the center. This HP-UHP unit is mainly composed of metasediments and volcanoclastic rocks, with blueschist, eclogite and carbonate lenses. Only the southern part of the HP-UHP unit is composed of the uppermost part of an oceanic crust (e.g., pillow basalts and deep-sea carbonates). From south to north, the relative abundance and size of blueschist massive boudins and layers (as well as eclogite boudins) decreases and the sequence is increasingly interlayered with metasedimentary and carbonate-rich horizons. This indicates that the subducted material was dominated by trench filling made of

  12. Plate boundary deformation of the Pacific plate. Two case studies. (1) Crustal structure of the northwestern Vizcaino block and Gorda escarpment, offshore northern California, and implications for postsubduction deformation of a paleoaccretionary margin. (2) A focused look at the Alpine fault, New Zealand: Seismicity, focal mechanisms and stress observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Beate

    Two examples of Pacific rim plate boundary deformation are presented. In the first part of the thesis crustal models are derived for the northwestern part of the Vizcaino block in California using marine seismic and gravity data collected by the Mendocino Triple Junction Seismic Experiment. A northwest-southeast trending kink in the Moho is imaged and interpreted to have formed under compression by reactivation of preexisting thrust faults in the paleoaccretionary prism at the seaward margin of the Vizcaino block. The study suggests that the deformation resulted from mainly north-south compression between the Pacific-Juan de Fuca plates across the Mendocino transform fault and predates late Pliocene Pacific-North America plate convergence. In the second part, 195 earthquakes recorded during the duration of the Southern Alps Passive Seismic Experiment (SAPSE) are analysed. Precise earthquake locations and focal mechanisms provide unprecedented detail of the seismotectonics in the central South Island. The short term (6 month) SAPSE seismicity is compared with long term (8 years) seismicity recorded by the New Zealand National Seismic network and the Lake Pukaki network. The seismicity rate of the Alpine fault is low, but comparable to locked sections of the San Andreas fault, with large earthquakes expected. Changes of the depth of the seismogenic zone, generally uniform at about 10--12 km, occur only localised over distances smaller than 30 km, suggesting that thermal perturbations must be of similar scale. This implies that the thermal effects of the uplift of the Southern Alps do not change the seismogenic depth significantly and are not in accordance with most of the present thermal models. Both the Hope and Porters Pass fault zones are seismically active and deformation is accommodated near the fault zones and in the adjacent crust. North of Mt Cook, a triangular shaped region along the Alpine fault is characterised by absence of earthquakes. We interpret this

  13. Investigations on the micro-scale surface interactions at the tool and workpiece interface in micro-manufacturing of bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peker, Mevlut Fatih

    Micro-forming studies have been more attractive in recent years because of miniaturization trend. One of the promising metal forming processes, micro-stamping, provides durability, strength, surface finish, and low cost for metal products. Hence, it is considered a prominent method for fabricating bipolar plates (BPP) with micro-channel arrays on large metallic surfaces to be used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). Major concerns in micro-stamping of high volume BPPs are surface interactions between micro-stamping dies and blank metal plates, and tribological changes. These concerns play a critical role in determining the surface quality, channel formation, and dimensional precision of bipolar plates. The surface quality of BPP is highly dependent on the micro-stamping die surface, and process conditions due to large ratios of surface area to volume (size effect) that cause an increased level of friction and wear issues at the contact interface. Due to the high volume and fast production rates, BPP surface characteristics such as surface roughness, hardness, and stiffness may change because of repeated interactions between tool (micro-forming die) and workpiece (sheet blank of interest). Since the surface characteristics of BPPs have a strong effect on corrosion and contact resistance of bipolar plates, and consequently overall fuel cell performance, evolution of surface characteristics at the tool and workpiece should be monitored, controlled, and kept in acceptable ranges throughout the long production cycles to maintain the surface quality. Compared to macro-forming operations, tribological changes in micro-forming process are bigger challenges due to their dominance and criticality. Therefore, tribological size effect should be considered for better understanding of tribological changes in micro-scale. The integrity of process simulation to the experiments, on the other hand, is essential. This study describes an approach that aims to investigate

  14. Linking serpentinite geochemistry with tectonic evolution at the subduction plate-interface: The Voltri Massif case study (Ligurian Western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaò, E.; Scambelluri, M.; Agostini, S.; Tonarini, S.; Godard, M.

    2016-10-01

    , whereas mylonitic serpentinite is reset in its concentrations of FME and its B, Sr and Pb isotope compositions, due to interaction with sediment- and crust-derived fluids. The environment of this interaction is either compatible with (i) an outer-rise zone setting, with percolation of seawater-derived fluids enriched in sedimentary components into bending-related fault structures, or with (ii) subduction channel domains, where ascending sediment-derived slab fluids infiltrate slices of former oceanic serpentinite accreted to the plate interface domain. Influx of sediment-derived subduction fluids along major deformation zones in serpentinite modifies the element budget of the rocks, with important implications for element recycling and the tectonic history of serpentinite. The B, Sr and Pb isotopic systematics, coupled with FME concentration in serpentinites are particularly helpful geochemical tracers of interaction between different reservoirs in subduction-interface environments, and are more sensitive than the traditionally applied stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions.

  15. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple

  16. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  17. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  18. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    The scientific hypothesis of this work is that modulation of the properties of hard materials to exhibit abrasion-reducing and low-energy surfaces will extend the functional lifetimes of elastomeric seals pressed against them in abrasive underwater systems. The initial motivation of this work was to correct a problem noted in the leaking of seals at major hydropower generating facilities subject to fouling by abrasive zebra mussel shells and extensive corrosion. Similar biofouling-influenced problems can develop at seals in medical devices and appliances from regulators in anesthetic machines and SCUBA diving oxygen supply units to autoclave door seals, injection syringe gaskets, medical pumps, drug delivery components, and feeding devices, as well as in food handling equipment like pasteurizers and transfer lines. Maritime and many other heavy industrial seal interfaces could also benefit from this coating system. Little prior work has been done to elucidate the relationship of seal plate surface properties to the friction and wear of elastomeric seals during sliding contacts of these articulating materials, or to examine the secondary influence of mineralized debris within the contacting interfaces. This investigation utilized the seal materials relevant to the hydropower application---neoprene elastomer against carbon steel---with and without the application of a silicone-epoxy coating (WearlonRTM 2020.98) selected for its wear-resistance, hydrophobicity, and "easy-release" capabilities against biological fouling debris present in actual field use. Analytical techniques applied to these materials before and after wear-producing processes included comprehensive Contact Angle measurements for Critical Surface Tension (CA-CST) determination, Scanning Electron Microscopic inspections, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements for determination of surface texture and inorganic composition, Multiple

  19. Recent plate motions and crustal deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Reports by U.S. workers on geodetic measurements of recent plate motions or crustal deformation published in 1987-1990 are reviewed. The review begins with global plate motions, proceeds through plate boundaries in California, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest, and finishes with volcanic phenomena, monument stability and longevity, and GPS relative position measurements. 184 refs.

  20. The South Pacific superswell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Marcia K.; Fischer, Karen M.

    Seafloor depths in a broad area of French Polynesia are 250 to 750 m shallower than lithosphere of the same age in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. The area of shallow seafloor also correlates with a region of high density of volcanoes, low seismic velocity in the upper mantle, and a reduction in the thickness of the elastic plate supporting the volcanoes. The Marquesas fracture zone marks an abrupt transition between normal lithosphere to the north which follows the thermal subsidence curve for a 125-km-thick plate and shallow lithosphere to the south which behaves as though it is only 75-km thick. This age dependence in the French Polynesian depth anomalies, the low elastic plate thickness, and the change in depth at the Marquesas fracture zone, a lithospheric discontinuity, require elevated temperatures in the lithosphere. The pattern and amplitude of the depth anomaly is not consistent with the notion that it results from lithospheric thinning beneath a number of overlapping hot spot swells. Rather, we propose that hot spot traces cluster in this region because the lithosphere is already thinner and more vulnerable to magma penetration. The reduction in the thickness of the thermal plate is presumably due to enhanced small-scale convection resulting from the thermal and/or chemical effect of a broad mantle up welling beneath the South Pacific as imaged by seismic tomography. The morphologic and petrologic characteristics of this superswell resemble those that existed in the mid-Cretaceous over H. W. Menard's Darwin Rise, a region of the Pacific which includes the Mid-Pacific Mountains, the Marshall Islands, Magellan Seamounts, and Wake Guyots. We propose that the South Pacific superswell is the modern-day equivalent of the Darwin Rise, and that it may be merely an extreme example of global variability in lithospheric thermal structure as a function of temperature, chemistry, and/or state-of-stress in the upper mantle.

  1. Refined Views of Strike-slip Fault Zones, Seismicity, and State of Stress Associated With the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Nicholson, C.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Shearer, P. M.; Sandwell, D. T.; Yang, W.

    2013-12-01

    The mostly strike-slip plate boundary in southern California is expressed as a system of late Quaternary faults or principal slip zones (PSZs), with numerous adjacent smaller slip surfaces. It is complex, even after large cumulative displacements, and consists of major fault systems with multi-stranded, non-planar fault geometry, including some in close proximity to each other. There are also secondary cross faults and low-angle detachments that interact with the PSZs accommodating main plate boundary motion. The loading of plate-tectonic strain causes the largest earthquakes along PSZs, moderate-sized events in their immediate vicinity, and small earthquakes across the whole region. We apply relocated earthquake and refined focal mechanism (1981-2013) catalogs, as well as other geophysical datasets to provide refined views of the 3D fault geometry of these active fault systems. To determine properties of individual fault zones, we measure the Euclidian distance from every hypocenter to the nearest PSZ. In addition, we assign crustal geophysical parameters such as heat flow value and shear or dilatation strain rates to each epicenter. We investigate seismogenic thickness and fault zone width as well as earthquake source processes. We find that the seismicity rate is a function of location, with the rate dying off exponentially with distance from the PSZ. About 80% of small earthquakes are located within 5 km of a PSZ. For small earthquakes, stress drops increase in size with distance away from the PSZs. The magnitude distribution near the PSZs suggests that large earthquakes are more common close to PSZs, and they are more likely to occur at greater depth than small earthquakes. In contrast, small quakes can occur at any geographical location. An optimal combination of heat flow and strain rate is required to concentrate the strain along rheologically weak fault zones, which accommodate the crustal deformation processes, causing seismicity. The regional trend of

  2. Imaging the Structure of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary using Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) Data and Wavelet Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanquini, A.; Cheung, K.; Gudmundsdottir, M. H.; Moon, S.; Lin, N.; Shelef, E.; Hilley, G. E.; Prentice, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Since the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, geologists have noted that the topography of active fault zones is significantly modified by repeated fault ruptures over geologic time. Here, we present an analysis of fault zone topography generated by high-resolution Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) data collected by the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM). The digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from the ALSM data reveal the location, orientation, and curvature of scarps associated with active, plate-boundary faults. In particular, we have examined topographic data from the B4 and Northern California data sets, as well as data from faults within the Eastern California Shear Zone. We used a wavelet-based convolution scheme, based on topographic forms modified from the profile scarp-diffusion model of Hanks et al. (1984), extended to encompass along-strike features. We applied this filtering methodology to digital topography along fault zones to estimate the best-fitting height, orientation, morphologic age, and associated Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of scarps found within these datasets. These results will be available to the community via a GIS web portal so that other workers can mine these data to understand patterns of fault-zone structure observed along the plate-bounding fault zones. To evaluate the utility of this methodology for identifying and characterizing fault scarps within the topographic swaths, we present sample results from the Calaveras fault, part of the San Andreas fault system in northern California. We found that along this fault, the filtering algorithm correctly identifies scarps characterized by ground surveys, previous analysis of aerial photography, and/or field mapping. However, some mapped fault traces with low SNR values because of their subtle morphologic expression are not identified by the algorithm. Similarly, some fluvial scarps that trend in a similar orientation to the overall fault zone are erroneously

  3. Cenozoic deep-water sedimentary basin formation at the Australia-Pacific plate boundary, southern New Caledonia Trough and Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, J. R.; Sutherland, R.; Stern, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    Investigation of four petroleum exploration wells and seismic-reflection interpretation reveal >2 km of tectonic subsidence related to Cretaceous rift structures, and 2-3km of Cenozoic subsidence with little faulting of the upper crust. Comparisons to thermal cooling models require stretching factors that are incompatible with the continental foundations of the basin. In addition, up to 50 % of the subsidence signal occurred in the Mid-Cenozoic, hundreds of kilometres from potential contemporary plate boundaries. Thus, upper crustal faulting, thermal relaxation or flexure cannot explain the 300-500 km wide and 2000 km long sedimentary basin system. We suggest that not all deep-water basins are the evolved products of processes that form shallow-water sedimentary basins, but instead they may be influenced by different processes such as convection in the asthenospheric mantle, instabilities in the mantle lithosphere and/or detachment fault zones that inevitably lead to deeper water.

  4. Early Cretaceous arc volcanic suite in Cebu Island, Central Philippines and its implications on paleo-Pacific plate subduction: Constraints from geochemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Santosh, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Philippine island arc system is a collage of amalgamated terranes of oceanic, continental and island arc affinities. Here we investigate a volcanic suite in Cebu Island of central Philippines, including basalt, diabase dike, basaltic pyroclastic rock and porphyritic andesite. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology of zircon grains from the porphyritic andesite and pyroclastic rock yielded ages of 126 ± 3 Ma and 119 ± 2 Ma, respectively, indicating an Early Cretaceous age. The age distribution of the detrital zircons from river sand in the area displays a peak at ca. 118 Ma, close to the age of the pyroclastic rock. The early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the central Philippines were previously regarded as parts of ophiolite complexes by most investigators, whereas the Cebu volcanics are distinct from these, and display calc-alkaline affinity and island arc setting, characterized by high LREE/HREE ratios and low HFSE contents. These features are similar to the Early Cretaceous arc basalts in the Amami Plateau and east Halmahera in the northernmost and southernmost West Philippine Basin respectively. Zircon Hf isotopes of the pyroclastic rocks show depleted nature similar to those of the Amami Plateau basalts, implying the subducted Pacific-type MORB as probable source. Zircon Hf isotopes of the porphyritic andesite show slight enrichment relative to that of the pyroclastic rocks and MORB, indicating subducted sediments as a minor end-member in the source. The Hf isotopic compositions of the volcanic rocks are also reflected in the detrital zircons from the river sands. We propose that the volcanic rocks of Cebu Island were derived from partial melting of sub-arc mantle wedge which was metasomatized by dehydration of subducted oceanic crust together with minor pelagic sediments. Within the tectonic environment of Southeast Asia during Early Cretaceous, the volcanic rocks in Cebu Island can be correlated to the subduction of paleo-Pacific plate. The Early Cretaceous

  5. Chemical and isotopic diversity in basalts dredged from the East Pacific Rise at 10°S, the fossil Galapagos Rise and the Nazca plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batiza, Rodey; Oestrike, Richard; Futa, Kiyoto

    1982-01-01

    The dredges from the East Pacific Rise at about 10°S recovered unusual transitional, light rare-earth element (LREE) enriched basalts which show a range of fractionation. On the basis of their chemical and isotopic abundances, it is unlikely that the lavas are related by a single simple process of magmatic differentiation. We suggest that the mantle source region of these basalts was chemically and isotopically heterogeneous. The chemistry of LREE-depleted tholeiitic basalt dredged from near the axis of the extinct Galapagos Rise indicates complex petrogenesis and differentiation. The presence of tholeiitic basalts here indicates that unlike the Guadalupe and Mathematician fossil ridges, the Galapagos Rise has not been the site of voluminous post-abandonment alkalic volcanism. Alkalic basalts of picritic bulk composition dredged from an elongate seamount near the Galapagos Rise do not represent liquid compositions. Instead, we suggest that these alkalic liquids contain added olivine and plagioclase xenocrysts. Although most of the samples analyzed are very fresh, a few have been altered. The latter exhibit characteristic chemical and isotopic effects of seawater alteration.

  6. Pacific Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Takeo, A.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Based on our recent results on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry (e.g., Suetsugu & Shiobara, 2014, Annual Review EPS), together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (both radial and azimuthal), with deployments of ~10-15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) (namely "ocean-bottom broadband dispersion survey"; Takeo et al., 2013, JGR; Kawakatsu et al., 2013, AGU; Takeo, 2014, Ph.D. Thesis; Takeo et al., 2014, JpGU). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations might be sought.

  7. Cenozoic reconstruction of southwest Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Y.Y.; Kroenke, L.W.

    1986-07-01

    Poles of opening and spreading rates for some of the well-studied marginal basins in the southwest Pacific have been redetermined. Times of opening range from Late Cretaceous-Paleocene in the Tasman basin to middle Pliocene in the Bismarck Sea. The observed magnetic lineations in most of these basins show a relatively short duration of opening and relatively small area of total opening. Most of the smaller basins are bounded by troughs and arcuate island chains, some of which are inferred to be trenches and volcanic arcs situated along paleoconvergent boundaries. At least four successive paleoconvergent boundaries are believed to have formed between the Pacific and the Indian-Australian plates during the Cenozoic. Combining the newly determined poles of opening, spreading rates, and paleoplate boundary locations, a series of palinspastic maps of the southwest Pacific have been constructed for these times, relative to a fixed hot-spot frame of reference for both the Pacific and Indian-Australian plates.

  8. Transition from adakitic to bimodal magmatism induced by the paleo-Pacific plate subduction and slab rollback beneath SE China: Evidence from petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Xu, Xisheng; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The late Mesozoic magmatic record of SE China is dominated by felsic volcanics and intrusions. However, this magmatism mainly occurred in coastal areas at 110-80 Ma, in contrast to poorly researched dike swarms that were emplaced inland at 165-120 Ma. Here, we focus on Early Cretaceous mafic and felsic dike swarms that provide new insights into the tectono-magmatic evolution of SE China. The swarms were intruded into Neoproterozoic plutons and include granodioritic porphyry, granitic porphyry, and diabase dikes. The granodioritic porphyry (128 ± 2 Ma) dikes are geochemically similar to adakitic rocks, suggesting that inland adakitic magmatism occurred between ca. 175 and ca. 130 Ma. The majority of these adakitic rocks are calc-alkaline and have Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic compositions that are indicative of derivation from a Neoproterozoic magmatic arc source within the lower crust. The granitic porphyry and diabase dikes were emplaced coevally at ca. 130 Ma, and the former contain high alkali and high field strength element (HFSE; e.g., Zr, Nb, Ce, and Y) concentrations that together with their high Ga/Al and FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios imply an A-type affinity. The widespread ca. 130 Ma magmatism that formed the A-type granites and coeval diabase dikes defines a NE-SW trending inland belt of bimodal magmatism in SE China. The presence of mafic enclaves in some of the A-type granites, and the Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of the latter are indicative of inadequate mixing between the basement sediment-derived and coeval mantle-derived basaltic melts that define the bimodal magmatism. The transition from adakitic rocks to bimodal magmatism in the inland region of SE China indicates a change in the prevailing tectonic regime. This change was associated with an increase in the dip angle of the northwestward-subducting paleo-Pacific Plate beneath SE China between the Middle Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous. This resulted in a transition from a local intra-plate extensional

  9. Geochronology, geochemistry, and Hf isotopes of Jurassic intermediate-acidic intrusions in the Xing'an Block, northeastern China: Petrogenesis and implications for subduction of the Paleo-Pacific oceanic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu; Ge, Wen-chun; Yang, Hao; Xu, Wen-liang; Zhang, Yan-long; Bi, Jun-hui; Liu, Xi-wen

    2016-03-01

    'an Block was related to subduction of the Paleo-Pacific oceanic plate.

  10. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites

  11. The Indosinian collision-extension event between the South China Block and the Palaeo-Pacific plate: Evidence from Indosinian alkaline granitic rocks in Dashuang, eastern Zhejiang, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jianren; Ye, Haimin; Liu, Kai; Li, Zilong; Takahashi, Yutaka; Zhao, Xilin; Kee, Weon-Seo

    2013-07-01

    collision and extension between the Palaeo-Pacific plate and the South China Block during the Indosinian. We use these data to refine the geodynamic model for Indosinian multi-plate convergence in South China.

  12. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  13. Interface between Education and State Policy: Australia. Asia and the Pacific Programme of Educational Innovation for Development, Education and Polity, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Phillip; And Others

    One of seven studies in the "Education and Polity" series, this document looks at alternative futures and the interface of education with four areas: communication; employment and leisure; state policy; and technology. The studies were commissioned during 1984 and were conducted by interdisciplinary teams: two in Australia, two in India, one in…

  14. Coseismic slip distribution of the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) refined by means of seafloor geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, T.; Hino, R.; Kido, M.; Inazu, D.; Osada, Y.; Ito, Y.; Ohzono, M.; Tsushima, H.; Suzuki, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miura, S.

    2012-07-01

    On 11 March 2011, the devastating M9.0 Tohoku Earthquake occurred on the interface of the subducting Pacific plate, and was followed by a huge tsunami that killed about 20,000 people. Several geophysical studies have already suggested that the very shallow portion of the plate interface might have played an important role in producing such a large earthquake and tsunami. However, the sparsity of seafloor observations leads to insufficient spatial resolution of the fault slip on such a shallow plate interface. For this reason, the location and degree of the slip has not yet been estimated accurately enough to assess future seismic risks. Thus, we estimated the coseismic slip distribution based on terrestrial GPS observations and all available seafloor geodetic data that significantly improve the spatial resolution at the shallow portion of the plate interface. The results reveal that an extremely large (greater than 50 m) slip occurred in a small (about 40 km in width and 120 km in length) area near the Japan Trench and generated the huge tsunami. The estimated slip distribution and a comparison of it with the coupling coefficient distribution deduced from the analysis of the small repeating earthquakes suggest that the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake released strain energy that had accumulated over the past 1000 years, probably since the Jogan Earthquake in 869. The accurate assessments of seismic risks on very shallow plate interfaces in subduction zones throughout the world can be obtained by improving the quality and quantity of seafloor geodetic observations.

  15. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  16. Origin of Small Tectonic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, C.; Coltice, N.; Seton, M.; Müller, D.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    The plate tectonic theory allowed to split the Earth surface into 6 (Le Pichon 1968) to 52 tectonic plates (Bird 2003). These plates are separated into two groups: the first of 7 large plates and the second of numerous smaller plates (Morra et al 2013). Previous studies using the reconstruction of the past 200 My, suggest that the size of large plates is driven by mantle flow. But the tools employed are descriptive (Morra et al 2013, Sornette and Pisarenko 2003), hence ignoring forces and physical principles within the lithosphere and the mantle. The processes at the origin of small plates remain unknown. We developed a new approach to explain the plate sizes. We demonstrate that the physics of convection drives it. We applied plate tectonics theory on 3D spherical convection models generating plate-like motions, which give access to a complete survey of data: velocities, viscosity and heat flow. Our data show that (1) the large plates depend on the dominating scale of the convective flow due to the initiation or the shutdown of subductions; (2) the smaller plates are generated thanks to large variability of regional stresses along subduction zone by slab pull and suction influenced by the geometry of trenches. Our results are consistent with the quick reorganizations of back-arc basins occuring synchronously with the modification of subduction zones geometry around the Pacific plate (Sdrolias et al 2004). Hence, we conclude that (1) the decreasing number of small plates in the plate reconstructions back in time is an artifact induced by their short lifetime, that is why they are artificially ignored; (2) the geometry of past trenches is simplified leading to an underestimation of the length of subduction zones.

  17. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon

    2014-05-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plate, with a transition from subduction of Pacific plate oceanic lithosphere in the North, beneath North Island to oblique continental collision in South Island. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone up to 250 km wide, with displacements on individual faults up to 100s of kilometres. Here, I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses, together with simple Airy isostasy, to determine the regional crustal and mantle structure. The buoyancy stress in the deforming layer is calculated by integrating the vertical normal stress with depth. This, in combination with plate-boundary stresses, must drive deformation. Horizontal gradients of buoyancy stress can be compared with horizontal gradients of strain rate, using the method of England & Molnar (1997), in the context of a simple thin sheet model of lithospheric deformation. I derive a velocity field for the New Zealand plate-boundary zone, using the method of Lamb (2000). This is representative of deformation over tens of thousands of years, based on fault slip, strain rate azimuth and paleomagnetic data, in the context of the short term relative plate motions. Comparison of appropriate combinations of horizontal gradients of vorticity and dilatation with horizontal gradients of buoyancy stress shows that deformation has some of the features of a Newtonian fluid. In detail, the minima in buoyancy stress, calculated from the vertical density structure, are offset horizontally from that calculated from gradients of strain rate, suggesting strong lateral contrasts in viscosity if deformation is strongly coupled at all levels in the lithosphere, with viscosities in the range 1 - 10 x 10**21 Pa s. However, subduction of Pacific plate lithosphere along the Hikurangi margin, and evidence for underthrusting beneath the Southern Alps

  18. Global Plate Velocities from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Philipsen, Steven

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed 204 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the global GPS network spanning January 1991 through March 1996. On the basis of these GPS coordinate solutions, we have estimated velocities for 38 sites, mostly located on the interiors of the Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, Nazca, North America, Pacific, and South America plates. The uncertainties of the horizontal velocity components range from 1.2 to 5.0 mm/yr. With the exception of sites on the Pacific and Nazca plates, the GPS velocities agree with absolute plate model predictions within 95% confidence. For most of the sites in North America, Antarctica, and Eurasia, the agreement is better than 2 mm/yr. We find no persuasive evidence for significant vertical motions (less than 3 standard deviations), except at four sites. Three of these four were sites constrained to geodetic reference frame velocities. The GPS velocities were then used to estimate angular velocities for eight tectonic plates. Absolute angular velocities derived from the GPS data agree with the no net rotation (NNR) NUVEL-1A model within 95% confidence except for the Pacific plate. Our pole of rotation for the Pacific plate lies 11.5 deg west of the NNR NUVEL-1A pole, with an angular speed 10% faster. Our relative angular velocities agree with NUVEL-1A except for some involving the Pacific plate. While our Pacific-North America angular velocity differs significantly from NUVEL-1A, our model and NUVEL-1A predict very small differences in relative motion along the Pacific-North America plate boundary itself. Our Pacific-Australia and Pacific- Eurasia angular velocities are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, predicting more rapid convergence at these two plate boundaries. Along the East Pacific Pise, our Pacific-Nazca angular velocity agrees in both rate and azimuth with NUVFL-1A.

  19. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  20. Pore Fluid Pressure and State of Stress Above the Plate Interface from Observations in a 3 Kilometer Deep Borehole: IODP Site C0002, Nankai Trough Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, H. J.; Saffer, D. M.; Hirose, T.; Castillo, D. A.; Kitajima, H.; Sone, H.

    2014-12-01

    During IODP Expedition 348 from October 2013 to January 2014, Site C0002 was drilled to more than 3000 meters' depth into the inner accretionary wedge at the Nankai Trough, setting a new depth record for scientific ocean drilling. It is the first hole to access the deep interior of an active convergent margin. Site C0002 is part of the NanTroSEIZE project off the Kii-Kumano region of Japan, designed to shed light on plate boundary fault zone processes near the up-dip edge of seismogenic locking and slip. The zone from 865 - 3056 meters below the sea floor was sampled via logging-while-drilling measurements, continuous sampling of drill cuttings, and limited coring. This interval was composed of lithified middle to late Miocene hemipelagic sediments and turbidites that are markedly deformed and dip steeply. P-wave speeds from sonic logs increase with depth to ~ 1600 meters, but are constant to slightly decreasing with depth from 1600 to 3050 meters. We hypothesize that this change in trend indicates the onset of elevated pore fluid pressure, but structural and lithologic factors may also play a role. We explore several methods for quantitative estimation of sonic-derived fluid pressure conditions in the inner wedge. A borehole leak-off test (LOT) and a series of borehole pressurization and injection tests were also performed, which we synthesize to estimate the least principal stress, or Shmin. Furthermore, downhole pressure while drilling (PWD) measurements recorded during borehole packoff events provide information on the maximum principal stress, SHmax. Taken together, the LOT and PWD observations suggest that the inner wedge at ~ 2000 meters depth is currently in a strike-slip stress regime, despite its position as the hanging wall of a main plate boundary thrust. This may be a transitional stress regime between shallow normal and deep thrust, controlled by depth-dependent magnitude of the tectonic convergence-related principal stress. Our results document for

  1. Overriding Plate Controls on Subduction Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharples, W. K.; Jadamec, M. A.; Moresi, L. N.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic data, rock deformation experiments, and geochemical studies indicate variability in the thickness, buoyancy, and strength of the lithosphere at plate boundaries. However, geodynamic models of subduction commonly either omit an overriding plate or do not investigate role of the variation in overriding plate properties on the subduction evolution. We present time-dependent numerical models of subduction that vary the overriding plate thickness, strength, and density and allow for a plate interface that evolves with time via an anisotropic brittle failure rheology. We examine the emergence of (a) asymmetric versus symmetric subduction, (b) trench retreat versus advance, (c) subduction zone geometry, (d) slab stagnation versus penetration into the lower mantle, and (e) flat slab subduction. The majority of the models result in sustained asymmetric subduction. The models demonstrate that trench retreat is correlated with a thin overriding plate, whereas, trench advance is correlated with a thick and/or strong overriding plate. Slab dip, measured at a depth below the plate boundary interface, has a negative correlation with an increase in overriding plate thickness. Overriding plate thickness exerts a first order control over slab penetration into the lower mantle, with penetration most commonly occurring in models with a thick overriding plate. Periods of flat slab subduction occur with thick, strong overriding plates producing strong plate boundary interface coupling. The results provide insight into how the overriding plate plays a role in establishing advancing and retreating subduction, as well as providing an explanation for the variation of slab geometry observed in subduction zones on Earth.

  2. Swan probe: A nanoliter-scale and high-throughput sampling interface for coupling electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with microfluidic droplet array and multiwell plate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di-Qiong; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2014-11-01

    Mass spectrometry provides a versatile detection method for high-throughput drug screening because it permits the use of native biological substrates and the direct quantification of unlabeled reaction products. This paper describes the design and application of a Swan-shaped probe for high-throughput and nanoliter-scale analysis of biological samples in both a microfluidic droplet array and a multiwell plate with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The Swan probe is fabricated using a single capillary with quite low cost, and it consists of a U-shaped section with a micrometer-sized hole for sampling and a tapered tip for sample electrospray ionization. Continuous sample introduction was carried out under both sampling modes of push-pull and spontaneous injection by sequentially dipping the probe in the sample solutions and then removing them. High-throughput and reliable ESI-MS analysis was achieved in analyzing 256 droplets within 90 min with a peak height RSD of 12.6% (n = 256). To validate its potential in drug discovery, the present system was applied in the screening of inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and the measurement of the IC50 values of identified inhibitors. PMID:25302930

  3. High Stress Consolidation, Ultrasonic, and Permeability Measurements: Constraints on Physical Properties and In Situ Stress along the Costa Rica Subduction Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winner, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Valdez, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment permeability and consolidation behavior are key parameters in governing the drainage state and thus potential for excess pore fluid pressure in subduction zones. Elevated pore pressure, in turn, is one important control on the strength and sliding behavior of faults. Along many subduction margins, evidence of elevated, near-lithostatic, in situ pore pressure comes from high seismic reflectivity, low P-wave velocity (Vp), and high Vp/Vs ratios. This inference is broadly supported by numerical modeling studies that indicate elevated pore pressures are likely given high rates of burial and tectonic loading, combined with the low permeability of marine mudstones. Here, we report on a series of high-stress consolidation experiments on sediment core samples from the incoming Cocos plate obtained as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344. Our experiments were designed to measure the consolidation behavior, permeability, and P-wave velocity of the incoming sediments over a range of confining stresses from .5 to 90 MPa. We explore a range of paths,including isostatic loading (σ1=σ2=σ3), K0 consolidation, in which the ratio of σ3/σ1 is maintained at ~0.6, and the trixial loading paths designed to maintain a near critical-state failure condition. In our tests, load is increased in a series of steps. After equilibration at each step, we conduct constant head permeability tests, and measure P-wave velocities in a "time of flight" mode. Initial results from isostatic loading tests on hemipelagic mudstone samples from 34 mbsf document consolidation and permeability-porosity trends, in which porosity decreases from 69% to 54% as stress in increased from .5 MPa to 15 MPa, and permeability decreases from 8.1 X 10-18 m2 at 1 MPa to 1.1 X 10-19 m2 at 15 MPa. P-wave velocity increases by 486-568 km/s over this effective stress range. Ultimately, data from our experiments will provide a robust basis for quantifying fluid content and pressure from

  4. Vibroacoustical behaviour of multilayered heterogeneous plates with elastic support and interface condition: Application to the case of the double-deck French high- speed train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaud, Thierry Rene

    1998-10-01

    Mass Transit has to meet specifications of increasing difficulty which put in the forefront areas which were before considered as secondary. In particular, passengers acoustic comfort has become a major criterion, reflecting the requirements for quality transportation. The present work has its origin in this specific context and more specially in the intention of FAIVELEY TRANSPORT, a Railway equipment supplier, to improve the acoustic behaviour of its products. The aim of this study is the comprehension of the physical phenomena of the noise transmission through the doors of the transport vehicles, from outside to inside. The Railway access doors are the main application of this work. The considered frequency range is low frequencies below 500 Hz. The final objective is to notably reduce the transmitted noise in order to improve the passengers' acoustic comfort inside the transport vehicles. To do this, we developed a model based on an analytical integro-modal approach, associated with a Rayleigh-Ritz approximation. The original aspect of this work is to develop a model of a vibrating structure which take into account its multilayered and heterogeneous aspects and its complex boundary and interface conditions (linear and punctual elastic stiffness). This model is the basis of a specific software for preliminary design studies (VANTAIL) which is able to indicate, with a parametric study, the contribution of each different part of the doors to the global vibroacoustic behaviour. An experimental study on an industrial structure (the access door of the double deck French high speed train) permits us to validate the developed software, to define its limits and to validate the proposed vibroacoustic treatments.

  5. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  6. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plate, with a transition from subduction of Pacific oceanic lithosphere beneath North Island, to oblique continental collision in South Island. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone up to 250 km wide, with displacements on individual faults up to 100s of kilometres. Active deformation must be driven by a combination of plate-boundary forces and internal buoyancy forces. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses, together with simple Airy isostasy, to determine regional crustal and mantle structure. Integration of the vertical normal stress to the base of the deforming layer yields the buoyancy stress. Horizontal gradients of this can be compared with horizontal gradients of strain rate, using the method of England & Molnar (1997), in the context of a simple thin sheet model of deformation. Thus, if deformation is that of a Newtonian fluid, then appropriate combinations of the horizontal gradients of vorticity and dilatation are related to gradients of buoyancy stress by the fluid viscosity. However, the short term geodetic deformation is strongly biased by elastic strain accumulation related to locking on the plate interface, and cannot be used to determine the plate-boundary velocity field averaged over many seismic cycles (see Lamb & Smith 2013). Therefore, I derive here a velocity field for the plate-boundary zone, which is representative of deformation over tens of thousands of years. This is based on an inversion of fault slip, strain rate azimuth and paleomagnetic data, in the context of the short term relative plate motions, solved in a network of triangles spanning the plate-boundary, using the method of Lamb (2000). A comparison of gradients of buoyancy stress with the appropriate combinations of gradients of vorticity and dilatation shows that deformation in

  7. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2012 Philippine Sea plate and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoczyk, Gregory M.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Benz, Harley M.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    The complex tectonics surrounding the Philippine Islands are dominated by the interactions of the Pacific, Sunda, and Eurasia plates with the Philippine Sea plate (PSP). The latter is unique because it is almost exclusively surrounded by zones of plate convergence. At its eastern and southeastern edges, the Pacific plate is subducted beneath the PSP at the Izu-Bonin, Mariana, and Yap trenches. Here, the subduction zone exhibits high rates of seismic activity to depths of over 600 km, though no great earthquakes (M>8.0) have been observed, likely because of weak coupling along the plate interface. In the northeast, the PSP subducts beneath Japan and the eastern margin of the Eurasia plate at the Nankai and Ryukyu trenches, extending westward to Taiwan. The Nankai portion of this subduction zone has hosted some of the largest earthquakes along the margins of the PSP, including a pair of Mw8.1 megathrust events in 1944 and 1946. Along its western margin, the convergence of the PSP and the Sunda plate is responsible for a broad and active plate boundary system extending along both sides of the Philippine Islands chain. The region is characterized by opposite-facing subduction systems on the east and west sides of the islands, and the archipelago is cut by a major transform structure: the Philippine Fault. Subduction of the Philippine Sea plate occurs at the eastern margin of the islands along the Philippine Trench and its northern extension, the East Luzon Trough. On the west side of Luzon, the Sunda Plate subducts eastward along a series of trenches, including the Manila Trench in the north, the smaller Negros Trench in the central Philippines, and the Sulu and Cotabato trenches in the south. Twentieth and early twentyfirst century seismic activity along the boundaries of the Philippine Sea plate has produced seven great (M>8.0) earthquakes and 250 large (M>7) events. Among the most destructive events were the 1923 Kanto, the 1948 Fukui, and the 1995 Kobe, Japan

  8. Present-day kinematics of the Rivera plate and implications for tectonics in southwestern Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Stein, Seth

    1990-01-01

    A model for the present-day motion of the Rivera plate relative to the North America, Cocos, and Pacific plates is derived using new data from the Pacific-Rivera rise and Rivera transform fault, together with new estimates of Pacific-Rivera motions. The results are combined with the closure-consistent NUVEL-1 global plate motion model of DeMets et al. (1990) to examine present-day deformation in southwestern Mexico. The analysis addresses several questions raised in previous studies of the Rivera plate. Namely, do plate motion data from the northern East Pacific rise require a distinct Rivera plate? Do plate kinematic data require the subduction of the Rivera plate along the seismically quiescent Acapulco trench? If so, what does the predicted subduction rate imply about the earthquake recurrence interval in the Jalisco region of southwestern Mexico?

  9. Present-day kinematics of the Rivera plate and implications for tectonics in southwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, Charles; Stein, Seth

    1990-12-01

    A model for the present-day motion of the Rivera plate relative to the North America, Cocos, and Pacific plates is derived using new data from the Pacific-Rivera rise and Rivera transform fault, together with new estimates of Pacific-Rivera motions. The results are combined with the closure-consistent NUVEL-1 global plate motion model of DeMets et al. (1990) to examine present-day deformation in southwestern Mexico. The analysis addresses several questions raised in previous studies of the Rivera plate. Namely, do plate motion data from the northern East Pacific rise require a distinct Rivera plate? Do plate kinematic data require the subduction of the Rivera plate along the seismically quiescent Acapulco trench? If so, what does the predicted subduction rate imply about the earthquake recurrence interval in the Jalisco region of southwestern Mexico?

  10. No-net-rotation model of current plate velocities incorporating plate motion model NUVEL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Gordon, Richard G.

    1991-01-01

    NNR-NUVEL1 is presented which is a model of plate velocities relative to the unique reference frame defined by requiring no-net-rotation of the lithosphere while constraining relative plate velocities to equal those in global plate motion model NUVEL-1 (DeMets et al., 1990). In NNR-NUVEL1, the Pacific plate rotates in a right-handed sense relative to the no-net-rotation reference frame at 0.67 deg/m.y. about 63 deg S, 107 deg E. At Hawaii the Pacific plate moves relative to the no-net-rotation reference frame at 70 mm/yr, which is 25 mm/yr slower than the Pacific plate moves relative to the hotspots. Differences between NNR-NUVEL1 and HS2-NUVEL1 are described. The no-net-rotation reference frame differs significantly from the hotspot reference frame. If the difference between reference frames is caused by motion of the hotspots relative to a mean-mantle reference frame, then hotspots beneath the Pacific plate move with coherent motion towards the east-southeast. Alternatively, the difference between reference frames can show that the uniform drag, no-net-torque reference frame, which is kinematically equivalent to the no-net-rotation reference frame, is based on a dynamically incorrect premise.

  11. Complete 40Ar resetting in an ultracataclasite by reactivation of a fossil seismogenic fault along the subducting plate interface in the Mugi Mélange of the Shimanto accretionary complex, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonai, Satoshi; Ito, Shun; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tamura, Hajimu; Tomioka, Naotaka

    2016-08-01

    We used the K-Ar ages of clay-sized mineral grains to investigate the timing of activity on the Minami-Awa Fault, which is a fossil seismogenic fault along a subducting plate interface separating the coherent strata of the Shimanto accretionary complex to the north from the tectonic mélange to the south. The K-Ar ages from the matrix shale of the mélange range from 85 to 48 Ma and decrease with decreasing amount of detrital mica, indicating that they record a mixture of authigenic illite related to burial diagenesis and detrital mica. In contrast, the K-Ar ages of an ultracataclasite within the fault core are significantly younger, ranging from 29 to 23 Ma, and are unrelated to grain size and amount of detrital mica. This indicates that s Ar diffused completely from the ultracataclasite between 29 and 23 Ma, which postdates the formation of authigenic illite by at least several million years. The diffusion of 40Ar in the ultracataclasite was probably caused by frictional heating or high-temperature fluid migration that occurred when the fault was reactivated. The results indicate that seismogenic faults that separate tectonic mélange from coherent strata in accretionary complexes may slip, not only during accretion, but also long after accretion.

  12. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.; Farrell, T.; Goodwin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  13. Peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babecki, A. J. (Inventor); Haehner, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A process for metal plating which comprises spraying a mixture of metallic powder and small peening particles at high velocity against a surface is described. The velocity must be sufficient to impact and bond metallic powder onto the surface. In the case of metal surfaces, the process has as one of its advantages providing mechanical working (hardening) of the surface simultaneously with the metal plating.

  14. Plate-induced Miocene extension in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, W.D. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA )

    1992-01-01

    Miocene crustal extension in southern California can be explained by the interaction of tectonic plates in relative motion. The Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Farallon (Guadalupe) plates are represented by flat elastic plates surrounded by an infinite elastic plate, the eastern part of which represents the North America plate. Forcing is by assigned subduction pull, and tractions at all plate boundaries satisfy a viscous constitutive law. Plate bottoms are stress-free. In the first part of the solution plate velocities and boundary tractions are found from static equilibrium. Then principal horizontal stresses and strains in plate interiors caused by tractions and subduction pull are found by a boundary element procedure. Using plate boundary geometry from Stock and Hodges for early- and mid-Miocene times, it is found that the portion of the North America plate margin between the Mendocino and Rivera triple junctions has maximum extensional strain directed westward. This result is generally consistent with directions associated with metamorphic core complex formation in southern California. The model is also consistent with extensional strain and rotation sense of crustal blocks in the vicinity of Los Angeles, as inferred by Luyendyk and others from paleomagnetic data. In the model the greatest extensional strain of the North America plate occurs near the Pacific-North America transform, in the area above the absent Farallon slab. Extension direction varies from northwest to southwest according to plate geometry, subduction pull (Juan de Fuca and Guadalupe), and plate boundary tractions.

  15. Coseismic Slip Distribution of the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake Deduced from Land and Seafloor Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, T.; Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Inazu, D.; Ohzono, M.; Tsushima, H.; Hino, R.; Ohta, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Miura, S.; Shinohara, M.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (M9.0) occurred on 11 March 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku district, northeastern Japan, where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the overriding continental plate. A number of models of the coseismic slip distribution of this earthquake have been already proposed based on seismological, geodetic, and tsunami data. Here, we present comprehensive coseismic slip distribution model based not only on land GPS data but also on seafloor geodetic observations, which are obtained through recent observation cruises. We combined displacements at seafloor sites that are deduced from two different types of seafloor observations with the displacements at land GPS stations. One is the seafloor crustal deformation observation with GPS/Acoustic ranging (GPS/A). Horizontal displacements associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake at 2 GPS/A stations are estimated by comparing the station positions deduced from the observations before and after the earthquake. Another type of the seafloor data is seafloor water pressure that is observed by means of ocean bottom pressure gauge (OBP). We analyzed OBP data observed at 2 cabled and 4 self pop-up stations, and estimated vertical displacements due to the main shock. Displacements at 5 GPS/A stations of Japan Coast Guard [Sato et al., 2011, science] are also included to estimate the coseismic slip distribution of the earthquake. Estimated slip distribution of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake shows following features. 1) The area of large slip ( > 20 m) is about 100 km x 200 km on the plate interface shallower than 30 km in depth. 2) There is no large slip occurred off southern Iwate prefecture on the plate interface throughout shallow to deep. 3) The latitudinal range of the area of large slip almost corresponds to the one of the area of strong interplate coupling zone off Miyagi prefecture. 4) Significant slip is estimated around the rupture area of 1978 M7.4 Miyagi-oki earthquake (40

  16. Northern East Pacific Rise: Evolution from 25 m.y. B.P. to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammerickx, Jacqueline; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1982-08-01

    The northeast Pacific topography and magnetic lineations (25 m.y. B.P. to the Present) record the traces of three major spreading reorganizations. Only one spreading center is observed today, but there is evidence for several ephemeral episodes of twin spreading accompanying the evolution from an extensive Pacific-Guadalupe plate boundary to a much shortened Pacific-Cocos and Pacific-Rivera plate boundary. The 25 m.y. B.P. plate reorganization culminated with the formation of the Guadalupe plate, bound by the Murray fracture zone to the north and the Cocos-Nazca spreading ridge to the south. Between 25 and 12.5 m.y. B.P. spreading continued while the plate retained the same general outline. The 12.5-11 m.y. B.P. reorganization resulted in the creation of a much shortened Pacific-Cocos plate boundary located in its early stages over the Mathematician seamounts and a much reduced Cocos-plate. The last reorganizaton (6.5-3.5 m.y. B.P.) resulted in the abandonment of the Mathematician spreading ridge as a Pacific-Cocos plate boundary in favor of the East Pacific Rise.

  17. Northern east Pacific rise: Evolution from 25 m. y. B. P. to the present

    SciTech Connect

    Mammerickx, J.; Klitgord, K.D.

    1982-08-10

    The northeast Pacific topography and magnetic lineations (25 m.y. B.P. to the Present) record the traces of three major spreading reorganizations. Only one spreading center is observed today, but there is evidence for several ephemeral episodes of twin spreading accompanying the evolution from an extensive Pacific-Guadalupe plate boundary to a much shortened Pacific-Cocos and Pacific-Rivera plate boundary. The 25 m.y. B.P. plate reorganization culminated with the formation of the Guadalupe plate, bound by the Murray fracture zone to the north and the Cocos-Nazca spreading ridge to the south. Between 25 and 12.5 m.y. B.P. spreading continued while the plate retained the same general outline. The 12.5--11 m.y. B.P. reorganization resulted in the creation of a much shortened Pacific-Cocos plate boundary located in its early stages over the Mathematician seamounts and a much reduced Cocos-plate. The last reorganization (6.5--3.5 m.y. B.P.) resulted in the abandonment of the Mathematician spreading ridge as a Pacific-Cocos plate boundary in favor of the East Pacific Rise.

  18. Volcanism in response to plate flexure.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoto; Takahashi, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Junji; Abe, Natsue; Ingle, Stephanie P; Kaneoka, Ichiro; Hirata, Takafumi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ishii, Teruaki; Ogawa, Yujiro; Machida, Shiki; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    2006-09-01

    Volcanism on Earth is known to occur in three tectonic settings: divergent plate boundaries (such as mid-ocean ridges), convergent plate boundaries (such as island arcs), and hot spots. We report volcanism on the 135 million-year-old Pacific Plate not belonging to any of these categories. Small alkalic volcanoes form from small percent melts and originate in the asthenosphere, as implied by their trace element geochemistry and noble gas isotopic compositions. We propose that these small volcanoes erupt along lithospheric fractures in response to plate flexure during subduction. Minor extents of asthenospheric melting and the volcanoes' tectonic alignment and age progression in the direction opposite to that of plate motion provide evidence for the presence of a small percent melt in the asthenosphere. PMID:16873612

  19. Plating on some difficult-to-plate metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1980-02-01

    Electrodeposition of coatings on metals such as beryllium, beryllium-copper, Kovar, lead, magnesium, thorium, titanium, tungsten, uranium, zirconium, and their alloys can be problematic. This is due in most cases to a natural oxide surface film that readily reforms after being removed. The procedures we recommend for plating on these metals rely on replacing the oxide film with a displacement coating, or etching to allow mechanical keying between the substrate and plated deposit. The effectiveness of the procedures is demonstrated by interface bond strengths found in ring-shear and conical-head tensile tests.

  20. Late Tectonic history of Beaufort Sea - North Pacific area

    SciTech Connect

    McWhae, J.R.H.

    1985-02-01

    The Kaltag fault (and its northern associated splay, the Rapid fault array) is the sheared suture between the Eurasian-Alaskan plate and the North American plate in the area between the Mackenzie Delta and the Alaskan Border. This condition has been maintained throughout considerable additional phases of faulting and folding from mid-Cretaceous to the present. Previously, the Alaskan plate had been the northwestern nose of the North America plate. The interplate suture was deflected to the north as the Canadian Shield was approached. The Kaltag fault continued northeastward 2000 km seaward of the Sverdrup rim, northwest of the Canadian Arctic Island, and north of Greenland. The driving force was directed from the southwest by the Eurasian plate after its collision in Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) with the North American plate and the docking of north-moving exotic terranes from the Pacific. During the early Tertiary, perhaps in concert with the accretion of the Okhotsk block to the Asian plate north of Japan, the northern Pacific subduction zone jumped southward to the Aleutian Arc where it has persisted until today. A distance of 800 km separates the stable shelf of the Canadian craton, at the Alberta Foothills thrust belt, from the subduction zone off Vancouver Island. The foreland thrust belt and the accretion of exotic terranes in Mesozoic and Tertiary times extended the continental crust of the North American plate westward to the present active transform margin with the Pacific plate along the Queen Charlotte fault zone.

  1. The present-day number of tectonic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    2016-03-01

    The number of tectonic plates on Earth described in the literature has expanded greatly since the start of the plate tectonic era, when only about a dozen plates were considered in global models of present-day plate motions. With new techniques of more accurate earthquake epicenter locations, modern ways of measuring ocean bathymetry using swath mapping, and the use of space based geodetic techniques, there has been a huge growth in the number of plates thought to exist. The study by Bird (2003) proposed 52 plates, many of which were delineated on the basis of earthquake locations. Because of the pattern of areas of these plates, he suggested that there should be more small plates than he could identify. In this paper, I gather together publications that have proposed a total of 107 new plates, giving 159 plates in all. The largest plate (Pacific) is about 20 % of the Earth's area or 104 Mm2, and the smallest of which (Plate number 5 from Hammond et al. 2011) is only 273 km2 in area. Sorting the plates by size allows us to investigate how size varies as a function of order. There are several changes of slope in the plots of plate number organized by size against plate size order which are discussed. The sizes of the largest seven plates is constrained by the area of the Earth. A middle set of 73 plates down to an area of 97,563 km2 (the Danakil plate at number 80, is the plate of median size) follows a fairly regular pattern of plate size as a function of plate number. For smaller plates, there is a break in the slope of the plate size/plate number plot and the next 32 plates follow a pattern of plate size proposed by the models of Koehn et al. (2008) down to an area of 11,638 km2 (West Mojave plate # 112). Smaller plates do not follow any regular pattern of area as a function of plate number, probably because we have not sampled enough of these very small plates to reveal any clear pattern.

  2. Aqueous Solutions and their Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-04-02

    Preface of the special issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry in conjunction with the international workshop "Aqueous Solutions and their Interfaces". The topics include the structure of liquid water, the analysis of X-ray and neutron scattering experimental data, the vibrational spectroscopy of liquid water, the structure and spectroscopy of aqueous interfaces and the development of theoretical approaches to model the structure and spectra of liquid water and interfaces. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  3. Relationship between temperatures and fault slips on the upper surface of the subducting Philippine Sea plate beneath the Kanto district, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shoichi; Takagi, Rumi; Matsumoto, Takumi

    2015-05-01

    To elucidate the relationship between interplate temperatures and generation mechanisms for megathrust earthquakes and slow slip events (SSEs) in the Kanto district, central Japan, we performed numerical simulations on the thermal state. For this purpose, we newly developed a 2-D box-type thermal convection model that is able to handle the subduction of two oceanic plates: the young oceanic Philippine Sea (PHS) plate subducts following subduction of the old oceanic Pacific (PAC) plate beneath it. To constrain temperatures on the upper surface of the PHS plate, we used high-density Hi-net heat flow data on land. We found that low heat flow in the Kanto district was caused mostly by subduction of the cold PHS plate. To explain the heat flow distribution in the Kanto district in more detail, we needed to incorporate frictional heating at the plate interface on the seaward side of the corner of the mantle wedge, and temperature changes due to surface erosion and sedimentation associated with crustal deformation during the Quaternary on land into the models. The most suitable pore pressure ratio to explain the heat flow data was 0.98. The thermally estimated seismogenic zone corresponded well to the fault planes of the 1923 Taisho Kanto earthquake and the western half of the 1707 Genroku Kanto earthquake. The eastern half of the fault plane of the 1707 Genroku Kanto earthquake could be divided into two areas; the northwestern fault plane corresponded to the thermally estimated seismogenic zone, whereas the relationship between the southeastern fault plane and interplate temperatures was ambiguous. The off-Boso SSEs occurred on the plate interface at temperatures lower than approximately 250 °C, and the slipped region passed through the 150 °C isotherm, corresponding to the clay mineral phase transformation from smectite to illite. This might suggest that the SSEs occurred in relation to a dehydration process.

  4. Flexure and rheology of Pacific oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Johnny; Watts, Tony

    2016-04-01

    The idea of a rigid lithosphere that supports loads through flexural isostasy was first postulated in the late 19th century. Since then, there has been much effort to investigate the spatial and temporal variation of the lithosphere's flexural rigidity, and to understand how these variations are linked to its rheology. We have used flexural modelling to first re-assess the variation in the rigidity of oceanic lithosphere with its age at the time of loading, and then to constrain mantle rheology by testing the predictions of laboratory-derived flow laws. A broken elastic plate model was used to model trench-normal, ensemble-averaged profiles of satellite-derived gravity at the trench-outer rise system of circum-Pacific subduction zones, where an inverse procedure was used to find the best-fit Te and loading conditions. The results show a first-order increase in Te with plate age, which is best fit by the depth to the 400 ± 35°C plate-cooling isotherm. Fits to the observed gravity are significantly improved by an elastic plate that weakens landward of the outer rise, which suggests that bending-induced plate weakening is a ubiquitous feature of circum-Pacific subduction zones. Two methods were used to constrain mantle rheology. In the first, the Te derived by modelling flexural observations was compared to the Te predicted by laboratory-derived yield strength envelopes. In the second, flexural observations were modelled using elastic-plastic plates with laboratory-derived, depth-dependent yield strength. The results show that flow laws for low-temperature plasticity of dry olivine provide a good fit to the observations at circum-Pacific subduction zones, but are much too strong to fit observations of flexure in the Hawaiian Islands region. We suggest that this discrepancy can be explained by differences in the timescale of loading combined with moderate thermal rejuvenation of the Hawaiian lithosphere.

  5. Shells on a Sphere: Tectonic Plate Motion and Plate Boundary Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Edwin Victor, III

    Plate motion models have matured from being based only on geology and seismicity to incorporating space-based geodetic methods like GPS. I use a block modeling approach to incorporate both rigid block rotation and near-boundary elastic strain accumulation effects in a formal inversion of GPS velocities. Independent Okhotsk and Amurian microplate motions are tested using GPS velocities that constrain the plate kinematics of northeast Asia. Modeling favors scenarios with independent OKH and AMU motion, based on the application of F-test statistics. The plate-motion parameters of the independent plates are consistent with the kinematics inferred from earthquake focal mechanism solutions along their boundaries. GPS-measured velocities (15 from continuously recording stations within the stable India plate interior) geodetically constrain India plate motion, intraplate strain, and plate boundary deformation around the India plate. Dense station coverage from previously published studies allows rigorous testing of boundary parameterizations. I develop robust India plate motion parameters and see good agreement between predicted plate directions from the preferred model and the seismological data. Available GPS data in and around the Aegean region is combined and used to evaluate plate motion models, elastic plate boundary deformation and its relationship to seismogenic coupling along the Hellenic subduction zone. The A.D. 365 M ˜8.4, the A.D. 1303 M˜8 Crete suggest that portions of the plate interface must be locked. The primary focus of this study is to examine potential upper plate deformation resulting from a locked subduction interface, active hanging-wall extension, or both. I consider multiple model scenarios in an attempt to interpret the both the horizontal and vertical geodetic signals in the region and its implications for earthquake hazard assessment.

  6. Circum-Pacific diatomite deposits

    SciTech Connect

    North, F.K.

    1986-07-01

    Deformed diatomites of assured identification are all Oligocene or younger. They are not to be interpreted with oceanic diatom oozes as analogs, nor with California's Monterey Formation as prototype. All examples, apart from the unique Monterey, are deposits of relatively shallow waters at convergent plate or microplate boundaries: in arc-trench gaps or (less importantly) in immediate back-arc belts. Tethyan examples, along a collision boundary, are now slivers in the late stages of external flysch along the fronts of Alpine thrust belts. Circum-Pacific examples, at ocean-continent subduction boundaries, are preserved only on mountainous islands or peninsulas, the uplift (not folding) of which has protected the diatomites and their overlying evaporites from subduction. The control is tectonic and volcanic, not by water temperature or eustatism. Preserved deposits appear to be restricted to particular segments of the Pacific boundary delineated by Benioff zones having some significant minimum dip. The unique Monterey Formation owes its spectacular development and preservation to the conversion of an arc-trench boundary to a transform boundary, at a triple junction, before the diatomite was deposited. The Monterey's importance as an oil source sediment does not stem from its true diatomite component. Other Circum-Pacific diatomites are of negligible significance to the petroleum geologist, but are potentially minable for other uses in Japan, the Philippines, and Peru, and possibly in Chile.

  7. Environmental materials and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig.

  8. Recent movements of the Juan de Fuca Plate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-08-01

    Analysis of the magnetic anomalies of the Juan de Fuca plate system allows instantaneous poles of rotation relative to the Pacific plate to be calculated from 7 Ma to the present. By combining these with global solutions for Pacific America and ``absolute'' (relative to hot spot) motions, a plate motion sequence can be constructed. This sequence shows that both absolute motions and motions relative to America are characterized by slower velocities where younger and more buoyant material enters the convergence zone: ``pivoting subduction.'' The resistance provided by the youngest portion of the Juan de Fuca plate apparently resulted in its detachment at 4 Ma as the independent Explorer plate. In relation to the hot spot framework, this plate almost immediately began to rotate clockwise around a pole close to itself such that its translational movement into the mantle virtually ceased. After 4 Ma the remainder of the Juan de Fuca plate adjusted its motion in response to the fact that the youngest material entering the subduction zone was not to the south. Differences in seismicity and recent uplift between northern and southern Vancourver Island may reflect a distinction in tectonic style between the ``normal'' subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate to the south and a complex ``underplating occurring as the Explorer plate is overridden by the continent. The history of the Explorer plate may exemplify the conditins under which the self-driving forces of small subducting plates are overcome by the influence of larger, adjacent plates. The recent rapid migration of the absolute pole of rotation of the Juan de Fuca plate toward the plate suggests that it, too, may be nearing this condition.

  9. Recent movements of the Juan de Fuca Plate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddihough, Robin

    1984-08-01

    Analysis of the magnetic anomalies of the Juan de Fuca plate system allows instantaneous poles of rotation relative to the Pacific plate to be calculated from 7 Ma to the present. By combining these with global solutions for Pacific/America and "absolute" (relative to hot spot) motions, a plate motion sequence can be constructed. This sequence shows that both absolute motions and motions relative to America are characterized by slower velocities where younger and more buoyant material enters the convergence zone: "pivoting subduction." The resistance provided by the youngest portion of the Juan de Fuca plate apparently resulted in its detachment at 4 Ma as the independent Explorer plate. In relation to the hot spot framework, this plate almost immediately began to rotate clockwise around a pole close to itself such that its translational movement into the mantle virtually ceased. After 4 Ma the remainder of the Juan de Fuca plate adjusted its motion in response to the fact that the youngest material entering the subduction zone was now to the south. Differences in seismicity and recent uplift between northern and southern Vancouver Island may reflect a distinction in tectonic style between the "normal" subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate to the south and a complex "underplating" occurring as the Explorer plate is overridden by the continent. The history of the Explorer plate may exemplify the conditions under which the self-driving forces of small subducting plates are overcome by the influence of larger, adjacent plates. The recent rapid migration of the absolute pole of rotation of the Juan de Fuca plate toward the plate suggests that it, too, may be nearing this condition.

  10. Stochastic modelling of a large subduction interface earthquake in Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois-Holden, C.; Zhao, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Wellington region, home of New Zealand's capital city, is cut by a number of major right-lateral strike slip faults, and is underlain by the currently locked west-dipping subduction interface between the down going Pacific Plate, and the over-riding Australian Plate. A potential cause of significant earthquake loss in the Wellington region is a large magnitude (perhaps 8+) "subduction earthquake" on the Australia-Pacific plate interface, which lies ~23 km beneath Wellington City. "It's Our Fault" is a project involving a comprehensive study of Wellington's earthquake risk. Its objective is to position Wellington city to become more resilient, through an encompassing study of the likelihood of large earthquakes, and the effects and impacts of these earthquakes on humans and the built environment. As part of the "It's Our Fault" project, we are working on estimating ground motions from potential large plate boundary earthquakes. We present the latest results on ground motion simulations in terms of response spectra and acceleration time histories. First we characterise the potential interface rupture area based on previous geodetically-derived estimates interface of slip deficit. Then, we entertain a suitable range of source parameters, including various rupture areas, moment magnitudes, stress drops, slip distributions and rupture propagation directions. Our comprehensive study also includes simulations from historical large world subduction events translated into the New Zealand subduction context, such as the 2003 M8.3 Tokachi-Oki Japan earthquake and the M8.8 2010 Chili earthquake. To model synthetic seismograms and the corresponding response spectra we employed the EXSIM code developed by Atkinson et al. (2009), with a regional attenuation model based on the 3D attenuation model for the lower North-Island which has been developed by Eberhart-Phillips et al. (2005). The resulting rupture scenarios all produce long duration shaking, and peak ground

  11. Intrinsic component mode synthesis and plate vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourquin, F.; D'Hennezel, F.

    1992-07-01

    A 'fixed-interface' method of component mode synthesis is presented and employed to compute error bounds for the case of Kirchhoff plates. The fixed-interface method exploits particular 'constraint modes' that are used as eigenfunctions for the Poincare-Steklov operator in the domain decomposition. The technique is applied to the computation of error bounds and coupling modes for several variants of plate problems. The definition and number of the component modes required for accurate mode synthesis does not depend on the selected discretization process. This allows the fixed-interface technique to be used for the effective treatment of large 3D elasticity problems with a large number of unknown interfaces.

  12. Pacific subduction and Mesozoic mineralization in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Ling, M.; Liang, H.; Ding, X.; Fan, W.; Yang, X.

    2009-12-01

    Northeastern China is well known for the removal of subcontinental lithosphere mantle of the North China craton in the Late Mesozoic and the Cretaceous giant igneous event, while southeastern China is famous for its large scale magmatism and mineralization from the Late Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous. All these can be plausibly interpreted by the interaction between eastern China and the subducting Pacific plate. From Jurassic to Cretaceous, Eastern China was related to the subduction of the Pacific plate under Eurasia in the south, concurrent with oblique subduction of the Izanagi plate in the north (Maruyama et al., 1997; Li and Li, 2007; Sun et al., 2007; Zhou et al., 2000). Cretaceous tectonic evolution of eastern China matches remarkably well with the drifting history of the Pacific plate. The most pronounced phenomena are: (1) eastern China large-scale orogenic lode gold (Au) mineralisation occurred contemporaneously with an abrupt change of ~80 degree in the drifting direction of the subducting Pacific plate, concurrent with the formation of the Ontong Java Plateau (Sun et al., 2007); (2) the subduction of the ridge between the Pacific and Izanagi Plates can plausibly explain the mineralization and rock distribution of the Lower Yangtze River mineralization belt (Ling et al., 2009); (3) southwestward subduction of the Pacific plate and corresponding slab rollback can feasibly interprete the formation of the late Mesozoic (180-125 Ma) magmatism and metallogenic events in SE China. Reference Li, Z. X., and Li, X. H., 2007, Formation of the 1300-km-wide intracontinental orogen and postorogenic magmatic province in Mesozoic South China: A flat-slab subduction model: Geology, v. 35, p. 179-182. Ling, M. X., Wang, F. Y., Ding, X., Hu, Y. H., Zhou, J. B., Zartman, R. E., Yang, X. Y., and Sun, W. D., 2009, Cretaceous ridge subduction along the Lower Yangtze River Belt, eastern China: Economic Geology, v. 104, p. 303-321. Maruyama, S., 1997, Pacific-type orogeny

  13. High-frequency Pn,Sn phases recorded by ocean bottom seismometers on the Cocos plate

    SciTech Connect

    McCreery, C.S.

    1981-05-01

    Data from ocean bottom seismometers located on the Cocos plate indicate that high-frequency Pn,Sn phases are generated by earthquakes along the subducting margin of that plate and are propagated across the plate. The Sn phase appears to be severely attenuated as it approaches the ridge crest. Estimates of Pn velocity are lower than previous extimates for western Pacific paths, which may indicate a relationship between Pn,Sn velocity and lithospheric age. High frequencies found in these phases suggest that Q for Pn,Sn propagation across the Cocos plate is similar to that for the western Pacific.

  14. Geodynamics of the Eastern Pacific Region, Caribbean and Scotia Arcs. Volume 9

    SciTech Connect

    Cabre, R.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyze the geodynamic phenomena related to the interaction of the eastern Pacific with the Americas between Canada and the Antarctic peninsula. Studies include the Cordilleran arcs and Juan de Fuca plate.

  15. Origin of the oceanic basalt basement of the Solomon Islands arc and its relationship to the Ontong Java Plateau-insights from Cenozoic plate motion models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic global plate motion models based on a hotspot reference frame may provide a useful framework for analyzing the tectonic evolution of the Solomon Islands convergent margin. A postulated late Miocene collision of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) with a NE-facing arc is consistent with the predicted path of the OJP across the Pacific Basin and its Miocene arrival at the trench. Late-stage igneous activity (65-30 Ma) predicted for the OJP as it rode over the Samoan hotspot occurred in correlative stratigraphic sections on Malaita, the supposed accreted flake of OJP in the Solomon Islands arc. Convergence similar to the present velocities between Australia and the Pacific plates was characteristic of the last 43 million years. Prior to 43 Ma Pacific-Australia plate motions were divergent, seemingly at odds with geologic evidence for early Tertiary convergence, particularly in Papua New Guinea. A postulated South Pacific plate may have existed between Australia and the Pacific plate and would have allowed implied northward subduction along the northeastern Australia plate boundary that lasted into the early Eocene. Subsequent reorganization of plate motions in the middle Eocene correlates with middle Eocene marginal basin formation along ridges oblique to the main plate boundary. Cessation of spreading on the Pacific-South Pacific Ridge and its subsequent subduction beneath Asia followed the change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma. A trapped remnant of the extinct, NW-trending ridge may still lie beneath the western Philippine Sea. The terminal deformation, metamorphism and ophiolite obduction in the Eocene orogen of the southwest Pacific also correlates with the major change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma and the subsequent compression of the dying Eocene arc against outlying continental and oceanic crustal blocks of the Australian plate. The Solomon Islands oceanic basement may represent juxtaposition of oceanic plateaus of the Australian plate beneath

  16. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    A satellite laser ranging experiment conducted by NASA since 1972 has measured the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates in California. Based on these measurements, the 896-km distance between San Diego and Quincy, California, is shortening at 62 + or - 9 mm/yr. This geodetic estimate is consistent with the rate of motion between the two plates, calculated from geological data to be 53 + or - 3 mm/yr averaged over the past few million years.

  17. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  18. Marginal deformation of crustal plates as key to crustal motion, crustal spirals, and the driving force

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.G.M.

    1986-07-01

    Present plate tectonic models concentrate on compressive- and extensive-type plate margins, often incorporating shear margins as a subtype of compressive margins. However, if a single moving plate is considered, it becomes apparent that the leading edge is a compressive margin, the trailing edge is an extensive margin, and the lateral edges are shear margins. Conversely, if a plate's margin can be recognized by identifying areas of subduction (compression), rifting (extension), and strike slip and buckle folding (shearing), then not only can a plate be identified but its motion can also be inferred. The Pacific plate provides an excellent example. It is bounded by subduction trenches along its west-northwest margin, extension rifts along its east-southeast margin, and shear and buckle-fold complexes along its south-southwest and north-northeast margins. A west-northwest motion is inferred. As other major plates are examined, two striking features are revealed. A west-northwest to northwest motion is consistently identified, and the plates line up end to end forming a northwest-spiraling segmented band encircling the globe. The lateral margins of this band form the well-known Tethyan shear system. The plates comprising this band are of varying sizes and composition, and the extent of deformation along a plate margin is directly related to plate size. The Pacific and Eurasian plates dominate in size and marginal deformation. The tail of this north-spiraling ribbon of crustal plates is deformed in the Southern Hemisphere, most notably in the area of the African, Indian, and Australian plates. Each southern plate has a strong north component of motion as well as a counterclockwise spiraling action. The plates appear to have rotated in response to drag along the southern margin of the Pacific and Eurasian plates.

  19. A Simple Model for the Vertical Crustal Movement Associated with the Earthquake Cycle Along the Pacific Coast of Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiya, T.

    2013-12-01

    Before the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake, rapid subsidence more than 5mm/yr has been observed along the Pacific coast of the Tohoku area by leveling, tide gauges, and GPS (Kato, 1979, Kato and Tsumura, 1979, El-Fiky and Kato, 1999). On the other hand, Stage 5e (~125 ka) marine terraces are widely recognized along the same area, implying the area is uplifting in a long-term. Ikeda (1999) hypothesized that these deformation signals reflect accumulation of elastic strain at the plate interface and there is a possibility of a giant earthquake causing a coastal uplift. However, the coastal area subsided as large as 1m during the 2011 main shock. Though we observe significant postseismic uplift, it is not certain if the preseismic as well as coseismic subsidence will be recovered. We construct a simple model of earthquake deformation cycle to interpret the vertical movement along the Pacific coast of northeast Japan. The model consists of a 40 km thick elastic lithosphere overlying a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenospher with a viscosity of 10^19 Pa s. Plate boundary is modeled as two rectangular faults located in the lithosphere and connected each other. As for the kinematic conditions of these faults, we represent the temporal evolution of fault slip as a sum of the steady term and the perturbation term following Savage and Prescott (1978). The first steady term corresponds to the long-term plate subduction, which contributes to long-term geomorphic evolution such as the marine terraces (Hashimoto et al., 2004). The second perturbation term represent earthquake cycle effects. We evaluate this effect under assumptions that earthquake occurrence is perfectly periodic, plate interface is fully coupled during interseismic periods, and the slip deficit is fully released by earthquakes. If the earthquake recurrence interval is shorter than the relaxation time of the structure, interseismic movement is in the opposite direction to the coseismic ones and changes almost linearly

  20. Pressurized bellows flat contact heat exchanger interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Fred E.; Howell, Harold R.; Winkler, Roger V.

    1990-03-01

    Disclosed is an interdigitated plate-type heat exchanger interface. The interface includes a modular interconnect to thermally connect a pair or pairs of plate-type heat exchangers to a second single or multiple plate-type heat exchanger. The modular interconnect comprises a series of parallel, plate-type heat exchangers arranged in pairs to form a slot therebetween. The plate-type heat exchangers of the second heat exchanger insert into the slots of the modular interconnect. Bellows are provided between the pairs of fins of the modular interconnect so that when the bellows are pressurized, they drive the plate-type heat exchangers of the modular interconnect toward one another, thus closing upon the second heat exchanger plates. Each end of the bellows has a part thereof a thin, membrane diaphragm which readily conforms to the contours of the heat exchanger plates of the modular interconnect when the bellows is pressurized. This ensures an even distribution of pressure on the heat exchangers of the modular interconnect thus creating substantially planar contact between the two heat exchangers. The effect of the interface of the present invention is to provide a dry connection between two heat exchangers whereby the rate of heat transfer can be varied by varying the pressure within the bellows.

  1. Pressurized bellows flat contact heat exchanger interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, Fred E. (Inventor); Howell, Harold R. (Inventor); Winkler, Roger V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is an interdigitated plate-type heat exchanger interface. The interface includes a modular interconnect to thermally connect a pair or pairs of plate-type heat exchangers to a second single or multiple plate-type heat exchanger. The modular interconnect comprises a series of parallel, plate-type heat exchangers arranged in pairs to form a slot therebetween. The plate-type heat exchangers of the second heat exchanger insert into the slots of the modular interconnect. Bellows are provided between the pairs of fins of the modular interconnect so that when the bellows are pressurized, they drive the plate-type heat exchangers of the modular interconnect toward one another, thus closing upon the second heat exchanger plates. Each end of the bellows has a part thereof a thin, membrane diaphragm which readily conforms to the contours of the heat exchanger plates of the modular interconnect when the bellows is pressurized. This ensures an even distribution of pressure on the heat exchangers of the modular interconnect thus creating substantially planar contact between the two heat exchangers. The effect of the interface of the present invention is to provide a dry connection between two heat exchangers whereby the rate of heat transfer can be varied by varying the pressure within the bellows.

  2. Plate tectonics hiati as the cause of global glaciations: 2. The late Proterozoic 'Snowball Earth'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, M. F.

    2003-04-01

    A fundamental reappraisal of the mechanisms that drive plate tectonics has yielded the remarkable conclusion that, for at least the past 130 Ma, the principal agent has not been ridge-push or slab-pull but a CW-directed torque (probably of electromagnetic origin at the CMB) reaching the deep (>600 km, e.g.[1]) tectospheric keel of the Antarctica craton. Major changes in spreading direction marked both ends of the 122--85 Ma Cretaceous Superchron and started by forming the Ontong Java Plateau. Action of MORs as gearlike linkages has driven Africa and India CCW since Gondwana breakup and continues to drive the Pacific plate CCW. In the Arctic there is now no cratonic keel to pick up any corresponding polar torque, so northern hemisphere plate tectonics is far less active. The thesis of this contribution is that in the Neoproterozoic the lack of cratons at high latitudes would have deprived plate tectonics of this motivation, causing MORs to die (see below) and a major fall in sea-level, leading to global glaciation as outlined in Part 1 for the Huronian events. Like that seen during that first hiatus, dyke-swarm volcanism could have arisen from thermal shrinkage of the global lithosphere, providing CO2 and ash-covering that interrrupted glacial episodes. In oceanic settings this volcanism would have lowered pH and supplied Fe2+ for shallow bio-oxygenic action to deposit as BIF. My multifacet studies of the subduction process convince me that the rapid development of "flat-slab" interface profiles involves the physical removal of hanging-wall material in front of the downbend by basal subduction tectonic erosion (STE). Historically this, and its inferred ubiquity in the Archaean as the precursor to PSM (Part 1), suggests that the required subducting-plate buoyancy is thermal. Accordingly, a redesign [2] of the MOR process has incorporated the heat-containing LVZ as an integral part of the plate and luckily provides a lot more ridge-push to ensure the subduction of

  3. MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

    2013-12-01

    MACMA (Multi-Agent Convective MAntle) is a tool developed to simulate evolutive plate tectonics and mantle convection in a 2-D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012). The model relies mainly on a force balance to compute the velocity of each plate, and on empirical rules to determine how plate boundaries move and evolve. It includes first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. The MACMA interface was designed to be user-friendly and a simple use of the simulator can be achieved without any prerequisite knowledge in fluid dynamics, mantle rheology, nor in numerical methods. As a preliminary study, the simulator was used by a few students from bachelor's degree to master's degree levels. An initial configuration for plate tectonics has to be created before starting a simulation: the number and types of plate boundaries (ridge, subduction, passive margins) has to be defined and seafloor ages must be given. A simple but interesting exercise consists in letting students build such an initial configuration: they must analyze a map of tectonic plates, choose a 2-D section and examine carefully a map of seafloor ages. Students mentioned that the exercise made them realize that the 3-D spherical structure of plate tectonics does not translate directly in a simple 2-D section, as opposed to what is usually shown in books. Physical parameters: e.g. mantle viscosity, number of layers to consider in the mantle (upper and lower mantle, possible asthenosphere), initial time and mantle temperature, have to be chosen, and students can use this virtual lab to see how different scenarios emerge when parameters are varied. Very importantly, the direct visualization of the mobility of plate

  4. Seismicity Associated with a Stranded Plate Fragment Above the Juan de Fuca Slab in the Vicinity of the Mendocino Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.; Waldhauser, F.; Oppenheimer, D. H.; Blair, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Our new model of the subducted Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate beneath western North America, combined with the spatial resolution of double-differenced earthquake relocations, offers new insights regarding subsurface seismic sources in the complex tectonic setting near the Mendocino triple junction. Relocated seismicity resolves a double seismic zone within the slab beneath northwestern California that strongly constrains the location of the plate interface and delineates a cluster of seismicity ~10 km above the interface that includes the April 1992 M7.1 Cape Mendocino earthquake near its eastern edge. This cluster does not just represent aftershocks to the M7.1 event, but has persisted through time. About half of the earthquakes within the cluster occurred within the year following the April 1992 event. However, the remaining earthquakes either occurred within the 17 years preceding April 1992 or the 17 years following April 1993. The seismogenic structure forms a triangular shape approximately 80-km long in a north-south direction and up to 50-km long in a west-east direction. The structure is up to 8-km thick, and its surface dips gently landward from depths of ~6 to 14 km. Interpretation of the M7.1 event as occurring above the subduction interface requires a more complex slab geometry than previously envisioned. Specifically, the slab just east of the trench dips about 15° and then flattens to a dip of just a few degrees from ~15-25 km before it steepens again to about 25° from ~25-45 km, which is the maximum depth it can be imaged by hypocenters. The seismicity cluster is situated above the slab where it flexes concave upward in the transition from its initial moderate dip to a flat dip. Flat slab segments are observed elsewhere around the Pacific Rim where the subducting plate is relatively buoyant owing to young or thick oceanic crust, consistent with this JdF segment which is ~8-5 Ma where it enters the trench. These data provide compelling evidence that a

  5. Seismicity and plate tectonics in south central Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wormer, J. D.; Davies, J.; Gedney, L.

    1974-01-01

    Hypocenter distribution shows that the Benioff zone associated with the Aleutian arc terminates in interior Alaska some 75 km north of the Denali fault. There appears to be a break in the subducting Pacific plate in the Yentna River-Prince William Sound area which separates two seismically independent blocks, similar to the segmented structure reported for the central Aleutian arc.

  6. Plate motions, the driving mechanism, and the geopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidler, E.; Jacoby, W. R.; Lemmens, M.

    1984-06-01

    A two mode model is developed for transient mantle convection and plate movement. Geoid high points are associated with regions of vigorous oceanic-plate subduction in the western Pacific on one side of the earth and dispersed Pangea on the other. Convective forces are hypothesized to occur in both modes simultaneously. Slow, mantle-wide currents power the dispersal while thermally induced density contours power the oceanic plate subduction. It is predicted that the two modes will reverse sides of the planet in 100 million yr.

  7. Plate tectonics and the Gulf of California region

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, N.

    1990-11-01

    The geology and tectonism of California have been influenced greatly by the collision and interaction between the Pacific plate and the North American plate. The forces generated by this interaction caused substantial horizontal movement along the San Andreas fault system and created the Gulf of California rift zone. This article summarizes the unique features of the gulf, describes the theory of plate tectonics, explains how tectonism may have affected the geologic evolution and physiography of the gulf, and illustrates the process by which the Colorado River became linked to the gulf.

  8. Stop motion microphotography of laser driven plates

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Trott, W.M.

    1994-09-01

    Laser driven plates have been used for several years for high velocity shock wave and impact studies. Recent questions about the integrity and ablation rates of these plates coupled with an improved capability for microscopic stop motion photography led to this study. For these experiments, the plates were aluminum, coated on the ends of optical fibers. A high power laser pulse in the fiber ionizes the aluminum at the fiber/coating interface. The plasma thus created accelerates the remaining aluminum to high velocities, several kilometers per second. We defined {open_quotes}thick{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}thin{close_quotes} coatings as those where a flying plate (flyer) was launched vs. the material being completely ionized. Here we were specifically interested in the thick/thin boundary to develop data for the numerical models attempting to predict flyer behavior.

  9. Mantle flow geometry from ridge to trench beneath the Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, Robert; Allen, Richard M.; Bastow, Ian D.; Totten, Eoghan; Richards, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic plates are underlain by a low-viscosity mantle layer, the asthenosphere. Asthenospheric flow may be induced by the overriding plate or by deeper mantle convection. Shear strain due to this flow can be inferred using the directional dependence of seismic wave speeds--seismic anisotropy. However, isolation of asthenospheric signals is challenging; most seismometers are located on continents, whose complex structure influences the seismic waves en route to the surface. The Cascadia Initiative, an offshore seismometer deployment in the US Pacific Northwest, offers the opportunity to analyse seismic data recorded on simpler oceanic lithosphere. Here we use measurements of seismic anisotropy across the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates to reconstruct patterns of asthenospheric mantle shear flow from the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge to the Cascadia subduction zone trench. We find that the direction of fastest seismic wave motion rotates with increasing distance from the mid-ocean ridge to become aligned with the direction of motion of the Juan de Fuca Plate, implying that this plate influences mantle flow. In contrast, asthenospheric mantle flow beneath the Gorda Plate does not align with Gorda Plate motion and instead aligns with the neighbouring Pacific Plate motion. These results show that asthenospheric flow beneath the small, slow-moving Gorda Plate is controlled largely by advection due to the much larger, faster-moving Pacific Plate.

  10. 14. Date Plate, 'C.O. #836, Dwg. #12A, Full Size. For ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Date Plate, 'C.O. #836, Dwg. #12A, Full Size. For Portal Strut with Date Plate `DP' see dwg. #12' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  11. PACIFIC NORTHWEST CYBER SUMMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Matlock, Gordon W.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.; Smith, Karen S.

    2013-08-07

    On March 26, 2013, the Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) jointly hosted the Pacific Northwest Cyber Summit with the DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the White House, Washington State congressional delegation, Washington State National Guard, and regional energy companies.

  12. ASSEMBLY OF PARALLEL PLATES

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Lennox, D.H.

    1963-04-23

    This invention is concerned with a rigid assembly of parallel plates in which keyways are stamped out along the edges of the plates and a self-retaining key is inserted into aligned keyways. Spacers having similar keyways are included between adjacent plates. The entire assembly is locked into a rigid structure by fastening only the outermost plates to the ends of the keys. (AEC)

  13. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence. PMID:17799689

  14. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  15. The Plate Boundary Observatory Cascadia Network: Development and Installation of a Large Scale Real-time GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Dittman, T.; Feaux, K.; Gallaher, W. W.; Mattioli, G. S.; Mencin, D.; Walls, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), through a NSF-ARRA supplement, has enhanced the geophysical infrastructure in in the Pacific Northwest by upgrading 232 Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations to allow the collection and distribution of high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) data streams (RT-GPS). These upgraded stations supplemented the original 100 RT-GPS stations in the PBO GPS network. The addition of the new RT-GPS sites in the Pacific Northwest should spur new volcano and earthquake research opportunities in an area of great scientific interest and high geophysical hazard. Streaming RT-GPS data will enable researchers to detect and investigate strong ground motion during large geophysical events, including a possible plate-interface earthquake, which has implications for earthquake hazard mitigation. A total of 282 PBO stations were upgraded and added to the UNAVCO real-time GPS system, along with addition of 22 new meteorological instruments to existing PBO stations. Extensive testing of BGAN satellite communications systems has been conducted to support the Cascadia RT-GPS upgrades and the installation of three BGAN satellite fail over systems along the Cascadia margin will allow for the continuation of data flow in the event of a loss of primary communications during in a large geophysical event or other interruptions in commercial cellular networks. In summary, with these additional upgrades in the Cascadia region, the PBO RT-GPS network will increase to 420 stations. Upgrades to UNAVCO's data infrastructure included evaluation and purchase of the Trimble Pivot Platform, servers, and additional hardware for archiving the high rate data. UNAVCO staff is working closely with the UNAVCO community to develop data standards, protocols, and a science plan for the use of RT-GPS data.

  16. SKITTER/implement mechanical interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, John Wilson, III; Cone, Alan E.; Garolera, Frank J.; German, David; Lindabury, David Peter; Luckado, Marshall Cleveland; Murphey, Craig; Rowell, John Bryan; Wilkinson, Brad

    1988-01-01

    SKITTER (Spacial Kinematic Inertial Translatory Tripod Extremity Robot) is a three-legged transport vehicle designed to perform under the unique environment of the moon. The objective of this project was to design a mechanical interface for SKITTER. This mechanical latching interface will allow SKITTER to use a series of implements such as drills, cranes, etc., and perform different tasks on the moon. The design emphasized versatility and detachability; that is, the interface design is the same for all implements, and connection and detachment is simple. After consideration of many alternatives, a system of three identical latches at each of the three interface points was chosen. The latching mechanism satisfies the design constraints because it facilitates connection and detachment. Also, the moving parts are protected from the dusty environment by housing plates.

  17. Geographical distribution of shear wave anisotropy within marine sediments in the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Fukao, Yoshio; Fujie, Gou; Takemura, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    In the northwestern Pacific, the elastic properties of marine sediments, including P-wave velocities ( Vp) and S wave velocities ( Vs), have recently been constrained by active seismic surveys. However, information on S anisotropy associated with the alignments of fractures and fabric remains elusive. To obtain such information, we used ambient noise records observed by ocean-bottom seismometers at 254 sites in the northwestern Pacific to calculate the auto-correlation functions for the S reflection retrieval from the top of the basement. For these S reflections, we measured differential travel times and polarized directions to reveal the potential geographical systematic distribution of S anisotropy. As a result, the observed differential times between fast and slow axes were at most 0.05 s. The fast polarization axes tend to align in the trench-parallel direction in the outer rise region. In particular, their directions changed systematically in accordance with the direction of the trench axis, which changes sharply across the junction of the Kuril and Japan trenches. We consider that a contributing factor for the obtained S anisotropy within marine sediments in the outer rise region is primarily aligned fractures due to the tensional stresses associated with the bending of the Pacific Plate. Moreover, numerical simulations conducted by using the three-dimensional (3D) finite difference method for isotropic and anisotropic media indicates that the successful extraction of S anisotropic information from the S reflection observed in this study is obtained from near-vertically propagating S waves due to extremely low Vs within marine sediments. In addition, we conducted an additional numerical simulation with a realistic velocity model to confirm whether S reflections below the basement can be extracted or not. The resultant auto-correlation function shows only S reflections from the top of the basement. It appears that such near-vertically propagating S waves

  18. Deformation-related volcanism in the Pacific Ocean linked to the Hawaiian-Emperor bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John M.; Hoernle, Kaj; Müller, R. Dietmar; Morgan, Jason P.; Butterworth, Nathaniel P.; Hauff, Folkmar; Sandwell, David T.; Jokat, Wilfried; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Stoffers, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Ocean islands, seamounts and volcanic ridges are thought to form above mantle plumes. Yet, this mechanism cannot explain many volcanic features on the Pacific Ocean floor and some might instead be caused by cracks in the oceanic crust linked to the reorganization of plate motions. A distinctive bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain has been linked to changes in the direction of motion of the Pacific Plate, movement of the Hawaiian plume, or a combination of both. However, these links are uncertain because there is no independent record that precisely dates tectonic events that affected the Pacific Plate. Here we analyse the geochemical characteristics of lava samples collected from the Musicians Ridges, lines of volcanic seamounts formed close to the Hawaiian-Emperor bend. We find that the geochemical signature of these lavas is unlike typical ocean island basalts and instead resembles mid-ocean ridge basalts. We infer that the seamounts are unrelated to mantle plume activity and instead formed in an extensional setting, due to deformation of the Pacific Plate. 40Ar/39Ar dating reveals that the Musicians Ridges formed during two time windows that bracket the time of formation of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend, 53-52 and 48-47 million years ago. We conclude that the Hawaiian-Emperor bend was formed by plate-mantle reorganization, potentially triggered by a series of subduction events at the Pacific Plate margins.

  19. Predicting Earthquake Occurrence at Subduction-Zone Plate Boundaries Through Advanced Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsu'Ura, M.; Hashimoto, C.; Fukuyama, E.

    2004-12-01

    In general, predicting the occurrence of earthquakes is very difficult, because of the complexity of actual faults and nonlinear interaction between them. From the standpoint of earthquake prediction, however, our target is limited to the large events that completely break down a seismogenic zone. To such large events we may apply the concept of the earthquake cycle. The entire process of earthquake generation cycles generally consists of tectonic loading due to relative plate motion, quasi-static rupture nucleation, dynamic rupture propagation and stop, and restoration of fault strength. This process can be completely described by a coupled nonlinear system, which consists of an elastic/viscoelastic slip-response function that relates fault slip to shear stress change and a fault constitutive law that prescribes change in shear strength with fault slip and contact time. The shear stress and the shear strength are related with each other through boundary conditions on the fault. The driving force of this system is observed relative plate motion. The system to describe the earthquake generation cycle is conceptually quite simple. The complexity in practical modeling mainly comes from complexity in structure of the real earth. Recently, we have developed a physics-based, predictive simulation system for earthquake generation at plate boundaries in and around Japan, where the four plates of Pacific, North American, Philippine Sea and Eurasian are interacting with each other. The simulation system consists of a crust-mantle structure model, a quasi-static tectonic loading model, and a dynamic rupture propagation model. First, we constructed a realistic 3D model of plate interfaces in and around Japan by applying an inversion technique to ISC hypocenter data, and computed viscoelastic slip-response functions for this structure model. Second, we introduced the slip- and time-dependent fault constitutive law with an inherent strength-restoration mechanism as a basic

  20. An improved plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, John C.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

  1. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  2. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  3. Tectonic map of the Circum-Pacific region, Pacific basin sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheibner, E.; Moore, G.W.; Drummond, K.J.; Dalziel, Corvalan Q.J.; Moritani, T.; Teraoka, Y.; Sato, T.; Craddock, C.

    2013-01-01

    Circum-Pacific Map Project: The Circum-Pacific Map Project was a cooperative international effort designed to show the relationship of known energy and mineral resources to the major geologic features of the Pacific basin and surrounding continental areas. Available geologic, mineral, and energy-resource data are being complemented by new, project-developed data sets such as magnetic lineations, seafloor mineral deposits, and seafloor sediment. Earth scientists representing some 180 organizations from more than 40 Pacific-region countries are involved in this work. Six overlapping equal-area regional maps at a scale of 1:10,000,000 form the cartographic base for the project: the four Circum-Pacific Quadrants (Northwest, Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast), and the Antarctic and Arctic Sheets. There is also a Pacific Basin Sheet at a scale of 1:17,000,000. The Base Map Series and the Geographic Series (published from 1977 to 1990), the Plate-Tectonic Series (published in 1981 and 1982), the Geodynamic Series (published in 1984 and 1985), and the Geologic Series (published from 1984 to 1989) all include six map sheets. Other thematic map series in preparation include Mineral-Resources, Energy-Resources and Tectonic Maps. Altogether, more than 50 map sheets are planned. The maps were prepared cooperatively by the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey and are available from the Branch of Distribution, U. S. Geological Survey, Box 25286, Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225, U.S.A. The Circum-Pacific Map Project is organized under six panels of geoscientists representing national earth-science organizations, universities, and natural-resource companies. The six panels correspond to the basic map areas. Current panel chairmen are Tomoyuki Moritani (Northwest Quadrant), R. Wally Johnson (Southwest Quadrant), Ian W.D. Dalziel (Antarctic Region), vacant. (Southeast Quadrant), Kenneth J. Drummond (Northeast Quadrant), and

  4. Paper microzone plates.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Phillips, Scott T; Vella, Sarah J; Martinez, Andres W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes 96- and 384-microzone plates fabricated in paper as alternatives to conventional multiwell plates fabricated in molded polymers. Paper-based plates are functionally related to plastic well plates, but they offer new capabilities. For example, paper-microzone plates are thin (approximately 180 microm), require small volumes of sample (5 microL per zone), and can be manufactured from inexpensive materials ($0.05 per plate). The paper-based plates are fabricated by patterning sheets of paper, using photolithography, into hydrophilic zones surrounded by hydrophobic polymeric barriers. This photolithography used an inexpensive formulation photoresist that allows rapid (approximately 15 min) prototyping of paper-based plates. These plates are compatible with conventional microplate readers for quantitative absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The limit of detection per zone loaded for fluorescence was 125 fmol for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and this level corresponds to 0.02 the quantity of analyte per well used to achieve comparable signal-to-noise in a 96-well plastic plate (using a solution of 25 nM labeled protein). The limits of detection for absorbance on paper was approximately 50 pmol per zone for both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Amaranth dyes; these values were 0.4 that required for the plastic plate. Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader. PMID:19572563

  5. Multicolor printing plate joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An upper plate having ink flow channels and a lower plate having a multicolored pattern are joined. The joining is accomplished without clogging any ink flow paths. A pattern having different colored parts and apertures is formed in a lower plate. Ink flow channels each having respective ink input ports are formed in an upper plate. The ink flow channels are coated with solder mask and the bottom of the upper plate is then coated with solder. The upper and lower plates are pressed together at from 2 to 5 psi and heated to a temperature of from 295 F to 750 F or enough to melt the solder. After the plates have cooled and the pressure is released, the solder mask is removed from the interior passageways by means of a liquid solvent.

  6. Ocean Basin Evolution and Global-Scale Plate Reorganization Events Since Pangea Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Seton, Maria; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Matthews, Kara J.; Wright, Nicky M.; Shephard, Grace E.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Hosseinpour, Maral; Bower, Dan J.; Cannon, John

    2016-06-01

    We present a revised global plate motion model with continuously closing plate boundaries ranging from the Triassic at 230 Ma to the present day, assess differences among alternative absolute plate motion models, and review global tectonic events. Relatively high mean absolute plate motion rates of approximately 9–10 cm yr‑1 between 140 and 120 Ma may be related to transient plate motion accelerations driven by the successive emplacement of a sequence of large igneous provinces during that time. An event at ˜100 Ma is most clearly expressed in the Indian Ocean and may reflect the initiation of Andean-style subduction along southern continental Eurasia, whereas an acceleration at ˜80 Ma of mean rates from 6 to 8 cm yr‑1 reflects the initial northward acceleration of India and simultaneous speedups of plates in the Pacific. An event at ˜50 Ma expressed in relative, and some absolute, plate motion changes around the globe and in a reduction of global mean plate speeds from about 6 to 4–5 cm yr‑1 indicates that an increase in collisional forces (such as the India–Eurasia collision) and ridge subduction events in the Pacific (such as the Izanagi–Pacific Ridge) play a significant role in modulating plate velocities.

  7. The age and origin of the Pacific islands: a geological overview.

    PubMed

    Neall, Vincent E; Trewick, Steven A

    2008-10-27

    The Pacific Ocean evolved from the Panthalassic Ocean that was first formed ca 750 Ma with the rifting apart of Rodinia. By 160 Ma, the first ocean floor ascribed to the current Pacific plate was produced to the west of a spreading centre in the central Pacific, ultimately growing to become the largest oceanic plate on the Earth. The current Nazca, Cocos and Juan de Fuca (Gorda) plates were initially one plate, produced to the east of the original spreading centre before becoming split into three. The islands of the Pacific have originated as: linear chains of volcanic islands on the above plates either by mantle plume or propagating fracture origin, atolls, uplifted coralline reefs, fragments of continental crust, obducted portions of adjoining lithospheric plates and islands resulting from subduction along convergent plate margins. Out of the 11 linear volcanic chains identified, each is briefly described and its history summarized. The geology of 10 exemplar archipelagos (Japan, Izu-Bonin, Palau, Solomons, Fiji, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Society, Galápagos and Hawaii) is then discussed in detail. PMID:18768382

  8. Hyperbolic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Giomi, Luca

    2012-09-28

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets, or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature. PMID:23030106

  9. Hyperbolic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca

    2012-09-01

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets, or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature.

  10. Plate Motion and Crustal Deformation Estimated with Geodetic Data from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Heflin, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    We use geodetic data taken over four years with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate: (1) motion between six major plates and (2) motion relative to these plates of ten sites in plate boundary zones. The degree of consistency between geodetic velocities and rigid plates requires the (one-dimensional) standard errors in horizontal velocities to be approx. 2 mm/yr. Each of the 15 angular velocities describing motion between plate pairs that we estimate with GPS differs insignificantly from the corresponding angular velocity in global plate motion model NUVEL-1A, which averages motion over the past 3 m.y. The motion of the Pacific plate relative to both the Eurasian and North American plates is observed to be faster than predicted by NUVEL-1A, supporting the inference from Very Long B ase- line Interferometry (VLBI) that motion of the Pacific plate has speed up over the past few m.y. The Eurasia-North America pole of rotation is estimated to be north of NUVEL-1A, consistent with the independent hypothesis that the pole has recently migrated northward across northeast Asia to near the Lena River delta. Victoria, which lies above the main thrust at the Cascadia subduction zone, moves relative to the interior of the overriding plate at 30% of the velocity of the subducting plate, reinforcing the conclusion that the thrust there is locked beneath the continental shelf and slope.

  11. Geology and plate-tectonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, W.P.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is a transform fault along the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates. Bedrock along the fault includes various lithologic units that range in age from Precambrian to Tertiary and younger. Some bedrock units that can be matched across the fault suggest strike-slip displacement of as much as 560 km. This chapter describes geologic formations of northern and central California, including Franciscan rocks, Coast Range ophiolite, Great Valley sequence, Coast Range thrust, Salinian block, displacement of pre-Quaternary rocks by the San Andreas fault, and the relation of geologic structure to seismic behavior. Formations of southern California which are described are the Transverse Ranges and the Salton Trough and displacement of basement rocks by the San Andreas fault. Plate-tectonic development of the San Andreas fault is also discussed.

  12. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  13. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  14. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  15. Plating methods, a survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, J. B.; Emerson, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of a comprehensive search of the literature available, much of which has been generated by the research centers of NASA and its contractors, on plating and coating methods and techniques. Methods covered included: (1) electroplating from aqueous solutions; (2) electroplating from nonaqueous solutions; (3) electroplating from fused-salt baths; (4) electroforming; (5) electroless plating, immersion plating, and mirroring; (6) electroplating from gaseous plasmas; and (7) anodized films and conversion coatings.

  16. 3D Simulation of the Entire Process of Earthquake Generation at Subduction-Zone Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsu'Ura, M.; Hashimoto, C.; Fukuyama, E.

    2003-12-01

    In general, the entire process of earthquake generation consists of tectonic loading due to relative plate motion, quasi-static rupture nucleation, dynamic rupture propagation and stop, and restoration of fault strength. This process can be completely described by a coupled nonlinear system, which consists of an elastic/viscoelastic slip-response function that relates fault slip to shear stress change and a fault constitutive law that prescribes change in shear strength with fault slip and contact time. The shear stress and the shear strength are related with each other through boundary conditions on the fault. The driving force of this system is observed relative plate motion. The system to describe the earthquake generation cycle is conceptually quite simple. The complexity in practical modelling mainly comes from complexity in structure of the real earth. As a product of Crustal Activity Modelling Program (CAMP), which is one of the three main programs composing the Solid Earth Simulator project (1998-2003) promoted by MEXT, we have completed a physics-based predictive simulation model for the entire process of earthquake generation cycles in and around Japan, where the four plates of Pacific, North American, Philippine Sea and Eurasian are interacting with each other in a very complicated way. The total simulation system consists of a crust-mantle structure model, a tectonic loading model and a dynamic rupture model. First, we constructed a realistic 3D standard model of plate interfaces in and around Japan by applying an inversion technique to ISC hypocenter distribution data, and computed viscoelastic slip-response functions for this structure model. Second, we introduced the slip- and time-dependent fault constitutive law with an inherent strength-restoration mechanism as a basic equation governing the entire process of earthquake generation. Third, combining all these elements, we developed a simulation model for quasi-static stress accumulation due to

  17. CALUTRON FACE PLATE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-08-25

    The construction of a removable cover plate for a calutron tank is described. The plate is fabricated of a rectangular frame member to which is welded a bowed or dished plate of thin steel, reinforced with transverse stiffening ribs. When the tank is placed between the poles of a magnet, the plate may be pivoted away from the tank and magnet and is adapted to support the ion separation mechanism secured to its inner side as well as the vacuum load within the tank.

  18. PLATES WITH OXIDE INSERTS

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Schumar, J.F.

    1958-06-10

    Planar-type fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors are described, particularly those comprising fuel in the oxide form such as thoria and urania. The fuel assembly consists of a plurality of parallel spaced fuel plate mennbers having their longitudinal side edges attached to two parallel supporting side plates, thereby providing coolant flow channels between the opposite faces of adjacent fuel plates. The fuel plates are comprised of a plurality of longitudinally extending tubular sections connected by web portions, the tubular sections being filled with a plurality of pellets of the fuel material and the pellets being thermally bonded to the inside of the tubular section by lead.

  19. Slow slip events and seismic tremor at circum-Pacific subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Susan Y.; Rokosky, Juliana M.

    2007-09-01

    It has been known for a long time that slip accompanying earthquakes accounts for only a fraction of plate tectonic displacements. However, only recently has a fuller spectrum of strain release processes, including normal, slow, and silent earthquakes (or slow slip events) and continuous and episodic slip, been observed and generated by numerical simulations of the earthquake cycle. Despite a profusion of observations and modeling studies the physical mechanism of slow slip events remains elusive. The concurrence of seismic tremor with slow slip episodes in Cascadia and southwestern Japan provides insight into the process of slow slip. A perceived similarity between subduction zone and volcanic tremor has led to suggestions that slow slip involves fluid migration on or near the plate interface. Alternatively, evidence is accumulating to support the notion that tremor results from shear failure during slow slip. Global observations of the location, spatial extent, magnitude, duration, slip rate, and periodicity of these aseismic slip transients indicate significant variation that may be exploited to better understand their generation. Most slow slip events occur just downdip of the seismogenic zone, consistent with rate- and state-dependent frictional modeling that requires unstable to stable transitional properties for slow slip generation. At a few convergent margins the occurrence of slow slip events within the seismogenic zone makes it highly likely that transitions in frictional properties exist there and are the loci of slow slip nucleation. Slow slip events perturb the surrounding stress field and may either increase or relieve stress on a fault, bringing it closer to or farther from earthquake failure, respectively. This paper presents a review of slow slip events and related seismic tremor observed at plate boundaries worldwide, with a focus on circum-Pacific subduction zones. Trends in global observations of slow slip events suggest that (1) slow slip is a

  20. 11. GIRDER PARTIAL ELEVATION AND SECTIONS, 80 FOOT THROUGH PLATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GIRDER PARTIAL ELEVATION AND SECTIONS, 80 FOOT THROUGH PLATE GIRDER SPAN. (Also includes a Marking Diagram and a schedule of parts.) American Bridge Company, Ambridge Plant No. 5, sheet no. 1, dated April 7, 1928, order no. F5073. For U.S. Steel Products Company, Pacific Coast Depot, order no. SF578. For Southern Pacific Company, order no. 8873-P-28746. Scale 1/4 inch to one foot. - Napa River Railroad Bridge, Spanning Napa River, east of Soscol Avenue, Napa, Napa County, CA

  1. Plate motions: Simpler than they look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambridge, M.; Iaffaldano, G.; Bodin, T.

    2012-12-01

    Plate motions shape Earth's surface through time. These kinematics are of paramount importance to make inferences on sea-level change, mantle/lithosphere interactions and dynamic topography among others. Over the last few decades much effort has gone into plate motion reconstructions at finer temporal resolution from ocean-floor finite-rotations. However, measurements feature substantial noise arising mainly from the challenge of identifying precisely magnetic lineations of the ocean-floor, as well as from uncertainties in geomagnetic reversal timescales. It is therefore standard practise to smooth reconstructions typically by averaging over 2 to 5 Myr-long intervals. But this comes at the price of i) downgrading the native resolution of costly measurements and ii) having to choose one among many smoothing methods that do not yield a unique result. At the native resolution of reconstructions, however, the scenario arising is puzzling, as plate motions vary erratically and significantly over short periods of less than 1 Myr. This equally undermines our ability to make geodynamic inferences, because the rates at which forces need to be built upon plates to explain these kinematics far exceed the most optimistic estimates based, for instance, on the temporal evolution of lithospheric slabs into Earth's mantle. Here we focus on the longest and most temporally-resolved records of ocean-floor spreading ever produced, across mid-oceanic ridges in the Atlantic, Indian and South Pacific Oceans. We show that the largest kinematic changes across these ridges relate to data-noise, and are of apparent nature. We overcome this limitation employing a trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian framework, which drastically reduces noise without loss of temporal resolution. Changes in the temporal trends of plate motions occur on timescales no shorter than a few million years, yielding simpler kinematic patterns and more plausible dynamics. This has important implications for the

  2. The Philippine Sea Plate: Magnetism and reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert; Fuller, Michael; Ali, Jason R.; Anderson, Charles D.

    basins. The model predictions closely fit all paleomagnetic data and also satisfy constraints on rotation inferred from magnetic anomaly skewness and seamount magnetization studies. We therefore propose that the plate has rotated clockwise in a discontinuous manner since the early Tertiary: about the present Eurasia-Philippine Sea Plate pole of 48.2°N, 157°E by 5.45° between 0 and 5 Ma, and about best fit rotation poles of 15°N, 160°E by 34° between 5 and 25 Ma, and about 10°N, 150°E by 50° between 40 and 50 Ma. Changes in rates of rotation have been driven by large scale tectonic changes, including the change in Pacific motion at ˜43 Ma and arc-continent collision at the north Australian margin at ˜22 Ma. Some eastern plate margin sites record rotations that differ from those predicted by the model and are interpreted to reflect local tectonic deformation.

  3. Ultrasonic Testing of NIF Amplifier FAU Top Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D J; Huber, R D; Haskins, J J; Rodriguez, J A; Souza, P R; Le, T V

    2002-05-07

    A key component in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser optic system is the amplifier frame assembly unit (FAU). The cast aluminum top plate that supports the FAU is required to withstand loads that would occur during an earthquake with a recurrence period of 1000 years. The stringent seismic requirements placed on the FAU top plate induced a study of the cast aluminum material used in the top plate. Ultrasonic testing was used to aid in characterizing the aluminum material used in the plates. This report documents the work performed using contact ultrasonic testing to characterize the FAU top plate material. The ultrasonic work reported here had 3 objectives: (1) inspect the plate material before cyclic testing conducted at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER); (2) determine the overall quality of individual plates; and (3) detect large defects in critical areas of individual plates. Section III, ''Pre-cyclic test inspection'', describes work performed in support of Objective 1. Section IV, ''Ultrasonic field measurements'', describes work performed in support of Objectives 2 and 3.

  4. Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing '99, World Scientific, New Jersey; Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing '00, World Scientific, New Jersey; Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing '01, World Scientific, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, R.B.; Dunker, A.K.; Hunter, L.; Klein, T.E.; Lauderdale, K.

    2003-04-28

    The Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing is an international, multidisciplinary conference covering current research in the theory and application of computational methods in problems of biological significance. Researchers from the United States, the Asian Pacific nations and around the world gather each year at PSB to exchange research results and discuss open issues in all aspects of computational biology. PSB provides a forum for work on databases, algorithms, interfaces, visualization, modeling and other computational methods, as applied to biological problems. The data-rich areas of molecular biology are emphasized.

  5. Present-day plate motions. [ocean bottom movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    An instantaneous plate-motion model, Relative Motion 2 (RM2), is obtained by inverting a data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths, and 142 earthquake slip vectors. RM2 is compared with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries and, while the model performs close to optimally in most regions, attention is directed to those regions which are not suitably described by the model. Reasons for the discrepancies between RM2 and observations for the India-Antarctica plate boundary, the Pacific-India plate boundary, and the east-west trending transform fault azimuths observed in the French-American Mid-Ocean Undersea Study area are discussed.

  6. Theoretical Investigation of Calculating Temperatures in the Combining Zone of Cu/Fe Composite Plate Jointed by Explosive Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Y. D.; Zhang, W. J.; Kong, X. Q.; Zhao, X.

    2016-03-01

    The heat-transfer behavior of the interface of Flyer plate (or Base Plate) has great influence on the microcosmic structures, stress distributions, and interface distortion of the welded interface of composite plates by explosive welding. In this paper, the temperature distributions in the combing zone are studied for the case of Cu/Fe composite plate jointed by explosive welding near the lower limit of explosive welding. The results show that Flyer plate (Cu plate) and Base Plate (Fe plate) firstly almost have the same melting rate in the explosive welding process. Then, the melting rate of Cu plate becomes higher than that of Fe plate. Finally, the melt thicknesses of Cu plate and Fe plate trend to be different constants, respectively. Meanwhile, the melting layer of Cu plate is thicker than that of Fe plate. The research could supply some theoretical foundations for calculating the temperature distribution and optimizing the explosive welding parameters of Cu/Fe composite plate to some extent.

  7. Seismicity and Plate Geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction Region, Northern California (1986-2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, B. C.; Pryor, I. S.; Williams, T. B.

    2007-12-01

    The Mendocino triple junction is an unstable triple junction located at the convergence of the North American (NAP), Pacific, and Gorda lithospheric plates near Cape Mendocino, northern California. Thirty years of seismic data (1976 - 2006) was analyzed to characterize plate geometry and stress orientations affecting the region. A simple 3-D model of plate geometry was developed to separate earthquake events occurring in the NAP or Gorda plate. Upper- hemisphere focal mechanism solutions were hand plotted for select earthquake events in the study area. NAP solutions north of the MTJ are primarily reverse mechanisms. P and T axes for these solutions indicate north-northeast (~N45E) directed pressure consistent with geodetic and geologic data. NAP solutions south of the MTJ are strike-slip solutions consistent with northwest striking faults of the northern San Andreas fault zone. Gorda plate solutions east of the MTJ are primarily normal fault solutions indicating downslab tension in the subducting plate. East-west cross section plots indicate a very dense cloud of seismicity at the MTJ and demonstrate a shallow dip angle (~8° - 12°) for the top of the Gorda plate to longitude 123.5 W. East of this longitude dip angle increases and Gorda plate seismicity phases out. North-south cross sections show a clear gap in seismicity coincident with an interpreted southern extent of the Gorda plate at latitude 40.25 N as well as the aseismic nature of both the Pacific plate and northern San Andreas fault proper.

  8. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  9. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  10. A review of the tectonic evolution of the Northern Pacific and adjacent Cordilleran Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Johannes; Gaina, Carmen; Johnston, Stephen T.

    2014-05-01

    Numerous plate kinematic models for the North Pacific realm have been developed since the advent of plate tectonics in the early seventies (e.g Atwater (1970), Mammerickx and Sharman (1988)). Although published kinematic models are consistent with the broad scale features of the North Pacific, the link between plate motions and the evolution of the North American Cordillera remains poorly understood. Part of the problem lies in conflicting interpretations of geological versus paleomagnetic data sets, with the result being a lack of consensus regarding: the paleolocation of key geological units; the paleogeography of terrane formation and amalgamation; the motion, boundaries and even existence of oceanic plates; and the character (e.g. trend of subduction) and position of plate boundaries within the northern Pacific basin. Remnants of the Farallon and Kula plates, and some short-lived microplates, demonstrate the complicated tectonic evolution of the oceanic realm west of the North American margin (e.g. Rea and Dixon (1983); McCrory and Wilson (2013); Shephard et al. (2013)). The creation and destruction of major tectonic plates and microplates has presumably left a record in the Cordilleran orogen of western North America. However, working backward from the geological relationships to plate reconstructions remains difficult. Here we investigate the relationship between the plate motions of the Pacific Ocean and the terrane movements in the North American Cordillera by revising the marine magnetic and gravity anomalies of the northern Pacific. In particular, we reevaluate plate boundaries at times of major changes in plate geometry of the Pacific, Kula, Chinook and Farallon plates from C34n onward. Our focus is also on the plate geometries of the Resurrection, Eshamy and Siletz-Crescent plates during the time between anomaly C26 and C12, and the links between plate interactions and on-shore tectonic events recorded in the geological record of Vancouver Island

  11. Soft Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles de Gennes, Pierre; Edwards, Introduction By Sam

    1997-04-01

    Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, one of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, died in 1984. Dirac's college, St. John's of Cambridge, generously endowed annual lectures to be held at Cambridge University in his memory. This volume contains a much expanded version of the 1994 Dirac Lecture by Nobel Laureate Pierre Gilles de Gennes. The book presents an impressionistic tour of the physics of soft interfaces. Full of insight and interesting asides, it not only provides an accessible introduction to this topic, but also lays down many markers and signposts that will be of interest to researchers in physics or chemistry. Features discussions of wetting and dewetting, the dynamics of different types of interface and adhesion and polymer/polymer welding.

  12. Turbine vane plate assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schiavo Jr., Anthony L.

    2006-01-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes a turbine vane having first and second shrouds with an elongated airfoil extending between. Each end of the airfoil transitions into a shroud at a respective junction. Each of the shrouds has a plurality of cooling passages, and the airfoil has a plurality of cooling passages extending between the first and second shrouds. A substantially flat inner plate and an outer plate are coupled to each of the first and second shrouds so as to form inner and outer plenums. Each inner plenum is defined between at least the junction and the substantially flat inner plate; each outer plenum is defined between at least the substantially flat inner plate and the outer plate. Each inner plenum is in fluid communication with a respective outer plenum through at least one of the cooling passages in the respective shroud.

  13. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  14. Numerical simulation of lithospheric plate dynamics and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Rozenberg, V.; Melnikova, L.; Soloviev, A.

    2009-12-01

    We model the lithospheric plate dynamics as an interaction of rigid blocks (spherical segments) and faults separating them. The spherical block-and-fault dynamics (BAFD) model consists of 15 blocks approximating tectonic plates and 5 additional blocks representing parts of the plates, where deep seismicity is observed. The blocks move as a consequence of the prescribed underlying mantle motion. The block displacements at any time are defined so that the system of the blocks is in a quasi-static equilibrium state. Because of the block rigidity, all deformations take place in the fault zones. The interaction between the spherical blocks is visco-elastic (a state of stress accumulation), so long as the ratio of the stress to the pressure is below a certain strength level. When this level is exceeded in some part of a fault, a stress-drop (a synthetic earthquake) occurs in accordance with the dry friction law. Immediately following the earthquake and for some period of time, the corresponding parts of the faults are in a state of creep. Catalogs of synthetic earthquakes are produced as results of numerical simulations. Using the catalogs of synthetic events we can study frequency-magnitude relationships, clustering of the events, long-range interaction of earthquakes, earthquake mechanisms, and fault slips. The model catalogs obtained reflect important features of global seismicity: (i) two large seismic belts, the circum-Pacific and Alpine-Himalayan; (ii) extensive, but less pronounced, seismicity at mid-oceanic ridges; and (iii) increased seismic activity associated with triple junctions of plate boundaries. The model results are consistent with the observations: Nazca/South America, Cocos/Caribbean, India/Eurasia, California region, Arabia/Eurasia, northern Australia, and the Philippine plate margin are marked in the model as the regions prone to strong earthquakes. The modeled seismic activity is moderate at the boundaries such as the southern Pacific plate, Nazca/Pacific

  15. Deck view, west approach; former Western Pacific (now Union Pacific) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Deck view, west approach; former Western Pacific (now Union Pacific) Railroad at left; wind turbine generators atop hill in background; view to northeast; 90mm lens - Carroll Overhead Bridge, Altamont Pass Road, Livermore, Alameda County, CA

  16. Alignment between seafloor spreading directions and absolute plate motions through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Simon E.; Flament, Nicolas; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-02-01

    The history of seafloor spreading in the ocean basins provides a detailed record of relative motions between Earth's tectonic plates since Pangea breakup. Determining how tectonic plates have moved relative to the Earth's deep interior is more challenging. Recent studies of contemporary plate motions have demonstrated links between relative plate motion and absolute plate motion (APM), and with seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Here we explore the link between spreading directions and APM since the Early Cretaceous. We find a significant alignment between APM and spreading directions at mid-ocean ridges; however, the degree of alignment is influenced by geodynamic setting, and is strongest for mid-Atlantic spreading ridges between plates that are not directly influenced by time-varying slab pull. In the Pacific, significant mismatches between spreading and APM direction may relate to a major plate-mantle reorganization. We conclude that spreading fabric can be used to improve models of APM.

  17. Global Dynamic Numerical Simulations of Plate Tectonic Reorganizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, G.; Quevedo, L.; Butterworth, N.; Matthews, K. J.; Müller, D.

    2010-12-01

    We use a new numerical approach for global geodynamics to investigate the origin of present global plate motion and to identify the causes of the last two global tectonic reorganizations occurred about 50 and 100 million years ago (Ma) [1]. While the 50 Ma event is the most well-known global plate-mantle event, expressed by the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain, a prominent plate reorganization at about 100 Ma, although presently little studied, is clearly indicated by a major bend in the fracture zones in the Indian Ocean and by a change in Pacific plate motion [2]. Our workflow involves turning plate reconstructions into surface meshes that are subsequently employed as initial conditions for global Boundary Element numerical models. The tectonic setting that anticipates the reorganizations is processed with the software GPlates, combining the 3D mesh of the paleo-plate morphology and the reconstruction of paleo-subducted slabs, elaborated from tectonic history [3]. All our models involve the entire planetary system, are fully dynamic, have free surface, are characterized by a spectacular computational speed due to the simultaneous use of the multi-pole algorithm and the Boundary Element formulation and are limited only by the use of sharp material property variations [4]. We employ this new tool to unravel the causes of plate tectonic reorganizations, producing and comparing global plate motion with the reconstructed ones. References: [1] Torsvik, T., Müller, R.D., Van der Voo, R., Steinberger, B., and Gaina, C., 2008, Global Plate Motion Frames: Toward a unified model: Reviews in Geophysics, VOL. 46, RG3004, 44 PP., 2008 [2] Wessel, P. and Kroenke, L.W. Pacific absolute plate motion since 145 Ma: An assessment of the fixed hot spot hypothesis. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol 113, B06101, 2008 [3] L. Quevedo, G. Morra, R. D. Mueller. Parallel Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Crustal Dynamics, Proceeding 9th World Congress and 4th Asian

  18. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  19. Trans-Pacific Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A trans-Pacific section along latitude 24.5°N is planned for 1985, with the field program tentatively scheduled for April 17 to June 27. The purpose of the expedition is to measure the transport of heat by ocean currents, to determine the net transport of water masses and estimate the meridional general circulation of the North Pacific, and to improve the mapping of tracer distributions in the deep North Pacific.Approximately 200 surface-to-bottom CTD/rosette stations will be occupied across the width of the ocean, with maximum station spacing of 80 km over abyssal plains, closing to 30-50 km over rough topography and boundaries. Water samples will be collected and analyzed on board for salinity, oxygen, and nutrients.

  20. Off-axis crustal thickness across and along the east pacific rise within the MELT area

    PubMed

    Canales; Detrick; Bazin; Harding; Orcutt

    1998-05-22

    Wide-angle seismic data along the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) arrays show that the thickness of 0.5- to 1. 5-million-year-old crust of the Nazca Plate is not resolvably different from that of the Pacific Plate, despite an asymmetry in depth and gravity across this portion of the East Pacific Rise. Crustal thickness on similarly aged crust on the Nazca plate near a magmatically robust part of the East Pacific Rise at 17 degrees15'S is slightly thinner (5.1 to 5.7 kilometers) than at the 15 degrees55'S overlapping spreading center (5.8 to 6.3 kilometers). This small north-south off-axis crustal thickness difference may reflect along-axis temporal variations in magma supply, whereas the across-axis asymmetry in depth and gravity must be caused by density variations in the underlying mantle. PMID:9596565

  1. An estimate of tidal and non-tidal modulations of plate subduction speed in the transition zone in the Tokai district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Yabe, Suguru; Ide, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Non-volcanic tremors and slow slip events in subduction zones have been found to be triggered by small external stress disturbances, as demonstrated by the synchronization of temporal variations in tremor rate with diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. Therefore, long-term variations in tremor rate might be predicted by amplitude modulations of diurnal and semi-diurnal tides at decadal time scales. Given that tremors and slow slips are shear slip on the plate boundary, their long-term variations must be associated with fluctuations in plate subduction speed below the seismogenic zone. In previous work, we showed a good correlation between long-term seismicity and empirically calculated tremor rate based on observed tidal levels in the Nankai region, western Japan. Here, we present an improved method of modeling long-term slip rate fluctuation based on the calculation of Coulomb stress due to ocean and solid earth tides on the plate interface. We also include the effects of non-tidal ocean variations, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Kuroshio Current, employing an ocean model developed by the Japan Meteorological Agency. We apply the method to the Tokai district, where the effects of the Kuroshio Current are large, and demonstrate the importance of considering non-tidal effects. Our calculated slip rate fluctuations could amount to 1 mm/year in decadal scales, and periods with faster rates partly corresponded to variations in seismicity. Slow slip events in the study region weakly corresponded to times of higher stress.

  2. Pole of rotating analysis of present-day Juan de Fuca plate motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, C.; Wilson, D. S.; Hey, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    Convergence rates between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates are calculated by means of their relative, present-day pole of rotation. A method of calculating the propagation of errors in addition to the instantaneous poles of rotation is also formulated and applied to determine the Euler pole for Pacific-Juan de Fuca. This pole is vectorially added to previously published poles for North America-Pacific and 'hot spot'-Pacific to obtain North America-Juan de Fuca and 'hot spot'-Juan de Fuca, respectively. The errors associated with these resultant poles are determined by propagating the errors of the two summed angular velocity vectors. Under the assumption that hot spots are fixed with respect to a mantle reference frame, the average absolute velocity of the Juan de Puca plate is computed at approximately 15 mm/yr, thereby making it the slowest-moving of the oceanic plates.

  3. A great earthquake rupture across a rapidly evolving three-plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Kevin P; Lay, Thorne; Ammon, Charles J

    2009-04-10

    On 1 April 2007 a great, tsunamigenic earthquake (moment magnitude 8.1) ruptured the Solomon Islands subduction zone at the triple junction where the Australia and Solomon Sea-Woodlark Basin plates simultaneously underthrust the Pacific plate with different slip directions. The associated abrupt change in slip direction during the great earthquake drove convergent anelastic deformation of the upper Pacific plate, which generated localized uplift in the forearc above the subducting Simbo fault, potentially amplifying local tsunami amplitude. Elastic deformation during the seismic cycle appears to be primarily accommodated by the overriding Pacific forearc. This earthquake demonstrates the seismogenic potential of extremely young subducting oceanic lithosphere, the ability of ruptures to traverse substantial geologic boundaries, and the consequences of complex coseismic slip for uplift and tsunamigenesis. PMID:19359581

  4. 19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For Renewal of Br. 210-C Near Tehama, Sac. Division, Scale 1' = 40' & 1/4' = 1'-0', Sept. 1927, M.W.D., Drawing 5935, Sheet 2.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  5. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  6. Lohse's historic plate archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M.; Tsvetkova, K.; Richter, G.; Scholz, G.; Böhm, P.

    The description and the analysis of Oswald Lohse's astrophotographic plates, collected at the Astrophysical Observatory Potsdam in the period 1879 - 1889, are presented. 67 plates of the archive, taken with the greatest instrument of the observatory at that time - the refractor (D = 0.30 m, F = 5.40 m, scale = 38''/mm) and with the second heliographic objective (D = 0.13 m, F = 1.36 m, scale = 152''/mm) - - survived two world wars in relative good condition. The plate emulsions are from different manufacturers in the beginning of astrophotography (Gädicke, Schleussner, Beernaert, etc.). The sizes of the plates are usually 9x12 cm2, which corresponds to fields of 1.2deg and 5deg respectively for each instrument mentioned above. The average limiting magnitude is 13.0(pg). Besides of the plates received for technical experiments (work on photographic processes, testing of new instruments and methods of observations), the scientific observations follow programs for studies of planet surfaces, bright stars, some double stars, stellar clusters and nebulous objects. Lohse's archive is included into the Wide Field Plate Database (http://www.skyarchive.org) as the oldest systematic one, covering the fields of Orion (M42/43), Pleiades, h & chi Persei, M37, M3, M11, M13, M92, M31, etc. With the PDS 2020 GM+ microdensitometer of Münster University 10 archive plates were digitized.

  7. Teleseismic receiver function imaging of the Pacific Northwest, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eager, Kevin Charles

    The origins of widespread Cenozoic tectonomagmatism in the Pacific Northwest, United States likely involve complex dynamics including subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate and mantle upwelling processes, all of which are reflected in the crust and upper mantle. To provide an improved understanding of these processes, I analyze P-to- S converted phases using the receiver function method to image topographic variations on regional seismic discontinuities in the upper mantle, which provides constraints on mantle thermal structure, and the crust-mantle interface, which provides constraints on crustal thickness and composition. My results confirm complexity in the Juan de Fuca slab structure as found by regional tomographic studies, including limited evidence of the slab penetrating the transition zone between the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. Evidence is inconclusive for a simple mantle plume beneath the central Oregon High Lava Plains, but indicates a regional increase in mantle temperatures stretching to the east. This result implies the inflow of warm material, either from around the southern edge of the Juan de Fuca plate as it descends into the mantle, or from a regional upwelling to the east related to the Yellowstone hotspot. Results for regional crustal structure reveal thin (˜31 km) crust beneath the High Lava Plains relative to surrounding regions that exhibit thicker (35+ km) crust. The thick (≥ 40 km) crust of the Owyhee Plateau has a sharp western boundary and normal Poisson's ratio, a measure of crustal composition. I find a slightly thickened crust and low Poisson's ratio between Steens Mountain and the Owyhee Plateau, consistent with residuum from source magma of the Steens flood basalts. Central and southern Oregon exhibit very high Poisson's ratios and low velocity zones within the crust, suggesting a degree of intracrustal partial melt not seen along the center of the age-progressive High Lava Plains magmatic track, perhaps due to crustal melt

  8. The surface and through crack problems in layered orthotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, Fazil; Wu, Binghua

    1991-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for a relatively accurate calculation of Stress Intensity Factors in a laminated orthotropic plate containing a through or part-through crack. The laminated plate is assumed to be under bending or membrane loading and the mode 1 problem is considered. First three transverse shear deformation plate theories (Mindlin's displacement based first-order theory, Reissner's stress-based first-order theory, and a simple-higher order theory due to Reddy) are reviewed and examined for homogeneous, laminated and heterogeneous orthotropic plates. Based on a general linear laminated plate theory, a method by which the stress intensity factors can be obtained in orthotropic laminated and heterogeneous plates with a through crack is developed. Examples are given for both symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated plates and the effects of various material properties on the stress intensity factors are studied. In order to implement the line-spring model which is used later to study the surface crack problem, the corresponding plane elasticity problem of a two-bonded orthotropic plated containing a crack perpendicular to the interface is also considered. Three different crack profiles: an internal crack, an edge crack, and a crack terminating at the interface are considered. The effect of the different material combinations, geometries, and material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors and on the power of stress singularity for a crack terminating at the interface is fully examined. The Line Spring model of Rice and Levy is used for the part-through crack problem. The surface crack is assumed to lie in one of the two-layered laminated orthotropic plates due to the limitation of the available plane strain results. All problems considered are of the mixed boundary value type and are reduced to Cauchy type of singular integral equations which are then solved numerically.

  9. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  10. Deep earthquakes in the southwest Pacific: A tectonic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamburger, M.W.; Isacks, B.L.

    1987-12-10

    This paper examines the spatial distribution deep earthquakes in the Tonga-Fiji-New Hebrides region of the southwest Pacific. Our interpretation emphasizes the complex Cenozoic tectonics of the Pacific/Indo-Australian plate boundary as a primary control on the distribution and deformation of subducted lithosphere. Most deep earthquakes in the interarc region are associated with the contorted Pacific plate lithosphere subducted at the Tonga Trench. However, anomalous groups of deep earthquakes located west of the Tonga zone are unrelated to the present plate configuration. Tectonic reconstructions of the region to 8 m.y. B.P. provide circumstantial evidence that (1) the anomalous events west of the Tonga zone occur in two pieces of detached lithosphere, subducted at the Vitiaz and proto-New Hebrides trenches during the late Miocene, (2) the flattening of the inclined seismic zone in northernmost Tonga is related to the rapid opening of the Lau Basin since 4 m.y. B.P., and (3) the sharp westward curvature of the Tonga seismic zone in this area coincides with a preexisting bend in the late Miocene Vitiaz arc. The sharpness of its present curvature appears to be secondary effect of shear flow in the lower mantle and compression between detached (Vitiaz) and attached (Tonga) lithosphere. Thus much of the contortion of the subducted lithosphere beneath Tonga-Fiji may be produced by local tectonic interactions, rather than collision of the slab with an impenetrable boundary in the midmantle. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  11. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  12. Flat plate solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, M.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

  13. Plate tectonics: Metamorphic myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clear evidence for subduction-induced metamorphism, and thus the operation of plate tectonics on the ancient Earth has been lacking. Theoretical calculations indicate that we may have been looking for something that cannot exist.

  14. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

  15. The Pacific Rim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul F., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The articles in this special edition were compiled to provide information to Canadian social studies teachers about Pacific Rim countries. Section 1, entitled "The Big Picture and Future Interests," contains: (1) "Social Studies for the 21st Century" (J. Tucker); (2) "Culture and Communication: A Perspective on Asian Studies for Tomorrow's…

  16. OCLC in Asia Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Min-min

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) and the changing Asia Pacific library scene under the broad headings of the three phases of technology innovation. Highlights include WorldCat and the OCLC shared cataloging system; resource sharing and interlibrary loan; enriching OCLC online catalog with Asian collections; and future outlooks.…

  17. Positive battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The power characteristics of a lead acid battery are improved by incorporating a dispersion of 1 to 10% by weight of a thermodynamically stable conductivity additive, such as conductive tin oxide coated glass fibers (34) of filamentary glass wool (42) in the positive active layer (32) carried on the grid (30) of the positive plate (16). Positive plate potential must be kept high enough to prevent reduction of the tin oxide to tin by utilizing an oversized, precharged positive paste.

  18. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  19. Unicortical versus bicortical locked plate fixation in midshaft clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Bravman, Jonathan T; Taylor, Michal L; Baldini, Todd; Vidal, Armando F

    2015-05-01

    Higher rates of poor outcomes in displaced midshaft clavicle fractures treated nonoperatively have recently been reported. Along with expanding indications for operative fixation and increasing application of locked plate constructs, it is unknown whether complications related to bicortical penetration of the clavicle can be avoided using unicortical fixation. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of unicortical and bicortical fixation in precontoured vs manually contoured locking clavicle plates. Forty-eight Sawbone composite human clavicle specimens (item #3408; Pacific Research Laboratories, Vashon, Washington) with a midshaft clavicle osteotomy were reduced and plated in 8 specimens each using a bicortical and unicortical fixation for each of 3 locked plate constructs (3.5-mm LCP Reconstruction Plate; 3.5-mm LCP Superior Clavicle Plate; 3.5-mm LCP Superior Anterior Clavicle Plate; Synthes, Inc, West Chester, Pennsylvania). Specimens were tested for stiffness in axial torsion and cantilever bending and then loaded to failure in 3-point bending. Data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P<.05). No significant differences were found between unicortical and bicortical fixation in failure load, cantilever bending, and cross body stiffness. Bicortical fixation was significantly stiffer than unicortical fixation in torsion only for the same plates. Significant differences also existed between plates in torsion. Unicortical locked plate fixation may be a reasonable option in the treatment of displaced midshaft clavicle fracture fixation to avoid complications associated with posteroinferior hardware penetration following clavicle fracture fixation based on the biomechanical performance of these constructs. However, it remains unclear whether these differences will be clinically significant. PMID:25970369

  20. The dynamic response of inelastic, delaminated composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.O.; Addessio, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of metal matrix composite (MMC) plates is considered. In particular, the influence of inelastic deformations and delamination at the interfaces of the lamina on the macroscopic and local response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al plates are studied. The work is carried out using a recently developed plate theory which models both delamination and localized history-dependent effects such, as inelasticity. A linear debonding model for the interface is employed for the current work. The theory models both the initiation and growth of delaminations without imposing any restrictions on the location, size, or direction of growth of the delamination. In the current work the response of the individual lamina in the plate are modeled using the Method of Cells (MOC) micromechanical model. The inelastic behavior in the matrix is modeled using the unified viscoplastic theory of Bodner and Partom. The behavior of a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al plate under dynamic cylindrical bending subjected to a ramp and hold type of loading is examined. For simplicity, the plate is assumed to be composed of a cross-ply layup. It is shown that both inelastic deformations and delamination have a strong influence on dynamic plate behavior. The inelastic deformations have strong effect on the axial displacement while delamination has greater influence on the deflection.

  1. Phononic plate waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Tsong; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Sun, Jia-Hong

    2011-10-01

    In the past two decades, phononic crystals (PCs) which consist of periodically arranged media have attracted considerable interest because of the existence of complete frequency band gaps and maneuverable band structures. Recently, Lamb waves in thin plates with PC structures have started to receive increasing attention for their potential applications in filters, resonators, and waveguides. This paper presents a review of recent works related to phononic plate waves which have recently been published by the authors and coworkers. Theoretical and experimental studies of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plate structures are covered. On the theoretical side, analyses of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plates using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and finite-element (FE) method are addressed. These methods were applied to study the complete band gaps of Lamb waves, characteristics of the propagating and localized wave modes, and behavior of anomalous refraction, called negative refraction, in the PC plates. The theoretical analyses demonstrated the effects of PC-based negative refraction, lens, waveguides, and resonant cavities. We also discuss the influences of geometrical parameters on the guiding and resonance efficiency and on the frequencies of waveguide and cavity modes. On the experimental side, the design and fabrication of a silicon-based Lamb wave resonator which utilizes PC plates as reflective gratings to form the resonant cavity are discussed. The measured results showed significant improvement of the insertion losses and quality factors of the resonators when the PCs were applied. PMID:21989878

  2. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C., Jr.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. High conductance thermal interface concept for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulin, Elizabeth C.; Horan, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    An interface concept has been developed which produces high conductance at a thermal/mechanical joint without resorting to high clamping forces or potentially contaminating fillers such as thermal grease. This paper discusses the characteristics of several variations of the high conductance interface concept and compares them to those of existing interface concepts proposed for several Space Station applications. The application of the high conductance concept to thermal joints such as internal coldplate interfaces and external equipment module to heat acquisition plate interfaces would reduce the weight and complexity and increase the efficiency of the Space Station Thermal Management System.

  4. Caribbean plate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

  5. Using Plate Mapping to Examine Portion Size and Plate Composition for Large and Small Divided Plates

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, David E.; Sobal, Jeffery; Wansink, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Does the size of a plate influence the serving of all items equally, or does it influence the serving of some foods – such as meat versus starch versus vegetables – very differently? To examine this, we utilize a promising new plate mapping method where people drew a meal on a paper plate to examine sensitivity to small versus large three-compartment divided plates in portion size and meal composition in a sample of 109 university students. The total drawn meal area was 37% bigger on large plates than small plates, that is, the portion of plate coverage did not differ by plate size. Men and women drew bigger vegetable portions and men drew bigger meat portions on large plates when compared to small plates. These results suggest that men and women are differentially sensitive to plate size for overall meal size and for meal composition. Implications for decreasing portion size and improving meal balance are discussed. PMID:25280373

  6. The response of a plate bonded to a randomly vibrating viscoelastic half-space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The response of an infinite Bernoulli-Euler plate placed on the surface of a randomly vibrating viscoelastic half-space is calculated, allowing for the presence of shear stresses between the plate and the half-space. The shear stresses arise from the condition that the relative motion between the plate and the half-space vanishes at the interface. The three components of displacement of the free surface of the half-space before the plate is added are assumed to be stationary homogeneous random functions of position and time. From the wavenumber-frequency spectra of these displacements the frequency spectra of the three components of displacement of the plate half-space interface are calculated. As an example, the frequency spectrum of the vertical interface displacement is calculated for two assumed forms of the wavenumber spectra of the free-surface displacements.

  7. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  8. Cadmium plating replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  9. Cadmium plating replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  10. Is structural interface standardization beneficial?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombert, W. E.

    1983-11-01

    Factors applicable to fixed angle, large field and fixed angle, large building flat plate photovoltaic (PV) generator arrays are discussed in the context of standardization. It is concluded that structural interface standardization may be highly desirable in any one major project, but not at this time in the overall PV industry. Attempts to mandate such standardization will act as a deterrent to long-range improvements. In specific projects, structural standardization should be defined at the largest practical interface, leaving the maximum possible freedom to the module and array manufacturer. There is a corollary area, however, where detailed standards would benefit the industry; the matter of Standard Practices. Work being done towards definition of acceptable/desirable practices in materials, finishes, fastening and locking methods, grounding techniques, lightning protection, etc., and in handling the environmental ranges, should be continued.

  11. Overall contact conductance of a prototype Parallel Fin Thermal Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stobb, C. A.; Limardo, Jose G.

    1992-01-01

    The Parallel Fin Thermal Interface has been developed and tested as an orbital replaceable interface. The interface consists of two identical plates with pairs of opposing parallel straight fins. Each pair of fins is sandwiched between two insert plates pressed against the fins with enough force for good heat transfer through the interface. Two prototype parallel fin interfaces were built (Model 140 and 380) with different fin and insert plate dimensions. Samples of the interfacing surfaces were found to have roughness values ranging from 22 to 35 microinches. Overall interface conductance (Hc) values of 46.7 to 74.2 Btu/hr sq ft-F were obtained for the 140 model in vacuum with an interface pressure from 18.8 to 37.5 psi, respectively. The Model 380 exhibited Hc values from 31.2 to 46.8 Btu/hr sq ft-F in vacuum, with respective interface pressures of 14.2 and 22.0 psi. Several correlations were found to agree with test data to within 20 percent.

  12. Elastocapillary coalescence of plates and pillars

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z.; Schneider, T. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, H.-Y.; Aizenberg, J.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    When a fluid-immersed array of supported plates or pillars is dried, evaporation leads to the formation of menisci on the tips of the plates or pillars that bring them together to form complex patterns. Building on prior experimental observations, we use a combination of theory and computation to understand the nature of this instability and its evolution in both the two- and three-dimensional setting of the problem. For the case of plates, we explicitly derive the interaction torques based on the relevant physical parameters associated with pillar deformation, contact-line pinning/depinning and fluid volume changes. A Bloch-wave analysis for our periodic mechanical system captures the window of volumes where the two-plate eigenvalue characterizes the onset of the coalescence instability. We then study the evolution of these binary clusters and their eventual elastic arrest using numerical simulations that account for evaporative dynamics coupled to capillary coalescence. This explains both the formation of hierarchical clusters and the sensitive dependence of the final structures on initial perturbations, as seen in our experiments. We then generalize our analysis to treat the problem of pillar collapse in three dimensions, where the fluid domain is completely connected and the interface is a minimal surface with the uniform mean curvature. Our theory and simulations capture the salient features of experimental observations in a range of different situations and may thus be useful in controlling the ensuing patterns. PMID:25792949

  13. Modeling the Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.A.; O'Brien, J.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Two numerical models utilizing primitive equations (two momentum equations and a mass continuity equation) simulate the oceanography of the Pacific Ocean from 20{degrees}S to 50{degrees}N. The authors examine the abundant model data through visualization , by animating the appropriate model fields and viewing the time history of each model simulation as a color movie. The animations are used to aid understanding of ocean circulation.

  14. Northeast Pacific flatfish management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumble, Robert J.

    1998-03-01

    Exploitation of northeast Pacific flatfish effectively began in the late 1800s with the fishery for Pacific halibut. Harvest of other flatfish occurred on a limited, local basis until foreign fishing fleets came to the area in the late 1950s. When US and Canadian fishermen replaced the foreign fleets in the 1970s and 1980s, a conservation-based management system designed to control foreign fishing was applied to the domestic fleet. Flatfish stock assessment is based on scientific surveys, both trawl and longline, and on catch-age models. In Alaskan waters since 1989 and since 1996 in Canadian waters, mandatory observers collect data on species composition, discards of flatfish and other groundfish, and catch and discards of prohibited species. Fishermen pay observer costs. Most biomass and harvest occurs in the Bering Sea-Aleutian Islands area. Many northeast Pacific flatfish are near record-high abundance, an order of magnitude higher than 20 years ago. Exploitation rates based on F35% or F0.1 generate acceptable biological catch of more than 1 million mt, but annual harvest reaches only 300,000 mt. Total groundfish harvest is limited by an optimum yield limit of 2 million mt in the Bering Sea-Aleutian Islands, where the acceptable biological catch is 3 million mt, and by limits on amounts of Pacific halibut and other prohibited species bycatch. Most flatfish are relatively low-value species, and fishermen chose to fish for more valuable species. A large, powerful fleet which developed under open access in the US saw fishing time decline and economic problems increase as catching capacity grew, while Canada stabilized its fleet with limited entry and catch restrictions for individual vessels.

  15. Past Plate Motions and The Evolution of Earth's Lower Mantle: Relating LLSVPs and Plume Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, A. L.; Torsvik, T. H.; Shephard, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography elucidates broad, low shear-wave velocity structures in the lower mantle beneath Africa and the central Pacific with uncertain physical and compositional origins. The anomalously slow areas, which cover nearly 50% of the core-mantle boundary, are often referred to as Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) due to the reduced velocity of seismic waves passing through them. Several hypotheses have arisen to explain the LLSVPs in the context of large-scale mantle convection. One end-member scenario infers a spatial correlation between LLSVP margins at depth and the reconstructed surface eruption sites of hotspots, kimberlites, and Large Igneous Provinces. Such a correlation has been explained by the preferential triggering of plumes at LLSVP margins by impingement of the subducting lithosphere upon the lower thermal boundary layer at the interface between ambient mantle and the higher density structures. This scenario propounds that Earth's plate motion history plays a controlling role in plume development, and that the location, geometry and morphology of plumes may be influenced by the movement of subducting slabs. Here, we investigate what is necessary to create such a pattern of plume distribution in relation to LLSVPs. We consider what effect past plate motions may have had on the evolution of Earth's lower mantle, and discuss the development of mantle plumes in terms of subduction dynamics. We integrate plate tectonic histories and numerical models of mantle convection to investigate the role that subduction history plays in the development and evolution of plumes in the presence of LLSVPs. To test whether an interaction exists between the surface location of subduction and plume eruption sites, and if so, to what degree over time, we apply varying shifts to the absolute reference frame of the plate reconstruction. With this method, we are able to change the location of subduction at the surface and thus the global flow field. This in turn

  16. Polyaxial Screws in Locked Plating of Tibial Pilon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yenna, Zachary C; Bhadra, Arup K; Ojike, Nwakile I; Burden, Robert L; Voor, Michael J; Roberts, Craig S

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the axial and torsional stiffness of polyaxial locked plating techniques compared with fixed-angle locked plating techniques in a distal tibia pilon fracture model. The effect of using a polyaxial screw to cross the fracture site was examined to determine its ability to control relative fracture site motion. A laboratory experiment was performed to investigate the biomechanical stiffness of distal tibia fracture models repaired with 3.5-mm anterior polyaxial distal tibial plates and locking screws. Sawbones Fourth Generation Composite Tibia models (Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc, Vashon, Washington) were used to model an Orthopaedic Trauma Association 43-A1.3 distal tibia pilon fracture. The polyaxial plates were inserted with 2 central locking screws at a position perpendicular to the cortical surface of the tibia and tested for load as a function of axial displacement and torque as a function of angular displacement. The 2 screws were withdrawn and inserted at an angle 15° from perpendicular, allowing them to span the fracture and insert into the opposing fracture surface. Each tibia was tested again for axial and torsional stiffness. In medial and posterior loading, no statistically significant difference was found between tibiae plated with the polyaxial plate and the central screws placed in the neutral position compared with the central screws placed at a 15° position. In torsional loading, a statistically significant difference was noted, showing greater stiffness in tibiae plated with the polyaxial plate and the central screws placed at a 15° position compared with tibiae plated with the central screws placed at a 0° (or perpendicular) position. This study showed that variable angle constructs show similar stiffness properties between perpendicular and 15° angle insertions in axial loading. The 15° angle construct shows greater stiffness in torsional loading. PMID:26270750

  17. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  18. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having through-plate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with led spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  19. Survey of ion plating sources. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1979-01-01

    Based on the type of evaporation source, gaseous media and mode of transport, the following is discussed: resistance, electron beam, sputtering, reactive and ion beam evaporation. Ionization efficiencies and ion energies in the glow discharge determine the percentage of atoms which are ionized under typical ion plating conditions. The plating flux consists of a small number of energetic ions and a large number of energetic neutrals. The energy distribution ranges from thermal energies up to a maximum energy of the discharge. The various reaction mechanisms which contribute to the exceptionally strong adherence - formation of a graded sustrate/coating interface are not fully understood, however the controlling factors are evaluated. The influence of process variables on the nucleation and growth characteristics are illustrated in terms of morphological changes which affect the mechanical and tribological properties of the coating.

  20. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Tortorelli, Peter F; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Vitek, John Michael; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Wilson, Mahlon; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Connors, Dan; Rakowski, Jim; Gervasio, Don

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  1. Fracture of composite orthotropic plates for materials type 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.

    1976-01-01

    The fracture problem of laminated plates which consist of orthotropic layers is considered. Symmetrical cracks are located normal to the bimaterial interfaces. The external loads are applied away from the crack region. Three cases are considered: (a) the case of internal cracks; (b) the case of broken laminates; and (c) case of a crack crossing the interface. A general formulation of the problem is given for plane strain and generalized plane stress cases. The singular behavior of stresses at the crack tips and at the interfaces is studied. In each case the stress intensity factors are computed for various crack geometries.

  2. Plate-mantle coupling from post-Pangea plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Dietmar Müller, R.; Seton, Maria; Flament, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Convection in the Earth's mantle that involves plates at the surfaces gives rise to plate velocities that vary through time and depend on the balance of plate boundary forces, with the present-day providing a snapshot of this ongoing process. However, present-day plate velocities do not capture plate behaviour over geologically representative timeframes and thus cannot be used to evaluate factors limiting plate velocities. Previous studies investigated the effects of continental keels on plate speeds by either using the present-day snapshot or a limited number of reconstructed plate configurations, often leading to conflicting results. For example, an early assumption was that continental keels (especially cratons) were unlikely to impede fast plate motions because India's velocity approached ~20 cm/yr in the Eocene prior to the collision with Eurasia. We employ a modern plate reconstruction approach with evolving global topological plate boundaries for the post-Pangea timeframe (since 200 Ma) to evaluate factors controlling plate velocities. Plate boundary configurations and plate velocities are extracted from the open-source and cross-platform plate reconstruction package GPlates (www.gplates.org) at 1 Myr intervals. For each plate, at each timestep, the area of continental and cratonic lithosphere is calculated to evaluate the effect on plate velocities. Our results support that oceanic plates tend to be 2-3 times faster than plates with large portion of continental plate area, consistent with predictions of numerical models of mantle convection. The fastest plates (~8.5 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by oceanic plate area and high subducting portion of plate perimeter, while the slowest plates (~2.6-2.8 cm/yr RMS) are dominated by continental plate area and bounded by transforms and mid-oceanic ridge segments. Importantly, increasing cratonic fractions (both Proterozoic and Archean lithosphere) significantly impede plate velocities, suggesting that deep continental

  3. Reduced Plating Ignitron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A (Inventor); Pearson, J Boise (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An ignitron apparatus has an airtight tubular housing having a first sealed end and a second sealed end. An anode is connected at the first sealed end, projecting into the housing, and a recess at the second sealed and forms a well which contains a quantity of liquid gallium or gallium alloy making up the cathode. An ignitor projects through the liquid metal and into the housing. The inner surface of the housing includes at least one plating-reduction structure to prevent electrical shorting of the apparatus caused by plating of the liquid metal.

  4. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  5. Horizontal and vertical deformation field in New Caledonia, South West Pacific, derived from more than 20 years of GNSS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, V.; Calmant, S.; Valty, P.; Gravelle, M.; Sakic, P.; Aucan, J.; Pelletier, B.

    2015-12-01

    New Caledonia is located in the South West Pacific Ocean, on the Australian Plate just before its subduction under the North Fiji Basin. Because it is on the subducting side of the plate interface, New Caledonia is considered to be stable to first order and not to undergo rapid deformation. However, moderate seismicity is recorded close to the plate interface, in the southern part of the main land and along the Loyalty ridge. In addition, the main island and Loyalty ridge are subjected to long-term vertical deformation due to the flexure of the plate entering subduction. A geodetic network was installed since the early days of GPS (~1990) and has been further developed and occasionally measured since. Due to the low number of global GNSS recording stations in the early 1990s, the positioning accuracy that can be achieved with these data is poor compared to present-day standards, and expected movements are slow (possibly less than 1 mm/yr). However, the >20 year length of the time series may allow us to determine the current deformation field in New Caledonia and Loyalty Ridge. We pay special care in using older GNSS data for characterizing ground motions, reprocessing all available data using a range of different processing strategies and products. We calculated daily positions from double-differenced ionosphere-free carrier phase data in a global network using the GAMIT software and combined and aligned the results on the ITRF2008 using the CATREF software, according to the processing strategy developed as part of the current ULR6 (www.sonel.org) reprocessing campaign for IGS. We compare the double difference results with those obtained in PPP mode using JPL GIPSY software as well as CNES GINS software and different products (MIT, JPL and GRG orbits and clocks provided in the framework of the IGS2 reprocessing campaign). We present both the results for New Caledonia and an analysis of the applicability of these different processing strategies to older GNSS

  6. Lithospheric structure in the Pacific geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Hinojosa, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The high degree and order SEASAT geoid in the central Pacific correlates closely with the structure of the cooling lithosphere. Relative changes in plate age across major fracture zones in relatively young seafloor frame the east-west trending pattern formed by the geoid anomalies. The field removal in bathymetry corresponds to removal of some of the low degree and order geoidal components, the step like structure across fracture zones is also removed. The regional thermal subsidence was removed from the bathymetry by subtracting a mean subsidence surface from the observed bathymetry. This produces a residual bathymetry map analogous to the usual residual depth anomaly maps. The residual bathymetry obtained in this way contains shallow depths for young seafloor, and larger depths for older seafloor, thus retaining the structure of the lithosphere while removing the subsidence of the lithosphere.

  7. The Pacific RANET Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postawko, S.; Ah Poe, A.; Morrissey, M.

    2004-12-01

    There are few places in the world more vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change than the island nations of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The region also faces great challenges in communicating the issues related to climate to the general population. Lack of communications infrastructure, multiple languages, and knowledgeable personnel to deliver information, are all challenges for these countries. However, a recently developed international consortium is taking the first steps to addressing these challenges. The RANET (RAdio and interNET communications) project was originally developed for the countries of Africa, with initial funding from NOAA, to make weather, climate, and other environmental information more accessible to remote and resource-poor communities. The program is now expanding into Asia and the Pacific. RANET works to build telecommunication bridges between scientific-based products and remote communities that could benefit from such information.?The RANET project in the Pacific is a consortium of partners from the Pacific Island nations, the U.S., New Zealand, Australia, and others. Coordination of the project is loosely overseen by a Steering Committee, made up of representatives from the various interested partners. For regions where the appropriate technology exists (which includes the capital cities of nearly all of the island states of the Pacific), information is downloaded via a digital satellite receiver. This can then be broadcast within a country by many means, including Community FM Radio stations. The information distributed includes technical information needed by meteorological and related services to improve their own products and services, as well as a second level of information designed to serve communities, including weather forecasts, bulletins, warnings, etc. The primary challenge at this time is developing content that is both relevant and understandable to these remote communities. While some information will

  8. 78 FR 46325 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC785 Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific... Subcommittee of the Pacific Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) will convene a teleconference... Groundfish Subcommittee teleconference. Council address: Pacific Council, 7700 NE Ambassador Place, Suite...

  9. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders are 70 percent more likely to have ... being told they had asthma, 2014 Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Non-Hispanic White Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander/ ...

  10. Energy resources of Pacific Coast of Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno Salazar, R.

    1986-07-01

    Despite failure of modest exploration efforts to yield commercial hydrocarbon production in the Choco-Pacific coastal basin of Colombia, recent geophysical, geochemical, and surface geologic investigations indicate a potential for petroleum accumulations, which could be related to fields located on the western basins of Ecuador that in fact constitute an extension of the Colombian Pacific geologic scheme. The Choco-Pacific coastal basin of Colombia covers an area of approximately 70,000 km/sup 2/, of which 14,000 km/sup 2/ lies offshore. The structural style of this area corresponds to a convergent plate basin created over folded oceanic sediments and adjacent to the subduction zone. Such a framework could be conducive to an attractive array of potential hydrocarbon-bearing traps. Geochemical knowledge of potential source rocks of Cretaceous and early Tertiary age confers an added attraction to the area. Most evaluations reveal kerogen-rich, gas-prone organic matter. Nevertheless, the existence of oil seeps from Cretaceous outcrops could indicate sufficient thermal maturity for oil generation. Adequate reservoirs could be found in sandy or calcareous rocks of late Eocene to Oligocene age, predominantly of marine origin with an estimated thickness exceeding 20,000 ft. Colombia has been one of the leading world producers of gold and platinum, mostly derived from the vast alluvial cover of the onshore area of the basin. In rocks cropping out in the Western Cordillera (eastern margin of the basin), deposits of potentially commercial value of porphyry copper and molybdenum, as well as massive sulfur, manganese, and bauxite, have been found.

  11. The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The 1990 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting was held in Kanazawa, Japan from 15-21 Aug. 1990. This was the first meeting of a new series of meetings for the American Geophysical Union, and it proved to be very successful in terms of the scientific program and attendance, which included over 1,000 participants. The intent of this meeting was an effort on the part of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and several Japanese geophysical societies to gather individual Earth and space scientists at a major scientific meeting to focus on geophysical problems being studied in the western Pacific rim. The meeting was organized along the lines of a typical AGU annual meeting with some invited talks, many contributed talks, poster sessions, and with emphasis on presentations and informal discussions. The program committee consisted of scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. This meeting provided ample opportunities for U.S. and Japanese scientists to get to know each other and their works on a one-to-one basis. It was also a valuable opportunity for students studying geophysics to get together and interact with each other and with scientists from both the U.S. and Japan. There were 939 abstracts submitted to the conference and a total of 102 sessions designed as a result of the abstracts received. The topics of interest are as follows: space geodetic and observatory measurements for earthquake and tectonic studies; gravity, sea level, and vertical motion; variations in earth rotation and earth dynamics; sedimentary magnetism; global processes and precipitation; subsurface contaminant transport; U.S. Western Pacific Rim initiatives in hydrology; shelf and coastal circulation; tectonics, magmatism, and hydrothermal processes; earthquake prediction and hazard assessment; seismic wave propagation in realistic media; and dynamics and structure of plate boundaries and of the Earth's deep interior.

  12. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  13. A thickness mode acoustic wave sensor for measuring interface stiffness between two elastic materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiankang; Wang, Wencai; Wang, Ji; Yang, Zengtao; Yang, Jiashi

    2008-08-01

    We studied thickness vibration of 2 elastic layers with an elastic interface mounted on a plate piezoelectric resonator. The effect of the interface elasticity on resonant frequencies was examined. The result obtained suggests an acoustic wave sensor for measuring the elastic property of an interface between 2 materials. PMID:18986911

  14. Growth Plate Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... or crushed, the growth plate may close prematurely, forming a bony bridge or “bar.” The risk of ... this publication: James S. Panagis, M.D., M.P.H., NIAMS/NIH; R. Tracy Ballock, M.D., Case ...

  15. The Plate Tectonics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  16. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  17. Unitary plate electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor); Clough, Thomas J. (Inventor); Josefowicz, Jack Y. (Inventor); Sibert, John W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The unitary electrode (10) comprises a porous sheet (12) of fiberglass the strands (14) of which contain a coating (16) of conductive tin oxide. The lower portion of the sheet contains a layer (18) of resin and the upper layer (20) contains lead dioxide forming a positive active electrode on an electrolyte-impervious layer. The strands (14) form a continuous conduction path through both layers (16, 18). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating the surface of the plate facing the negative electrode with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (130) of lead or graphite filled resin adhered to the plate with a layer (31) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten resin from kettle (60) onto a sheet of glass wool (56) overlying a sheet of lead foil and then applying positive active paste from hopper (64) into the upper layer (68). The plate can also be formed by passing an assembly of a sheet ( 80) of resin, a sheet (86) of sintered glass and a sheet (90) of lead between the nip (92) of heated rollers (93, 95) and then filling lead oxide into the pores (116) of the upper layer (118).

  18. Plate Motions, Regional Deformation, and Time-Variation of Plate Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    The significant results obtained with support of this grant include the following: (1) Using VLBI data in combination with other geodetical, geophysical, and geological data to bound the present rotation of the Colorado Plateau, and to evaluate to its implications for the kinematics and seismogenic potential of the western half of the conterminous U.S. (2) Determining realistic estimates of uncertainties for VLBI data and then applying the data and uncertainties to obtain an upper bound on the integral of deformation within the "stable interior" of the North American and other plates and thus to place an upper bound on the seismogenic potential within these regions. (3) Combining VLBI data with other geodetic, geophysical, and geologic data to estimate the motion of coastal California in a frame of reference attached to the Sierra Nevada-Great Valley microplate. This analysis has provided new insights into the kinematic boundary conditions that may control or at least strongly influence the locations of asperities that rupture in great earthquakes along the San Andreas transform system. (4) Determining a global tectonic model from VLBI geodetic data that combines the estimation of plate angular velocities with individual site linear velocities where tectonically appropriate. and (5) Investigation of the some of the outstanding problems defined by the work leading to global plate motion model NUVEL-1. These problems, such as the motion between the Pacific and North American plates and between west Africa and east Africa, are focused on regions where the seismogenic potential may be greater than implied by published plate tectonic models.

  19. Development of transtensional and transpressive plate boundaries due to noncircular (cycloid) relative plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, V.S. )

    1990-05-01

    The trace of a transform fault commonly is assumed to be circular and concentric with the finite relative motion of the plates adjacent to the fault. These assumptions have led to controversy as the transform fault label has been applied to the San Andreas fault in California because the San Andreas fault is neither circular nor concentric with the motion of the Pacific plate relative to the North American plate. The assumption of circular relative plate motion over a finite time interval is not generally valid. When finite relative plate motion is not circular, the length and orientation of a transform fault must change through time. The length and orientation of ridge-ridge transform faults in oceanic crust evolve through the migration, propagation, and abandonment of ridge segments. Transform faults that bound continental crust evolve differently than do transform faults along mid-ocean ridges because continental transform faults typically do not have ridges at both ends and because of the rheological differences between oceanic and continental crust. Along continent-continent transform faults in which the initial displacement is entirely strike slip, later displacements will be progressively more divergent or convergent (i.e., transtensive or transpressive). Transtension can result in the development of deep basins with high heat flow. Transpression can result in folding, reverse faulting, and decoupling of the crust from its lower crustal or mantle lithosphere in the region adjacent to the transform fault. Regardless of whether the transform boundary becomes transtensional or transpressional, the boundary evolves from a discrete transform fault to a broader, structurally complex accommodation zone (sensu lato).

  20. Fractures, not Plumes, Have Controlled Major Seamount Volcanism in the Pacific over 170 Million Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.; Winterer, E. L.

    2003-12-01

    The distribution of guyots and atolls and large volcanic islands on the Pacific plate can be used to outline the likely connection between stresses acting on the plate and the gradual development of large, linear volcanic chains over the past 170 Ma. We construe three general periods with different stress regimes in the history of the Pacific plate. 1) During the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, the Pacific plate was surrounded by ridge segments and there were no major stress alignments within it. Within-plate volcanism thus assumed the scattered arrangement for the condition of no tectonic stress (1), and the large Magellan and Wake seamount clusters formed. Near the eastern boundaries of the plate, complex and shifting patterns of ridge reorganization dictated formation of very long, splayed, near-axis ridges such as Horizon Guyot and Necker Ridge. 2) At about 90 Ma, the growing middle-aged Pacific plate achieved its first persistent stress regime with the formation of subduction boundaries along its western or northwestern margin. The plate was no longer static but began to move over the asthenosphere and into the mantle. Subduction boundaries and the overall direction of subduction are uncertain, but this imparted a general yet not fully stable component of tension across the plate, producing the NNW Gilbert-Marshall, Line and Emperor Seamount ridges, generally orthogonal to the overall direction of least principal stress. The Line Island seamount chain, being near ridge axes, sustained a variable stress regime. It thus has no age progression of rocks dated between 70-90 Ma (2), great width, and a dual orientations of ridges. 3) By 47 Ma, nearly half of the boundaries of the Pacific plate now were trenches spanning from the Aleutians to New Zealand. In addition, northward migration of the Indian plate and Australia caught a major portion of the westerly moving Pacific plate between the northeast corner of the Tonga Trench and the Aleutians. The plate could not

  1. The Microstructure of Rolled Plates from Cast Billets of U-10Mo Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Burkes, Douglas; Lavender, Curt A.

    2015-03-01

    This report covers the examination of 13 samples of rolled plates from three separate castings of uranium, alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) which were sent from the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  2. Transition on the Geometry of the Cocos Plate in Central-Southern Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Domínguez, M. Á.; Perez-Campos, X.; Valencia-Cabrera, D.; Clayton, R. W.; Cordoba-Montiel, F.; Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic setting, produced by the interaction between the Cocos and North American plates, follows complex geometries along the Pacific coast. Previous studies in central Mexico showed that the slab dips nearly horizontally before steeply subducting into the continental mantle; in contrast, in southern Mexico, the slabs dips under the continental plate at a constant angle. Receiver functions from four seismic networks: GECO (Geometry of Cocos), SSN (Servicio Sismológico Nacional), OxNet (Oaxaca Network) and UV (Universidad Veracruzana) are used to study the crustal structure underneath the stations, and image the subducting Cocos plate in order to define the geometry and the transition angle in central-southern Mexico.

  3. Classifying Pacific islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Patrick D.; Kumar, Lalit; Eliot, Ian; McLean, Roger F.

    2016-12-01

    An earth-science-based classification of islands within the Pacific Basin resulted from the preparation of a database describing the location, area, and type of 1779 islands, where island type is determined as a function of the prevailing lithology and maximum elevation of each island, with an island defined as a discrete landmass composed of a contiguous land area ≥1 ha (0.01 km2) above mean high-water level. Reefs lacking islands and short-lived (<20 years) transient islands are not included. The principal aim of the classification is to assess the spatial diversity of the geologic and geomorphic attributes of Pacific islands. It is intended to be valid at a regional scale and based on two attributes: five types of lithology (volcanic, limestone, composite, continental, surficial) and a distinction between high and low islands. These attributes yielded eight island types: volcanic high and low islands; limestone high and low islands; composite high and low islands; reef (including all unconsolidated) islands; and continental islands. Most common are reef islands (36 %) and volcanic high islands (31 %), whereas the least common are composite low islands (1 %). Continental islands, 18 of the 1779 islands examined, are not included in maps showing the distribution of island attributes and types. Rationale for the spatial distributions of the various island attributes is drawn from the available literature and canvassed in the text. With exception of the few continental islands, the distribution of island types is broadly interpretable from the proximity of island-forming processes. It is anticipated the classification will become the basis for more focused investigation of spatial variability of the climate and ocean setting as well as the biological attributes of Pacific islands. It may also be used in spatial assessments of second-order phenomena associated with the islands, such as their vulnerability to various disasters, coastal erosion, or ocean pollution as

  4. Pacific neogene stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, John; Beu, Alan; Blueford, Joyce R.; Chinzei, Kiyotaka; Hornibrook, Norcutt; Ingle, James; Steininger, Fritz; Tsuchi, Ryuichi

    The Fourth International Congress of Pacific Neogene Stratigraphy, was held July 29-31, 1987, at the University of California, Berkeley. This very successful congress was organized by the Regional Committee on Pacific Neogene Stratigraphy (RCPNS) of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) and the International Geological Correlation Program (IGCP) Project 246 “Pacific Neogene Events in Time and Space.” The meeting was attended by 180 scientists from 16 different countries, and more than 90 presentations were made, on topics ranging from paleoclimatology, biostratigraphy, regional stratigraphy and geologic history, new techniques in stratigraphy, evolutionary studies, and modern biofacies and sediment relationships.A. R. Edwards of the New Zealand Geological Survey (Lower Hutt, New Zealand) spoke on climatic events that he recognizes in the late Neogene strata of New Zealand. The carbon isotope shift during chron 6 (6.3-6.5 Ma) is identified in the sequence at Blind River (Marlborough, New Zealand). The extinction of ˜25% of New Zealand molluscan genera during the latest Micoene (Kapitean Stage) accompanied the greatly accelerated diversification of planktonic foraminifera lineages at this time. The New Zealand events are also coeval with the Messinian “salinity crisis” in the Mediterranean. A series of events (extinctions of Mollusca, appearance of glacial rock types, foraminifera speciation, and nannofossil appearances) in New Zealand late Pliocene rocks reflect the climatic deterioration. One type of sub-Antarctic molluscan fauna abruptly appeared in central North Island at 2.4 m.y., coeval with the onset of major Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  5. The Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Tagica, K

    1993-03-01

    Population education in the Pacific region is summarized in terms of awareness and commitment, curriculum and instructional materials development, integration into the school curricula, training programs, and evaluation research. Several population education issues of current concern relate to the increase in chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension that are associated with life styles and diet, and the rising incidence of AIDS and teenage pregnancy. In the Pacific region, many countries have advanced population programs and policies, while some still do not even have a population policy. The issue of balancing population and resources is a topic that has not been sufficiently addressed in resource-poor countries. There is wide variance in awareness and commitment to population education in the Pacific region. Commitment and continuous support are crucial to population education projects. Lack of support is sometimes due to changing government personnel and lack of awareness of policy makers. Population education is not the same as family planning or sex education, and traditionally is spread through seminars and workshops by part time project personnel unconnected to the entire educational apparatus. Presently, only 8 population projects are functioning in the region, with 2-3 in the planning stages. Materials development in the Pacific region has been devoted to the secondary school level, yet awareness is increasing that sexuality, family health, and the environment should be introduced at the primary level. A popular strategy is to integrate population issues into the existing curriculum, such as in Fiji, the Marshall Islands, and Kiribati, which also have teacher training curriculum. In most countries sex education is still a controversial topic, and materials are developed by teacher committees working after school rather in a curriculum development unit. AIDS has pushed this topic into the public sector. A chart is provided for each country and

  6. Pacific rim lures explorationists

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, L.

    1991-09-01

    The Pacific Rim has been far and away the most attractive hunting ground for explorationists in the past year. Observers point to political initiatives coupled with a growing demand as igniting the region's numerous hydrocarbon possibilities. This paper describes some of the new incentives and the resultant exploration results and developments in China, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Vietnam. A major sign of the region's political maturity is the willingness for the countries involved to solve the longstanding disputes over the claims in hydrocarbon-prone South China Sea.

  7. Earth - Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by the Galileo spacecraft early Dec. 12, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.6 million miles from the Earth. The color composite used images taken through the red, green and violet filters. The Pacific Ocean covers virtually all of the visible disk of the Earth in this picture. The glint of the Sun reflected from smooth water is near the center. This is a frame of the Galileo Earth spin movie, a 500-frame time-lapse motion picture showing a 25-hour period of Earths rotation and atmospheric dynamics.

  8. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Spindel, Robert C

    2005-03-01

    A series of long-range acoustic propagation experiments have been conducted in the North Pacific Ocean during the last 15 years using various combinations of low-frequency, wide-bandwidth transmitters and horizontal and vertical line array receivers, including a 2-dimensional array with a maximum vertical aperture of 1400 m and a horizontal aperture of 3600 m. These measurements were undertaken to further our understanding of the physics of low-frequency, broadband propagation and the effects of environmental variability on signal stability and coherence. In this volume some of the results are presented. In the present paper the central issues these experiments have addressed are briefly summarized. PMID:15810685

  9. Simulation of high-resolution x-ray zone plates.

    PubMed

    Kurokhtin, Alexei N; Popov, Alexei V

    2002-02-01

    A full-wave approach to quantitative characterization of x-ray zone plate lenses is proposed. Distributed focusing efficiency eta(z) of a multifocus optical element is defined as the energy flux through the Airy disk of a reference perfect lens with variable focal length z. Maxima of this function characterize diffraction efficiencies and spatial resolution of the zone plate foci. The parabolic wave equation is used to take into account diffraction effects inside the optical element. Rough and fuzzy interface models are introduced to describe realistic zone profiles. Numerical simulation reveals the limited capability of zone width reduction to improve the zone plate imaging performance. The possibilities of second-order focus enhancement by optimization of the zone plate thickness, line-to-space ratio, and zone tilt are studied numerically. PMID:11822594

  10. Large-scale motion between Pacific and Atlantic hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, John A.; Gee, Jeff

    1995-11-01

    STUDIES of true polar wander (TPW), the rotation of the solid Earth with respect to the spin axis1, have suggested that there has been 10-15° of relative motion over the past 130 Myr (refs 2-4). In such studies, the orientation of the spin axis is recovered from continental palaeomagnetic poles (corrected for relative plate motions), and compared with a deep-mantle reference frame defined by hotspot locations. But deducing relative plate motions becomes increasingly difficult for older (Mesozoic) time periods, hindering tests of TPW on timescales comparable to those of large-scale mantle convection; moreover, the assumption of hotspot fixity is controversial5,6. We examine here a more direct approach7,8, using palaeolatitudes derived from Pacific guyots. Contrary to predictions from TPW models, these data suggest only minor latitudinal shifts of Pacific hotspots during the Cretaceous period. Instead of TPW, relative motion between the Atlantic and Pacific hotspot groups9 is required at a velocity of approximately 30 mm yr-1, more than 50% larger than previously proposed5.

  11. A new global plate velocity model using space geodetic data, REVEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sella, G. F.; Dixon, T. H.; Mao, A.; Stein, S.

    2001-12-01

    Our model describes the relative velocities of 19 plates and continental blocks, and is derived from publicly available space geodetic (primarily GPS) data for the period 1993-2000. We include an independent and rigorous estimate for GPS velocity uncertainties in order to assess plate rigidity, and propagate these uncertainties to the velocity predictions. By excluding sites that may be influenced by seismic cycle effects within the plate boundary zone as well sites affected by glacial isostatic adjustment, we believe the plate velocity model is representative of geologically Recent motions (last ~10,000 years) and have termed it REVEL, for Recent velocity. Departures from short term rigid plate behaviour due to glacial isostatic adjustment are clearly observed for North America and Eurasia. Australia shows possible differences from rigid plate behavior in a manner consistent with its mapped intraplate stress field. We see statistically significant differences between the velocity predictions of REVEL-2000 and those of the NUVEL-1A geologic model for about one third of tested plate pairs. Pacific-North America motion and motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to North and South America are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, presumably reflecting systematic errors in the geological model because the relevant rate data do not reflect the full plate rate. Many other differences between the geodetic and geological models appear to reflect real velocity changes over the last few million years. Nubia-Arabia and Arabia-Eurasia appear to be slowing, perhaps related to the collision of Arabia with Eurasia and consequent increased resistance to Arabia's northward motion Several other plate pairs, including Nazca-Pacific, Nazca-South America and Nubia-South America, are experiencing gradual slowing that dates back to about 25 Ma. This is the time of the initiation of the modern Andes mountains, and we speculate that associated crustal thickening on the leading edge of

  12. Plate Kinematics in Northeast Asia Constrained by GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, M. G.; Steblov, G. M.; King, R. W.; Herring, T. A.; Scholz, C. H.; Bürgmann, R.; Frolov, D. I.; Levin, V. Y.

    2004-05-01

    GPS observations in Siberia combined with global observations, collected in 1995-2003, allow us to improve constraints on the geometry and relative motion of the Eurasian (EUR), North American (NAM), and Pacific (PAC) plates [1]. In contrast to our earlier work and to other published studies, we estimate simultaneously both the relative plate rotation vectors (RV) and the translation rate of the reference frame (RF) which is treated as a free parameter. With this approach, we get identical values of RV regardless of which RF is used. Our estimate of RV for the EUR-NAM pair and the estimate based on the ITRF2000 catalog differ significantly because of the non-uniform sampling of EUR in ITRF2000, with most stations clustered in Europe. There are small (<1 mm/yr) but systematic plate-residual velocities within stable EUR, westward in Siberia and eastward in Europe, which, if real, indicate a small relative motion of these formerly independent plates. By comparing velocities relative to EUR and to NAM, we conclude that east Siberia to the east of the Cherskiy Range belongs to the North American plate. This fact was assumed in the literature for three decades but not proven because of uncertainties with the plate boundary arising from the ambiguous seismicity. Smaller plates in east Asia, such as Amurian and Okhotsk, are not required by the GPS velocities in our analysis. [1] Steblov, G.M., M.G. Kogan, R.W. King, C.H. Scholz, R. Bürgmann, and D.I. Frolov, Imprint of the North American Plate in Siberia revealed by GPS, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(18), 1924, doi:10.1029/2003GL017805, 2003.

  13. Franciscan complex calera limestones: Accreted remnants of farallon plate oceanic plateaus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarduno, J.A.; McWilliams, M.; Debiche, M.G.; Sliter, W.V.; Blake, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Calera Limestone, part of the Franciscan Complex of northern California, may have formed in a palaeoenvironment similar to Hess and Shatsky Rises of the present north-west Pacific1. We report here new palaeomagnetic results, palaeontological data and recent plate-motion models that reinforce this assertion. The Calera Limestone may have formed on Farallon Plate plateaus, north of the Pacific-Farallon spreading centre as a counterpart to Hess or Shatsky Rises. In one model2, the plateaus were formed by hotspots close to the Farallon_Pacific ridge axis. On accretion to North America, plateau dissection in the late Cretaceous to Eocene (50-70 Myr) could explain the occurrence of large volumes of pillow basalt and exotic blocks of limestone in the Franciscan Complex. Partial subduction of the plateaus could have contributed to Laramide (70-40 Myr) compressional events3. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Mesozoic Plate Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Margin of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Asia joined Laurentia and Baltica during the formation of the Urals in the Early Permian. Subsequently, the northern margin of Pangea shared a paleo-Pacific facing margin. Analysis of events along this (mostly active) margin provides insight into the plate tectonic setting and evolution of the Arctic basins and their temporal links to Pacific margin events. A 3-phase tectonic evolution characterizes the northern margin of Pangea during the Mesozoic: 1. Permo-Triassic rifting (Siberian Trap magmatism)was linked to rifting in a series of back-arc basins developed along the northern margin of Pangea. Triassic-Jurasic deep-water sedimentary seqences deposited in these basins were subsequently deformed during phase 2 events. 2. Lithospheric shortening/convergence across this margin deformed these basinal sediments and shed syn-orogenic deposits cratonward in the Jura-Cretaceous. Syn-orogenic basinal successions are widespread from the Verkoyansk margin of Siberia to the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. Their sources are well-characterized by U-Pb ages of detrital zircon suites and include Pennsylvanian-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic magmatic belts, implying convergence and emplacement of a long-lived arc system onto the continental margin. 3. Structures related to phase 2 are cut and overprinted by voluminous, syn-extensional, slab-related magmatism that developed during southward or Pacific-ward migration of a N-dipping subducting slab. It is inferred that the earliest part of the Amerasia Basin likely opened during part of this magmatic event, 135 to 90 Ma. The final culmination of this magmatic event is the Ohotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt, ~90-75 Ma;after this, magmatism continues to migrate Pacific-ward in a series of steps. Utilizing plate models of the Arctic by Lawver et al.(2002) it can be shown that some of the differences in the timing and style of Mesozoic orogenesis along the northern paleo-Pacific margin of Pangea (and especially the differences between the

  15. Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Obesity Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... youthonline . [Accessed 05/25/2016] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  16. Profile: Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander Profile: Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (Map of the US with the states that have significant Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander populations according to the Census Bureau) HI - ...

  17. Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders Among Asian/Pacific Islanders, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the fourth leading cause of infant mortality. Asian/Pacific Islanders women generally have lower infant mortality rates ...

  18. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders Overall, Asian American adults are less likely ... Disease Death Rates per 100,000 (2013) Asians/Pacific Islanders Non-Hispanic White Asians/Pacific Islanders /Non- ...

  19. Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profiles > Asian American > Immunizations Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders Asian/Pacific Islander adults are 10% less likely to ever ... to non-Hispanic white adults. In 2014, Asian/Pacific Islander adults aged 65 years and older were ...

  20. Diabetes and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Pacific Islander > Diabetes Diabetes and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Asian Americans, in general, have the same ... However, there are differences within the Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander population. From a national survey, Native Hawaiians/ ...

  1. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  2. MyPlate Food Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... follow throughout your life. 2. Fruits Like veggies, fruits contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber. The red section of MyPlate is slightly smaller than the green, but together fruits and veggies should fill half your plate. Whole ...

  3. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite)  Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  4. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: Child abuse Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  5. Borehole Magnetic Field Simulation of Rotated Plates with Special Application for the Philippine Sea and Caroline Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, C.; Virgil, C.; Neuhaus, M.; Hoerdt, A.

    2014-12-01

    The rotation of tectonic plates and basins is not uncommon in the Western Pacific. However, determining the exact amount of rotation over geological time can be quite challenging, especially for the Philippine Sea and Caroline Plates, because paleomagnetic measurements are rare and even if they exist come from sites near the plate boundary which may have suffered local tectonic deformations. Although it is generally thought that the Philippine Sea Plate rotated 90° clockwise during the last 55 Ma and that Caroline Plate likewise began to rotate soon after its formation around 32 Ma, there is no direct evidence for such arguments. While the recent IODP drilling (Leg 351) of the Amami-Sankaku Basin in the northern tip of the West Philippine Basin promises to provide an opportunity to estimate the rotation of the Philippine Sea Plate, in practice, the collection and subsequent reduction of borehole magnetic field data can be quite complicated. Moreover, if the magnetization intensity is low, which is the case for sediments, it is difficult to assess the outcome of magnetic field investigations. Hence, it is important to have the capability to compare the observation with model simulation readily. In this paper, we present magnetic field simulations within the borehole using the analytical methods outlined by Bosum and others (1988) which assumes a circular borehole within uniformly magnetized strata layers and Gallet and Courtilot (1989) which can accommodate inclined layers. The methods are applied to the Philippine Sea Plate and Caroline Plate using geological parameters whose values are derived from previous kinematic models. The results of such modeling can be quite useful and important in planning additional borehole magnetic surveys for the future as well.

  6. Pacific Northwest: paradise lost

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.V.

    1980-04-18

    An influx of new residents to the Pacific Northwest is changing social patterns and is endangering the region's valued wilderness and resources. A growing population and a feeling that the national govenment is more exploitive than conserving of its resources combines with a political tension between progressive populism and conservative Mormon influences to make residents wary of either newcomers or new prosperity. The abundant hydro power is threatened as power demand increases and utilities, industries, and the state and local governments compete for their fair share. A plan to restructure the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has been introduced in Congress to give it a single appointed administrator with the authority to decide how power will be distributed and which new power sources to develop. Concern about the two national nuclear waste repositories at Hanford and Idaho Falls led to a six-month moratorium at Hanford to warn the government that the site was not intended to be a permanent solution. A legislative proposal to set up regional nuclear parks will not relieve the Pacific Northwest's problems for some time. Leaders blame the policymakers for looking on the area as too remote and underpopulated to worry about. 18 references (DCK)

  7. The East Asian Sea: A vanished Cenozoic ocean between the Pacific and Indian oceans revealed by subducted slab constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jonny; Lu, Renqi; Suppe, John; Kanda, Ravi V. S.

    2014-05-01

    We have mapped an extensive 2500 km by 7500 km swath of sub-horizontal slabs at 600 to 1200 km depths that we call the 'East Asian Sea'. The northern margin of the East Asian Sea slabs begin at Taiwan and Japan, and extend south to SE Australia near New Zealand, underlying the Philippine Sea, the Caroline Sea, New Guinea, and northern to eastern Australia. When restored with other mapped slabs under Asia-Oceania, the mapped slabs reveal a vanished ocean that existed between the Pacific and Indian oceans in the Cenozoic. The subduction of the Asian Sea fills a crucial gap in plate tectonic reconstructions of East Asia by accounting for a significant proportion of fast Pacific and Indo-Australian convergence towards Eurasia since 43 Ma, during which time the Pacific moved ~3000 km WNW and Australia moved ~2500 km northward in a near-orthogonal direction relative to a mantle reference. In addition, the Australian plate expanded up to 2000 km at its northern and eastern margins. Slabs were primarily mapped from the MITP08 global P-wave mantle tomographic model (Li et al., 2008) and compared to other global P- and S-wave global tomography. Reconstructed slab lengths were assessed by quantitative flexural slip unfolding of mid-slab surfaces to a spherical Earth surface model. Seismic tomographic volumes were also calculated for selected serial cross-sections. We present a plate tectonic reconstruction with the slab constraints, with the implication that the East Asian Sea was progressively overrun and subducted beneath the Philippine Sea, the Caroline Sea and the expanding Melanesian arcs. Reconstructions to earlier periods indicate the East Asian Sea was originally Pacific or proto-Pacific mantle lithosphere, and was fragmented from the Pacific plate during the major ~45 Ma Eocene motion change. This implies that the East Asian Sea was initially the upper plate of the Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec Western Pacific subduction zones.

  8. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  9. North American plate dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Randall M.; Reding, Lynn M.

    1991-01-01

    Deformation within the North American plate in response to various tectonic processes is modeled using an elastic finite element analysis. The tectonic processes considered in the modeling include ridge forces associated with the normal thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere, shear and normal stresses transmitted across transforms, normal stresses transmitted across convergent boundaries, stresses due to horizontal density contrasts within the continent, and shear tractions applied along the base of the plate. Model stresses are calculated with respect to a lithostatic reference stress state. Shear stresses transmitted across transform boundaries along the San Andreas and Caribbean are small, of the order of 5-10 MPa. Also, compressive stresses of the order of 5-10 MPa transmitted across the major transforms improve the fit to the data. Compressive stresses across convergent margins along the Aleutians and the Middle America trench are important.

  10. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  11. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  12. Bipolar battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A liquid-impermeable plate (10) having throughplate conductivity with essentially zero resistance comprises an insulator sheet (12) having a series of spaced perforations (14) each of which contains a metal element (16) sealingly received into the perforation (14). A low-cost plate can readily be manufactured by punching a thermoplastic sheet (40) such as polypropylene with a punching tool (52), filling the apertures with lead spheres (63) having a diameter smaller than the holes (50) but larger than the thickness of the sheet, sweeping excess spheres (62) off the sheet with a doctor blade (60) and then pressing a heated platen (74) onto the sheet to swage the spheres into a cylindrical shape and melt the surrounding resin to form a liquid-impermeable collar (4) sealing the metal into the sheet.

  13. Teaching about the Pacific Rim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtan, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Presents ERIC Digest No. 43 which examines the meaning of the term "Pacific Rim," reasons for emphasizing the Pacific Rim in the social studies curriculum, and useful strategies for teaching about that part of the world. Lists references, including ERIC resources, used in the digest's preparation. (GEA)

  14. Teaching about the Pacific Rim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtan, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Examines (1) the meaning of the term Pacific Rim, (2) the reasons for emphasizing the Pacific Rim in the social studies curriculum, and (3) useful strategies for teaching about this part of the world. Provides a list of reference and ERIC resources dealing with this subject. (GEA)

  15. About the REL Pacific Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific, 2014

    2014-01-01

    REL Pacific is one of ten Regional Educational Laboratories established and funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. Their region encompasses approximately 4.9 million square miles and serves seven Pacific island entities, including American Samoa; the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; the Federated…

  16. The East Pacific Rise: An Active Not Passive Spreading System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, D. B.; Rowan, C. J.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Grand, S. P.; Simmons, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional plate tectonic interpretations of mid-oceanic ridges regard spreading as an entirely passive phenomenon. From this one would assume that the oceanic ridges will move over the mantle in response to the geodynamics of the diverging plates, and do not remain fixed spatially over any protracted period of time. An analysis of the kinematics of ridge motions in the Indo-Atlantic hotspot frame of reference since 83 Ma generally supports this view, with the notable exception of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The Pacific-Nazca/Farallon segment of the EPR north of Easter Island (27°S) is oriented essentially N-S, and has produced more than 9500km of E-W spreading in the past 80 Ma, making it the dominant ridge in the world's plate system over this interval of time. Yet despite the large amount of E-W divergence, the spreading center has maintained its longitudinal position to within <±250 km of the current ridge axis. Global mantle convective flow modeling indicates that the EPR, unlike any other extensive segment of the mid-oceanic ridge system, is underlain by an active upwelling system extending from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. We suggest that the lack of E-W motion of the EPR apparent from the kinematics is a consequence of these mantle dynamics; this ridge is thus not behaving as a passive plate boundary, but is actively and directly linked to, and controlled by, whole mantle upwelling. This observation overturns the notion that ridges are always entirely passive features of the plate system. Subduction of the northern EPR beneath western North America has thus resulted in the overriding of an active upwelling system that has contributed significantly to the evolution of Basin and Range kinematics and superimposed dynamics, including significant contributions from dynamic topography.

  17. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Smov FOS Plate Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1994-01-01

    The goal is to measure the precise plate scale and orientation. This will be acheived by performing a raster step and dwell sequence in the 4.3 arcsec aperture. The edges of the aperture should be avoided to prevent vignetting effects. An aperture map is required at each step of the dwell sequence. This test has to be conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors. We will also determine the offset between the two detectors.

  19. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  20. Martian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1994-03-01

    The northern lowlands of Mars have been produced by plate tectonics. Preexisting old thick highland crust was subducted, while seafloor spreading produced thin lowland crust during late Noachian and Early Hesperian time. In the preferred reconstruction, a breakup margin extended north of Cimmeria Terra between Daedalia Planum and Isidis Planitia where the highland-lowland transition is relatively simple. South dipping subduction occured beneath Arabia Terra and east dipping subduction beneath Tharsis Montes and Tempe Terra. Lineations associated with Gordii Dorsum are attributed to ridge-parallel structures, while Phelegra Montes and Scandia Colles are interpreted as transfer-parallel structures or ridge-fault-fault triple junction tracks. Other than for these few features, there is little topographic roughness in the lowlands. Seafloor spreading, if it occurred, must have been relatively rapid. Quantitative estimates of spreading rate are obtained by considering the physics of seafloor spreading in the lower (approx. 0.4 g) gravity of Mars, the absence of vertical scarps from age differences across fracture zones, and the smooth axial topography. Crustal thickness at a given potential temperature in the mantle source region scales inversely with gravity. Thus, the velocity of the rough-smooth transition for axial topography also scales inversely with gravity. Plate reorganizations where young crust becomes difficult to subduct are another constraint on spreading age. Plate tectonics, if it occurred, dominated the thermal and stress history of the planet. A geochemical implication is that the lower gravity of Mars allows deeper hydrothermal circulation through cracks and hence more hydration of oceanic crust so that more water is easily subducted than on the Earth. Age and structural relationships from photogeology as well as median wavelength gravity anomalies across the now dead breakup and subduction margins are the data most likely to test and modify hypotheses

  1. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  2. Plates with Incompatible Prestrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lewicka, Marta; Schäffner, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We study effective elastic behavior of the incompatibly prestrained thin plates, where the prestrain is independent of thickness and uniform through the plate's thickness h. We model such plates as three-dimensional elastic bodies with a prescribed pointwise stress-free state characterized by a Riemannian metric G, and seek the limiting behavior as {h to 0}. We first establish that when the energy per volume scales as the second power of h, the resulting {Γ} -limit is a Kirchhoff-type bending theory. We then show the somewhat surprising result that there exist non-immersible metrics G for whom the infimum energy (per volume) scales smaller than h 2. This implies that the minimizing sequence of deformations carries nontrivial residual three-dimensional energy but it has zero bending energy as seen from the limit Kirchhoff theory perspective. Another implication is that other asymptotic scenarios are valid in appropriate smaller scaling regimes of energy. We characterize the metrics G with the above property, showing that the zero bending energy in the Kirchhoff limit occurs if and only if the Riemann curvatures R 1213, R 1223 and R 1212 of G vanish identically. We illustrate our findings with examples; of particular interest is an example where {G_{2 × 2}}, the two-dimensional restriction of G, is flat but the plate still exhibits the energy scaling of the Föppl-von Kármán type. Finally, we apply these results to a model of nematic glass, including a characterization of the condition when the metric is immersible, for {G = Id3 + γ n ⊗ n} given in terms of the inhomogeneous unit director field distribution { n in R^3}.

  3. The North Pacific Gyre Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; di Lorenzo, E.

    2007-12-01

    Discussion of North Pacific Decadal decadal variability has focused primarily on the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, the leading mode of sea surface temperature anomalies north of the tropics. The PDO appears to result from a superposition of SST pattern forced by the North Pacific atmosphere due to its intrinsic dynamics and teleconnected from the tropics, with a regional impact of the ocean circulation in the frontal regions associated with the Kuroshio/Oyashio and their extensions into the interior. Recent modeling, however, suggest that previously unexplained decadal changes of salinity, nutrient upwelling and chlorophyl in the California Current are not dominated by the PDO. Rather, these are associated with a mode of variability associated with wind driven changes of the North Pacific Gyre. Consideration of this mode variability may thus be important to understand present and future variations of the North Pacific ecosystem, and in the interpretation of climate proxies.

  4. Origin and subsidence of Guyots in Mid-Pacific Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterer, Edward L.; Metzler, Christopher V.

    1984-11-01

    Morphologic and magnetic data suggest that the Mid-Pacific Mountains formed during Early Cretaceous time as a broad ENE trending double chain of midplate island seamounts over a mantle hot spot as the Pacific plate moved westward and slightly southward. Dredge, drill core, and reflection seismic data indicate that coral-rudistid reefs grew on the subsiding seamounts and evolved to atolls and banks, largely burying the volcanic foundations. Magnetic data indicate that by late Aptian time, about 110 Ma, the seamounts were located at about 20°-25°S, which we suggest was near the fringes of the latitudinal zone of vigorous reef growth, where upward growth rates could just keep up with subsidence. A broad uplift probably related to the widespread regional emplacement of Aptian volcanics as oceanic plateaus, seamounts, and deep-water flows and sills raised the Mid-Pacific Mountain reefs out of the water, and both reflection seismic and isotopic data suggest that a karstic topography developed on many of the emergent reefs. As subsidence recommenced, the reefs could hot grow upward apace with subsidence. Renewed volcanism in Late Cretaceous time in the easternmost Mid-Pacific Mountains maintained islands for a while, as at Horizon Guyot, but probably without large reefs. Elsewhere, pelagic conditions have prevailed as the guyots sank to their present-day depths. These depths are systematically related to the inferred age of the volcanic foundations, being greatest on the youngest volcanoes.

  5. Plate tectonics and crustal deformation around the Japanese Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze over a century of geodetic data to study crustal deformation and plate motion around the Japanese Islands, using the block-fault model for crustal deformation developed by Matsu'ura et al. (1986). We model the area including the Japanese Islands with 19 crustal blocks and 104 faults based on the distribution of active faults and seismicity. Geodetic data are used to obtain block motions and average slip rates of faults. This geodetic model predicts that the Pacific plate moves N deg 69 +/- 2 deg W at about 80 +/- 3 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate which is much lower than that predicted in geologic models. Substantial aseismic slip occurs on the subduction boundaries. The block containing the Izu Peninsula may be separated from the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. The faults on the coast of Japan Sea and the western part of the Median Tectonic Line have slip rates exceeding 4 mm/yr, while the Fossa Magna does not play an important role in the tectonics of the central Japan. The geodetic model requires the division of northeastern Japan, contrary to the hypothesis that northeastern Japan is a part of the North American plate. Owing to rapid convergence, the seismic risk in the Nankai trough may be larger than that of the Tokai gap.

  6. Transform push, oblique subduction resistance, and intraplate stress of the Juan de Fuca Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kelin; He, Jiangheng; Davis, Earl E.

    1997-01-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is a small oceanic plate between the Pacific and North America plates. In the southernmost region, referred to as the Gorda deformation zone, the maximum compressive stress σ1 constrained by earthquake focal mechanisms is N-S. Off Oregon, and possibly off Washington, NW trending left-lateral faults cutting the Juan de Fuca plate indicate a σ1 in a NE-SW to E-W direction. The magnitude of differential stress increases from north to south; this is inferred from the plastic yielding and distribution of earthquakes throughout the Gorda deformation zone. To understand how tectonic forces determine the stress field of the Juan de Fuca plate, we have modeled the intraplate stress using both elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic plane-stress finite element models. We conclude that the right-lateral shear motion of the Pacific and North America plates is primarily responsible for the stress pattern of the Juan de Fuca plate. The most important roles are played by a compressional force normal to the Mendocino transform fault, a result of the northward push by the Pacific plate and a horizontal resistance operating against the northward, or margin-parallel, component of oblique subduction. Margin-parallel subduction resistance results in large N-S compression in the Gorda deformation zone because the force is integrated over the full length of the Cascadia subduction zone. The Mendocino transform fault serves as a strong buttress that is very weak in shear but capable of transmitting large strike-normal compressive stresses. Internal failure of the Gorda deformation zone potentially places limits on the magnitude of the fault-normal stresses being transmitted and correspondingly on the magnitude of strike-parallel subduction resistance. Transform faults and oblique subduction zones in other parts of the world can be expected to transmit and create stresses in the same manner.

  7. Transform push, oblique subduction resistance, and intraplate stress of the Juan de Fuca plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, K.; He, J.; Davis, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate is a small oceanic plate between the Pacific and North America plates. In the southernmost region, referred to as the Gorda deformation zone, the maximum compressive stress a, constrained by earthquake focal mechanisms is N-S. Off Oregon, and possibly off Washington, NW trending left-lateral faults cutting the Juan de Fuca plate indicate a a, in a NE-SW to E-W direction. The magnitude of differential stress increases from north to south; this is inferred from the plastic yielding and distribution of earthquakes throughout the Gorda deformation zone. To understand how tectonic forces determine the stress field of the Juan de Fuca plate, we have modeled the intraplate stress using both elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic plane-stress finite element models. We conclude that the right-lateral shear motion of the Pacific and North America plates is primarily responsible for the stress pattern of the Juan de Fuca plate. The most important roles are played by a compressional force normal to the Mendocino transform fault, a result of the northward push by the Pacific plate and a horizontal resistance operating against the northward, or margin-parallel, component of oblique subduction. Margin-parallel subduction resistance results in large N-S compression in the Gorda deformation zone because the force is integrated over the full length of the Cascadia subduction zone. The Mendocino transform fault serves as a strong buttress that is very weak in shear but capable of transmitting large strike-normal compressive stresses. Internal failure of the Gorda deformation zone potentially places limits on the magnitude of the fault-normal stresses being transmitted and correspondingly on the magnitude of strike-parallel subduction resistance. Transform faults and oblique subduction zones in other parts of the world can be expected to transmit and create stresses in the same manner. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. A lithosphere-dynamics constraint on mantle flow: Analysis of the Eurasian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warners-Ruckstuhl, K. N.; Meijer, P. Th.; Govers, R.; Wortel, M. J. R.

    2010-09-01

    We present a method to estimate the poorly understood mechanical coupling between lithosphere and underlying mantle, and apply it to the Eurasian plate. Mechanical equilibrium of tectonic plates requires the torque from mantle tractions ($\\overline{TM) to be balanced by the torques from edge forces ($\\overline{TE) and lithospheric body forces ($\\overline{TB). The direction of $\\overline{TE proves tightly constrained by plate boundary nature but $\\overline{TB is affected uncertainties in the density structure of continents. We consistently find that the non-zero torque required from mantle tractions does not agree with the orientation of any published absolute motion model. We conclude that mechanical balance of the Eurasian plate requires an actively convecting mantle, which should result in a torque on the Eurasian plate located in the southwest Pacific.

  9. Gravity and Flexure Modelling of Subducting Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, J. A.; Watts, A. B.; SO 215 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    The long-term strength of the lithosphere is determined by its flexural rigidity, which is commonly expressed through the effective elastic thickness, Te. Flexure studies have revealed a dependence of Te on thermal age. In the oceans, loads formed on young (70 Ma) seafloor. In the continents, loads on young (1000 Ma) lithosphere. Recent studies have questioned the relationship of Te with age, especially at subduction zones, where oceanic and continental lithosphere are flexed downwards by up to ~6 km over horizontal distances of up to ~350 km. We have therefore used free-air gravity anomaly and topography profile data, combined with forward and inverse modelling techniques, to re-assess Te in these settings. Preliminary inverse modelling results from the Tonga-Kermadec Trench - Outer Rise system, where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the Indo-Australian plate, show large spatial variations in Te that are unrelated to age. In contrast to the southern end of the system, where Te is determined by the depth to the 600° C and 900° C isotherms, the northern end of the system shows a reduction in strength. Results also suggest a reduction in Te trenchward of the outer rise that is coincident with a region of pervasive extensional faulting visible in swath bathymetry data. In a continental setting, the Ganges foreland basin has formed by flexure of the Indo-Australian plate in front of the migrating loads of the Himalaya. Preliminary forward modelling results, using the Himalaya as a known surface topographic load, suggest that Te is high - consistent with the great age of Indian cratonic lithosphere. However, results from inverse modelling that solves for unknown loads (vertical shear force and bending moment) show significant scatter and display trade-offs between Te and these driving loads.

  10. Tomography and Dynamics of Western-Pacific Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2012-01-01

    the Japan Sea and the East Asia margin may be related to a metastable olivine wedge in the subducting Pacific slab. The Pacific slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone under East Asia, and a big mantle wedge (BMW) has formed above the stagnant slab. Convective circulations and fluid and magmatic processes in the BMW may have caused intraplate volcanism (e.g., Changbai and Wudalianchi), reactivation of the North China craton, large earthquakes, and other active tectonics in East Asia. Deep subduction and dehydration of continental plates (such as the Eurasian plate, Indian plate and Burma microplate) are also found, which have caused intraplate magmatism (e.g., Tengchong) and geothermal anomalies above the subducted continental plates. Under Kamchatka, the subducting Pacific slab shortens toward the north and terminates near the Aleutian-Kamchatka junction. The slab loss was induced by friction with the surrounding asthenosphere, as the Pacific plate rotated clockwise 30 Ma ago, and then it was enlarged by the slab-edge pinch-off by the asthenospheric flow. The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which may trigger upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle. Suggestions are also made for future directions of the seismological research of subduction zones.

  11. Roving the Pacific: Pacific Manuscripts Bureau Microfilming in the Pacific Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maidment, Ewan

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of microfilming by the Pacific Manuscripts Bureau (PMB), a non-profit organization established in 1968 to identify and preserve archives, manuscripts, and rare printed documents relating to the South Pacific Islands. Describes a 1997 PMB microfilming expedition to Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. (PEN)

  12. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  13. A new seismically constrained subduction interface model for Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakopoulos, C.; Newman, A. V.; Thomas, A. M.; Moore-Driskell, M.; Farmer, G. T.

    2015-08-01

    We provide a detailed, seismically defined three-dimensional model for the subducting plate interface along the Middle America Trench between northern Nicaragua and southern Costa Rica. The model uses data from a weighted catalog of about 30,000 earthquake hypocenters compiled from nine catalogs to constrain the interface through a process we term the "maximum seismicity method." The method determines the average position of the largest cluster of microseismicity beneath an a priori functional surface above the interface. This technique is applied to all seismicity above 40 km depth, the approximate intersection of the hanging wall Mohorovičić discontinuity, where seismicity likely lies along the plate interface. Below this depth, an envelope above 90% of seismicity approximates the slab surface. Because of station proximity to the interface, this model provides highest precision along the interface beneath the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica, an area where marked geometric changes coincide with crustal transitions and topography observed seaward of the trench. The new interface is useful for a number of geophysical studies that aim to understand subduction zone earthquake behavior and geodynamic and tectonic development of convergent plate boundaries.

  14. Seismic slip on an upper-plate normal fault during a large subduction megathrust rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen P.; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of stress accumulation and release during subduction zone seismic cycles requires an understanding of the distribution of fault slip during earthquakes. Reconstructions of slip are typically constrained to a single, known fault plane. Yet, slip has been shown to occur on multiple faults within the subducting plate owing to stress triggering, resulting in phenomena such as earthquake doublets. However, rapid stress triggering from the plate interface to faults in the overriding plate has not been documented before. We have analysed seismic data from the magnitude 7.1 Araucania earthquake that occurred in the Chilean subduction zone in January 2011. We find that the earthquake, which was reported as a single event in global moment tensor solutions, was instead composed of two ruptures on two separate faults. We use 3-D full waveform simulations to better constrain the centroid of the second rupture. Within 12 s, a thrust earthquake (Mw 6.8) on the plate interface triggered a second large rupture on a normal fault 30 km away in the overriding plate (Mw 6.7). We define this set of events as a 'closely spaced doublet' (CSD). This configuration of partitioned rupture is consistent with normal-faulting mechanisms in the ensuing aftershock sequence. We conclude that plate interface rupture can trigger almost instantaneous slip in the overriding plate of a subduction zone. This shallow upper-plate rupture may be masked from teleseismic data, posing a challenge for real-time tsunami warning systems.

  15. A kinematic model for the evolution of the Gorda Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoddard, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic lineation pattern produced by the Gorda Rise reflects a complex tectonic history marked by propagating ridges and nonrigid deformation of the Gorda plate. The Pacific-side lineation pattern is matched using a kinematic model which incorporates northward and southward propagating ridge segments and ridge rotation. By superimposing flexural-slip style deformation on the resulting Gorda-side lineations, and allowing convergent motion at the Mendocino Fracture Zone, the Gorda magnetic pattern is also successfully predicted. A similar model, but one which does not allow convergence at the Mendocino Fracture Zone, fails to produce the observed lineation pattern. Model predictions of the amount of material that would be 'obducted' at the Mendocino due to convergence between the Gorda and Pacific agree with bathymetric and density estimates of the amount of material located along the Mendocino Ridge.

  16. EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Data in the College Classroom (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Olds, S. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the EarthScope project, designed to study the 3-D strain field across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American tectonics plates in the western United States. All PBO data are freely available to scientific and educational communities and have been incorporated into a variety of activities for college and university classrooms. UNAVCO Education and Outreach program staff have worked closely with faculty users, scientific researchers, and facility staff to create materials that are scientifically and technically accurate as well as useful to the classroom user. Availability of processed GPS data is not new to the geoscience community. However, PBO data staff have worked with education staff to deliver data that are readily accessible to educators. The UNAVCO Data for Educators webpage, incorporating an embedded Google Map with PBO GPS locations and providing current GPS time series plots and downloadable data, extends and updates the datasets available to our community. Google Earth allows the visualization GPS data with other types of datasets, e.g. LiDAR, while maintaining the self-contained and easy-to-use interface of UNAVCO’s Jules Verne Voyager map tools, which have multiple sets of geological and geophysical data. Curricular materials provide scaffolds for using EarthScope data in a variety of forms for different learning goals. Simple visualization of earthquake epicenters and locations of volcanoes can be used with velocity vectors to make simple deductions of plate boundary behaviors. Readily available time series plots provide opportunities for additional science skills, and there are web and paper-based support materials for downloading data, manipulating tables, and using plotting programs for processed GPS data. Scientists have provided contextual materials to explore the importance of these data in interpreting the structure and dynamics of the Earth. These data

  17. Fuel cell end plate structure

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1991-04-23

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  18. 76 FR 9001 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); March 4-10, 2011 Pacific Council Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA221 Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); March 4-10, 2011 Pacific Council Meetings AGENCY: NMFS, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Pacific Council and its...

  19. 78 FR 13641 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); March 5-11, 2013 Pacific Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC527 Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); March 5-11, 2013 Pacific Council Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS.... SUMMARY: The Pacific Council and its advisory entities will hold public meetings. DATES: The...

  20. 75 FR 63441 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); November 3-9, 2010, Pacific Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ68 Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); November 3- 9, 2010, Pacific Council Meeting AGENCY: NMFS, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Pacific Council and its...

  1. Advances in sputtered and ion plated solid film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The glow discharge or ion assisted vacuum deposition techniques, primarily sputtering and ion plating, have rapidly emerged and offer great potential to deposit solid lubricants. The increased energizing of these deposition processes lead to improved adherence and coherence, favorable morphological growth, higher density, and reduced residual stresses in the film. These techniques are of invaluable importance where high precision machines tribo-components require very thin, uniform lubricating films (0.2 m), which do not interface with component tolerances. The performance of sputtered MoS2 films and ion plated Au and Pb films are described in terms of film thickness, coefficient of friction, and wear lives.

  2. Palaeotsunamis in the Pacific Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, J.; Chague-Goff, C.; Dominey-Howes, D.; McAdoo, B.; Cronin, S.; Bonte-Grapetin, Michael, M.; Nichol, S.; Horrocks, M.; Cisternas, M.; Lamarche, G.; Pelletier, B.; Jaffe, B.; Dudley, W.

    2011-01-01

    The recent 29 September 2009 South Pacific and 27 February 2010 Chilean events are a graphic reminder that the tsunami hazard and risk for the Pacific Ocean region should not be forgotten. Pacific Islands Countries (PICs) generally have short (<150 years) historic records, which means that to understand their tsunami hazard and risk researchers must study evidence for prehistoric events. However, our current state of knowledge of palaeotsunamis in PICs as opposed to their circum-Pacific counterparts is minimal at best. We briefly outline the limited extent of our current knowledge and propose an innovative methodology for future research in the Pacific. Each PIC represents a point source of information in the Pacific Ocean and this would allow their palaeotsunami records to be treated akin to palaeo-DART?? (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) buoys. Contemporaneous palaeotsunamis from local, regional and distant sources could be identified by using the spatial distribution of island records throughout the Pacific Ocean in conjunction with robust event chronologies. This would be highly innovative and, more importantly, would help provide the building blocks necessary to achieve more meaningful disaster risk reduction for PICs. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Media independent interface. Interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A Media Independent Interface (MII) is specified, using current standards in the industry. The MII is described in hierarchical fashion. At the base are IEEE/International Standards Organization (ISO) documents (standards) which describe the functionality of the software modules or layers and their interconnection. These documents describe primitives which are to transcent the MII. The intent of the MII is to provide a universal interface to one or more Media Access Contols (MACs) for the Logical Link Controller and Station Manager. This interface includes both a standardized electrical and mechanical interface and a standardized functional specification which defines the services expected from the MAC.

  4. Wobble plate engine

    SciTech Connect

    Derderian, H.; Pronovost, J.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a conventional Stirling cycle engine of the type characterized by an elongated cylinder having a closed end and an open end, means for applying heat to the exterior of the cylinder to heat gas in the interior of the cylinder at the closed end thereof, a displacer piston mounted for a reciprocation within the closed end of the cylinder and a power piston axially aligned with the displacer piston and mounted for coaxial reciprocation between the displacer piston and the open end of the cylinder, the reciprocation of the displacer piston leading the corresponding stroke of the power piston by a predetermined phase angle, the improved means for properly phasing the reciprocation of the two pistons and for converting the reciprocation of the power piston into rotation of an output shaft which is parallel to the axis of reciprocation comprising: a supporting frame; an output shaft mounted on said frame for rotation about a first axis which is parallel to the axis of reciprocation of the two pistons, said shaft having an inclined cylindrical bearing surface the axis of which intersects said first axis at an acute angle; gimbal means pivotally mounted on said supporting frame for oscillation about a second axis perpendicular to and intersecting first axis; a wobble plate pivotally mounted on a third axis within said gimbal means for oscillation with said gimbal means and for further oscillation about said third axis which is mutually perpendicular to and intersecting said first and second axes, said wobble plate being rotatably mounted on said inclined cylindrical bearing surface in a plane which is perpendicular to said axis of said bearing surface whereby said output shaft can rotate about said first axis as said wobble plate oscillates about said second and third axes.

  5. Vibration characteristics of rectangular plate in compressible inviscid fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chan-Yi; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a mathematical derivation of the vibration characteristics of an elastic thin plate placed at the bottom of a three dimensional rectangular container filled with compressible inviscid fluid. A set of beam functions is used as the admissible functions of the plate in a fluid-plate system, and the motion of the fluid induced by the deformation of the plate is obtained from a three-dimensional acoustic equation. Pressure from the fluid over the fluid-plate interface is integrated to form a virtual mass matrix. The frequency equation of the fluid-plate system is derived by combining mass, stiffness, and the virtual mass matrix. Solving the frequency equation makes it possible to obtain the dynamic characteristic of the fluid-plate system, such as resonant frequencies, corresponding mode shapes, and velocity of the fluid. Numerical calculations were performed for plates coupled with fluids with various degrees of compressibility to illustrate the difference between compressible and incompressible fluids in a fluid-plate system. The proposed method could be used to predict resonant frequencies and mode shapes with accuracy compared to that of incompressible fluid theory (IFT). The proposed method can be used to analyze cases involving high value of sound velocity, such as incompressible fluids. When the sound velocity approaches infinity, the results obtained for compressible fluids are similar to those of incompressible fluids. We also examined the influence of fluid compressibility on vibration characteristics in which a decrease in sound velocity was shown to correspond to a decrease in resonant frequency. Additional modes, not observed in incompressible fluids, were obtained in cases of low sound velocity, particularly at higher resonant frequencies. Fluid velocity plots clearly reveal that the additional resonant modes can be attributed to the compressible behavior of the fluid.

  6. Shuttle plate braiding machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huey, Jr., Cecil O. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for moving yarn in a selected pattern to form a braided article. The apparatus includes a segmented grid of stationary support elements and a plurality of shuttles configured to carry yarn. The shuttles are supported for movement on the grid assembly and each shuttle includes a retractable plunger for engaging a reciprocating shuttle plate that moves below the grid assembly. Such engagement at selected times causes the shuttles to move about the grid assembly in a selected pattern to form a braided article of a particular geometry.

  7. Reduced hydrogen cadmium plating

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeller, T.; Ross, L. ); Varma, R. ); Agarwala, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the advantages of using a periodic reverse pulse plating method, incorporating a fast cathodic pulse which is separated from the subsequent anodic/cathodic pulses by a long rest period in producing silvery cadmium coatings on steel from aqueous fluoroborate electrolyte. Also, the deposition obtained by combination of pulse currents and turbulent electrolyte flow system (forced convection of electrolyte, Re {approximately} 20-25,000) result in a near hydrogen-free electrodeposition of fine- grained cadmium. This is confirmed by the determination of diffusible hydrogen by the electrochemical (Barnach Electrode) method.

  8. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  9. Ultrafast microchannel plate photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Kume, H; Koyama, K; Nakatsugawa, K; Suzuki, S; Fatlowitz, D

    1988-03-15

    Performance characteristics of several new types of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) with microchannel plates (MCP) are presented in this paper. They are the MCP-PMT with 6-microm diam channels, MCP-PMT with an S-l photocathode, and MCP-PMT with multi (discrete) anode and gatable MCP-PMT. Important requirements of an optical detector for picosecond lasers, fluorescence measurements, and material analysis are low light detectability, ultrafast time response, and versatile operation including modulation. The basic configuration, characteristics, and practical results of these detectors are described. PMID:20531532

  10. Plumes do not Exist: Plate Circulation is Confined to Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, W. B.

    2002-12-01

    Plumes from deep mantle are widely conjectured to define an absolute reference frame, inaugurate rifting, drive plates, and profoundly modify oceans and continents. Mantle properties and composition are assumed to be whatever enables plumes. Nevertheless, purported critical evidence for plume speculation is false, and all data are better interpreted without plumes. Plume fantasies are made ever more complex and ad hoc to evade contradictory data, and have no predictive value because plumes do not exist. All plume conjecture derives from Hawaii and the guess that the Emperor-Hawaii inflection records a 60-degree change in Pacific plate direction at 45 Ma. Paleomagnetic latitudes and smooth Pacific spreading patterns disprove any such change. Rationales for other fixed plumes collapse when tested, and hypotheses of jumping, splitting, and gyrating plumes are specious. Thermal and physical properties of Hawaiian lithosphere falsify plume predictions. Purported tomographic support elsewhere represents artifacts and misleading presentations. Asthenosphere is everywhere near solidus temperature, so melt needs a tensional setting for egress but not local heat. Gradational and inconsistent contrasts between MORB and OIB are as required by depth-varying melt generation and behavior in contrasted settings and do not indicate systematically unlike sources. MORB melts rise, with minimal reaction, through hot asthenosphere, whereas OIB melts react with cool lithosphere, and lose mass, by crystallizing refractories and retaining and assimilating fusibles. The unfractionated lower mantle of plume conjecture is contrary to cosmologic and thermodynamic data, for mantle below 660 km is more refractory than that above. Subduction, due to density inversion by top-down cooling that forms oceanic lithosphere, drives plate tectonics and upper-mantle circulation. It organizes plate motions and lithosphere stress, which controls plate boundaries and volcanic chains. Hinge rollback is the

  11. Writing and Visualization for Teaching Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. F.

    2004-12-01

    The Theory of Plate Tectonics is probably the most important paradigm for understanding the workings of our planet. As such it is an integral part in any Introductory Geology course. Whereas geology majors usually easily embrace the Theory of Plate Tectonics, the enthusiasm for the coherence and elegance of this theory appears to be much more subdued among the majority of non-science majors. While visual and electronic media certainly support the teaching of the theory, pretty pictures and animations are not sufficient for many non-science majors to grasp the concepts of interacting lithospheric plates. It is well known that students do better in learning scientific concepts if they create their own understanding through research and inquiry-based learning, by working in the field, manipulating real earth-science data, and through writing. Writing assignments give instructors the opportunity to assess their students' learning and to clarify misconceptions yet they also have to be willing to teach students how to craft a science paper. Most electronic media and textbook-added CD-ROMs are not useful for making the structure of a science paper transparent. I found many of the necessary ingredients for effectively teaching plate tectonics in the interactive CD-ROM, "Our Dynamic Planet", developed by Wm. Prothero together with G. Kelly (University of California at Santa Barbara). It allows students to select and manipulate real earth-science data of plate-tectonically active regions, and provides an electronic interface that lets students create graphical representations of their collected data. A downloadable Teacher's Manual provides suggestions on teaching students to write a scientific argument, rooted in sound pedagogy. Originally designed for a large oceanography class, the material was modified for use in a small introductory geology class for non-science majors. Various assignments were given to instruct students in writing a scientific argument based on their

  12. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders were four times more likely than non- ... a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander adults have developed several of the high ...

  13. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  14. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  15. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  16. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  17. Photovoltaic array: Power conditioner interface characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The electrical output (power, current, and voltage) of flat plate solar arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as dc-to-ac power conditioners must be capable of accommodating widely varying input levels while maintaining operation at or near the maximum power point of the array. The array operating characteristics and extreme output limits necessary for the systematic design of array load interfaces under a wide variety of climatic conditions are studied. A number of interface parameters are examined, including optimum operating voltage, voltage energy, maximum power and current limits, and maximum open circuit voltage. The effect of array degradation and I-V curve fill factor or the array power conditioner interface is also discussed. Results are presented as normalized ratios of power conditioner parameters to array parameters, making the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes.

  18. Mid-pacific mountains revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenke, Loren W.; Kellogg, James N.; Nemoto, Kenji

    1985-06-01

    The Mid-Pacific Mountains are guyots whose volcanic pedestals have been constructed on a broad basement plateau, the flanks of which are downfaulted. Edifice construction may have been controlled by an orthogonal system of intersecting faults trending roughly ENE and NNW. Low amplitude gravity anomalies observed over the Mid-Pacific Mountains indicate complete Airy-Heiskanen isostatic compensation, crustal thickening, and eruption on thin elastic lithosphere. Tholeiites of the Mid-Pacific Mountains resemble lavas of Iceland and the Galapagos Islands. The orthogonal fault system, low gravity anomalies, and lava chemistry of the Mid-Pacific Mountains can be explained by eruption on or near a great ENE-trending rift system.

  19. Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of the Circum-North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Monger, James W.H.; Norton, Ian O.; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Stone, David B.; Scotese, Christopher R.; Scholl, David W.; Fujita, Kazuya

    2000-01-01

    the ancestral margins of present-day Northeast Asia and northwestern North America. The rifting resulted in the fragmentation of each continent and the formation of cratonal and passive continental-margin terranes that eventually migrated and accreted to other sites along the evolving margins of the original or adjacent continents. (2) From about the Late Triassic through the mid-Cretaceous, a succession of island arcs and tectonically paired subduction zones formed near the continental margins. (3) From about mainly the mid-Cretaceous through the present, a succession of igneous arcs and tectonically paired subduction zones formed along the continental margins. (4) From about the Jurassic to the present, oblique convergence and rotations caused orogenparallel sinistral and then dextral displacements within the upper-plate margins of cratons that have become Northeast Asia and North America. The oblique convergences and rotations resulted in the fragmentation, displacement, and duplication of formerly more nearly continuous arcs, subduction zones, and passive continental margins. These fragments were subsequently accreted along the expanding continental margins. (5) From the Early Jurassic through Tertiary, movement of the upper continental plates toward subduction zones resulted in strong plate coupling and accretion of the former island arcs and subduction zones to the continental margins. Accretions were accompanied and followed by crustal thickening, anatexis, metamorphism, and uplift. The accretions resulted in substantial growth of the North Asian and North American Continents. (6) During the middle and late Cenozoic, oblique to orthogonal convergence of the Pacifi c plate with present-day Alaska and Northeast Asia resulted in formation of the modern-day ring of volcanoes around the Circum-North Pacific. Oblique convergence between the Pacific plate and Alaska also resulted in major dextral-slip faulting in interior and southern Alaska and along the western p

  20. Deformation of island-arc lithosphere due to steady plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Steady plate subduction elastically brings about permanent lithospheric deformation in island arcs, though this effect has been neglected in most studies based on elastic dislocation theory. We investigate the characteristics of the permanent lithospheric deformation using a kinematic model, in which steady slip motion is given along a plate interface in the elastic lithosphere overlying the viscoelastic asthenosphere under gravity. As a rule of thumb, long-term lithospheric deformation can be understood as a bending of an elastic plate floating on non-viscous fluid, because the asthenosphere behaves like water on the long term. The steady slip below the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary does not contribute to long-term lithospheric deformation. Hence, the key parameters that control the lithospheric deformation are only the thickness of the lithosphere and the geometry of the plate interface. Slip on a plate interface generally causes substantial vertical displacement, and gravity always tries to retrieve the original gravitational equilibrium. For a curved plate interface gravity causes convex upward bending of the island-arc lithosphere, while for a planar plate interface gravity causes convex downward bending. Larger curvature and thicker lithosphere generally results in larger deformation. When the curvature changes along the plate interface, internal deformation is also involved intrinsically, which modifies the deformation field due to gravity. Because the plate interface generally has some curvature, at least near the trench, convex upward bending of the island-arc lithosphere, which involves uplift of island-arc and subsidence around the trench, is always realized. On the other hand, the deformation field of the island-arc lithosphere sensitively depends on lithospheric thickness and plate interface geometry. These characteristics obtained by the numerical simulation are consistent with observed topography and free-air gravity anomalies in subduction

  1. Precise relative locations for earthquakes in the northeast Pacific region

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, K. Michael; VanDeMark, Thomas F.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-10-09

    We report that double-difference methods applied to cross-correlation measured Rayleigh wave time shifts are an effective tool to improve epicentroid locations and relative origin time shifts in remote regions. We apply these methods to seismicity offshore of southwestern Canada and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, occurring along the boundaries of the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (including the Explorer Plate and Gorda Block) Plates. The Blanco, Mendocino, Revere-Dellwood, Nootka, and Sovanco fracture zones host the majority of this seismicity, largely consisting of strike-slip earthquakes. The Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda spreading ridges join these fracture zones and host normal faulting earthquakes. Our results show that at least the moderate-magnitude activity clusters along fault strike, supporting suggestions of large variations in seismic coupling along oceanic transform faults. Our improved relative locations corroborate earlier interpretations of the internal deformation in the Explorer and Gorda Plates. North of the Explorer Plate, improved locations support models that propose northern extension of the Revere-Dellwood fault. Relocations also support interpretations that favor multiple parallel active faults along the Blanco Transform Fault Zone. Seismicity of the western half of the Blanco appears more scattered and less collinear than the eastern half, possibly related to fault maturity. We use azimuthal variations in the Rayleigh wave cross-correlation amplitude to detect and model rupture directivity for a moderate size earthquake along the eastern Blanco Fault. Lastly, the observations constrain the seismogenic zone geometry and suggest a relatively narrow seismogenic zone width of 2 to 4 km.

  2. Precise relative locations for earthquakes in the northeast Pacific region

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cleveland, K. Michael; VanDeMark, Thomas F.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-10-09

    We report that double-difference methods applied to cross-correlation measured Rayleigh wave time shifts are an effective tool to improve epicentroid locations and relative origin time shifts in remote regions. We apply these methods to seismicity offshore of southwestern Canada and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, occurring along the boundaries of the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (including the Explorer Plate and Gorda Block) Plates. The Blanco, Mendocino, Revere-Dellwood, Nootka, and Sovanco fracture zones host the majority of this seismicity, largely consisting of strike-slip earthquakes. The Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda spreading ridges join these fracture zones and host normal faultingmore » earthquakes. Our results show that at least the moderate-magnitude activity clusters along fault strike, supporting suggestions of large variations in seismic coupling along oceanic transform faults. Our improved relative locations corroborate earlier interpretations of the internal deformation in the Explorer and Gorda Plates. North of the Explorer Plate, improved locations support models that propose northern extension of the Revere-Dellwood fault. Relocations also support interpretations that favor multiple parallel active faults along the Blanco Transform Fault Zone. Seismicity of the western half of the Blanco appears more scattered and less collinear than the eastern half, possibly related to fault maturity. We use azimuthal variations in the Rayleigh wave cross-correlation amplitude to detect and model rupture directivity for a moderate size earthquake along the eastern Blanco Fault. Lastly, the observations constrain the seismogenic zone geometry and suggest a relatively narrow seismogenic zone width of 2 to 4 km.« less

  3. Stratocumulus Clouds, eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This sheet of closed-cell stratocumulus clouds was sighted in the eastern Pacific Ocean (13.5N, 141.0W) southeast of the Hawaiian Islands. This cloud sheet has a distinctive fracture zone that separates an older cloud layer (right side of scene) from a newly formed layer (left). Stratocumulus cloud sheets originate over the cold waters of the California current and migrate westward over the Pacific Ocean.

  4. Rehabilitation services for the Pacific.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M H; Barker, J C

    1993-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Rehabilitation Research and Training Center was created to help meet the challenges of rehabilitating people in rural remote communities in the United States-associated Pacific. We describe the center, the special region it serves, some of its many programs, and some of the ways it is helping communities in this region provide services that are appropriate and sensitive to the culture, the environment, and the disability. PMID:8351905

  5. Wave energy: a Pacific perspective.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Robert; Ruehl, Kelley; Hovland, Justin; Meicke, Stephen

    2012-01-28

    This paper illustrates the status of wave energy development in Pacific rim countries by characterizing the available resource and introducing the region's current and potential future leaders in wave energy converter development. It also describes the existing licensing and permitting process as well as potential environmental concerns. Capabilities of Pacific Ocean testing facilities are described in addition to the region's vision of the future of wave energy. PMID:22184673

  6. Localised Plate Motion on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghail, R. C.

    1996-03-01

    The volcanic and tectonic features observed in Dali Vinculum, Parga Vinculum and Imdr Regio are concentrated at long, narrow, curvilinear zones, with relatively minor volcanism and tectonism between these zones. These zones, whilst more diffuse than terrestrial plate boundaries, nevertheless define the margins of tectonic plates. In contrast to Earth, however, it appears that venusian plates are neither created nor destroyed by lateral motion. Rather, plates are thinned and intruded at vincula plate boundaries, vertically accreted by small-scale intra-plate (planitia) volcanism and perhaps destroyed by delamination of thickened crust in tesserae and montane regions such as Thetis Regio and Ishtar Terra. The diversity in age both between and within these three areas together with the evidence for infrequent, small scale resurfacing in the planitiae are difficult to reconcile with a non-uniformitarian geological process.

  7. Philippine Sea and East Asian plate tectonics since 52 Ma constrained by new subducted slab reconstruction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jonny; Suppe, John; Lu, Renqi; Kanda, Ravi

    2016-06-01

    We reconstructed Philippine Sea and East Asian plate tectonics since 52 Ma from 28 slabs mapped in 3-D from global tomography, with a subducted area of ~25% of present-day global oceanic lithosphere. Slab constraints include subducted parts of existing Pacific, Indian, and Philippine Sea oceans, plus wholly subducted proto-South China Sea and newly discovered "East Asian Sea." Mapped slabs were unfolded and restored to the Earth surface using three methodologies and input to globally consistent plate reconstructions. Important constraints include the following: (1) the Ryukyu slab is ~1000 km N-S, too short to account for ~20° Philippine Sea northward motion from paleolatitudes; (2) the Marianas-Pacific subduction zone was at its present location (±200 km) since 48 ± 10 Ma based on a >1000 km deep slab wall; (3) the 8000 × 2500 km East Asian Sea existed between the Pacific and Indian Oceans at 52 Ma based on lower mantle flat slabs; (4) the Caroline back-arc basin moved with the Pacific, based on the overlapping, coeval Caroline hot spot track. These new constraints allow two classes of Philippine Sea plate models, which we compared to paleomagnetic and geologic data. Our preferred model involves Philippine Sea nucleation above the Manus plume (0°/150°E) near the Pacific-East Asian Sea plate boundary. Large Philippine Sea westward motion and post-40 Ma maximum 80° clockwise rotation accompanied late Eocene-Oligocene collision with the Caroline/Pacific plate. The Philippine Sea moved northward post-25 Ma over the northern East Asian Sea, forming a northern Philippine Sea arc that collided with the SW Japan-Ryukyu margin in the Miocene (~20-14 Ma).

  8. The Plate Boundary Observatory Cascadia Network: Development and Installation of a Large Scale Real-time GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Feaux, K.; Gallaher, W. W.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Mencin, D.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), through a NSF-ARRA supplement, has enhanced the geophysical infrastructure in in the Pacific Northwest by upgrading a total of 282 Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations to allow the collection and distribution of high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) data streams (RT-GPS). These upgraded stations supplemented the original 100 RT-GPS stations in the PBO GPS network. The addition of the new RT-GPS sites in Cascadia should spur new volcano and earthquake research opportunities in an area of great scientific interest and high geophysical hazard. Streaming RT-GPS data will enable researchers to detect and investigate strong ground motion during large geophysical events, including a possible plate-interface earthquake, which has implications for earthquake hazard mitigation. A Mw 6.9 earthquake occurred on March 10, 2014, off the coast of northern California. As a response, UNAVCO downloaded high-rate GPS data from Plate Boundary Observatory stations within 500 km of the epicenter of the event, providing a good test of network performance.In addition to the 282 stations upgraded to real-time, 22 new meteorological instruments were added to existing PBO stations. Extensive testing of BGAN satellite communications systems has been conducted to support the Cascadia RT-GPS upgrades and the installation of three BGAN satellite fail over systems along the Cascadia margin will allow for the continuation of data flow in the event of a loss of primary communications during in a large geophysical event or other interruptions in commercial cellular networks. In summary, with these additional upgrades in the Cascadia region, the PBO RT-GPS network will increase to 420 stations. Upgrades to the UNAVCO data infrastructure included evaluation and purchase of the Trimble Pivot Platform, servers, and additional hardware for archiving the high rate data, as well as testing and implementation of GLONASS and Trimble RTX positioning on the

  9. Interseismic Plate coupling and strain partitioning in the Northeastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaker, D. M.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Ali, S. T.; Przybylski, P.; Mattioli, G.; Jansma, P.; Prépetit, C.; de Chabalier, J. B.

    2008-09-01

    The northeastern Caribbean provides a natural laboratory to investigate strain partitioning, its causes and its consequences on the stress regime and tectonic evolution of a subduction plate boundary. Here, we use GPS and earthquake slip vector data to produce a present-day kinematic model that accounts for secular block rotation and elastic strain accumulation, with variable interplate coupling, on active faults. We confirm that the oblique convergence between Caribbean and North America in Hispaniola is partitioned between plate boundary parallel motion on the Septentrional and Enriquillo faults in the overriding plate and plate-boundary normal motion at the plate interface on the Northern Hispaniola Fault. To the east, the Caribbean/North America plate motion is accommodated by oblique slip on the faults bounding the Puerto Rico block to the north (Puerto Rico subduction) and to the south (Muertos thrust), with no evidence for partitioning. The spatial correlation between interplate coupling, strain partitioning and the subduction of buoyant oceanic asperities suggests that the latter enhance the transfer of interplate shear stresses to the overriding plate, facilitating strike-slip faulting in the overriding plate. The model slip rate deficit, together with the dates of large historical earthquakes, indicates the potential for a large (Mw7.5 or greater) earthquake on the Septentrional fault in the Dominican Republic. Similarly, the Enriquillo fault in Haiti is currently capable of a Mw7.2 earthquake if the entire elastic strain accumulated since the last major earthquake was released in a single event today. The model results show that the Puerto Rico/Lesser Antilles subduction thrust is only partially coupled, meaning that the plate interface is accumulating elastic strain at rates slower than the total plate motion. This does not preclude the existence of isolated locked patches accumulating elastic strain to be released in future earthquakes, but whose

  10. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, L.P.

    1981-02-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  11. Multiple plate hydrostatic viscous damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for damping radial motion of a rotating shaft is described. The damper comprises a series of spaced plates extending in a radial direction. A hydraulic piston is utilized to place a load in these plates. Each annular plate is provided with a suitable hydrostatic bearing geometry on at least one of its faces. This structure provides a high degree of dampening in a rotor case system of turbomachinery in general. The damper is particularly useful in gas turbine engines.

  12. Ion plating for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1981-01-01

    The ion plating techniques are classified relative to the instrumental set up, evaporation media, and mode of transport. A distinction is drawn between the low vacuum (plasma) and high vacuum (ion beam) techniques. Ion plating technology is discussed at the fundamental and industrial level. At the fundamental level, the capabilities and limitations of the plasma (evaporant flux) and film characteristics are evaluated. And on the industrial level, the performance and potential uses of ion plated films are discussed.

  13. The Interaction of Lamb Waves with Solid-Solid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, B. W.; Castaings, M.; Hosten, B.

    2003-03-01

    This paper deals with the topic of the interaction of Lamb waves, more specifically the A0 and S0 modes, with a solid-solid interface. This solid-solid interface is the contact between two dry, rough surfaces and could represent a kissing bond in an adhesive joint or the contacting surfaces of a bolted joint. In this paper, a very thick elastomer with high internal damping is loaded against one surface of a glass plate to create a solid-solid interface. The principal effect is shown to be increased attenuation of the guided waves propagating along the glass plate. This attenuation is caused by leakage of energy from the plate into the elastomer, where it is dissipated due to high viscoelastic damping. It is shown that the increase in attenuation is strongly dependent on the compressive load applied across the solid-solid interface. This interface is represented as a spring layer in a continuum model of the multi-layered system. Both normal and shear stiffnesses of the interface are quantified from the attenuation of A0 and S0 Lamb waves measured at each step of the compressive loading.

  14. Locking, mass flux and topographic response at convergent plate boundaries - the Chilean case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin. Towards the short end of the time scale, deformation appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. This has fundamental implications for spatial and temporal distribution of seismic hazard. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for the forearc response.

  15. Carbon-assisted flyer plates

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, David B.; Paisley, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    A laser driven flyer plate utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited.

  16. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  17. Glass-bead peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Peen plating of aluminum, copper, and nickel powders was investigated. Only aluminum was plated successfully within the range of peen plating conditions studied. Optimum plating conditions for aluminum were found to be: (1) bead/powder mixture containing 25 to 35% powder by weight, (2) peening intensity of 0.007A as measured by Almen strip, and (3) glass impact bead diameter of at least 297 microns (0.0117 inches) for depositing-100 mesh aluminum powder. No extensive cleaning or substrate preparation is required beyond removing loose dirt or heavy oil.

  18. Laser-driven flyer plate

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1991-09-10

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma. 2 figures.

  19. Laser-driven flyer plate

    DOEpatents

    Paisley, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma.

  20. 78 FR 56658 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC864 Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific...

  1. 77 FR 17459 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB107 Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific...

  2. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin.

  3. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  4. Origin of plate tectonics: Grain-damage, inheritance and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of plate tectonics is enigmatic because of the lack of observations in the early Archean as well as the challenge of understanding how plates form. The damage theory of lithospheric weakening by grain-reduction provides a physical framework for plate generation. This model builds on grain-scale physics to describe planetary-scale processes, and is consistent with lab and field observations of polycrystalline rocks and lithospheric mylonites. Grain-damage accounts for the evolution of damage and healing by grain growth, hence predicts plate boundary formation and longevity, and how they depend on surface conditions. The establishment of global plate tectonics likely started between >4Ga and 2.7Ga, and may have taken over a billion years to develop. Under Earth-like conditions, grain-damage combined with intermittent Archean protosubduction produces persistent weak zones that accumulate into well developed plates by 3Ga. However, Venus' hotter surface promotes healing, suppresses damage and inhibits weak zone accumulation, which suggests why plate tectonics failed to spread on our sister planet. New work posits that interface damage is possibly suppressed at moderate grain-size; this induces a hysteresis loop wherein three equilibrium deformation branches coexist. These branches include a stable large-grain, weakly-deforming state in dislocation creep, a stable small-grain rapidly-deforming state in diffusion creep analogous to mylonites, and an unstable intermediate-grain state. At the right conditions, a lithosphere can acquire two stable deformation states characteristic of plate tectonics; i.e., both slowly deforming plate interiors and rapidly deforming plate boundaries can co-exist. Earth currently sits inside the hysteresis loop and can have coexisting deformation states, while Venus sits at the end of the loop where only the weakly deforming branch dominates. The hot post-Hadean Earth might have had peak deformation only on the weakly

  5. Is the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend Coeval for all Pacific Seamount Trails?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.

    2004-12-01

    By far the largest number of hotspots can be found in the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA). Its Cretaceous counterpart is preserved in a large range of seamounts and guyots found in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). The seamounts in these regions display very distinct and long-lived isotopic signatures (Staudigel et al., 1991; Koppers et al., 2003) that can be used to combine source region chemistry and seamount geochronology to map out mantle melting anomalies over geological time. These mappings may resolve many important questions regarding the stationary character, continuity and longevity of the hotspots in the South Pacific mantle. Most importantly, it may also answer the question whether the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB) is coeval for all Pacific Seamount trails at 47 Ma? Fixed hotspots should be expressed in volcanic trails on the lithospheric plates revealing absolute rates of motion from their age progressions and the direction of motion based on their azimuths. By definition, bends in these hotspot trails thus should give an indication of changing plate motion happening simultaneously across individual lithospheric plates. Based on the morphology of seamounts in the Pacific, the Hawaiian-Emperor, Louisville, Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau seamount trails may be identified as the only hotspot trails to exhibit a clear HEB-type bend (Kroenke et al. 2004). Of these, the Louisville seamount trail only displays a faint bend that may be coeval with the sharp 60 degree bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor trail (Koppers et al. 2004) at 47 Ma. However, new 40Ar/39Ar analyses indicate that the HEB-type bends in the Gilberts Ridge and Tokelau seamount trails are asynchronous around 67 Ma and 57 Ma, respectively. We argue, therefore, that plate motion alone cannot explain these age systematics, but that both hotspot motion and changing lithospheric stress regimes may play an important role in their creation. The simple and elegant hotspot model that

  6. Origin and evolution of the Pacific Superplume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Pacific superplume defined as P- and S-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle underneath the southern Pacific superswell which yields a bundle of 5 hotspots. Moreover, it has been well-known that it has become active during the Cretaceous time to form a series of huge oceanic plateaus such as Ontong-Java and other oceanic Lips. I summarize the history of the Pacific superplume and speculate its origin, based on UHP experiments, tomographic images, and paleogeography back to 1.0Ga. The Pacific superplume was born when the supercontinent Rodinia was rifted to bear the Pacific Ocean in it at 750Ma. Since then it has been activated episodically at 750-700Ma, 550-500Ma, 300-250Ma and 125-85Ma, the last of which has been well-recorded on both ocean-floor and in orogenic belts. During the pulsation period, it should be emphasized that not only superplume but also the ocean-floor spreading became 30-50% faster than that of normal period. Based on UHP experiments at 660km depth and tomographic images in whole mantle, pulsation can be explained by regional mantle overturn, by which more fertile and higher-temperature materials in the lower mantle replace the upper mantle to accelerate both plate tectonics and plume activity However, the birth of superplume may be different from regional mantle overturn. Presence of cold superplume was estimated first underneath Asia by P-wave whole mantle tomography. Paleogeographic reconstruction gives us an image that cold superplume swallow many continents into a black hole to form a supercontinent. A supercontinent formed by a cold superplume must be broken up subsequently by a hot superplume underneath. The upper mantle underneath the supercontinet must be coldest among all parts of upper mantle, because of extensive subduction hence refrigeration. Moreover, subduction carries water underneath the continents, particularly in the case of subduction of cold slab. Transformation of cold to hot superplume took about 200 m.y. after the

  7. 20. 'Portals and Gusset Plates for 3 180'61/2' c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. 'Portals and Gusset Plates for 3 - 180'-6-1/2' c. to c. End Pins Single Track Through Spans, 10th, 11th, & 13th Crossings of Sacramento River, Southern Pacific Co. Sacramento Division, The Phoenix Bridge Co., C.O's. 839, 840 & 841, Drawing #12, Engineer C. Scheidl, Draftsman B. Heald, Scale 1-1/2' = 1'0', April 16th, 1901.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 310.58, Milepost 310.58, Sims, Shasta County, CA

  8. 10. DETAIL OF BUILDER'S PLATE AT NORTH PORTAL. PLATE READS: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF BUILDER'S PLATE AT NORTH PORTAL. PLATE READS: 1889, BUILT BY THE BERLIN IRON BRIDGE CO. EAST BERLIN CONN. DOUGLAS & JARVIS PAT. APT. 16, 1878, AP'L 17, 1885. A.P. FORESMAN, WM. S. STARR, T.J. STREBEIGH, COMMISSIONERS. - Pine Creek Bridge, River Road spanning Pine Creek, Jersey Shore, Lycoming County, PA

  9. Laser-Based Characterization of Nuclear Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; David L. Cottle; Barry H. Rabin

    2013-07-01

    Ensuring the integrity of fuel-clad and clad-clad bonding in nuclear fuels is important for safe reactor operation and assessment of fuel performance, yet the measurement of bond strengths in actual fuels has proved challenging. The laser shockwave technique (LST) originally developed to characterize structural adhesion in composites is being employed to characterize interface strength in a new type of plate fuel being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large-amplitude acoustic waves and is well suited for application to both fresh and irradiated nuclear-fuel plates. This paper will report on initial characterization results obtained from fresh fuel plates manufactured by different processes, including hot isostatic pressing, friction stir welding, and hot rolling.

  10. Laser-based characterization of nuclear fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James A.; Cottle, Dave L.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2014-02-18

    Ensuring the integrity of fuel-clad and clad-clad bonding in nuclear fuels is important for safe reactor operation and assessment of fuel performance, yet the measurement of bond strengths in actual fuels has proved challenging. The laser shockwave technique (LST) originally developed to characterize structural adhesion in composites is being employed to characterize interface strength in a new type of plate fuel being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large-amplitude acoustic waves and is well suited for application to both fresh and irradiated nuclear-fuel plates. This paper will report on initial characterization results obtained from fresh fuel plates manufactured by different processes, including hot isostatic pressing, friction stir welding, and hot rolling.

  11. Ion plated gold films: Properties, tribological behavior and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1987-01-01

    The glow discharge energizing favorably modifies and controls the coating/substrate adherence and the nucleation and growth sequence of ion plated gold films. As a result the adherence, coherence, internal stresses, and morphology of the fi