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Sample records for pacific test site

  1. Production and dissolution of nuclear explosive melt glasses at underground test sites in the Pacific Region

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.; Smith, D.K.

    1998-11-06

    From 1975 to 1996 the French detonated 140 underground nuclear explosions beneath the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa in the South Pacific; from 1965 to 1971 the United States detonated three high yield nuclear tests beneath Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain. Approximately 800 metric tons of basalt is melted per kiloton of nuclear yield; almost lo7 metric tons of basalt were melted in these tests. Long-lived and toxic radionuclides are partitioned into the melt glass at the time of explosion and are released by dissolution with seawater under saturated conditions. A glass dissolution model predicts that nuclear melt glasses at these sites will dissolve in lo6 to lo7 yea

  2. Effect of carbonate soil on transport and dose estimates from long-lived radionuclides at U. S. Pacific Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Conrado, C.L.; Hamilton, T.F.; Robison, W.L.; Stoker, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    The United States conducted a series of nuclear tests from 1946 to 1958 at Bikini, a coral atoll, in the Marshall Islands (MI). The aquatic and terrestrial environments of the atoll are still contaminated with several long-lived radionuclides that were generated during testing. The four major radionuclides found in terrestrial plants and soils are Cesium-137 ({sup 137} Cs), Strontium-90 ({sup 90} Sr), Plutonium-239+ 240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) and Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). {sup 137}Cs in the coral soils is more available for uptake by plants than {sup 137}Cs associated with continental soils of North America or Europe. Soil-to-plant {sup 137}Cs median concentration ratios (CR) (kBq kg{sup {minus}1} dry weight plant/kBq kg {sup {minus}1} dry weight soil) for tropical fruits and vegetables range between 0.8 and 36, much larger than the range of 0.005 to 0.5 reported for vegetation in temperate zones. Conversely, {sup 90}Sr median CRs range from 0.006 to 1.0 at the atoll versus a range from 0.02 to 3.0 for continental silica-based soils. Thus, the relative uptake of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr by plants in carbonate soils is reversed from that observed in silica-based soils. The CRs for {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are very similar to those observed in continental soils. Values range from 10{sup {minus}6} to 10{sup {minus}4} for both {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. No significant difference is observed between the two in coral soil. The uptake of {sup 137}Cs by plants is enhanced because of the absence of mineral binding sites and the low concentration of potassium in the coral soil. {sup 137}Cs is bound to the organic fraction of the soil, whereas {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are primarily bound to soil particles. Assessment of plant uptake for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr into locally grown food crops was a major contributing factor in (1) reliably predicting the radiological dose for returning residents, and (2) developing a strategy to limit the

  3. Solar site test module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissel, R. R.; Scott, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A solar site test module using the Rockwell AIM 65microcomputer is described. The module is designed to work at any site where an IBM site data acquisition system (SDAS) is installed and is intended primarily as a troubleshooting tool. It collects sensor information (temperatures, flow rates, etc.) and displays or prints it immediately in calibrated engineering units. It will read one sensor on demand, periodically read up to 10sensors or periodically read all sensors. Performance calculations can also be included with sensor data. Unattended operation is possible to, e.g., monitor a group of sensors once per hour. Work is underway to add a data acquisition system to the test module so that it can be used at sites which have no SDAS.

  4. EGFR Mutation Testing Practices within the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Keith M.; Utomo, Ahmad; Rajadurai, Pathmanathan; Tran, Van Khanh; Du, Xiang; Chou, Teh-Ying; Enriquez, Ma. Luisa D.; Lee, Geon Kook; Iqbal, Jabed; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Hagiwara, Koichi; Liang, Zhiyong; Normanno, Nicola; Park, Keunchil; Toyooka, Shinichi; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Waring, Paul; Zhang, Li; McCormack, Rose; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Itoh, Yohji; Sugeno, Masatoshi; Mok, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutation-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients necessitates accurate, timely testing. Although EGFR mutation testing has been adopted by many laboratories in Asia, data are lacking on the proportion of NSCLC patients tested in each country, and the most commonly used testing methods. Methods: A retrospective survey of records from NSCLC patients tested for EGFR mutations during 2011 was conducted in 11 Asian Pacific countries at 40 sites that routinely performed EGFR mutation testing during that period. Patient records were used to complete an online questionnaire at each site. Results: Of the 22,193 NSCLC patient records surveyed, 31.8% (95% confidence interval: 31.2%–32.5%) were tested for EGFR mutations. The rate of EGFR mutation positivity was 39.6% among the 10,687 cases tested. The majority of samples were biopsy and/or cytology samples (71.4%). DNA sequencing was the most commonly used testing method accounting for 40% and 32.5% of tissue and cytology samples, respectively. A pathology report was available only to 60.0% of the sites, and 47.5% were not members of a Quality Assurance Scheme. Conclusions: In 2011, EGFR mutation testing practices varied widely across Asia. These data provide a reference platform from which to improve the molecular diagnosis of NSCLC, and EGFR mutation testing in particular, in Asia. PMID:25376513

  5. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and

  6. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the

  7. The effect of carbonate soil on transport and dose estimates for long-lived radionuclides at a U.S. Pacific test site

    SciTech Connect

    Conrado, C L; Hamilton, T F; Robison, W L; Stoker, A C

    1999-01-01

    The US conducted a series of nuclear tests from 1946 to 1958 at Bikini, a coral atoll, in the Marshall Islands (MI). The aquatic and terrestrial environments of the atoll are still contaminated with several long-lived radionuclides that were generated during testing. The four major radionuclides found in terrestrial plants and soils are Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr), Plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) and Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). {sup 137}Cs in the coral soils is more available for uptake by plants than {sup 137}Cs associated with continental soils of North America or Europe. Soil-to-plant {sup 137}Cs median concentration ratios (CR) (kBq kg{sup {minus}1} dry weight plant/kBq kg{sup {minus}1} dry weight soil) for tropical fruits and vegetables range between 0.8 and 36, much larger than the range of 0.005 to 0.5 reported for vegetation in temperate zones. Conversely, {sup 90}Sr median CRs range from 0.006 to 1.0 at the atoll versus a range from 0.02 to 3.0 for continental silica-based soils. Thus, the relative uptake of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr by plants in carbonate soils is reversed from that observed in silica-based soils. The CRs for {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are very similar to those observed in continental soils. Values range from 10{sup {minus}6} to 10{sup {minus}4} for both {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. No significant difference is observed between the two in coral soil.

  8. Computer-Based Testing: Test Site Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Gerald A.

    Computer-based testing places great burdens on all involved parties to ensure test security. A task analysis of test site security might identify the areas of protecting the test, protecting the data, and protecting the environment as essential issues in test security. Protecting the test involves transmission of the examinations, identifying the…

  9. Subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Bryan, J.B.; Glenn, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Ground are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Attempts to explain the difference in terms of device yield (which was much larger in the Pacific tests than at NTS) have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 41 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  10. JPL's parabolic dish test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A parabolic dish test site (PDTS) was established in the California Mojave Desert to carry out work in testing solar point focusing concentrator systems and related hardware. The site was chosen because of its high solar insolation level and year around clear sky conditions. The various facilities and equipment at the PDTS, and the concentrator experiments being performed are described.

  11. Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

  12. Package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the package testing capabilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In the past all of the package testing that was performed at PNL was done on prototype or mocked up radioactive material packaging. Presently, we are developing the capability to perform testing on non-radioactive material packaging. The testing on the non-radioactive material packaging will be done to satisfy the new performance oriented packaging requirements (DOT Docket HM-181, 1991). This paper describes the equipment used to perform the performance oriented packaging tests and also describes some testing capability for testing radioactive material packaging.

  13. Nevada Test Site Sensor Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, B.J.; Boyer, W.B.

    1996-12-01

    A Sensor Test Facility (STF) was recently established at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). It has been used for a series of sensor tests that have demonstrated the usefulness of the testbed. The facility consists of a cut-and-cover bunker complex and the two square mile surrounding area. The STF was developed as a scientific testbed optimized for the development and evaluation of advanced sensor systems, including ground sensor systems designed to identify and detect hardened underground facilities. This was accomplished by identifying a facility in a remote location where seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference would be minimal, establishing a testbed that would be accommodating to field testing, and conducting a thorough geophysical characterization of the area surrounding the facility in order to understand the local geology and its effects on geophysical signals emanating from the facility. The STF is representative of a number of cut-and-cover bunkers around the world that are used for the manufacture and/or storage of weapons of mass destruction. This paper provides a general description of the Nevada Test Site, the Sensor Test Facility, and the Geophysical Site Characterization.

  14. Site-testing in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, J. W. V.; Lawrence, J. S.; Ashley, M. C. B.

    2007-10-01

    Sites on the Antarctic Plateau such as Dome A, Dome C and South Pole, offer unique and exceptionally favourable conditions for astronomy. Site testing over the past decade has revealed extremely low infrared backgrounds, low water vapour, excellent infrared transmission and very low levels of atmospheric turbulence. Although several large facilities have already been built in Antarctica and plans for many more are well underway, there is still much to learn about this unique and beautiful place.

  15. Nevada Test Site closure program

    SciTech Connect

    Shenk, D.P.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use.

  16. Site Testing Results and Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Michael M.; Storey, John W.; Burton, Michael G.

    NOTE: this is highly preliminary just to get the abstract in by the deadline! - brief summary of the AASTO program - key points from the site testing results at South Pole - very brief introduction to ICECAM and the AASTINO - key results from ICECAM and the AASTINO instruments - next year's instrument plans at South Pole and Dome C including a brief mention of Doug Caldwell's experiment

  17. Oligocene-Miocene relative (geomagnetic) paleointensity correlated from the equatorial Pacific (IODP Site U1334 and ODP Site 1218) to the South Atlantic (ODP Site 1090)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Lanci, L.

    2014-02-01

    Late Oligocene to Early Miocene relative paleointensity (RPI) proxies can be correlated from the equatorial Pacific (IODP Site U1334 and ODP Site 1218) to the South Atlantic (ODP Site 1090). Age models are constrained by magnetic polarity stratigraphy through correlation to a common geomagnetic polarity timescale. The RPI records do not contain significant power at specific (orbital) frequencies, and hence there is no significant coherency between RPI proxies and the normalizers used to construct the proxies, although orbital power is present in some normalizers. There is no obvious control on RPI proxies from mean sedimentation rate within polarity chrons, magnetic grain size proxies or magnetic concentration parameters. The salient test is whether the equatorial Pacific records can be correlated one to another, and to the records from the South Atlantic. All records are dominated by RPI minima at polarity reversals, as expected, although the comparison within polarity chrons is compelling enough to conclude that the intensity of the Earth's axial dipole is being recorded. This is supported by the fit of RPI data from Sites U1334 and 1218 after correlation of the two sites using diverse core-scanning data, rather than polarity reversals alone. We do not see a consistent relationship between polarity-chron duration and mean RPI, and no consistent skewness (“saw-tooth” pattern) for RPI within polarity chrons. Stacks of RPI records for 17.5-26.5 Ma include long-term changes in RPI on Myr timescales that are superimposed on RPI minima associated with polarity reversals, and shorter-term variations in RPI with an apparent pacing of ∼50 kyr. The equatorial Pacific to South Atlantic correlations indicate that RPI can be used as a (global) stratigraphic tool in pre-Quaternary sediments with typical pelagic sedimentation rates of a few cm/kyr.

  18. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. (a... the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and others in the Pacific Sound Resources and...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. (a... the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and others in the Pacific Sound Resources and...

  20. Desert test site uniformity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerola, Dana X.; Bruegge, Carol J.

    2009-08-01

    Desert test sites such as Railroad Valley (RRV) Nevada, Egypt-1, and Libya-4 are commonly targeted to assess the on-orbit radiometric performance of sensors. Railroad Valley is used for vicarious calibration experiments, where a field-team makes ground measurements to produce accurate estimates of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances. The Sahara desert test sites are not instrumented, but provide a stable target that can be used for sensor cross-comparisons, or for stability monitoring of a single sensor. These sites are of interest to NASA's Atmospheric Carbon Observation from Space (ACOS) and JAXA's Greenhouse Gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) programs. This study assesses the utility of these three test sites to the ACOS and GOSAT calibration teams. To simulate errors in sensor-measured radiance with pointing errors, simulated data have been created using MODIS Aqua data. MODIS data are further utilized to validate the campaign data acquired from June 22 through July 5, 2009. The first GOSAT vicarious calibration experiment was conducted during this timeframe.

  1. Desert Test Site Uniformity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerola, Dana X.; Bruegge, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Desert test sites such as Railroad Valley (RRV) Nevada, Egypt-1, and Libya-4 are commonly targeted to assess the on-orbit radiometric performance of sensors. Railroad Valley is used for vicarious calibration experiments, where a field-team makes ground measurements to produce accurate estimates of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances. The Sahara desert test sites are not instrumented, but provide a stable target that can be used for sensor cross-comparisons, or for stability monitoring of a single sensor. These sites are of interest to NASA's Atmospheric Carbon Observation from Space (ACOS) and JAXA's Greenhouse Gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) programs. This study assesses the utility of these three test sites to the ACOS and GOSAT calibration teams. To simulate errors in sensor-measured radiance with pointing errors, simulated data have been created using MODIS Aqua data. MODIS data are further utilized to validate the campaign data acquired from June 22 through July 5, 2009. The first GOSAT vicarious calibration experiment was conducted during this timeframe.

  2. Synthetic testing of the Pacific Northwest earthquake early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, B. W.; Schmidt, D. A.; Bodin, P.; Vidale, J. E.; Gomberg, J. S.; Jamison, D.; Minson, S. E.; Hartog, J. R.; Kress, V. C.; Malone, S. D.; Usher, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone poses one of the greatest risks for a megaquake in the continental United States and, because of this, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) at the University of Washington is building a joint seismic and geodetic earthquake early warning system. Our two-stage approach to earthquake early warning includes: (1) detection and initial characterization using strong-motion and broadband data from the PNSN with the ElarmS package, and (2) geodetic modeling modules using GPS data from the Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA) and combined seismogeodetic (GPS + strong-motion) data. Because of Cascadia's relatively low seismicity rate and the paucity of data from plate boundary earthquakes, we have prioritized the development of a test system and the creation of several large simulated events. The test system permits us to: (1) replay segments of actual seismic waveform data recorded from the PNSN and neighboring networks to represent both earthquakes and noise conditions, and (2) broadcast synthetic data into the system to simulate signals we anticipate from earthquakes for which we have no actual ground motion recordings. The test system lets us also simulate various error conditions (latent and/or out-of-sequence data, telemetry drop-outs, etc.) and to explore how best to mitigate them. Here, we report on the performance of the joint early warning system and the geodetic modeling modules in a simulated real-time mode using simulated 5-Hz displacements from plausible Cascadian earthquake scenarios. The simulations are created using the FK integration method for hypothetical source models for a wide array of possible faulting types and magnitudes. The results show that the geodetic modeling modules are able to properly characterize the simulated events, and we discuss the limitations with respect to latency, network architecture, and earthquake location throughout the Pacific Northwest.

  3. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C., Jr.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Tilden, Harold T.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Su-Coker, Jennifer; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Fritz, Brad G.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.; Lowry, Kami L.; Moon, Thomas W.; Becker, James M.; Mendez, Keith M.; Raney, Elizabeth A.; Chamness, Michele A.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2014-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science’s 10 national laboratories, provides innovative science and technology development in the areas of energy and the environment, fundamental and computational science, and national security. DOE’s Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) is responsible for oversight of PNNL at its Campus in Richland, Washington, as well as its facilities in Sequim, Seattle, and North Bonneville, Washington, and Corvallis and Portland, Oregon.

  5. SLS Test Stand Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Kathryn; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Test site selection is a critical element of the design, development and production of a new system. With the advent of the new Space Launch System (SLS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had a number of test site selection decisions that needed to be made early enough in the Program to support the planned Launch Readiness Date (LRD). This case study focuses on decisions that needed to be made in 2011 and 2012 in preparation for the April 2013 DPMC decision about where to execute the Main Propulsion Test that is commonly referred to as "Green Run." Those decisions relied upon cooperative analysis between the Program, the Test Lab and Center Operations. The SLS is a human spaceflight vehicle designed to carry a crew farther into space than humans have previously flown. The vehicle consists of four parts: the crew capsule, the upper stage, the core stage, and the first stage solid rocket boosters. The crew capsule carries the astronauts, while the upper stage, the core stage, and solid rocket boosters provide thrust for the vehicle. In other words, the stages provide the "lift" part of the lift vehicle. In conjunction with the solid rocket boosters, the core stage provides the initial "get-off-the-ground" thrust to the vehicle. The ignition of the four core stage engines and two solid rocket boosters is the first step in the launch portion of the mission. The solid rocket boosters burn out after about 2 minutes of flight, and are then jettisoned. The core stage provides thrust until the vehicle reaches a specific altitude and speed, at which point the core stage is shut off and jettisoned, and the upper stage provides vehicle thrust for subsequent mission trajectories. The integrated core stage primarily consists of a liquid oxygen tank, a liquid hydrogen tank, and the four core stage engines. For the SLS program, four RS-25 engines were selected as the four core stage engines. The RS-25 engine is the same engine that was used for Space

  6. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND AND COMPONENTS TEST LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1999-05-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site.

  8. 30 CFR 36.40 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test site. 36.40 Section 36.40 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Test Requirements § 36.40 Test site. Tests shall be conducted at MSHA's Diesel Testing Laboratory or...

  9. 30 CFR 36.40 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test site. 36.40 Section 36.40 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Test Requirements § 36.40 Test site. Tests shall be conducted at MSHA's Diesel Testing Laboratory or...

  10. 30 CFR 36.40 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test site. 36.40 Section 36.40 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Test Requirements § 36.40 Test site. Tests shall be conducted at MSHA's Diesel Testing Laboratory or...

  11. 30 CFR 36.40 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test site. 36.40 Section 36.40 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Test Requirements § 36.40 Test site. Tests shall be conducted at MSHA's Diesel Testing Laboratory or...

  12. Expeditions to Drill Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, Millard F.

    2005-04-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), an international collaboration of Earth, ocean, and life scientists that began in 2003, offers scientists worldwide unprecedented opportunities to address a vast array of scientific problems in all submarine settings. Recently, the scientific advisory structure of the proposal-driven IODP scheduled drilling expeditions, targeting critical scientific problems in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific Ocean, for 2005 and early 2006 (Figure 1, Table 1). The IODP, which is co-led by Japan and the United States, with strong contributions from the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) and China, is guided by an initial science plan, ``Earth, Oceans, and Life'' (www.iodp.org). For the first time, through the IODP, scientists have at their disposal both a riser (drilling vessel which has a metal tube surrounding the drill pipe that enables the return of drilling fluid and cuttings to the drill ship; the ``riser'' is attached to a ``blow-out preventer'' or shut-off device at the seafloor) and riserless drilling vessel (which lacks a riser pipe and blow-out preventer), as well as mission-specific capabilities such as drilling barges and jack-up rigs for shallow-water and Arctic drilling.

  13. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  14. ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER POPULATION DENSITY AND EPA REGULATED SITES IN THE SEATTLE/TACOMA AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shaded density polygons of 1990 Census Block Data for the Asian/Pacific Islander population group plotted with locations of EPA regulated sites (CERCLA, RCRA, NPDES (majors), and TRI) for the Seattle/Tacoma geographic area. Source scale of map is based on the 1990 Census tigerlin...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA....

  16. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  19. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  1. 30 CFR 33.30 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test site. 33.30 Section 33.30 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.30 Test site. Tests shall be conducted at an appropriate location determined by MSHA....

  2. 30 CFR 33.30 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test site. 33.30 Section 33.30 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.30 Test site. Tests shall be conducted at an appropriate location determined by MSHA....

  3. 30 CFR 33.30 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test site. 33.30 Section 33.30 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.30 Test site. Tests shall be conducted at an appropriate location determined by MSHA....

  4. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES SATURN V STAND (BACKGROUND), BLOCK HOUSE (MIDDLE GROUND), STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND (FAR RIGHT). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 300 area facility liquid effluent monitoring: 1994 and 1995 field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Thompson, C.J.; Damberg, E.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1997-07-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Effluent Management Services manages liquid waste streams from some of the 300 Area buildings on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to ensure liquid discharges to the Columbia River are in compliance with permit requirements. The buildings are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In fiscal year (FY) 1994 and FY 1995, three field tests were conducted to gather information that could be used to (1) increase the understanding of 300 Area building liquid waste streams based on the characterization and monitoring data collected during calendar year (CY) 1994 and CY 1995 and (2) establish improved methods for evaluating facility releases. The three field tests were (1) an evaluation of a continuous monitoring/event-triggered sampling system, (2) a volatile organic compound hold-time study, and (3) an investigation of the dilution and retention properties of the 300 Area process sewer. The results from the first field test showed that future characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams could benefit significantly from augmenting continuous monitoring with event-triggered sampling. Current continuous-monitoring practices (i.e., monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow) cannot detect discharges of organic pollutants. Effluent control effectiveness would be enhanced by incorporating a continuous total organic carbon analyzer in the system to detect events involving releases of organic compounds. In the second field test, sample hold times were shown to have a significant effect on volatile organic compound data. Samples analyzed in the field within 1 hour of collection generally had 1.5 to 3 times higher volatile organic compound concentrations than those analyzed 1.5 to 4 weeks later at on-site and off-site laboratories, respectively. The number of volatile organic compounds detected also decreased with increasing hold times.

  6. Influences of Dynamics on Convection at the Tropical Pacific ARM Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Jim H.

    2004-02-15

    Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region plays an important role in driving global-scale atmospheric circulation. While the TWP is very important, climate models have a difficult time capturing the intricacies of convection in this region. For these reasons, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has made the TWP one of its concentrated areas of study. The ARM program now has three sites in the tropical Pacific region: Manus, Nauru, and Darwin. An examination of cloud frequency and radiation data from theses sites reveals variability on a wide range of time scales. At Manus, variability due to intraseasonal processes, including the Madden-Julian Oscillation, is most pronounced but intraseasonal effects are modulated by the annual monsoon cycle as well as by ENSO. In particular, the relative frequency of convection over the large islands of the maritime continent and over the ocean depends on the stage of the monsoon cycle. An important element of ARM's interest in tropical Pacific convection is to characterize cloud optical properties. Because cloud properties are likely to be different for maritime and island-based convection, it is important to understand the dynamical processes that govern the frequency with which each occurs. This paper attempts to attribute variability observed at the tropical Pacific ARM sites to dynamical processes on a range of spatial scales.

  7. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  8. Signatures of testing: On-site inspection technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Zucca, J.J.; Carrigan, C.; Goldstein, P.; Jarpe, S.P.; Sweeney, J.; Pickles, W.L.; Wright, B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the phenomenology of nuclear explosions and technologies for their detection as relevant to On-Site Inspection (OSI) for a comprehensive test-ban (CTB). Our experience with the US nuclear test program which has been primarily carried out at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in the Pacific Ocean. The goals of OSI are to resolve ambiguous events, reduce uncertainty, deter attempts at evasion, and provide responsive and technically competent means of confirming the occurrence of a nuclear explosion should deterrence fail. These goals would include finding evidence of an evasive nuclear explosion or evidence that the event was non-nuclear, such as an earthquake or large chemical explosion.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS FOR CHRONIC TOXICITY TESTING OF PACIFIC MARINE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of a year-round capability for conducting short-term toxicity tests for estimating chronic effect levels of toxic materials with a native Pacific coast fish and a native Pacific coast mysid shrimp was the goal of this project. n order to achieve acceptable sensitivity...

  10. Pliocene paleoclimatic interpretation of DSDP Site 580 (NW Pacific) using diatoms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution quantitative diatom data are tabulated for the early part of the late Pliocene (3.25 to 2.08 Ma) at DSDP Site 580 in the northwestern Pacific. Sample spacing averages 11 k.y. between 3.1 and 2.8 Ma, but increases to 14 to 19 k.y. prior to 3.1 Ma and after 2.8 Ma. Q-mode factor analysis of the middle Pliocene assemblage reveals four factors which explain 92.4% of the total variance of the 47 samples studied between 3.25 and 2.55 Ma. Three of the factors are closely related to modern subarctic, transitional, and subtropical elements, while the fourth factor, which is dominated by Coscinodiscus marginatus and the extinct Pliocene species Neodenticula kamtschatica, appears to correspond to a middle Pliocene precursor of the subarctic water mass. Knowledge of the modern and generalized Pliocene paleoclimatic relationships of various diatom taxa is used to generate a paleoclimate curve ("Twt") based on the ratio of warm-water (subtropical) to cold-water diatoms with warm-water transitional taxa (Thalassionema nitzschioides, Thalassiosira oestrupii, and Coscinodiscus radiatus) factored into the equation at an intermediate (0.5) value. The "Twt" ratios at more southerly DSDP Sites 579 and 578 are consistently higher (warmer) than those at Site 580 throughout the Pliocene, suggesting the validity of the ratio as a paleoclimatic index. Diatom paleoclimatic data reveal a middle Pliocene (3.1 to 3.0 Ma) warm interval at Site 580 during which paleotemperatures may have exceeded maximum Holocene values by 3??-5.5??C at least three times. This middle Pliocene warm interval is also recognized by planktic foraminifers in the North Atlantic, and it appears to correspond with generalized depleted oxygen isotope values suggesting polar warming. The diatom "Twt" curve for Site 580 compares fairly well with radiolarian and silicoflagellate paleoclimatic curves for Site 580, planktic foraminiferal sea-surface temperature estimates for the North Atlantic, and benthic

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  13. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES POWER PLANT TEST STAND AND SATURN V TEST STAND IN THE WEST TEST AREA (FAR BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. Mid-Piacenzian sea surface temperature record from ODP Site 1115 in the western equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoll, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Planktic foraminifer assemblages and alkenone unsaturation ratios have been analyzed for the mid-Piacen-zian (3.3 to 2.9 Ma) section of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1115B, located in the western equatorial Pacific off the coast of New Guinea. Cold and warm season sea surface temperature (SST) estimates were determined using a modern analog technique. ODP Site 1115 is located just south of the transition between the planktic foraminifer tropical and subtropical faunal provinces and approximates the southern boundary of the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) warm pool. Comparison of the faunal and alkenone SST estimates (presented here) with an existing nannofossil climate proxy shows similar trends. Results of this analysis show increased seasonal variability during the middle of the sampled section (3.22 to 3.10 Ma), suggesting a possible northward migration of both the subtropical faunal province and the southern boundary of the WEP warm pool.

  15. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-10-01

    The ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' was prepared by Bechtel Nevada (BN) to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2004''. It was produced this year to provide a more cost-effective and wider distribution of a hardcopy summary of the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004'' to interested DOE stakeholders.

  16. Annual update for the Nevada Test Site site treatment plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This document describes the purpose and scope of the Draft Annual Update for the Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan, the framework for developing the Annual Update, and the current inventory of mixed waste covered under the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Compliance Act Consent Order and stored at the Nevada Test Site. No Site Treatment Plan milestones or Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order deadlines have been missed for fiscal year 1996. The Shipping Cask, a portion of the solvent sludge waste stream, and eight B-25 boxes from the lead-contaminated soil waste stream have been deleted from the Site Treatment Plan and the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order, in accordance with Part XI of the Federal Facility Cleanup Act Consent Order.

  17. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  18. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-10-01

    This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  19. Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal Siting in a Highly Seismic Region on the Mexican Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaczek, Yannick; Lambert, Nicolas

    A new LNG terminal should be built on the Pacific coast of Mexico, one of the most seismic regions in the world. According to International codes, a siting process must be carried out to insure the feasibility of the project, which involves, in a first step, a data collection of all existing documents related to geology, seismicity, and geotechnics. As a second step, a seismo-tectonic study has been performed, with localisation of active faults on or close to the site (aerial and satellite imagery, geophysical investigations) and determination of OBE & SSE levels. Afterwards, the site was globally characterised, with a first geotechnical report, dealing with liquefaction risks, typical soil layers, and general foundation methodology. The general site layout, the general stability of buildings, the detailed soil investigations, and the detailed foundation design are performed in the phases as described in this paper.

  20. Double tracks test site characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  1. 30 CFR 33.30 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test site. 33.30 Section 33.30 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test...

  2. 30 CFR 33.30 - Test site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test site. 33.30 Section 33.30 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test...

  3. 14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1120. Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. "SITE WORK, CIVIL, SITE PLAN." Test Area 1-120. Specifications No. OC2-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 7 of 148; file no. 1320/58, Rev. C. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338 Rev. C, Date: 16 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  5. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2003 was prepared by Bechtel Nevada to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy and the information needs of the public. This report is meant to be useful to members of the public, public officials, regulators, and Nevada Test Site contractors. The Executive Summary strives to present in a concise format the purpose of the document, the NTS mission and major programs, a summary of radiological releases and doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of non-radiological releases, and an overview of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Management System. The Executive Summary, combined with the following Compliance Summary, are written to meet all the objectives of the report and to be stand-alone sections for those who choose not to read the entire document.

  6. Redox Conditions and Related Color Change in Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sediments: IODP Site U1334

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, W. E.; Gussone, N. C.; Hathorne, E. C.; Kimoto, K.; Delaney, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    This study was prompted by a 65 m thick brown-green color change in deep-sea sediments of IODP Site U1334 (0-38 Ma, 4799 m water depth) that corresponds to its equatorial crossing (caused by the Northward movement of the pacific plate). Green sediment is a visual indicator of reducing conditions in sediment due to enhanced organic matter deposition and burial. Here we use geochemical redox indicators to characterize the effect of equatorial upwelling on bottom water. The modern redox signal is captured in porewater profiles (nitrate, manganese, iron, sulfate) while trace metal Enrichment Factors (EF) in bulk sediment (manganese, uranium, molybdenum, rhenium) normalized to the detrital component (titanium) record redox state at burial. To measure export productivity we also measure biogenic barium. Porewater profiles reveal suboxic diagenesis; profiles follow the expected sequence of nitrate, manganese oxide, and iron oxide reduction with increasing depth. Constant sulfate (~28 μM) implies anoxia has not occurred. Bulk sediment Mn EF are enriched (EF > 1) throughout the record (Mn EF = 15-200) while U and Mo enrichment corresponds to green color and equatorial proximity (U EF = 4-19; Mo EF = 0-7). Constant Mn enrichment implies continuous oxygenation. Uranium and Mo enrichment near the equator represents suboxic conditions also seen in the porewater. Low Re concentrations (below detection) provide additional evidence against anoxia. A comparison of Mn EF from total digestions to samples treated with an additional reductive cleaning step distinguishes between Mn-oxides and Mn-carbonates, indicating oxygenated and reducing conditions respectively. Mn-carbonate occurrence agrees with U and Mo EF; conditions were more reducing near the equator. Bio-Ba shows significant variability over this interval (22-99 mmol g-1). Our geochemical results indicate that bottom waters became suboxic at the equator as a result of equatorial upwelling-influenced increases in organic

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009, Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  9. Coalescent-based hypothesis testing supports multiple Pleistocene refugia in the Pacific Northwest for the Pacific giant salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus).

    PubMed

    Steele, Craig A; Storfer, Andrew

    2006-08-01

    Phylogeographic patterns of many taxa are explained by Pleistocene glaciation. The temperate rainforests within the Pacific Northwest of North America provide an excellent example of this phenomenon, and competing phylogenetic hypotheses exist regarding the number of Pleistocene refugia influencing genetic variation of endemic organisms. One such endemic is the Pacific giant salamander, Dicamptodon tenebrosus. In this study, we estimate this species' phylogeny and use a coalescent modeling approach to test five hypotheses concerning the number, location and divergence times of purported Pleistocene refugia. Single refugium hypotheses include: a northern refugium in the Columbia River Valley and a southern refugium in the Klamath-Siskiyou Mountains. Dual refugia hypotheses include these same refugia but separated at varying times: last glacial maximum (20,000 years ago), mid-Pleistocene (800,000 years ago) and early Pleistocene (1.7 million years ago). Phylogenetic analyses and inferences from nested clade analysis reveal distinct northern and southern lineages expanding from the Columbia River Valley and the Klamath-Siskiyou Mountains, respectively. Results of coalescent simulations reject both single refugium hypotheses and the hypothesis of dual refugia with a separation date in the late Pleistocene but not hypotheses predicting dual refugia with separation in early or mid-Pleistocene. Estimates of time since divergence between northern and southern lineages also indicate separation since early to mid-Pleistocene. Tests for expanding populations using mismatch distributions and 'g' distributions reveal demographic growth in the northern and southern lineages. The combination of these results provides strong evidence that this species was restricted into, and subsequently expanded from, at least two Pleistocene refugia in the Pacific Northwest. PMID:16842421

  10. Development of protocols for chronic toxicity testing of Pacific marine species

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, C.J.; Seim, W.K.; Hoffman, R.L.; Weber, L.

    1990-03-01

    The development of a year-round capability for conducting short-term toxicity tests for estimating chronic-effect levels of toxic materials with a native Pacific coast fish and a native Pacific coast mysid shrimp was the goal of the project. In order to achieve acceptable sensitivity as a surrogate for chronic toxicity tests, targeting the reproductive portion of the mysid life cycle and all or part of the embryonic, larval, or early post-larval portion of the fish life cycle was deemed necessary. This targeting is consistent with conclusions based upon earlier work in developing similar tests with Atlantic coast, Gulf coast, and freshwater fish and invertebrates.

  11. Southern ocean controls on the extent of denitrification in the southeast Pacific (ODP Site 1234)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Mix, A.; Martinez, P.

    2005-12-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the observed temporal changes in oceanic denitrification, the bacterial reduction of nitrate under suboxic conditions, has been sought due to the potential importance of N inventory changes and the production of N2O on the climate system. High-resolution oxygen isotope and bulk sediment δ15N records from ODP Site 1234 on the Chile Margin are presented as a record of denitrification changes within the Peru-Chile Upwelling system over the last 65ky. The character of the Site 1234 δ15N record is quite similar to that of its northern hemisphere counterparts with the exception of timing. Denitrification changes in the southeast Pacific show coherent variation with Antarctic climate, as indicated by the Byrd ice core δ18O record, rather than with northern hemisphere climate change. The high latitude polar oceans play a fundamental role in setting the physical and biological controls on subsurface oxygen supply and demand. The southern hemisphere character of the Chile margin record suggests that episodes of reduced denitrification in the SE Pacific likely represent times when more oxygen was supplied as the result of changes in the chemical composition of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW), which forms in the Subantarctic zone of the Southern Ocean and ventilates the low latitude thermocline. An increase in oxygen can be achieved through (1) lower temperatures/ higher ventilation rates and/or (2) reduced oxygen demand in the low latitude subsurface due to reduction in the preformed nutrient content of SAMW.

  12. Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

    1983-08-01

    The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

  13. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  14. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  15. Testing the Link between Tropical Pacific Variability and Antarctic Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twedt, J. R.; Bitz, C. M.; Battisti, D. S.; Frierson, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The recent expansion in Antarctic sea ice and the reported hiatus in global warming are at odds with CMIP5 model responses to anthropogenic forcing. Several studies have looked to the cooling of the central and eastern Tropical Pacific from 1980 - 2013 as potential drivers of these unexpected trends, via Rossby wave teleconnections and increased ocean heat uptake in the subtropical Pacific. Rossby waves emanating from the tropical Pacific are known to impact high latitudes, but their role in the recent expansion of Antarctic Sea ice is still a subject of debate. Furthermore, the wind-driven cooling of the tropical Pacific may change the rate of surface warming through an increase in ocean heat uptake, thus the Pacific may also be causing the reported hiatus. We test both of these hypothesis in two experiments carried out with a coupled ocean-atmosphere model, the Community Earth System Model 1.1. The first method uses an energy conserving flux adjustment to reproduce the observed cooling in the central and eastern tropical Pacific. The second method introduces a new tool to CESM; it adds an anomalous wind stress to the tropical Pacific while preserving the atmosphere-ocean coupling. We find that both forcing methods are able to simulate a cooling trend in the tropical Pacific and the attendant changes in tropical convection. Yet neither method reproduces a slowdown in global warming. Furthermore, the teleconnections to Antarctica show a modest effect on sea ice extent, but do not fully account for the recent expansion in Antarctic Sea Ice.

  16. The Nevada Test Site as a Lunar Analog Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon Freid

    2007-02-13

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a large (1,350 square miles) secure site currently operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy and was established in 1951 to provide a venue for testing nuclear weapons. Three areas with a variety of elevation and geological parameters were used for testing, but the largest number of tests was in Yucca Flat. The Yucca Flat area is approximately 5 miles wide and 20 miles long and approximately 460 subsidence craters resulted from testing in this area. The Sedan crater displaced approximately 12 million tons of earth and is the largest of these craters at 1,280 feet across and 320 feet deep. The profiles of Sedan and the other craters offer a wide variety of shapes and depths that are ideally suited for lunar analog testing.

  17. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2007. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This report meets these objectives for the NTS and three offsite Nevada facilities mentioned in this report.

  18. Nevada Test Site Environmental Summary Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  19. Nevada Test Site Summary 2006 (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security-related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  20. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  1. Tonopah Test Range closure sites revegetation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    This document is a revegetation plan for long-term stabilization (revegetation) of land disturbed by activities associated with the closure of a Bomblet Pit and the Five Points Landfill. Both sites are on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) located in south-central Nevada. This document contains general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during the revegetation of these sites. The revegetation procedures proposed have been developed over several years of research and include the results of reclamation trials at Area 11 and Area 19 on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and more recently at the Double Tracks (Nellis Air Force Range) reclamation demonstration plots. In addition, the results of reclamation efforts and concurrent research efforts at the Yucca Mountain Project have been considered in the preparation of this revegetation plan.

  2. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Wruble, D T; McDowell, E M

    1990-11-01

    Prior to 1989 annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the offsite radiological surveillance program conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with this 1989 annual Site environmental report for the NTS, these two documents are being combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection program conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear activities at the Site. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental releases and meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimate calculations. 57 refs., 52 figs., 65 tabs.

  3. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs) are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1A, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NTSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2009 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL)-Nellis. It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  4. A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Long, Charles N.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2013-04-01

    Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using long-term datasets from the three Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The Nauru and Darwin sites show significant variability in sky cover, downwelling radiative fluxes, and surface cloud radiative effect (CRE) due to El Niño and the Australian monsoon, respectively, while the Manus site shows little intra-seasonal or interannual variability. Cloud radar measurement of cloud base and top heights are used to define cloud types so that the effect of cloud type on the surface CRE can be examined. Clouds with low bases contribute 71-75% of the surface shortwave (SW) CRE and 66-74% of the surface longwave (LW) CRE at the three TWP sites, while clouds with mid-level bases contribute 8-9% of the SW CRE and 12-14% of the LW CRE, and clouds with high bases contribute 16-19% of the SW CRE and 15-21% of the LW CRE.

  5. Equatorial Pacific climatic variations during the Miocene - Pliocene at IODP-Site U-1338

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselle, G.; Beltran, C.; Sicre, M.; de Rafélis, M.; Raffi, I.; Backman, J.; Iodp Expeditions 320/321 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    The modern Equatorial Pacific setting has been established during the late Miocene-Pliocene. We provide here a new record of Equatorial Pacific sea surface conditions during the Miocene-Pliocene at IODP Site U1338 (2°30.469’N, 117°58.178’W), which contains a continuous and well-preserved sedimentary record. Our reconstruction is mainly based on stable isotopic measurements of oxygen and carbon on bulk carbonate, planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils 2-5 µm, as well as the alkenone unsaturation index (Uk’37) proxy. The data provide a new and detailed alkenone based SST reconstruction for mid-Miocene through Pliocene in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific and indicate a steady trend about 27 °C during mid-Miocene. Coccolith δ18O curve shows no resemblance to the benthic isotope curve established by Zachos et al. (2001) and shows an anti-correlation with alkenone based SST from 6.5 Ma, indicating that isotopic sea surface variations are mainly controlled by the temperature. Especially, these curves point jointly to a rapid cooling from 3.5 Ma. Moreover, sea surface temperatures variations fluctuate in parallel with cycles of environment fertility at about 2 Ma, supported by δ13C variations and modifications of nannofossil assemblages, and permit to hypothesize regular fluctuations of under current circulation. Combined these results with climatic and tectonic evolutions allow to demonstrate a series of paleoceanographic events, including: - High-productivity conditions characterized the mid-Miocene time interval. - The “carbonate crash”, around 11-9 Ma, during which deep oceanic conditions changes occurred, are assigned to the closing of the Panama gateway. - The late Miocene, in which the Indonesian and Central American seaways are gradually narrowing. The east-west Pacific circulations are then restricted and we hypothesize the gradual establishment of long-term El Niño-La Niña-like oceanic and climatic conditions, with the settlement of

  6. Astronomical Site Testing Initiatives in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David A. H.; Graham, Edward; Vaughan, Richard; Belay, Solomon; Biressa, Tolu

    2015-08-01

    Two astronomical site testing initiatives are beginning in both Kenya and Ethiopia, with the aim of selecting suitable locations in those countries for modest sized (1-2m) optical telescopes.The first project, in Kenya, has initially involved a desk-top study of ~30 years of low resolution (~80 km) meteorological satellite data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (so called “ERA-reanalysis” data). This was later supplemented by ~2 years of higher resolution (~12 km) United Kingdom Met Office Limited Area Model for Africa (“Africa-LAM”) data, kindly made available by the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC).The analysis looked at cloud cover, aerosol distribution, integrated water vapour and wind conditions, On the basis of this study, we determined a number of regions in the north of Kenya, east of the Rift Valley, which show promise as potential observatory sites. We are now in the process of installing Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) at 3 selected sites (~2000-2700 m altitude) to begin monitoring meteorological conditions over the next few years. It is eventually hoped to supplement this study with instrumentation to allow the measurement of sky brightness, local cloud cover and seeing (e.g. with a DIMM system).A similar program of astronomical site testing is due to start in 2015 in the Lalibela region of northern Ethiopia, at three potential dark sky sites with expected relatively low cloud cover, ranging in altitude from ~3600 to 4100 m.

  7. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts.

  9. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  10. Onset of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the southern Pacific Ocean (DSDP Site 277, Campbell Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, C. J.; Hines, B. R.; Littler, K.; Villasante-Marcos, V.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Strong, C. P.; Zachos, J. C.; Eggins, S. M.; Northcote, L.; Phillips, A.

    2015-02-01

    Re-examination of a sediment core collected by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP Site 277) on the western margin of the Campbell Plateau, Southwest Pacific Ocean (paleolatitude of ∼ 65° S), has identified an intact Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary overlain by a 34 cm-thick record of the initial phase of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) within nannofossil chalk. The upper part of the PETM is truncated, either due to drilling disturbance or a sedimentary hiatus. An intact record of the onset of the PETM is indicated by a gradual decrease in δ13C values over 20 cm, followed by a 14 cm interval in which δ13C is 2‰ lighter than uppermost Paleocene values. After accounting for effects of diagenetic alteration, we use δ18O and Mg/Ca values from foraminiferal tests to determine that intermediate and surface waters warmed by ∼ 6° at the onset of the PETM prior to the full development of the negative δ13C excursion. After this initial warming, sea temperatures were relatively stable through the PETM, but declined abruptly across the unconformity that truncates the event at this site. Mg/Ca analysis of foraminiferal tests indicate peak intermediate and surface water temperatures of ∼ 19 and ∼ 32 °C, respectively. These temperatures may be influenced by enhanced poleward ocean heat transport during the PETM and surface water values may also be biased towards warm season temperatures.

  11. Science To Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Felmy, Andrew R. ); Grate, Jay W. ); Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J. ); Meyer, Philip D. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Pfund, David M. ); Su, Yali ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Weber, William J. ); Zachara, John M. )

    2001-06-19

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, nine in fiscal year 1998, seven in fiscal year 1999, and five in fiscal year 2000. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have published final reports. The 1997 and 1998 award projects have been completed or are nearing completion. Final reports for these awards will be published, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the 1999 and 2000 grants address significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. The 1999 and 2000 EMSP awards at PNNL are focused primarily in two areas: Tank Waste Remediation, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  12. Convective Signals from Surface Measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-23

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal has been detected using observations from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). With downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and fractional sky cover from the ACRF TWP Manus site, and the statistical tools of wavelet and spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals from surface observations spanning the period from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-retrieved values of precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and interpolated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) satellite measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the same location. Our results indicate that the MJO convective signal has a strong seasonal-to-interannual evolution that is likely correlated with the interannual variability of El Ni ˜no Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  13. The Interface of Pacific and Other Knowledges in a Supplementary Education Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbairn-Dunlop, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Because identity (language and culture) are central to Pacific knowledge and knowledge construction processes, Pacific students' educational experiences should be viewed through a cultural lens that sees Pacific knowledge and practices as valid and valued. This study explores the relationship between culture and educational outcomes as seen…

  14. The EUROSEISTEST Experimental Test Site in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitilakis, K.; Manos, G.; Raptakis, D.; Anastasiadis, A.; Makra, K.; Manakou, M.

    2009-04-01

    The European experimental site EUROSEISTEST has been established since 1993 in the epicentral area of the June 20th 1978 earthquake (40.8˚ N, 23.2˚ E, Ms 6.5, Imax VIII+ MSK, Papazachos et al., 1979), located in the active tectonic Mygdonian basin, 30km NNE from Thessaloniki, Greece. Euroseistest has been funded by the European Commission - Directorate General for Research and Development under the framework of consecutive EC research projects (EuroseisTest, EuroseisMod and Eurroseisrisk). It is specially designed and dedicated to conduct experimental and theoretical studies on site effects, soil and site characterization and soil-foundation-structure interaction phenomena. The geological, geophysical and geotechnical conditions of the Euroseistest valley (Mygdonian graben) is very well constrained through numerous in situ campaigns and laboratory tests. The permanent accelerometric network comprises 21 digital 3D stations, including vertical arrays down to 200m (schist bedrock), covering a surface of about 100 sq Km. The site is also covered by a permanent seismological network. A number of high quality recordings, from temporary and permanent arrays, gave the possibility to perform advanced experimental and theoretical studies on site effects (e.g. Raptakis et al., 1998; Pitilakis et al., 1999; Raptakis et al., 2000; Chávez-García et al., 2000; Makra, 2000; Makra et al., 2001 & 2005). The main advantage of Euroseistest is the detailed knowledge of the 3D geological-geotechnical structure of the basin (Manakou, 2007) and its dense permanent accelerometric network. For this reason the site has been recently selected by CEA to validate and check the advanced numerical codes to be used in Cadarache ITER project. Besides the study of site effects, Euroseistest offers interesting possibilities to study SSI problems through two model structures (scaled 1:3). A 6-storey building and a bridge pier, which have been constructed and instrumented in the centre of the

  15. Site acceptance test, W-030 MICON system

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-10

    Monitoring and control of the W-030 ventilation upgrade is provided by a distributed control system (DCS) furnished by MICON Corporation. After shipment to the Hanford Site, the site acceptance test (SAT) for this system was conducted in a laboratory environment over a six month period, involving four distinct phases and numerous hardware and software modifications required to correct test exceptions. The final results is a system which is not fully compliant with procurement specifications but is determined to meet minimum Project W-030 safety and functional requirements. A negotiated settlement was reached with the supplier to establish a `path forward` for system implementation. This report documents the `as-run` status of the SAT. The SAT was completed in August of 1995. It was later followed by comprehensive acceptance testing of the W-030 control-logic configuration software; results are documented in WHC-SD-W030-ATR-011. Further testing is reported as part of process system startup operational testing, performed after the MICON installation.

  16. Drilling operations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-29

    The Nevada Operations Office (NV) is responsible for supporting the nuclear test programs of the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. This support includes the drilling of test holes for nuclear device testing a the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of the Department of Energy's management of test hole inventories at the NTS. Our audit disclosed that NV accumulated a large inventory of unused test holes and approved drilling additional holes for which neither laboratory (Los Alamos nor Livermore) had identified a need. The overdrilling of test holes occurred because NV did not comply with good inventory practices that would have had NV's approving official question the need for, and the timing of, the laboratories' drilling requests. Instead, NV gave perfunctory approval to the laboratories' work orders for drilling test holes, and emphasized keeping two drill rig crews busy and satisfying the laboratories' demands for dedicated drilling personnel. Although NV did not agree that overdrilling had occurred, it has cut back its drilling activities and estimated that this will save abut $7.6 million annually. NV agreed with the recommendations in the report and has taken corrective actions.

  17. Spent fuel test project, Climax granitic stock, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-10-24

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of dry geologic storage of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The SFT-C is located at a depth of 420 m in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent commercial PWR fuel assemblies are to be stored for 3 to 5 years. Additional heat is supplied by electrical heaters, and more than 800 channels of technical information are being recorded. The measurements include rock temperature, rock displacement and stress, joint motion, and monitoring of the ventilation air volume, temperature, and dewpoint.

  18. Poisoned Pacific: The legacy of French nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsson, B.

    1990-03-01

    The author points out that France hosted a summit meeting of the seven wealthiest nations on earth in the summer of 1989, celebrating the bicentenary of the French Revolution. Although introducing a new subject to the economic summit - present environmental concerns - nothing was said about the poisoning of the islands and islanders from 159 nuclear tests (44 atmospheric, 115 underground) since 1966 on two tiny atolls (Moruroa and Fangataufa) in French Polynesia. The first test rained dead fish from a lagoon; others spread radiation throughout the region. De Gaulle's promise of independence to the Polynesians during World War II, as soon as the war was over, was forgotten once nuclear testing began. The atolls and the patience of the Polynesians have been used up; and a colony that once was nearly self-sufficient now imports 80% of its food.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Site.

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is one of the four fixed sites. It consists of three climate research facilities; the Manus facility on Los Negros Island in Manus, Papua New Guinea (established in 1996); the Nauru facility on Nauru Island, Republic of Nauru (1998); and the Darwin facility in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (2002). The operations are supported by government agencies in each host country. Covering the area roughly between 10 degrees N and 10 degrees S of the equator and from 130 degrees E to 167 degrees E, the TWP locale includes a region that plays a large role in the interannual variability observed in the global climate system. More than 250,000 TWP data sets from 1996 to the present reside in the ARM Archive. Begin at the TWP information page for links or access data directly from the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  20. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NTS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NTS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  1. Ridge-spotting: A new test for Pacific absolute plate motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Relative plate motions provide high-resolution descriptions of motions of plates relative to other plates. Yet geodynamically, motions of plates relative to the mantle are required since such motions can be attributed to forces (e.g., slab pull and ridge push) acting upon the plates. Various reference frames have been proposed, such as the hot spot reference frame, to link plate motions to a mantle framework. Unfortunately, both accuracy and precision of absolute plate motion models lag behind those of relative plate motion models. Consequently, it is paramount to use relative plate motions in improving our understanding of absolute plate motions. A new technique called "ridge-spotting" combines absolute and relative plate motions and examines the viability of proposed absolute plate motion models. We test the method on six published Pacific absolute plate motions models, including fixed and moving hot spot models as well as a geodynamically derived model. Ridge-spotting reconstructs the Pacific-Farallon and Pacific-Antarctica ridge systems over the last 80 Myr. All six absolute plate motion models predict large amounts of northward migration and monotonic clockwise rotation for the Pacific-Farallon ridge. A geodynamic implication of our ridge migration predictions is that the suggestion that the Pacific-Farallon ridge may have been pinned by a large mantle upwelling is not supported. Unexpected or erratic ridge behaviors may be tied to limitations in the models themselves or (for Indo-Atlantic models) discrepancies in the plate circuits used to project models into the Pacific realm. Ridge-spotting is promising and will be extended to include more plates and other ocean basins.

  2. Population dose near the Semipalatinsk test site.

    PubMed

    Hille, R; Hill, P; Bouisset, P; Calmet, D; Kluson, J; Seisebaev, A; Smagulov, S

    1998-10-01

    To determine the consequences of atmospheric atomic bomb tests for the population in the surroundings of the former nuclear weapons test site near Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan, a pilot study was performed by an international cooperation between Kazakh, French, Czech and German institutions at two villages, Mostik and Maisk. Together with Kazakh scientists, eight experts from Europe carried out a field mission in September 1995 to assess, within the framework of a NATO supported project, the radiological situation as far as external doses, environmental contamination and body burden of man were concerned. A summary of the results obtained is presented. The actual radiological situation near the test site is characterized by fallout contaminations. Cs was found in upper soil layers in concentrations similar to those of the global fallout. Also Sr, Am and Co were observed. The resulting present dose to the population is low. Mean external doses from soil contamination for Maisk and Mostik (0.60-0.63 mSv/year) presently correspond to mean external doses in normal environments. Mean values of the annual internal doses observed in these two villages are below 2 microSv/year for 90Sr. For other radionuclides the internal doses are also negligible. PMID:9840482

  3. Nevada Test Site Groundwater Well Rehabilitation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Hudson

    2006-12-01

    This plan describes actions to improve the utility and credibility of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) interim groundwater monitoring program. The two principal actions are: (1) well maintenance/rehabilitation activities and (2) the deployment of dedicated low-cost and reliable jack-pumps for groundwater sampling from deep monitoring wells. The scope of this proposal is to perform these actions on some number of nine selected wells (Figure 1) to evaluate whether these actions are achievable, practical, cost effective, and result in improved groundwater data quality.

  4. NEON Collaborative Data Collection Campaign at Pacific South West Site in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Musinsky, J.; Petroy, S. B.; Wasser, L. A.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Serbin, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale observatory that will collect biological, chemical and geophysical data over the continental United States in order to study biodiversity, landcover change, climate change and invasive species. In June 2013, a large-scale data collection took place over NEON's Pacific South West (PSW) site 17 in CA, USA. Data were collected in the San Joaquin Experimental Range and the Sierra National Forest. NEON's AOP (Airborne Observation Platform) acquired high spatial resolution hyperspectral data (~1m pixels), waveform lidar, discrete lidar, and RGB imagery over all three sites. A field team simultaneously collected atmospheric and vegetation inventory data, including tree locations, height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), species, and spectral data. The NEON collect was centered within a collaboration of multiple research entities, including NASA, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), University of Massachusetts (Boston; UMB, and Lowell; UML), Boston University (BU), and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (UWM). NASA's AVIRIS and MASTER sensors were flown over a wider area encompassing the NEON sites, with AVIRIS acquiring hyperspectral data (224 bands) at approximately 30m spatial resolution, and MASTER acquiring multispectral thermal data (50 bands) at approximately 50m spatial resolution. These data will be downscaled to approximate theoretical HyspIRI data (60m spatial resolution) as part of a large collection of preparatory research. Concurrently, a variety of university teams were active in the field: RIT collected ground-based lidar, leaf area index (LAI), herbaceous biomass measurements, wide-angle photographs, and spectral measurements. Data were collected over 20 80x80m sites, centered on existing 20x20m NEON sites. This data set will be used to inform synthetic scene design and to study the impact of sub-pixel structural variation on pixel-level spectral response; The BU, UMB, and UML

  5. 33 CFR 334.1410 - Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range. 334.1410 Section 334.1410 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1410 Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu,...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1410 - Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range. 334.1410 Section 334.1410 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1410 Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu,...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1410 - Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range. 334.1410 Section 334.1410 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1410 Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu,...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1410 - Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range. 334.1410 Section 334.1410 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1410 Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu,...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1410 - Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range. 334.1410 Section 334.1410 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1410 Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu,...

  10. Health consequences and health systems response to the Pacific U.S. Nuclear Weapons Testing Program.

    PubMed

    Palafox, Neal A; Riklon, Sheldon; Alik, Wilfred; Hixon, Allen L

    2007-03-01

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States detonated 67 thermonuclear devices in the Pacific as part of their U.S. Nuclear Weapons Testing Program (USNWTP). The aggregate explosive power was equal to 7,200 Hiroshima atomic bombs. Recent documents released by the U.S. government suggest that the deleterious effects of the nuclear testing were greater and extended farther than previously known. The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) government and affected communities have sought refress through diplomatic routes with the U.S. government, however, existing medical programs and financial reparations have not adequately addressed many of the health consequences of the USNWTP. Since radiation-induced cancers may have a long latency, a healthcare infrastructure is needed to address both cancer and related health issues. This article reviews the health consequences of the Pacific USNWTP and the current health systems ability to respond. PMID:19772154

  11. A 7-d toxicity test for marine pollutants using the Pacific mysid Mysidopsis intii. 1: Culture and protocol development

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, C.J.; Vance, M.M.; Harmon, V.L.; Kreeger, K.E.; Kreeger, D.A.; Chapman, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a short term (7-d) toxicity test for marine pollutants that is practical to perform at sites remote from a source of test organisms. Laboratory culture methods were developed that allowed successful long-term rearing of populations of the mysid Mysidopsis intii, a species indigenous to the Pacific coast of the United States. Mysidopsis intii was found to have a short life cycle of 20 d at 20 C, making it useful for chronic toxicity tests. A 7-d toxicity test was developed by comparing the sensitivities of various life stages of M. intii to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The most sensitive end point was found to be growth (final body length) of juveniles during the first 7 d after release. The sensitivity of mysids to SDS decreased with increasing age. To allow for shipping newly released juveniles to remote sites, a 7-d test was evaluated starting with 2-d-old mysids. The median lethal concentration for M. intii exposed to SDS at ages from 2 to 9 d was 4.59 mg/L (95% confidence limits, 4.21--5.00), and the maximum acceptable SDS concentration was 4.99 mg/L for both survival and growth.

  12. 76 FR 35208 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Nevada Irrigation District; Notice of Environmental Site Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Nevada Irrigation District; Notice of... Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and Nevada Irrigation District (NID) (applicants) will conduct...

  13. Radionuclide Mobility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Smith, D; Rose, T; Glascoe, L; Steefel, C; Zavarin, M

    2003-11-13

    Underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are characterized by abundant fission product and actinide source terms. Included are {sup 99}Tc and other soluble radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I), which are presumably mobile in groundwater and potentially toxic to down-gradient receptors. NTS provides the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an analog of the release of these radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository in the absence of engineered barriers. The investigation described in this report synthesizes a substantial body of data collected on the identity and distribution of soluble radionuclides at field scales over distances of hundreds of meters, for durations up to 40 years, and under hydrogeologic conditions very similar to the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This body of data is complemented by laboratory transport studies and a synthesis of recent modeling investigations from the NTS, with an emphasis on the ongoing Yucca Mountain Program (YMP) efforts. Overall, understanding the controls of radionuclide mobility associated with these nuclear tests will provide insight into the repository's future performance as well as bounds and calibrations for the numerical predictions of long-term radionuclide releases and migration.

  14. Savannah River Site L reactor testing

    SciTech Connect

    Menna, J.D.; Whitehouse, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Flow tests were conducted in the Savannah River Site L reactor to evaluate the performance of the primary coolant system under simulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. Results were obtained with a prototypic cold fuel charge in the core. Core flows typical of normal and shutdown operation were studied. The tests consisted of measuring hydraulic parameters while lowering tank moderator levels to allow air entrainment from the reactor tank through operating coolant pumps. Data were collected continuously as the flows changed from single-phase to a two-component mixture of water and air. Minimum tank levels equivalent to those resulting from a hypothetical double-ended guillotine break of a coolant pipe were simulated. System pressures, water levels, densities, flows, and pump parameters were measured by over 200 instruments especially designed or adapted for in-reactor use. Special in-reactor video cameras provided visual observation of flow regimes and confirmed water levels in the reactor tank, plenum, and pump suction and plenum inlet pipes. The tests provided a unique opportunity to study full-scale pump degradation and two-component flow distributions in the reactor under ambient temperature conditions. Results showed the different pump operating regimes and points of transition and some of the other key features of the reactor response system during a severe loss of coolant event. 4 refs., 24 figs.

  15. Site testing telescope on Mt. Hopkins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, R. H.; Haemmerle, V. R.; Woolf, N. J.

    1990-07-01

    A site testing telescope (STT) was placed for a period of 3 months outside the building, and for a period of 4 months inside the building of the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) located on Mt. Hopkins, and measurements of the astronomical seeing were carried out with both the STT and MMT. A comparison of the simultaneous and interleaved measurements with the two telescopes reveals a tight correlation and a well-defined relationship between the seeing image sizes determined with each telescope. The STT predicts very well the size of a long-exposure image obtained with the MMT. There exists for the MMT an optical blur component of about 0.47 arcsec that is revealed in image size data obtained with only the MMT and that is also revealed and must be accounted for in comparisons between the STT and MMT. Also discovered is a downward component of seeing that is caused by a trailing downwind plume of cold turbulent air that is shed off the radiatively cooled exterior building surfaces. The interior dome component of seeing is remarkably small (upper limit about 0.2 arcsec). The median site seeing is determined to be 0.55 arcsec at an effective wavelength of 7165 A for the MMT observations, or about 0.59 arcsec at 5000 A. The 10 percentile value is about 0.28 arcsec (0.30 arcsec at 5000 A). The median seeing observed with the MMT from one and a half years of data is 0.72 arcsec (0.75 arcsec at 5000 A), and is degraded from the site value virtually entirely by the optical blur component.

  16. Plant traits, productivity, biomass and soil properties from forest sites in the Pacific Northwest, 1999-2014.

    PubMed

    Berner, Logan T; Law, Beverly E

    2016-01-01

    Plant trait measurements are needed for evaluating ecological responses to environmental conditions and for ecosystem process model development, parameterization, and testing. We present a standardized dataset integrating measurements from projects conducted by the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research and Regional Analysis- Pacific Northwest (TERRA-PNW) research group between 1999 and 2014 across Oregon and Northern California, where measurements were collected for scaling and modeling regional terrestrial carbon processes with models such as Biome-BGC and the Community Land Model. The dataset contains measurements of specific leaf area, leaf longevity, leaf carbon and nitrogen for 35 tree and shrub species derived from more than 1,200 branch samples collected from over 200 forest plots, including several AmeriFlux sites. The dataset also contains plot-level measurements of forest composition, structure (e.g., tree biomass), and productivity, as well as measurements of soil structure (e.g., bulk density) and chemistry (e.g., carbon). Publically-archiving regional datasets of standardized, co-located, and geo-referenced plant trait measurements will advance the ability of earth system models to capture species-level climate sensitivity at regional to global scales. PMID:26784559

  17. Plant traits, productivity, biomass and soil properties from forest sites in the Pacific Northwest, 1999–2014

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Logan T.; Law, Beverly E.

    2016-01-01

    Plant trait measurements are needed for evaluating ecological responses to environmental conditions and for ecosystem process model development, parameterization, and testing. We present a standardized dataset integrating measurements from projects conducted by the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research and Regional Analysis- Pacific Northwest (TERRA-PNW) research group between 1999 and 2014 across Oregon and Northern California, where measurements were collected for scaling and modeling regional terrestrial carbon processes with models such as Biome-BGC and the Community Land Model. The dataset contains measurements of specific leaf area, leaf longevity, leaf carbon and nitrogen for 35 tree and shrub species derived from more than 1,200 branch samples collected from over 200 forest plots, including several AmeriFlux sites. The dataset also contains plot-level measurements of forest composition, structure (e.g., tree biomass), and productivity, as well as measurements of soil structure (e.g., bulk density) and chemistry (e.g., carbon). Publically-archiving regional datasets of standardized, co-located, and geo-referenced plant trait measurements will advance the ability of earth system models to capture species-level climate sensitivity at regional to global scales. PMID:26784559

  18. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

  19. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  20. Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, W.B.; Burke, L.J.; Gomez, B.J.; Livingston, L.; Nelson, D.S.; Smathers, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two secure control centers. This system also includes an automated ground truth capability that consists of differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receivers on test vehicles and live TV coverage of critical road sections. Finally there is a high-speed, secure computer network link between the control centers and the Air Force`s Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility in Albuquerque NM. The second capability is Bunker 2-300. It is a facility for evaluating advanced sensor systems for monitoring activities in underground cut-and-cover facilities. The main part of the facility consists of an underground bunker with three large rooms for operating various types of equipment. This equipment includes simulated chemical production machinery and controlled seismic and acoustic signal sources. There has been a thorough geologic and electromagnetic characterization of the region around the bunker. Since the facility is in a remote location, it is well-isolated from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference.

  1. Expanding the Planetary Analog Test Sites in Hawaii - Planetary Basalt Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) is one of the very few planetary surface research test sites in the country that is totally funded by the state legislature. In recent expansions, PISCES is broadening its work in planetary test sites to include much more R&D work in the planetary surface systems, and the manipulation of basalt materials. This is to include laser 3D printing of basalt, 'lunar-concrete' construction in state projects for Hawaii, renewable energy, and adding lava tubes/skylights to their mix of high-quality planetary analog test sites. PISCES Executive Director, Rob Kelso, will be providing program updates on the interest of the Hawaii State Legislature in planetary surface systems, new applied research initiatives in planetary basalts and interests in planetary construction.

  2. Multidisciplinary study on Wyoming test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Marrs, R. W.; Borgman, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ten EREP data passes over the Wyoming test site provided excellent S190A and S190B coverage and some useful S192 imagery. These data were employed in an evaluation of the EREP imaging sensors in several earth resources applications. Boysen Reservoir and Hyattsville were test areas for band to band comparison of the S190 and S192 sensors and for evaluation of the image data for geologic mapping. Contrast measurements were made from the S192 image data for typical sequence of sedimentary rocks. Histograms compiled from these measurements show that near infrared S192 bands provide the greatest amount of contrast between geologic units. Comparison was also made between LANDSAT imagery and S190B and aerial photography for regional land use mapping. The S190B photography was found far superior to the color composite LANDSAT imagery and was almost as effective as the 1:120,000 scale aerial photography. A map of linear elements prepared from LANDSAT and EREP imagery of the southwestern Bighorn Mountains provided an important aid in defining the relationship between fracture and ground water movement through the Madison aquifer.

  3. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  4. Department of Energy – Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2011-12-21

    The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environmental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

  5. Environmental assessment for double tracks test site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), with appropriate approvals from the U.S. Air Force (USAF), proposes to conduct environmental restoration operations at the Double Tracks test site located on the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in Nye County, Nevada. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the potential environmental consequences of four alternative actions for conducting the restoration operation and of the no action alternative. The EA also identifies mitigation measures, where appropriate, designed to protect natural and cultural resources and reduce impacts to human health and safety. The environmental restoration operation at the Double Tracks test site would serve two primary objectives. First, the proposed work would evaluate the effectiveness of future restoration operations involving contamination over larger areas. The project would implement remediation technology options and evaluate how these technologies could be applied to the larger areas of contaminated soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), and the NAFR. Second, the remediation would provide for the removal of plutonium contamination down to or below a predetermined level which would require cleanup of 1 hectare (ha) (2.5 acres), for the most likely case, or up to 3.0 ha (7.4 acres) of contaminated soil, for the upper bounding case.

  6. Convective signals from surface measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific site: Manus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-04

    Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signals have been detected using highly sampled observations from the U.S. DOE ARM Climate Research Facility located at the Tropical Western Pacific Manus site. Using downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and derived shortwave fractional sky cover, and the statistical tools of wavelet, cross wavelet, and Fourier spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals and their phase change from surface observations spanning from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-gauge combined values of precipitation from the NASA Global Precipitation Climatology Project and the NOAA interpolated outgoing longwave radiation for the same location. We find that the Manus MJO signal is weakest during the strongest 1997-1998 El Nin˜o Southern Oscillation (ENSO) year. A significant 3-5-month lead in boreal winter is identified further between Manus MJO and NOAA NINO3.4 sea surface temperature (former leads latter). A striking inverse relationship is found also between the instantaneous synoptic and intraseasonal phenomena over Manus. To further study the interaction between intraseasonal and diurnal scale variability, we composite the diurnal cycle of cloudiness for 21-MJO events that have passed over Manus. Our diurnal composite analysis of shortwave and longwave fractional sky covers indicates that during the MJO peak (strong convection), the diurnal amplitude of cloudiness is reduced substantially, while the diurnal mean cloudiness reaches the highest value and there are no significant phase changes. We argue that the increasing diurnal mean and decreasing diurnal amplitude are caused by the systematic convective cloud formation that is associated with the wet phase of the MJO, while the diurnal phase is still regulated by the well-defined solar forcing. This confirms our previous finding of the anti-phase relationship between the synoptic and intraseasonal phenomena. The detection of theMJOover the Manus site provides

  7. Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" in 1958. The contemporary site plans of test stands "A," "B," and "C" are also visible, along with the interconnecting tunnel system. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering "Site Plan for Proposed Test Stand "D" - Edwards Test Station," drawing no. ESP/22-0, 14 November 1958 - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Paradoxical High Productivity in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean During the Miocene "El Padre", ODP Site 849, and IODP Sites U1337 and U1338

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, M. W.; Moore, T. C., Jr.; Ravelo, A. C.; Baldauf, J.; Ford, H. L.; Stepanova, A.; Hertzberg, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Prior to 4.6 Ma, SST proxy data has identified a 2° SST gradient from east to west across the equatorial Pacific, much smaller than the Holocene E-W gradient near 6°. The reduced Miocene gradient should have significantly reduced atmospheric Walker circulation and reduced the forcing for eastern Pacific upwelling. However, abundant data on biogenic deposition has found that, if anything, eastern equatorial Pacific productivity was higher in the Miocene and was still centered at the equator. The eastern equatorial Pacific is also marked by abrupt order-of-magnitude changes in production that last for 50-200 kyr throughout the middle and late Miocene. The latest (but not largest) of these productivity intervals began abruptly (<5 kyr onset) at 4745 ka at ODP Site 849, then at 0.6°S, and ended more gradually around 4555 ka. The high production interval can be traced as far north as Site U1337 at a paleolatitude of 2.5°N. Much higher relative diatom production occurs near the equator than at sites further north; instead they have high carbonate production, presumably by coccolithophorids. The opal and carbonate distributions will ultimately provide information on plankton response to changes in nutrient delivery. We explore why the equatorial Pacific was more productive in the Miocene than in the late Pliocene and Pleistocene. Since the thermocline was warmer and the SST gradient with depth was more gradual in the Miocene, less wind stress is needed to lift the same nutrient load. Also, under warmer climates the ocean was probably more heterotrophic. Changes in organic carbon burial suggest that plankton decomposed higher in the water column in the Miocene than in the Pleistocene, and there was less cycling of particulate organic matter deep into the ocean interior. Nevertheless, abrupt but long lasting changes in production are a challenge to understand without abrupt dynamic changes in linkages between nutrient reservoirs. In the eastern Pacific the longer term

  9. Structural geology report: Spent Fuel Test - Climax Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, D.G.; Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    We performed underground mapping and core logging in the Climax Stock, a granitic intrusive at the Nevada Test Site, as part of a major field test to determine the feasibility of using granitic or crystalline rock for the underground storage of spent fuel from a nuclear reactor. This mapping and logging identified more than 2500 fractures, over 1500 of which were described in enough detail to allow statistical analyses and orientation studies to be performed. We identified eight joint sets, three major shear sets, and a fault zone within the Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) portion of the Stock. Joint sets identified within the SFT-C and elsewhere in the Stock correlated well. The orientations of joint sets identified by other investigators were consistent with our findings, indicating that the joint sets are persistent and have a relatively uniform orientation throughout a major portion of the Stock. The one joint set not seen elsewhere in the Stock is healed and the wall rock is altered, implying that healed joints were not included in the mapping criteria used by other investigators. The shear sets were distinguished from the joint sets by virtue of crushed minerals, continuous clay infilling, and other evidences of shearing, and from faults by the lack of offsetting. Previous investigators working mainly in the Pile Driver Drifts identified two of the shear sets. The third set, being nearly parallel to these Drifts had not been identified previously. The fault zone identified at the far (Receiving Room) end of the project is oriented approximately N45{sup 0}E-75{sup 0}SE, similar to both the Boundary and Shaft Station Faults. We have, therefore, concluded that the Receiving Room Fault is one of a series of normal faults that occur within the Climax Stock and that are possibly related, in both age and genesis, to the Boundary Fault. 52 refs., 26 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of potential geopressure geothermal test sites in southern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.

    1980-04-01

    Six geopressured-geothermal prospects in southern Louisiana were studied in detail to assess their potential use as test sites for the production of geopressure-geothermal energy. Each of the six sites contains substantial quantities of energy. Three of these prospects, Grand Lake, Lake Theriot, and Bayou Hebert, appear to be suitable for a test site. A summary of the findings is presented.

  11. Nevada Test Site, site treatment plan 1999 annual update

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFC Act) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFC Act Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996, and revised June 15, 1998. The FFC Act CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP.

  12. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum at DSDP Site 277, Campbell Plateau, southern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, C. J.; Hines, B. R.; Littler, K.; Villasante-Marcos, V.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Strong, C. P.; Zachos, J. C.; Eggins, S. M.; Northcote, L.; Phillips, A.

    2015-07-01

    Re-examination of sediment cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 277 on the western margin of the Campbell Plateau (paleolatitude of ~65° S) has identified an intact Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary overlain by a 34 cm thick record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) within nannofossil chalk. The upper part of the PETM is truncated, either due to drilling disturbance or a sedimentary hiatus. An intact record of the onset of the PETM is indicated by a gradual decrease in δ13C values over 20 cm, followed by a 14 cm interval in which δ13C is 2 ‰ lighter than uppermost Paleocene values. After accounting for effects of diagenetic alteration, we use δ18O and Mg/Ca values from foraminiferal tests to determine that intermediate and surface waters warmed by ~5-6° at the onset of the PETM prior to the full development of the negative δ13C excursion. After this initial warming, sea temperatures were relatively stable through the PETM but declined abruptly across the horizon that truncates the event at this site. Mg/Ca analysis of foraminiferal tests indicates peak intermediate and surface water temperatures of ~19 and ~32 °C, respectively. These temperatures may be influenced by residual diagenetic factors and changes in ocean circulation, and surface water values may also be biased towards warm-season temperatures.

  13. Site test for infrared solar tower in Yunnan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ke; Liu, Zhong; Wu, Ming-Chan; Lu, Ru-Wei; Qian, Pin; Zhang, Rui-Long

    This paper describes the history of site tests for solar optical observations in Yunnan. The site test for the infrared solar tower (IST) in Yunnan began from 1996, and consisted of 3 phases: the preliminary site survey, comparison observation and the observation at the fixed stations (with S-DIMM). The best site is finalized at Lao Ying Di, a small peninsula on the bank of Fuxian Lake, Cheng Jiang county. The site for the IST station at Lao Ying Di is chosen following the comparison observation with SDIMM for over one year at two final near-water sites. The two sites are picked out from 7 sites near water and 8 sites in mountain areas with visual observation by using an 89 mm Questar telescope after on-site survey over 40 candidate locations in Yunnan. The IST station is about 68 km from Kunming. The average sunshine time is 2200 hours annually.

  14. Planktic foraminiferal response to the Latest Danian Event in the Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1210)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Sofie; Bornemann, André; Deprez, Arne; Speijer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    stable isotope record for the central Pacific (ODP Site 1209). Paleocean

  15. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  16. 13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' (4217/E-18), Test Stand 'D' (4223/E-24), and Control and Recording Center (4221/E-22) with ancillary structures, and connecting roads and services. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Facilities Engineering and Construction Office 'Repairs to Test Stand 'C,' Edwards Test Station, Legend & Site Plan M-1,' drawing no. ESP/115, August 14, 1987. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. The Impact of the Latest Danian Event on Planktic Foraminiferal Faunas at ODP Site 1210 (Shatsky Rise, Pacific Ocean).

    PubMed

    Jehle, Sofie; Bornemann, André; Deprez, Arne; Speijer, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    The marine ecosystem has been severely disturbed by several transient paleoenvironmental events (<200 kyr duration) during the early Paleogene, of which the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma) was the most prominent. Over the last decade a number of similar events of Paleocene and Eocene age have been discovered. However, relatively little attention has been paid to pre-PETM events, such as the "Latest Danian Event" ("LDE", ~62.18 Ma), specifically from an open ocean perspective. Here we present new foraminiferal isotope (δ13C, δ18O) and faunal data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1210 at Shatsky Rise (Pacific Ocean) in order to reconstruct the prevailing paleoceanographic conditions. The studied five-meter-thick succession covers ~900 kyr and includes the 200-kyr-lasting LDE. All groups surface dwelling, subsurface dwelling and benthic foraminifera show a negative δ13C excursion of >0.6‰, similar in magnitude to the one previously reported from neighboring Site 1209 for benthic foraminifera. δ18O-inferred warming by 1.6 to 2.8°C (0.4-0.7‰ δ18O measured on benthic and planktic foraminiferal tests) of the entire water column accompanies the negative δ13C excursion. A well stratified upper ocean directly before and during the LDE is proposed based on the stable isotope gradients between surface and subsurface dwellers. The gradient is less well developed, but still enhanced after the event. Isotope data are supplemented by comprehensive planktic foraminiferal faunal analyses revealing a dominance of Morozovella species together with Parasubbotina species. Subsurface-dwelling Parasubbotina shows high abundances during the LDE tracing changes in the strength of the isotope gradients and, thus, may indicate optimal living conditions within a well stratified surface ocean for this taxon. In addition, distinct faunal changes are reported like the disappearance of Praemurica species right at the base of the LDE and the continuous replacement

  18. The Impact of the Latest Danian Event on Planktic Foraminiferal Faunas at ODP Site 1210 (Shatsky Rise, Pacific Ocean)

    PubMed Central

    Jehle, Sofie; Bornemann, André; Deprez, Arne; Speijer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    The marine ecosystem has been severely disturbed by several transient paleoenvironmental events (<200 kyr duration) during the early Paleogene, of which the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma) was the most prominent. Over the last decade a number of similar events of Paleocene and Eocene age have been discovered. However, relatively little attention has been paid to pre-PETM events, such as the “Latest Danian Event” ("LDE", ~62.18 Ma), specifically from an open ocean perspective. Here we present new foraminiferal isotope (δ13C, δ18O) and faunal data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1210 at Shatsky Rise (Pacific Ocean) in order to reconstruct the prevailing paleoceanographic conditions. The studied five-meter-thick succession covers ~900 kyr and includes the 200-kyr-lasting LDE. All groups surface dwelling, subsurface dwelling and benthic foraminifera show a negative δ13C excursion of >0.6‰, similar in magnitude to the one previously reported from neighboring Site 1209 for benthic foraminifera. δ18O-inferred warming by 1.6 to 2.8°C (0.4–0.7‰ δ18O measured on benthic and planktic foraminiferal tests) of the entire water column accompanies the negative δ13C excursion. A well stratified upper ocean directly before and during the LDE is proposed based on the stable isotope gradients between surface and subsurface dwellers. The gradient is less well developed, but still enhanced after the event. Isotope data are supplemented by comprehensive planktic foraminiferal faunal analyses revealing a dominance of Morozovella species together with Parasubbotina species. Subsurface-dwelling Parasubbotina shows high abundances during the LDE tracing changes in the strength of the isotope gradients and, thus, may indicate optimal living conditions within a well stratified surface ocean for this taxon. In addition, distinct faunal changes are reported like the disappearance of Praemurica species right at the base of the LDE and the continuous

  19. HIV risks and testing behavior among Asians and Pacific Islanders: results of the HIV Testing Survey, 2002-2003.

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Erin M.; Freedman, Mark S.; Buskin, Susan E.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The HIV Testing Survey (HITS) was developed to examine HIV testing and risk behavior in individuals at risk for HIV infection. The first Seattle HITS was conducted in 2000 (HITS-2000); HITS was conducted in Seattle again in 2002-2003 among Asians and Pacific Islanders (HITS-API). METHODS: Both HITS projects, HITS-API and HITS-2000, included anonymously targeted participants from at-risk populations. Data from the surveys were compared to see whether there were differences in HIV testing behavior between API and a general at-risk population in the Seattle area. Data were analyzed for 165 participants in HITS-API and 270 in HITS-2000. RESULTS: More API (90%) perceived themselves at some HIV risk relative to HITS-2000 participants (71%, chi2 p<0.05). In HITS-API and HITS-2000, participants reported significant HIV risks--no or inconsistent condom use with nonprimary partners or sharing injection equipment. Only 47% of HITS-API participants tested in the past year compared with 64% of HITS-2000. There was no association between HIV testing and risks in HITS-API. CONCLUSIONS: Based on self-report from HITS-API, the overall perceived risk for HIV infection was high, many engaged in high-risk behaviors, and HIV testing was suboptimal. PMID:16080452

  20. Using Transmission Control Protocol in the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Satellite Communication Experiment - the Next Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, E.

    1998-01-01

    Ths paper describes a future Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) test which was planned as a part of the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Satellite Communications Experiment. The TCP test portion of the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Satellite Communications Experiment intends to examine the correlation between the underlying assumptions of come TCP algorithms and the performance shortfalls observed when the algorithms are used in a stellite-based environment, and to make experimental changes to existing TCP variants to study the effects of the modifications.

  1. Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System siren testing report

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, L.B.

    1997-08-13

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effective coverage of the proposed upgrades to the existing Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System (HSEAS). The upgrades are to enhance the existing HSEAS along the Columbia River from the Vernita Bridge to the White Bluffs Boat Launch as well as install a new alerting system in the 400 Area on the Hanford Site. Five siren sites along the Columbia River and two sites in the 400 Area were tested to determine the site locations that will provide the desired coverage.

  2. Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-10-28

    Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex begins with a global to regional perspective regarding the location of low-level and mixed low-level waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site. For decades, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has served as a vital disposal resource in the nation-wide cleanup of former nuclear research and testing facilities. State-of-the-art waste management sites at the NNSS offer a safe, permanent disposal option for U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Department of Defense facilities generating cleanup-related radioactive waste.

  3. Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2007-08-01

    Journey to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Complex begins with a global to regional perspective regarding the location of low-level and mixed low-level waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site. For decades, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has served as a vital disposal resource in the nation-wide cleanup of former nuclear research and testing facilities. State-of-the-art waste management sites at the NNSS offer a safe, permanent disposal option for U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. Department of Defense facilities generating cleanup-related radioactive waste.

  4. Comparison of constant-rate pumping test and slug interference test results at the Hanford Site B pond multilevel test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Thorne, P.D.

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, is responsible for monitoring the movement and fate of contamination within the unconfined aquifer to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring and assessment of contamination migration on the Hanford Site, a sitewide 3-dimensional groundwater flow model is being developed. Providing quantitative hydrologic property data is instrumental in development of the 3-dimensional model. Multilevel monitoring facilities have been installed to provide detailed, vertically distributed hydrologic characterization information for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer. In previous reports, vertically distributed water-level and hydrochemical data obtained over time from these multi-level monitoring facilities have been evaluated and reported. This report describes the B pond facility in Section 2.0. It also provides analysis results for a constant-rate pumping test (Section 3.0) and slug interference test (Section 4.0) that were conducted at a multilevel test facility located near B Pond (see Figure 1. 1) in the central part of the Hanford Site. A hydraulic test summary (Section 5.0) that focuses on the comparison of hydraulic property estimates obtained using the two test methods is also presented. Reference materials are listed in Section 6.0.

  5. When Web Sites Post Test Answers, Professors Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Several Web sites have emerged in recent years that encourage students to upload old exams to build a bank of test questions and answers that can be consulted by other students. This article reports that some professors have raised concerns about these sites, arguing that these could be used to cheat, especially if professors reuse old tests.…

  6. 77 FR 14319 - Unmanned Aircraft System Test Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 91 Unmanned Aircraft System Test Sites AGENCY: Federal... test ranges/sites to integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System...

  7. Nevada Test Site Treatment Plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Treatment Plans (STPS) are required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy (DOE) or stores mixed waste, defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. On April 6, 1993, DOE published a Federal Register notice (58 FR 17875) describing its proposed process for developing the STPs in three phases including a Conceptual, a Draft, and a Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). All of the DOE Nevada Operations Office STP iterations have been developed with the state of Nevada`s input. The options and schedules reflect a ``bottoms-up`` approach and have been evaluated for impacts on other DOE sites, as well as impacts to the overall DOE program. Changes may have occurred in the preferred option and associated schedules between the PSTP, which was submitted to the state of Nevada and US Environmental Protection Agency April 1995, and the Final STP (hereafter referred to as the STP) as treatment evaluations progressed. The STP includes changes that have occurred since the submittal of the PSTP as a result of state-to-state and DOE-to-state discussions.

  8. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  9. On-site cell field test support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  10. Multidisciplinary study of Wyoming test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A field photometer system has been developed which allows faster and easier measurement of object reflectances. Preliminary tests indicate that the new system will be slightly accurate than the previous filter wheel system, in addition to being easier to operate, more rugged, more compact, and less expensive.

  11. HIV Testing Behavior among Pacific Islanders in Southern California: Exploring the Importance of Race/Ethnicity, Knowledge, and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Lois M.; Kim, Anna J.; Sablan-Santos, Lola; Quitugua, Lourdes Flores; Lepule, Jonathan; Maguadog, Tony; Perez, Rose; Young, Steve; Young, Louise

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of a 2008 community needs assessment survey of a convenience sample of 179 Pacific Islander respondents in southern California; the needs assessment focused on HIV knowledge, HIV testing behavior, and experience with intimate partner/relationship violence. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that…

  12. Stereo View of Phoenix Test Sample Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This anaglyph image, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 7, the seventh day of the mission (June 1, 2008), shows a stereoscopic 3D view of the so-called 'Knave of Hearts' first-dig test area to the north of the lander. The Robotic Arm's scraping blade left a small horizontal depression above where the sample was taken.

    Scientists speculate that white material in the depression left by the dig could represent ice or salts that precipitated into the soil. This material is likely the same white material observed in the sample in the Robotic Arm's scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Phoenix Test Sample Site in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 7, the seventh day of the mission (June 1, 2008), shows the so-called 'Knave of Hearts' first-dig test area to the north of the lander. The Robotic Arm's scraping blade left a small horizontal depression above where the sample was taken.

    Scientists speculate that white material in the depression left by the dig could represent ice or salts that precipitated into the soil. This material is likely the same white material observed in the sample in the Robotic Arm's scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Parabolic dish test site: History and operating experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The parabolic dish test site (PDTS) was established for testing point-focusing solar concentrator systems operating at temperatures approaching 1650 C. Among tests run were evaluation and performance characterization of parabolic dish concentrators, receivers, power conversion units, and solar/fossil-fuel hybrid systems. The PDTS was fully operational until its closure in June, 1984. The evolution of the test program, a chronological listing of the experiments run, and data summaries for most of the tests conducted are presented.

  15. Tools for DIY site-testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Federico; Rondanelli, Roberto; Abarca, Accel; Diaz, Marcos; Querel, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Our group has designed, sourced and constructed a radiosonde/ground-station pair using inexpensive opensource hardware. Based on the Arduino platform, the easy to build radiosonde allows the atmospheric science community to test and deploy instrumentation packages that can be fully customized to their individual sensing requirements. This sensing/transmitter package has been successfully deployed on a tethered-balloon, a weather balloon, a UAV airplane, and is currently being integrated into a UAV quadcopter and a student-built rocket. In this paper, the system, field measurements and potential applications will be described. As will the science drivers of having full control and open access to a measurement system in an age when commercial solutions have become popular but are restrictive in terms of proprietary sensor specifications, "black-box" calibration operations or data handling routines, etc. The ability to modify and experiment with both the hardware and software tools is an essential part of the scientific process. Without an understanding of the intrinsic biases or limitations in your instruments and system, it becomes difficult to improve them or advance the knowledge in any given field.

  16. Dolomitization of atolls by sea water convection flow: test of a hypothesis at Niue, South Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, P.; Socki, R.A.; Chan, L.

    1987-03-01

    The core of the former atoll on Niue Island, South Pacific, is extensively dolomitized. A detailed stable isotope study reveals that the dolomites are uniformly enriched in /sup 18/O and /sup 13/C(delta /sup 18/O = 2.8 per thousand +/- 0.5; delta /sup 13/C = 2.0 per thousand +/- 0.3) relative to their carbonate precursor. The Sr isotope ratios are equally constant with depth yielding /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values between 0.70912 and 0.70916. The observed isotopic compositions point to sea water as the dominant dolomitizing fluid. The Sr age of the dolomites is younger than the biostratigraphic age (Mid to Late Miocene) placing the dolomitization event at Plio-Pleistocene time. A model of sea water convection is proposed for atoll dolomitization on the basis of a thermal gradient between the atoll and the ambient ocean water. Sea water is drawn through the atoll margin and transferred upward by convective flow delivering Mg to the sites of dolomite precipitation. Transported with the sea water are volcano-derived metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn) as evidenced by the chemical gradient in the dolomite unit. It is suggested that the thermal convection model can find general application in atolls and other carbonate platforms containing dolomite where thermal instability exists. 70 references.

  17. Bomb-test 90Sr in Pacific and Indian Ocean surface water as recorded by banded corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toggweiler, J. R.; Trumbore, Susan

    We report here measurements of bomb-test 90Sr activity in the CaCO 3 skeletons of banded head forming corals collected from nine locations in the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans. Density variations in skeletal carbonate demarcate annual growth bands and allow one to section individual years. Measurements of 90Sr activity in the annual bands reconstruct the activity of the water in which the coral grew. Our oldest records date to the early years of the nuclear era and record not only fallout deposition from the major U.S. and Soviet tests of 1958-1962, but also the huge, and largely unappreciated, localized inputs from the U.S. tests at Eniwetok and Bikini atolls during 1952-1958. In the 1960's the 90Sr activity in Indian Ocean surface water was twice as high as activity levels in the South Pacific at comparable latitudes. We suggest that substantial amounts of northern hemisphere fallout moved west and south into the Indian Ocean via passages through the Indonesian archipelago. Equatorial Pacific 90Sr levels have remained relatively constant from the mid 1960's through the end of the 1970's in spite of 90Sr decay, reflecting a large-scale transfer of water between the temperate and tropical North Pacific. Activity levels at Fanning Is. (4°N, 160°W) appear to vary in conjunction with the 3-4 year El Niño cycle.

  18. Hanford tank initiative test facility site selection study

    SciTech Connect

    Staehr, T.W.

    1997-04-03

    The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) project is developing equipment for the removal of hard heel waste from the Hanford Site underground single-shell waste storage tanks. The HTI equipment will initially be installed in the 241-C-106 tank where its operation will be demonstrated. This study evaluates existing Hanford Site facilities and other sites for functional testing of the HTI equipment before it is installed into the 241-C-106 tank.

  19. Grid site testing for ATLAS with HammerCloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmsheuser, J.; Hönig, F.; Legger, F.; Medrano Llamas, R.; Sciacca, F. G.; van der Ster, D.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    With the exponential growth of LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data in 2012, distributed computing has become the established way to analyze collider data. The ATLAS grid infrastructure includes more than 130 sites worldwide, ranging from large national computing centers to smaller university clusters. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling virtual organisations (VO) and site-administrators to run validation tests of the site and software infrastructure in an automated or on-demand manner. The HammerCloud infrastructure has been constantly improved to support the addition of new test workflows. These new workflows comprise e.g. tests of the ATLAS nightly build system, ATLAS Monte Carlo production system, XRootD federation (FAX) and new site stress test workflows. We report on the development, optimization and results of the various components in the HammerCloud framework.

  20. Noteworthy mammal distribution records for the Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Medica, P.A.

    1989-06-01

    Nevada Test Site records for the gray fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus scottii and the dark kangaroo mouse Microdipodops meqacephalus sabulonis are substantiated, and a range extension for Mustela frenata nevadensis documented. 17 refs.

  1. Usability Testing in a Library Web Site Redesign Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for an intuitive library information gateway to meet users' information needs and describes the process involved in redesigning a library Web site based on experiences at Roger Williams University. Explains usability testing methods that were used to discover how users were interacting with the Web site interface. (Author/LRW)

  2. Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

    2012-03-01

    This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

  3. Noteworthy mammal distribution records for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Medica, P.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Previous reports on the mammals of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, indicate the presence of 46 species (42 terrestrial mammals and 4 bats). Under a new project entitled Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program at the Nevada Test Site, two previously uncollected species of mammals were obtained, and a range extension for a third species was documented during the 1988 sampling season. Voucher specimens have been deposited at the Nevada State Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada.

  4. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Fritz, Brad G.; Tilden, Harold T.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Su-Coker, Jennifer; Stegen, Amanda; Moon, Thomas W.; Becker, James M.; Raney, Elizabeth A.; Chamness, Michele A.; Mendez, Keith M.

    2013-09-01

    The PNNL Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012 was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting" to provide a synopsis of calendar year 2012 information related to environmental management performance and compliance efforts. It summarizes site compliance with federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, policies, directives, permits, and orders and environmental management performance.

  5. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Tilden, Harold T.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.; Stegen, Amanda; Barnett, J. Matthew; Su-Coker, Jennifer; Moon, Thomas W.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Opitz, Brian E.

    2012-09-01

    The PNNL Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011 was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting" to provide a synopsis of calendar year 2011 information related to environmental management performance and compliance efforts. It summarizes site compliance with federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, policies, directives, permits, and orders and environmental management performance.

  6. Population genetic structure in Atlantic and Pacific Ocean common murres (Uria aalge): Natural replicate tests of post-Pleistocene evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris-Pocock, J. A.; Taylor, S.A.; Birt, T.P.; Damus, M.; Piatt, J.F.; Warheit, K.I.; Friesen, V.L.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the factors that influence population differentiation in temperate taxa can be difficult because the signatures of both historic and contemporary demographics are often reflected in population genetic patterns. Fortunately, analyses based on coalescent theory can help untangle the relative influence of these historic and contemporary factors. Common murres (Uria aalge) are vagile seabirds that breed in the boreal and low arctic waters of the Northern Hemisphere. Previous analyses revealed that Atlantic and Pacific populations are genetically distinct; however, less is known about population genetic structure within ocean basins. We employed the mitochondrial control region, four microsatellite loci and four intron loci to investigate population genetic structure throughout the range of common murres. As in previous studies, we found that Atlantic and Pacific populations diverged during the Pleistocene and do not currently exchange migrants. Therefore, Atlantic and Pacific murre populations can be used as natural replicates to test mechanisms of population differentiation. While we found little population genetic structure within the Pacific, we detected significant east-west structuring among Atlantic colonies. The degree that population genetic structure reflected contemporary population demographics also differed between ocean basins. Specifically, while the low levels of population differentiation in the Pacific are at least partially due to high levels of contemporary gene flow, the east-west structuring of populations within the Atlantic appears to be the result of historic fragmentation of populations rather than restricted contemporary gene flow. The contrasting results in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans highlight the necessity of carefully considering multilocus nonequilibrium population genetic approaches when reconstructing the demographic history of temperate Northern Hemisphere taxa. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  7. The East Pacific Rise 8\\deg to 11\\deg N Integrated Studies Site (ISS); Update and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S.; Haymon, R.; Holland, M.; von Damm, K.

    2003-12-01

    The 8\\deg to 11\\deg N segment of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) represents a dynamic, fast-spreading type of mid-ocean ridge selected for focused interdisciplinary study within the Ridge 2000 program. Diverse fast spreading environments are encompassed by the site including a hierarchy of axial segments and discontinuities. The site "bull's- eye" is at 9\\deg49' to 9\\deg51' N where numerous high temperature vents and diffuse flow communities have been mapped and monitored over the past 14 years. Concentric circles around the bull's eye encompass ridge segments at a range of scales, from the first-order segment bounded by the Siquieros and Clipperton transform faults to the fourth-order segment which includes the extent of the 1991 and 1992 volcanic eruptions. Five-year goals for the site include a working model of mantle flow and melt supply; detailed imaging of subseafloor structures and relationships to vent communities and chemistry; quantitative data about microbes and macrofauna and linkages with fluid flow, tectonics, and magmatism; quantification of the heat/chemical flux into the water column; and linkages and temporal variation in geological, chemical, and biological parameters. Field programs in 2002 collected data for calculations of primary and secondary productivity at different vent communities, with a focus on tube worms and bivalves; searched for hydrothermal signals from an earlier earthquake swarm; and continued time-series fluid sampling at all 9\\deg10' to 9\\deg51'N high-temperature vents. 2003 cruises will continue geophysical/volcanological studies and deploy an array of in situ chemical sensors for use in monitoring vent fluids. Programs scheduled to begin in 2004 include three-dimensional multi-channel seismic and magnetotelluric studies of subsurface structure at the site "Bull's eye", initiation of monitoring studies of seismicity, fluid temperature and chemistry, and vent fauna. An overview of on-going and upcoming studies at the site

  8. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Low Impact Soil Sites' and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Closure activities were conducted from February through April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996; as amended February 2008) and Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 107 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2009). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized.

  9. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 and Site Description (Volume 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2006 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2006 produced to be a more cost-effective means of distributing information contained in the NTSER to interested DOE stakeholders.

  10. DENSE GAS PLUME FIELD MEASUREMENTS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field experiments on dense gas diffusion carried out at the Spills Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site are briefly described, including four "baseline" releases made in July 1993 and two new series planned for August-September 1995. he first series will target neutral to very s...

  11. 75 FR 20832 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada Test Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada Test Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal...

  12. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2013-06-06

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2012 from PNNL Site sources is 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 1E-7 mrem (1E-9 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 2E-6 mrem (2E-08 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2012. The total radiological dose for 2012 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 1E-5 mrem (1E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  13. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2012-06-12

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation ProtectionAir Emissions. The EDE to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine emissions in 2011 from PNNL Site sources was 1.7E 05 mrem (1.7E-7 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2011. The total radiological dose for 2011 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions was more than 10,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  14. Measured data from the Avery Island Site C heater test

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, H.; Stickney, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    Over the past six years, a comprehensive field testing program was conducted in the Avery Island salt mine. Three single canister heater tests were included in the testing program. Specifically, electric heaters, which simulate canisters of heat-generating nuclear waste, were placed in the floor of the Avery Island salt mine, and measurements were made of the response of the salt to heating. These tests were in operation by June, 1978. One of the three heater tests, Site C, operated for a period of 1858 days and was decommissioned during July and August, 1983. This data report presents the temperature and displacement data gathered during the operation and decommissioning of the Site C heater test. The purpose of this data report is to transmit the data to the scientific community. Rigorous analysis and interpretation of the data are considered beyond the scope of a data report. 8 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Measured data from the Avery Island Site C heater test

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, H.; Stickney, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    Over the past six years, a comprehensive field testing program was conducted in the Avery Island salt mine. Three single canister heater tests were included in the testing program. Specifically, electric heaters, which simulate canisters of heat-generating nuclear waste, were placed in the floor of the Avery Island salt mine, and measurements were made of the response of the salt to heating. These tests were in operation by June 1978. One of the three heater tests, Site C, operated for a period of 1858 days and was decommissioned during July and August 1983. This data report presents the temperature and displacement data gathered during the operation and decommissioning of the Site C heater test. The purpose of this data report is to transmit the data to the scientific community. Rigorous analysis and interpretation of the data are considered beyond the scope of a data report. 6 references, 21 figures, 1 table.

  16. The Pacific Northwest Hydrological Observatory (PNW HO): Hypothesis and model testing power through diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. J.; Grant, G.; Hulse, D.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Hydrological Observatory (PNW HO) is a proposed national facility for the examination of the linkages between hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles, sustainability of water resources in the face of increasing human demands and climate change, hydrologic and ecosystem interactions, and hydrologic extremes. The PNW HO infrastructure will support research that examines forcings, feedbacks and couplings across hydro-eco-climatic interfaces, process scaling, and development of new predictive schemes and methods to reduce predictive uncertainty. Much of the data collection infrastructure is already in place, in the form of USGS gauging, local and State data recording. The PNW HO includes a novel experimental design that twins two neighboring watersheds-the humid Willamette and arid Deschutes River Basins-that represent a full range of landscape gradients and societal problems relating to water quantity and quality. Workers at the PNW HO will be able to build upon existing synthesis documents in the form of the Willamette River Basin Planning Atlas and recent AGU Monograph on the Deschutes River Basin. The PNW HO design builds upon the HJ Andrews LTER site in the headwaters and recent listing of the Willamette River Basin as a UNESCO HELP international observatory. The PNW HO has access to one of the richest SNOTEL datasets in North America along the divide between the Willamette and Deschutes Basins. The Willamette is a USGS NAWQA basin and the Deschutes has been the focus of a major USGS groundwater investigation, and is one of five sites nationally in the Fire Learning Network. Finally, and perhaps most importantly for technology transfer of HO science to policy and practice, the PNW HO enjoys a rather unique combination of Oregon's state-based land use planning and doctrine of prior appropriations water law (land use planning and water rights). While there are certainly areas in the West where human populations are growing as fast or faster, none

  17. Overview of software development at the parabolic dish test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazono, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development history of the data acquisition and data analysis software is discussed. The software development occurred between 1978 and 1984 in support of solar energy module testing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site, located within Edwards Test Station. The development went through incremental stages, starting with a simple single-user BASIC set of programs, and progressing to the relative complex multi-user FORTRAN system that was used until the termination of the project. Additional software in support of testing is discussed including software in support of a meteorological subsystem and the Test Bed Concentrator Control Console interface. Conclusions and recommendations for further development are discussed.

  18. A 7-d toxicity test for marine pollutants using the Pacific mysid Mysidopsis intii. 2: Protocol evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, V.L.; Langdon, C.J.

    1996-10-01

    The sensitivity of the Pacific coast mysid Mysidopsis intii to pollutants was compared in 7-d toxicity tests with that of the Gulf coast mysid M. bahia and the Pacific coast mysid Holmesimysis costata. Survival and growth responses of M. intii to zinc (maximum acceptable toxicant concentration [MATC] survival and growth, 152 {micro}g/L) were as sensitive as survival of both M. bahia (MATC survival, 152 {micro}g/L) and H. costata (MATC survival, 152 {micro}g/L). In contrast, the 7-d test for M. intii was less sensitive (MATC growth and survival, 4.99 mg/L) than the test for H. costata (MATC survival, 1.99 mg/L) when sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as the toxicant. Interlaboratory evaluation of the 7-d test for M. intii exposed to SDS indicated that the test was reliable. The mean test results for the group of participating laboratories were not significantly different from those of a group of three in-house tests, indicating that shipping and handling did not affect mysid sensitivity to SDS. Mysid growth was not as sensitive to SDS as survival in the interlaboratory tests. Although there were significant differences in median lethal concentration (LC50) values among participating laboratories, coefficients of variation of LC50 and MATC survival values among laboratories were 10.3 and 37%, respectively. These coefficients were comparable to those reported for interlaboratory tests with H. costata.

  19. On-Site Test for Cannabinoids in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Lee, Dayong; Schwope, David M.; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral fluid (OF) testing offers noninvasive sample collection for on-site drug testing; however, to date, test performance for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) detection has had unacceptable diagnostic sensitivity. On-site tests must accurately identify cannabis exposure because this drug accounts for the highest prevalence in workplace drug testing and driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) programs. Methods Ten cannabis smokers (9 males, 1 female) provided written informed consent to participate in this institutional review board–approved study and smoked 1 6.8%-THC cigarette ad libitum. OF was collected with the Draeger DrugTest® 5000 test cassette and Quantisal™ device 0.5 h before and up to 22 h after smoking. Test cassettes were analyzed within 15 min (n = 66), and Quantisal GC-MS THC results obtained within 24 h. Final THC detection times and test performances were assessed at different cannabinoid cutoffs. Results Diagnostic sensitivity, diagnostic specificity, and efficiency at DrugTest 5000's 5 μg/L screening cutoff and various THC confirmation cutoffs were 86.2–90.7,75.0 –77.8, and 84.8–87.9%, respectively. Last detection times were >22 h, longer than previously suggested. Confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC, absent in THC smoke, minimized the potential for passive OF contamination and still provided 22-h windows of detection, appropriate for workplace drug testing, whereas confirmation of cannabidiol, and/or cannabinol yielded shorter 6-h windows of detection, appropriate for DUID OF testing. Conclusions The DrugTest 5000 on-site device provided high diagnostic sensitivity for detection of cannabinoid exposure, and the selection of OF confirmation analytes and cutoffs provided appropriate windows of detection to meet the goals of different drug testing programs. PMID:22912396

  20. testing the regional application of site statistics with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, S.; Paradise, S.

    2009-04-01

    Remote sensing from ground sites is often associated with a time record length and/or accuracy to its data, which is superior to that of remote sensing from space. Thus, in those cases ground measurement (network-) data are applied to constrain retrieval assumptions and/or to extend satellite data in time. Alternately, this combination can be and has been used to explore the potential application of local site statistics to surrounding regions. As a demonstrator MISR sensor statistical maps of the retrieved aerosol optical depth are applied the test the regional representation of site statistics for aerosol optical depth detected at AERONET (sub-photometer) and EARLINET (lidar) sites. The regional representation tests explore local applicability for regions from 100 to 1000 km in diameter based on an analysis of averages for relative error and relative bias.

  1. Site Release Reports for C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks Test Site, and 29 GSF Test Pits

    SciTech Connect

    K.E. Rasmuson

    2002-04-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy has implemented a program to reclaim lands disturbed by site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Long term goals of the program are to re-establish processes on disturbed sites that will lead to self-sustaining plant communities. The Biological Opinion for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Studies required that the U.S. Department of Energy develop a Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan to evaluate the success of reclamation efforts. According to the Reclamation Standards and Monitoring Plan, reclaimed sites will be monitored periodically, remediated if necessary, and eventually compared to an appropriate reference area to determine whether reclamation goals have been achieved and the site can be released from further monitoring. Plant cover, density, and species richness (success parameters) on reclaimed sites are compared to 60 percent of the values (success criteria) for the same parameters on the reference area. Small sites (less than 0.1 ha) are evaluated for release using qualitative methods while large sites (greater than 0.1 ha) are evaluated using quantitative methods. In the summer of 2000, 31 small sites reclaimed in 1993 and 1994 were evaluated for reclamation success and potential release from further monitoring. Plant density, cover, and species richness were estimated on the C-Well Pipeline, UE-25 Large Rocks test site, and 29 ground surface facility test pits. Evidence of erosion, reproduction and natural recruitment, exotic species abundance, and animal use (key attributes) also were recorded for each site and used in success evaluations. The C-Well Pipeline and ground surface facility test pits were located in a ''Larrea tridentata - Ephedra nevadensis'' vegetation association while the UE-25 Large Rocks test site was located in an area dominated by ''Coleogyne ramosissima and Ephedra nevadensis''. Reference areas in the same vegetation associations with similar slope and aspect were chosen for comparison to

  2. Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank (UST) release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of each hydrocarbon release has not been documented, therefore, this report addresses the remedial activities completed for each release site. The hydrocarbon release associated with each tank site within CAU 450 was remediated by excavating the impacted soil. Clean closure of the release was verified through soil sample analysis by an off-site laboratory. All release closure activities were completed following standard environmental and regulatory guidelines. Based upon site observations during the remedial activities and the soil sample analytical results, which indicated that soil concentrations were below the Nevada Administrative code (NAC) Action Level of 100 mg/kg, it is anticipated that each of the release CASs be closed without further action.

  3. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-07-01

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

  4. US Air Force installation restoration program: Remedial investigation of former herbicide storage site at Johnston Island, Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report represents a synthesis and reformatting of six primary documents and other related materials on soils, ocean sediments, air, and biota investigations conducted at Johnston Island (JI), Pacific Ocean, to characterize contamination resulting from storage of 1.37 million gallons of Herbicide Orange (HO) from 1972 through 1977. The individual study components comprise the Remedial Investigation (RI) of the former HO storage site at JI. This report describes the procedures, results, and conclusions of the sampling and analysis programs conducted at JI. Samples of site soils, ocean sediments, airborne particulates, dust, sweepings, and aquatic organisms were collected and analyzed for HO-derived 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), and 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Environmental media other than soils at the storage facility itself were found to be free of contamination or to contain very low contaminant concentrations. No contamination was found in ocean sediments, indicating possible dispersion of contaminants due to erosion. A few of the biological specimens collected were found to contain TCDD levels below the guidelines of 25 to 50 parts per trillion established by the US Food and Drug Administration; TCDD in all other biota samples was nondetectable. Analysis of samples of airborne particulates and of soils, dust, and sweepings from high-use and residential areas outside the boundaries of the former storage site indicated that there is little or no concern of adverse impacts from airborne transport and deposition of TCDD.

  5. Diversity of mosquitoes and the aquatic insects associated with their oviposition sites along the Pacific coast of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The abundance, richness and diversity of mosquitoes and aquatic insects associated with their oviposition sites were surveyed along eight states of the Pacific coast of Mexico. Diversity was estimated using the Shannon index (H’), similarity measures and cluster analysis. Methods Oviposition sites were sampled during 2–3 months per year, over a three year period. Field collected larvae and pupae were reared and identified to species following adult emergence. Aquatic insects present at oviposition sites were also collected, counted and identified to species or genus. Results In total, 15 genera and 74 species of mosquitoes were identified: Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, An. albimanus and Aedes aegypti were the most abundant and widely-distributed species, representing 47% of total mosquito individuals sampled. New species records for certain states are reported. Anopheline diversity was lowest in Sinaloa state (H’ = 0.54) and highest in Chiapas (H’ = 1.61) and Michoacán (H’ = 1.56), whereas culicid diversity was lowest in Michoacán (H’ = 1.93), Colima (H’ = 1.95), Sinaloa (H’ = 1.99) and Jalisco (H’ = 2.01) and highest in Chiapas (H’ = 2.66). In total, 10 orders, 57 families, 166 genera and 247 species of aquatic insects were identified in samples. Aquatic insect diversity was highest in Chiapas, Oaxaca and Michoacán (H’ = 3.60-3.75). Mosquito larval/pupal abundance was not correlated with that of predatory Coleoptera and Hemiptera. Conclusion This represents the first update on the diversity and geographic distribution of the mosquitoes and aquatic insects of Mexico in over five decades. This information has been cataloged in Mexico’s National Biodiversity Information System (SNIB-CONABIO) for public inspection. PMID:24450800

  6. Investigation of mercury deposition and potential sources at six sites from the Pacific Coast to the Great Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Wright, Genine; Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Weiss-Penzias, Peter; Miller, Matthieu B

    2014-02-01

    The Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project showed that USA National Parks had fish mercury (Hg) concentrations above threshold concentrations set for wildlife. Since significant areas of the Western USA are arid, we hypothesized that dry deposition would be important. The primary question was whether sources of Hg were local and thus, easily addressed, or regional (from within the United States), or global (long range transport), and more difficult to address. To investigate this, surrogate surfaces and passive samplers for the measurement of GOM deposition and concentration, respectively, were deployed from the coast of California to the eastern edge of Nevada. Meteorological data, back trajectory modeling, and ozone concentrations were applied to better understand potential sources of Hg. Lowest seasonal mean Hg deposition (0.2 to 0.4 ng m(-2)h(-1)) was observed at low elevation (<100 m) Pacific Coast sites. Highest values were recorded at Lick Observatory, a high elevation coastal site (1,279 m), and Great Basin National Park (2,062 m) in rural eastern Nevada (1.5 to 2.4 ng m(-2)h(-1)). Intermediate values were recorded in Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks (0.9 to 1.2 ng m(-2)h(-1)). Results indicate that local, regional and global sources of air pollution, specifically oxidants, are contributing to observed deposition. At Great Basin National Park air chemistry was influenced by regional urban and agricultural emissions and free troposphere inputs. Dry deposition contributed ~2 times less Hg than wet deposition at the coastal locations, but 3 to 4 times more at the higher elevation sites. Based on the spatial trends, oxidation in the marine boundary layer or ocean sources contributed ~0.4 ng m(-2)h(-1) at the coastal locations. Regional pollution and long range transport contributed 1 to 2 ng m(-2)h(-1) to other locations, and the source of Hg is global and as such, all sources are important to consider. PMID:24252197

  7. GIS Surface Effects Map Archive, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, Dennis N.

    2003-08-28

    The GIS Surface Effects Map Archive contains a comprehensive collection of maps showing the surface effects produced by underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site. From 1951 to 1992, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and agencies of the U.S. Department of Energy used field and aerial-photo mapping techniques to painstakingly map such surface effects as collapse sinks, craters, cracks, fractures, faults, and pressure ridges. Shortly after each test, a complex surface effects map was produced. Of the more than 920 underground detonations conducted at the Nevada Test Site, 688 were mapped for surface effects. This archive preserves these original maps in digital format. A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to digitally reproduce each original, hand-drawn surface effects map and to assemble these maps into the digital data sets of this archive. The archive was designed to allow easy access to the maps, while preserving the original maps for perpetuity. Users can query the detonation sites database; prepare, view, and print individual or composite maps; and perform various types of scientific analysis and management tasks. Spatial analyses and queries can be performed on detonation sites and related surface effects in conjunction with other chronological, geographical, geological, or hydrological information via links to external maps and databases. This browser interface provides information about the archive, the history of surface effects mapping at the Nevada Test Site, the methods used to produce the digital surface effects maps, and links to published reports, data tables, and maps. Location maps show testing areas, operational areas, and detonation sites. Demonstration maps illustrate the methods used to produce the digital surface effects maps and exhibit some of the characteristics and uses for these data. Use the links below to view and print individual surface effects maps, retrieve information about the detonations and types of

  8. Subsurface novel gas transport at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.; Guell, M.A.; Hunt, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of our research was to explain the results of a groundwater pumping test done from 1975 to 1991 at the location of the nuclear test {open_quotes}Cambric{close_quotes} on the Nevada Test Site. The elution data from the pumped well indicated that krypton was delayed relative to tritium in the eluate and that less than half of the calculated Kr-85 source term was removed (though over 92% of the tritium was removed). We postulated an explanation for these observations and tested it with a mathematical model that simulated the movement of tritium and krypton at this site. The model showed that the hypothesis was consistent with the observed behavior; but the model was very sensitive to assumptions about initial radionuclide distributions and to hydrologic parameters. 1 ref.

  9. Land utilization and water resource inventories over extended test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    In addition to the work on the corn blight this year, several other analysis tests were completed which resulted in significant findings. These aspects are discussed as follows: (1) field spectral measurements of soil conditions; (2) analysis of extended test site data; this discussion involves three different sets of data analysis sequences; (3) urban land use analysis, for studying water runoff potentials; and (4) thermal data quality study, as an expansion of our water resources studies involving temperature calibration techniques.

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 396: Area 20 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 396, Area 20 Spill Sites, is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 396 is listed in Appendix II of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 and consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 20 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 20-25-01, Oil Spills (2); CAS 20-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 20-25-03, Oil Spill; CAS 20-99-08, Spill. Closure activities for CAU 396 were conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 396.

  11. Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

    1995-02-01

    The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

  12. Determining the Effect of Growth Rate on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Algal Lipids in Two North Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical hydrologic changes have a large effect on global climate, but there does not yet exist a good indicator of rainfall variation in the tropics. Understanding past natural variability of such features as the Intertropical Convergence Zone and El Niño Southern Oscillation provides information about the extent of anthropogenic climate change today. The hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H ratio) of algal lipids has been shown to track the isotopic composition of source water in which the organism grew, providing information about precipitation variability over time. However, culture work has revealed that environmental factors such as salinity, temperature, growth rate, and irradiance also influence algal lipid D/H ratios. Here I present work determining the effect of growth rate and irradiance on the hydrogen isotope composition of alkenone-producing algae in the water column in two North Pacific locations, off the coast of Oregon and near the Hawaii Ocean Time Series site. This work corroborates empirical relationships observed in culture studies and indicates that the effects of growth rate and irradiance should be taken into account when applying the D/H isotope ratio rainfall proxy to reconstruct past climates.

  13. Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site. This report contains remedial verification of the soil sample analytical results for the following: Area 11 Tweezer facility; Area 12 boiler house; Area 12 service station; Area 23 bypass yard; Area 23 service station; Area 25 power house; Area 25 tech. services building; Area 25 tech. operations building; Area 26 power house; and Area 27 boiler house.

  14. Seasonal radiolarian flux at the VERTEX North Pacific time-series site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowing, Marcia M.

    1993-03-01

    Fluxes of radiolarians were measured at several depths from 50 to 2000 m at 33°N. 139°W with free-floating particle interceptor traps in a series of 3-month collections from October 1986 to May 1988. Fluxes of spumellarians, nassellarians and phaeodarians were generally highest and were most variable in the upper 100 m. Patterns of flux differed among the three groups, and no clear seasonal patterns were evident, within the resolution of the methods. Standing stocks, sampled with large-volume water samples, varied little during the study period. Fluxes of each group from the base of the euphotic zone (150 m) were similar throughout the study period, as generally were fluxes from 150 to 2000 m. Flux patterns of two species of nassellarians and of several species of phacodarians were examined. Flux of the symbiont-bearing nassellarian Lithopera bacca from the euphotic zone peaked in summer, but at 2000 m there was no seasonal pattern to its flux. Among the phacodarians. Lirella bullata showed spring peaks in flux at 2000 m. The lack of clear seasonal patterns for the groups and for many individual species suggests that the seasonal variability in factors, such as primary productivity and nitrogen dynamics, at this oligotrophic site was too weak to affect radiolarians, which are at least one trophic step removed from these factors. Variability in radiolarian fluxes at all depths over the 18 month period ranged from undetectable to a factor of 10; this probably represents normal variability at this oligotrophic site. The majority of polycystines trapped in the upper 100 m were alive at the time of capture, and the percentage of living specimens decreased rapidly as depth increased. In contrast, living phacodarians dominated the fluxes of phacodarians at all depths. Several species of phacodarians with shallower depth distributions were absent from the deepest traps, whereas species with deeper distributions were present in the 2000 m traps. Carbon flux of living

  15. Nevada Test Site environmental data report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1998-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations. These mandates require compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection regulations. During calendar year (CY) 1996, environmental protection and monitoring programs were conducted at the Nevada Test Site and other DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV)-managed sites in Nevada and across the US. A detailed discussion of these environmental protection and monitoring programs and summary data and assessments for environmental monitoring results are provided in the DOE/NV Annual Site Environmental Report-1996 (ASER), DOE/NV/11718-137. This document provides summary data results and detailed assessments for the environmental monitoring conducted for all DOE/NV-managed sites in CY1996.

  16. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  17. POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AROUND THE NEVADA TEST SITE, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory (EMSL-LV) conducts an offsite radiological safety program outside the boundaries of the Nevada Test Site. As part of this program, the EMSL-LV maintains a comprehensive and current listing of all rural offsite residents and dairy an...

  18. Nevada test site radionuclide inventory and distribution: project operations plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kordas, J.F.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1982-06-01

    This document is the operational plan for conducting the Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The basic objective of this program is to inventory the significant radionuclides of NTS origin in NTS surface soil. The expected duration of the program is five years. This plan includes the program objectives, methods, organization, and schedules.

  19. 78 FR 68360 - Unmanned Aircraft System Test Site Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... comments published in the Federal Register on February 22, 2013 (78 FR 12259), Docket No. FAA-2013-0061... (78 FR 18932), Docket No. FAA-2013-0061- 0050. In addition, this document publishes the FAA's Final... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 91 Unmanned Aircraft System Test Site Program AGENCY:...

  20. Smallpox Vaccination of Laboratory Workers at US Variola Testing Sites.

    PubMed

    Medcalf, Sharon; Bilek, Laura; Hartman, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Leuschen, Patricia; Miller, Hannah; O'Keefe, Anne; Sayles, Harlan; Smith, Philip W

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the need to revaccinate laboratory workers against smallpox, we assessed regular revaccination at the US Laboratory Response Network's variola testing sites by examining barriers to revaccination and the potential for persistence of immunity. Our data do not provide evidence to suggest prolonging the recommended interval for revaccination. PMID:26196153

  1. Smallpox Vaccination of Laboratory Workers at US Variola Testing Sites

    PubMed Central

    Bilek, Laura; Hartman, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C.; Leuschen, Patricia; Miller, Hannah; O’Keefe, Anne; Sayles, Harlan; Smith, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the need to revaccinate laboratory workers against smallpox, we assessed regular revaccination at the US Laboratory Response Network’s variola testing sites by examining barriers to revaccination and the potential for persistence of immunity. Our data do not provide evidence to suggest prolonging the recommended interval for revaccination. PMID:26196153

  2. NEVADA TEST SITE EXPERIMENTAL FARM: SUMMARY REPORT 1963-1981

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings from experiments conducted at the Experimental Dairy Farm located on the Nevada Test Site. These experiments included the air-forage-cow-milk transport of the radioiodines, and the metabolism and milk transfer of other fission products and seve...

  3. Uptake of HIV testing in substance use disorder treatment programs that offer on-site testing.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Tiffany L; Horigian, Viviana E; Tross, Susan; Gruber, Valerie A; Pereyra, Margaret; Mandler, Raul N; Feaster, Daniel J; Metsch, Lisa R

    2015-03-01

    Increasing rates of HIV testing within substance use disorder (SUD) treatment clients is an important public health strategy for reducing HIV transmission rates. The present study examined uptake of HIV testing among 1,224 clients in five SUD treatment units that offered on-site testing in Florida, New York, and California. Nearly one-third (30 %) of the participants, who had not previously tested positive, reported not having been tested for HIV within the past 12 months. Women, African Americans, and injection drug users had a higher likelihood of having been tested within the past 12 months. The SUD treatment program was the most frequently identified location of participants' last HIV test. Despite the availability of free, on-site testing, a substantial proportion of clients were not tested, suggesting that strategies to increase uptake of testing should include addressing barriers not limited to location and cost. PMID:25074737

  4. Anatexis at the roof of an oceanic magma chamber at IODP Site 1256 (equatorial Pacific): an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Lennart A.; France, Lydéric; Zhang, Chao; Godard, Marguerite; Koepke, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Replenished axial melt lenses at fast-spreading mid-oceanic ridges may move upward and intrude into the overlying hydrothermally altered sheeted dikes, resulting in high-grade contact metamorphism with the potential to trigger anatexis in the roof rocks. Assumed products of this process are anatectic melts of felsic composition and granoblastic, two-pyroxene hornfels, representing the residue after partial melting. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 309, 312, and 335 at Site 1256 (eastern equatorial Pacific) sampled such a fossilized oceanic magma chamber. In this study, we simulated magma chamber roof rock anatectic processes by performing partial melting experiments using six different protoliths from the Site 1256 sheeted dike complex, spanning a lithological range from poorly to strongly altered basalts to partially or fully recrystallized granoblastic hornfels. Results show that extensively altered starting material lacking primary magmatic minerals cannot reproduce the chemistry of natural felsic rocks recovered in ridge environments, especially elements sensitive to hydrothermal alteration (e.g., K, Cl). Natural geochemical trends are reproduced through partial melting of moderately altered basalts from the lower sheeted dikes. Two-pyroxene hornfels, the assumed residue, were reproduced only at low melting degrees (<20 vol%). The overall amphibole absence in the experiments confirms the natural observation that amphibole is not produced during peak metamorphism. Comparing experimental products with the natural equivalents reveals that water activity ( aH2O) was significantly reduced during anatectic processes, mainly based on lower melt aluminum oxide and lower plagioclase anorthite content at lower aH2O. High silica melt at the expected temperature (1000-1050 °C; peak thermal overprint of two-pyroxene hornfels) could only be reproduced in the experimental series performed at aH2O = 0.1.

  5. Effects of sea ice on winter site fidelity of Pacific common eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Margaret R.; Douglas, David C.; Wilson, Heather M.; McCloskey, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    In northern marine habitats, the presence or absence of sea ice results in variability in the distribution of many species and the quality and availability of pelagic winter habitat. To understand the effects of ice on intra- and inter-annual winter site fidelity and movements in a northern sea-duck species, we marked 25 adult Pacific Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum) on their nesting area at Cape Espenberg, Alaska, with satellite transmitters and monitored their movements to their wintering areas in the northern Bering Sea for a 2-year period. We examined changes in winter fidelity in relation to home-range characteristics and ice. Characteristics of polynyas (areas with persistent open water during winter) varied substantially and likely had an effect on the size of winter ranges and movements within polynyas. Movements within polynyas were correlated with changes in weather that affected ice conditions. Ninety-five percent of individuals were found within their 95% utilization distribution (UD) of the previous year, and 90% were found within their 50% UD. Spatial distributions of winter locations between years changed for 32% of the individuals; however, we do not consider these subtle movements biologically significant. Although ice conditions varied between polynyas within and between years, the Common Eiders monitored in our study showed a high degree of fidelity to their winter areas. This observation is counterintuitive, given the requirement that resources are predictable for site fidelity to occur; however, ice may not have been severe enough to restrict access to other resources and, subsequently, force birds to move.

  6. Geochemistry of the rare earth elements in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A, northern equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, S.E.; Piper, D.Z.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A has been determined by instrumental neutron activation methods. The concentrations of the REE vary markedly. Low concentrations characterize samples from a depression (the valley), in which Quaternary sediments are thin or absent; high concentrations are found in samples from the surrounding abyssal hills (the highlands) where the Quaternary sediment section is relatively thick. Moreover, the valley nodules are strongly depleted in the light trivalent REE (LREE) and Ce compared with nodules from the highlands, some of the former showing negative Ce anomalies. The REE abundances in the nodules are strongly influenced by the REE abundances in coexisting bottom water. Some controls on the REE chemistry of bottom waters include: a) the more effective removal of the LREE relative to the HREE from seawater because of the greater degree of complexation of the latter elements with seawater ligands, b) the very efficient oxidative scavenging of Ce on particle surfaces in seawater, and c) the strong depletion of both Ce and the LREE in, or a larger benthic flux of the HREE into, the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) which flows through the valley. The distinctive REE chemistry of valley nodules is a function of their growth from geochemically evolved AABW. In contrast, the REE chemistry of highland nodules indicates growth from a local, less evolved seawater source. ?? 1987.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field-investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans.

  8. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 540: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, Lloyd

    2006-10-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 540: Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the 'Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 540 is located within Areas 12 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 12-44-01, ER 12-1 Well Site Release; CAS 12-99-01, Oil Stained Dirt; CAS 19-25-02, Oil Spill; CAS 19-25-04, Oil Spill; CAS 19-25-05, Oil Spill; CAS 19-25-06, Oil Spill; CAS 19-25-07, Oil Spill; CAS 19-25-08, Oil Spills (3); and CAS 19-44-03, U-19bf Drill Site Release. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting recommendations of no further action for the CASs within CAU 540. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: (1) Reviewed the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination; (2) Performed closure activities to address the presence of substances regulated by 'Nevada Administrative Code' 445A.2272 (NAC, 2002); and (3) Documented Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 540 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

  9. Discovery of Off-Axis Melt Lenses at the RIDGE-2000 East Pacific Rise Integrated Studies Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.; Nedimović, M. R.; Carton, H.; Xu, M.; Newman, K.; Aghaei, O.; Marjanović, M.; Stowe, L.

    2008-12-01

    The first multi-streamer 3D seismic reflection experiment conducted aboard the R/V Marcus Langseth was carried out in July-August 2008 at the RIDGE-2000 Integrated Studies Site at the East Pacific Rise between 9°37'N and 9°57'N. One of the major findings of this cruise is the presence of at least three regions with prominent near-axis crustal reflectors that we interpret as off-axis melt lenses (OAML) injected at mid-crustal levels to both the east and west of the ridge crest. In some instances these regions are associated with subtle topographic expressions of seafloor volcanism. The first set of OAML reflections was discovered near 9° 54'N at distances from the ridge axis that range from ~4 to ~7 km, and extending ~6.3 km in the ridge-parallel direction. Two-way travel times from the seafloor to the OAML are 750-830 ms, which correspond to depths of ~1,800-2,000 m (assuming an average upper crustal velocity of 4.7 km/s), although in some cases there is evidence for deeper (~1,420 ms, or ~3,330 m) reflections farther off-axis forming a staircase-like system of melt lenses. A second set of OAML reflections was discovered further south near 9° 39'N also within 3-6 km east of the spreading axis, and extending ~3.3 km in the ridge-parallel direction. Crustal travel times to these OAML reflections are 710-830 ms (1,700-2,000 m below seafloor). In this region the OAML is locally underlain by deeper reflections at depths of 1,300 ms (~3,100 m) that could indicate off-axis melt sill intrusions at multiple levels. A smaller OAML was found within 2 km west of the axis near 9° 52'N. In this paper we present preliminary cross-sections of this dataset to evaluate the extent and general characteristics of these off-axis events, which highlight the importance of off-axis magmatism in crustal accretion along this section of the East Pacific Rise.

  10. Rehabilitation of the former nuclear test sites at Maralinga

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.M.; Davoren, P.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Department of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra, has commenced tendering procedures for appointment of a Project Management Organisation for the Rehabilitation of the former British atomic weapon test sites at Maralinga and Emu in South Australia. This paper gives a historical background to the atomic tests, and reports scientific and engineering studies conducted by the Technical Assessment Group (TAG) to define practical and economic options for rehabilitation of the former test sites. The rehabilitation option preferred by the Australian Government will focus on removal and burial of soil and fragments highly contaminated with plutonium oxide, and erection of warning fences around areas where permanent residence will not be permitted. The application of in-situ vitrification is under investigation for stabilisation of twenty one disposal pits containing up to twenty kilograms of plutonium at Taranaki.

  11. Reducing fungal infections and testing tag loss in juvenile Pacific lampreys implanted with passive integrated transponders.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, H.E.; Gee, L.P.; Mesa, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus are facing severe population declines, yet little is known about juvenile lamprey passage, life history, or adult return rates because until now, these small fish could not be tagged for unique identification of live individuals. Previously, we developed a simple and effective method for tagging juvenile lampreys with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and showed that tagging per se did not affect survival. Mortality in tagged and untagged control fish, however, was frequently associated with fungal infection. In this study, we addressed two outstanding issues related to handling and tagging juvenile lampreys. First, we tried to mitigate freshwater fungal infections by reducing irritation and stress from anesthesia and by treating tagged fish briefly with a prophylactic immediately after tagging. We tested four anesthetics at three concentrations each and determined that 100 mg/L MS-222 and 60 mg/L BENZOAK® (benzocaine) were the most effective for anesthetizing juvenile lampreys to handleable while minimizing irritation. We also showed that fish anesthetized with BENZOAK® may have lower rates of fungal infection than those anesthetized with MS-222 or AQUI-S® 20E (eugenol). When fish anesthetized with MS-222 or BENZOAK® were given a 30 min prophylactic treatment with Stress Coat®, hydrogen peroxide, or salt immediately after tagging, few fish presented with fungal infections. However, untreated, tagged control fish also showed few fungal infections, making it difficult to determine if the prophylactic treatments were successful. The second question we addressed was whether activity would increase tag loss in PIT-tagged lampreys. We found that active swimming did not cause tag loss if fish were first held for 20–24 h after tagging. Therefore, we recommend anesthesia with MS-222 or BENZOAK® and then tagging with a 20–24 h recovery period followed by immediate release. If field studies show that lampreys are not

  12. Evaluation of soil radioactivity data from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Since 1951, 933 nuclear tests have been conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and test areas on the adjacent Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR). Until the early 1960s. the majority of tests were atmospheric, involving detonation of nuclear explosive devices on the ground or on a tower, suspended from a balloon or dropped from an airplane. Since the signing of the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963, most tests have been conducted underground, although several shallow subsurface tests took place between 1962 and 1968. As a result of the aboveground and near-surface nuclear explosions, as well as ventings of underground tests, destruction of nuclear devices with conventional explosives, and nuclear-rocket engine tests, the surface soil on portions of the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides. Relatively little consideration was given to the environmental effects of nuclear testing during the first two decades of operations at the NTS. Since the early 1970s, however, increasingly strict environmental regulations have forced greater attention to be given to contamination problems at the site and how to remediate them. One key element in the current environmental restoration program at the NTS is determining the amount and extent of radioactivity in the surface soil. The general distribution of soil radioactivity on the NTS is already well known as a result of several programs carried out in the 1970s and 1980s. However, questions have been raised as to whether the data from those earlier studies are suitable for use in the current environmental assessments and risk analyses. The primary purpose of this preliminary data review is to determine to what extent the historical data collected at the NTS can be used in the characterization/remediation process.

  13. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space.

  15. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  16. Land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site: A field tour

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

    1993-12-31

    An all-day tour to observe and land reclamation on the Nevada Test Site was conducted in conjunction with the 8th Wildland Shrub and Arid Land Restoration Symposium. Tour participants were introduced to the US Department of Energy reclamation programs for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and Treatability Studies for Soil Media (TSSM) Project. The tour consisted of several stops that covered a variety of topics and studies including revegetation by seeding, topsoil stockpile stabilization, erosion control, shrub transplanting, shrub herbivory, irrigation, mulching, water harvesting, and weather monitoring.

  17. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  18. Plutonium Particle Migration in the Shallow Vadose Zone: The Nevada Test Site as an Analog Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. R.; Smith, D. K.

    2004-12-01

    The upper meter of the vadose zone in desert environments is the horizon where wastes have been released and human exposure is determined through dermal, inhalation, and food uptake pathways. This region is also characterized by numerous coupled processes that determine contaminant transport, including precipitation infiltration, evapotranspiration, daily and annual temperature cycling, dust resuspension, animal burrowing, and geochemical weathering reactions. While there is considerable interest in colloidal transport of minerals, pathogenic organisms, and contaminants in the vadose zone, there are limited field sites where the actual occurrence of contaminant migration can be quantified over the appropriate spatial and temporal scales of interest. At the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site, there have been numerous releases of radionuclides since the 1950's that have become field-scale tracer tests. One series of tests was the four safety shots conducted in an alluvial valley of Area 11 in the 1950's. These experiments tested the ability of nuclear materials to survive chemical explosions without initiating fission reactions. Four above-ground tests were conducted and they released plutonium and uranium on the desert valley floor with only one of the tests undergoing some fission. Shortly after the tests, the sites were surveyed for radionuclide distribution on the land surface using aerial surveys and with depth. Additional studies were conducted in the 1970's to better understand the fate of plutonium in the desert that included studies of depth distribution and dust resuspension. More recently, plutonium particle distribution in the soil profile was detected using autoradiography. The results to date demonstrate the vertical migration of plutonium particles to depths in excess of 30 cm in this arid vadose zone. While plutonium migration at the Nevada Test Site has been and continues to be a concern, these field experiments have become analog sites for the

  19. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2003-04-01

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the activities performed to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996, and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SA4FER) Plan for CAU 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 2001). CAU 398 consists of the following thirteen Corrective Action Sites (CASs) all located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1): CAS 25-25-02, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-03, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-04, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-05, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-06, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-07, Hydraulic Oil Spill(s), CAS 25-25-08, Hydraulic Oil Spill(s), CAS 25-25-16, Diesel Spill (from CAS 25-01-02), CAS 25-25-17, Subsurface Hydraulic Oil Spill, CAS 25-44-0 1, Fuel Spill, CAS 25-44-04, Acid Spill (from CAS 25-01-01), CAS 25-44-02, Spill, and CAS 25-44-03, Spill. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix B. Copies of the CAU Use Restriction Information forms are included in Appendix C.

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 350: Miscellaneous Housekeeping Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-05-01

    This Closure Report documents the closure activities conducted for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 350: Miscellaneous Housekeeping sites. CAU 350 is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 12 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): CAS 12-26-01, Lead Shot; CAS 15-22-04, Drums(2); CAS 15-22-06, Drums(10); CAS 15-22-16, Drums(3); CAS 15-22-22, Hydrocarbon Impacted Soil; CAS 15-22-29, Drums(2); CAS 15-24-07, Batteries; and CAS 15-99-02, Gas Cylinder. Closure activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or material, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each site was clean-closed by visual inspection and/or laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  1. Spent fuel handling system for a geologic storage test at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.E.; House, P.A.; Wright, G.W.

    1980-05-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is conducting a test of the geologic storage of encapsulated spent commercial reactor fuel assemblies in a granitic rock at the Nevada Test Site. The test, known as the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C), is sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. Eleven pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies are stored retrievably for three to five years in a linear array in the Climax stock at a depth of 420 m.

  2. Site Characterization for a Deep Borehole Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Hardin, E. L.; Freeze, G. A.; Sassani, D.; Brady, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is at the beginning of 5-year Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT) to investigate the feasibility of constructing and characterizing two boreholes in crystalline basement rock to a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft). The concept of deep borehole disposal for radioactive waste has some advantages over mined repositories, including incremental construction and loading, the enhanced natural barriers provided by deep continental crystalline basement, and reduced site characterization. Site characterization efforts need to determine an eligible site that does not have the following disqualifying characteristics: greater than 2 km to crystalline basement, upward vertical fluid potential gradients, presence of economically exploitable natural resources, presence of high permeability connection to the shallow subsurface, and significant probability of future seismic or volcanic activity. Site characterization activities for the DBFT will include geomechanical (i.e., rock in situ stress state, and fluid pressure), geological (i.e., rock and fracture infill lithology), hydrological (i.e., quantity of fluid, fluid convection properties, and solute transport mechanisms), and geochemical (i.e., rock-water interaction and natural tracers) aspects. Both direct (i.e., sampling and in situ testing) and indirect (i.e., borehole geophysical) methods are planned for efficient and effective characterization of these site aspects and physical processes. Borehole-based characterization will be used to determine the variability of system state (i.e., stress, pressure, temperature, and chemistry) with depth, and interpretation of material and system parameters relevant to numerical site simulation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE

  3. Analysis of stress-induced oval fractures in a borehole at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 504, eastern equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Flamand, R.

    1999-01-01

    Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Hole 504B is located in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and extends to a total depth of 2111 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). Several acoustic televiewer logs have been obtained in this well during successive stages of drilling, and the resulting digital images have revealed numerous oval-shaped fractures seemingly etched into the borehole wall. A theoretical examination of these stress-induced features identifies a unique and ephemeral set of stress distributions and magnitudes that are necessary for their production. Consequently, the ovals provide a basis for quantifying the magnitudes and orientations of the maximum and minimum horizontal principal stresses, SH and Sh, at this site. Vertical, truncated breakouts and horizontal tensile fractures define the spatial boundaries of the ovals. Explicit criteria for their occurrence are combined with estimates for various physical properties of the rock to yield a range of possible values for the horizontal principal stresses. The conspicuous oval geometry is completed by a curved fracture that joins the vertical and horizontal components. Its degree of curvature is delineated by the modified Griffith failure criterion and is directly related to the principal stress difference (SH - Sh). Matching a series of type curves corresponding to specific values for (SH - Sh) with the actual undistorted well bore images allows the magnitude of the stress difference to be further constrained. With a value for (SH - Sh) of 45 ?? 5 MPa the individual magnitudes of SH and Sh are determined more precisely. Final estimates for the horizontal principal stresses in DSDP Hole 504B at a depth of 1200 mbsf are 141 MPa ??? SH ??? 149 MPa and 91 MPa ??? Sh ??? 109 MPa. Stress magnitudes derived from this approach rely heavily upon the values of a variety of physical properties, and complementary laboratory measurements performed on relevant rock samples provide critical information. Uncertainties in

  4. Magnesium isotopic compositions of altered oceanic basalts and gabbros from IODP site 1256 at the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Ke, Shan; Gao, Yongjun; Xiao, Yilin; Li, Shuguang

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the behaviour of Mg isotopes during alteration of oceanic crust and constrain the Mg isotopic compositions of the altered oceanic crust (AOC), high-precision Mg isotope analyses have been conducted on forty-four altered basalts and gabbros recovered from IODP site 1256, which represent the carbonate-barren AOC formed at the East Pacific Rise (EPR). These samples were altered by interaction of seawater-derived fluids with oceanic crust at different temperatures and water/rock ratios. With the exception of one sample that has a slightly heavier Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg = 0.01 ± 0.08‰), all the other samples have relatively homogenous and mantle-like Mg isotopic compositions, with δ26Mg ranging from - 0.36 to - 0.14‰ (an average value of - 0.25 ± 0.11‰, 2SD, n = 43). This suggests that limited Mg isotope fractionation occurred during alteration of oceanic crust at the EPR at bulk rock scale, irrespective of highly variable alteration temperatures and variable water/rock ratios. Thus, our study suggests that the offset of δ26Mg values between seawater and global runoff dominantly results from the formation of marine dolomite as a sink for Mg. The mantle-like Mg isotopic composition further indicates that recycling of carbonate-barren AOC would not result in Mg isotope heterogeneity of the mantle at global scale. Consequently, the light Mg isotopic compositions of the mantle at local scale must result from incorporation of recycled Mg isotopically light carbonates.

  5. Creation of geographic information database of subsatellite calibration test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyelyk, Ya. I.; Semeniv, O. V.

    2014-12-01

    The prototype of geographic information database (DB) of the sub-satellite calibration test site has been created, to which user can be accessed from the free open-source geographic information system Quantum GIS (QGIS) environment. QGIS is used as an integrator of all data and applications and visualizer of the satellite imagery and vector layers of test sites in the cartographic interface. Conversion of the database from the local representation in the MS Access to the server representation in the PostgreSQL environment has been performed. Dynamic application to QGIS for user interaction from QGIS environment with the object-relational database and to display information from the database has been created. Functional-algorithmic part of these application and the interface for user interaction with the database has been developed.

  6. Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

    1994-12-01

    A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

  7. Automated test-site radiometer for vicarious calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Yin, Ya-peng; Liu, En-chao; Zhang, Yan-na; Xun, Li-na; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-peng; Qiu, Gang-gang; Zhang, Quan; Zheng, Xiao-bing

    2014-11-01

    In order to realize unmanned vicarious calibration, Automated Test-site Radiometer (ATR) was developed for surface reflectance measurements. ATR samples the spectrum from 400nm-1600 nm with 8 interference filters coupled with silicon and InGaAs detectors. The field of view each channel is 10 ° with parallel optical axis. One SWIR channel lies in the center and the other seven VNIR channels are on the circle of 4.8cm diameters which guarantee each channel to view nearly the same section of ground. The optical head as a whole is temperature controlled utilizing a TE cooler for greater stability and lower noise. ATR is powered by a solar panel and transmit its data through a BDS (China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) terminator for long-term measurements without personnel in site. ATR deployed in Dunhuang test site with ground field about 30-cm-diameter area for multi-spectral reflectance measurements. Other instruments at the site include a Cimel sunphotometer and a diffuser-to-globe irradiance meter for atmosphere observations. The methodology for band-averaged reflectance retrieval and hyperspectral reflectance fitting process are described. Then the hyperspectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters are put into 6s code to predict TOA radiance which compare with MODIS radiance.

  8. 2003 Nevada Test Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Nevada Test Site. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. Evaluation of transition year Canadian test sites. [Saskatchewan Province

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, R. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The spring small grain proportion accuracy in 15 Saskatchewan test sites was found to be comparable to that of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment Phase 3 and Transition Year results in the U.S. spring wheat states. Spring small grain labeling accuracy was 94%, and the direct wheat labeling accuracy was 89%, despite the low barley separation accuracy of 30%.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Groundwater Withdrawal at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Rosemary; Giroux, Brian; Pohll, Greg; Hershey, Ronald; Russell, Charles; Howcroft, William

    2004-01-28

    Alternative uses of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) may require large amounts of water to construct and/or operate. The only abundant source of water at the NTS is groundwater. This report describes preliminary modeling to quantify the amount of groundwater available for development from three hydrographic areas at the NTS. Modeling was conducted with a three-dimensional transient numerical groundwater flow model.

  11. Development testing of grouting and liner technology for humid sites

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    Shallow land burial, although practiced for many years, has not always secured radionuclides from the biosphere in humid environments. To develop and demonstrate improved burial technology the Engineered Test Facility was implemented. An integral part of this experiment was site characterization, with geologic and hydrologic factors as major the components. Improved techniques for burial of low-level waste were developed and tested in the laboratory before being applied in the field. The two techniques studied were membrane trench liner and grouting void spaces.

  12. Savannah River Site ECS-2 tests uncertainty report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.C.; Larson, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    This document presents a measurement uncertainty analysis for the instruments used in the ECS-2 test series conducted for the Savannah River Site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The tests are a series of downflow dryout heat transfer experiments designed to support computer code development and verification in setting limits for the Savannah River Production reactors. The measurements include input current, voltage, and power; air and water flows, fluid and metal temperatures, and absolute and differential pressures. An analysis of the data acquisition system as it relates to these measurements is also included. 18 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Lightning detection and warning on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The mission of the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office in Las Vegas, Nevada, is to provide all meteorological services needed to support the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) programs at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. These services are performed under the authority of an Interagency Agreement (IA) between the National Weather Service and DOE/NV. WSNSO meteorologists and meteorological technicians provide a 24-hour weather watch for the NTS and its surrounding areas including the Tonopah Test Range. Given the critical nature of operations on the NTS facility, WSNSO maintains a high level of awareness of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Hydrologic Uncertainty Assessment for Decommissioning Sites: Hypothetical Test Case Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2001-03-19

    This report uses hypothetical decommissioning test cases to illustrate an uncertainty assessment methodology for dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses (see NUREG/CR-6656). The hypothetical test case source term and scenarios are based on an actual decommissioning case and the physcial setting is based on the site of a field experiment carried out for the NRC in Arizona. The emphasis in the test case was on parameter uncertainty. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regiounal databases for estimating parameter uncertainty. A Bayesian updating method is used in one of the test case applications to combine site-specific information with the generic parameter distributions. Sensitivity analysis and probabilisitc siumlation are used to describe the impact of parameter uncertainty on predicted dose. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conceptual and computational behavior of the dose assessment codes as they are applied to the test cases. The primary code used in this application was RESRAD v.6.0 although DandD v.1.0 results are also reported. The methods presented and the issues discussed are applicable to other codes as well.

  15. Hydrologic Uncertainty Assessment for Decommissioning Sites: Hypothetical Test Case Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D; Taira, Randal Y

    2001-03-19

    This report uses hypothetical decommissioning test cases to illustrate an uncertainty assessment methodology for dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses (see NUREG/CR-6656). The hypothetical test case source term and scenarios are based on an actual decommissioning case and the physical setting is based on the site of a field experiment carried out for the NRC in Arizona. The emphasis in the test case was on parameter uncertainty. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases for estimating parameter uncertainty. A Bayesian updating method is used in one of the test case applications to combine site-specific information with the generic parameter distributions. Sensitivity analysis and probabilistic simulation are used to describe the impact of parameter uncertainty on predicted dose. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conceptual and computational behavior of the dose assessment codes as they are applied to the test cases. The primary code used in this application was RESRAD v.6.0 although D and D v.1.0 results are also reported. The methods presented and the issues discussed are applicable to other codes as well.

  16. Magnetotelluric Data, Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Central Yucca Flat, Profile 1, as shown in figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  17. Magnetotelluric Data, Northern Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T. H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Frenchman Flat Profile 3, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  18. Magnetotelluric Data, Southern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Southern Yucca Flat, Profile 4, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  19. DOUBLE TRACKS Test Site interim corrective action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The DOUBLE TRACKS site is located on Range 71 north of the Nellis Air Force Range, northwest of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). DOUBLE TRACKS was the first of four experiments that constituted Operation ROLLER COASTER. On May 15, 1963, weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium were dispersed using 54 kilograms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. The explosion occurred in the open, 0.3 m above the steel plate. No fission yield was detected from the test, and the total amount of plutonium deposited on the ground surface was estimated to be between 980 and 1,600 grams. The test device was composed primarily of uranium-238 and plutonium-239. The mass ratio of uranium to plutonium was 4.35. The objective of the corrective action is to reduce the potential risk to human health and the environment and to demonstrate technically viable and cost-effective excavation, transportation, and disposal. To achieve these objectives, Bechtel Nevada (BN) will remove soil with a total transuranic activity greater then 200 pCI/g, containerize the soil in ``supersacks,`` transport the filled ``supersacks`` to the NTS, and dispose of them in the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site. During this interim corrective action, BN will also conduct a limited demonstration of an alternative method for excavation of radioactive near-surface soil contamination.

  20. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2008-09-29

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Dose-per-Unit-Release Factors for Use in Calculating Radionuclide Air Emissions Potential-to-Emit Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2009-06-11

    This report documents assumptions and inputs used to prepare the dose-per-unit-release factors for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site (including the buildings that make up the Physical Sciences Facility [PSF] as well as the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory [EMSL]) calculated using the EPA-approved Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988–Personal Computer (CAP88-PC) Version 3 software package. The dose-per-unit-release factors are used to prepare dose estimates for a maximum public receptor (MPR) in support of Radioactive Air Pollutants Notice of Construction (NOC) applications for the PNNL Site.

  2. Los Alamos studies of the Nevada test site facilities for the testing of nuclear rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, Michael V.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Nevada test site geographic location; location of NRDA facilities, area 25; assessment program plan; program goal, scope, and process -- the New Nuclear Rocket Program; nuclear rocket engine test facilities; EMAD Facility; summary of final assessment results; ETS-1 Facility; and facilities cost summary.

  3. Deep Resistivity Structure of Mid Valley, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallin, Erin L.; Rodriguez, Brian D.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing ground-water contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. From 1951 to 1992, 828 underground nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site northwest of Las Vegas (DOE UGTA, 2003). Most of these tests were conducted hundreds of feet above the ground-water table; however, more than 200 of the tests were near, or within, the water table. This underground testing was limited to specific areas of the Nevada Test Site including Pahute Mesa, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RM-SM), Frenchman Flat, and Yucca Flat. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RM-SM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) (National Security Technologies, 2007). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DOE and NNSA-NSO collected and processed data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat (YF) to help define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of the pre-Tertiary confining units. We collected 51 magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) stations for that research (Williams and others, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2005d, 2005e, and 2005f). In early 2005 we extended that research with 26 additional MT data stations (Williams and others, 2006) located on and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain (RM-SM). The new stations extended the area of the hydrogeologic study previously conducted in Yucca Flat, further refining what is known about the pre

  4. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T J; Riedhauser, S R

    1999-12-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys.

  6. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Murphy

    2008-03-01

    In the past, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site has been performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation Department. Calibration and performance tests on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor were performed but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor because it had never been put into service. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no program in place to test them quarterly. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) Manager at the time decided that the program needed to be strengthened and MC&A took over performance testing of all SNM portal monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with creating a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, writing procedures, troubleshooting/repairing, validating the process, control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and running the program.

  7. Nevada Test Site craters used for astronaut training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Craters produced by chemical and nuclear explosives at the Nevada Test Site were used to train astronauts before their lunar missions. The craters have characteristics suitable for reconnaissance-type field investigations. The Schooner test produced a crater about 300 m across and excavated more than 72 m of stratigraphic section deposited in a fairly regular fashion so that systematic observations yield systematic results. Other features common on the moon, such as secondary craters and glass-coated rocks, are present at Schooner crater. Smaller explosive tests on Buckboard Mesa excavated rocks from three horizontal alteration zones within basalt flows so that the original sequence of the zones could be determined. One crater illustrated the characteristics of craters formed across vertical boundaries between rock units. Although the exercises at the Nevada Test Site were only a small part of the training of the astronauts, voice transcripts of Apollo missions 14, 16, and 17 show that the exercises contributed to astronaut performance on the moon.

  8. "Know Hepatitis B:" A Multilingual Communications Campaign Promoting Testing for Hepatitis B Among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Cynthia; Chen, Sherry; Carnes, C Amanda; Block, Joan; Chen, Daniel; Caballero, Jeffrey; Moraras, Kate; Cohen, Chari

    2016-01-01

    The "Know Hepatitis B" campaign was the first national, multilingual communications campaign to promote testing for hepatitis B virus (HBV) among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). This population comprises fewer than 5% of the total U.S. population but accounts for more than half of the up to 1.4 million Americans living with chronic HBV infection. To address this health disparity with a national campaign, CDC partnered with Hep B United, a national coalition of community-based partners working to educate AAPIs about hepatitis B and the need for testing. Guided by formative research, the "Know Hepatitis B" campaign was implemented in 2013 with a two-pronged communications strategy. CDC used available Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese media outlets on a national level and relied on Hep B United to incorporate campaign materials into educational efforts at the local level. This partnership helped facilitate HBV testing among the priority population. PMID:27168659

  9. Test site experiments with a reconfigurable stepped frequency GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Matera, Loredana; Piro, Salvatore; Rizzo, Enzo; Capozzoli, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, some new possibilities offered by a reconfigurable stepped frequency GPR system are exposed. In particular, results achieved from a prototypal system achieved in two scientific test sites will be shown together with the results achieved in the same test sites with traditional systems. Moreover a novel technique for the rejection of undesired interferences is shown, with the use of interferences caused on purpose. Key words GPR, reconfigurable stepped frequency. Introduction A reconfigurable GPR system is meant as a GPR where some parameter can be changed vs. the frequency (if the system is stepped frequency) or vs. the time (if the system is pulsed) in a programmable way. The programming should then account for the conditions met in the scenario at hand [1]. Within the research project AITECH (http://www.aitechnet.com/ibam.html), the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage, together with the University of Florence and the IDS corporation have implemented a prototype, that has been used in sites of cultural interest in Italy [2], but also abroad in Norway and Malta. The system is a stepped frequency GPR working in the frequency range 50-1000 MHz, and its reconfigurability consists in three properties. The first one is the fact that the length of the antennas can be modulated by the aperture and closure of two electronic switches present along the arms of the antennas, so that the antennas can become electrically (and electronically) longer or shorter, so becoming more suitable to radiate some frequencies rather than some other. In particular, the system can radiate three different bands in the comprehensive range between 50-1000 MHz, so being suitable for different depth range of the buried targets, and the three bands are gathered in a unique "going through" because for each measurement point the system can sweep the entire frequency range trhee times, one for each configuration of the switchres on the arms. The second property is

  10. Test site experiments with a reconfigurable stepped frequency GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Matera, Loredana; Piro, Salvatore; Rizzo, Enzo; Capozzoli, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, some new possibilities offered by a reconfigurable stepped frequency GPR system are exposed. In particular, results achieved from a prototypal system achieved in two scientific test sites will be shown together with the results achieved in the same test sites with traditional systems. Moreover a novel technique for the rejection of undesired interferences is shown, with the use of interferences caused on purpose. Key words GPR, reconfigurable stepped frequency. Introduction A reconfigurable GPR system is meant as a GPR where some parameter can be changed vs. the frequency (if the system is stepped frequency) or vs. the time (if the system is pulsed) in a programmable way. The programming should then account for the conditions met in the scenario at hand [1]. Within the research project AITECH (http://www.aitechnet.com/ibam.html), the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage, together with the University of Florence and the IDS corporation have implemented a prototype, that has been used in sites of cultural interest in Italy [2], but also abroad in Norway and Malta. The system is a stepped frequency GPR working in the frequency range 50-1000 MHz, and its reconfigurability consists in three properties. The first one is the fact that the length of the antennas can be modulated by the aperture and closure of two electronic switches present along the arms of the antennas, so that the antennas can become electrically (and electronically) longer or shorter, so becoming more suitable to radiate some frequencies rather than some other. In particular, the system can radiate three different bands in the comprehensive range between 50-1000 MHz, so being suitable for different depth range of the buried targets, and the three bands are gathered in a unique "going through" because for each measurement point the system can sweep the entire frequency range trhee times, one for each configuration of the switchres on the arms. The second property is