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  1. Mapping of Regional Myocardial Strain and Work During Ventricular Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Prinzen, Frits W.; Hunter, William C.; Wyman, Bradley T.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to determine the spatial distribution of myocardial function (myofiber shortening and work) within the left ventricular (LV) wall during ventricular pacing. BACKGROUND Asynchronous electrical activation, as induced by ventricular pacing, causes various abnormalities in LV function, perfusion and structure. These derangements may be caused by abnormalities in regional contraction patterns. However, insight into these patterns during pacing is as yet limited. METHODS In seven anesthetized dogs, high spatial and temporal resolution magnetic resonance-tagged images were acquired in three orthogonal planes. Three-dimensional deformation data and LV cavity pressure and volume were used to determine midwall circumferential strain and external and total mechanical work at 192 sites around the left ventricle. RESULTS During ventricular pacing, systolic fiber strain and external work were approximately zero in regions near the pacing site, and gradually increased to more than twice the normal value in the most remote regions. Total mechanical work, normalized to the value during right atrial pacing, was 38 ± 13% (right ventricular apex [RVapex] pacing) and 61 ± 23% (left ventricular base [LVbase] pacing) close to the pacing site, and 125 ± 48% and 171 ± 60% in remote regions, respectively (p < 0.05 between RVapex and LVbase pacing). The number of regions with reduced work was significantly larger during RVapex than during LVbase pacing. This was associated with a reduction of global LV pump function during RVapex pacing. CONCLUSIONS Ventricular pacing causes a threefold difference in myofiber work within the LV wall. This difference appears large enough to regard local myocardial function as an important determinant for abnormalities in perfusion, metabolism, structure and pump function during asynchronous electrical activation. Pacing at sites that cause more synchronous activation may limit the occurrence of such derangements

  2. Regional Framework for Self Paced Learning Modules. South Fraser Health Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blenkinsopp, John

    The purpose of this manual is to provide a guide for developing consistent, effective self-directed learning modules for the Surrey Memorial Hospital staff, physicians, and volunteers in the South Fraser Region. Eleven sections include: (1) "Philosophy for Self Paced Learning"; "What's Exciting?"; "What's the Challenge?"; (2) "Purpose"; (3)…

  3. Improvement of Right Ventricular Hemodynamics with Left Ventricular Endocardial Pacing during Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    HYDE, EOIN R.; BEHAR, JONATHAN M.; CROZIER, ANDREW; CLARIDGE, SIMON; JACKSON, TOM; SOHAL, MANAV; GILL, JASWINDER S.; O'NEILL, MARK D.; RAZAVI, REZA; RINALDI, CHRISTOPHER A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with biventricular epicardial (BV‐CS) or endocardial left ventricular (LV) stimulation (BV‐EN) improves LV hemodynamics. The effect of CRT on right ventricular function is less clear, particularly for BV‐EN. Our objective was to compare the simultaneous acute hemodynamic response (AHR) of the right and left ventricles (RV and LV) with BV‐CS and BV‐EN in order to determine the optimal mode of CRT delivery. Methods Nine patients with previously implanted CRT devices successfully underwent a temporary pacing study. Pressure wires measured the simultaneous AHR in both ventricles during different pacing protocols. Conventional epicardial CRT was delivered in LV‐only (LV‐CS) and BV‐CS configurations and compared with BV‐EN pacing in multiple locations using a roving decapolar catheter. Results Best BV‐EN (optimal AHR of all LV endocardial pacing sites) produced a significantly greater RV AHR compared with LV‐CS and BV‐CS pacing (P < 0.05). RV AHR had a significantly increased standard deviation compared to LV AHR (P < 0.05) with a weak correlation between RV and LV AHR (Spearman rs = −0.06). Compromised biventricular optimization, whereby RV AHR was increased at the expense of a smaller decrease in LV AHR, was achieved in 56% of cases, all with BV‐EN pacing. Conclusions BV‐EN pacing produces significant increases in both LV and RV AHR, above that achievable with conventional epicardial pacing. RV AHR cannot be used as a surrogate for optimizing LV AHR; however, compromised biventricular optimization is possible. The beneficial effect of endocardial LV pacing on RV function may have important clinical benefits beyond conventional CRT. PMID:27001004

  4. A Fast-Start Pacing Strategy Speeds Pulmonary Oxygen Uptake Kinetics and Improves Supramaximal Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Turnes, Tiago; Salvador, Amadeo Félix; Lisbôa, Felipe Domingos; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the present study was to investigate the effects of a fast-start pacing strategy on running performance and pulmonary oxygen uptake () kinetics at the upper boundary of the severe-intensity domain. Eleven active male participants (28±10 years, 70±5 kg, 176±6 cm, 57±4 mL/kg/min) visited the laboratory for a series of tests that were performed until exhaustion: 1) an incremental test; 2) three laboratory test sessions performed at 95, 100 and 110% of the maximal aerobic speed; 3) two to four constant speed tests for the determination of the highest constant speed (HS) that still allowed achieving maximal oxygen uptake; and 4) an exercise based on the HS using a higher initial speed followed by a subsequent decrease. To predict equalized performance values for the constant pace, the relationship between time and distance/speed through log-log modelling was used. When a fast-start was utilized, subjects were able to cover a greater distance in a performance of similar duration in comparison with a constant-pace performance (constant pace: 670 m±22%; fast-start: 683 m±22%; P = 0.029); subjects also demonstrated a higher exercise tolerance at a similar average speed when compared with constant-pace performance (constant pace: 114 s±30%; fast-start: 125 s±26%; P = 0.037). Moreover, the mean response time was reduced after a fast start (constant pace: 22.2 s±28%; fast-start: 19.3 s±29%; P = 0.025). In conclusion, middle-distance running performances with a duration of 2–3 min are improved and response time is faster when a fast-start is adopted. PMID:25360744

  5. Efficacy of paced breathing for insomnia: enhances vagal activity and improves sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Tsai, H J; Kuo, Terry B J; Lee, Guo-She; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2015-03-01

    Fourteen self-reported insomniacs (SRI) and 14 good sleepers (GS) had their cardiac neuronal activity assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) under controlled respiration at a slow frequency rate of 0.1 Hz, and a forced rate of 0.2 Hz during daytime rest. Nighttime sleep was measured by polysomnography. The SRI showed depressed high frequency power of HRV compared to the GS. An increased total power of HRV was observed among the SRI during slow, paced breathing compared with spontaneous breathing and 0.2 Hz. Sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, and awakening time during sleep were decreased and sleep efficiency was increased if SRI practiced slow, paced breathing exercises for 20 min before going to sleep. Our results indicate that there is autonomic dysfunction among insomniacs, especially in relation to vagal activity; however, this decreased vagal activity can be facilitated by practicing slow, paced breathing, thereby improving sleep quality. PMID:25234581

  6. "U-Pace" Instruction: Improving Student Success by Integrating Content Mastery and Amplified Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Diane M.; Pfeiffer, Heidi M.; Fleming, Raymond; Ports, Katie A.; Pedrick, Laura E.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Jirovec, Danielle L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    "U-Pace," an instructional intervention, has potential for widespread implementation because student behavior recorded in any learning management system is used by "U-Pace" instructors to tailor coaching of student learning based on students' strengths and motivations. "U-Pace" utilizes an online learning…

  7. "U-Pace" Instruction: Improving Student Success by Integrating Content Mastery and Amplified Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Diane M.; Pfeiffer, Heidi M.; Fleming, Raymond; Ports, Katie A.; Pedrick, Laura E.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Jirovec, Danielle L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    "U-Pace," an instructional intervention, has potential for widespread implementation because student behavior recorded in any learning management system is used by "U-Pace" instructors to tailor coaching of student learning based on students' strengths and motivations. "U-Pace" utilizes an online learning environment to integrate content mastery…

  8. Muscle ischemic preconditioning does not improve performance during self-paced exercise.

    PubMed

    Tocco, F; Marongiu, E; Ghiani, G; Sanna, I; Palazzolo, G; Olla, S; Pusceddu, M; Sanna, P; Corona, F; Concu, A; Crisafulli, A

    2015-01-01

    Muscle ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been found to improve exercise performance in laboratory tests. This investigation aims at verifying whether performance is improved by IP during self-paced exercise (SPE) in the field. 11 well-trained male runners performed 3 randomly assigned 5 000 m self-paced running tests on an outdoor track. One was the reference (RT) test, while the others were performed following muscle IP (IPT) and a control sham test (ST). Average speeds were measured during each test. Mean values in oxygen uptake (VO2), aerobic energy cost (AEC) during race and post-race blood lactate (BLa) were gathered. Data showed that none of the studied variables were affected by IPT or ST with respect to the RT test. Average speeds were 4.63±0.31, 4.62±0.31 and 4.60±0.25 m·s(-1) for the RT, the ST and the IPT tests, respectively. Moreover, there was no difference among tests in speed reached during each lap. VO2 was 3.5±0.69, 3.74±0.85 and 3.62±1.19 l·min(-1). AEC was 1.04±0.15, 1.08±0.1 and 1.09±0.15 kcal·kg(-1)·km(-1). Finally, post-race BLa levels reached 12.85±3.54, 11.88±4.74 and 12.82±3.6 mmol·l(-1). These findings indicate that performance during SPE is not ameliorated by ischemic preconditioning, thereby indicating that IP is not suitable as an ergogenic aid. PMID:25264861

  9. In Heart Failure Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block Single Lead MultiSpot Left Ventricular Pacing Does Not Improve Acute Hemodynamic Response To Conventional Biventricular Pacing. A Multicenter Prospective, Interventional, Non-Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterliński, Maciej; Sokal, Adam; Lenarczyk, Radosław; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Vanderheyden, Marc; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Francis, Darrel; Heynens, Joeri; Stegemann, Berthold; Cornelussen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent efforts to increase CRT response by multiSPOT pacing (MSP) from multiple bipols on the same left ventricular lead are still inconclusive. Aim The Left Ventricular (LV) MultiSPOTpacing for CRT (iSPOT) study compared the acute hemodynamic response of MSP pacing by using 3 electrodes on a quadripolar lead compared with conventional biventricular pacing (BiV). Methods Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent an acute hemodynamic study to determine the %change in LV+dP/dtmax from baseline atrial pacing compared to the following configurations: BiV pacing with the LV lead in a one of lateral veins, while pacing from the distal, mid, or proximal electrode and all 3 electrodes together (i.e. MSP). All measurements were repeated 4 times at 5 different atrioventricular delays. We also measured QRS-width and individual Q-LV durations. Results Protocol was completed in 24 patients, all with LBBB (QRS width 171±20 ms) and 58% ischemic aetiology. The percentage change in LV+dP/dtmax for MSP pacing was 31.0±3.3% (Mean±SE), which was not significantly superior to any BiV pacing configuration: 28.9±3.2% (LV-distal), 28.3±2.7% (LV-mid), and 29.5±3.0% (LV-prox), respectively. Correlation between LV+dP/dtmax and either QRS-width or Q-LV ratio was poor. Conclusions In patients with LBBB MultiSPOT LV pacing demonstrated comparable improvement in contractility to best conventional BiV pacing. Optimization of atrioventricular delay is important for the best performance for both BiV and MultiSPOT pacing configurations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01883141 PMID:27124724

  10. Improved myocardial contractility with glucose-insulin-potassium infusion during pacing in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, H G; Rogers, W J; Russell, R O; Rackley, C E

    1985-04-01

    The metabolic and mechanical effects of a solution of glucose-insulin-potassium (G-I-K) were investigated in 18 patients who underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization for coronary artery disease. All patients were paced at a rate of approximately 140 beats/min before and after infusion of G-I-K. Basal and paced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure, dP/dt, arterial substrate levels and osmolarity were measured in all 18 patients. In 13 patients cardiac index was also measured. In 5 patients arterial-coronary sinus measurements of oxygen, carbon dioxide, glucose, free fatty acids, lactate, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, ammonia and urea were made, in addition to coronary sinus blood flow. G-I-K increased the blood sugar level to approximately 200 mg/dl and raised the serum osmolarity 9 mosmol. Pacing alone raised the cardiac index 4% and pacing with G-I-K increased the cardiac index 6% (p less than 0.05). Pacing before G-I-K augmented dP/dt (21%) and pacing with G-I-K increased it (30%) (p less than 0.01). The metabolic changes noted included a shift in the respiratory quotient from 0.77 to 0.96 with G-I-K infusion (p less than 0.05). During G-I-K infusion the myocardial oxygen consumption at rest increased from 17.1 to 21.8 ml/min (23%, p less than 0.05). Myocardial oxygen consumption during pacing was similar before and after G-I-K infusion. Before G-I-K infusion nitrogen balance was slightly positive; after G-I-K infusion it was negative with regard to the nitrogen-containing compounds measured.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3885708

  11. Using "U-Pace" Instruction to Improve the Academic Performance of Economically Disadvantaged Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, R.; Stoiber, L. C.; Pfeiffer, H. M.; Kienzler, S. E.; Fleming, R. R.; Pedrick, L. E.; Barth, D. J.; Reddy, D. .

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate whether the student success associated with the "U-Pace" instructional approach, which integrates mastery-based learning with proactive instructor support in an online learning environment, would replicate for both economically disadvantaged students and students who are not economically…

  12. Protein-Pacing from Food or Supplementation Improves Physical Performance in Overweight Men and Women: The PRISE 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Paul J.; Edmonds, Rohan C.; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Gentile, Christopher L.; Ketcham, Caitlin; Darin, Christopher; Renna, Mariale; Zheng, Qian; Zhang, Jun Zhu; Ormsbee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that protein-pacing (P; six meals/day @ 1.4 g/kg body weight (BW), three of which included whey protein (WP) supplementation) combined with a multi-mode fitness program consisting of resistance, interval sprint, stretching, and endurance exercise training (RISE) improves body composition in overweight individuals. The purpose of this study was to extend these findings and determine whether protein-pacing with only food protein (FP) is comparable to WP supplementation during RISE training on physical performance outcomes in overweight/obese individuals. Thirty weight-matched volunteers were prescribed RISE training and a P diet derived from either whey protein supplementation (WP, n = 15) or food protein sources (FP, n = 15) for 16 weeks. Twenty-one participants completed the intervention (WP, n = 9; FP, n = 12). Measures of body composition and physical performance were significantly improved in both groups (p < 0.05), with no effect of protein source. Likewise, markers of cardiometabolic disease risk (e.g., LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, systolic blood pressure) were significantly improved (p < 0.05) to a similar extent in both groups. These results demonstrate that both whey protein and food protein sources combined with multimodal RISE training are equally effective at improving physical performance and cardiometabolic health in obese individuals. PMID:27187451

  13. Protein-Pacing from Food or Supplementation Improves Physical Performance in Overweight Men and Women: The PRISE 2 Study.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Edmonds, Rohan C; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Gentile, Christopher L; Ketcham, Caitlin; Darin, Christopher; Renna, Mariale; Zheng, Qian; Zhang, Jun Zhu; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that protein-pacing (P; six meals/day @ 1.4 g/kg body weight (BW), three of which included whey protein (WP) supplementation) combined with a multi-mode fitness program consisting of resistance, interval sprint, stretching, and endurance exercise training (RISE) improves body composition in overweight individuals. The purpose of this study was to extend these findings and determine whether protein-pacing with only food protein (FP) is comparable to WP supplementation during RISE training on physical performance outcomes in overweight/obese individuals. Thirty weight-matched volunteers were prescribed RISE training and a P diet derived from either whey protein supplementation (WP, n = 15) or food protein sources (FP, n = 15) for 16 weeks. Twenty-one participants completed the intervention (WP, n = 9; FP, n = 12). Measures of body composition and physical performance were significantly improved in both groups (p < 0.05), with no effect of protein source. Likewise, markers of cardiometabolic disease risk (e.g., LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, systolic blood pressure) were significantly improved (p < 0.05) to a similar extent in both groups. These results demonstrate that both whey protein and food protein sources combined with multimodal RISE training are equally effective at improving physical performance and cardiometabolic health in obese individuals. PMID:27187451

  14. Pace Yourself.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Ann R.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests techniques and behaviors teachers can use to optimize the flow and pacing of their music lessons. Included are techniques for timing the lesson, keeping students involved, and minimizing interruptions and transitions. (SJL)

  15. Keeping Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the struggles of two tough moms who team up to start their own company. Fed up with a lack of stylish, properly-fitting shoes for their children with cerebral palsy, they established "Keeping Pace" which currently offers a selection of stylish girls' and boys' athletic sneakers and casual dress shoes for boys, all sold…

  16. Improving Responsiveness to Intervention for English-Language Learners: A Comparison of Instructional Pace on Letter Naming Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Donna; Bluck, John

    2006-01-01

    An alternating treatments design was used to compare the effects of a 1-s and a 5-s paced intervention on rates of letter naming by English Language Learners (ELL). Participants were four kindergarten students performing below the average letter naming level and learning rate than other ELL classmates. The fast paced intervention consisted of a…

  17. Regional myocardial blood flow and coronary vascular reserve in unanesthetized ponies during pacing-induced ventricular tachycardia

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.; Manohar, M.; Lundeen, G.

    1983-08-01

    To examine the effects of tachycardia on coronary circulation, transmural distribution of myocardial blood flow (MBF, 15-micron diameter radionuclide-labeled microspheres) was studied in six healthy adult ponies at rest (heart rate . 60 +/- 7 beats . min-1), during ventricular pacing at 150 and 200 beats . min-1, as well as with ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 before and during maximal coronary vasodilatation (iv adenosine infusion; 4 mumole . kg-1 . min-1). Mean aortic pressure and cardiac output were unchanged from control values with ventricular pacing. Whereas ventricular pacing at 150 and 200 beats . min-1 resulted in a progressive uniform increase in transmural MBF and well-maintained endo:epi perfusion ratio, pacing at 250 beats . min-1 did not result in a further increase in MBF compared to pacing at 200 beats . min-1 and the left ventricular (LV) subendocardial:subepicardial (endo:epi) perfusion ratio was significantly less than 1.00 (0.87 +/- 0.05). Blood flow to the LV papillary muscles and subendocardium was significantly less than that recorded at 200 beats . min-1. The LV endo:epi perfusion ratio with ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 during adenosine infusion resulted in a decrease in mean aortic pressure (63% of control value) and a marked further reduction in blood flow to the LV papillary muscles as well as the LV subendocardium, while MBF increased dramatically in the LV subepicardium compared to values observed during ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 alone. These data demonstrate that coronary vasomotion functions to maintain LV subendocardial blood flow in the pony myocardium at a heart rate of 200 beats . min-1, while at 250 beats . min-1 exhaustion of coronary vasodilator reserve in the deeper layers limits further increase in MBF.

  18. PACE Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    M., Zimring,; Hoffman, I.; Fuller, M.

    2010-08-11

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On July 6, 2010, FHFA and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) concluded that Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs 'present significant safety and soundness concerns' to the housing finance industry. This statement came after a year of discussions with state and federal agencies in which PACE, a novel mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, has gone from receiving support from the White House, canonization as one of Scientific American's 'World Changing Ideas' and legislative adoption in 24 states to questionable relevance, at least in the residential sector. Whether PACE resumes its expansion as an innovative tool for financing energy efficiency and clean generation depends on outcomes in each of the three branches of government - discussions on a PACE pilot phase among federal agencies, litigation in federal court, and legislation in Congress - all highly uncertain. This policy brief addresses the practical impacts of these possible outcomes on existing and emerging PACE programs across the United States and potential paths forward.

  19. Project for Program Improvement through the Utilization of Self-Paced Individualized Instruction Concepts Industrial Equipment Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley's Ridge Vocational Technical School, Forrest City, AR.

    The general objectives of an Arkansas technical school's self-paced individualized instruction program were designing, field testing, and disseminating an instructional management system with support materials that identify and justify the need for a program of instruction. Eight specific objectives have been developed to facilitate students'…

  20. PACE4: a subtilisin-like endoprotease with unique properties.

    PubMed Central

    Mains, R E; Berard, C A; Denault, J B; Zhou, A; Johnson, R C; Leduc, R

    1997-01-01

    PACE4 is one of the neuroendocrine-specific mammalian subtilisin-related endoproteases believed to function in the secretory pathway. The biosynthesis and secretion of PACE4 have been studied using transfected neuroendocrine and fibroblast cell lines. as well as primary pituitary cultures. ProPACE4 (approx. 106 kDa) is cleaved intracellularly before secretion of PACE4 (approx. 97 kDa); the N-terminal propeptide cleavage is accelerated in a truncated form of PACE4 lacking the Cys-rich C-terminal region (PACE4s). Neither PACE4 nor PACE4s is stored in regulated neuroendocrine secretory granules, whereas pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides and prohormone convertase I enter the regulated secretory pathway efficiently. The relatively slow cleavage of the proregion of proPACE4 in primary anterior pituitary cells, followed by rapid secretion of PACE4, is similar to the results for proPACE4 in transfected cell lines. The enzyme activity of PACE4 is distinct from furin and prohormone convertases, both in the marked sensitivity of PACE4 to inhibition by leupeptin and the relative insensitivity of PACE4 to inhibition by Ca2+ chelators and dithiothreitol; PACE4 is not inhibited by the alpha1-antitrypsin Portland variant that is very potent at inhibiting furin. The unique biosynthetic and enzymic patterns seen for PACE4 suggest a role for this neuroendocrine-specific subtilisin-like endoprotease outside the pathway for peptide biosynthesis. PMID:9032441

  1. Permanent cardiac pacing in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Wael; Hegazy, Ranya; AbdElAziz, Osama; Sobhy, Rodina; Hasanein, Hossam; Shaltout, Fawzan

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric pacemaker (PM) implants comprise less than 1 % of all PM implants. This study aimed to investigate permanent cardiac pacing among the pediatric population, identifying different indications and complications of pediatric cardiac pacing, especially focusing on the effect of the pacing sites, the PM lead type, and the indications for pacing. The current work is a cross-sectional study of 103 procedures for permanent PM insertion in pediatric patients between January 2001 and December 2010. The patients were followed up 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation, then every 6 months or as needed. Evaluation included routine clinical examination, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and a full analysis of the pacing system measurements. The ages of the patients ranged from 0.09 to 12 years (median, 2.3 years). The most common indication for pacing was postoperative complete heart bock, noted in 54 patients (52.4 %). Transvenous endocardial PM insertion was performed in 92 procedures (89.3 %), whereas transthoracic epicardial insertion was performed in 11 procedures (10.7 %). The most common site of pacing was the right ventricular apex (n = 64, 62 %), followed by the right ventricular outflow tract (n = 25, 24.3 %). Transthoracic epicardial PM insertion was associated with a significantly higher percentage and greater severity of complications. In this study, 65 % of the patients with left ventricle (LV) dilation before pacing showed a significant improvement in LV dimensions and function after pacing. This was noted only in those with endocardially inserted PM leads in both the congenital and the postoperative groups regardless of the pacing site. Endocardial PM insertion in children is a safe procedure with fewer complications and a lower ventricular threshold than the epicardial route. Permanent single-chamber right ventricle pacing is safe and can lead to significant improvement in LV function and dimensions. However, long-term follow

  2. Reversal of Pacing-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Normal QRS Axis Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ju Youn; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Right ventricular apical pacing has been a commonly used method for placement of permanent pacemaker, but it is known to be associated with ventricular dyssynchrony and may lead to heart failure. Septal pacing could be an alternative method to improve this complication but the results have been conflicting; hence, other strategies are needed. This case is about a patient with pacing-induced cardiomyopathy who showed much improvement after repositioning the leads to a site different from that of normally paced QRS axis. PMID:27275181

  3. Self-Paced Fortran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, James

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the instructional format of the lecture and the self-paced methods of teaching FORTRAN at Michigan State University and compares end-of-term grades of students taking a second computer science course based on whether they took the first course in the self-paced or the traditional lecture format. (Author/BB)

  4. Development and evaluation of the feasibility and effects on staff, patients, and families of a new tool, the Psychosocial Assessment and Communication Evaluation (PACE), to improve communication and palliative care in intensive care and during clinical uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are widespread concerns about communication and support for patients and families, especially when they face clinical uncertainty, a situation most marked in intensive care units (ICUs). Therefore, we aimed to develop and evaluate an interventional tool to improve communication and palliative care, using the ICU as an example of where this is difficult. Methods Our design was a phase I-II study following the Medical Research Council Guidance for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions and the (Methods of Researching End-of-life Care (MORECare) statement. In two ICUs, with over 1900 admissions annually, phase I modeled a new intervention comprising implementation training and an assessment tool. We conducted a literature review, qualitative interviews, and focus groups with 40 staff and 13 family members. This resulted in the new tool, the Psychosocial Assessment and Communication Evaluation (PACE). Phase II evaluated the feasibility and effects of PACE, using observation, record audit, and surveys of staff and family members. Qualitative data were analyzed using the framework approach. The statistical tests used on quantitative data were t-tests (for normally distributed characteristics), the χ2 or Fisher’s exact test (for non-normally distributed characteristics) and the Mann–Whitney U-test (for experience assessments) to compare the characteristics and experience for cases with and without PACE recorded. Results PACE provides individualized assessments of all patients entering the ICU. It is completed within 24 to 48 hours of admission, and covers five aspects (key relationships, social details and needs, patient preferences, communication and information status, and other concerns), followed by recording of an ongoing communication evaluation. Implementation is supported by a training program with specialist palliative care. A post-implementation survey of 95 ICU staff found that 89% rated PACE assessment as very or

  5. Physiological cardiac pacing: Current status.

    PubMed

    Das, Asit; Kahali, Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Adverse hemodynamics of right ventricular (RV) pacing is a well-known fact. It was believed to be the result of atrio-ventricular (AV) dyssynchrony and sequential pacing of the atrium and ventricle may solve these problems. However, despite maintenance of AV synchrony, the dual chamber pacemakers in different trials have failed to show its superiority over single chamber RV apical pacing in terms of death, progression of heart failure, and atrial fibrillation (AF). As a consequence, investigators searched for alternate pacing sites with a more physiological activation pattern and better hemodynamics. Direct His bundle pacing and Para-Hisian pacing are the most physiological ventricular pacing sites. But, this is technically difficult. Ventricular septal pacing compared to apical pacing results in a shorter electrical activation delay and consequently less mechanical dyssynchrony. But, the study results are heterogeneous. Selective site atria pacing (atrial septal) is useful for patients with atrial conduction disorders in prevention of AF. PMID:27543481

  6. Promoting continence in nursing homes in four European countries: the use of PACES as a mechanism for improving the uptake of evidence-based recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Gill; Kitson, Alison; Munn, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Background Multi-faceted approaches are generally recognised as the most effective way to support the implementation of evidence into practice. Audit and feedback often constitute one element of a multi-faceted implementation package, alongside other strategies, such as interactive education and facilitated support mechanisms. This paper describes a multi-faceted implementation strategy that used the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (PACES) as an online audit tool to support facilitators working to introduce evidence-based continence recommendations in nursing homes in four different European countries. Aims/objectives The paper describes the experience of using PACES with an international group of nursing home facilitators. In particular, the objectives of the paper are: to describe the process of introducing PACES to internal facilitators in eight nursing homes; to discuss the progress made during a 12-month period of collecting and analysing audit data using PACES; to summarise the collective experience of using PACES, including reflections on its strengths and limitations. Methods Descriptive data were collected during the 12-month period of working with PACES in the eight nursing home sites. These data included digital and written notes taken at an initial 3-day introductory programme, at monthly teleconferences held between the external and internal facilitators and at a final 2-day meeting. Qualitative analysis of the data was undertaken on an ongoing basis throughout the implementation period, which enabled formative evaluation of PACES. A final summative evaluation of the experience of using PACES was undertaken as part of the closing project meeting in June 2011. Results The nursing home facilitators took longer than anticipated to introduce PACES and it was only after 9–10 months that they became confident and comfortable using the system. This was due to a combination of factors, including a lack of audit

  7. Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale

    SciTech Connect

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Coughlin, Jason; Fuller, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2010-04-12

    A significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its 'Recovery through Retrofit' plan. The residential PACE model involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached to the property and the assessment is paid back as a line item on the property tax bill. As of April 2010, 17 states have passed legislation to allow their local governments to create PACE programs, two already have the authority to set up PACE programs, and over 10 additional states are actively developing enabling legislation. This policy brief analyzes one of the advantages of PACE, which is the transferability of the special assessment from one homeowner to the next when the home is sold. This analysis focuses on the potential for the outstanding lien to impact the sales negotiation process, rather than the legal nature of the lien transfer itself. The goal of this paper is to consider what implications a PACE lien may have on the home sales negotiation process so that it can be addressed upfront rather than risk a future backlash to PACE programs. If PACE programs do expand at a rapid rate, the chances are high that there will be other cases where prospective buyers uses PACE liens to negotiate lower home prices or require repayment of the lien as a condition of sale. As a result, PACE programs should highlight this issue as a potential risk factor for the sake of full disclosure. A good example of this

  8. Self-Paced Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Norma Jean

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of self-paced units. Development suggestions include determining the form of the units, including goals, responsibilities, and definitions of terms; keeping them short; including a variety of activities; and requiring that all lessons be completed at school. Contains sample units on climatology and meteorology, the sun, and…

  9. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  10. Optimized multisite ventricular pacing in postoperative single-ventricle patients.

    PubMed

    Havalad, Vinod; Cabreriza, Santos E; Cheung, Eva W; Aponte-Patel, Linda; Wang, Alice; Cheng, Bin; Wang, Daniel Y; Silver, Eric; Bacha, Emile A; Spotnitz, Henry M

    2014-10-01

    Ventricular dyssynchrony is associated with morbidity and mortality after palliation of a single ventricle. The authors hypothesized that resynchronization with optimized temporary multisite pacing postoperatively would be safe, feasible, and effective. Pacing was assessed in the intensive care unit within the first 24 h after surgery. Two unipolar atrial pacing leads and four bipolar ventricular pacing leads were placed at standardized sites intraoperatively. Pacing was optimized to maximize mean arterial pressure. The protocol tested 11 combinations of the 4 different ventricular lead sites, 6 atrioventricular delays (50-150 ms), and 14 intraventricular delays. Optimal pacing settings were thus determined and ultimately compared in four configurations: bipolar, unipolar, single-site atrioventricular pacing, and intrinsic rhythm. Each patient was his or her own control, and all pacing comparisons were implemented in random sequence. Single-ventricle palliation was performed for 17 children ages 0-21 years. Pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) versus intrinsic rhythm, with the following configurations: bipolar multisite pacing increased MAP by 2.2 % (67.7 ± 2.4 to 69.2 ± 2.4 mmHg; p = 0.013) and unipolar multisite pacing increased MAP by 2.8 % (67.7 ± 2.4 to 69.6 ± 2.7 mmHg; p = 0.002). Atrioventricular single-site pacing increased MAP by 2.1 % (67.7 ± 2.4 to 69.1 ± 2.5 mmHg: p = 0.02, insignificant difference under Bonferroni correction). The echocardiographic fractional area change in nine patients increased significantly only with unipolar pacing (32 ± 3.1 to 36 ± 4.2 %; p = 0.02). No study-related adverse events occurred. Multisite pacing optimization is safe and feasible in the early postoperative period after single-ventricle palliation, with improvements in mean arterial pressure and fractional area shortening. Further study to evaluate clinical benefits is required. PMID:24827078

  11. TCP Pacing Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Transmission control protocol (TCP) was conceived and designed to run over a variety of communication links, including wireless and high-bandwidth links. However, with recent technological advances in satellite and fiber-optic networks, researchers are reevaluating the flexibility of TCP. The TCP pacing and packet pair probing implementation may help overcome two of the major obstacles identified for efficient bandwidth utilization over communication links with large delay-bandwidth products.

  12. Controlled transient respiratory arrest along with rapid right ventricular pacing for improving balloon stability during balloon valvuloplasty in pediatric patients with congenital aortic stenosis--a retrospective case series analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Das, Soumi; Ghose, Tapas; Sarkar, Achyut; Goswami, Anupam; Kundu, Sudeshna

    2010-01-01

    Rapid right ventricular pacing is safe, effective, and established method to provide balloon stability during balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). Controlled transient respiratory arrest at this point of time may further reduce left ventricular stroke volume, providing an additional benefit to maintain balloon stability. Two groups were studied. Among the 10 patients, five had rapid pacing alone (Group A), while the other five were provided with cessation of positive pressure breathing as well (Group B). The outcomes of BAV in the two groups of patients were studied. One patient in Group A had failed balloon dilatation even after the fourth attempt, while in Group B there were no failures. The peak systolic gradient reduction was higher in Group B (70.05% in comparison to 52.16% of group A). In Group A, five subjects developed aortic regurgitation (grade 2 in four and grade 3 in one, while no grade 3 aortic regurgitation developed in any patient in Group B). Controlled transient respiratory arrest along with rapid ventricular pacing may be effective in maintaining balloon stability and improve the outcome of BAV. PMID:20826965

  13. Enact legislation supporting residential property assessed clean energy financing (PACE)

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Devashree

    2012-11-15

    Congress should enact legislation that supports residential property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs in the nation’s states and metropolitan areas. Such legislation should require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to allow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to purchase residential mortgages with PACE assessments while at the same time providing responsible underwriting standards and a set of benchmarks for residential PACE assessments in order to minimize financial risks to mortgage holders. Congressional support of residential PACE financing will improve energy efficiency, encourage job creation, and foster economic growth in the nation’s state and metropolitan areas.

  14. [The best of cardiac pacing in 1999].

    PubMed

    Deharo, J C

    2000-01-01

    Since the first clinical application to man forty years ago, for the treatment of bradycardia, cardiac pacing has been the object of continuous technological innovation in parallel with those in electronics and computerisation. However, independently of these expected advances, there has been a surprising widening of the field of application of pacing into those of haemodynamics and rhythmology. The recent publication of the long-term results of the Pacing in Cardiomyopathy (PIC) study confirmed the sustained decrease of intraventricular pressure gradient, of NYHA functional stage and improved quality of life of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy paced in the DDD mode. The investigators also underlined the placebo effect of the pacemaker. The decrease in risk of sudden death and the reduction in ventricular remodelling have not been demonstrated yet. More recently, biventricular pacing has been proposed for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy and a French study showed a long-term improvement in NYHA stage and effort capacity. Several prospective randomised trials are under way to validate this indication. Acute haemodynamic evaluations have confirmed the efficacy of biventricular stimulation but also underline the value of left ventricular pacing alone. The effects on mortality, the selection of patients and the optimal configuration of pacing remain to be defined. In the field of prevention of atrial arrhythmias, the results of the multicenter SYNBIAPACE study, investigating biatrial pacing in patients with interatrial conduction defects, only showed a tendency to an increase in the delay before recurrence of atrial fibrillation. The value of the memory functions of pacemakers and the algorithms of prevention of atrial arrhythmias are still under investigation. Haemodynamic transducers have been introduced in some recent pacemakers to assess myocardial contractility and have applications in the evaluation of different pacing modes and in the

  15. Noninvasive external cardiac pacing for thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.D.; Warren, S.E.; Gervino, E.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Royal, H.D.; Parker, J.A.; Silverman, K.J.; Kolodny, G.M.; Zoll, P.M.; McKay, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Improvements in noninvasive external cardiac pacing have led to a technique with reliable electrical capture and tolerable patient discomfort. To assess the use of this modality of pacing in combination with thallium scintigraphy as a noninvasive pacing stress test, we applied simultaneous noninvasive cardiac pacing, hemodynamic monitoring, and thallium-201 scintigraphy in 14 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for chest pain syndromes. Two patients had normal coronary arteries, while the remaining 12 had significant coronary artery disease. Thallium scintigraphic responses to pacing were compared to routine exercise thallium stress testing in nine of these 14 patients. All patients were noninvasively paced to more than 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. Twelve patients demonstrated reversible thallium defects, which corresponded in 11 cases to significant lesions seen on coronary angiography. Of nine patients who underwent both pacing and exercise thallium stress tests, comparable maximal rate-pressure products were achieved. Moreover, thallium imaging at peak pacing and during delayed views did not differ significantly from exercise thallium scintigraphy. A limiting factor associated with the technique was local patient discomfort, which occurred to some degree in all patients. We conclude that noninvasive external cardiac pacing together with thallium scintigraphy is capable of detecting significant coronary artery disease and may be comparable to routine exercise thallium stress testing. This new modality of stress testing could be useful in patients unable to undergo the exercise required for standard exercise tolerance testing, particularly if improvements in the technology can be found to reduce further the local discomfort.

  16. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  17. Sectoral approaches to improve regional carbon budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Pete; Nabuurs, Gert-Jan; Marland, Gregg

    2008-06-01

    Humans utilise about 40% of the earth s net primary production (NPP) but the products of this NPP are often managed by different sectors, with timber and forest products managed by the forestry sector and food and fibre products from croplands and grasslands managed by the agricultural sector. Other significant anthropogenic impacts on the global carbon cycle include human utilization of fossil fuels and impacts on less intensively managed systems such as peatlands, wetlands and permafrost. A great deal of knowledge, expertise and data is available within each sector. We describe the contribution of sectoral carbon budgets to our understanding of the global carbon cycle. Whilst many sectors exhibit similarities for carbon budgeting, some key differences arise due to differences in goods and services provided, ecology, management practices used, landmanagement personnel responsible, policies affecting land management, data types and availability, and the drivers of change. We review the methods and data sources available for assessing sectoral carbon budgets, and describe some of key data limitations and uncertainties for each sector in different regions of the world. We identify the main gaps in our knowledge/data, show that coverage is better for the developed world for most sectors, and suggest how sectoral carbon budgets could be improved in the future. Research priorities include the development of shared protocols through site networks, a move to full carbon accounting within sectors, and the assessment of full greenhouse gas budgets.

  18. Protein-Pacing and Multi-Component Exercise Training Improves Physical Performance Outcomes in Exercise-Trained Women: The PRISE 3 Study.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Ives, Stephen J; Norton, Chelsea; Escudero, Daniela; Minicucci, Olivia; O'Brien, Gabe; Paul, Maia; Ormsbee, Michael J; Miller, Vincent; Sheridan, Caitlin; He, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial cardiometabolic and body composition effects of combined protein-pacing (P; 5-6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) and multi-mode exercise (resistance, interval, stretching, endurance; RISE) training (PRISE) in obese adults has previously been established. The current study examines PRISE on physical performance (endurance, strength and power) outcomes in healthy, physically active women. Thirty exercise-trained women (>4 days exercise/week) were randomized to either PRISE (n = 15) or a control (CON, 5-6 meals/day at 1.0 g/kg BW/day; n = 15) for 12 weeks. Muscular strength (1-RM bench press, 1-RM BP) endurance (sit-ups, SUs; push-ups, PUs), power (bench throws, BTs), blood pressure (BP), augmentation index, (AIx), and abdominal fat mass were assessed at Weeks 0 (pre) and 13 (post). At baseline, no differences existed between groups. Following the 12-week intervention, PRISE had greater gains (p < 0.05) in SUs, PUs (6 ± 7 vs. 10 ± 7, 40%; 8 ± 13 vs. 14 ± 12, 43% ∆reps, respectively), BTs (11 ± 35 vs. 44 ± 34, 75% ∆watts), AIx (1 ± 9 vs. -5 ± 11, 120%), and DBP (-5 ± 9 vs. -11 ± 11, 55% ∆mmHg). These findings suggest that combined protein-pacing (P; 5-6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) diet and multi-component exercise (RISE) training (PRISE) enhances muscular endurance, strength, power, and cardiovascular health in exercise-trained, active women. PMID:27258301

  19. Protein-Pacing and Multi-Component Exercise Training Improves Physical Performance Outcomes in Exercise-Trained Women: The PRISE 3 Study †

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Paul J.; Ives, Stephen J.; Norton, Chelsea; Escudero, Daniela; Minicucci, Olivia; O’Brien, Gabe; Paul, Maia; Ormsbee, Michael J.; Miller, Vincent; Sheridan, Caitlin; He, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial cardiometabolic and body composition effects of combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) and multi-mode exercise (resistance, interval, stretching, endurance; RISE) training (PRISE) in obese adults has previously been established. The current study examines PRISE on physical performance (endurance, strength and power) outcomes in healthy, physically active women. Thirty exercise-trained women (>4 days exercise/week) were randomized to either PRISE (n = 15) or a control (CON, 5–6 meals/day at 1.0 g/kg BW/day; n = 15) for 12 weeks. Muscular strength (1-RM bench press, 1-RM BP) endurance (sit-ups, SUs; push-ups, PUs), power (bench throws, BTs), blood pressure (BP), augmentation index, (AIx), and abdominal fat mass were assessed at Weeks 0 (pre) and 13 (post). At baseline, no differences existed between groups. Following the 12-week intervention, PRISE had greater gains (p < 0.05) in SUs, PUs (6 ± 7 vs. 10 ± 7, 40%; 8 ± 13 vs. 14 ± 12, 43% ∆reps, respectively), BTs (11 ± 35 vs. 44 ± 34, 75% ∆watts), AIx (1 ± 9 vs. −5 ± 11, 120%), and DBP (−5 ± 9 vs. −11 ± 11, 55% ∆mmHg). These findings suggest that combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) diet and multi-component exercise (RISE) training (PRISE) enhances muscular endurance, strength, power, and cardiovascular health in exercise-trained, active women. PMID:27258301

  20. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  1. Restructuring VA ambulatory care and medical education: the PACE model of primary care.

    PubMed

    Cope, D W; Sherman, S; Robbins, A S

    1996-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Western Region and associated medical schools formulated a set of recommendations for an improved ambulatory health care delivery system during a 1988 strategic planning conference. As a result, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Sepulveda, California, initiated the Pilot (now Primary) Ambulatory Care and Education (PACE) program in 1990 to implement and evaluate a model program. The PACE program represents a significant departure from traditional VA and non-VA academic medical center care, shifting the focus of care from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. From its inception, the PACE program has used an interdisciplinary team approach with three independent global care firms. Each firm is interdisciplinary in composition, with a matrix management structure that expands role function and empowers team members. Emphasis is on managed primary care, stressing a biopsychosocial approach and cost-effective comprehensive care emphasizing prevention and health maintenance. Information management is provided through a network of personal computers that serve as a front end to the VHA Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP) mainframe. In addition to providing comprehensive and cost-effective care, the PACE program educates trainees in all health care disciplines, conducts research, and disseminates information about important procedures and outcomes. Undergraduate and graduate trainees from 11 health care disciplines rotate through the PACE program to learn an integrated approach to managed ambulatory care delivery. All trainees are involved in a problem-based approach to learning that emphasizes shared training experiences among health care disciplines. This paper describes the transitional phases of the PACE program (strategic planning, reorganization, and quality improvement) that are relevant for other institutions that are shifting to training programs emphasizing primary and ambulatory care

  2. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sam SX; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon. PMID:25258562

  3. An Undergraduate Intern Program at PACES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starks, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) established the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in 1995 to conduct basic and applied research that contributes to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. Specifically, PACES provides a repository of remote sensing and other information that supports investigations into an improved understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes occurring in the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Approximately 85% of UTEP's students come from El Paso County, a fast growing urban region representative of many large cities in the Southwest that have, or will soon have, a majority of their population composed of groups currently underrepresented in the scientific and technical workforce. UTEP's student population has an ethnic distribution (63% Hispanic, 32% Anglo, 3% African American, 1.5 % Asian American, and less than 1% Native American) that closely matches the demographics of the region it serves. Thus, UTEP has a mission to serve a multicultural population where minority students comprise the majority. Most Hispanic students at UTEP are primarily of Mexican origin. A large number are first or second-generation U.S. citizens. Characteristics that unite Hispanic students, in particular those of Mexican-origin, are a strong sense of family loyalty and a belief that all family members are responsible for contributing to the economic stability and well-being of the family. Most of their families are larger in number than the national average, and a variety of generations live together or share considerable resources. Thus, many young people feel an obligation and a desire to go to work at a young age and to continue working while in college, thereby assisting their parents and other family members. Older siblings understand that they have responsibilities to do household chores, to aid their younger siblings economically, and to assist elderly family members. This "work ethic" within the

  4. Historical highlights in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The benchmarks in cardiac pacing are identified, beginning with F. Steiner (1871), who rhythmically stimulated the chloroform-arrested hearts of 3 horses, 1 donkey, 10 dogs, 14 cats, and 8 rabbits. The chloroform-arrested heart in human subjects was paced by T. Greene in the following year (1872) in the UK. In 1882, H. Ziemssen in Germany applied cardiac pacing to a 42-year old woman who had a large defect in the anterior left chest wall subsequent to resection of an enchondroma. Intentional cardiac pacing did not occur until 1932, when A.A. Hyman in the US demonstrated that cardiac pacing could be clinically practical. Hyman made a batteryless pacemaker for delivery in induction shock stimuli (60-120/min) to the atria. His pacemaker was powered by a hand-wound, spring-driven generator which provided 6 min of pacemaking without rewinding. Closed-chest ventricular pacing was introduced in the US in 1952 by P.M. Zoll et al. Zoll (1956) also introduced closed-chest ventricular defibrillation. W.L. Weirich et al. (1958) demonstrated that direct-heart stimulation in closed-chest patients could be achieved with slender wire electrodes. S. Furman and J.B. Schwedel (1959) developed a monopolar catheter electrode for ventricular pacing in man. In the same year, W. Greatbatch and W.M. Chardack developed the implantable pacemaker. PMID:18238328

  5. Health Information System Simulation. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Beth H.; Lacobie, Kevin

    This volume is one of three in a self-paced computer literacy course that gives allied health students a firm base of knowledge concerning computer usage in the hospital environment. It also develops skill in several applications software packages. This volume contains five self-paced modules that allow students to interact with a health…

  6. Improving Regional Air Quality with Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-05-01

    This model documentation is designed to assist State and local governments in pursuing wind energy purchases as a control measure under regional air quality plans. It is intended to support efforts to draft State Implementation Plans (SIPs), including wind energy purchases, to ensure compliance with the standard for ground-level ozone established under the Clean Air Act.

  7. Four chamber pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cazeau, S; Ritter, P; Bakdach, S; Lazarus, A; Limousin, M; Henao, L; Mundler, O; Daubert, J C; Mugica, J

    1994-11-01

    A 54-year-old man received a four chamber pacing system for severe congestive heart failure (NYHA functional Class IV). His ECG showed a left bundle branch block (200-msec QRS duration) with 200-msec PR interval, normal QRS axis, and 90-msec interatrial interval. An acute hemodynamic study with insertion of four temporary leads was performed prior to the implant, which demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. A permanent pacemaker was implanted based on the encouraging results of the acute study. The right chamber leads were introduced by cephalic and subclavian approaches. The left atrium was paced with a coronary sinus lead, Medtronic SP 2188-58 model. An epicardial Medtronic 5071 lead was placed on the LV free wall. The four leads were connected to a standard bipolar DDD pacemaker, Chorus 6234. The two atrial leads were connected via a Y-connector to the atrial channel of the pacemaker with a bipolar pacing configuration. The two ventricular leads were connected in a similar fashion to the ventricular channel of the device. The right chamber leads were connected to the distal poles. The left chamber leads were connected to the proximal poles of the pacemaker. Six weeks later, the patient's clinical status improved markedly with a weight loss of 17 kg and disappearance of peripheral edema. His functional class was reduced to NYHA II. Four chamber pacing is technically feasible. In patients with evidence of interventricular dyssynchrony, this original pacing mode probably provides a mechanical activation sequence closer to the natural one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7845801

  8. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  9. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  10. Obstacles to activity pacing: assessment, relationship to activity and functioning.

    PubMed

    Cane, Douglas; McCarthy, Mary; Mazmanian, Dwight

    2016-07-01

    Activity pacing is frequently included among the strategies provided to individuals with chronic pain to manage pain and improve functioning. Individuals with chronic pain may, however, limit their use of activity pacing because they perceive significant obstacles to its use. This study describes the development of a measure to assess obstacles to activity pacing and examines the relationship of this measure to activity patterns and functioning. A sample of 637 individuals with chronic pain completed items describing potential obstacles to activity pacing as part of their pretreatment assessment. Item analyses were used to construct a 14-item measure of obstacles to activity pacing. A subset of these individuals completed the measure again after completion of a group treatment program. The resulting measure demonstrated excellent internal consistency and was minimally affected by social desirability. Correlations with measures of activity and psychosocial functioning provided initial construct validity for the measure. Sex differences were found with women initially identifying more obstacles to activity pacing. Fewer obstacles were identified by both men and women after treatment, and these changes were related to modest changes in activity patterns and functioning. The present results identify a number of obstacles that may limit the use of activity pacing by individuals with chronic pain. Treatment may result in a decrease in the number of obstacles identified, and this change is related to changes in the individual's activity pattern and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26963845

  11. Diaphragm pacing: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Antoine; Arame, Alex; Pricopi, Ciprian; Boucherie, Jean-Claude; Badia, Alain; Panzini, Capucine Morelot

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragm pacing (DP) is an orphan surgical procedure that may be proposed in strictly selected ventilator-dependent patients to get an active diaphragm contraction. The goal is to wean from mechanical ventilation (MV) and restore permanent efficient breathing. The two validated indications, despite the lack of randomised control trials, concern patients with high-level spinal cord injuries (SCI) and central hypoventilation syndromes (CHS). To date, two different techniques exist. The first, intrathoracic diaphragm pacing (IT-DP), based on a radiofrequency method, in which the electrodes are directly placed around the phrenic nerve. The second, intraperitoneal diaphragm pacing (IP-DP) uses intradiaphragmatic electrodes implanted through laparoscopy. In both techniques, the phrenic nerves must be intact and diaphragm reconditioning is always required after implantation. No perioperative mortality has been reported and ventilator-weaning rate is about 72% to 96% in both techniques. Improvement of quality of life, by restoring a more physiological breathing, has been almost constant in patients that could be weaned. Failure or delay in recovery of effective diaphragm contractions could be due to irreversible amyotrophy or chest wall damage. Recent works have evaluated the interest of IP-DP in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). After some short series were reported in the literature, the only multicentric randomized study including 74 ALS patients was prematurely stopped because of excessive mortality in paced patients. Then, another trial analysed the place of IP-DP in peripheral diaphragm dysfunction but, given the multiple biases, the published results cannot validate that indication. Reviewing all available literature as in our experience, shows that DP is an effective method to wean selected patients dependent on ventilator and improve their daily life. Other potential indications will have to be evaluated by randomised control trials. PMID:27195135

  12. Diaphragm pacing: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Le Pimpec-Barthes, Francoise; Legras, Antoine; Arame, Alex; Pricopi, Ciprian; Boucherie, Jean-Claude; Badia, Alain; Panzini, Capucine Morelot

    2016-04-01

    Diaphragm pacing (DP) is an orphan surgical procedure that may be proposed in strictly selected ventilator-dependent patients to get an active diaphragm contraction. The goal is to wean from mechanical ventilation (MV) and restore permanent efficient breathing. The two validated indications, despite the lack of randomised control trials, concern patients with high-level spinal cord injuries (SCI) and central hypoventilation syndromes (CHS). To date, two different techniques exist. The first, intrathoracic diaphragm pacing (IT-DP), based on a radiofrequency method, in which the electrodes are directly placed around the phrenic nerve. The second, intraperitoneal diaphragm pacing (IP-DP) uses intradiaphragmatic electrodes implanted through laparoscopy. In both techniques, the phrenic nerves must be intact and diaphragm reconditioning is always required after implantation. No perioperative mortality has been reported and ventilator-weaning rate is about 72% to 96% in both techniques. Improvement of quality of life, by restoring a more physiological breathing, has been almost constant in patients that could be weaned. Failure or delay in recovery of effective diaphragm contractions could be due to irreversible amyotrophy or chest wall damage. Recent works have evaluated the interest of IP-DP in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). After some short series were reported in the literature, the only multicentric randomized study including 74 ALS patients was prematurely stopped because of excessive mortality in paced patients. Then, another trial analysed the place of IP-DP in peripheral diaphragm dysfunction but, given the multiple biases, the published results cannot validate that indication. Reviewing all available literature as in our experience, shows that DP is an effective method to wean selected patients dependent on ventilator and improve their daily life. Other potential indications will have to be evaluated by randomised control trials. PMID:27195135

  13. The PACES Summer Science Trek: A Pre-College Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michelle B.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) received five-year funding to form the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in July 1995. PACES has as its goals to conduct research contributing to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and to develop skilled scientists and engineers. PACES seeks to gain a more comprehensive understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes and changes taking place in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico region. The PACES center has collaborative ties with two NASA field center (Goddard Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The original proposal contained no provision for outreach programs. However, at a meeting in the fall of 1995, Dan Goldin, NASA Administrator, issued the challenge that in order to accomplish NASA's goals to educate more of the citizenry in science and engineering, the Centers should take a broader perspective aimed at younger children.

  14. Presentation Time Concerning System-Paced Multimedia Instructions and the Superiority of Learner Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Petzold, Kirstin; Zinnbauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The superiority of learner-paced over system-paced instructions was demonstrated in multiple experiments. In these experiments, the system-paced presentations were highly speeded, causing cognitive overload, while the learner-paced instructions allowed adjustments of the presentational flow to the learner's needs by pacing facilities, mostly…

  15. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  16. Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2010-02-22

    In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.

  17. Improving cumulative effects assessment in Alberta: Regional strategic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Dallas Lalonde, Kim; McEachern, Menzie; Kenney, John; Mendoza, Gustavo; Buffin, Andrew; Rich, Kate

    2011-09-15

    The Government of Alberta, Canada is developing a regulatory framework to better manage cumulative environmental effects from development in the province. A key component of this effort is regional planning, which will lay the primary foundation for cumulative effects management into the future. Alberta Environment has considered the information needs of regional planning and has concluded that Regional Strategic Assessment may offer significant advantages if integrated into the planning process, including the overall improvement of cumulative environmental effects assessment in the province.

  18. Science Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Biology, Chemistry, and Physical Science developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace relationships, learning activities with suggested…

  19. Mathematics Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.; Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Algebra 1, Geometry, Math for Technology, Mathematical Problem Solving, and Pre-Algebra developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace…

  20. Diaphragmatic pacing in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Kevin; DiMarco, Anthony F

    2014-08-01

    After cervical spinal cord injuries, many patients are unable to sustain independent ventilation because of a disruption of diaphragm innervation and respiratory functioning. If phrenic nerve function is preserved, the patient may be able to tolerate exogenous pacing of the diaphragm via electrical stimulation. Previously this was accomplished by stimulation directly to the phrenic nerves, but may be accomplished less invasively by percutaneously stimulating the diaphragm itself. The benefits, when compared with mechanical ventilation, include a lower rate of pulmonary complications, improved venous return, more normal breathing and speech, facilitation of eating, cost-effectiveness, and increased patient mobility. PMID:25064791

  1. Did recent world record marathon runners employ optimal pacing strategies?

    PubMed

    Angus, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    We apply statistical analysis of high frequency (1 km) split data for the most recent two world-record marathon runs: Run 1 (2:03:59, 28 September 2008) and Run 2 (2:03:38, 25 September 2011). Based on studies in the endurance cycling literature, we develop two principles to approximate 'optimal' pacing in the field marathon. By utilising GPS and weather data, we test, and then de-trend, for each athlete's field response to gradient and headwind on course, recovering standardised proxies for power-based pacing traces. The resultant traces were analysed to ascertain if either runner followed optimal pacing principles; and characterise any deviations from optimality. Whereas gradient was insignificant, headwind was a significant factor in running speed variability for both runners, with Runner 2 targeting the (optimal) parallel variation principle, whilst Runner 1 did not. After adjusting for these responses, neither runner followed the (optimal) 'even' power pacing principle, with Runner 2's macro-pacing strategy fitting a sinusoidal oscillator with exponentially expanding envelope whilst Runner 1 followed a U-shaped, quadratic form. The study suggests that: (a) better pacing strategy could provide elite marathon runners with an economical pathway to significant performance improvements at world-record level; and (b) the data and analysis herein is consistent with a complex-adaptive model of power regulation. PMID:23879745

  2. Two-channel gastric pacing in patients with diabetic gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Sarosiek, Irene; Forster, Jameson; Ross, Robert A.; Chen, Jiande D.Z.; McCallum, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our primary goals were to investigate the effects of two-channel gastric pacing on gastric myoelectrical activity, and energy consumption with the secondary intent to monitor gastric emptying and symptoms in patients with severe diabetic gastroparesis. Methods Four pairs of temporary pacing wires were inserted on the serosa of the stomach at the time of laparotomy to place the Enterra™ System in 19 patients with severe gastroparesis not responding to standard medical therapies. Two of the pairs were for electrical stimulation and the other two for recording. Five days after surgery the optimal pacing parameters for the entrainment of gastric slow waves in each patient were identified by serosal recordings. Two-channel gastric pacing was then initiated for 6 weeks using a newly developed external multi-channel pulse generator. Electrogastrogram (EGG), total symptom score (TSS), and a 4-hour gastric emptying test were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of active gastric pacing. Enterra™ device was turned OFF during the duration of this study. Key Results Two-channel gastric pacing at 1.1 times the intrinsic frequency entrained gastric slow waves and normalized gastric dysrhythmia. After 6 weeks of gastric pacing, tachygastria was decreased from 15±3 to 5±1% in the fasting state and from 10±2 to 5±1% postprandially (P<0.05), mean TSS was reduced from 21.3±1.1 to 7.0±1.5 (P<0.05) and mean 4-hour gastric retention improved from 42% to 28% (P=0.05). Conclusions& Inferences Two-channel gastric pacing is a novel treatment approach which is able to normalize and enhance gastric slow wave activity as well as accelerate gastric emptying in patients with diabetic gastroparesis with a good safety profile. PMID:21806741

  3. Pacing the Heart with Genes: Recent Progress in Biological Pacing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Cheol

    2015-08-01

    The heartbeat originates within the sinoatrial node (SA node or SAN), a small highly specialized structure containing <10,000 genuine pacemaker cells. The ~5 billion working cardiomyocytes downstream of the SAN remain quiescent when it fails, leading to circulatory collapse and fueling a $6B/year electronic pacemaker industry. The electronic pacemaker devices work quite well. But, device-related problems persist. These include lead failure/repositioning, finite battery life, and infection. For pediatric patients, the children outgrow the length of the leads, necessitating replacement with longer leads. These pitfalls have motivated creation of biological pacing. that are free from all hardware. Toward this goal, we and others have tested the concept of biological pacemakers. Combined with efforts to create clinically relevant, large animal models of biological pacing, the field is moving beyond a conceptual novelty toward a future with clinical reality. PMID:26116393

  4. Trust regions in Kriging-based optimization with expected improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regis, Rommel G.

    2016-06-01

    The Kriging-based Efficient Global Optimization (EGO) method works well on many expensive black-box optimization problems. However, it does not seem to perform well on problems with steep and narrow global minimum basins and on high-dimensional problems. This article develops a new Kriging-based optimization method called TRIKE (Trust Region Implementation in Kriging-based optimization with Expected improvement) that implements a trust-region-like approach where each iterate is obtained by maximizing an Expected Improvement (EI) function within some trust region. This trust region is adjusted depending on the ratio of the actual improvement to the EI. This article also develops the Kriging-based CYCLONE (CYClic Local search in OptimizatioN using Expected improvement) method that uses a cyclic pattern to determine the search regions where the EI is maximized. TRIKE and CYCLONE are compared with EGO on 28 test problems with up to 32 dimensions and on a 36-dimensional groundwater bioremediation application in appendices supplied as an online supplement available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0305215X.2015.1082350. The results show that both algorithms yield substantial improvements over EGO and they are competitive with a radial basis function method.

  5. Self-Paced Instruction: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Elisabeth

    1975-01-01

    Discussed the benefits and costs of self-paced instruction (SPI) based on brief summaries of experiences in teaching introductory economics at seven universities. Provided also is a six-step pattern for setting up a self-paced course. The author concludes that the evidence on the educational benefits of self-paced instruction is at present…

  6. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public...) Payment § 460.186 PACE premiums. The amount that a PACE organization can charge a participant as a monthly premium depends on the participant's eligibility under Medicare and Medicaid, as follows: (a)...

  7. Characterization and comparison of polysaccharides from Lycium barbarum in China using saccharide mapping based on PACE and HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding-Tao; Cheong, Kit-Leong; Deng, Yong; Lin, Peng-Cheng; Wei, Feng; Lv, Xiao-Jie; Long, Ze-Rong; Zhao, Jing; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Li, Shao-Ping

    2015-12-10

    Water-soluble polysaccharides from 51 batches of fruits of L. barbarum (wolfberry) in China were investigated and compared using saccharide mapping, partial acid hydrolysis, single and composite enzymatic digestion, followed by polysaccharide analysis by using carbohydrate gel electrophoresis (PACE) analysis and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis, respectively. Results showed that multiple PACE and HPTLC fingerprints of partial acid and enzymatic hydrolysates of polysaccharides from L. barbarum in China were similar, respectively. In addition, results indicated that β-1,3-glucosidic, α-1,4-galactosiduronic and α-1,5-arabinosidic linkages existed in polysaccharides from L. barbarum collected in China, and the similarity of polysaccharides in L. barbarum collected from different regions of China was pretty high, which are helpful for the improvement of the performance of polysaccharides from L. barbarum in functional/health foods area. Furthermore, polysaccharides from Panax notoginseng, Angelica sinensis, and Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus were successfully distinguished from those of L. barbarum based on their PACE fingerprints. These results were beneficial to improve the quality control of polysaccharides from L. barabrum and their products, which suggested that saccharide mapping based on PACE and HPTLC analysis could be a routine approach for quality control of polysaccharides. PMID:26428094

  8. Pacing the right ventricular outflow tract septum: time to embrace the future.

    PubMed

    Hillock, Richard J; Mond, Harry G

    2012-01-01

    Transvenous pacing has revolutionized the management of patients with potentially life-threatening bradycardias and at its most basic level ensures rate support to maintain cardiac output. However, we have known for at least a decade that pacing from the right ventricle (RV) apex can induce left ventricle (LV) dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and maybe an increased mortality. Although pacemaker manufacturers have developed successful pacing algorithms designed to minimize unnecessary ventricular pacing, it cannot be avoided in a substantial proportion of pacemaker-dependent patients. Just as there is undoubted evidence that RV apical pacing is injurious, there is emerging evidence that pacing from the RV septum is associated with a shorter duration of activation, improved haemodynamics, and less LV remodelling. The move from traditional RV apical pacing to RV septal pacing requires a change in mindset for many practitioners. The anatomical landmarks and electrocardiograph features of RV septal pacing are well described and easily recognized. While active fixation is required to place the lead on the septum, shaped stylets are now available to assist the implanter. In addition, concerns about the stability and longevity of steroid-eluting active fixation leads have proven to be unfounded. We therefore encourage all implanters to adopt RV septal pacing to minimize the potential of harm to their patients. PMID:21846639

  9. DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a multicentre clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Slade, A. K.; Sadoul, N.; Shapiro, L.; Chojnowska, L.; Simon, J. P.; Saumarez, R. C.; Dodinot, B.; Camm, A. J.; McKenna, W. J.; Aliot, E.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--DDD pacing has been advocated as an effective treatment for drug refractory obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This study reports the outcome of pacing in 56 patients with refractory symptoms referred to four tertiary centres. METHODS--Core data on symptoms, drug burden, and left ventricular outflow tract gradient were recorded. Patients underwent a temporary pacing study with optimisation of the atrioventricular (AV) delay for greatest gradient reduction without haemodynamic compromise. Patients were assessed after implantation in terms of changes in symptoms, drug load, and outflow tract gradient. RESULTS--56 patients underwent pacing assessment. The mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient before pacing was 78 (31) mm Hg. At temporary study the mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient was 38 (24) mm Hg with a median (range) optimised sensed AV delay of 65 (25-125) ms. Fifty three patients were implanted and followed up for a mean (SD) of 11 (11) months. The median (range) programmed sensed AV delay was 60 (31-200) ms. Left ventricular outflow tract gradient at follow up was 36 (25) mm Hg. Forty four patients had improved functional class. Although a correlation (r = 0.69) was shown between acute and chronic left ventricular outflow tract gradient reduction, there was no correlation between magnitude of gradient reduction and functional improvement, and no appreciable change in pharmacological burden. CONCLUSION--This series confirms symptomatic improvement after DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There remains, however, a discrepancy between perceived symptomatic benefit and modest objective improvement. Furthermore, the optimal outcome has been achieved only with continued pharmacological treatment. Current methods of temporary evaluation do not predict functional outcome which seems to be independent of the magnitude of gradient reduction. PMID:8624871

  10. Improving and Communicating Workforce Skills: A Regional Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Dee

    2011-01-01

    The demand for improved workplace skills in the U.S. is rapidly rising, and U.S. industries, employees, and educational systems are struggling to respond. This paper describes the Skills Advantage program, an effort led by employers and facilitated by Kirkwood Community College to address regional employment needs. This work-ready certificate…

  11. Improved location features for linkage of regions across ipsilateral mammograms.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Christine; van Schie, Guido; Lesniak, Jan M; Karssemeijer, Nico; Székely, Gábor

    2013-12-01

    Improved performance has been reported for computer aided detection (CADe) methods using information from multiple mammographic views over single-view CADe approaches. Linkage across the views is based on assuming that location and image features from the same lesion depicted in both views will be similar. In this study we investigate if the location features can be improved and what effect such an improvement has on the linkage of lesions across ipsilateral views. Performance of different methods to define the location features was first assessed with respect to the location of 137 manually annotated and linked masses. Taking the median result from five complementary methods (based on pectoral muscle boundary, breast shape and intensity signature) increased the mean accuracy compared to the current standard (7.1 vs. 6.3 mm). Thereafter the impact of this best method on the automatic linkage of detected regions across views was assessed for a second, independent dataset of 131 mammogram pairs. Linkage was based on the combination of location and single-view image features by a linear discriminate analysis classifier trained to differentiate between links of corresponding true-positive (TP) regions versus links including TP and false-positive (FP) regions. Nested cross-validation results showed that using the improved location features significantly increased the classification performance and the percentage of correctly linked regions. PMID:23731758

  12. Optical pacing of the adult rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael W; Wang, Y T; Doughman, Y Q; Watanabe, M; Cheng, Y; Rollins, A M

    2013-01-01

    Optical pacing has been demonstrated to be a viable alternative to electrical pacing in embryonic hearts. In this study, the feasibility of optically pacing an adult rabbit heart was explored. Hearts from adult New Zealand White rabbits (n = 9) were excised, cannulated and perfused on a modified Langendorff apparatus. Pulsed laser light (λ = 1851 nm) was directed to either the left or right atrium through a multimode optical fiber. An ECG signal from the left ventricle and a trigger pulse from the laser were recorded simultaneously to determine when capture was achieved. Successful optical pacing was demonstrated by obtaining pacing capture, stopping, then recapturing as well as by varying the pacing frequency. Stimulation thresholds measured at various pulse durations suggested that longer pulses (8 ms) had a lower energy capture threshold. To determine whether optical pacing caused damage, two hearts were perfused with 30 µM of propidium iodide and analyzed histologically. A small number of cells near the stimulation site had compromised cell membranes, which probably limited the time duration over which pacing was maintained. Here, short-term optical pacing (few minutes duration) is demonstrated in the adult rabbit heart for the first time. Future studies will be directed to optimize optical pacing parameters to decrease stimulation thresholds and may enable longer-term pacing. PMID:24049683

  13. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  14. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  15. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  16. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  17. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  18. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  19. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  20. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  1. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  2. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  3. Cardiac Pacing - Is Telemonitoring Now Essential?

    PubMed

    Burri, Haran

    2013-11-01

    Modern pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are able to automatically perform tests executed manually during in-office visits; such as measurement of sensing and pacing thresholds. In addition, the devices also record a wealth of diagnostic data that are of clinical relevance. The advent of wireless technology in these devices allows automatic transmission of these data that can be consulted remotely by the physician. There is now solid evidence indicating that remote device follow-up can safely reduce the number of in-office visits, thereby improving convenience for patients and caregivers alike. Remote monitoring with automatic alerts for arrhythmias, heart failure and technical issues, has been shown to dramatically reduce delay to diagnosis of these events compared with standard follow-up; potentially improving patient safety and outcome. For these reasons, remote device management is becoming the standard of care. PMID:26835047

  4. [Permanent cardiac pacing in women--light and shadow].

    PubMed

    Małecka, Barbara; Wysokińsk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Permanent cardiac pacing has survived a sharp increase in quality improvement and frequency of usage. Nowadays particular aspects of this method of treatment are being considered. In this paper distinctiveness of women population treated by permanent pacing is discussed. Indications for heart pacing in women appear at a later age than in men. Moreover, women remain longer in follow-up, therefore their prognosis is better. The most serious late pacing complications, i.e., infections are less frequent in women. However, implantations procedures seem to be more difficult in female gender, most probably due to a smaller body size, especially of afferent veins. This leads to a higher periprocedural complication rate and refers especially to endocardial lead implantation, which in women is connected with double risk of pneumothorax. Late complications of permanent pacing are effectively treated by transvenous lead extraction. Female gender has been demonstrated as an independent risk factor of extraction failure. It seems that reasonable qualification for pacemaker implantations and leaving the procedures in the hands of experienced operators will strengthen the "light side" and limit the "dark side" of this therapy in women. PMID:26455022

  5. Hospital-Based Coalition to Improve Regional Surge Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Terndrup, Thomas E.; Leaming, James M.; Adams, R. Jerry; Adoff, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Surge capacity for optimization of access to hospital beds is a limiting factor in response to catastrophic events. Medical facilities, communication tools, manpower, and resource reserves exist to respond to these events. However, these factors may not be optimally functioning to generate an effective and efficient surge response. The objective was to improve the function of these factors. Methods Regional healthcare facilities and supporting local emergency response agencies developed a coalition (the Healthcare Facilities Partnership of South Central Pennsylvania; HCFP-SCPA) to increase regional surge capacity and emergency preparedness for healthcare facilities. The coalition focused on 6 objectives: (1) increase awareness of capabilities and assets, (2) develop and pilot test advanced planning and exercising of plans in the region, (3) augment written medical mutual aid agreements, (4) develop and strengthen partnership relationships, (5) ensure National Incident Management System compliance, and (6) develop and test a plan for effective utilization of volunteer healthcare professionals. Results In comparison to baseline measurements, the coalition improved existing areas covered under all 6 objectives documented during a 24-month evaluation period. Enhanced communications between the hospital coalition, and real-time exercises, were used to provide evidence of improved preparedness for putative mass casualty incidents. Conclusion The HCFP-SCPA successfully increased preparedness and surge capacity through a partnership of regional healthcare facilities and emergency response agencies. PMID:23316266

  6. Improved regional ventricular function after successful surgical revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, B.H.; Massie, B.M.; Botvinick, E.H.

    1984-04-01

    Left ventricular segments with reversible asynergy at rest demonstrate reversible myocardial perfusion defects on exercise thallium-201 scintigrams. To determine if improved perfusion eliminates asynergy at rest, 23 patients with angina (stable in 21, unstable in 2) were studied before and after coronary artery bypass surgery. All patients underwent exercise myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, contrast ventriculography and coronary arteriography before and after surgery. Selective graft angiography was performed during the postoperative catheterization to determine graft patency. Segmental ventricular function was quantitated by a regional fraction method. The scintigrams were divided into five regions and compared with the corresponding regions of the ventriculogram. Seventy-one of a possible 142 ventricular segments exhibited exercise-induced perfusion deficits. Preoperative regional ejection fraction was normal in 42 of these segments and abnormal in 29. Postoperatively, in 19 of the abnormal segments, function improved or normalized. All these segments had improved perfusion during exercise after surgery and were supplied by a patent bypass graft. Nine of the 10 segments in which abnormal wall motion persisted postoperatively continued to have exercise-induced perfusion deficits, and 9 of the 10 segments were supplied by an occluded or stenotic graft or one with poor run off. Of the 42 segments with normal wall motion preoperatively, 30 had improved perfusion after surgery and 35 maintained normal function. This study indicates that asynergy at rest is permanently reversed after coronary bypass surgery if improved myocardial perfusion can be documented. These findings are consistent with but do not prove the concept that reversible rest asynergy may reflect chronic ischemia or a prolonged effect from previous ischemic episodes.

  7. Tools and Trends in Self-Paced Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Ever since the PLATO system of the 1960's, CALL (computer assisted language learning) has had a major focus on providing self-paced, auto-correcting exercises for language learners to practice their skills and improve their knowledge of discrete areas of language learning. The computer has been recognized from the beginning as a patient and…

  8. Algorithmic improvements to an exact region-filling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    We present many algorithmic improvements in our early region filling technique, which in a previous publication was already proved to be correct for all connected digital pictures. Ours is an integer-only method that also finds all interior points of any given digital picture by displaying and storing them in a locating matrix. Our filling/locating program is applicable both in computer graphics and image processing.

  9. Innovative pacing: Recent advances, emerging technologies, and future directions in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher; Kusumoto, Fred

    2016-07-01

    The field of cardiovascular medicine is rapidly evolving as advancements in technology and engineering provide clinicians new and exciting ways to care for an aging population. Cardiac pacing, in particular, has seen a series of game-changing technologies emerge in the past several years spurred by low-power electronics, high density batteries, improved catheter delivery systems and innovative software design. We look at several of these emerging pacemaker technologies, discussing the rationale, current state and future directions of these pioneering developments in electrophysiology. PMID:27017442

  10. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  11. Improving regional universal newborn hearing screening programmes in Italy.

    PubMed

    Molini, E; Cristi, M C; Lapenna, R; Calzolaro, L; Muzzi, E; Ciciriello, E; Della Volpe, A; Orzan, E; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    The Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) programme aims at achieving early detection of hearing impairment. Subsequent diagnosis and intervention should follow promptly. Within the framework of the Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the limitations and strengths of current UNHS programs in Italy have been analysed by a group of professionals working in tertiary centres involved in regional UNHS programmes, using SWOT analysis and a subsequent TOWS matrix. Coverage and lost-to-follow up rates are issues related to UNHS programmes. Recommendations to improve the effectiveness of the UNHS programme have been identified. The need for homogeneous policies, high-quality information and dissemination of knowledge for operators and families of hearing-impaired children emerged from the discussion. PMID:27054385

  12. The effects of fluid ingestion on free-paced intermittent-sprint performance and pacing strategies in the heat.

    PubMed

    Skein, Melissa; Duffield, Rob

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of fluid ingestion on pacing strategies and performance during intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat. Nine male rugby players performed a habituation session and 2 x 50-min intermittent-sprint protocols at a temperature of 31 degrees C, either with or without fluid. Participants were informed of a third session (not performed) to ensure that they remained blind to all respective conditions. The protocol consisted of a 15-m sprint every minute separated by self-paced bouts of hard running, jogging, and walking for the remainder of the minute. Sprint time, distance covered during self-paced exercise, and vertical jump height before and after exercise were recorded. Heart rate, core temperature, nude mass, capillary blood haematocrit, pH, lactate concentration, perceptual ratings of perceived exertion, thermal stress, and thirst were also recorded. Sprint times (fluid vs. no-fluid: 2.82 +/- 0.11 vs. 2.82 +/- 0.14) and distance covered during self-paced exercise (fluid vs. no-fluid: 4168 +/- 419 vs. 3981 +/- 263 m) were not different between conditions (P = 0.10-0.98) but were progressively reduced to a greater extent in the no-fluid trial (7 +/- 13%) (d = 0.56-0.58). There were no differences (P = 0.22-1.00; d = <0.20-0.84) between conditions in any physiological measures. Perceptual ratings of perceived exertion and thermal stress did not differ between conditions (P = 0.34-0.91; d < or =0.20-0.48). Rating of thirst after exercise was lower in the fluid trial (P = 0.02; d = 0.62-0.73). The present results suggest that fluid availability did not improve intermittent-sprint performance, however did affect pacing strategies with a greater reduction in distance covered of self-paced exercise during the no-fluid trial. PMID:20077276

  13. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  14. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  15. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  16. Web Tools: Keeping Learners on Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosloski, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in teaching technology and engineering is pacing. Some students grasp new technological concepts quickly, while others need repetition and may struggle to keep pace. This poses an obstacle for the technology and engineering teacher, and is particularly true when teaching students to build a website. However, there…

  17. Consistency of Students' Pace in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the consistency of students' behavior regarding their pace of actions over sessions within an online course. Pace in a session is defined as the number of logged actions divided by session length (in minutes). Log files of 6,112 students were collected, and datasets were constructed for examining pace…

  18. Effect of Right Ventricular versus Biventricular Pacing on Electrical Remodeling in the Normal Heart

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Samir; Mehdi, Haider; Mathier, Michael A.; Islam, M. Zahadul; Salama, Guy; London, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Background Biventricular (BIV) pacing can improve cardiac function in heart failure by altering the mechanical and electrical substrates. We investigated the effect of BIV versus right ventricular (RV) pacing on the normal heart. Methods and Results Male New Zealand White rabbits (n=33) were divided into 3 groups: sham-operated (control), RV pacing, and BIV pacing groups. Four weeks after surgery, the native QT (p=0.004) interval was significantly shorter in the BIV group compared to the RV or sham-operated groups. Also, compared to rabbits in the RV group, rabbits in the BIV group had shorter RV ventricular effective refractory period (VERP) at all cycle lengths, and shorter LV paced QT interval during the drive train of stimuli and close to refractoriness (p<0.001 for all comparisons). Protein expression of the KVLQT1 was significantly increased in the BIV group compared to the RV and control groups, while protein expression of SCN5A and connexin43 was significantly decreased in the RV compared to the other study groups. Erg protein expression was significantly increased in both pacing groups compared to the controls. Conclusions In this rabbit model, we demonstrate a direct effect of BIV but not RV pacing on shortening the native QT interval as well as the paced QT interval during burst pacing and close to the VERP. These findings underscore the fact that the effect of BIV pacing is partially mediated through direct electrical remodeling and may have implications as to the effect of BIV pacing on arrhythmia incidence and burden. PMID:20042767

  19. Right ventricular septal pacing: Safety and efficacy in a long term follow up

    PubMed Central

    Occhetta, Eraldo; Quirino, Gianluca; Baduena, Lara; Nappo, Rosaria; Cavallino, Chiara; Facchini, Emanuela; Pistelli, Paolo; Magnani, Andrea; Bortnik, Miriam; Francalacci, Gabriella; Dell’Era, Gabriele; Plebani, Laura; Marino, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the permanent high interventricular septal pacing in a long term follow up, as alternative to right ventricular apical pacing. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated: (1) 244 patients (74 ± 8 years; 169 men, 75 women) implanted with a single (132 pts) or dual chamber (112 pts) pacemaker (PM) with ventricular screw-in lead placed at the right ventricular high septal parahisian site (SEPTAL pacing); (2) 22 patients with permanent pacemaker and low percentage of pacing (< 20%) (NO pacing); (3) 33 patients with high percentage (> 80%) right ventricular apical pacing (RVA). All patients had a narrow spontaneous QRS (101 ± 14 ms). We evaluated New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, quality of life (QoL), 6 min walking test (6MWT) and left ventricular function (end-diastolic volume, LV-EDV; end-systolic volume, LV-ESV; ejection fraction, LV-EF) with 2D-echocardiography. RESULTS: Pacing parameters were stable during follow up (21 mo/patient). In SEPTAL pacing group we observed an improvement in NYHA class, QoL score and 6MWT. While LV-EDV didn’t significantly increase (104 ± 40 mL vs 100 ± 37 mL; P = 0.35), LV-ESV slightly increased (55 ± 31 mL vs 49 ± 27 mL; P = 0.05) and LV-EF slightly decreased (49% ± 11% vs 53% ± 11%; P = 0.001) but never falling < 45%. In the RVA pacing control group we observed a worsening of NYHA class and an important reduction of LV-EF (from 56% ± 6% to 43% ± 9%, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Right ventricular permanent high septal pacing is safe and effective in a long term follow up evaluation; it could be a good alternative to the conventional RVA pacing in order to avoid its deleterious effects. PMID:26322189

  20. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  1. The Pace of Cultural Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Today, humans inhabit most of the world’s terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1) cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2) this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3) culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history. PMID:23024804

  2. Heart rhythm during permanent cardiac pacing.

    PubMed Central

    Edhag, O; Rosenqvist, M

    1979-01-01

    Heart rhythm was analysed with regard to spontaneous or pacemaker-induced heart activity, in a consecutive series of 282 patients paced for at least 1 year. The mean duration of pacing was 59 (13 to 180) months. The mean age of the patients was 76 (39 to 93) years. Spontaneous heart activity at all routine examinations was found in 33 (12%) of the patients. Pacemaker-induced rhythm only was recorded in 42 per cent of the patients whereas the remaining 46 per cent had varying electrocardiographic patterns. Of the patients with spontaneous rhythm at each visit, 10 had had complete heart block before pacing. Regular sinus activity was recorded at every routine examination in 74 per cent of the patients paced for reasons other than the sick sinus syndrome. This indicated that a substantial number of paced patients might be candidates for atrial triggered pacing. Patients treated with digitalis more often had asystole at the time of replacement of the pacemaker (32%) than those not so treated (19). This suggests an increased risk of sudden death in paced patients on digitalis if the pacemaker fails. PMID:486279

  3. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  4. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  5. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  6. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  7. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  8. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  9. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  10. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  11. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  12. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  13. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  14. Can quantile mapping improve precipitation extremes from regional climate models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Satyanarayana; Gobiet, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The ability of quantile mapping to accurately bias correct regard to precipitation extremes is investigated in this study. We developed new methods by extending standard quantile mapping (QMα) to improve the quality of bias corrected extreme precipitation events as simulated by regional climate model (RCM) output. The new QM version (QMβ) was developed by combining parametric and nonparametric bias correction methods. The new nonparametric method is tested with and without a controlling shape parameter (Qmβ1 and Qmβ0, respectively). Bias corrections are applied on hindcast simulations for a small ensemble of RCMs at six different locations over Europe. We examined the quality of the extremes through split sample and cross validation approaches of these three bias correction methods. This split-sample approach mimics the application to future climate scenarios. A cross validation framework with particular focus on new extremes was developed. Error characteristics, q-q plots and Mean Absolute Error (MAEx) skill scores are used for evaluation. We demonstrate the unstable behaviour of correction function at higher quantiles with QMα, whereas the correction functions with for QMβ0 and QMβ1 are smoother, with QMβ1 providing the most reasonable correction values. The result from q-q plots demonstrates that, all bias correction methods are capable of producing new extremes but QMβ1 reproduces new extremes with low biases in all seasons compared to QMα, QMβ0. Our results clearly demonstrate the inherent limitations of empirical bias correction methods employed for extremes, particularly new extremes, and our findings reveals that the new bias correction method (Qmß1) produces more reliable climate scenarios for new extremes. These findings present a methodology that can better capture future extreme precipitation events, which is necessary to improve regional climate change impact studies.

  15. Improving efficiency of a regional stand alone bone bank.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Jonathan M; Rowan, Clare H; Davidson, Helen; Millar, Ciara; McAlinden, M Gavan

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of a stand-alone Bone Bank in our Regional Orthopaedic Hospital has improved the availability of femoral head allograft. Benninger et al. (Bone Joint J 96-B:1307-1311, 2014), demonstrated their institutions bank to be cost effective despite a 30 % discard rate for harvested allograft. We sought to audit our own discard rates and subsequent cost-effectiveness of our bone bank. Donor recruitment. Before approaching a potential donor, our establishment's nurse specialists review their clinical notes and biochemical laboratory results, available on a regional Electronic Care Records. They view femoral head architecture on radiographs against set criteria, Patient Archive and Communication system (SECTRA, Sweden). In total 1383 femoral heads were harvested, 247 were discarded giving an overall rate of 17.9 %. The most common reasons for discard of harvested graft was a positive microbiology/bacteriology result, n = 96 (38.9 %). After a rise in discard rates in 2007, we have steadily reduced our discard rates since 2006/2007 (28.2 %), 2008/2009 (17 %), 2010/2011 (14.8 %), and finally to 10.3 % in 2012/2013. In the current financial year, our cost to harvest, test, store and release a femoral head is £610. With a structured donor recruitment process and unique pre-operative radiographic analysis we have successfully reduced our discard rates bi-annually making our bone bank increasingly cost-effective. PMID:26138308

  16. Ventricular defibrillation combining DC electrical field and electrical pacing: an optical mapping study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musunuri, Sai Shruthi; Tang, Liang; Joung, Boyoung; Berbari, Edward J.; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-02-01

    Although high voltage direct current (DC) shock is a standard technique to terminate ventricular fibrillation (VF), it can cause severe pain and tissue damage. The exact effect of the DC electric field, which can depolarize the heart during VF is still unknown. We hypothesized that low-energy DC field in combination with pacing (pacing+DC) could terminate VF by affecting the ventricular propagation pattern. In six Langendorff-perfused isolated rabbit hearts with the ablated sinoatrial (SA) node, the DC field was delivered to the left ventricle (cathode) and right ventricle (anode). We designed a timed protocol using LabVIEW programming that delivers pacing, DC and pacing+DC stimuli for two seconds time intervals each. The pacing pulse (with varying pacing cycle length: 300ms-30ms) was delivered to the apex. Transmembrane voltage was recorded with optical mapping technique for 16 seconds at a sampling rate of 2ms/frame. We crushed the sinoatrial node to reduce the heart rate. The baseline activation appeared to have endocardial origins with a mean escape ventricular rate of 60 +/- 5bpm at baseline. The DC field (30mA-60mA) alone increased the mean heart rate to 120+/-5bpm. Although DC alone terminated VF in a few cases, the rate of termination was very low (6.2%). However, when pacing+DC was applied, it was possible to terminate VF in 34 of 130 episodes in six rabbits. The rate of successful defibrillation of VF with pacing+DC was significantly higher than that with DC alone (20% vs 6.2%, p<0.01). Pacing alone never terminated the VF. In conclusion, DC field may affect the conduction velocity in normal condition. Pacing+DC intervention could lead to regularization of VF propagation and eventually to termination. Further improvement of this approach may offer a higher success rate of defibrillation with lower energy requirements.

  17. Self-Paced Instruction--New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Lester

    1976-01-01

    An argument that teaching introductory economic analysis can be made more effective with self-paced instruction using appropriately designed materials such as films, cassettes, and programmed learning units. (Author/AV)

  18. Conservation law for self-paced movements.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongsung; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2016-08-01

    Optimal control models of biological movements introduce external task factors to specify the pace of movements. Here, we present the dual to the principle of optimality based on a conserved quantity, called "drive," that represents the influence of internal motivation level on movement pace. Optimal control and drive conservation provide equivalent descriptions for the regularities observed within individual movements. For regularities across movements, drive conservation predicts a previously unidentified scaling law between the overall size and speed of various self-paced hand movements in the absence of any external tasks, which we confirmed with psychophysical experiments. Drive can be interpreted as a high-level control variable that sets the overall pace of movements and may be represented in the brain as the tonic levels of neuromodulators that control the level of internal motivation, thus providing insights into how internal states affect biological motor control. PMID:27418602

  19. Lunar plasma measurement by MAP-PACE onboard KAGUYA (SELENE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi

    Low energy charged particles around the Moon were vigorously observed by Moon orbiting satellites and plasma instrumentation placed on the lunar surface in 1960s and 1970s. Though there were some satellites that explored the Moon afterwards, most of them were dedicated to the global mapping of the lunar surface. KAGUYA(SELENE) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that studies the origin and evolution of the Moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100km altitude. KAGUYA was successfully launched on 14 September 2007 by HIIA launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. KAGUYA was inserted into a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude and started continuous observation in mid-December 2007. One of the fourteen science instruments MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) was developed for the comprehensive three-dimensional plasma measurement around the Moon. MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the distribution function of low energy electrons below 15keV. IMA and IEA measure the distribution function of low energy ions below 28keV/q. IMA has an ability to discriminate the ion mass with high mass resolution. PACE sensors have been measuring solar wind, plasmas in the wake region of the Moon and plasmas in the Earth's magnetosphere. ESA sensors have discovered electron heating over magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface. ESA sensors have also observed electrons accelerated from the lunar surface in the wake region. PACE ion sensors have discovered new features of low energy ions around the Moon. IMA has discovered the existence of alkali ions that are originated from the lunar surface or lunar atmosphere and are picked up by the solar wind. IEA and IMA sensors discovered solar wind reflection by the Moon. PACE

  20. Effect of Adaptive Paced Cardiolocomotor Synchronization During Running: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bill; Jin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolocomotor synchronization (CLS) has been well established for individuals engaged in rhythmic activity, such as walking, running, or cycling. When frequency of the activity is at or near the heart rate, entrainment occurs. CLS has been shown in many cases to improve the efficiency of locomotor activity, improving stroke volume, reducing blood pressure variability, and lowering the oxygen uptake (VO2). Instead of a 1:1 frequency ratio of activity to heart rate, an investigation was performed to determine if different harmonic coupling at other simple integer ratios (e.g. 1:2, 2:3, 3:2) could achieve any performance benefits. CLS was ensured by pacing the stride rate according to the measured heartbeat (i.e., adaptive paced CLS, or forced CLS). An algorithm was designed that determined the simplest ratio (lowest denominator) that, when multiplied by the heart rate will fall within an individualized, predetermined comfortable pacing range for the user. The algorithm was implemented on an iPhone 4, which generated a ‘tick-tock’ sound through the iPhone’s headphones. A sham-controlled crossover study was performed with 15 volunteers of various fitness levels. Subjects ran a 3 mile (4.83 km) simulated training run at their normal pace on two consecutive days (randomized one adaptive pacing, one sham). Adaptive pacing resulted in faster runs run times, with subjects running an average of 26:03 ± 3:23 for adaptive pacing and 26:38 ± 3:31 for sham (F = 5.46, p < 0.05). The increase in heart rate from the start of the race as estimated by an exponential time constant was significantly longer during adaptive pacing, τ = 0.99 ± 0.30, compared to sham, τ = 1.53 ± 0.34 (t = -6.62, p < 0.01). Eighty-seven percent of runners found it easy to adjust their stride length to match the pacing signal with seventy-nine percent reporting that pacing helped their performance. These results suggest that adaptive paced CLS may have a beneficial effect on running performance

  1. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  2. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the

  3. Scanning linear estimation: improvements over region of interest (ROI) methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupinski, Meredith K.; Clarkson, Eric W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2013-03-01

    In tomographic medical imaging, a signal activity is typically estimated by summing voxels from a reconstructed image. We introduce an alternative estimation scheme that operates on the raw projection data and offers a substantial improvement, as measured by the ensemble mean-square error (EMSE), when compared to using voxel values from a maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) reconstruction. The scanning-linear (SL) estimator operates on the raw projection data and is derived as a special case of maximum-likelihood estimation with a series of approximations to make the calculation tractable. The approximated likelihood accounts for background randomness, measurement noise and variability in the parameters to be estimated. When signal size and location are known, the SL estimate of signal activity is unbiased, i.e. the average estimate equals the true value. By contrast, unpredictable bias arising from the null functions of the imaging system affect standard algorithms that operate on reconstructed data. The SL method is demonstrated for two different tasks: (1) simultaneously estimating a signal’s size, location and activity; (2) for a fixed signal size and location, estimating activity. Noisy projection data are realistically simulated using measured calibration data from the multi-module multi-resolution small-animal SPECT imaging system. For both tasks, the same set of images is reconstructed using the MLEM algorithm (80 iterations), and the average and maximum values within the region of interest (ROI) are calculated for comparison. This comparison shows dramatic improvements in EMSE for the SL estimates. To show that the bias in ROI estimates affects not only absolute values but also relative differences, such as those used to monitor the response to therapy, the activity estimation task is repeated for three different signal sizes.

  4. High-resolution entrainment mapping of gastric pacing: a new analytical tool.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Lammers, Wim J E P; Egbuji, John U; Mithraratne, Pulasthi; Chen, Jiande D Z; Cheng, Leo K; Windsor, John A; Pullan, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    Gastric pacing has been investigated as a potential treatment for gastroparesis. New pacing protocols are required to improve symptom and motility outcomes; however, research progress has been constrained by a limited understanding of the effects of electrical stimulation on slow-wave activity. This study introduces high-resolution (HR) "entrainment mapping" for the analysis of gastric pacing and presents four demonstrations. Gastric pacing was initiated in a porcine model (typical amplitude 4 mA, pulse width 400 ms, period 17 s). Entrainment mapping was performed using flexible multielectrode arrays (paced propagation was found to be anisotropic (longitudinal 2.6 +/- 1.7 vs. circumferential 4.5 +/- 0.6 mm/s; P < 0.001). In the third demonstration, a dysrhythmic episode that occurred during pacing was mapped in HR, revealing an ectopic slow-wave focus and uncoupled propagations. In the fourth demonstration, differences were observed between paced and native slow-wave amplitudes (0.24 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.38 +/- 0.14 mV; P < 0.001), velocities (6.2 +/- 2.8 vs. 11.5 +/- 4.7 mm/s; P < 0.001), and activated areas (20.6 +/- 1.9 vs. 32.8 +/- 2.6 cm(2); P < 0.001). Entrainment mapping enables an accurate quantification of the effects of gastric pacing on slow-wave activity, offering an improved method to assess whether pacing protocols are likely to achieve physiologically and clinically useful outcomes. PMID:19926815

  5. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words—some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (SES, parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n=62), and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness, and may help identify children at risk for starting behind. PMID:22235920

  6. Temporary leadless pacing in a patient with severe device infection.

    PubMed

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old patient underwent implantation of a transcatheter pacing systems (TPS) for severe lead endocarditis. The patient experienced fever after a dental procedure. On the transoesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), vegetations were attached to the leads. Because the patient was pacemaker dependent, a temporary pacing lead had to be placed. After removal, however, he did not improve. A second TEE showed new vegetations. Ventricular fibrillation occurred spontaneously; so isoprenalin had to be stopped and a new lead was implanted. Vegetations appeared soon after the new temporary lead was placed. We used a TPS as a bridging device, followed by implantation of a resynchronisation system, and explantation of the TPS. After the Micra TPS was implanted, the patient recovered noticeably. All inflammation parameters were negative and an additional (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT imaging also proved to be negative. So a CRT-D device was then implanted, and the TCP was removed. PMID:27190123

  7. The roles of pacing interval and pacing strength in ventricular fibrillation induced by rapid pacing with 1 : 1 capture

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongdong; Liu, Ban; Wei, Yidong; Tang, Kai; Yu, Xuejing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The roles of pacing interval (PI) and pacing strength (PS) in ventricular fibrillation (VF) induced by rapid pacing with 1 : 1 capture remain unclear. Material and methods Epicardial unipolar electrograms (UEs) were simultaneously recorded using contact mapping in 11 swine. Activation-recovery interval (ARI) restitution was constructed at 4 sites, i.e. the apex and base of the left and right ventricles, respectively. A steady state pacing (SSP) protocol was performed to induce VF. The longest PI and the lowest PS for inducing VF were recorded. Statistical correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between local ARI restitution properties and PI and PS for VF induction. Results Forty restitution curves were constructed from 11 SSP procedures. The maximal slope (Smax) of the ARI restitution curve of the right ventricular apex was positively correlated with the PI for VF induction (r = 0.761, p < 0.05). Spatial dispersions of ARI and Smax were negatively correlated with the PS for VF induction (r = –0.626 and r = –0.722, respectively, both p < 0.05). Conclusions Ventricular fibrillation can be induced by rapid ventricular pacing with 1 : 1 capture. The PI for VF induction was related to the Smax of the ARI restitution curve of the right ventricular apex, while PS for VF induction was associated with the spatial dispersions of ARI and its restitution property. PMID:26528357

  8. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payment. Under a PACE program agreement, CMS makes a prospective monthly payment to the PACE organization... Medicare Advantage organization. (b) Determination of rate. (1) The PACE program agreement specifies the methodology used to calculate the monthly capitation amount applicable to a PACE organization. (2) Except...

  9. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... payment. Under a PACE program agreement, CMS makes a prospective monthly payment to the PACE organization... Medicare Advantage organization. (b) Determination of rate. (1) The PACE program agreement specifies the methodology used to calculate the monthly capitation amount applicable to a PACE organization. (2) Except...

  10. Neurophysiological determinants of theoretical concepts and mechanisms involved in pacing.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; de Koning, Jos; Foster, Carl; Hettinga, Floor; Meeusen, Romain

    2013-05-01

    improve performance. The distribution of the power output reveals that after dopamine reuptake inhibition, subjects are able to maintain a higher power output compared with placebo. Manipulations of serotonin and, especially, noradrenaline, have the opposite effect and force subjects to decrease power output early in the time trial. Interestingly, after manipulation of brain serotonin, subjects are often unable to perform an end sprint, indicating an absence of a reserve capacity or motivation to increase power output. Taken together, it appears that many factors, such as ambient conditions and manipulation of brain neurotransmitters, have the potential to influence power output during exercise, and might thus be involved as regulatory mechanisms in the complex skill of pacing. PMID:23456493

  11. Applying Multimodel Ensemble from Regional Climate Models for Improving Runoff Projections on Semiarid Regions of Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Galiano, S. G.; Olmos, P.; Giraldo Osorio, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    In the Mediterranean area, significant changes on temperature and precipitation are expected throughout the century. These trends could exacerbate the existing conditions in regions already vulnerable to climatic variability, reducing the water availability. Improving knowledge about plausible impacts of climate change on water cycle processes at basin scale, is an important step for building adaptive capacity to the impacts in this region, where severe water shortages are expected for the next decades. RCMs ensemble in combination with distributed hydrological models with few parameters, constitutes a valid and robust methodology to increase the reliability of climate and hydrological projections. For reaching this objective, a novel methodology for building Regional Climate Models (RCMs) ensembles of meteorological variables (rainfall an temperatures), was applied. RCMs ensembles are justified for increasing the reliability of climate and hydrological projections. The evaluation of RCMs goodness-of-fit to build the ensemble is based on empirical probability density functions (PDF) extracted from both RCMs dataset and a highly resolution gridded observational dataset, for the time period 1961-1990. The applied method is considering the seasonal and annual variability of the rainfall and temperatures. The RCMs ensembles constitute the input to a distributed hydrological model at basin scale, for assessing the runoff projections. The selected hydrological model is presenting few parameters in order to reduce the uncertainties involved. The study basin corresponds to a head basin of Segura River Basin, located in the South East of Spain. The impacts on runoff and its trend from observational dataset and climate projections, were assessed. Considering the control period 1961-1990, plausible significant decreases in runoff for the time period 2021-2050, were identified.

  12. Can Regional Climate Models Improve Warm Season Forecasts in the North American Monsoon Region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, F.; Castro, C. L.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of this work is to improve warm season forecasts in the North American Monsoon Region. To do this, we are dynamically downscaling warm season CFS (Climate Forecast System) reforecasts from 1982-2005 for the contiguous U.S. using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model. CFS is the global coupled ocean-atmosphere model used by the Climate Prediction Center (CPC), a branch of the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), to provide official U.S. seasonal climate forecasts. Recently, NCEP has produced a comprehensive long-term retrospective ensemble CFS reforecasts for the years 1980-2005. These reforecasts show that CFS model 1) has an ability to forecast tropical Pacific SSTs and large-scale teleconnection patterns, at least as evaluated for the winter season; 2) has greater skill in forecasting winter than summer climate; and 3) demonstrates an increase in skill when a greater number of ensembles members are used. The decrease in CFS skill during the warm season is due to the fact that the physical mechanisms of rainfall at this time are more related to mesoscale processes, such as the diurnal cycle of convection, low-level moisture transport, propagation and organization of convection, and surface moisture recycling. In general, these are poorly represented in global atmospheric models. Preliminary simulations for years with extreme summer climate conditions in the western and central U.S. (specifically 1988 and 1993) show that CFS-WRF simulations can provide a more realistic representation of convective rainfall processes. Thus a RCM can potentially add significant value in climate forecasting of the warm season provided the downscaling methodology incorporates the following: 1) spectral nudging to preserve the variability in the large scale circulation while still permitting the development of smaller-scale variability in the RCM; and 2) use of realistic soil moisture initial condition, in this case provided by the

  13. A Simulation Study of Paced TCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulik, Joanna; Coulter, Robert; Rockwell, Dennis; Partridge, Craig

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the performance of paced TCP, a modified version of TCP designed especially for high delay- bandwidth networks. In typical networks, TCP optimizes its send-rate by transmitting increasingly large bursts, or windows, of packets, one burst per round-trip time, until it reaches a maximum window-size, which corresponds to the full capacity of the network. In a network with a high delay-bandwidth product, however, Transmission Control Protocol's (TCPs) maximum window-size may be larger than the queue size of the intermediate routers, and routers will begin to drop packets as soon as the windows become too large for the router queues. The TCP sender then concludes that the bottleneck capacity of the network has been reached, and it limits its send-rate accordingly. Partridge proposed paced TCP as a means of solving the problem of queueing bottlenecks. A sender using paced TCP would release packets in multiple, small bursts during a round-trip time in which ordinary TCP would release a single, large burst of packets. This approach allows the sender to increase its send-rate to the maximum window size without encountering queueing bottlenecks. This paper describes the performance of paced TCP in a simulated network and discusses implementation details that can affect the performance of paced TCP.

  14. REGIONAL APPROACH TO ESTIMATING RECREATION BENEFITS OF IMPROVED WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recreation demand and value are estimated with the travel-cost method for fishing, camping, boating, and swimming on a site-specific regional basis. The model is regional in that 197 sites are defined for the Pacific Northwest. A gravity model is employed to estimate the number o...

  15. Assessment of a Regional Transportation Education Alliance To Improve Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Beverly T.

    This report examines issues related to transportation education, with the objective of developing and packaging transportation-related materials for use in college and university transportation education programs. The study was conducted by the Southwest Region University Transportation Center (SWUTC) region, but it is expected that the results…

  16. Pacing hazards in helicopter aeromedical transport.

    PubMed

    Sumchai, A; Sternbach, G; Eliastam, M; Liem, L B

    1988-05-01

    A 62-year-old man with third-degree atrioventricular block and hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia had a cardiac arrest during helicopter transport to a specialized cardiac care unit. Before transport, his ventricular tachycardia had been successfully terminated by a rapid overdrive pacing technique. The failure of "burst suppression" and the absence of pacer spike artifact on the electrocardiographic monitor raise questions about the potential hazards of using various pacing techniques during helicopter transports. Most significantly, this case points to the possibility of interference by exogenous electromagnetic signals in the medical compartment of the helicopter. PMID:3370099

  17. Evaluation of Long Term Effect of RV Apical Pacing on Global LV Function by Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Tilkar, Mahendra; Jain, Siddhant; Mondal, Subrata; Sarkar, Piyabi; Modi, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We very often face pacemaker implanted patients during follow-up with shortness of breath and effort intolerance inspite of normal clinical parameters. Aim The aim of our study is to evaluate the cause of effort intolerance and probable cause of sub-clinical Congestive Cardiac Failure (CCF) in a case of long term Right Ventricular (RV) apical pacing on global Left Ventricular (LV) function non- invasively by echocardiography. Materials and Methods We studied 54 patients (Male 42, Female 12) of complete heart block (CHB) with RV apical pacing (40 VVI and 14 DCP). Mean duration of pacing was 58+4 months. All patients underwent 24 hours Holter monitoring to determine the percentage of ventricular pacing beats. 2-D Echocardiography was done to assess the regional wall motion of abnormality and global LV ejection fraction by modified Simpson’s rule. These methods were coupled with the Doppler derived Myocardial Performance Index (MPI), tissue Doppler imaging, and mechanical regional dyssynchrony with 3-D Echocardiography. Data were analysed from 54 RV- apical paced patients and compared with age and body surface area of 60 controlled subjects (Male 46, Female 14). Results Evaluation of LV function in 54 patients demonstrated regional wall motion abnormality and Doppler study revealed both LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction compare with control subjects (regional wall motion abnormality 80±6% vs 30±3% with p-value<0.0001) which is proportional to the percentage of ventricular pacing beats (mean paced beat 78%). Global LVEF 50±4% vs 60±2% (p-valve <0.0001) and MPI 0.46 ±0.12 v/s 0.36±0.09 (p-value <0.0001). Conclusion RV–apical pacing induces iatrogenic electrical dyssynchrony which leads to remodeling of LV and produces mechanical dyssynchrony which is responsible for LV dysfunction. Alternate site of RV pacing and/or biventricular pacing should be done to maintain biventricular electrical synchrony which will preserve the LV function. PMID

  18. PACES Participation in Educational Outreach Programs at the University of Texas at El Paso

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Rebecca L.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is involved in several initiatives to improve science education within the El Paso area public schools. These include outreach efforts into the K- 12 classrooms; training programs for in-service teachers; and the introduction of a strong science core curricula within the College of Education. The Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES), a NASA-funded University Research Center, will leverage off the goals of these existing initiatives to provide curriculum support materials at all levels. We will use currently available Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) materials as well as new materials developed specifically for this region, in an effort to introduce the Earth System Science perspective into these programs. In addition, we are developing curriculum support materials and classes within the Geology and Computer Departments, to provide education in the area of remote sensing and GIS applications at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  19. Developmental Math, Flipped and Self-Paced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pangyen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a developmental math course design that uses flipped instruction and self-paced learning. The design was created and taught at Metropolitan State University, where most students are returning adult students with little preparation in mathematics. The author argues that this design suits the students well: the learning…

  20. Internship: A Pacing Guide for Student Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrones, Elma; And Others

    This pacing guide is a detailed outline that provides trainees with a building-block approach to the aquisition of teaching skills. In addition, it provides clarity to the roles and responsibilities of the intern, the cooperating teacher, and the supervisor, and coordinates the classroom experience for the third semester of a four-semester…

  1. Program for Alternative Careers in Education (PACE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flicker, Bernard

    The overall objective of the Program for Alternative Careers in Education (PACE) is to develop an alternative model of teacher preparation that prepares individuals to function as educators in the widest possible variety of educational institutions including public and private human service institutions, social welfare agencies, communication…

  2. An Integrated Preprofessional Individually Paced Instruction Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollom, Kenneth A.; Kurtz, Edwin B.

    The individually-paced instruction program carried out by the engineering faculty at Oklahoma State University is described in this article to illustrate its goals, principles, characteristics, developments, and present status. The instructional model is discussed in connection with behavioral objectives, criteria for performance, and student…

  3. Self-Paced Graphics with Track Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Garland K.

    An engineering graphics course offered at North Carolina State University for freshman engineering students is described. The course is divided into 14 units and the students are allowed to proceed at their own pace. The first 11 units comprise the required core; the remaining 3 units may be chosen from other areas such as computer graphics,…

  4. Self-Paced Physics, Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As a part of the U. S. Naval Academy Self-Paced Physics Course materials, orientation is presented in this manual to assist an instructor in developing his individual class policies. Descriptions are given of objectives, class atmosphere, student progress, counseling activities, and remedial work. Under the heading of the management sequence,…

  5. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile. PMID:26316813

  6. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile. PMID:26316813

  7. Toward a More Efficient Implementation of Antifibrillation Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We devise a methodology to determine an optimal pattern of inputs to synchronize firing patterns of cardiac cells which only requires the ability to measure action potential durations in individual cells. In numerical bidomain simulations, the resulting synchronizing inputs are shown to terminate spiral waves with a higher probability than comparable inputs that do not synchronize the cells as strongly. These results suggest that designing stimuli which promote synchronization in cardiac tissue could improve the success rate of defibrillation, and point towards novel strategies for optimizing antifibrillation pacing. PMID:27391010

  8. A New Regional 3-D Velocity Model of the India-Pakistan Region for Improved Event Location Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, D.; Vincent, C.; Johnson, M.

    2001-05-01

    A 3-D velocity model for the crust and upper mantle (WINPAK3D) has been developed to improve regional event location in the India-Pakistan region. Results of extensive testing demonstrate that the model improves location accuracy for this region, specifically for the case of small regionally recorded events, for which teleseismic data may not be available. The model was developed by integrating the results of more than sixty previous studies related to crustal velocity structure in the region. We evaluated the validity of the 3-D model using the following methods: (1) cross validation analysis for a variety of events, (2) comparison of model determined hypocenters with known event location, and (3) comparison of model-derived and empirically-derived source-specific station corrections (SSSC) generated for the International Monitoring System (IMS) auxiliary seismic station located at Nilore. The 3-D model provides significant improvement in regional location compared to both global and regional 1-D models in this area of complex structural variability. For example, the epicenter mislocation for an event with a well known location was only 6.4 km using the 3-D model, compared with a mislocation of 13.0 km using an average regional 1-D model and 15.1 km for the IASPEI91 model. We will present these and other results to demonstrate that 3-D velocity models are essential to improving event location accuracy in regions with complicated crustal geology and structures. Such 3-D models will be a prerequisite for achieving improved location accuracies for regions of high monitoring interest.

  9. Multichip imager with improved optical performance near the butt region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnard, Kenneth P. (Inventor); Strong, Jr., Richard T. (Inventor); Goldfarb, Samuel (Inventor); Tower, John R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A compound imager consists of two or more individual chips, each with at least one line array of sensors thereupon. Each chip has a glass support plate attached to the side from which light reaches the line arrays. The chips are butted together end-to-end to make large line arrays of sensors. Because of imperfections in cutting, the butted surfaces define a gap. Light entering in the region of the gap is either lost or falls on an individual imager other than the one for which it is intended. This results in vignetting and/or crosstalk near the butted region. The gap is filled with an epoxy resin or other similar material which, when hardened, has an index of referaction near that of the glass support plate.

  10. Pacing-induced ST segment deviation in patients with unstable angina: clinical, angiographic, and hemodynamic correlation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, K M; Gould, L; Pomerantsev, E V; Angirekula, M; Bharathan, T

    1995-07-01

    To assess the clinical, coronary arteriographic, and hemodynamic differences between the unstable angina patients manifesting ST segment depression and those showing ST segment elevation as well as those demonstrating chest pain only without ST segment deviation during pacing, low-dose digital subtraction ventriculography was performed in 33 patients before and after abrupt cessation of atrial pacing during selective coronary arteriography. Transient ST segment depression during pacing was observed in 17 patients (52%), whereas 6 patients (18%) showed ST segment elevation; however, 10 patients (30%) did not manifest any ST segment deviation in spite of typical chest pain. Hypertension and a history of myocardial infarction were observed in a significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportion of patients with ST segment depression than in those with ST elevation. Patients who manifested ST segment depression during pacing had a higher incidence of triple-vessel disease (65 vs 17%; P < .05) as compared with the patients with ST segment elevation. Indirect evidence of intracoronary thrombi (complicated lesion, abrupt occlusion, and intraluminal filling defect) was noticed in a higher frequency (P < 0.05) in the group of patients with ST elevation during pacing. In patients with ST segment depression, no significant changes of global left ventricular (LV) functional parameters were observed. However, the length of the LV severe hypokinetic region was increased significantly (6.2 +/- 3.1 vs 23.5 +/- 6.2%; P < 0.005) during pacing in this group of patients. The shortening of the affected segments of the left ventricle was decreased significantly (52.3 +/- 3.6 vs 38.3 +/- 4.9%; P < 0.05) in these patients during pacing. In the group of patients with ST segment elevation during pacing, decrease in ejection fraction was associated with significant (P < 0.01) increase in midwall equatorial diastolic stress as compared with the patients with pacing-induced ST segment depression as

  11. The Pace of Perceivable Extreme Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Gan, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    When will the signal of obvious changes in extreme climate emerge over climate variability (Time of Emergence, ToE) is a key question for planning and implementing measures to mitigate the potential impact of climate change to natural and human systems that are generally adapted to potential changes from current variability. We estimated ToEs for the magnitude, duration and frequency of global extreme climate represented by 24 extreme climate indices (16 for temperature and 8 for precipitation) with different thresholds of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio based on projections of CMIP5 global climate models under RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 for the 21st century. The uncertainty of ToE is assessed by using 3 different methods to calculate S/N for each extreme index. Results show that ToEs of the projected extreme climate indices based on the RCP4.5 climate scenarios are generally projected to happen about 20 years later than that for the RCP8.5 climate scenarios. Under RCP8.5, the projected magnitude, duration and frequency of extreme temperature on Earth will all exceed 2 standard deviations by 2100, and the empirical 50th percentile of the global ToE for the frequency and magnitude of hot (cold) extreme are about 2040 and 2054 (2064 and 2054) for S/N > 2, respectively. The 50th percentile of global ToE for the intensity of extreme precipitation is about 2030 and 2058 for S/N >0.5 and S/N >1, respectively. We further evaluated the exposure of ecosystems and human societies to the pace of extreme climate change by determining the year of ToE for various extreme climate indices projected to occur over terrestrial biomes, marine realms and major urban areas with large populations. This was done by overlaying terrestrial, ecoregions and population maps with maps of ToE derived, to extract ToEs for these regions. Possible relationships between GDP per person and ToE are also investigated by relating the mean ToE for each country and its average value of GDP per person.

  12. Improving SLCF Science in the Himalayan Region: ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, A. K.; Pradhan, B. B.; Surapipith, V.

    2013-12-01

    What fraction of the black carbon arriving on Yala Glacier in Langtang, Nepal, is from cooking fires in the houses in the valley below? What fraction is from elsewhere in rural Nepal? What fraction is from industrial and transport sources in Kathmandu? What fraction is from northern India and beyond? What fraction is from the high altitude forest fires that take place during March or April? Effectively mitigating the impacts of black carbon and other short-lived climate forcers requires detailed understanding not just of emissions and impacts, but also of the atmospheric transport pathways that connect the two. In mountainous areas of the Hindu-Kush Himalaya detailed quantitative knowledge about emissions, atmospheric processes, and impacts is still largely missing. The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) is an intergovernmental organization covering Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, China, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar. ICIMOD's recently established Atmosphere Initiative not only assesses mitigation options and contributes to policy and capacity building in the region, but also works actively to promote collaboration among researchers in the region, while building up an in-house team whose research will address key questions about SLCF. In Spring 2013 ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative, in collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany, carried out the largest field campaign to date in Nepal, hosting instruments belonging to dozens of institutions around the world, at nine field site within and upwind of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The dataset that has been collected gives unprecedented insights into the emissions and atmospheric processes taking place downwind of and within the largest urban agglomeration in the Himalaya region. Meanwhile, in collaboration with national partner institutions, ICIMOD is in the process of setting up one atmospheric observatory each in Bhutan and in

  13. Improving a regional model using reduced complexity and parameter estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelson, Victor A.; Hunt, Randall J.; Haitjema, Henk M.

    2002-01-01

    The availability of powerful desktop computers and graphical user interfaces for ground water flow models makes possible the construction of ever more complex models. A proposed copper-zinc sulfide mine in northern Wisconsin offers a unique case in which the same hydrologic system has been modeled using a variety of techniques covering a wide range of sophistication and complexity. Early in the permitting process, simple numerical models were used to evaluate the necessary amount of water to be pumped from the mine, reductions in streamflow, and the drawdowns in the regional aquifer. More complex models have subsequently been used in an attempt to refine the predictions. Even after so much modeling effort, questions regarding the accuracy and reliability of the predictions remain. We have performed a new analysis of the proposed mine using the two-dimensional analytic element code GFLOW coupled with the nonlinear parameter estimation code UCODE. The new model is parsimonious, containing fewer than 10 parameters, and covers a region several times larger in areal extent than any of the previous models. The model demonstrates the suitability of analytic element codes for use with parameter estimation codes. The simplified model results are similar to the more complex models; predicted mine inflows and UCODE-derived 95% confidence intervals are consistent with the previous predictions. More important, the large areal extent of the model allowed us to examine hydrological features not included in the previous models, resulting in new insights about the effects that far-field boundary conditions can have on near-field model calibration and parameterization. In this case, the addition of surface water runoff into a lake in the headwaters of a stream while holding recharge constant moved a regional ground watershed divide and resulted in some of the added water being captured by the adjoining basin. Finally, a simple analytical solution was used to clarify the GFLOW model

  14. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  15. Temporary epicardial pacing wire placement in totally endoscopic cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoshen; Huang, Keli

    2016-07-01

    Temporary epicardial pacing wire placement is a common procedure in cardiac surgery. However, it is difficult to perform in totally endoscopic cardiac surgery. We describe a simple new technique to place temporary epicardial pacing wires quickly and safely. PMID:27130494

  16. Improvement of the Valencia region ultraviolet index (UVI) forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, I.; Marín, M. J.; Pastor, F.; Estrela, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The CEAM Foundation (Valencia, Spain) has developed an operational ultraviolet index (UVI) forecasting system based on the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. The main objective of this system is to provide the general public with a tool to minimize the impact of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which can cause important human health problems. The system presented in this paper has been developed in collaboration with the Environment Department of the Regional Government of Valencia, and it replaces the one running until 2007. The new system substitutes the previously used Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observed data with the total ozone column data forecasted from the Global Forecasting System (GFS) model. This has allowed the forecasting period to be increased from only 1 day in the original system to 3 days, with daily updates. The UVI forecast presented herein uses maps to show the hourly daytime evolution of the UV index on selected locations as well as the maximum UVI expected in the area of interest for the following 3 days (D, D+1, and D+2). The locations selected correspond to measurement stations equipped with erythemal radiation instruments. The UVI forecast information, the erythemal radiation experimental data, and other outreach information are supplied to the public through both the CEAM Meteorology and Climatology Program Web page and the Environment Department of the Regional Government of Valencia Web page.

  17. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    The mathematical framework used in the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing the source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.

  18. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-10-20

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event and the mathematical framework is used therein. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing the source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Moreover, using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.

  19. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-10-20

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event and the mathematical framework is used therein. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing themore » source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Moreover, using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.« less

  20. Applying 20/20 Hindsight to Self-Pacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleberger, Gary E.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are several suggestions for the maintenance of a science self-paced classroom. Topics include the use of computers for student self-assessment, teachers and students roles in the self-paced classroom, and laboratory setup and packaging in the self-paced science laboratory. (Author/DS)

  1. His bundle pacing: Initial experience and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Amrish; Deshmukh, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Direct His bundle pacing provides the most physiologic means of artificial pacing of the ventricles with a preserved His-Purkinje system and may play a role in patients with a diseased intrinsic conduction system. We describe our initial motivations and experience with permanent direct His bundle pacing and important lessons learned since that time. PMID:27591359

  2. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaudi, L. R.; Rossi, E.; Mántaras, M. C.; Perrone, M. S.; Siri, L. Nicola

    2007-11-01

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  3. State of the art of leadless pacing

    PubMed Central

    Sperzel, Johannes; Burri, Haran; Gras, Daniel; Tjong, Fleur V.Y.; Knops, Reinoud E.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinwender, Clemens; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Despite undisputable benefits, conventional pacemaker therapy is associated with specific complications related to the subcutaneous device and the transvenous leads. Recently, two miniaturized leadless pacemakers, Nanostim™ (St. Jude Medical) and Micra™ (Medtronic), which can be completely implanted inside the right ventricle using steerable delivery systems, entered clinical application. The WiCS™-cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) system (wireless cardiac stimulation for CRT, EBR Systems) delivers leadless left ventricular endocardial stimulation for cardiac resynchronization. In addition to obvious cosmetic benefits, leadless pacing systems may have the potential to overcome some complications of conventional pacing. However, acute and long-term complications still remains to be determined, as well as the feasibility of device explantation years after device placement. PMID:26024918

  4. State of the art of leadless pacing.

    PubMed

    Sperzel, Johannes; Burri, Haran; Gras, Daniel; Tjong, Fleur V Y; Knops, Reinoud E; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinwender, Clemens; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    Despite undisputable benefits, conventional pacemaker therapy is associated with specific complications related to the subcutaneous device and the transvenous leads. Recently, two miniaturized leadless pacemakers, Nanostim™ (St. Jude Medical) and Micra™ (Medtronic), which can be completely implanted inside the right ventricle using steerable delivery systems, entered clinical application. The WiCS™-cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) system (wireless cardiac stimulation for CRT, EBR Systems) delivers leadless left ventricular endocardial stimulation for cardiac resynchronization. In addition to obvious cosmetic benefits, leadless pacing systems may have the potential to overcome some complications of conventional pacing. However, acute and long-term complications still remains to be determined, as well as the feasibility of device explantation years after device placement. PMID:26024918

  5. Endogenous angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas receptor/NO pathway mediates the cardioprotective effects of pacing postconditioning.

    PubMed

    Abwainy, Ala'a; Babiker, Fawzi; Akhtar, Saghir; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the ANG-(1-7) receptor (Mas) and nitric oxide (NO) in pacing postconditiong (PPC)-mediated cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Cardiac contractility and hemodynamics were assessed using a modified Langendorff system, cardiac damage was assessed by measuring infarct size and creatinine kinase levels, and levels of phosphorylated and total endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) were determined by Western blot analysis. Isolated hearts were subjected to 30 min of regional ischemia, produced by fixed position ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, followed by 30 min of reperfusion (n = 6). Hearts were also subjected to PPC (three cycles of 30 s of left ventricular pacing alternated with 30 s of right atrial pacing) and/or treated during reperfusion with ANG-(1-7), N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, or the Mas antagonist (d-Ala7)-ANG I/II (1-7). The PPC-mediated improvement in cardiac contractility and hemodyanamics, cardiac damage, and eNOS phosphorylation were significantly attenuated upon treatment with (d-Ala7)-ANG I/II (1-7) or N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. Treatment with ANG-(1-7) improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size and creatinine kinase levels; however, the effects of ANG-(1-7) were not additive with PPC. In conclusion, these data provide novel insights into the cardioprotective mechanisms of PPC in that they involve the Mas receptor and eNOS and further suggest a potential therapeutic role for ANG-(1-7) in cardiac ischemic injury. PMID:26519026

  6. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy in 2015: keeping up with the pace.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, A; McGavigan, A D; Mariani, J A

    2016-03-01

    Despite improved understanding of the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) and availability of better medical therapies, HF continues to grow as a cause of morbidity and mortality in Australia and worldwide. Over the past decade, cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), or biventricular pacing, has been embraced as a powerful weapon against this growing epidemic. However, much has changed in our understanding of dyssynchrony in HF, and this has led to a change in guidelines to ensure more appropriate selection of CRT candidates to improve the 'non-response' rate. More data have also emerged about the use of CRT in atrial fibrillation and in pacemaker-dependent patients. There has also been a growing focus on multimodality imaging to guide patient selection and lead positioning. Exciting new lead technologies are also emerging, with the potential to improve CRT outcomes further. PMID:25851588

  7. Gait Alterations During Constant Pace Treadmill Racewalking.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Racewalking is an Olympic event requiring great endurance, and racewalkers often use treadmills in training because of the benefits of having a flat unchanging surface where pace judgment can be learned and because inclement weather can be avoided. The effects of fatigue associated with racewalking on a treadmill have not been studied and could be informative with regard to the maintenance of legal technique. The aim of this study was to measure key gait variables during a physically demanding treadmill racewalk. Fourteen international racewalkers completed 10 km on an instrumented treadmill at a pace equivalent to 103% of their recent best time. Spatiotemporal and ground reaction force data were recorded at 4 distances. High-speed videography data were simultaneously recorded to analyze changes in knee angle between the early and late stages. Increases in step length and corresponding decreases in cadence were found, although the small changes were not considered meaningful. There was also a small increase in flight time and a small decrease in push-off force. There were no other significant changes for any other variables (including knee angles). The increase in flight time might be important given that racewalkers are not permitted a visible loss of contact and suggests that fatiguing sessions on a treadmill can lead to the adoption of nonlegal technique. However, this disadvantage of treadmill training can be negated if the coach scrutinizes athletes throughout the session, and overall the consistent technique used is of benefit with regard to learning correct form and pacing ability. PMID:25647657

  8. Improved construction materials for polar regions using microcellular thermoplastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Microcellular polymer foams (MCF) are thermoplastic foams with very small cell diameters, less than 10 microns, and very large cell densities, 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 15) cells per cubic centimeter of unfoamed material. The concept of foaming polymers with microcellular voids was conceived to reduce the amount of material used for mass-produced items without compromising the mechanical properties. The reasoning behind this concept was that if voids smaller than the critical flaw size pre-existing in polymers were introduced into the matrix, they would not affect the overall strength of the product. MCF polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were examined to determine the effects of the microstructure towards the mechanical properties of the materials at room and arctic temperatures. Batch process parameters were discovered for these materials and foamed samples of three densities were produced for each material. To quantify the toughness and strength of these polymers, the tensile yield strength, tensile toughness, and impact resistance were measured at room and arctic temperatures. The feasibility of MCF polymers has been demonstrated by the consistent and repeatable MCF microstructures formed, but the improvements in the mechanical properties were not conclusive. Therefore the usefulness of the MCF polymers to replace other materials in arctic environments is questionable.

  9. An Exploratory Study of Student-Paced versus Teacher-Paced Accommodations for Large-Scale Math Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Keith; Rozek-Tedesco, Marick A.; Tindal, Gerald; Glasgow, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether a teacher-paced video (TPV) accommodation or a student-paced computer (SPC) accommodation provided differential access for student with disabilities versus their general education peers on a large-scale math test. It found that although both pacing accommodations significantly influenced mean scores, the SPC…

  10. Optical stimulation enables paced electrophysiological studies in embryonic hearts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Ma, Pei; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology plays a critical role in the development and function of the heart. Studies of early embryonic electrical activity have lacked a viable point stimulation technique to pace in vitro samples. Here, optical pacing by high-precision infrared stimulation is used to pace excised embryonic hearts, allowing electrophysiological parameters to be quantified during pacing at varying rates with optical mapping. Combined optical pacing and optical mapping enables electrophysiological studies in embryos under more physiological conditions and at varying heart rates, allowing detection of abnormal conduction and comparisons between normal and pathological electrical activity during development in various models. PMID:24761284

  11. European clinical experience with a dual chamber single pass sensing and pacing defibrillation lead.

    PubMed

    Gradaus, Rainer; Gonska, Bernd D; Stellbrink, Christoph; Cron, Thomas; Tebbenjohanns, Jürgen; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina; Himmrich, Ewald; Salerno, Jorge A; Osswald, Stefan; Gommer, Erik D; Van Veen, Benno K; Böcker, Dirk

    2002-07-01

    Dual chamber ICDs are increasingly implanted nowadays, mainly to improve discrimination between supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias but also to maintain AV synchrony in patients with bradycardia. The aim of this study was to investigate a new single pass right ventricular defibrillation lead capable of true bipolar sensing and pacing in the right atrium and integrated bipolar sensing and pacing in the right ventricle. The performance of the lead was evaluated in 57 patients (age 61 +/- 12 years; New York Heart Association 1.9 +/- 0.6, left ventricular ejection fraction 0.38 +/- 0.15) at implant, at prehospital discharge, and during a 1-year follow-up. Sensing and pacing behavior of the lead was evaluated in six different body positions. In four patients, no stable position of the atrial electrode could intraoperatively be found. The intraoperative atrial sensing was 2.3 +/- 1.6 mV and the atrial pacing threshold 0.8 +/- 0.5 V at 0.5 ms. At follow-up, the atrial sensing ranged from 1.5 mV to 2.2 mV and the atrial pacing threshold product from 0.8 to 1.7 V/ms. In 11 patients, an intermittent atrial sensing problem and in 24 patients an atrial pacing dysfunction were observed in at least one body position. In 565 episodes, a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 96.5% were found for ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, this single pass defibrillation lead performed well as a VDD lead and for dual chamber arrhythmia discrimination. However, loss of atrial capture in 45% of patients preclude its use in patients depending on atrial pacing. PMID:12164450

  12. Single pass lead VDD pacing in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, S; Elami, A; Amikam, S; Erdman, S; Ovsyshcher, I E

    1997-08-01

    Implantation of permanent pacemakers in children and adolescents is possible but usually is limited to single chamber generators. The natural growth of these patients may require physiological pacing, but until recently two leads were required for this type of pacing. The single pass lead VDD pacing mode makes possible physiological pacing by using only one lead, for both atrial sensing and ventricular sensing and pacing. The feasibility of VDD pacing using endocardial lead was evaluated in 16 children and adolescents with congenital or postsurgical atrioventricular block. Their mean age was 7.9 +/- 4.9 years (range 1-16 years) and the smallest patient's weight was 8.2 kg. In all the patients, a single pass pacing lead with atrial sensing rings and bipolar ventricular pacing and sensing capability was implanted through the left or right subclavian vein. The pacemaker generator was implanted in a rectopectoral position. The mean atrial electrogram during the implantation was 4.2 +/- 2.1 mV and 2.6 +/- 1.9 mV after a mean of 1 week. The ventricular pacing threshold was 0.5 +/- 0.2 V; the ventricular pacing impedance was 560 +/- 95 omega; and the ventricular electrogram amplitude was 9.9 +/- 2.1 mV. This is a first report to demonstrate the feasibility of atrial synchronous ventricular endocardial pacing using a single pass lead in a relatively large group of children and adolescents. PMID:9272534

  13. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  14. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  15. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  16. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  17. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  18. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  19. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  20. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  1. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  2. Right ventricle bipolar pacing may prevent appropriate biventricular pacing from two pacemakers. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kranidis, Athanasios I; Andrikopoulos, George K; Kappos, Kostas G; Bouki, Tania P; Dedehlias, Panos N

    2004-10-01

    This article reports on practical problems and possible solutions that may occur in case of upgrading a dual-chamber pacemaker by implanting a second left ventricular ventricular pacing, ventricular sensing, ventricular triggering (VVT) pacemaker. This therapeutic strategy was considered appropriate in the case of a 73-year-old patient with severe heart failure, who was scheduled to undergo coronary artery bypass surgery. A right-sided, dual-chamber pacemaker had been already implanted to the patient. The duration of the paced QRS complex was 220 ms and inter- and intraventricular dyssynchrony was documented in the echocardiographic study. We describe the methodological problems and possible solutions related to biventricular pacing following the abovementioned strategy. PMID:15484162

  3. Comparison of effectiveness of right ventricular septal pacing versus right ventricular apical pacing.

    PubMed

    Cano, Oscar; Osca, Joaquín; Sancho-Tello, María-José; Sánchez, Juan M; Ortiz, Víctor; Castro, José E; Salvador, Antonio; Olagüe, José

    2010-05-15

    Chronic right ventricular apical pacing (RVAP) has been associated with negative hemodynamic and clinical effects. The aim of the present study was to compare RVAP with right ventricular septal pacing (RVSP) in terms of echocardiographic features and clinical outcomes. A total of 93 patients without structural heart disease and with an indication for a permanent pacemaker were randomly assigned to receive a screw-in lead either in the RV apex (n = 46) or in the RV mid-septum (n = 47). The patients were divided into 3 subgroups according to the percentage of ventricular pacing: control group (n = 21, percentage of ventricular pacing < or =10%), RVAP group (n = 28), or RVSP group (n = 32; both latter groups had a percentage of ventricular pacing >10%). The RVAP group had more intraventricular dyssynchrony and a trend toward a worse left ventricular ejection fraction compared to the RVSP and control groups at 12 months of follow-up (maximal delay to peak systolic velocity between any of the 6 left ventricular basal segments was 57.8 +/- 38.2, 35.5 +/- 20.6, and 36.5 +/- 17.8 ms for RVAP, RVSP, and control group, respectively; p = 0.006; mean left ventricular ejection fraction 62.9 +/- 7.9%, 66.5 +/- 7.2%, and 66.6 +/- 7.2%, respectively, p = 0.14). Up to 48.1% of the RVAP patients showed significant intraventricular dyssynchrony compared to 19.4% of the RVSP patients and 23.8% of the controls (p = 0.04). However, no overt clinical benefits from RVSP were found. In conclusion, RVAP was associated with increased dyssynchrony compared to the RVSP and control patients. RVSP could represent an alternative pacing site in selected patients to reduce the harmful effects of traditional RVAP. PMID:20451689

  4. Benefit of single setting rate responsive ventricular pacing compared with fixed rate demand pacing in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gammage, M; Schofield, S; Rankin, I; Bennett, M; Coles, P; Pentecost, B

    1991-02-01

    In order to assess the value of a simple, single setting rate response option to VVI pacing, 12 patients (mean age 75.1 +/- 6.2, range 62-83 years, seven males, five females) with symptomatic complete heart block were entered into a double-blind, randomized crossover trial of VVI versus VVIR (single setting rate responsive) pacing using Medtronic Activitrax pacemakers. Assessment was by time taken in seconds (sec) and Borg scale symptom score (6-20) for simple activities (standing from chair x 30; walking 800 meters; 52 steps on stairs [slow and fast pace], and incremental, noninclined maximal treadmill exercise), performed after a 4-week period with the patient in each pacing mode. Times were significantly improved in VVIR mode for standing from chair [mean +/- SD] (78.7 +/- 22.5 vs 70.7 +/- 19.5 sec; P less than 0.05), for 800 m walk (1032 +/- 80 vs 885 +/- 59 sec; P less than 0.05), fast ascent of stairs (29.5 +/- 7.7 vs 26.5 +/- 5.6 sec; P less than 0.02), and treadmill exercise (626.7 +/- 189.5 vs 741.0 +/- 170.2 sec, P less than 0.005) although no difference in time for slow stair ascent was demonstrated. Symptom scores were significantly less in VVIR for standing from chair (12.7 +/- 2.8 vs 10.3 +/- 1.8; P less than 0.01), 800 m walk (10.9 +/- 2.7 vs 9.0 +/- 2.4; P less than 0.01), slow ascent of stairs (11.6 +/- 2.1 vs 10.0 +/- 2.0; P less than 0.01), and fast ascent of stairs (13.0 +/- 2.0 vs 11.7 +/- 1.9; P less than 0.02) but unchanged for treadmill exercise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1706502

  5. Aliskiren protecting atrial structural remodeling from rapid atrial pacing in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yan; Li, Weimin; Wang, Xinghua; Li, Jian; Yang, Wansong; Cheng, Lijun; Liu, Tong; Liu, Enzhao; Li, Guangping

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) contributing to the increasing mortality risk is the most common disease in clinical practice. Owing to the side effects and relative inefficacy of current antiarrhythmic drugs, some research focuses on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) for finding out the new treatment of AF. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether aliskiren as a proximal inhibitor of renin, which completely inhibits RAS, has beneficial effects on atrial structural remodeling in AF. In this study, rapid atrial pacing was induced at 500 beats per minute for 2 weeks in a canine model. A different dose of aliskiren was given orally for 2 weeks before rapid atrial pacing. HE staining and Masson's staining were used for analysis of myocardial fibrosis. TGF-β1, signal pathways, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were shown for the mechanism of structural remodeling after the treatment of aliskiren. Serious atrial fibrosis was induced by rapid atrial pacing, followed by the elevated TGF-β1, upregulated MEK and ERK1/2, and increased inflammatory factors. Aliskiren could apparently improve myocardial fibrosis by reducing the expression of TGF-β1, inhibiting MEK and ERK1/2 signal pathways, and decreasing IL-18 and TLR4 in both serum and atrial tissue. In conclusion, aliskiren could prevent atrial structural remodeling from rapid atrial pacing for 2 weeks. Aliskiren may play a potential beneficial role in the treatment of AF induced by rapid atrial pacing. PMID:27118660

  6. A biophysically based finite-state machine model for analyzing gastric experimental entrainment and pacing recordings.

    PubMed

    Sathar, Shameer; Trew, Mark L; Du, Peng; O'Grady, Greg; Cheng, Leo K

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is coordinated by slow waves (SWs) generated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Experimental studies have shown that SWs spontaneously activate at different intrinsic frequencies in isolated tissue, whereas in intact tissues they are entrained to a single frequency. Gastric pacing has been used in an attempt to improve motility in disorders such as gastroparesis by modulating entrainment, but the optimal methods of pacing are currently unknown. Computational models can aid in the interpretation of complex in vivo recordings and help to determine optimal pacing strategies. However, previous computational models of SW entrainment are limited to the intrinsic pacing frequency as the primary determinant of the conduction velocity, and are not able to accurately represent the effects of external stimuli and electrical anisotropies. In this paper, we present a novel computationally efficient method for modeling SW propagation through the ICC network while accounting for conductivity parameters and fiber orientations. The method successfully reproduced experimental recordings of entrainment following gastric transection and the effects of gastric pacing on SW activity. It provides a reliable new tool for investigating gastric electrophysiology in normal and diseased states, and to guide and focus future experimental studies. PMID:24276722

  7. Application of PACE Principles for Population Health Management of Frail Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Stefanacci, Richard G; Reich, Shelley; Casiano, Alex

    2015-10-01

    To determine which practices would have the most impact on reducing hospital and emergency department admissions and nursing home placement among older adults with multiple comorbid conditions, a literature search and survey were conducted to identify and prioritize comprehensive care principles as practiced in the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). PACE medical directors and members of the PACE interdisciplinary team (IDT) were surveyed to gain their insights on the most impactful practices, which were identified as: End-of-Life Management, Caregiver Support, Management of Red Flags, Medication Management, Participant and Caregiver Health Care System Literacy, and Care Coordination. In addition, this research evaluated measures that could be used to assess an organization's level of success with regard to each of the 6 PACE practices identified. The results reported in this article, found through a survey with PACE medical directors and IDT members concerning effective interventions, can be viewed as strategies to improve care for older adults, enabling them to maintain their independence in the community, avoid the expense of facility-based care, and enhance their quality of life. PMID:25647691

  8. Maine PACE Program Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Dana; Adamson, Joy M

    2015-01-30

    The ARRA EECBG BetterBuilding helped augment the existing Home Energy Savings Programs (HESP) and incentives with financing through a subordinate lien PACE and HUD PowerSaver programs. The program was designed to document innovative techniques to dramatically increase the number of homes participating in weatherization programs in participating towns. Maine will support new energy efficiency retrofit pilots throughout the state, designed to motivate a large number of homeowners to invest in comprehensive home energy efficiency upgrades to bring real solutions to market.

  9. Influence of cinnamon and catnip on the stereotypical pacing of oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Resende, Letícia de S; Pedretti Gomes, Karla C; Andriolo, Artur; Genaro, Gelson; Remy, Gabriella L; Almeida Ramos, Valdir de

    2011-01-01

    Nonhuman animals in captivity can experience environmental privation that results in their exhibiting abnormal behaviors. Environmental enrichment techniques can help improve their welfare. This study investigated the behavior of 8 zoo-housed oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in response to 2 odors (catnip and cinnamon) introduced individually into the animals' enclosures for 3 consecutive days. Proportion of scans spent engaging in stereotypical pacing were compared before, during, and after treatments. The addition of cinnamon reduced the proportion of pacing during and after enrichment (Wilcoxon: Z = 3.16, p < .001; Z = 3.16, p < .001, respectively), indicating a prolonged effect of the enrichment on the animals' behavior. Catnip appears to have elicited no significant difference in the stereotypic pacing before, during, or after the enrichment (Friedman: X(2) = 2.69; p = .260). The results highlight the potential use of cinnamon as a method of environmental enrichment for small captive-housed cats. PMID:22044295

  10. A gastroesophageal electrode for atrial and ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    McEneaney, D J; Cochrane, D J; Anderson, J A; Adgey, A A

    1997-07-01

    Temporary transvenous cardiac pacing requires technical expertise and access to fluoroscopy. We have developed a gastroesophageal electrode capable of atrial and ventricular pacing. The flexible polythene gastroesophageal electrode is passed into the stomach under light sedation. Five ring electrodes, now positioned in the lower esophagus, are used for atrial pacing. A point source (cathode) on the distal tip of the electrode, now positioned in the gastric fundus, is used for ventricular pacing. Two configurations of atrial and ventricular pacing were compared: unipolar and bipolar. During unipolar ventricular pacing the indifferent electrode (anode) was a high impedance chest pad. For bipolar ventricular pacing the indifferent electrode was a ring electrodes placed 2 cm proximal to the tip. Unipolar atrial pacing was performed with 1 of 5 proximal ring electrodes acting as cathode ("cathodic") or as anode ("anodic") in conjunction with a chest pad. Bipolar atrial pacing was performed using combinations of 2 of 5 ring electrodes. Atrial capture was obtained in all 55 subjects attempted. When all electrode combinations were compared, atrial capture was significantly more frequent using the bipolar approach (153/210 bipolar, 65/210 unipolar; t = 7.37, P < 0.001). For unipolar atrial pacing, cathodic stimulation (from esophagus) was more successful than anodic stimulation (cathodic 62/105, anodic 20/105; t = 5.81, P < 0.001). In 43 subjects attempted unipolar ventricular pacing resulted in a higher frequency of capture than the bipolar approach (unipolar 41/43 (95.3%), bipolar 19/43 (44.2%); P < 0.001). In conclusion, atrial pacing was optimal using pairs of ring electrodes ("bipolar") while ventricular pacing was optimal using the distal electrode tip (cathode) in conjunction with a chest pad electrode ("unipolar"). This gastroesophageal electrode may be useful in the emergency management of acute bradyarrhythmias and for elective electrophysiological studies. PMID

  11. Vocalization and pauses in fast-paced reading.

    PubMed

    Breznitz, Z

    1990-04-01

    Previous research (Breznitz, 1987a) indicated that prompting first-graders to read faster than usual increases their comprehension. The present study was conducted to clarify which of the speech elements that comprise reading time is affected when reading pace is accelerated. First-graders (N = 76) read aloud three parallel forms of a comprehension test, at self- and fast-paced rates consecutively, followed by a second self-paced reading. Vocalization time, pause time, pause frequency, and the average length of vocalizations and pauses were determined with an automatic vocal transaction analyzer. During fast-paced reading, children made fewer and shorter pauses, vocalized at a faster rate, and tended to speak in longer units. The speech characteristics indicative of fast-paced reading were significantly correlated with reading comprehension, even during self-paced reading, and can serve as indicators of effective reading. PMID:2366048

  12. Characteristics of Midwest Region School Districts Identified for Improvement. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 121

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Ploeg, Arie; Wan, Yinmei; Garcia, Alicia N.; Wraight, Sara; Burke, Matthew; Norbury, Heather; Gerdeman, R. Dean

    2012-01-01

    This report presents statistical profiles for the Midwest Region states of school districts designated as "in improvement" for school year 2009/10 under accountability provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and compares the prevalence and characteristics of these districts and those of districts not in improvement. It also reports the…

  13. Let's Go! School Nutrition Workgroups: Regional Partnerships for Improving School Meals.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Heidi L; Vine, Jackie; Rogers, Victoria W

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a regional approach for improving the nutritional quality of school meals and increasing the selection of healthier foods. Let's Go! is a childhood obesity prevention program that establishes regional workgroups to develop innovative solutions to improve school meal programs. Let's Go! fosters collaborative decision making, specifically addressing the feasibility of proposed strategies, differences in school environments, and level of readiness for change. This approach led to 77 schools achieving the HealthierUS School Challenge and 130 schools implementing Smarter Lunchrooms techniques in school year 2011-2012. Communities nationwide could use a similar approach to improve school meals. PMID:25656712

  14. Austin chalk maintains brisk drilling pace

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    Horizontal drilling in the Cretaceous Austin chalk trend of South Texas continues to set a fast pace. The Texas Railroad Commission has issued nearly 900 permits to drill horizontal wells in the Pearsall field area alone from 1984 through February 1991. TRC issued 1,485 permits for horizontal wells statewide during that period, including 1,285 since Jan. 1, 1990. Statewide, operators have reported completion of 685 horizontal wells. That includes 472 in Pearsall field, where TRC has issued 882 permits, and 121 in Giddings field, where 305 permits have been issued. Frio County, site of Pearsall field, led Texas counties with 494 permits and 278 horizontal completions. Oil drilling and reentry work is under way in many areas, and horizontal Austin chalk gas/condensate completions have been reported in Dimmit and Burleson counties.

  15. Microcomputer Applications for Health Care Professionals. Volume II. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Lucy

    This volume is one of three in a self-paced computer literacy course that gives allied health students a firm base of knowledge concerning computer usage in the hospital environment. It also develops skill in several applications software packages. Volume II contains materials for three one-hour courses on word processing applications, spreadsheet…

  16. Prediction of Procrastination in a Self-Pacing Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Donald D.; Hampton, John D.

    The objective of the study was to predict potential procrastinators in a self-pacing instructional system. Seventy-five entering college freshmen were randomly selected to participate in a large scale individually-paced program. Those students (25) who procrastinated were classified as "no-start-procrastinators" (NSP); the remainder (52) were…

  17. Rural Policy Development: An NRHA and PACE Association Collaborative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Peter; Morgan, Alan; Morris, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) offers a unique model of comprehensive care for frail, elderly people. To date, all of the PACE programs have been located in urban areas. Rural advocates and policymakers, however, believe the program may hold great promise for use in rural areas, which have higher percentages of elderly…

  18. Less Is More: Pacing in the ESL Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaunnessey, Maryann S.

    Pacing in the teaching of English as a second language (ESL) is considered. It is suggested that the problem of pacing is almost entirely a matter of teachers covering material so rapidly that the student frequently does not have the opportunity to integrate it. Since the recognition of sounds, symbols, and sentences is not mastery of them, it is…

  19. Achievement Monitoring of Individually Paced Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsky, Paul D.

    A study was made to monitor achievement of individually paced instruction. The project concentrated on designing testing procedures in group paced instructional programs to provide information to student, teachers, parents and administrators which could be used in both a formative and summative evaluation. The three objectives of the project were:…

  20. Social Interaction in Self-Paced Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry; Upton, Lorne; Dron, Jon; Malone, Judi; Poelhuber, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a case study of a self-paced university course that was originally designed to support independent, self-paced study at distance. We developed a social media intervention, in design-based research terms, that allows these independent students to contribute archived content to enhance the course, to engage in discussions…

  1. Is Self-Paced Instruction Really Worth It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, J. A.; Crowe, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a self-paced, learning-for-mastery course in undergraduate fluid mechanics. Includes the method of course assessment, method of student evaluation, and a description of the instructor's role and work load. Summarizes aspects of self-paced instruction considered favorable and unfavorable. (GS)

  2. Accelerating the "Pace" against Illiteracy: Parent and Child Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Roger

    1989-01-01

    In 1980, Kentucky reported the nation's lowest percentage of adults, aged 25 and older, who had graduated from high school. Legislators were inundated with recommendations for reform. The result was the enactment of the Parent and Child Education (PACE) pilot program (1986). In the PACE program, parents without high school diplomas attend classes…

  3. Right Bundle Branch Block-Like Pattern During Uncomplicated Right Ventricular Pacing and the Effect of Pacing Site.

    PubMed

    Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Weigand, Severin; Grebmer, Christian; Semmler, Verena; Brkic, Amir; Asbach, Stefan; Kloppe, Axel; Lennerz, Carsten; Bourier, Felix; Pastromas, Sokratis; Kolb, Christof

    2016-03-15

    Right bundle branch block (RBBB) configuration is an unexpected finding during right ventricular (RV) pacing that raises the suspicion of inadvertent left ventricular lead positioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of paced RBBB pattern in relation to RV lead location. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective, multicenter study, which randomized implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients to an apical versus midseptal defibrillator lead positioning. A 12-lead electrocardiogram was recorded during intrinsic rhythm and RV pacing. Paced RBBB-like pattern was defined as positive (>0.05 mV) net amplitude of QRS complex in leads V1 and/or V2. In total, 226 patients (65.6 ± 12.0 years, 20.8% women, 53.1% apical site) were included in the study. The prevalence of paced RBBB pattern in the total population was 15.5%. A significantly lower percentage of patients in the midseptal group demonstrated RBBB-type configuration during RV pacing compared with the apical group (1.9% vs 27.5%, p <0.001). Baseline RBBB, prolonged QRS duration during intrinsic rhythm, and reduced ejection fraction were not associated with increased likelihood of paced RBBB. In the subgroup of patients with RBBB type during pacing, 91.4% of patients had a paced QRS axis from -30° to -90°, whereas 100% of patients displayed a negative QRS vector at lead V3. In conclusion, RBBB configuration is encountered in a considerable percentage of device recipients during uncomplicated RV pacing. Midseptal lead positioning is associated with significantly lower likelihood of paced RBBB pattern compared with apical location. PMID:26796192

  4. Computer-Paced versus Experimenter-Paced Working Memory Span Tasks: Are They Equally Reliable and Valid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Working memory span tasks are popular measures, in part, because performance on these tasks predicts performance on other measures of cognitive ability. The traditional method of span-task administration is the experimenter-paced version, whose reliability and validity have been repeatedly demonstrated. However, computer-paced span tasks are…

  5. Improving Smallholder Farmer Biosecurity in the Mekong Region Through Change Management.

    PubMed

    Young, J R; Evans-Kocinski, S; Bush, R D; Windsor, P A

    2015-10-01

    Transboundary animal diseases including foot-and-mouth disease and haemorrhagic septicaemia remain a major constraint for improving smallholder large ruminant productivity in the Mekong region, producing negative impacts on rural livelihoods and compromising efforts to reduce poverty and food insecurity. The traditional husbandry practices of smallholders largely exclude preventive health measures, increasing risks of disease transmission. Although significant efforts have been made to understand the social aspects of change development in agricultural production, attention to improving the adoption of biosecurity has been limited. This study reviews smallholder biosecurity risk factors identified in the peer-reviewed literature and from field research observations conducted in Cambodia and Laos during 2006-2013, considering these in the context of a change management perspective aimed at improving adoption of biosecurity measures. Motivation for change, resistance to change, knowledge management, cultural dimensions, systems theory and leadership are discussed. Due to geographical, physical and resource variability, the implementation of biosecurity interventions suitable for smallholders is not a 'one size fits all'. Smallholders should be educated in biosecurity principles and empowered to make personal decisions rather than adopt prescribed pre-defined interventions. Biosecurity interventions should be aligned with smallholder farmer motivations, preferably offering clear short-term risk management benefits that elicit interest from smallholders. Linking biosecurity and disease control with improved livestock productivity provides opportunities for sustainable improvements in livelihoods. Participatory research and extension that improves farmer knowledge and practices offers a pathway to elicit sustainable broad-scale social change. However, examples of successes need to be communicated both at the 'evidence-based level' to influence regional policy

  6. Pushing the pace of tree species migration.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Eli D; McGill, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals have responded to past climate changes by migrating with habitable environments, sometimes shifting the boundaries of their geographic ranges by tens of kilometers per year or more. Species migrating in response to present climate conditions, however, must contend with landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic disturbance. We consider this problem in the context of wind-dispersed tree species. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal make these species capable of rapid migration rates. Models of species-front migration suggest that even tree species with the capacity for long-distance dispersal will be unable to keep pace with future spatial changes in temperature gradients, exclusive of habitat fragmentation effects. Here we present a numerical model that captures the salient dynamics of migration by long-distance dispersal for a generic tree species. We then use the model to explore the possible effects of assisted colonization within a fragmented landscape under a simulated tree-planting scheme. Our results suggest that an assisted-colonization program could accelerate species-front migration rates enough to match the speed of climate change, but such a program would involve an environmental-sustainability intervention at a massive scale. PMID:25162663

  7. Pushing the Pace of Tree Species Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Eli D.; McGill, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals have responded to past climate changes by migrating with habitable environments, sometimes shifting the boundaries of their geographic ranges by tens of kilometers per year or more. Species migrating in response to present climate conditions, however, must contend with landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic disturbance. We consider this problem in the context of wind-dispersed tree species. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal make these species capable of rapid migration rates. Models of species-front migration suggest that even tree species with the capacity for long-distance dispersal will be unable to keep pace with future spatial changes in temperature gradients, exclusive of habitat fragmentation effects. Here we present a numerical model that captures the salient dynamics of migration by long-distance dispersal for a generic tree species. We then use the model to explore the possible effects of assisted colonization within a fragmented landscape under a simulated tree-planting scheme. Our results suggest that an assisted-colonization program could accelerate species-front migration rates enough to match the speed of climate change, but such a program would involve an environmental-sustainability intervention at a massive scale. PMID:25162663

  8. Determining the profitability of improving water quality on farms in the southeastern Piedmont region of Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southeastern Piedmont (SEP) region of Georgia is a high nutrient status area for phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N). Previous research indicates certain farm practices utilize more P and N from the soil and/or decrease P and N runoff. With the objective to improve water quality, six farm fields in...

  9. Remediation/Restoration of Degraded Soil to Improve Productivity In The Central Great Plains Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quality and productivity of some farmlands in the central Great Plains Region (CGPR) have been lost through wind and water erosion induced by tillage and poor soil management. Productivity of degraded/eroded soils can be restored using organic amendments such as manure and improved crop and soil...

  10. An improvement of extremality regions for Gibbs measures of the Potts model on a Cayley tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydarov, Farhod; Khakimov, Rustam

    2016-03-01

    We give a condition of extemelity for translation-invariant Gibbs measures of q—state Potts model on a Cayley tree. We'll improve the regions of extremality for some measures considered in [14]. Moreover, some results in [14] are generalized.

  11. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification

    PubMed Central

    Galappaththige, Suran; Roth, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1) causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses. PMID:26057242

  12. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  13. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  14. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  15. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  16. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  17. Are Global and Regional Improvements in Life Expectancy and in Child, Adult and Senior Survival Slowing?

    PubMed Central

    Hum, Ryan J.; Verguet, Stéphane; Cheng, Yu-Ling; McGahan, Anita M.; Jha, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in life expectancy have been considerable over the past hundred years. Forecasters have taken to applying historical trends under an assumption of continuing improvements in life expectancy in the future. A linear mixed effects model was used to estimate the trends in global and regional rates of improvements in life expectancy, child, adult, and senior survival, in 166 countries between 1950 and 2010. Global improvements in life expectancy, including both child and adult survival rates, decelerated significantly over the study period. Overall life expectancy gains were estimated to have declined from 5.9 to 4.0 months per year for a mean deceleration of -0.07 months/year2; annual child survival gains declined from 4.4 to 1.6 deaths averted per 1000 for a mean deceleration of -0.06 deaths/1000/year2; adult survival gains were estimated to decline from 4.8 to 3.7 deaths averted per 1000 per year for a mean deceleration of -0.08 deaths/1000/year2. Senior survival gains however increased from 2.4 to 4.2 deaths averted per 1000 per year for an acceleration of 0.03 deaths/1000/year2. Regional variation in the four measures was substantial. The rates of global improvements in life expectancy, child survival, and adult survival have declined since 1950 despite an increase in the rate of improvements among seniors. We postulate that low-cost innovation, related to the last half-century progress in health–primarily devoted to children and middle age, is reaping diminishing returns on its investments. Trends are uneven across regions and measures, which may be due in part to the state of epidemiological transition between countries and regions and disparities in the diffusion of innovation, accessible only in high-income countries where life expectancy is already highest. PMID:25992949

  18. Remote Sensing Ocean Color Observations from NASA's PACE Mission: Applications and Societal Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzortziou, M.; Omar, A. H.; Turner, W.

    2014-12-01

    The PACE (Pre- Aerosol, Clouds and ocean Ecosystems) mission is a strategic Climate Continuity mission, included in NASA's 2010 plan: "Responding to the Challenge of Climate and Environmental Change: NASA's Plan for a Climate-Centric Architecture for Earth Observations and Applications from Space". On a polar orbit, PACE will make climate-quality global measurements that are essential for understanding ocean biology, biogeochemistry and ecology, and determining how the ocean's role in global biogeochemical cycling and ocean ecology both affects and is affected by climate change. With advanced global remote sensing capabilities that include high spectral-resolution imaging, extended spectral coverage to the UV and SWIR, improved spatial resolution in inland, estuarine and coastal waters, enhanced atmospheric correction and higher signal-to-noise, PACE is expected to provide high quality observations that, over the long-term, will contribute to an extended time series of records on inland, coastal, and ocean ecosystems—all of which have substantial value beyond basic science and research. The combination of climate-quality, global atmospheric and oceanic observations provided by the PACE mission will provide a unique capability to help understand changes that affect our ecosystem services, implement science-based management strategies of coastal, marine and inland aquatic resources, and support assessments, policy analyses, and design approaches to plan adaptation and responses to impacts of climate change. Here we discuss the PACE applications program, the new capabilities afforded by this future satellite mission, and how they could potentially advance applications across a range of areas, including Oceans, Climate, Water Resources, Ecological Forecasting, Disasters, Human Health and Air Quality.

  19. Self-Paced Timing Detects and Tracks Change in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Kelly C.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Duff, Kevin; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Wang, Chiachi; O’Rourke, Justin J.F.; Stout, Julie C.; Moser, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study compares self-paced timing performance (cross-sectionally and longitudinally) between participants with prodromal Huntington disease (pr-HD) and a comparison group of gene non-expanded participants from affected families (NC). Methods At baseline, participants in two groups (747 pr-HD: 188 NC) listened to tones presented at 550ms intervals, matched that pace by tapping response keys and continued the rhythm (self-paced) after the tone had stopped. Standardized cross-sectional and longitudinal linear models examined the relationships between self-paced timing precision and estimated proximity to diagnosis, and various other demographic factors. Results Pr-HD participants showed significantly less timing precision than NC. Cross-sectional comparison of pr-HD and NC participants showed a significant performance difference on two administration conditions of the task (dominant hand: p<.0001; alternating thumbs: p<.0001). Additionally, estimated proximity to diagnosis was related to timing precision in both conditions, (dominant hand: t=−11.14,df=920, p<.0001; alternating thumbs: t=−11.32, df=918, p<.0001), even considering demographic and experience variables. Longitudinal modeling showed that pr-HD participants worsen more quickly at the task than the NC group, and that decline rate increases with estimated proximity to diagnosis in both conditions (dominant hand: t=−2.85,df=417, p=.0045; alternating thumbs: t=−3.56, df= 445, p=.0004). Effect sizes based on adjusted mean annual change ranged from −0.34 to 0.25 in the longitudinal model. Conclusions The self-paced timing paradigm has potential for use as a screening tool and outcome measure in pr-HD clinical trials to gauge therapeutically-mediated improvement or maintenance of function. PMID:20604618

  20. Current State of Economic Returns from Education in China's Ethnic Regions and Explorations into Ways of Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lijun, Zhang; Fei, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Economic development and social progress in China's ethnic minority regions depend on improvements in population attributes brought about by education. Developing education in China's ethnic regions is a project of fundamental significance for realizing sustainable economic and social development in the ethnic regions. Improving the economic…

  1. Fast Paced, Low Cost Projects at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson-Morgan, Lisa; Clinton, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    What does an orbiting microsatellite, a robotic lander and a ruggedized camera and telescope have in common? They are all fast paced, low cost projects managed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) teamed with successful industry partners. MSFC has long been synonymous with human space flight large propulsion programs, engineering acumen and risk intolerance. However, there is a growing portfolio/product line within MSFC that focuses on these smaller, fast paced projects. While launching anything into space is expensive, using a managed risk posture, holding to schedule and keeping costs low by stopping at egood enough f were key elements to their success. Risk is defined as the possibility of loss or failure per Merriam Webster. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) defines risk using procedural requirement 8705.4 and establishes eclasses f to discern the acceptable risk per a project. It states a Class D risk has a medium to significant risk of not achieving mission success. MSFC, along with industry partners, has created a niche in Class D efforts. How did the big, cautious MSFC succeed on these projects that embodied the antithesis of its heritage in human space flight? A key factor toward these successful projects was innovative industry partners such as Dynetics Corporation, University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville), Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU APL), Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE), Von Braun Center for Science and Innovation (VCSI), SAIC, and Jacobs. Fast Affordable Satellite Technology (FastSat HSV01) is a low earth orbit microsatellite that houses six instruments with the primary scientific objective of earth observation and technology demonstration. The team was comprised of Dynetics, UAHuntsvile, SAIC, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and VCSI with the United States Air Force Space Test Program as the customer. The team completed design, development, manufacturing, environmental test and integration in

  2. Improving GHG inventories by regional information exchange: a report from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Umemiya, Chisa

    2006-01-01

    Background The Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are required to develop and report a national inventory of greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol. In the Asia region, "Workshops on Greenhouse Gas Inventories in Asia (WGIA)" have been organised annually since 2003 under the support of the government of Japan. WGIAs promote information exchange in the region to support countries' efforts to improve the quality of greenhouse gas inventories. This paper reports the major outcomes of the WGIAs and discusses the key aspects of information exchange in the region for the improvement of inventories. Results The major outcomes of WGIAs intended to help countries improve GHG inventories, can be summarised as follows: (1) identification of common issues and possible solutions by sector, (2) reporting country inventory practices, and (3) verification of the UNFCCC reporting requirements. Conclusion The workshops provided the opportunity for countries to share common issues and constraints pertinent to GHG inventories and to exchange information regarding possible solutions for those issues based on their own experience. The relevance of information exchange is determined due to emission sources, emitting mechanisms from sources, and technologies used. Information exchange about emission sources that are unique to Asia, like those of the agriculture sector, contributes significantly to the accumulation of knowledge at the regional and global levels. Enabling countries to verify their national circumstances with the reporting requirements under UNFCCC is also an essential part of the WGIA information exchange activities. PMID:16930465

  3. An improved method for oriT-directed cloning and functionalization of large bacterial genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Kvitko, Brian H; McMillan, Ian A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2013-08-01

    We have made significant improvements to a broad-host-range system for the cloning and manipulation of large bacterial genomic regions based on site-specific recombination between directly repeated oriT sites during conjugation. Using two suicide capture vectors carrying flanking homology regions, oriT sites are recombined on either side of the target region. Using a broad-host-range conjugation helper plasmid, the region between the oriT sites is conjugated into an Escherichia coli recipient strain, where it is circularized and maintained as a chimeric mini-F vector. The cloned target region is functionalized in multiple ways to accommodate downstream manipulation. The target region is flanked with Gateway attB sites for recombination into other vectors and by rare 18-bp I-SceI restriction sites for subcloning. The Tn7-functionalized target can also be inserted at a naturally occurring chromosomal attTn7 site(s) or maintained as a broad-host-range plasmid for complementation or heterologous expression studies. We have used the oriTn7 capture technique to clone and complement Burkholderia pseudomallei genomic regions up to 140 kb in size and have created isogenic Burkholderia strains with various combinations of genomic islands. We believe this system will greatly aid the cloning and genetic analysis of genomic islands, biosynthetic gene clusters, and large open reading frames. PMID:23747708

  4. An Improved Method for oriT-Directed Cloning and Functionalization of Large Bacterial Genomic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kvitko, Brian H.; McMillan, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    We have made significant improvements to a broad-host-range system for the cloning and manipulation of large bacterial genomic regions based on site-specific recombination between directly repeated oriT sites during conjugation. Using two suicide capture vectors carrying flanking homology regions, oriT sites are recombined on either side of the target region. Using a broad-host-range conjugation helper plasmid, the region between the oriT sites is conjugated into an Escherichia coli recipient strain, where it is circularized and maintained as a chimeric mini-F vector. The cloned target region is functionalized in multiple ways to accommodate downstream manipulation. The target region is flanked with Gateway attB sites for recombination into other vectors and by rare 18-bp I-SceI restriction sites for subcloning. The Tn7-functionalized target can also be inserted at a naturally occurring chromosomal attTn7 site(s) or maintained as a broad-host-range plasmid for complementation or heterologous expression studies. We have used the oriTn7 capture technique to clone and complement Burkholderia pseudomallei genomic regions up to 140 kb in size and have created isogenic Burkholderia strains with various combinations of genomic islands. We believe this system will greatly aid the cloning and genetic analysis of genomic islands, biosynthetic gene clusters, and large open reading frames. PMID:23747708

  5. Reshaping Rural Schools in the Northwest Region: Lessons from Federal School Improvement Grant Implementation. REL 2016-107

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Caitlin; Ostler, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The five states in the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Northwest Region have many rural schools that have been designated as in need of improvement. And all five states had rural schools in the first cohort of federal School Improvement Grant (SIG) recipients. To address school improvement, the majority of those schools implemented the…

  6. Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 064

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speth, Timothy; Saifer, Steffen; Forehand, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    This document presents a summary of the larger report, "Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region." Although the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) spells out parent involvement requirements for schools in need of improvement, the majority of the Northwest Region school improvement plans reviewed failed…

  7. International Collaboration to Improve The Regional Seismic Travel Time (RSTT) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S. C.; Begnaud, M. L.; Ballard, S.; Bondar, I.; Storchak, D. A.; Given, J. W.; Guendel, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Regional Seismic Travel Time (RSTT) method (Myers et al., 2010) was developed to facilitate the use of regional data in routine seismic monitoring. RSTT improves prediction accuracy for Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg travel times using a 3-dimensional model of the Earth's crust and laterally varying seismic wave speed in the upper mantle. Upper mantle velocity is parameterization as a linear function of depth, so that travel times can be computed accurately and in real time. Real-time computation on readily available computers is key to the usefulness of the method by seismic centers that utilize today's flexible networks. In areas where the RSTT model is well constrained by tomography (Eurasia and North America) we have demonstrated improvement in event location accuracy. Extension of RSTT tomographic datasets to new regions is being pursued through international outreach efforts that are coordinated between the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) and the International Seismological Centre (ISC). Our efforts to date have expanded the collection of regionally recorded events with well-constrained hypocenters in South America, Australia, and Africa. We have also incorporated recently published models of crust and upper mantle structure into the RSTT model. Tests in regions sampled by newly compiled data suggest that the RSTT model improves travel time predictions with respect to the ak135 model (Kennett et al., 1995), which is the global standard for travel time prediction. We are continuing to collect and freely distribute ground-truth data in new regions as well as updates to the RSTT model. This work performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. An improved regional ionospheric delay model based on the Nanning CORS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lilong; Cai, Chenghui; Chen, Jun; Li, Junyu; Huang, Liangke

    2015-12-01

    Klobuchar model can reflect the spatial and temporal variations of ionospheric feature, but model fixed initial phase and night-time delay will introduce a large number of errors. Aiming at the shortcomings of the models, take least-squares surface fitting model as the background, using CORS network in Nanning region to measure the data correctly, the Klobuchar model's initial phase, amplitude, and night-time delay values are steadily corrected, so as to establish regional ionospheric model in Nanning, the results show that the accuracy of Klobuchar model is improved significantly.

  9. Improving Ramsey spectroscopy in the extreme-ultraviolet region with a random-sampling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eramo, R.; Bellini, M.; Corsi, C.; Liontos, I.; Cavalieri, S.

    2011-04-15

    Ramsey-like techniques, based on the coherent excitation of a sample by delayed and phase-correlated pulses, are promising tools for high-precision spectroscopic tests of QED in the extreme-ultraviolet (xuv) spectral region, but currently suffer experimental limitations related to long acquisition times and critical stability issues. Here we propose a random subsampling approach to Ramsey spectroscopy that, by allowing experimentalists to reach a given spectral resolution goal in a fraction of the usual acquisition time, leads to substantial improvements in high-resolution spectroscopy and may open the way to a widespread application of Ramsey-like techniques to precision measurements in the xuv spectral region.

  10. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms.

  11. Positive emotion reduces dyspnea during slow paced breathing.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ben; Friedman, Bruce H

    2012-05-01

    Slow breathing is used to induce cardiovascular resonance, a state associated with health benefits, but it can also increase tidal volume and associated dyspnea (respiratory discomfort). Dyspnea may be decreased by induced positive affect. In this study, 71 subjects (36 men, M = 20 years) breathed at 6 breaths per min. In condition one, subjects paced their breathing by inhaling and exhaling as a vertical bar moved up and down. In condition two, breathing was paced by a timed slideshow of positive images; subjects inhaled during a black screen and exhaled as the image appeared. Cardiac, respiratory, and self-reported dyspnea and emotional indices were recorded. Tidal volume and the intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea were reduced when paced breathing was combined with pleasant images. These results show that positive affect can reduce dyspnea during slow paced breathing, and may have applications for induced cardiovascular resonance. PMID:22292794

  12. Pacing: A concept analysis of a chronic pain intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson-Lega, Kathryn; Berry, Robyn; Brown, Cary A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The intervention of pacing is regularly recommended for chronic pain patients. However, pacing is poorly defined and appears to be interpreted in varying, potentially contradictory manners within the field of chronic pain. This conceptual lack of clarity has implications for effective service delivery and for researchers’ ability to conduct rigorous study. An examination of the background literature demonstrates that while pacing is often one part of a multidisciplinary pain management program, outcome research is hindered by a lack of a clear and shared definition of this currently ill-defined construct. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a formal concept analysis of the term ‘pacing’. METHODS: A standardized concept analysis process (including literature scoping to identify all uses of the concept, analysis to determine defining attributes of the concept and identification of model, borderline and contrary cases) was used to determine what the concept of pacing does and does not represent within the current evidence base. RESULTS: A conceptual model including the core attributes of action, time, balance, learning and self-management emerged. From these attributes, an evidence-based definition for pacing was composed and distributed to stakeholders for review. After consideration of stakeholder feedback, the emergent definition of pacing was finalized as follows: “Pacing is an active self-management strategy whereby individuals learn to balance time spent on activity and rest for the purpose of achieving increased function and participation in meaningful activities”. CONCLUSION: The findings of the present concept analysis will help to standardize the use and definition of the term pacing across disciplines for the purposes of both pain management and research. PMID:23717825

  13. The Efficacy of Self-Paced Study in Multitrial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Pecher, Diane; Jang, Yoonhee; Zeelenberg, René

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we investigated the efficacy of self-paced study in multitrial learning. In Experiment 1, native speakers of English studied lists of Dutch-English word pairs under 1 of 4 imposed fixed presentation rate conditions (24 × 1 s, 12 × 2 s, 6 × 4 s, or 3 × 8 s) and a self-paced study condition. Total study time per list was equated for…

  14. Regional Seismic Travel-Time Prediction, Uncertainty, and Location Improvement in Western Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, M. P.; Myers, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate our ability to improve regional travel-time prediction and seismic event location using an a priori, three-dimensional velocity model of Western Eurasia and North Africa: WENA1.0 [Pasyanos et al., 2004]. Our objective is to improve the accuracy of seismic location estimates and calculate representative location uncertainty estimates. As we focus on the geographic region of Western Eurasia, the Middle East, and North Africa, we develop, test, and validate 3D model-based travel-time prediction models for 30 stations in the study region. Three principal results are presented. First, the 3D WENA1.0 velocity model improves travel-time prediction over the iasp91 model, as measured by variance reduction, for regional Pg, Pn, and P phases recorded at the 30 stations. Second, a distance-dependent uncertainty model is developed and tested for the WENA1.0 model. Third, an end-to-end validation test based on 500 event relocations demonstrates improved location performance over the 1-dimensional iasp91 model. Validation of the 3D model is based on a comparison of approximately 11,000 Pg, Pn, and P travel-time predictions and empirical observations from ground truth (GT) events. Ray coverage for the validation dataset is chosen to provide representative, regional-distance sampling across Eurasia and North Africa. The WENA1.0 model markedly improves travel-time predictions for most stations with an average variance reduction of 25% for all ray paths. We find that improvement is station dependent, with some stations benefiting greatly from WENA1.0 predictions (52% at APA, 33% at BKR, and 32% at NIL), some stations showing moderate improvement (12% at KEV, 14% at BOM, and 12% at TAM), some benefiting only slightly (6% at MOX, and 4% at SVE), and some are degraded (-6% at MLR and -18% at QUE). We further test WENA1.0 by comparing location accuracy with results obtained using the iasp91 model. Again, relocation of these events is dependent on ray paths that evenly

  15. An Improved Anchor Shot Detection Method Using Fitness of Face Location and Dissimilarity of Icon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Ji-Soo; Lee, Hyon-Soo; Hagiwara, Masafumi

    In this letter, we propose an improved anchor shot detection (ASD) method in order to effectively retrieve anchor shots from news video. The face location and dissimilarity of icon region are used to reduce false alarms in the proposed method. According to the results of the experiment on several types of news video, the proposed method obtained high anchor detection results compared with previous methods.

  16. Feasibility of Leadless Cardiac Pacing Using Injectable Magnetic Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y; Gabay, Hovav; Etzion, Yoram; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive, effective approach for immediate and painless heart pacing would have invaluable implications in several clinical scenarios. Here we present a novel strategy that utilizes the well-known mechano-electric feedback of the heart to evoke cardiac pacing, while relying on magnetic microparticles as leadless mechanical stimulators. We demonstrate that after localizing intravenously-injected magnetic microparticles in the right ventricular cavity using an external electromagnet, the application of magnetic pulses generates mechanical stimulation that provokes ventricular overdrive pacing in the rat heart. This temporary pacing consistently managed to revert drug-induced bradycardia, but could only last up to several seconds in the rat model, most likely due to escape of the particles between the applied pulses using our current experimental setting. In a pig model with open chest, MEF-based pacing was induced by banging magnetic particles and has lasted for a longer time. Due to overheating of the electromagnet, we intentionally terminated the experiments after 2 min. Our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of external leadless temporary pacing, using injectable magnetic microparticles that are manipulated by an external electromagnet. This new approach can have important utilities in clinical settings in which immediate and painless control of cardiac rhythm is required. PMID:27091192

  17. Feasibility of Leadless Cardiac Pacing Using Injectable Magnetic Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Gabay, Hovav; Etzion, Yoram; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive, effective approach for immediate and painless heart pacing would have invaluable implications in several clinical scenarios. Here we present a novel strategy that utilizes the well-known mechano-electric feedback of the heart to evoke cardiac pacing, while relying on magnetic microparticles as leadless mechanical stimulators. We demonstrate that after localizing intravenously-injected magnetic microparticles in the right ventricular cavity using an external electromagnet, the application of magnetic pulses generates mechanical stimulation that provokes ventricular overdrive pacing in the rat heart. This temporary pacing consistently managed to revert drug-induced bradycardia, but could only last up to several seconds in the rat model, most likely due to escape of the particles between the applied pulses using our current experimental setting. In a pig model with open chest, MEF-based pacing was induced by banging magnetic particles and has lasted for a longer time. Due to overheating of the electromagnet, we intentionally terminated the experiments after 2 min. Our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of external leadless temporary pacing, using injectable magnetic microparticles that are manipulated by an external electromagnet. This new approach can have important utilities in clinical settings in which immediate and painless control of cardiac rhythm is required. PMID:27091192

  18. Optimum pacing mode for patients with angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, R A; Ingram, A; Mitsuoka, T; Walsh, K; Sutton, R

    1986-01-01

    A within patient double blind prospective study of symptoms and exercise tolerance was designed to determine the preferred pacing mode in 10 patients with programmable dual chamber pacemakers who also had angina pectoris. Patients were randomly allocated to one month in each of the following modes: ventricular pacing at 70 beats/min (VVI) or atrioventricular synchronous upper rate 150 beats/min (DDD 150) or 100 beats/min (DDD 100). Medications were unchanged throughout the study; none was taking beta blockers. At the end of each month patients underwent an exercise test. During each month patients recorded symptoms and their preferred pacing mode. DDD 100 was the preferred mode (seven patients). There was significantly less chest pain with this mode than with either of the other modes. There were significantly more episodes of dizziness in VVI, and two patients who developed pacemaker syndrome were unable to complete the pacing period. Three patients developed angina during exercise testing in DDD 150. Atrial synchronous ventricular pacing is better than ventricular pacing for the control of symptoms in patients with angina pectoris provided that the upper atrial tracking rate is limited. PMID:3790382

  19. PACE and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2010-03-17

    The FHFA regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On June 18, 2009, James B. Lockhart III, then Director of FHFA, released a letter expressing concern about the negative impact of energy loan tax assessment programs (ELTAPs) - also known as Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs - on both the housing finance system and homeowner program participants. Subsequently, a number of PACE proponents responded to the concerns laid out in the FHFA letter. In early Fall 2009, word circulated that FHFA was planning to follow its June letter with guidance to other agencies, possibly including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, discouraging them from buying loans on properties subject to PACE-type assessment liens. This triggered a second round of stakeholder letters, several of which were addressed to President Obama. On October 18, 2009, the White House, in what some believe was an attempt to obviate the need for FHFA guidance, released a Policy Framework for PACE Financing Programs that outlined best practices guidance for homeowner and lender protection. As of February 2010, FHFA and the GSEs have agreed to monitor PACE programs and work with stakeholders and the Administration to consider additional guidance beyond the Policy Framework and to collect more information on PACE program efficacy and risks. A summary of the communications timeline and highlights of the communications are provided.

  20. Specific Intensity for Peaking: Is Race Pace the Best Option?

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Iker; Seiler, Stephen; Alcocer, Alberto; Carr, Natasha; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The peaking period for endurance competition is characterized for a relative increase of the intensity of training, after a longer period of training relatively dominated by lower intensity and higher volume Objectives: The present study was designed to compare physiological and 10 km performance effects of high intensity training (HIT) versus race pace interval training (RP) during peaking for competition in well-trained runners. Patients and Methods: 13 athletes took part in the study, they were divided into two groups: HIT and RP. HIT performed short intervals at ~105% of the maximal aerobic velocity (MAV), while RP trained longer intervals at a speed of ~90% of the MAV (a speed approximating 10 km race pace). After 12 weeks of baseline training, the athletes trained for 6 weeks under one of the two peaking regimes. Subjects performed 10 km prior to and after the intervention period. The total load of training was matched between groups during the treatment phase. Subjects completed a graded treadmill running test until volitional exhaustion prior to each 10 km race. MAV was determined as the minimal velocity eliciting maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Results: Both groups significantly improved their 10 km time (35 minutes 29 seconds ± 1 minutes 41 seconds vs 34 minutes 53 seconds ± 1 minutes 55 seconds, P < 0.01 for HIT; 35 minutes 27 seconds ± 1 minutes 40 seconds vs 34 minutes 53 seconds ± 1 minutes 18 seconds P < 0.01 for RP). VO2max increased after HIT (69 ± 3.6 vs 71.5 ± 4.2 ml.Kg-1.min-1, P < 0.05); while it didn’t for RP (68.4 ± 6 vs 69.8 ± 3 ml.Kg-1.min-1, p>0.05). In contrast, running economy decreased significantly after HIT (210 ± 6 ml.Kg-1.km-1 vs 218 ± 9, P < 0.05). Conclusions: A 6 week period of training at either 105% of MAV or 90% of MAV yielded similar performance gains in a 10km race performed at ~90% MAV. Therefore, the physiological impact of HIT training seems to be positive for VO2max but negative for running

  1. Improving Regional Forecast by Assimilating Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles into WRF Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and produce improved forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced space-based atmospheric sounding systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate high resolution AIRS profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) version 2.2 using WRF-Var. The paper focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background type, and an optimal methodology for ingesting AIRS temperature and moisture profiles as separate overland and overwater retrievals with different error characteristics. The AIRS thermodynamic profiles are derived from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm and contain information about the quality of each temperature layer. The quality indicators were used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for each profile location and pressure level. The analyses were then used to conduct a month-long series of regional forecasts over the continental U.S. The long-term impacts of AIRS profiles on forecast were assessed against verifying NAM analyses and stage IV precipitation data.

  2. The use of propagation path corrections to improve regional seismic event location in western China

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, L.K.; Cogbill, A.H.; Velasco, A.A.

    1999-03-01

    In an effort to improve the ability to locate seismic events in western China using only regional data, the authors have developed empirical propagation path corrections (PPCs) and applied such corrections using both traditional location routines as well as a nonlinear grid search method. Thus far, the authors have concentrated on corrections to observed P arrival times for shallow events using travel-time observations available from the USGS EDRs, the ISC catalogs, their own travel-tim picks from regional data, and data from other catalogs. They relocate events with the algorithm of Bratt and Bache (1988) from a region encompassing China. For individual stations having sufficient data, they produce a map of the regional travel-time residuals from all well-located teleseismic events. From these maps, interpolated PPC surfaces have been constructed using both surface fitting under tension and modified Bayesian kriging. The latter method offers the advantage of providing well-behaved interpolants, but requires that the authors have adequate error estimates associated with the travel-time residuals. To improve error estimates for kriging and event location, they separate measurement error from modeling error. The modeling error is defined as the travel-time variance of a particular model as a function of distance, while the measurement error is defined as the picking error associated with each phase. They estimate measurement errors for arrivals from the EDRs based on roundoff or truncation, and use signal-to-noise for the travel-time picks from the waveform data set.

  3. Combining GOSAT XCO2 observations over land and ocean to improve regional CO2 flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Feng; Jones, Dylan B. A.; O'Dell, Christopher W.; Nassar, Ray; Parazoo, Nicholas C.

    2016-02-01

    We used the GEOS-Chem data assimilation system to examine the impact of combining Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) XCO2 data over land and ocean on regional CO2 flux estimates for 2010-2012. We found that compared to assimilating only land data, combining land and ocean data produced an a posteriori CO2 distribution that is in better agreement with independent data and fluxes that are in closer agreement with existing top-down and bottom-up estimates. Adding XCO2 data over oceans changed the tropical land regions from a source of 0.64 Pg C/yr to a sink of -0.60 Pg C/yr and produced a corresponding reduction in the estimated sink in northern and southern land regions by 0.49 Pg C/yr and 0.80 Pg C/yr, respectively. This highlights the importance of improved observational coverage in the tropics to better quantify the latitudinal distribution of the terrestrial fluxes. Based only on land XCO2 data, we estimated a strong source in northern tropical South America, which experienced wet conditions in 2010-2012. In contrast, with the land and ocean data, we estimated a sink for this wet region in the north, and a source for the seasonally dry regions in the south and east, which is consistent with our understanding of the impact of moisture availability on the carbon balance of the region. Our results suggest that using satellite data with a more zonally balanced observational coverage could help mitigate discrepancies in CO2 flux estimates; further improvement could be expected with the greater observational coverage provided by the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2.

  4. A hybrid approach to improving the skills of seasonal climate outlook at the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuyan; Wang, Julian X. L.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Morris, Vernon

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid seasonal forecasting approach was generated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction operational Climate Forecast System (CFS) and its nesting Climate extension of Weather Research and Forecasting (CWRF) model to improve forecasting skill over the United States. Skills for the three summers of 2011-2013 were evaluated regarding location, timing, magnitude, and frequency. Higher spatial pattern correlation coefficients showed that the hybrid approach substantially improved summer mean precipitation and 2-m temperature geographical distributions compared with the results of the CFS and CWRF models. The area mean temporal correlation coefficients demonstrated that the hybrid approach also consistently improved the timing prediction skills for both variables. In general, the smaller root mean square errors indicated that the hybrid approach reduced the magnitude of the biases for both precipitation and temperature. The greatest improvements were achieved when the individual models had similar skills. The comparison with a North American multi-model ensemble further proved the feasibility of improving real-time seasonal forecast skill by using the hybrid approach, especially for heavy rain forecasting. Based on the complementary advantages of CFS the global model and CWRF the nesting regional model, the hybrid approach showed a substantial enhancement over CFS real-time forecasts during the summer. Future works are needed for further improving the quality of the hybrid approach through CWRF's optimized physics ensemble, which has been proven to be feasible and reliable.

  5. Improving sensitivity of piezoresistive microcantilever biosensors using stress concentration region designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. Z.; Cho, C.; Choi, W.; Lee, M.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    To improve the surface-stress sensitivity of piezoresistive microcantilever biosensors, this study presents cantilever designs with circular, square and triangular stress concentration regions (SCRs). The cantilever substrates are made of silicon and silicon dioxide and the piezoresistor is p-doped silicon. The cantilevers are characterized using FEM software for their surface-stress sensitivity and thermal vulnerability by applying surface stress, temperature and bias voltage loads. A relation for the surface-stress sensitivity of a silicon cantilever is also presented. Results show that use of SCRs in a silicon cantilever can improve its sensitivity by up to 55% and that a square SCR is the most suitable design to improve the overall sensitivity.

  6. Spontaneous Velocity Effect of Musical Expression on Self-Paced Walking.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Jeska; Desmet, Frank; Moens, Bart; Van Dyck, Edith; Leman, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The expressive features of music can influence the velocity of walking. So far, studies used instructed (and intended) synchronization. But is this velocity effect still present with non-instructed (spontaneous) synchronization? To figure that out, participants were instructed to walk in their own comfort tempo on an indoor track, first in silence and then with tempo-matched music. We compared velocities of silence and music conditions. The results show that some music has an activating influence, increasing velocity and motivation, while other music has a relaxing influence, decreasing velocity and motivation. The influence of musical expression on the velocity of self-paced walking can be predicted with a regression model using only three sonic features explaining 56% of the variance. Phase-coherence between footfall and beat did not contribute to the velocity effect, due to its implied fixed pacing. The findings suggest that the velocity effect depends on vigor entrainment that influences both stride length and pacing. Our findings are relevant for preventing injuries, for gait improvement in walking rehabilitation, and for improving performance in sports activities. PMID:27167064

  7. Spontaneous Velocity Effect of Musical Expression on Self-Paced Walking

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Jeska; Desmet, Frank; Moens, Bart; Van Dyck, Edith; Leman, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The expressive features of music can influence the velocity of walking. So far, studies used instructed (and intended) synchronization. But is this velocity effect still present with non-instructed (spontaneous) synchronization? To figure that out, participants were instructed to walk in their own comfort tempo on an indoor track, first in silence and then with tempo-matched music. We compared velocities of silence and music conditions. The results show that some music has an activating influence, increasing velocity and motivation, while other music has a relaxing influence, decreasing velocity and motivation. The influence of musical expression on the velocity of self-paced walking can be predicted with a regression model using only three sonic features explaining 56% of the variance. Phase-coherence between footfall and beat did not contribute to the velocity effect, due to its implied fixed pacing. The findings suggest that the velocity effect depends on vigor entrainment that influences both stride length and pacing. Our findings are relevant for preventing injuries, for gait improvement in walking rehabilitation, and for improving performance in sports activities. PMID:27167064

  8. The pace of past climate change vs. potential bird distributions and land use in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Brooke L; Pidgeon, Anna M; Radeloff, Volker C; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Vavrus, Stephen J; Heglund, Patricia J

    2016-03-01

    Climate change may drastically alter patterns of species distributions and richness, but predicting future species patterns in occurrence is challenging. Significant shifts in distributions have already been observed, and understanding these recent changes can improve our understanding of potential future changes. We assessed how past climate change affected potential breeding distributions for landbird species in the conterminous United States. We quantified the bioclimatic velocity of potential breeding distributions, that is, the pace and direction of change for each species' suitable climate space over the past 60 years. We found that potential breeding distributions for landbirds have shifted substantially with an average velocity of 1.27 km yr(-1) , about double the pace of prior distribution shift estimates across terrestrial systems globally (0.61 km yr(-1) ). The direction of shifts was not uniform. The majority of species' distributions shifted west, northwest, and north. Multidirectional shifts suggest that changes in climate conditions beyond mean temperature were influencing distributional changes. Indeed, precipitation variables that were proxies for extreme conditions were important variables across all models. There were winners and losers in terms of the area of distributions; many species experienced contractions along west and east distribution edges, and expansions along northern distribution edges. Changes were also reflected in the potential species richness, with some regions potentially gaining species (Midwest, East) and other areas potentially losing species (Southwest). However, the degree to which changes in potential breeding distributions are manifested in actual species richness depends on landcover. Areas that have become increasingly suitable for breeding birds due to changing climate are often those attractive to humans for agriculture and development. This suggests that many areas might have supported more breeding bird

  9. The pace of past climate change vs. potential bird distributions and land use in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bateman, Brooke L.; Pidgeon, Anna M.; Radeloff, Volker C.; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Vavrus, Stephen J.; Heglund, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change may drastically alter patterns of species distributions and richness, but predicting future species patterns in occurrence is challenging. Significant shifts in distributions have already been observed, and understanding these recent changes can improve our understanding of potential future changes. We assessed how past climate change affected potential breeding distributions for landbird species in the conterminous United States. We quantified the bioclimatic velocity of potential breeding distributions, that is, the pace and direction of change for each species’ suitable climate space over the past 60 years. We found that potential breeding distributions for landbirds have shifted substantially with an average velocity of 1.27 km yr−1, about double the pace of prior distribution shift estimates across terrestrial systems globally (0.61 km yr−1). The direction of shifts was not uniform. The majority of species’ distributions shifted west, northwest, and north. Multidirectional shifts suggest that changes in climate conditions beyond mean temperature were influencing distributional changes. Indeed, precipitation variables that were proxies for extreme conditions were important variables across all models. There were winners and losers in terms of the area of distributions; many species experienced contractions along west and east distribution edges, and expansions along northern distribution edges. Changes were also reflected in the potential species richness, with some regions potentially gaining species (Midwest, East) and other areas potentially losing species (Southwest). However, the degree to which changes in potential breeding distributions are manifested in actual species richness depends on landcover. Areas that have become increasingly suitable for breeding birds due to changing climate are often those attractive to humans for agriculture and development. This suggests that many areas might have supported more breeding bird

  10. Semirational Directed Evolution of Loop Regions in Aspergillus japonicus β-Fructofuranosidase for Improved Fructooligosaccharide Production.

    PubMed

    Trollope, K M; Görgens, J F; Volschenk, H

    2015-10-01

    The Aspergillus japonicus β-fructofuranosidase catalyzes the industrially important biotransformation of sucrose to fructooligosaccharides. Operating at high substrate loading and temperatures between 50 and 60°C, the enzyme activity is negatively influenced by glucose product inhibition and thermal instability. To address these limitations, the solvent-exposed loop regions of the β-fructofuranosidase were engineered using a combined crystal structure- and evolutionary-guided approach. This semirational approach yielded a functionally enriched first-round library of 36 single-amino-acid-substitution variants with 58% retaining activity, and of these, 71% displayed improved activities compared to the parent. The substitutions yielding the five most improved variants subsequently were exhaustively combined and evaluated. A four-substitution combination variant was identified as the most improved and reduced the time to completion of an efficient industrial-like reaction by 22%. Characterization of the top five combination variants by isothermal denaturation assays indicated that these variants displayed improved thermostability, with the most thermostable variant displaying a 5.7°C increased melting temperature. The variants displayed uniquely altered, concentration-dependent substrate and product binding as determined by differential scanning fluorimetry. The altered catalytic activity was evidenced by increased specific activities of all five variants, with the most improved variant doubling that of the parent. Variant homology modeling and computational analyses were used to rationalize the effects of amino acid changes lacking direct interaction with substrates. Data indicated that targeting substitutions to loop regions resulted in improved enzyme thermostability, specific activity, and relief from product inhibition. PMID:26253664

  11. Semirational Directed Evolution of Loop Regions in Aspergillus japonicus β-Fructofuranosidase for Improved Fructooligosaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Trollope, K. M.; Görgens, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    The Aspergillus japonicus β-fructofuranosidase catalyzes the industrially important biotransformation of sucrose to fructooligosaccharides. Operating at high substrate loading and temperatures between 50 and 60°C, the enzyme activity is negatively influenced by glucose product inhibition and thermal instability. To address these limitations, the solvent-exposed loop regions of the β-fructofuranosidase were engineered using a combined crystal structure- and evolutionary-guided approach. This semirational approach yielded a functionally enriched first-round library of 36 single-amino-acid-substitution variants with 58% retaining activity, and of these, 71% displayed improved activities compared to the parent. The substitutions yielding the five most improved variants subsequently were exhaustively combined and evaluated. A four-substitution combination variant was identified as the most improved and reduced the time to completion of an efficient industrial-like reaction by 22%. Characterization of the top five combination variants by isothermal denaturation assays indicated that these variants displayed improved thermostability, with the most thermostable variant displaying a 5.7°C increased melting temperature. The variants displayed uniquely altered, concentration-dependent substrate and product binding as determined by differential scanning fluorimetry. The altered catalytic activity was evidenced by increased specific activities of all five variants, with the most improved variant doubling that of the parent. Variant homology modeling and computational analyses were used to rationalize the effects of amino acid changes lacking direct interaction with substrates. Data indicated that targeting substitutions to loop regions resulted in improved enzyme thermostability, specific activity, and relief from product inhibition. PMID:26253664

  12. The impact of SLMTA in improving laboratory quality systems in the Caribbean Region

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Giselle; Gordon, Floris; Irving, Yvette; Whyms, Ismae; Parris, Keith; Beckles, Songee; Maruta, Talkmore; Ndlovu, Nqobile; Albalak, Rachel; Alemnji, George

    2016-01-01

    Background Past efforts to improve laboratory quality systems and to achieve accreditation for better patient care in the Caribbean Region have been slow. Objective To describe the impact of the Strengthening of Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) training programme and mentorship amongst five clinical laboratories in the Caribbean after 18 months. Method Five national reference laboratories from four countries participated in the SLMTA programme that incorporated classroom teaching and implementation of improvement projects. Mentors were assigned to the laboratories to guide trainees on their improvement projects and to assist in the development of Quality Management Systems (QMS). Audits were conducted at baseline, six months, exit (at 12 months) and post-SLMTA (at 18 months) using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA) checklist to measure changes in implementation of the QMS during the period. At the end of each audit, a comprehensive implementation plan was developed in order to address gaps. Results Baseline audit scores ranged from 19% to 52%, corresponding to 0 stars on the SLIPTA five-star scale. After 18 months, one laboratory reached four stars, two reached three stars and two reached two stars. There was a corresponding decrease in nonconformities and development of over 100 management and technical standard operating procedures in each of the five laboratories. Conclusion The tremendous improvement in these five Caribbean laboratories shows that SLMTA coupled with mentorship is an effective, user-friendly, flexible and customisable approach to the implementation of laboratory QMS. It is recommended that other laboratories in the region consider using the SLMTA training programme as they engage in quality systems improvement and preparation for accreditation. PMID:27066396

  13. Biomechanically and electromyographically assessed load on the spine in self-paced and force-paced lifting work.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, T P; Stålhammar, H R; Rautanen, M T; Troup, J D

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure dose of spinal load when different pacing methods were applied to lifting work and to develop methodology for such measurements. The compressive load on the spine computed by a dynamic biomechanical model and the electromyographic activity of back muscles were used for describing the spinal load. Five men and five women worked in a laboratory on two days lifting a box up and down for 30 min on both days, on one day force-paced (4 lifts/min), and on the other self-paced in random order. The weight of the box was rated by the subjects to be acceptable for the work done. The lift rate of our female subjects was higher and that of the male subjects lower in self-paced than in force-paced work. There were no significant differences in peak lumbosacral compressions nor in the amplitude distributions of electromyography between the two pacing methods. The biomechanically-calculated compressive forces on the spine were lower (about 2.7 kN for the men and 2.3 kN for women) than the biomechanical recommendations for safe lifting, but the EMG activity showed quite high peaks so that for 1% of work time the activity was on women above 60% and on men above 40% of the activity during maximum isometric voluntary test contraction. PMID:1633794

  14. Improving nitrogen management via a regional management plan for Chinese rice production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Xinping; Cui, Zhenling; Wang, Guiliang; Zhang, Weifeng

    2015-09-01

    A lack of basic information on optimal nitrogen (N) management often results in over- or under-application of N fertilizer in small-scale intensive rice farming. Here, we present a new database of N input from a survey of 6611 small-scale rice farmers and rice yield in response to added N in 1177 experimental on-farm tests across eight agroecological subregions of China. This database enables us to evaluate N management by farmers and develop an optimal approach to regional N management. We also investigated grain yield, N application rate, and estimated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in comparison to N application and farming practices. Across all farmers, the average N application rate, weighted by the area of rice production in each subregion, was 210 kg ha-1 and ranged from 30 to 744 kg ha-1 across fields and from 131 to 316 kg ha-1 across regions. The regionally optimal N rate (RONR) determined from the experiments averaged 167 kg ha-1 and varied from 114 to 224 kg N ha-1 for the different regions. If these RONR were widely adopted in China, approximately 56% of farms would reduce their use of N fertilizer, and approximately 33% would increase their use of N fertilizer. As a result, grain yield would increase by 7.4% from 7.14 to 7.67 Mg ha-1, and the estimated GHG emissions would be reduced by 11.1% from 1390 to 1236 kg carbon dioxide (CO2) eq Mg-1 grain. These results suggest that to achieve the goals of improvement in regional yield and sustainable environmental development, regional N use should be optimized among N-poor and N-rich farms and regions in China.

  15. A Low-Cost Simulation Model for R-Wave Synchronized Atrial Pacing in Pediatric Patients with Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Miriam; Egender, Friedemann; Heßling, Vera; Dähnert, Ingo; Gebauer, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) occurs frequently after pediatric cardiac surgery. R-wave synchronized atrial (AVT) pacing is used to re-establish atrioventricular synchrony. AVT pacing is complex, with technical pitfalls. We sought to establish and to test a low-cost simulation model suitable for training and analysis in AVT pacing. Methods A simulation model was developed based on a JET simulator, a simulation doll, a cardiac monitor, and a pacemaker. A computer program simulated electrocardiograms. Ten experienced pediatric cardiologists tested the model. Their performance was analyzed using a testing protocol with 10 working steps. Results Four testers found the simulation model realistic; 6 found it very realistic. Nine claimed that the trial had improved their skills. All testers considered the model useful in teaching AVT pacing. The simulation test identified 5 working steps in which major mistakes in performance test may impede safe and effective AVT pacing and thus permitted specific training. The components of the model (exclusive monitor and pacemaker) cost less than $50. Assembly and training-session expenses were trivial. Conclusions A realistic, low-cost simulation model of AVT pacing is described. The model is suitable for teaching and analyzing AVT pacing technique. PMID:26943363

  16. Harnessing genomics to improve health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region - an executive course in genomics policy.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Tara; Rab, Mohammed Abdur; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

    2005-01-21

    BACKGROUND: While innovations in medicine, science and technology have resulted in improved health and quality of life for many people, the benefits of modern medicine continue to elude millions of people in many parts of the world. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in EMR, the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics jointly organized a Genomics and Public Health Policy Executive Course, held September 20th-23rd, 2003, in Muscat, Oman. The 4-day course was sponsored by WHO-EMRO with additional support from the Canadian Program in Genomics and Global Health. The overall objective of the course was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in the region. This article presents the course findings and recommendations for genomics policy in EMR. METHODS: The course brought together senior representatives from academia, biotechnology companies, regulatory bodies, media, voluntary, and legal organizations to engage in discussion. Topics covered included scientific advances in genomics, followed by innovations in business models, public sector perspectives, ethics, legal issues and national innovation systems. RESULTS: A set of recommendations, summarized below, was formulated for the Regional Office, the Member States and for individuals.* Advocacy for genomics and biotechnology for political leadership;* Networking between member states to share information, expertise, training, and regional cooperation in biotechnology; coordination of national surveys for assessment of health biotechnology innovation systems, science capacity, government policies, legislation and regulations, intellectual property policies, private sector activity;* Creation in each member country of an effective National Body on genomics, biotechnology and health to:- formulate national biotechnology strategies- raise biotechnology awareness- encourage teaching and

  17. RCWIM - an improved global water isotope pattern prediction model using fuzzy climatic clustering regionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzer, Stefan; Araguás-Araguás, Luis; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Aggarwal, Pradeep K.

    2013-04-01

    Prediction of geospatial H and O isotopic patterns in precipitation has become increasingly important to diverse disciplines beyond hydrology, such as climatology, ecology, food authenticity, and criminal forensics, because these two isotopes of rainwater often control the terrestrial isotopic spatial patterns that facilitate the linkage of products (food, wildlife, water) to origin or movement (food, criminalistics). Currently, spatial water isotopic pattern prediction relies on combined regression and interpolation techniques to create gridded datasets by using data obtained from the Global Network of Isotopes In Precipitation (GNIP). However, current models suffer from two shortcomings: (a) models may have limited covariates and/or parameterization fitted to a global domain, which results in poor predictive outcomes at regional scales, or (b) the spatial domain is intentionally restricted to regional settings, and thereby of little use in providing information at global geospatial scales. Here we present a new global climatically regionalized isotope prediction model which overcomes these limitations through the use of fuzzy clustering of climatic data subsets, allowing us to better identify and customize appropriate covariates and their multiple regression coefficients instead of aiming for a one-size-fits-all global fit (RCWIM - Regionalized Climate Cluster Water Isotope Model). The new model significantly reduces the point-based regression residuals and results in much lower overall isotopic prediction uncertainty, since residuals are interpolated onto the regression surface. The new precipitation δ2H and δ18O isoscape model is available on a global scale at 10 arc-minutes spatial and at monthly, seasonal and annual temporal resolution, and will provide improved predicted stable isotope values used for a growing number of applications. The model further provides a flexible framework for future improvements using regional climatic clustering.

  18. Rapid Recovery in Sub-Optimal Readers in Wales through a Self-Paced Computer-Based Reading Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Phil; Hughes, Antony; Phillips, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Basic literacy skills underlie much future adult functioning, and are targeted in children through a variety of means. Children with identified special needs in reading were exposed to a self-paced computer-based reading programme that focused on improving phonetic ability. Exposure was limited to three, 40-minute sessions a week, for 10 weeks.…

  19. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. 460.90 Section 460.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  20. An improved approach for rainfall estimation over Indian summer monsoon region using Kalpana-1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, C.; Prakash, Satya; Sathiyamoorthy, V.; Gairola, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, an improved Kalpana-1 infrared (IR) based rainfall estimation algorithm, specific to Indian summer monsoon region is presented. This algorithm comprises of two parts: (i) development of Kalpana-1 IR based rainfall estimation algorithm with improvement for orographic warm rain underestimation generally suffered by IR based rainfall estimation methods and (ii) cooling index to take care of the growth and decay of clouds and thereby improving the precipitation estimation. In the first part, a power-law based regression relationship between cloud top temperature from Kalpana-1 IR channel and rainfall from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) - precipitation radar specific to the Indian region is developed. This algorithm tries to overcome the inherent orographic issues of the IR based rainfall estimation techniques. Over the windward sides of the Western Ghats, Himalayas and Arakan Yoma mountain chains, separate regression coefficients are generated to take care of the orographically produced warm rainfall. Generally global rainfall retrieval methods fail to detect the warm rainfall over these regions. Rain estimated over the orographic region is suitably blended with the rain retrieved over the entire domain comprising of the Indian monsoon region and parts of the Indian Ocean using another regression relationship. While blending, a smoothening function is applied to avoid rainfall artefacts and an elliptical weighting function is introduced for the purpose. In the second part, a cooling index to distinguish rain/no-rain conditions is developed using Kalpana-1 IR data. The cooling index identifies the cloud growing/decaying regions using two consecutive half-hourly IR images of Kalpana-1 by assigning appropriate weights to growing and non-growing clouds. Intercomparison of estimated rainfall from the present algorithm with TRMM-3B42/3B43 precipitation products and Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded rain gauge data are found to be

  1. Quantifying 10 years of Improvements in Earthquake and Tsunami Monitoring in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; McNamara, D. E.; Saurel, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude-9.3 Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of December 26, 2004, increased global awareness to the destructive hazard of earthquakes and tsunamis. Post event assessments of global coastline vulnerability highlighted the Caribbean as a region of high hazard and risk and that it was poorly monitored. Nearly 100 tsunamis have been reported for the Caribbean region and Adjacent Regions in the past 500 years and continue to pose a threat for its nations, coastal areas along the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic seaboard of North and South America. Significant efforts to improve monitoring capabilities have been undertaken since this time including an expansion of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Global Seismographic Network (GSN) (McNamara et al., 2006) and establishment of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Intergovernmental Coordination Group (ICG) for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS). The minimum performance standards it recommended for initial earthquake locations include: 1) Earthquake detection within 1 minute, 2) Minimum magnitude threshold = M4.5, and 3) Initial hypocenter error of <30 km. In this study, we assess current compliance with performance standards and model improvements in earthquake and tsunami monitoring capabilities in the Caribbean region since the first meeting of the UNESCO ICG-Caribe EWS in 2006. The three measures of network capability modeled in this study are: 1) minimum Mw detection threshold; 2) P-wave detection time of an automatic processing system and; 3) theoretical earthquake location uncertainty. By modeling three measures of seismic network capability, we can optimize the distribution of ICG-Caribe EWS seismic stations and select an international network that will be contributed from existing real-time broadband national networks in the region. Sea level monitoring improvements both offshore and

  2. Evaluating and improving CLM hydrologic processes for integrated earth system modeling at regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Leung, L.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Coleman, A. M.; Ke, Y.; Tesfa, T. K.; Li, H.

    2010-12-01

    The community land model (CLM) was designed for coupling with atmospheric models to simulate water, energy, and carbon fluxes between the land surface and atmosphere. These fluxes are regulated in various degrees by its hydrologic processes, which have not been vigorously evaluated for applications at watershed or regional scales. In the framework of an integrated regional earth system model being developed, accurate hydrologic information in all of its components including socio-economy, atmosphere, land, and energy infrastructure is needed to represent the interactions between human and earth system processes. Applying CLM in this framework requires evaluation and model improvement so that CLM could be used to represent hydrology, soil, managed and unmanaged ecosystems, and biogeochemical processes across scales in a single modeling framework. In this presentation, we will report preliminary results on the development of CLM featuring: (1) improved land surface hydrology that incorporates hydrologic processes from the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model, including the parameterizations of subgrid variability, dynamic surface- and groundwater interactions, and hydraulic redistribution; (2) a semi-distributed extension of CLM (DCLM) for more spatially-explicit hydrologic modeling, which is critical for regional land and water management decisions under climate change mitigation and adaptation scenarios. The model development will be evaluated at flux towers and watersheds at various scales.

  3. Wiener filtering improves quantification of regional myocardial perfusion with thallium-201 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Jeremy, R.W.; Dyer, S.M.; Frank, T.L.; Becker, L.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Quantitation of myocardial perfusion with thallium-201 (201Tl) SPECT is limited by finite resolution and image noise. This study examined whether Wiener filtering could improve quantitation of the severity of myocardial perfusion deficits. In 19 anesthetized dogs, adjustable stenoses were placed on the left anterior descending (LAD, n = 12) or circumflex (LCx, n = 7) arteries. Thallium-201 SPECT images were acquired during maximal coronary vasodilation with dipyridamole, and simultaneous measurements of myocardial blood flow were made with microspheres. The relationship between SPECT and microsphere flow deficits in the LAD region was significantly better (p less than 0.05) with Wiener filtering (Y = 0.90X + 0.03, r = 0.78) than with conventional Hanning filtering (Y = 0.66X + 0.34, r = 0.61). Similarly, in the LCx region the relationship between SPECT and microsphere perfusion deficits was better (p less than 0.01) with the Wiener filter (Y = 0.91X + 0.07, r = 0.66) than with the Hanning filter (Y = 0.36X + 0.50, r = 0.40). Wiener filtering improves quantitation of the severity of regional myocardial perfusion deficits, allowing better assessment of the functional significance of coronary artery stenoses.

  4. Continuous improvement in dietetics education with a regional advisory board: a model that works.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rose L

    2003-08-01

    Continuous improvement has been a focus of business and health care for years. The Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education has also identified the need for continuous improvement in dietetics education programs and requires them to seek outside counsel to help accomplish it. Most dietetics education programs develop advisory boards to provide this outside counsel, but finding individuals to commit to an ongoing advisory board can be challenging. Dietetics internship directors from dietetics practicum programs throughout Arizona created the Arizona Dietetic Practicum Advisory Committee (AzDPAC), which uses suggestions from preceptors, interns, and committee members to generate ideas for improvement. Since the conception of AzDPAC both tangible and intangible outcomes have occurred. Tangible outcomes include better coordination among programs, development of a combined annual affiliate meeting, standardization of forms, creation of a combined "Clinical Bootcamp," development of a Web page describing all programs, and better networking among interns from different programs. In addition, AzDPAC improved cooperation and sharing of expertise and created an available group of peers for new directors. An advisory committee of regional program directors is a model that works in providing dietetics education programs with ongoing outside counsel and ideas for continuous improvement. PMID:12891153

  5. Improving Remotely-sensed Precipitation Estimates Over Mountainous Regions For Use In Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, I.; Akcelik, M.; Kuligowski, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    In support of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service's (NWS) flash flood warning and heavy precipitation forecast efforts, the NOAA National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS) Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) has been providing satellite based precipitation estimates operationally since 1978. Two of the satellite based rainfall algorithms are the Hydro-Estimator (HE) and the Self-Calibrating Multivariate Precipitation Retrieval (SCaMPR). However, unlike the HE algorithm the SCaMPR does not currently make any adjustments for the effects of complex topography on rainfall. This study investigates the potential for improving the SCaMPR algorithm by incorporating an orographic correction and humidity correction based calibration of the SCaMPR against rain gauge transects in northwestern Mexico to identify correctable biases related to elevation, slope, wind direction and humidity. Elevation-dependent bias structure of the SCaMPR algorithm suggest that the rainfall algorithm underestimates precipitation in case of upward atmospheric movements and overestimates rainfall in case of downward atmospheric movements along with mountainous terrain. A regionally dependent empirical elevation-based bias correction technique may help improve the quality of satellite-derived precipitation products. As well as orography, effect of atmospheric indices over precipitation estimates is analyzed. The findings suggest that continued improvement to the developed orographic correction scheme is warranted in order to advance quantitative precipitation estimation in complex terrain regions for use in weather forecasting and hydrologic applications.

  6. Development and Implementation of Quality Rating and Improvement Systems in Midwest Region States. REL 2016-143

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faria, Ann-Marie; Greenberg, Ariela; Hawkinson, Laura; Metzger, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes common and unique approaches that Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest Region states have adopted in developing and implementing their quality rating and improvement systems (QRISs). A QRIS is a method for assessing, improving, and communicating the quality of early childhood education and care providers. The study…

  7. Improving Snow Measurement Technology to Better Parameterise Cold Regions Hydrometeorology Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J.; Debeer, C.; Ellis, C.; Essery, R.; Helgason, W.; Kinar, N.; Link, T.; MacDonald, J.

    2008-12-01

    Marmot Creek Research Basin, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada constitutes a long term cold regions hydrometeorological observatory with over 45 years of intensive observations in alpine and forested zones. Recently, novel combinations of measurement technology to snow have been deployed in Marmot Creek to advance the understanding of snow processes and to improve hydrometeorological models of streamflow and atmospheric variables. One advance has been the development and application of portable acoustic reflectometry to measure the density and structure of seasonal snowpacks using an audible sound wave. This has permitted the non-invasive measurement of snow water equivalent for both stationary and snow survey applications. Another advance has been the use of oblique time-lapse digital photography which is corrected for elevation and view angle from a LiDAR DEM to produce daily orthogonal snow covered area images of the alpine zone. These images are used to calculate snowcovered area and to develop and test improved snowcover melt and depletion algorithms. Deployment of 3-axis ultrasonic anemometers and fast hygrometers with collection of 10 Hz data and full correction for non-stationarity, axis rotation and other effects has shown that horizontal turbulence is often advected into mountain clearings and causes failure of traditional bulk transfer calculations of latent and sensible heat. For forest snow a hanging, weighed spruce tree and hanging, weighed sub-canopy troughs are used to capture intercepted snow load and unloaded snow fluxes respectively. These quantities provide the information needed to test detailed models of the snow interception and unloading processes. To quantify variations in sub-canopy energy for snowmelt, infrared imaging radiometers and narrow beam radiometers are used to measure thermal radiation exitance from needles, stems and trunks in forests of varying structure. These measurements are being used to develop improved models of

  8. Quantifying 10 years of improved earthquake-monitoring performance in the Caribbean region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, Daniel E.; Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Saurel, Jean-Marie; Huerfano-Moreno, V.; Lynch, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and adjacent regions during the past 500 years. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Hundreds of thousands are currently threatened along the Caribbean coastlines. Were a great tsunamigenic earthquake to occur in the Caribbean region today, the effects would potentially be catastrophic due to an increasingly vulnerable region that has seen significant population increases in the past 40–50 years and currently hosts an estimated 500,000 daily beach visitors from North America and Europe, a majority of whom are not likely aware of tsunami and earthquake hazards. Following the magnitude 9.1 Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake of 26 December 2004, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Intergovernmental Coordination Group (ICG) for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Early Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE‐EWS) was established and developed minimum performance standards for the detection and analysis of earthquakes. In this study, we model earthquake‐magnitude detection threshold and P‐wave detection time and demonstrate that the requirements established by the UNESCO ICG CARIBE‐EWS are met with 100% of the network operating. We demonstrate that earthquake‐monitoring performance in the Caribbean Sea region has improved significantly in the past decade as the number of real‐time seismic stations available to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tsunami warning centers have increased. We also identify weaknesses in the current international network and provide guidance for selecting the optimal distribution of seismic stations contributed from existing real‐time broadband national networks in the region.

  9. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24% to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6-h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3°C.

  10. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.; Wang, Y.; Xue, M.

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  11. Analysis and improvement of ionospheric thin shell model used in SBAS for China region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Yuan, H.

    2013-06-01

    The most frequently used mapping function for converting slant total electron content (STEC) to vertical total electron content (VTEC) uses a simplified ionospheric single layer model in satellite based augmentation system (SBAS). Aiming at ionospheric single layer model altitude variation, we analyzed the statistical characteristic of mapping function in systemic approach particular for the region of China, and then experimental mapping function was proposed. The experimental mapping function is used in SBAS ionospheric correction and the precision of vertical correction is compared with standard mapping function. The results show that conversion factor errors depend on latitude, time and elevation, experimental mapping function is helpful to the vertical TEC estimation and may improve the precision of SBAS ionospheric refraction correction especially for the low latitude region of China.

  12. Regional representativeness assessment and improvement of eddy flux observations in China.

    PubMed

    He, Honglin; Zhang, Liyun; Gao, Yangzi; Ren, Xiaoli; Zhang, Li; Yu, Guirui; Wang, Shaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Both the amounts of data describing the site-scale carbon flux at a high temporal and spatial resolution collected in China and the number of eddy covariance flux towers have been increasing during the last decade. To correctly upscale these fluxes to the regional and global level, the representativeness of the current network of flux towers must be known. The present study quantifies the representativeness of the flux network for the regional carbon exchange. This analysis combined the total solar radiation, air temperature, vapor pressure and the enhanced vegetation index to indicate the environmental characteristics of each 1-km pixel cell and flux tower. Next, the Euclidean distance from each pixel to the tower was calculated to determine the representativeness of the existing flux towers. To improve the regional representativeness, additional tower locations were pinpointed by identifying and clustering the underrepresented areas. The existing network of flux towers performed well in representing the environmental conditions of the middle and the northeastern portions of China. The well-represented areas covered 60.9% of the total areas. The towers in croplands and grasslands represented the vegetation types well, but the wetlands and barelands were poorly represented. The representativeness of the flux network increased with the addition of nine towers located in forests, grasslands, wetlands and barelands. The representativeness of 27.5% of the land areas improved. In addition, the well-represented areas were enlarged by 15.2%. Substantial gains in representation were achieved by adding new towers on the Tibet Plateau. The representativeness of the northwest and southwest was improved less significantly, suggesting that more towers are required to capture certain ecosystem behaviors. PMID:25310829

  13. Improved regional water management utilizing climate forecasts: An interbasin transfer model with a risk management framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weihua; Sankarasubramanian, A.; Ranjithan, R. S.; Brill, E. D.

    2014-08-01

    Regional water supply systems undergo surplus and deficit conditions due to differences in inflow characteristics as well as due to their seasonal demand patterns. This study proposes a framework for regional water management by proposing an interbasin transfer (IBT) model that uses climate-information-based inflow forecast for minimizing the deviations from the end-of-season target storage across the participating pools. Using the ensemble streamflow forecast, the IBT water allocation model was applied for two reservoir systems in the North Carolina Triangle Area. Results show that interbasin transfers initiated by the ensemble streamflow forecast could potentially improve the overall water supply reliability as the demand continues to grow in the Triangle Area. To further understand the utility of climate forecasts in facilitating IBT under different spatial correlation structures between inflows and between the initial storages of the two systems, a synthetic experiment was designed to evaluate the framework under inflow forecast having different skills. Findings from the synthetic study can be summarized as follows: (a) inflow forecasts combined with the proposed IBT optimization model provide improved allocation in comparison to the allocations obtained under the no-transfer scenario as well as under transfers obtained with climatology; (b) spatial correlations between inflows and between initial storages among participating reservoirs could also influence the potential benefits that could be achieved through IBT; (c) IBT is particularly beneficial for systems that experience low correlations between inflows or between initial storages or on both attributes of the regional water supply system. Thus, if both infrastructure and permitting structures exist for promoting interbasin transfers, season-ahead inflow forecasts could provide added benefits in forecasting surplus/deficit conditions among the participating pools in the regional water supply system.

  14. [Analysis of fusion waves created with temporal pacing].

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Shigemi, K; Hayashi, K; Kakihara, K; Nakajima, Y; Fukushima, H; Tanaka, Y

    1998-08-01

    Fifty-five beats of fusion waves were recorded continuously with an audio digital tape and the tape was re-played for analysis. A 45-year-old male (56 kg, 175 cm) with cervical spondylosis was scheduled to undergo laminoplasty of the cervical vertebral (C2-C6). A temporal ventricular (VVI mode) pacing lead was inserted from the right cubital vein to the right ventricular apex for preventing bradycardia while manipulating the medulla. The height of the R wave decreased gradually and the depth of S wave increased in the earlier period of fusion beats and it was reversed later. The narrow QRS width indicated that the electrode was placed near the cardiac conducting system. The gradually increasing intervals between P waves activated the pacing, and the P wave intervals recovered inhibiting the pacing. During the recovery phase, some beats were still activated by pacing instead of depressing the rate below the original rate. These beats suggest the importance of considering the atrial-ventricular conducting time. Arterial pressure fluctuated only slightly during the 'fusion beats, suggesting that despite the abnormality in the cardiac conduction system due to pacing, contraction of the ventricular muscles was only slightly affected in this case. PMID:9753972

  15. Phrenic Nerve Stimulation for Diaphragm Pacing in a Quadriplegic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryung; Kim, Il-sup; Hong, Jae Taek

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoventilation due to injury to the brain stem respiratory center or high cervical cord (above the C3 level) can result in dependence to prolonged mechanical ventilation with tracheostomy, frequent nosocomial pneumonia, and prolonged hospitalization. Diaphragm pacing through electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve is an established treatment for central hypoventilation syndrome. We performed chronic phrenic nerve stimulation for diaphragm pacing with the spinal cord stimulator for pain control in a quadriplegic patient with central apnea due to complete spinal cord injury at the level of C2 from cervical epidural hematoma. After diaphragmatic pacing, the patient who was completely dependent on the mechanical ventilator could ambulate up to three hours every day without aid of mechanical ventilation during the 12 months of follow-up. Diaphragm pacing through unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation with spinal cord stimulator was feasible in an apneic patient with complete quadriplegia who was completely dependent on mechanical ventilation. Diaphragm pacing with the spinal cord stimulator is feasible and effective for the treatment of the central hypoventilation syndrome. PMID:24294464

  16. T wave alternans during exercise and atrial pacing in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohnloser, S. H.; Klingenheben, T.; Zabel, M.; Li, Y. G.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence is accumulating that microvolt T wave alternans (TWA) is a marker of increased risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Initially, atrial pacing was used to elevate heart rate and elicit TWA. More recently, a noninvasive approach has been developed that elevates heart rate using exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 30 consecutive patients with a history of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the spectral method was used to detect TWA during both atrial pacing and submaximal exercise testing. The concordance rate for the presence or absence of TWA using the two measurement methods was 84%. There was a patient-specific heart rate threshold for the detection of TWA that averaged 100 +/- 14 beats/min during exercise compared with 97 +/- 9 beats/min during right atrial pacing (P = NS). Beyond this threshold, there was a significant and comparable increase in level of TWA with decreasing pacing cycle length and increasing exercise heart rates. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to demonstrate that microvolt TWA can be assessed reliably and noninvasively during exercise stress. There is a patient-specific heart rate threshold beyond which TWA continues to increase with increasing heart rates. Heart rate thresholds for the onset of TWA measured during atrial pacing and exercise stress were comparable, indicating that heart rate alone appears to be the main factor of determining the onset of TWA during submaximal exercise stress.

  17. Improved line parameters for ozone bands in the 10-micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaud, Jean-Marie; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, Malathy V.

    1990-01-01

    A complete update of spectroscopic line parameters for the 10-micron bands of ozone is reported. The listing contains calculated positions, intensities, lower state energies, and air- and self-broadened halfwidths of more than 53,000 lines. The results have been generated using improved spectroscopic parameters obtained in a number of recent high resolution laboratory studies. A total of eighteen bands of (O-16)3 (sixteen hot bands plus the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals) are included along with the nu(1) and nu(3) fundamentals of both (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16). As shown by comparisons of line-by-line simulations with 0.003/cm resolution balloon-borne stratospheric solar spectra, the new parameters greatly improve the accuracy of atmospheric calculations in the 10-micron region, especially for the isotopic (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16) lines.

  18. Iraqi primary care system in Kurdistan region: providers’ perspectives on problems and opportunities for improvement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As part of a comprehensive study on the primary health care system in Iraq, we sought to explore primary care providers’ perspectives about the main problems influencing the provision of primary care services and opportunities to improve the system. Methods A qualitative study based on four focus groups involving 40 primary care providers from 12 primary health care centres was conducted in Erbil governorate in the Iraqi Kurdistan region between July and October 2010. A topic guide was used to lead discussions and covered questions on positive aspects of and current problems with the primary care system in addition to the priority needs for its improvement. The discussions were fully transcribed and the qualitative data was analyzed by content analysis, followed by a thematic analysis. Results Problems facing the primary care system included inappropriate health service delivery (irrational use of health services, irrational treatment, poor referral system, poor infrastructure and poor hygiene), health workforce challenges (high number of specialists, uneven distribution of the health workforce, rapid turnover, lack of training and educational opportunities and discrepancies in the salary system), shortage in resources (shortage and low quality of medical supplies and shortage in financing), poor information technology and poor leadership/governance. The greatest emphasis was placed on poor organization of health services delivery, particularly the irrational use of health services and the related overcrowding and overload on primary care providers and health facilities. Suggestions for improving the system included application of a family medicine approach and ensuring effective planning and monitoring. Conclusions This study has provided a comprehensive understanding of the factors that negatively affect the primary care system in Iraq’s Kurdistan region from the perspective of primary care providers. From their experience, primary care providers

  19. The distribution of pace adopted by cyclists during a cross-country mountain bike World Championships.

    PubMed

    Abbiss, Chris R; Ross, Megan L R; Garvican, Laura A; Ross, Neil; Pottgiesser, Torben; Gregory, John; Martin, David T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of pace self-selected by cyclists of varying ability, biological age and sex performing in a mountain bike World Championship event. Data were collected on cyclists performing in the Elite Male (ELITEmale; n = 75), Elite Female (ELITEfemale; n = 50), Under 23 Male (U23male; n = 62), Under 23 Female (U23female; n = 34), Junior Male (JNRmale; n = 71) and Junior Female (JNRfemale; n = 30) categories of the 2009 UCI Cross-Country Mountain Bike World Championships. Split times were recorded for the top, middle and bottom 20% of all finishers of each category. Timing splits were positioned to separate the course into technical and non-technical, uphill, downhill and rolling/flat sections. Compared with bottom performers, top performers in all male categories (ELITEmale, U23male, JNRmale) maintained a more even pace over the event as evidenced by a significantly lower standard deviation and range in average lap speed. Top performers, males, and ELITEmale athletes spent a lower percentage of overall race time on technical uphill sections of the course, compared with middle and bottom placed finishers, females, and JNRmale athletes, respectively. Better male performers adopt a more even distribution of pace throughout cross-country mountain events. Performance of lower placed finishers, females and JNRmale athletes may be improved by enhancing technical uphill cycling ability. PMID:23521618

  20. Sputter-deposited TiN electrode coatings for superior sensing and pacing performance.

    PubMed

    Schaldach, M; Hubmann, M; Weikl, A; Hardt, R

    1990-12-01

    The sensing and pacing performance of pacemaker electrodes is characterized by the electrochemical properties of the electrode/tissue interface affecting tissue reactions and the kinetics of the ionic exchange. The usually smooth metallic electrode surface results in a high pass filter characteristic. To better match the electrode's filter characteristic to the spectral content of the depolarization signal, various combinations of electrode shape, material and surface structure have been researched. The electrode with sputter-deposited TiN coating presented in this report has been designed to meet the demand for low acute as well as chronic thresholds and superior sensing performance not only with respect to spontaneous activity but also regarding the detection of the evoked response. The clinical results obtained with this electrode prove the excellent pacing and sensing properties resulting from minimized polarization losses and optimized filtering of the signal to be detected, respectively. The acute and chronic clinical advantages over previous concepts are attributed mainly to the biocompatibility of the material used and the microcrystalline surface structure achieved by the coating process. The design concept of the new electrode is presented together with the clinical results obtained. While the advancements in microelectronics and battery technology have certainly formed the basis for the development of pulse generators featuring an ever increasing versatility of functions at the same or even smaller pacemaker dimensions, from a point of view of pacing system performance the development of improved electrode concepts as the one presented must be regarded as equally indispensable. PMID:1704562

  1. Regional Body-Wave Corrections and Surface-Wave Tomography Models to Improve Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Rodgers, A J; Meyeda, K M; Sicherman, A

    2003-07-18

    Our identification research for the past several years has focused on the problem of correctly discriminating small-magnitude explosions from a background of earthquakes, mining tremors, and other events. Small magnitudes lead to an emphasis on regional waveforms. The goal is to reduce the variance within the population of each type of event, while increasing the separation between the explosions and the other event types. We address this problem for both broad categories of seismic waves, body waves, and surface waves. First, we map out the effects of propagation and source size in advance so that they can be accounted for and removed from observed events. This can dramatically reduce the population variance. Second, we try to optimize the measurement process to improve the separation between population types. For body waves we focus on the identification power of the short-period regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn and Lg, and coda that can often be detected down to very small magnitudes. It is now well established that particular ratios of these phases, such as 6- to 8-Hz Pn/Lg, can effectively discriminate between closely located explosions and earthquakes. To extend this discrimination power over broad areas, we developed a revised Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC2) procedure (Walter and Taylor, 2002). This joint source and path model fits the observed spectra and removes magnitude and distance trends from the data. It allows for the possibility of variable apparent stress scaling in earthquakes, an unresolved issue that is the subject of investigation under separate funding. The MDACZ procedure makes use of the extremely stable coda estimates of Mw for source magnitude and can also use independent Q tomography to help reduce trade-offs in fitting spectra. We can then apply the kriging operation to the MDAC2 residuals to provide full 2-D path corrections by phase and frequency band. These corrections allow the exploration of all possible ratios and

  2. Limb Correction of Infrared Imagery in Cloudy Regions for the Improved Interpretation of RGB Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmer, Nicholas J.; Berndt, Emily; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Red-Green-Blue (RGB) composites (EUMETSAT User Services 2009) combine information from several channels into a single composite image. RGB composites contain the same information as the original channels, but presents the information in a more efficient manner. However, RGB composites derived from infrared imagery of both polar-orbiting and geostationary sensors are adversely affected by the limb effect, which interferes with the qualitative interpretation of RGB composites at large viewing zenith angles. The limb effect, or limb-cooling, is a result of an increase in optical path length of the absorbing atmosphere as viewing zenith angle increases (Goldberg et al. 2001; Joyce et al. 2001; Liu and Weng 2007). As a result, greater atmospheric absorption occurs at the limb, causing the sensor to observe anomalously cooler brightness temperatures. Figure 1 illustrates this effect. In general, limb-cooling results in a 4-11 K decrease in measured brightness temperature (Liu and Weng 2007) depending on the infrared band. For example, water vapor and ozone absorption channels display much larger limb-cooling than infrared window channels. Consequently, RGB composites created from infrared imagery not corrected for limb effects can only be reliably interpreted close to nadir, which reduces the spatial coverage of the available imagery. Elmer (2015) developed a reliable, operational limb correction technique for clear regions. However, many RGB composites are intended to be used and interpreted in cloudy regions, so a limb correction methodology valid for both clear and cloudy regions is needed. This paper presents a limb correction technique valid for both clear and cloudy regions, which is described in Section 2. Section 3 presents several RGB case studies demonstrating the improved functionality of limb-corrected RGBs in both clear and cloudy regions, and Section 4 summarizes and presents the key conclusions of this work.

  3. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.; Wang, Y.; Xue, M.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under a China Meteorological Administration (CMA) chemical weather modeling system, GRAPES/CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System, CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment). Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are interactively fed online into a two-moment cloud scheme (WRF Double-Moment 6-class scheme - WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred.

    The results show that aerosols that interact with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content, and cloud droplet number concentrations, while decreasing the mean diameters of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive microphysical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48 % enhancements of threat score for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The aerosols that interact with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  4. Multisite Pacing for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Promise and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Antonios P; Behar, Jonathan M; Claridge, Simon; Jackson, Tom; Sohal, Manav; Rinaldi, Christopher Aldo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces the morbidity and mortality of patients with symptomatic heart failure and intraventricular conduction delay. However, its clinical outcomes are non-uniform and up to one third of treated patients are subsequently classified as non-responders. Multisite pacing (MSP), i.e. stimulating the myocardium from multiple locations, has emerged as a potential therapeutic option in patients requiring CRT. The rationale for MSP is based on the hypothesis that increasing the pacing locations in the left ventricle results in a more physiologic and coordinated myocardial systole. MSP can be achieved by additional leads in the right or left ventricle but this can lead to high battery drain and more frequent generator replacements. Multipolar left ventricular leads can deliver pacing at multiple sites, and therefore, a single lead can be used for MSP. However, the optimal programming settings and the outcomes of this approach remain yet to be determined. PMID:27216844

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation over Broca's region improves phonemic and semantic fluency in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Z; Pisoni, A; Papagno, C

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can be proficiently used to modulate attentional and cognitive functions. For instance, in the language domain there is evidence that tDCS can fasten picture naming in both healthy individuals and aphasic patients, or improve grammar learning. In this study, we investigated whether tDCS can be used to increase healthy subjects' performance in phonemic and semantic fluency tasks, that are typically used in clinical assessment of language. Ten healthy individuals performed a semantic and a phonemic fluency task following anodal tDCS applied over Broca's region. Each participant underwent a real and a sham tDCS session. Participants were found to produce more words following real anodal tDCS both in the phonemic and in the semantic fluency. Control experiments ascertained that this finding did not depend upon unspecific effects of tDCS over levels of general arousal or attention or upon participants' expectations. These data confirm the efficacy of tDCS in transiently improving language functions by showing that anodal stimulation of Broca's region can enhance verbal fluency. Implications of these results for the treatment of language functions in aphasia are considered. PMID:21477637

  6. New Local, National and Regional Cereal Price Indices for Improved Identification of Food Insecurity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Tondel, Fabien; Thorne, Jennifer A.; Essam, Timothy; Mann, Bristol F.; Stabler, Blake; Eilerts, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Large price increases over a short time period can be indicative of a deteriorating food security situation. Food price indices developed by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) are used to monitor food price trends at a global level, but largely reflect supply and demand conditions in export markets. However, reporting by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)'s Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) indicates that staple cereal prices in many markets of the developing world, especially in surplus-producing areas, often have a delayed and variable response to international export market price trends. Here we present new price indices compiled for improved food security monitoring and assessment, and specifically for monitoring conditions of food access across diverse food insecure regions. We found that cereal price indices constructed using market prices within a food insecure region showed significant differences from the international cereals price, and had a variable price dispersion across markets within each marketshed. Using satellite-derived remote sensing information that estimates local production and the FAO Cereals Index as predictors, we were able to forecast movements of the local or national price indices in the remote, arid and semi-arid countries of the 38 countries examined. This work supports the need for improved decision-making about targeted aid and humanitarian relief, by providing earlier early warning of food security crises.

  7. A new direct torque control strategy with improved system performance in the low-speed region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chengzhi; Wu, Yingnan; Zhang, Hui

    2006-11-01

    Based on the theoretic analysis of performance of the induction motor (IM), the increment of electromagnetic torque of IM is analyzed in detail. this paper explains the reason why the IM performance in the low speed region is poor under conventional direct torque control (DTC). Then one new control strategy of IM is proposed on the basis of classical direct torque control (DTC). The scheme is replacing the single voltage space vector with high frequency voltage pulse when IM runs in the low speed region. By control voltage pulse, a fuzzy neural network direct torque control system based on TMS320F240 is made. The high frequency voltage purls make system's impedance improve obviously. It can effectively reduce the influence of stator resistance in flux linkage. Then, we can avoid facing the tradition stator resistance examining problem. Through duty ratio control technique in high frequency voltage pulse, this scheme can effectively reduce the torque ripple in low speed and static function of the system is improved greatly. The results of the experiment verified the feasibility of the proposed strategy.

  8. Enhancement of the double flexible pace search threshold determination for change vector analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouzi, S. A.; Vidal, A.; Bentounes, H. A.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing is one of the most reliable ways to monitor land use and land cover change of large areas. On the other hand, satellite images from different agencies are becoming accessible due to the new user dissemination policies. For that reason, interpretation of remotely sensed data in a spatiotemporal context is becoming a valuable research topic. In the present day, a map of change has a great significant for scientific purposes or planning and management applications. However, it is difficult to extract useful visual information from the large collection of available satellite images. For that reason, automatic or semi-automatic exploration is needed. One of the key stages in the change detection methods is threshold selection. This threshold determination problem has been addressed by several recent techniques based on Change Vector Analysis (CVA). Thus, this work provides a simple semi-automatic procedure that defines the change/no change condition and a comparative study will be involved together with the previous existing method called Double Flexible Pace Search (DFPS). This study uses Landsat Thematic Mapper scenes acquired on different dates in an Algerian region. First, some training data sets containing all possible classes of change are required and their respective supervised posterior probability maps for each scene are obtained. The selected supervised classifier is based on the Maximum Likelihood method. Then four training sets (two sets from each date) are chosen from their corresponding probability maps based on their spatial location in the original images. The optimal average will be obtained as an average of the thresholds obtained at every set. This work verifies that the proposed approach is effective on the selected area, providing improved change map results.

  9. Is right ventricular mid-septal pacing superior to apical pacing in patients with high degree atrio-ventricular block and moderately depressed left ventricular function?*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Mao, Ye; Liu, Shao-hua; Wu, Qiong; Luo, Qing-zhi; Pan, Wen-qi; Jin, Qi; Zhang, Ning; Ling, Tian-you; Chen, Ying; Gu, Gang; Shen, Wei-feng; Wu, Li-qun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We are aimed to investigate whether right ventricular mid-septal pacing (RVMSP) is superior to conventional right ventricular apical pacing (RVAP) in improving clinical functional capacity and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) for patients with high-degree atrio-ventricular block and moderately depressed left ventricle (LV) function. Methods: Ninety-two patients with high-degree atrio-ventricular block and moderately reduced LVEF (ranging from 35% to 50%) were randomly allocated to RVMSP (n=45) and RVAP (n=47). New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, echocardiographic LVEF, and distance during a 6-min walk test (6MWT) were determined at 18 months after pacemaker implantation. Serum levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results: Compared with baseline, NYHA functional class remained unchanged at 18 months, distance during 6MWT (485 m vs. 517 m) and LVEF (36.7% vs. 41.8%) were increased, but BNP levels were reduced (2352 pg/ml vs. 710 pg/ml) in the RVMSP group compared with those in the RVAP group, especially in patients with LVEF 35%–40% (for all comparisons, P<0.05). However, clinical function capacity and LV function measurements were not significantly changed in patients with RVAP, despite the pacing measurements being similar in both groups, such as R-wave amplitude and capture threshold. Conclusions: RVMSP provides a better clinical utility, compared with RVAP, in patients with high-degree atrioventricular block and moderately depressed LV function whose LVEF levels ranged from 35% to 40%. PMID:24903987

  10. Analysis of Stakeholder's Behaviours for an Improved Management of an Agricultural Coastal Region in Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Ayisha Al; Jens, Grundmann; der Weth Rüdiger, van; Niels, Schütze

    2015-04-01

    Al Batinah coastal area is the main agricultural region in Oman. Agriculture is concentrated in Al Batinah, because of more fertile soils and easier access to water in the form of groundwater compared to other administrative areas in the country. The region now is facing a problem as a result of over abstraction of fresh groundwater for irrigation from the main aquifer along the coast. This enforces the inflow of sea water into the coastal aquifer and causes salinization of the groundwater. As a consequence the groundwater becomes no longer suitable for irrigation which impacts the social and economical situation of farmers as well as the environment. Therefore, the existing situation generates conflicts between different stakeholders regarding water availability, sustainable aquifer management, and profitable agricultural production in Al Batinah region. Several management measures to maintain the groundwater aquifer in the region, were implemented by the government. However, these solutions showed only limited successes for the existing problem. The aim of this study now is to evaluate the implementation potential of several management interventions and their combinations by analysing opinions and responses of all relevant stakeholders in the region. This is done in order to identify potential conflicts among stakeholders to a participatory process within the frame of an integrated water resources management and to support decision makers in taking more informed decisions. Questionnaires were designed for collecting data from different groups of stakeholders e.g. water professionals, farmers from the study area and decision makers of different organizations and ministries. These data were analysed statistically for each group separately as well as regarding relations amongst groups by using the SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Science) software package. Results show, that the need to improve the situation is supported by all groups. However, significant

  11. Improved sequence-based prediction of disordered regions with multilayer fusion of multiple information sources

    PubMed Central

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Stach, Wojciech; Chen, Ke; Kedarisetti, Kanaka Durga; Disfani, Fatemeh Miri; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Intrinsically disordered proteins play a crucial role in numerous regulatory processes. Their abundance and ubiquity combined with a relatively low quantity of their annotations motivate research toward the development of computational models that predict disordered regions from protein sequences. Although the prediction quality of these methods continues to rise, novel and improved predictors are urgently needed. Results: We propose a novel method, named MFDp (Multilayered Fusion-based Disorder predictor), that aims to improve over the current disorder predictors. MFDp is as an ensemble of 3 Support Vector Machines specialized for the prediction of short, long and generic disordered regions. It combines three complementary disorder predictors, sequence, sequence profiles, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility, backbone dihedral torsion angles, residue flexibility and B-factors. Our method utilizes a custom-designed set of features that are based on raw predictions and aggregated raw values and recognizes various types of disorder. The MFDp is compared at the residue level on two datasets against eight recent disorder predictors and top-performing methods from the most recent CASP8 experiment. In spite of using training chains with ≤25% similarity to the test sequences, our method consistently and significantly outperforms the other methods based on the MCC index. The MFDp outperforms modern disorder predictors for the binary disorder assignment and provides competitive real-valued predictions. The MFDp's outputs are also shown to outperform the other methods in the identification of proteins with long disordered regions. Availability: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/MFDp.html Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: lkurgan@ece.ualberta.ca PMID:20823312

  12. NASA Earth Science Research Results for Improved Regional Crop Yield Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, P.; O'Hara, C. G.; Shrestha, B.; Sinclair, T. R.; G de Goncalves, L. G.; Salado Navarro, L. R.

    2007-12-01

    spatial and temporal resolution remote sensing datasets; improved time-series meteorological inputs required for crop growth models; and regional prediction capability through geo-processing-based yield modeling.

  13. Primary Endpoints of the Biventricular Pacing after Cardiac Surgery Trial

    PubMed Central

    Spotnitz, Henry M.; Cabreriza, Santos; Wang, Daniel Y.; Quinn, T. Alexander; Cheng, Bin; Bedrosian, Lauren; Aponte-Patel, Linda; Smith, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine whether optimized biventricular pacing increases cardiac index in patients at risk of left ventricular dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass. Procedures included coronary artery bypass, aortic or mitral surgery and combinations. This trial was approved by the Columbia University Institutional Review Board and was conducted under an Investigational Device Exemption. Methods Screening of 6,346 patients yielded 47 endpoints. With informed consent, 61 patients were randomized to pacing or control groups. Atrioventricular and interventricular delays were optimized one (Phase I), two (Phase II), and 12–24 hours (Phase III) after bypass in all patients. Cardiac index was measured by thermal dilution in triplicate. Two-sample t-test assessed differences between groups and subgroups. Results Cardiac index was 12% higher (2.83±0.16 (S.E.M.) vs. 2.52±0.13 liters/minute/square meter) in the paced group, less than predicted and not statistically significant (p=0.14). However, when aortic and aortic/mitral surgery groups were combined, cardiac index increased 29% in the paced group (2.90±0.19, n=14) vs. controls (2.24±0.15, n=11) (p=0.0138). Using a linear mixed effects model, t-test revealed that mean arterial pressure increased with pacing vs. no pacing at all optimization points (Phase I 79.2±1.7 vs. 74.5±1.6 mmHg, p=0.008, Phase II 75.9±1.5 vs. 73.6±1.8, p=0.006, Phase III 81.9±2.8 vs. 79.5±2.7, p=0.002) Conclusions Cardiac index did not increase significantly overall but increased 29% after aortic valve surgery. Mean arterial pressure increased with pacing at three time points. Additional studies are needed to distinguish rate from resynchronization effects, emphasize atrioventricular delay optimization, and examine clinical benefits of temporary postoperative pacing. PMID:23866800

  14. The 'death pace' in the CO.17 trial.

    PubMed

    Formica, Vincenzo; Formica, Domenico; Formica, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In an era where the cost of care in oncology is rising, suggestions of new frameworks that may help in orienting biomarker discovery are highly desirable. We propose a different perspective for looking at survival data, which we call 'death pace' analysis, which focuses on the variation of the gap between survival curves over time and that may make it easier to identify subpopulations with distinct predictive molecular features. The recently published data on EJC on the impact of the primary colonic site in the CO.17 trial seem to be particularly suitable for the death pace analysis. PMID:26688001

  15. Centrifugal dryers keep pace with the market

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    New plant design and upgrades create a shift in dewatering strategies. The article describes recent developments. Three major manufacturers supply centrifugal dryers - TEMA, Centrifugal & Mechanical Industries (CMI) and Ludowici. CMI introduced a line of vertical centrifugal dryers. TEMA improved the techniques by developing a horizontal vibratory centrifuge (HVC) which simplified maintenance. 3 figs., 1 photo.

  16. DiPALS: Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Christopher J; Bradburn, Mike J; Maguire, Chin; Cooper, Cindy L; Baird, Wendy O; Baxter, Susan K; Cohen, Judith; Cantrill, Hannah; Dixon, Simon; Ackroyd, Roger; Baudouin, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Berrisford, Richard; Bianchi, Stephen; Bourke, Stephen C; Darlison, Roy; Ealing, John; Elliott, Mark; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Galloway, Simon; Hamdalla, Hisham; Hanemann, C Oliver; Hughes, Philip; Imam, Ibrahim; Karat, Dayalan; Leek, Roger; Maynard, Nick; Orrell, Richard W; Sarela, Abeezar; Stradling, John; Talbot, Kevin; Taylor, Lyn; Turner, Martin; Simonds, Anita K; Williams, Tim; Wedzicha, Wisia; Young, Carolyn; Shaw, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting in death, usually from respiratory failure, within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a treatment that when given to patients in respiratory failure leads to improved survival and quality of life. Diaphragm pacing (DP), using the NeuRx/4(®) diaphragm pacing system (DPS)™ (Synapse Biomedical, Oberlin, OH, USA), is a new technique that may offer additional or alternative benefits to patients with ALS who are in respiratory failure. OBJECTIVE The Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (DiPALS) trial evaluated the effect of DP on survival over the study duration in patients with ALS with respiratory failure. DESIGN The DiPALS trial was a multicentre, parallel-group, open-label, randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic analyses and a qualitative longitudinal substudy. PARTICIPANTS Eligible participants had a diagnosis of ALS (ALS laboratory-supported probable, clinically probable or clinically definite according to the World Federation of Neurology revised El Escorial criteria), had been stabilised on riluzole for 30 days, were aged ≥ 18 years and were in respiratory failure. We planned to recruit 108 patients from seven UK-based specialist ALS or respiratory centres. Allocation was performed using 1 : 1 non-deterministic minimisation. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomised to either standard care (NIV alone) or standard care (NIV) plus DP using the NeuRX/4 DPS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation to death from any cause. Secondary outcomes were patient quality of life [assessed by European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, three levels (EQ-5D-3L), Short Form questionnaire-36 items and Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index questionnaire]; carer quality of life (EQ-5D-3L and Caregiver Burden Inventory); cost-utility analysis and health

  17. Improving Loop Modeling of the Antibody Complementarity-Determining Region 3 Using Knowledge-Based Restraints

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Jessica A.; Koehler Leman, Julia; Cisneros, Alberto; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Structural restrictions are present even in the most sequence diverse portions of antibodies, the complementary determining region (CDR) loops. Previous studies identified robust rules that define canonical structures for five of the six CDR loops, however the heavy chain CDR 3 (HCDR3) defies standard classification attempts. The HCDR3 loop can be subdivided into two domains referred to as the “torso” and the “head” domains and two major families of canonical torso structures have been identified; the more prevalent “bulged” and less frequent “non-bulged” torsos. In the present study, we found that Rosetta loop modeling of 28 benchmark bulged HCDR3 loops is improved with knowledge-based structural restraints developed from available antibody crystal structures in the PDB. These restraints restrict the sampling space Rosetta searches in the torso domain, limiting the φ and ψ angles of these residues to conformations that have been experimentally observed. The application of these restraints in Rosetta result in more native-like structure sampling and improved score-based differentiation of native-like HCDR3 models, significantly improving our ability to model antibody HCDR3 loops. PMID:27182833

  18. Improving Regional and National Weather Operations with New Lightning Mapping Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macgorman, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    , sparse-lightning holes in the updraft cores of supercell storms, cores of large lightning density resembling the reflectivity cores of cells, and the maturation of the stratiform precipitation region of mesoscale convective systems, which produce much of the rainfall and flooding in the central United States. However, it is relatively difficult for weather forecasters to incorporate much information from lightning data into their forecasts when using only raw, real-time lightning locations. More research is needed to help extract or summarize information from the lightning data and present it in a form easier for forecasters to digest. Another area in which lightning data can contribute is data assimilation into numerical weather models to improve their forecasts. Research has demonstrated that lightning data can be assimilated into forecast models in much the same way as radar data are, but lightning data could readily be available over large regions of the globe where obtaining radar data is not feasible. Besides improving the initialization of the model by improving the location and extent of storms when the model begins its forecast cycle, a process that itself still can be improved, lightning data could be used in variational schemes to diagnose and compensate for errors often present in the atmosphere at the beginning of a model's forecast cycle. Otherwise, these errors in the model atmosphere often cause the forecast to return close to the state it would have had in 6-12 h without even simple data assimilation.

  19. Improving Local and Regional Flood Quantile Estimates Using a Hierarchical Bayesian GEV Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro Lima, C. H.; Lall, U.; Devineni, N.; Troy, T.

    2013-12-01

    Flood risk management usually relies on local and regional flood frequency analysis, which tends to suffer from lack of data and parameter uncertainties. Here we estimate local and regional Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution parameters in a hierarchical Bayesian framework, which helps reduce uncertainties by pooling more information in the estimation process and provides a simple topology to propagate model and parameter uncertainties to flood quantile estimates. As prior information for the Bayesian model, it is assumed for each site that the GEV location and scale parameters come from independent log-normal distributions, whose mean parameter follows the well known log-log scaling law with the drainage area. The shape parameter for each site is shrunk towards a common mean. Non-informative prior distributions are assumed for the hyperparameters and the MCMC method is used to sample from the posterior distributions. The model is tested using annual maximum series from 20 streamflow gauges located in an 83.000 km2 basin in southeastern Brazil. The results show a significant improvement of flood quantile estimates over the traditional GEV model, particularly for sites with few data. For return periods within the range of the data (around 50 years), the Bayesian credible intervals for the flood quantiles are narrower than the classical confidence limits based on the delta method. As the return period increases beyond the range of the data, the confidence limits from the delta method become unreliable and the Bayesian credible intervals provide a way to estimate satisfactory confidence bands for the flood quantiles considering the parameter uncertainties. In order to evaluate the applicability of the proposed hierarchical Bayesian model for flood frequency regional analysis, we estimate flood quantiles for three randomly chosen out-of-sample sites and compare with classical estimates using the index flood method. The posterior distributions of the scaling

  20. Regional analgesia for improvement of long-term functional outcome after elective large joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Atchabahian, Arthur; Schwartz, Gary; Hall, Charles B; Lajam, Claudette M; Andreae, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional analgesia is more effective than conventional analgesia for controlling pain and may facilitate rehabilitation after large joint replacement in the short term. It remains unclear if regional anaesthesia improves functional outcomes after joint replacement beyond three months after surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on long-term functional outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after elective major joint (knee, shoulder and hip) replacement surgery. Search methods We performed an electronic search of several databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL), and handsearched reference lists and conference abstracts. We updated our search in June 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing regional analgesia versus conventional analgesia in patients undergoing total shoulder, hip or knee replacement. We included studies that reported a functional outcome with a follow-up of at least three months after surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results We included six studies with 350 participants followed for at least three months. All of these studies enrolled participants undergoing total knee replacement. Studies were at least partially blinded. Three studies had a high risk of performance bias and one a high risk of attrition bias, but the risk of bias was otherwise unclear or low. Only one study assessed joint function using a global score. Due to heterogeneity in outcome and reporting, we could only pool three out of six RCTs, with range of motion assessed at three months after surgery used as a surrogate for joint function. All studies had a high risk of detection bias. Using the random-effects model, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups (mean difference 3.99 degrees, 95% confidence interval (CI)

  1. Improved regional seismic location and confidence bounds using a combined model and empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S.; Flanagan, M.; Pasyanos, M.; Schultz, C.

    2003-04-01

    We demonstrate improvement in seismic location using a combined model and empirical approach. We find that no individual earth model provides optimal travel-time prediction everywhere. We have, therefore, adopted an approach whereby travel-time predictions from any number of models and empirical observations are geographically merged to form a travel-time model for each network station. Starting with a set of candidate earth models, which often range from 3-dimensional regional models to radially symmetric global models, we evaluate travel-time prediction for distinct distance ranges and geographic regions. Models are then assigned to each distance/region based on performance of travel-time prediction. In addition to assessing travel-time prediction accuracy we develop non-stationary uncertainty models for each set of travel-time predictions. The multi-model, travel-time predictions and uncertainties are merged to form one travel-time prediction model for each station. We further refine model-based predictions and uncertainties using empirical observations and the Modified Bayesian Kriging method of Schultz et al. (1998). This calibration process results in hypocenter-specific travel time predictions and uncertainties for each station and phase. We test and validate throughout the calibration process. A corner stone of our calibration and validation process is the LLNL database. We refine seismicity catalogs by identifying locations that meet strict network criteria (Bondar et al. 2002). We also include event locations determined using non-seismic techniques, such as InSAR satellite. Arrival-time measurements are directly and statistically validated using detailed review of select waveforms. Using this data set and non-circular statistical test, we measure the improvement of travel-time prediction and validate travel-time prediction uncertainty. Ultimately, we use a set of well-located events that are left out of the calibration process to measure improvement in

  2. Maternal health in the eastern Mediterranean region of the World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Mahaini, R; Mahmoud, H

    2005-07-01

    Globally, progress in improving the survival and well-being of mothers has been slow, and this holds true for the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Thus at the current pace, it is unlikely that the Millennium Development Goal related improving maternal health will be achieved in the Region by the year 2015. This paper outlines the factors contributing to maternal mortality and poor health in the Region and the challenges faced. The action needed to redress the situation and improve maternal health, and hence achieve the fourth Millennium Development Goal, is presented. PMID:16700367

  3. Improved quantification for local regions of interest in preclinical PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cal-González, J.; Moore, S. C.; Park, M.-A.; Herraiz, J. L.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.; Udias, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography, there are several causes of quantitative inaccuracy, such as partial volume or spillover effects. The impact of these effects is greater when using radionuclides that have a large positron range, e.g. 68Ga and 124I, which have been increasingly used in the clinic. We have implemented and evaluated a local projection algorithm (LPA), originally evaluated for SPECT, to compensate for both partial-volume and spillover effects in PET. This method is based on the use of a high-resolution CT or MR image, co-registered with a PET image, which permits a high-resolution segmentation of a few tissues within a volume of interest (VOI) centered on a region within which tissue-activity values need to be estimated. The additional boundary information is used to obtain improved activity estimates for each tissue within the VOI, by solving a simple inversion problem. We implemented this algorithm for the preclinical Argus PET/CT scanner and assessed its performance using the radionuclides 18F, 68Ga and 124I. We also evaluated and compared the results obtained when it was applied during the iterative reconstruction, as well as after the reconstruction as a postprocessing procedure. In addition, we studied how LPA can help to reduce the ‘spillover contamination’, which causes inaccurate quantification of lesions in the immediate neighborhood of large, ‘hot’ sources. Quantification was significantly improved by using LPA, which provided more accurate ratios of lesion-to-background activity concentration for hot and cold regions. For 18F, the contrast was improved from 3.0 to 4.0 in hot lesions (when the true ratio was 4.0) and from 0.16 to 0.06 in cold lesions (true ratio  =  0.0), when using the LPA postprocessing. Furthermore, activity values estimated within the VOI using LPA during reconstruction were slightly more accurate than those obtained by post-processing, while also visually improving the image contrast and uniformity

  4. Improved quantification for local regions of interest in preclinical PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Cal-González, J; Moore, S C; Park, M-A; Herraiz, J L; Vaquero, J J; Desco, M; Udias, J M

    2015-09-21

    In Positron Emission Tomography, there are several causes of quantitative inaccuracy, such as partial volume or spillover effects. The impact of these effects is greater when using radionuclides that have a large positron range, e.g. (68)Ga and (124)I, which have been increasingly used in the clinic. We have implemented and evaluated a local projection algorithm (LPA), originally evaluated for SPECT, to compensate for both partial-volume and spillover effects in PET. This method is based on the use of a high-resolution CT or MR image, co-registered with a PET image, which permits a high-resolution segmentation of a few tissues within a volume of interest (VOI) centered on a region within which tissue-activity values need to be estimated. The additional boundary information is used to obtain improved activity estimates for each tissue within the VOI, by solving a simple inversion problem. We implemented this algorithm for the preclinical Argus PET/CT scanner and assessed its performance using the radionuclides (18)F, (68)Ga and (124)I. We also evaluated and compared the results obtained when it was applied during the iterative reconstruction, as well as after the reconstruction as a postprocessing procedure. In addition, we studied how LPA can help to reduce the 'spillover contamination', which causes inaccurate quantification of lesions in the immediate neighborhood of large, 'hot' sources. Quantification was significantly improved by using LPA, which provided more accurate ratios of lesion-to-background activity concentration for hot and cold regions. For (18)F, the contrast was improved from 3.0 to 4.0 in hot lesions (when the true ratio was 4.0) and from 0.16 to 0.06 in cold lesions (true ratio  =  0.0), when using the LPA postprocessing. Furthermore, activity values estimated within the VOI using LPA during reconstruction were slightly more accurate than those obtained by post-processing, while also visually improving the image contrast and uniformity

  5. Reducing Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury Using a Regional Multicenter Quality Improvement Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jeremiah R.; Solomon, Richard J.; Sarnak, Mark J.; McCullough, Peter A.; Splaine, Mark E.; Davies, Louise; Ross, Cathy S.; Dauerman, Harold L.; Stender, Janette L.; Conley, Sheila M.; Robb, John F.; Chaisson, Kristine; Boss, Richard; Lambert, Peggy; Goldberg, David J.; Lucier, Deborah; Fedele, Frank A.; Kellett, Mirle A.; Horton, Susan; Phillips, William J.; Downs, Cynthia; Wiseman, Alan; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Malenka, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and is a patient safety objective of the National Quality Forum. However, no formal quality improvement program to prevent CI-AKI has been conducted. Therefore, we sought to determine if a six-year regional multi-center quality improvement intervention could reduce CI-AKI following PCI. Methods and Results We conducted a prospective multi-center quality improvement study to prevent CI-AKI (serum creatinine increase ≥0.3 mg/dL within 48 hours or ≥50% during hospitalization) among 21,067 non-emergent patients undergoing PCI at ten hospitals between 2007 and 2012. Six ‘intervention’ hospitals participated in the quality improvement intervention. Two hospitals with significantly lower baseline rates of CI-AKI, which served as “benchmark” sites and were used to develop the intervention and two hospitals not receiving the intervention were used as controls. Using time series analysis and multilevel poisson regression clustering to the hospital-level we calculated adjusted risk ratios (RR) for CI-AKI comparing the intervention period to baseline. Adjusted rates of CI-AKI were significantly reduced in hospitals receiving the intervention by 21% (RR 0.79; 95%CI: 0.67 to 0.93; p=0.005) for all patients and by 28% in patients with baseline eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 (RR 0.72; 95%CI: 0.56 to 0.91; p=0.007). Benchmark hospitals had no significant changes in CI-AKI. Key qualitative system factors associated with improvement included: multidisciplinary teams, limiting contrast volume, standardized fluid orders, intravenous fluid bolus, and patient education about oral hydration. Conclusions Simple cost-effective quality improvement interventions can prevent up to one in five CI-AKI events in patients with undergoing non-emergent PCI. PMID:25074372

  6. PACE Model Gives Advertising Campaign-Centered Curriculum (Commentary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Describes PACE (Portfolio, Assignments, Content, and Evaluation), an advertising curriculum model in which students work on real advertising campaigns. Explains that students form account groups which locate products needing promotional assistance. Identifies the goals of the curriculum to be competent writing and practical understanding of…

  7. A Self-Paced Instructional Approach for Engineering Descriptive Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Eugene J.

    These materials, used in a self-paced course in engineering descriptive geometry for freshman and sophomore college-level students, cover three modules: basic spatial relationships; intersections, parallelism, and perpendicularity; and graphic analysis and development. Each module contains five instructional units. Each unit includes a rationale,…

  8. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  9. Kentucky's Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Kevin M.

    A lack of education is a major cause of poverty among many Kentucky citizens. In 1986, Kentucky's dropout rate was the second highest of the 50 states. That same year, Kentucky established the Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program in an effort to combat the problems of insufficient education and poverty that tend to be perpetuated from…

  10. Curriculum Designs for Tech Prep Clusters. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains descriptions of various Tech Prep programs developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each entry includes general program descriptions, curriculum outlines, and course descriptions. The clusters and their specialty areas described in the booklet are:…

  11. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 19-23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fourth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric charges, insulators, Coulomb's law, electric fields, lines of force, solid angles, conductors, motion of charged particles, dipoles, electric flux,…

  12. Microcomputers in Education: A Self-Paced Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Doris; Carey, Regan

    Designed to serve as a self-paced computer course for education students with no experience using microcomputers, this manual contains instructions for operating an Apple IIe microcomputer, its introductory software, and Bank Street Writer, using the DOS 3.3 System Master. The lessons, which contain illustrations and sample screens, include…

  13. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 11-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the third part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to impulses, inelastic and elastic collisions, two-dimensional collision problems, universal constant of gravitation, gravitational acceleration and…

  14. The Pace of Vocabulary Growth Helps Predict Later Vocabulary Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES],…

  15. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 32-36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this seventh problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The content is related to magnetic fields, magnetic moments, forces on charged particles in magnetic fields, electron volts, cyclotron, electronic charge to mass ratio, current-carrying…

  16. Atrioventricular Sequential Pacing for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy During Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan; Pai, Sher-Lu; Perry, Dana K; Blackshear, Joseph L; Aniskevich, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disorder that carries an increased risk of morbidity and mortality during liver transplantation. We describe the use of atrioventricular sequential pacing, placed preoperatively, to assist with intraoperative management of a patient with severe refractory hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing orthotopic piggyback liver transplantation. We discuss the pathogenesis and treatment of this infrequent but serious comorbidity. PMID:26466305

  17. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 460.122 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which the participant believes that his or her life, health, or ability to regain or maintain maximum... appeal. (3) The PACE organization may extend the 72-hour timeframe by up to 14 calendar days for...

  18. Hardware packet pacing using a DMA in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Phillip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2013-08-13

    Method and system for hardware packet pacing using a direct memory access controller in a parallel computer which, in one aspect, keeps track of a total number of bytes put on the network as a result of a remote get operation, using a hardware token counter.

  19. Professional Acknowledgement for Continuing Education (PACE): General Information Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASMT News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    To provide a central, permanent file of continuing education credits for persons in the field of medical technology, the Professional Acknowledgement for Continuing Education (PACE) program was established by the American Society for Medical Technology. Three different types of units will be recorded: College/University credits, Continuing…

  20. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 28-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this sixth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric currents, current densities, resistances, Ohm's law, voltages, Joule heating, electromotive forces, single loop circuits, series and parallel…

  1. PACES: A Model of Student Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mark D.; Tarabochia, Dawn W.; Koltz, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    School counselors design, deliver, and evaluate comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs that are focused on enhancing student development and success. A model of student well-being, known as PACES, is defined and described that consists of five distinct and interactive domains: physical, affective, cognitive, economic, and social.…

  2. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  3. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  4. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  5. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the quality of care furnished to participants; or (ii) The PACE organization failed to comply.... (c) Termination due to health and safety risk. CMS or a State administering agency may terminate a... cannot ensure the health and safety of its participants. This determination may result from...

  6. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 24-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fifth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to work in electric fields, potential differences, parallel plates, electric potential energies, potential gradients, capacitances, and capacitor circuits.…

  7. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 37-40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this eighth problems and solutions book used as a part of course assignments. The content is related to magnetic induction, Faraday's law, induced currents, Lenz's law, induced electromotive forces, time-varying magnetic fields, self-inductance, inductors,…

  8. Basic Library Skills: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Judith

    This self-paced workbook is designed to introduce college students to the resources and facilities of the library and to providing the knowledge and skills necessary to do basic library research. Two introductory chapters include a library-specific tour with floor plans (the D. Leonard Corgan Library, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) and information…

  9. The Print and Computer Enlargement System--PACE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morford, Ronald A.

    The Print and Computer Enlargement (PACE) System is being designed as a portable computerized reading and writing system that enables a low-vision person to read regular print and then create and edit text using large-print computerized output. The design goal was to develop a system that: weighed no more than 12 pounds so it could be easily…

  10. Library Skills for Teachers: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mech, Terrence

    Designed to introduce education students to the basic library resources in the field, this self-paced workbook assumes a basic knowledge of the library and its resources. Each section in the eight-chapter workbook discusses a particular type of reference material and sample entries are provided when appropriate. Eleven assignments (two multiple…

  11. Pacing strategies during a cycling time trial with simulated headwinds and tailwinds.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G; Brunskill, A

    2000-10-01

    increased significantly during the first 8.05 km of the V condition when power outputs were 5% higher than in condition C. Heart rate showed no main effect of pacing strategy (p = 0.80) and the interaction between strategy and race split did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.07). These results suggest that in a 16.1 km time trial with equal 8.05 km headwind and tailwind sections, riders habitually set off too fast in the first few kilometres and will benefit (10 s improvement) from a constant pacing strategy and, to a slightly greater degree (12 s improvement), from a variable (5% +/- mean) pacing strategy in line with the variations in wind direction during the race. Riders should choose a constant power when external conditions are constant, but when there are hilly or variable wind sections in the race, a variable power strategy should be planned. This strategy would be best monitored with 'power-measuring devices' rather than heart rate or subjective feelings as the sensitivity of these variables to small but meaningful changes in power during a race is low. PMID:11083127

  12. Comparative study of left ventricular function in patients with unstable angina, non-Q wave myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris: assessment with atrial pacing and digital ventriculography.

    PubMed

    Hussain, K M; Gould, L; Pomerantsev, E V; Angirekula, M; Bharathan, T

    1995-10-01

    To compare left ventricular global and segmental function at rest and during right atrial pacing in patients with unstable angina, non-Q wave myocardial infarction, and stable angina (class III angina), low-dose digital subtraction ventriculography was performed at rest and after abrupt cessation of pacing in 42 patients with unstable angina, 8 patients with non-Q wave myocardial infarction and 15 patients with stable angina during selective coronary arteriography. Left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly lower at rest in patients with unstable angina (P < 0.01) and non-Q wave myocardial infarction (P < 0.05) and during pacing (P < 0.01). These two groups of patients had significantly higher values of left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes at rest and during pacing as compared with stable angina group. In comparing various clinical patterns of unstable angina, ejection fraction was significantly (P < 0.05) lower during pacing in patients with crescendo angina than in new-onset angina. However, ejection fraction was significantly (P < 0.01) lower in crescendo angina only at rest as compared with rest angina. The length of zone of severe hypokinesia was greater in unstable angina (P < 0.01) as well as in non-Q wave myocardial infarction (P < 0.05) both at rest and during pacing as compared with stable angina. Contractility of region of hypokinesia during pacing was higher (P < 0.01) in stable angina than in unstable angina and non-Q wave myocardial infarction. In analyzing segmental function in various subgroups of unstable angina, the authors found that the length of total hypokinesia was significantly higher (P < 0.05) during pacing in crescendo angina than in new-onset angina. Contractility of region of hypokinesia was lowest at rest and during pacing in patients with crescendo angina. This study demonstrates that patients with unstable angina as well as non-Q wave myocardial infarction were characterized by more pronounced global and

  13. Pn and Sn tomography across Eurasia to improve regional seismic event locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Barmin, Mikhail P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Levshin, Anatoli L.; Engdahl, E. Robert

    2002-11-01

    This paper has three motivations: first, to map Pn and Sn velocities beneath most of Eurasia to reveal information on a length scale relevant to regional tectonics, second, to test recently constructed 3-D mantle models and, third, to develop and test a method to produce Pn and Sn travel time correction surfaces which are the 3-D analogue of travel time curves for a 1-D model. Our third motive is inspired by the need to improve regional location capabilities in monitoring nuclear treaties such as the nuclear Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). To a groomed version of the ISC/NEIC data, we apply the tomographic method of Barmin et al. [Pure Appl. Geophys. (2001)], augmented to include station and event corrections and an epicentral distance correction. The Pn and Sn maps are estimated on a 1°×1° grid throughout Eurasia. We define the phases Pn and Sn as arriving between epicentral distances of 3° and 15°. After selection, the resulting data set consists of about 1,250,000 Pn and 420,000 Sn travel times distributed inhomogeneously across Eurasia. The rms misfit to the entire Eurasian data set from the Pn and Sn model increases nearly linearly with distance and averages about 1.6 s for Pn and 3.2 s for Sn, but is better for events that occurred on several nuclear test sites and for selected high-quality data subsets. The Pn and Sn maps compare favorably with recent 3-D models of P and S in the uppermost mantle and with recently compiled teleseismic station corrections across the region. The most intriguing features on the maps are the low-velocity anomalies that characterize most tectonically deformed regions such as the anomaly across central and southern Asia and the Middle East that extends along a tortuous path from Turkey in the west to Lake Baikal in the east. These anomalies are related to the closing of the Neo-Tethys Ocean and the collision of India with Asia. The uppermost mantle beneath the Pacific Rim back-arc is also very slow, presumably due to

  14. Improving Shade Modelling in a Regional River Temperature Model Using Fine-Scale LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Loicq, P.; Moatar, F.; Beaufort, A.; Melin, E.; Jullian, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Air temperature is often considered as a proxy of the stream temperature to model the distribution areas of aquatic species water temperature is not available at a regional scale. To simulate the water temperature at a regional scale (105 km²), a physically-based model using the equilibrium temperature concept and including upstream-downstream propagation of the thermal signal was developed and applied to the entire Loire basin (Beaufort et al., submitted). This model, called T-NET (Temperature-NETwork) is based on a hydrographical network topology. Computations are made hourly on 52,000 reaches which average 1.7 km long in the Loire drainage basin. The model gives a median Root Mean Square Error of 1.8°C at hourly time step on the basis of 128 water temperature stations (2008-2012). In that version of the model, tree shadings is modelled by a constant factor proportional to the vegetation cover on 10 meters sides the river reaches. According to sensitivity analysis, improving the shade representation would enhance T-NET accuracy, especially for the maximum daily temperatures, which are currently not very well modelized. This study evaluates the most efficient way (accuracy/computing time) to improve the shade model thanks to 1-m resolution LIDAR data available on tributary of the LoireRiver (317 km long and an area of 8280 km²). Two methods are tested and compared: the first one is a spatially explicit computation of the cast shadow for every LIDAR pixel. The second is based on averaged vegetation cover characteristics of buffers and reaches of variable size. Validation of the water temperature model is made against 4 temperature sensors well spread along the stream, as well as two airborne thermal infrared imageries acquired in summer 2014 and winter 2015 over a 80 km reach. The poster will present the optimal length- and crosswise scale to characterize the vegetation from LIDAR data.

  15. Hydrological modelling improvements required in basins in the Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalayas region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif; Richards, Keith S.; McRobie, Allan; Booij, Martijn

    2016-04-01

    Millions of people rely on river water originating from basins in the Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalayas (HKH), where snow- and ice-melt are significant flow components. One such basin is the Upper Indus Basin (UIB), where snow- and ice-melt can contribute more than 80% of total flow. Containing some of the world's largest alpine glaciers, this basin may be highly susceptible to global warming and climate change, and reliable predictions of future water availability are vital for resource planning for downstream food and energy needs in a changing climate, but depend on significantly improved hydrological modelling. However, a critical assessment of available hydro-climatic data and hydrological modelling in the HKH region has identified five major failings in many published hydro-climatic studies, even those appearing in reputable international journals. The main weaknesses of these studies are: i) incorrect basin areas; ii) under-estimated precipitation; iii) incorrectly-defined glacier boundaries; iv) under-estimated snow-cover data; and v) use of biased melt factors for snow and ice during the summer months. This paper illustrates these limitations, which have either resulted in modelled flows being under-estimates of measured flows, leading to an implied severe water scarcity; or have led to the use of unrealistically high degree-day factors and over-estimates of glacier melt contributions, implying unrealistic melt rates. These effects vary amongst sub-basins. Forecasts obtained from these models cannot be used reliably in policy making or water resource development, and need revision. Detailed critical analysis and improvement of existing hydrological modelling may be equally necessary in other mountain regions across the world.

  16. Improving reservoir operations modeling for integration in a regional Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, N.; Li, H.; Ward, D. L.; Huang, M.; Leung, L.; Wigmosta, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    In integrated Earth system models (EaSMs), accurate hydrologic information in all of its components including socio-economy, atmosphere, land, and energy infrastructure is needed to represent the interactions between human and Earth system processes. The hydrology processes regulate the water, energy and carbon fluxes in this integrated framework. Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of EaSMs in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies such as integrated assessment activities at regional to global scales. Dynamic programming approaches to optimize operations of reservoir systems have been widely used for water resources management planning at local and regional scales and recently have emerged in global-scale applications; albeit they are performed offline from the EaSMs , and require accurate knowledge of future flow for the upcoming water year. Other emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are more flexible for coupling with EaSMs. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing overall regulated flow at large basin scales. Improved generic operating rules are presented and evaluated across multiple spatial scales and objectives (flow but also storage and supply) over the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System, which is representative of large river systems with increasing competitive reservoir purposes in the future. Challenges due to the difference in time and spatial scales between the physical processes versus reservoir operations and targets (irrigation, flood control, hydropower, environmental flow, navigation) are then discussed in the context of improving hydrology and evapotranspiration fluxes within an integrated EaSM.

  17. Effects of nitroglycerin, postextrasystolic potentiation, and pacing-induced ischaemia on wall motion in patients with ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, F; Ensslen, R; Thormann, J; Sesto, M

    1977-01-01

    The influence of nitroglycerin, postextrasystolic potentiation, and rapid ventricular pacing on total and regional ventricular function was studied in 32 patients with normal ventricular function and in 44 patients with left ventricular asynergy caused by obstructive coronary artery disease. Total ventricular function was assessed by ventriculography and regional ventricular function was analysed by use of 7 hemiaxes. Nitroglycerin increased ejection fraction and decreased left ventricular systolic and end-diastolic pressures in the normally functioning ventricles; apical wall motion increased, while basal wall motion remained unchanged after nitroglycerin in these ventricles. Pressures fell significantly in ventricles with asynergy after nitroglycerin; ejection fraction decreased while wall motion in asynergic areas was inconsistently influenced. Postextrasystolic potentiation augmented ejection fraction by a powerful and homogeneous increase of wall motion in normally functioning ventricles. Asynergic areas and normal areas in diseased ventricles showed identical augmentation of wall motion after a premature beat. Rapid venticular pacing produced a significant increase in end-diastolic pressure and a fall in ejection fraction in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease. Wall motion in normal areas perfused by arteries with critical stenoses was dramatically depressed after pacing, while asynergic areas and normal areas perfused by normal arteries remained unchanged. The results show that normal contractile behaviour can be detected by postextrasystolic potentiation in asynergic areas, suggesting that some normally perfused muscle exists in these areas. Pacing stress does not further deteriorate function in asynergic areas, which suggests the presence of viable and well perfused muscle (within scar tissue) whose function may not profit from revascularization. Pacing-induced asynergy identifies the functional significance of coronary stenoses and suggests

  18. Importance of activity data for improving the residential wood combustion emission inventory at regional level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Cinzia; Caserini, Stefano; Galante, Silvia; Dilara, Panagiota; Galletti, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    The contribution of residential wood combustion (RWC) to emission inventory at local level was estimated using a bottom-up approach for the Lombardy Region of North Italy. A survey, based on the CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing) method, has been undertaken through 18,000 interviews. The interviews had the objective to characterize the RWC use in this region, in term of both total and municipal wood consumption. Details on the type of appliances used in RWC were also gathered. The results of the survey were then statistically analyzed in order to allow an estimate of RWC with high spatial resolution (i.e., at municipal level) in relation to the size and altitude of the territory. The work provides new evidence of the importance of wood combustion as a key source for PM and NMVOC emissions at local level, and thus highlights the importance of technological improvements and new policies aimed at emission reduction in this sector. Considering the great differences in average PM emission factors between low efficiency appliances (fireplaces, old stoves) and high efficiency ones (new stoves, pellet burners), this work emphasizes the importance of obtaining more detailed information on the types of wood appliances used for arriving at a reliable PM emission inventory for RWC.

  19. Improved food availability for food security in Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ray-Yu; Hanson, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Food security requires that all people can access sufficient food for a healthy life. Enough food is produced to feed the global population, but more than 1.02 billion people are malnourished. Malnutrition and chronic food insecurity are widespread in some countries of the Asia-Pacific region; as much as 20 to 60 percent of the region's population lacks sufficient food to meet their minimum energy requirement. Food security greatly depends on food availability, although this alone is not sufficient to secure satisfactory nutritional status. Food security at the national level requires an effective framework of food, health, and economic systems coupled with awareness and consideration of environmental conditions. To improve food availability and security in the short term, lower income countries should focus on increasing productivity in the food system to generate higher incomes for workers on-farm and off-farm in the food chain. Over the long term, sustainable and small-scale farming based on ecologically viable systems should be the emphasis for agricultural development. Nutrition and health sectors should help promote food-based approaches that lead to diversification of crops, balanced diets, and ultimately better health. PMID:19965357

  20. Improved analysis of TCRγδ variable region expression in humans.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Petros; Bukatz, Daniela; Kock, Sylvia; Malkovsky, Miroslav; Finke, Jürgen; Fisch, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Deeper understanding of γδ Τ cell increases in various clinical situations requires the assessment of TCRγ and δ variable (V) region gene expression and junctional diversity. Here we describe an improved TCRγ and δ spectratyping method used to study the γδ T-cell expansions in two patients with thymoma and immunodeficiency. One of these patients also suffered from chronic CMV infection and pure red cell aplasia and the other from chronic visceral leishmaniasis and myasthenia gravis. Analyses of the junctional diversity of the TCRγ and δ chains, flow cytometry with a panel of non-commercially available anti-TCRγδ V region monoclonal antibodies and functional studies were performed. The results clearly distinguished an expansion of oligoclonal, most likely antigen-driven, cytotoxic γδ T cells in the first patient from a naive pattern of polyclonal γδ T-cell proliferation in the second. These findings demonstrate the diversity of γδ T-cell expansions in immunodeficient patients and highlight the value of spectratyping as a tool for their characterization and understanding of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27109705

  1. Brain regions essential for improved lexical access in an aged aphasic patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Meinzer, Marcus; Flaisch, Tobias; Obleser, Jonas; Assadollahi, Ramin; Djundja, Daniela; Barthel, Gabriela; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    Background The relationship between functional recovery after brain injury and concomitant neuroplastic changes is emphasized in recent research. In the present study we aimed to delineate brain regions essential for language performance in aphasia using functional magnetic resonance imaging and acquisition in a temporal sparse sampling procedure, which allows monitoring of overt verbal responses during scanning. Case presentation An 80-year old patient with chronic aphasia (2 years post-onset) was investigated before and after intensive language training using an overt picture naming task. Differential brain activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus for correct word retrieval and errors was found. Improved language performance following therapy was mirrored by increased fronto-thalamic activation while stability in more general measures of attention/concentration and working memory was assured. Three healthy age-matched control subjects did not show behavioral changes or increased activation when tested repeatedly within the same 2-week time interval. Conclusion The results bear significance in that the changes in brain activation reported can unequivocally be attributed to the short-term training program and a language domain-specific plasticity process. Moreover, it further challenges the claim of a limited recovery potential in chronic aphasia, even at very old age. Delineation of brain regions essential for performance on a single case basis might have major implications for treatment using transcranial magnetic stimulation. PMID:16916464

  2. The Deep South Clouds & Aerosols project: Improving the modelling of clouds in the Southern Ocean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Olaf; McDonald, Adrian; Harvey, Mike; Davies, Roger; Katurji, Marwan; Varma, Vidya; Williams, Jonny

    2016-04-01

    Southern-Hemisphere climate projections are subject to persistent climate model biases affecting the large majority of contemporary climate models, which degrade the reliability of these projections, particularly at the regional scale. Southern-Hemisphere specific problems include the fact that satellite-based observations comparisons with model output indicate that cloud occurrence above the Southern Ocean is substantially underestimated, with consequences for the radiation balance, sea surface temperatures, sea ice, and the position of storm tracks. The Southern-Ocean and Antarctic region is generally characterized by an acute paucity of surface-based and airborne observations, further complicating the situation. In recognition of this and other Southern-Hemisphere specific problems with climate modelling, the New Zealand Government has launched the Deep South National Science Challenge, whose purpose is to develop a new Earth System Model which reduces these very large radiative forcing problems associated with erroneous clouds. The plan is to conduct a campaign of targeted observations in the Southern Ocean region, leveraging off international measurement campaigns in this area, and using these and existing measurements of cloud and aerosol properties to improve the representation of clouds in the nascent New Zealand Earth System Model. Observations and model development will target aerosol physics and chemistry, particularly sulphate, sea salt, and non-sulphate organic aerosol, its interactions with clouds, and cloud microphysics. The hypothesis is that the cloud schemes in most GCMs are trained on Northern-Hemisphere data characterized by substantial anthropogenic or terrestrial aerosol-related influences which are almost completely absent in the Deep South.

  3. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ˜16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ˜20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs.

  4. White noise improves learning by modulating activity in dopaminergic midbrain regions and right superior temporal sulcus.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Vanessa H; Bauch, Eva M; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-07-01

    In neural systems, information processing can be facilitated by adding an optimal level of white noise. Although this phenomenon, the so-called stochastic resonance, has traditionally been linked with perception, recent evidence indicates that white noise may also exert positive effects on cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. The underlying neural mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Here, on the basis of recent theories, we tested the hypothesis that auditory white noise, when presented during the encoding of scene images, enhances subsequent recognition memory performance and modulates activity within the dopaminergic midbrain (i.e., substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, SN/VTA). Indeed, in a behavioral experiment, we can show in healthy humans that auditory white noise-but not control sounds, such as a sinus tone-slightly improves recognition memory. In an fMRI experiment, white noise selectively enhances stimulus-driven phasic activity in the SN/VTA and auditory cortex. Moreover, it induces stronger connectivity between SN/VTA and right STS, which, in addition, exhibited a positive correlation with subsequent memory improvement by white noise. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of auditory white noise on learning depend on dopaminergic neuromodulation and enhanced connectivity between midbrain regions and the STS-a key player in attention modulation. Moreover, they indicate that white noise could be particularly useful to facilitate learning in conditions where changes of the mesolimbic system are causally related to memory deficits including healthy and pathological aging. PMID:24345178

  5. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  6. Improvement of a windgust parametrization with an application using the Canadian Regional Climate Model over Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuszli, C.; Goyette, S.; Beniston, M.

    2013-12-01

    Severe winds recorded during a number of winter storms are simulated over the period 1990 to 2011 with the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) at a high spatial resolution. Flow fields are first downscaled from NCEP-NCAR reanalyses and then down to 2-km grid spacing in the horizontal through a self-nesting technique. During this last step, different windgust schemes of different complexities were tested and their performances compared one to each other and to observations from MeteoSwiss national network. Simple schemes reproduced the surface observations in an overall realistic manner but differences are noticed in the hourly maximum values. In order to improve one of the simple schemes, an empirically fixed parameter in the formulation is now allowed to vary in the horizontal where values have been calibrated using the MeteoSwiss stations hourly wind maximum. Then, these unequally-spaced values are interpolated onto the model surface computational grid. The CRCM using this modified scheme is applied on the 2-km grid in order to qualify and quantify the changes of the hourly gust values. The improvements are noticeable where hourly differences between observed and simulated values are reduced at several stations. This modified simple gust scheme would be useful in numerical weather prediction modelling where an application is envisaged in the near future.

  7. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-01

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface Btw reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (-Btw)/Bpw, where Bpw is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  8. Junction barrier Schottky rectifier with an improved P-well region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Ting; Cao, Fei; Shao, Lei; Chen, Yu-Xian

    2012-12-01

    A junction barrier Schottky (JBS) rectifier with an improved P-well on 4H—SiC is proposed to improve the VF—IR trade-off and the breakdown voltage. The reverse current density of the proposed JBS rectifier at 300 K and 800 V is about 3.3×10-8 times that of the common JBS rectifier at no expense of the forward voltage drop. This is because the depletion layer thickness in the P-well region at the same reverse voltage is larger than in the P+ grid, resulting in a lower spreading current and tunneling current. As a result, the breakdown voltage of the proposed JBS rectifier is over 1.6 kV, that is about 0.8 times more than that of the common JBS rectifier due to the uniform electric field. Although the series resistance of the proposed JBS rectifier is a little larger than that of the common JBS rectifier, the figure of merit (FOM) of the proposed JBS rectifier is about 2.9 times that of the common JBS rectifier. Based on simulating the values of susceptibility of the two JBS rectifiers to electrostatic discharge (ESD) in the human body model (HBM) circuits, the failure energy of the proposed JBS rectifier increases 17% compared with that of the common JBS rectifier.

  9. 42 CFR 460.132 - Quality assessment and performance improvement plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.132...

  10. 42 CFR 460.132 - Quality assessment and performance improvement plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.132...

  11. Toward Improved Land Surface Initialization in Support of Regional WRF Forecasts at the Kenya Meteorological Department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case. Jonathan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Kabuchanga, Eric; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.

    2014-01-01

    Flooding and drought are two key forecasting challenges for the Kenya Meteorological Department (KMD). Atmospheric processes leading to excessive precipitation and/or prolonged drought can be quite sensitive to the state of the land surface, which interacts with the boundary layer of the atmosphere providing a source of heat and moisture. The development and evolution of precipitation systems are affected by heat and moisture fluxes from the land surface within weakly-sheared environments, such as in the tropics and sub-tropics. These heat and moisture fluxes during the day can be strongly influenced by land cover, vegetation, and soil moisture content. Therefore, it is important to represent the land surface state as accurately as possible in numerical weather prediction models. Enhanced regional modeling capabilities have the potential to improve forecast guidance in support of daily operations and high-end events over east Africa. KMD currently runs a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in real time to support its daily forecasting operations, invoking the Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) dynamical core. They make use of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / National Weather Service Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) to manage and produce the WRF-NMM model runs on a 7-km regional grid over eastern Africa. Two organizations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, SERVIR and the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, have established a working partnership with KMD for enhancing its regional modeling capabilities. To accomplish this goal, SPoRT and SERVIR will provide experimental land surface initialization datasets and model verification capabilities to KMD. To produce a land-surface initialization more consistent with the resolution of the KMD-WRF runs, the NASA Land Information System (LIS

  12. Translating the potential of hydrological forecasts into improved decision making in African regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, J.; He, X.; Wanders, N.; Wood, E. F.; Ali, A.; Olang, L.; Estes, L. D.; Caylor, K. K.; Evans, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological forecasts at local scale and seasonal time scales have the potential to inform decision-making by individuals and institutions to improve management of water resources and enhance food security. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding climate variability and its predictability over African regions. However, there remain many challenges in translating large-scale evaluations and forecasts into locally relevant information. This is hampered by lack of on the ground data of hydrological and agricultural states, and the generally low skill of climate forecasts at time scales beyond one or two weeks. Additionally, the uptake of forecasts is not prevalent because of lack of capacity, and institutional and cultural barriers to using new and uncertain information. New technologies for monitoring and forecasting relevant hydrological variables, and novel approaches to understanding how this information may be used within decision making processes, have the potential to make substantial progress in addressing these challenges. We present a quasi-operational drought and flood monitoring and forecasting system and its use in understanding the potential of hydrological forecasts for improved decision-making. The system monitors in near real-time the terrestrial water cycle for the African continent based on remote sensing data and land surface hydrological modeling. The monitoring forms initial conditions for hydrological forecasts at short time scale, aimed at flood forecasting, and seasonal scale aimed at drought and crop yield forecasts. The flood forecasts are driven by precipitation and temperature forecasts from the Global Forecast System (GFS). The drought forecasts are driven by climate forecasts from the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME). The seasonal forecast skill is modest and seasonally/regionally dependent with part of the skill coming from persistence in initial land surface conditions. We discuss the use of the system

  13. Drought, Fire and Insects in Western US Forests: Observations to Improve Regional Land System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. E.; Yang, Z.; Berner, L. T.; Hicke, J. A.; Buotte, P.; Hudiburg, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Drought, fire and insects are major disturbances in the western US, and conditions are expected to get warmer and drier in the future. We combine multi-scale observations and modeling with CLM4.5 to examine the effects of these disturbances on forests in the western US. We modified the Community Land Model, CLM4.5, to improve simulated drought-related mortality in forests, and prediction of insect outbreaks under future climate conditions. We examined differences in plant traits that represent species variation in sensitivity to drought, and redefined plant groupings in PFTs. Plant traits, including sapwood area: leaf area ratio and stemwood density were strongly correlated with water availability during the ecohydrologic year. Our database of co-located observations of traits for 30 tree species was used to produce parameterization of the model by species groupings according to similar traits. Burn area predicted by the new fire model in CLM4.5 compares well with recent years of GFED data, but has a positive bias compared with Landsat-based MTBS. Biomass mortality over recent decades increased, and was captured well by the model in general, but missed mortality trends of some species. Comparisons with AmeriFlux data showed that the model with dynamic tree mortality only (no species trait improvements) overestimated GPP in dry years compared with flux data at semi-arid sites, and underestimated GPP at more mesic sites that experience dry summers. Simulations with both dynamic tree mortality and species trait parameters improved estimates of GPP by 17-22%; differences between predicted and observed NEE were larger. Future projections show higher productivity from increased atmospheric CO2 and warming that somewhat offsets drought and fire effects over the next few decades. Challenges include representation of hydraulic failure in models, and availability of species trait and carbon/water process data in disturbance- and drought-impacted regions.

  14. Improvement of a windgust parametrization with an application using the Canadian Regional Climate Model over Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuszli, Charles-Antoine; Goyette, Stéphane; Beniston, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Severe winds recorded during a number of winter storms are simulated over the period 1990 to 2011 with the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) at a high spatial resolution. Flow fields are first downscaled from NCEP-NCAR reanalyses and then down to 2-km grid spacing in the horizontal through a self-nesting technique. During this last step, different windgust schemes of different complexities were tested and their performances compared one to each other and to observations from MeteoSwiss national network. Simple schemes reproduced the surface observations in an overall realistic manner but differences are noticed in the hourly maximum values. In order to improve the scheme in operational use at MeteoSwiss, an empirically fixed parameter in the formulation is now allowed to vary in the horizontal where values have been calibrated using the MeteoSwiss stations hourly wind maximum. Then, these unequally-spaced values are statistically predicted and interpolated onto the model surface computational grid with a cokriging analysis based on elevation data such as terrain curvature, slope and aspect. This parameters' map is used to improve one of the gusts scheme and the CRCM is run on the 2-km grid in order to qualify and quantify the changes of the hourly gust values during the storms. The improvements are significant where hourly differences between observed and simulated values are reduced at several stations. The performance of this method is shown to be closely related to the analysis of the main flow regimes in Switzerland during which the storms are simulated. An application of this modified gust scheme for numerical weather prediction modelling is envisaged in the near future.

  15. Plasma-assisted cleaning by electrostatics (PACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, W. M.; Neumann, M. J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2006-03-01

    As feature sizes shrink, particle contamination on EUV masks used in the fabrication process of semiconductor chips is an increasingly difficult problem that leads to lower wafer throughput and higher costs of chip production. Current practices to remove particulates off of masks include using a sulfuric acid bath, ultrasonic cleansing, and rinsing in de-ionized water. However, nanometer-scale etching occurs through this cleaning process in addition to the presence of residual contamination due to the chemicals used, which leads to feature devolution. Currently, pellicles are used to protect the reticle with the pellicle being transparent to 193 nm light; however with current EUV technology being developed for 13.5 nm light, the pellicle is no longer transparent at this wavelength and thus cannot be used. Other mask-cleaning processes such as laser-induce plasma cleaning (LIP) run the risk of substrate damage due to potentially destructive methods. Plasma-assisted electrostatic cleaning involves using a potential drop in a plasma sheath electric field and charge imbalance between the particle and the substrate to propel the nanoparticles off the surface. Through applying a positive bias to the substrate and using a weak local plasma to charge the particles, the contamination is removed from the surface. As the particle size decreases the amount of time to charge the particle is longer thus leading to a longer removal period. However, as long as the particle is in the plasma sheath region, there is no theoretical limit on the size of the particle removed.

  16. Application of Suomi-NPP Green Vegetation Fraction and NUCAPS for Improving Regional Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Berndt, Emily B.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Zavodsky, Bradley T.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA SPoRT Center is working to incorporate Suomi-NPP products into its research and transition activities to improve regional numerical weather prediction (NWP). Specifically, SPoRT seeks to utilize two data products from NOAA/NESDIS: (1) daily global VIIRS green vegetation fraction (GVF), and (2) NOAA Unique CrIS and ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) temperature and moisture retrieved profiles. The goal of (1) is to improve the representation of vegetation in the Noah land surface model (LSM) over existing climatological GVF datasets in order to improve the land-atmosphere energy exchanges in NWP models and produce better temperature, moisture, and precipitation forecasts. The goal of (2) is to assimilate NUCAPS retrieved profiles into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system to assess the impact on a summer pre-frontal convection case. Most regional NWP applications make use of a monthly GVF climatology for use in the Noah LSM within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The GVF partitions incoming energy into direct surface heating/evaporation over bare soil versus evapotranspiration processes over vegetated surfaces. Misrepresentations of the fractional coverage of vegetation during anomalous weather/climate regimes (e.g., early/late bloom or freeze; drought) can lead to poor NWP model results when land-atmosphere feedback is important. SPoRT has been producing a daily MODIS GVF product based on the University of Wisconsin Direct Broadcast swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). While positive impacts have been demonstrated in the WRF model for some cases, the reflectances composing these NDVI do not correct for atmospheric aerosols nor satellite view angle, resulting in temporal noisiness at certain locations (especially heavy vegetation). The method behind the NESDIS VIIRS GVF is expected to alleviate the issues seen in the MODIS GVF real-time product, thereby offering a higher-quality dataset for

  17. An improved earthquake catalogue in the Marmara Sea region, Turkey, using massive template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrullo, Emanuela; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Bouchon, Michel

    2016-04-01

    After the 1999 Izmit earthquake, the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) represents a 150 km unruptured segment of the North Anatolian Fault located below the Marmara Sea. One of the principal issue for seismic hazard assessment in the region is to know if the MMF is totally or partially locked and where the nucleation of the major forthcoming event is going to take place. The area is actually one of the best-instrumented fault systems in Europe. Since year 2007, various seismic networks both broadband, short period and OBS stations were deployed in order to monitor continuously the seismicity along the MMF and the related fault systems. A recent analysis of the seismicity recorded during the 2007-2012 period has provided new insights on the recent evolution of this important regional seismic gap. This analysis was based on events detected with STA/LTA procedure and manually picked P and S wave arrivals times (Schmittbuhl et al., 2015). In order to extend the level of details and to fully take advantage of the dense seismic network we improved the seismic catalog using an automatic earthquake detection technique based on a template matching approach. This approach uses known earthquake seismic signals in order to detect newer events similar to the tested one from waveform cross-correlation. To set-up the methodology and verify the accuracy and the robustness of the results, we initially focused in the eastern part of the Marmara Sea (Cinarcik basin) and compared new detection with those manually identified. Through the massive analysis of cross-correlation based on the template scanning of the continuous recordings, we construct a refined catalog of earthquakes for the Marmara Sea in 2007-2014 period. Our improved earthquake catalog will provide an effective tool to improve the catalog completeness, to monitor and study the fine details of the time-space distribution of events, to characterize the repeating earthquake source processes and to understand the mechanical state of

  18. Teachers' Perceptions of the Educational Platform--Is There a Connection between School Improvement and Regional Educational Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boström, Lena; Dalin, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    This research examined teachers' attitudes in a school development project, The best regional educational system in the world which focuses on regional development and school improvement. The project was performed in counties in Mid Sweden, which have a lower educational level and school achievements and a competence escape compare with other…

  19. The Views of 920 PACE Project Directors. Report No.5 of the Second National Study of PACE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfax County Schools, Baileys Crossroads, VA. Center for Effecting Educational Change.

    This report consists of a survey and statistical analysis of Projects to Advance Creativity in Education (PACE) as viewed by the 920 project directors in this ESEA Title III program. Discussion centers about (1) characteristics of existing projects, (2) problems encountered, (3) views toward State, local, and Federal agencies, (4) criteria for…

  20. PACE IV: The Developmental Physical Education Curriculum from Theory to Practice (PACE = Positive Approaches to Children's Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Dept. of Kinesiology.

    The purpose of PACE is to bring together individuals who have been responsible for new, innovative, and exciting developmental physical education programs. The following summaries are included: "Literacy in the Gym" (Tami Benham); "Activity Ideas for Fundamental Movement Skill Development" (Thomas H. Green); "Creative Movement Activities: A…

  1. Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 064

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speth, Timothy; Saifer, Steffen; Forehand, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Although the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) spells out parent involvement requirements for schools in need of improvement, the majority of the Northwest Region school improvement plans reviewed failed to include such provisions. Reported findings include: (1) Despite a wide range of parent involvement practices discussed in legislation…

  2. A self-paced oral feeding system that enhances preterm infants’ oral feeding skills

    PubMed Central

    Lau, C; Fucile, S; Schanler, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Aim Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants have difficulty transitioning to independent oral feeding, be they breast- or bottle-feeding. We developed a ‘self-paced’ feeding system that eliminates the natural presence of the positive hydrostatic pressure and internal vacuum build-up within a bottle during feeding. Such system enhanced these infants’ oral feeding performance as monitored by overall transfer (OT; % ml taken/ml prescribed), rate of transfer (RT; ml/min over an entire feeding). This study hypothesizes that the improvements observed in these infants resulted from their ability to use more mature oral feeding skills (OFS). Methods ‘Feeders and growers’ born between 26–29 weeks gestation were assigned to a control or experimental group fed with a standard or self-paced bottle, respectively. They were monitored when taking 1–2 and 6–8 oral feedings/day. OFS was monitored using our recently published non-invasive assessment scale that identifies 4 maturity levels based on infants’ RT and proficiency (PRO; % ml taken during the first 5 min of a feeding/total ml prescribed) during bottle feeding. Results Infants oral feeding outcomes, i.e., OT, RT, PRO, and OFS maturity levels were enhanced in infants fed with the self-paced vs. standard bottle (p ≤ 0.007). Conclusion The improved oral feeding performance of VLBW infants correlated with enhanced OFS. This study is a first to recognize that VLBW infants’ true OFS are more mature than recognized. We speculate that the physical properties inherent to standard bottles that are eliminated with the self-paced system interfere with the display of their true oral feeding potential thereby hindering their overall oral feeding performance. PMID:25999776

  3. Tropical pacing of Antarctic sea ice increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    One reason why coupled climate model simulations generally do not reproduce the observed increase in Antarctic sea ice extent may be that their internally generated climate variability does not sync with the observed phases of phenomena like the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and ENSO. For example, it is unlikely for a free-running coupled model simulation to capture the shift of the PDO from its positive to negative phase during 1998, and the subsequent ~15 year duration of the negative PDO phase. In previously presented work based on atmospheric models forced by observed tropical SSTs and stratospheric ozone, we demonstrated that tropical variability is key to explaining the wind trends over the Southern Ocean during the past ~35 years, particularly in the Ross, Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the regions of the largest trends in sea ice extent and ice season duration. Here, we extend this idea to coupled model simulations with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in which the evolution of SST anomalies in the central and eastern tropical Pacific is constrained to match the observations. This ensemble of 10 "tropical pacemaker" simulations shows a more realistic evolution of Antarctic sea ice anomalies than does its unconstrained counterpart, the CESM Large Ensemble (both sets of runs include stratospheric ozone depletion and other time-dependent radiative forcings). In particular, the pacemaker runs show that increased sea ice in the eastern Ross Sea is associated with a deeper Amundsen Sea Low (ASL) and stronger westerlies over the south Pacific. These circulation patterns in turn are linked with the negative phase of the PDO, characterized by negative SST anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific. The timing of tropical decadal variability with respect to ozone depletion further suggests a strong role for tropical variability in the recent acceleration of the Antarctic sea ice trend, as ozone depletion stabilized by late 1990s, prior to the most

  4. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  5. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  6. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  7. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  8. Effects of pacing magnitudes and forms on bistability width in a modeled ventricular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Liu, Xuemei; Zheng, Lixian; Mi, Yuanyuan; Qian, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Bistability in periodically paced cardiac tissue is relevant to cardiac arrhythmias and its control. In the present paper, one-dimensional tissue of the phase I Luo-Rudy model is numerically investigated. The effects of various parameters of pacing signals on bistability width are studied. The following conclusions are obtained: (i) Pacing can be classified into two types: pulsatile and sinusoidal types. Pulsatile pacing reduces bistability width as its magnitude is increased. Sinusoidal pacing increases the width as its amplitude is increased. (ii) In a pacing period the hyperpolarizing part plays a more important role than the depolarizing part. Variations of the hyperpolarizing ratio in a period evidently change the width of bistability and its variation tendency. (iii) A dynamical mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the phenomena, which reveals the reason for the different effects of pulsatile and sinusoidal pacing on bistability. The methods for changing bistability width by external pacing may help control arrhythmias in cardiology.

  9. Improving intranasal delivery of neurological nanomedicine to the olfactory region using magnetophoretic guidance of microsphere carriers

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Zhang, Ze; Si, Xiuhua A

    2015-01-01

    Background Although direct nose-to-brain drug delivery has multiple advantages, its application is limited by the extremely low delivery efficiency (<1%) to the olfactory region where drugs can enter the brain. It is crucial to developing new methods that can deliver drug particles more effectively to the olfactory region. Materials and methods We introduced a delivery method that used magnetophoresis to improve olfactory delivery efficiency. The performance of the proposed method was assessed numerically in an image-based human nose model. Influences of the magnet layout, magnet strength, drug-release position, and particle diameter on the olfactory dosage were examined. Results and discussion Results showed that particle diameter was a critical factor in controlling the motion of nasally inhaled ferromagnetic drug particles. The optimal particle size was found to be approximately 15 μm for effective magnetophoretic guidance while avoiding loss of particles to the walls in the anterior nose. Olfactory delivery efficiency was shown to be sensitive to the position and strength of magnets and the release position of drug particles. The results of this study showed that clinically significant olfactory doses (up to 45%) were feasible using the optimal combination of magnet layout, selective drug release, and microsphere-carrier diameter. A 64-fold-higher delivery of dosage was predicted in the magnetized nose compared to the control case, which did not have a magnetic field. However, the sensitivity of olfactory dosage to operating conditions and the unstable nature of magnetophoresis make controlled guidance of nasally inhaled aerosols still highly challenging. PMID:25709443

  10. Improvement of surface albedo parameterization within a regional climate model (RegCM3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Y.; Lü, S.

    2009-03-01

    A parameterization for calculating surface albedo of Solar Zenith Angel (SZA) dependence with coefficient for each vegetation type determined on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) reformed by the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) is incorporated within the latest Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3), and evaluated with a high resolution one-way nesting simulation in China using the Climate Research Unit (CRU) data and the observations from the Field Experiment on Interaction between Land and Atmosphere in Arid Region of Northwest China (NWC-ALIEX). The performance of the SZA method modeling surface characteristic is investigated.Results indicate, RegCM with SZA method (RCM_SZA) considerably improve the cold bias of original RegCM (RCM_ORI) in air surface temperature in East Asia with 1.2 degree increased in summer due to the lower albedo produced by SZA method which makes more solar radiation absorbed by the surface and used for heating the atmosphere near to the surface. The simulated diurnal cycle of ground temperature conforms fairly well to the observation in the nesting simulation in Northwest China, especially during the noon time when the SZA has the lowest value. However, the modification can not obviously affect the East Asia summer monsoon precipitation simulation although RCM_SZA produce more evapo-transpiration in surface with more than 2 Wm-2 increases in simulated latent heat fluxes both in East Asia and in Northwest China compared to RCM_ORI.

  11. Role of Ratings of Perceived Exertion during Self-Paced Exercise: What are We Actually Measuring?

    PubMed

    Abbiss, Chris R; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Meeusen, Romain; Skorski, Sabrina

    2015-09-01

    Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and effort are considered extremely important in the regulation of intensity during self-paced physical activity. While effort and exertion are slightly different constructs, these terms are often used interchangeably within the literature. The development of perceptions of both effort and exertion is a complicated process involving numerous neural processes occurring in various regions within the brain. It is widely accepted that perceptions of effort are highly dependent on efferent copies of central drive which are sent from motor to sensory regions of the brain. Additionally, it has been suggested that perceptions of effort and exertion are integrated based on the balance between corollary discharge and actual afferent feedback; however, the involvement of peripheral afferent sensory feedback in the development of such perceptions has been debated. As such, this review examines the possible difference between effort and exertion, and the implications of such differences in understanding the role of such perceptions in the regulation of pace during exercise. PMID:26054383

  12. Improving image accuracy of region-of-interest in cone-beam CT using prior image.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Jin Sung; Cho, Seungryong

    2014-01-01

    In diagnostic follow-ups of diseases, such as calcium scoring in kidney or fat content assessment in liver using repeated CT scans, quantitatively accurate and consistent CT values are desirable at a low cost of radiation dose to the patient. Region of-interest (ROI) imaging technique is considered a reasonable dose reduction method in CT scans for its shielding geometry outside the ROI. However, image artifacts in the reconstructed images caused by missing data outside the ROI may degrade overall image quality and, more importantly, can decrease image accuracy of the ROI substantially. In this study, we propose a method to increase image accuracy of the ROI and to reduce imaging radiation dose via utilizing the outside ROI data from prior scans in the repeated CT applications. We performed both numerical and experimental studies to validate our proposed method. In a numerical study, we used an XCAT phantom with its liver and stomach changing their sizes from one scan to another. Image accuracy of the liver has been improved as the error decreased from 44.4 HU to -0.1 HU by the proposed method, compared to an existing method of data extrapolation to compensate for the missing data outside the ROI. Repeated cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of a patient who went through daily CBCT scans for radiation therapy were also used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method experimentally. The results showed improved image accuracy inside the ROI. The magnitude of error decreased from -73.2 HU to 18 HU, and effectively reduced image artifacts throughout the entire image. PMID:24710451

  13. Update for Users of the Methanol Database: Recent Improvements, Remaining Problems, and More Complicated Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Pearson, J. C.; Drouin, B. J.; Hougen, J. T.

    2009-06-01

    Last year, we published a new global fit for normal methanol covering the first three torsional states (v_t = 0, 1 and 2) for J values up to 30^{[a]}. The global fit of approximately 5600 frequency measurements and 19 000 Fourier transform far infrared (FTFIR) wavenumber measurements to 119 parameters reached the estimated experimental measurement accuracy for the FTFIR transitions, and about twice the estimated experimental measurement accuracy for the microwave, submillimeter-wave and terahertz transitions. Due to a number of complications in that data set, we designated the work as a "living document" and encouraged measurement laboratories represented in the data set to assess carefully how their data were treated, and to partition (if appropriate) their measurements into an optimum set (for which they specify their highest measurement precision) and a less good set (for which they specify a reduced measurement precision). Using the new JPL spectrometer and additional improved measurements, we have recently revisited a large number of transitions. Poor line shapes due either to power saturation or blending were carefully treated with a multi-line peakfinding procedure and assessed with more realistic uncertainties. Assignments were also extended to higher K and J. Several perturbed systems have been identified with complicated networks of interactions. The current data set now contains nearly 9500 frequency measured transitions. While we believe that this represents a substantial improvement on the quantum number coverage of our previous paper^{[a]}, we are also aware of continuing problems in our data fitting. Above all, we are facing challenges moving into a more complicated region with networks of interactions coupling different torsional states. Li-Hong Xu, J. Fisher, R.M. Lees, H.Y. Shi, J.T. Hougen, J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, G.A. Blake, R. Braakman, 2008, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 251, 305-313.

  14. Significantly Improving Regional Seismic Amplitude Tomography at Higher Frequencies by Determining S -Wave Bandwidth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fisk, Mark D.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2016-05-03

    Characterizing regional seismic signals continues to be a difficult problem due to their variability. Calibration of these signals is very important to many aspects of monitoring underground nuclear explosions, including detecting seismic signals, discriminating explosions from earthquakes, and reliably estimating magnitude and yield. Amplitude tomography, which simultaneously inverts for source, propagation, and site effects, is a leading method of calibrating these signals. A major issue in amplitude tomography is the data quality of the input amplitude measurements. Pre-event and prephase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) tests are typically used but can frequently include bad signals and exclude good signals. The deficiencies ofmore » SNR criteria, which are demonstrated here, lead to large calibration errors. To ameliorate these issues, we introduce a semi-automated approach to assess the bandwidth of a spectrum where it behaves physically. We determine the maximum frequency (denoted as Fmax) where it deviates from this behavior due to inflections at which noise or spurious signals start to bias the spectra away from the expected decay. We compare two amplitude tomography runs using the SNR and new Fmax criteria and show significant improvements to the stability and accuracy of the tomography output for frequency bands higher than 2 Hz by using our assessments of valid S-wave bandwidth. We compare Q estimates, P/S residuals, and some detailed results to explain the improvements. Lastly, for frequency bands higher than 4 Hz, needed for effective P/S discrimination of explosions from earthquakes, the new bandwidth criteria sufficiently fix the instabilities and errors so that the residuals and calibration terms are useful for application.« less

  15. Changes in Mood in New Enrollees at a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, Stephanie M.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Austin, Shane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine changes in mood after 9 months of enrollment in a Program of All- Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). DESIGN Cohort Study SETTING Alexian Brothers PACE–St. Louis, Missouri PARTICIPANTS Newly enrolled patients aged 55 or older, living in the PACE service area, eligible for nursing home care, and able to live safely in the community with continuous care for at least 9 months (n=182). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)-15 score at the pre- admission evaluation (PAE) and the 9 month evaluation (9ME). RESULTS Of the 182 patients evaluated, 27% (n=49) met the definition of depression as defined by the GDS-15 score of ≥6 at the PAE. At the 9ME, only 11% of patients met the depression criteria (p<0.001). Of the patients who met the criteria for depression at the PAE, 80% of patients (n=39) no longer met this criteria at the 9ME (p=0.029). Similar findings were observed by age, sex, and race. Greater improvement was observed among those who were depressed at the PAE; the depressed cohort improved by 5.0 points (p<0.001) on the GDS-15 scale from the PAE to the 9ME, whereas the non-depressed cohort improved by 0.6 points (p=0.003). CONCLUSION The use of PACE as an alternative intervention may be a good option to improve mood in older adults. PMID:26260643

  16. The Pacing Board: A Technique to Assist the Transition from Single Word to Multiword Utterances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumin, Libby; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Pacing boards can assist in the transition from single word to multiword utterances by children with language impairments. The pacing board provides visual and motor cues to help young children imitate and spontaneously produce multiword utterances as well as increase metalinguistic awareness of speech units. Instructions for making pacing boards…

  17. Effects of Modality and Pace on Achievement, Mental Effort, and Positive Affect in Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izmirli, Serkan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of instruction given with different multimedia modalities (written text + animation or narration + animation) on the academic achievement, cognitive load, and positive affect in different paces (learner-paced or system-paced); 97 freshmen university students divided into four groups taught in…

  18. Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: U-Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) partnered to disseminate U-Pace, a technology-enabled instructional model that promotes student success through deeper learning. UWM developed U-Pace in 2006 for an Introduction to Psychology course and, over time, evidence indicates that U-Pace not only…

  19. What Pace Is Best? Assessing Adults' Learning from Slideshows and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara

    2014-01-01

    When acquiring information from a 2D platform, self-control and/or optimal pacing may help reduce cognitive load and enhance learning outcomes. In the present research, adults viewed novel action sequences via one of four learning media: (1) self-paced slideshows, where viewers advanced through slides at their own pace by clicking a mouse, (2)…

  20. RNA interference improves myopathic phenotypes in mice over-expressing FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1(-high) mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1(-high) mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  1. RNA Interference Improves Myopathic Phenotypes in Mice Over-expressing FSHD Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1−high mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1−high mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  2. Combining double-difference relocation with regional depth-phase modelling to improve hypocentre accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shutian; Eaton, David W.

    2011-05-01

    Precise and accurate earthquake hypocentres are critical for various fields, such as the study of tectonic process and seismic-hazard assessment. Double-difference relocation methods are widely used and can dramatically improve the precision of event relative locations. In areas of sparse seismic network coverage, however, a significant trade-off exists between focal depth, epicentral location and the origin time. Regional depth-phase modelling (RDPM) is suitable for sparse networks and can provide focal-depth information that is relatively insensitive to uncertainties in epicentral location and independent of errors in the origin time. Here, we propose a hybrid method in which focal depth is determined using RDPM and then treated as a fixed parameter in subsequent double-difference calculations, thus reducing the size of the system of equations and increasing the precision of the hypocentral solutions. Based on examples using small earthquakes from eastern Canada and southwestern USA, we show that the application of this technique yields solutions that appear to be more robust and accurate than those obtained by standard double-difference relocation method alone.

  3. Improving the chi-squared approximation for bivariate normal tolerance regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.

    1993-01-01

    Let X be a two-dimensional random variable distributed according to N2(mu,Sigma) and let bar-X and S be the respective sample mean and covariance matrix calculated from N observations of X. Given a containment probability beta and a level of confidence gamma, we seek a number c, depending only on N, beta, and gamma such that the ellipsoid R = (x: (x - bar-X)'S(exp -1) (x - bar-X) less than or = c) is a tolerance region of content beta and level gamma; i.e., R has probability gamma of containing at least 100 beta percent of the distribution of X. Various approximations for c exist in the literature, but one of the simplest to compute -- a multiple of the ratio of certain chi-squared percentage points -- is badly biased for small N. For the bivariate normal case, most of the bias can be removed by simple adjustment using a factor A which depends on beta and gamma. This paper provides values of A for various beta and gamma so that the simple approximation for c can be made viable for any reasonable sample size. The methodology provides an illustrative example of how a combination of Monte-Carlo simulation and simple regression modelling can be used to improve an existing approximation.

  4. Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Alexis R

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed “exercise-induced pain”. Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. PMID:25228823

  5. Optimal pacing for running 400- and 800-m track races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, James

    2013-06-01

    We present a toy model of anaerobic glycolysis that utilizes appropriate physiological and mathematical consideration while remaining useful to the athlete. The toy model produces an optimal pacing strategy for 400-m and 800-m races that is analytically calculated via the Euler-Lagrange equation. The calculation of the optimum v(t) is presented in detail, with an emphasis on intuitive arguments in order to serve as a bridge between the basic techniques presented in undergraduate physics textbooks and the more advanced techniques of control theory. Observed pacing strategies in 400-m and 800-m world-record races are found to be well-fit by the toy model, which allows us to draw a new physiological interpretation for the advantages of common weight-training practices.

  6. Single lead atrial synchronous ventricular pacing: a dream come true.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, G E

    1994-09-01

    Single lead, atrial synchronous pacing systems were developed in the late 1970s. Clinical experience has demonstrated the need to position the "floating" atrial electrode in the mid-to-high right atrium and the need for a specially designed pulse generator (with very high atrial sensitivity) to provide a high quality and amplitude atrial electrogram for consistent sensing. A 12-year experience with different electrode configurations, from the first unipolar designed in 1980 to the most recent atrial bipolar electrodes, has confirmed the validity of the original concept and the long-term reliability of the single lead atrial synchronous pacing system, which can reliably produce long-term atrial sensing and ventricular stimulation in the presence of normal sinoatrial function. PMID:7991425

  7. Chronic animal testing of new cardiac pacing electrodes.

    PubMed

    Adler, S; Spehr, P; Allen, J; Block, W

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the electrical performance of new electrode technologies, 24 leads containing either carbon coated porous titanium (BIOPORE, (Intermedics, Inc., Freeport, TX], iridium oxide (IROX), or iridium oxide coated with polyethylene glycol (IROX-PEG) electrodes (eight of each) were implanted into the ventricles of 12 canines. Stimulation threshold data was measured at regular intervals for 24 weeks. Low acute values were observed for all leads (0.32 +/- .13 V at 0.6 msec pulse width), but the IROX-PEG electrode demonstrated lower subchronic, peak, and chronic values. Compared to implant, the IROX-PEG electrodes' stimulation thresholds rose only 0.23 V when chronic conditions occurred. There were no significant differences between the electrodes in pacing impedance or R wave amplitude measurements. We conclude that both IROX and IROX-PEG technologies represent a promising approach to the design of more efficient cardiac pacing leads. PMID:1704563

  8. Hemodynamic importance of preserving the normal sequence of ventricular activation in permanent cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, C; Gras, D; Le Helloco, A; Nicol, L; Mabo, P; Daubert, C

    1995-06-01

    Pacing the right ventricle in the apex profoundly modifies the sequence of activation and thus the sequence of contraction and relaxation of the left ventricle. To evaluate the relative importance of preserving normal ventricular activation sequence and optimal atrioventricular (AV) synchrony in permanent pacing, we compared the effects of three pacing modes: AAI, preserving both normal AV synchrony and normal activation sequence; DDD, with complete ventricular capture that preserves only AV synchrony; and VVI, disrupting both, at rest and during exercise. Hemodynamic and radionuclide studies were performed in 11 patients who had normal intrinsic conduction and who were implanted on a long-term basis with a DDDR pacemaker for isolated sinus node dysfunction. AAI versus DDD and VVI significantly increased cardiac output at rest (6.6 +/- 1.3 L/min vs 6 +/- 0.9 L/min vs 5 +/- 1 L/min; p < 0.01) and during exercise (13.5 +/- 2 L/min vs 12.1 +/- 2.2 L/min vs 14.4 +/- 2.1 L/min; p < 0.01). Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was lowest with AAI (15.4 +/- 4.5 mm Hg), with an average reduction of 17% compared with DDD (19.6 +/- 5 mm Hg; p < 0.01) and of 30% compared with VVI (25.8 +/- 7 mm Hg; p < 0.01) during exercise. Identical benefits were observed for all other hemodynamic parameters: right atrial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, left ventricular (LV) stroke work index, and systemic vascular resistances. LV ejection fraction was significantly higher in AAI than in DDD at rest (61% vs 58%, respectively; p < 0.05) and during exercise (65% vs 60%, respectively; p < 0.05). This improvement in LV systolic function resulted principally from the increase in septal ejection fraction. LV filling also was improved in AAI as demonstrated by a significant increase in peak filling rate at rest and during exercise. These data show the importance of preserving, whenever possible, not only normal AV synchrony but also normal ventricular activation sequence in permanent cardiac

  9. Improving plot- and regional-scale crop models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, F.; Rötter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies on global climate report that climate variability is increasing with more frequent and intense extreme events1. There are quite large uncertainties from both the plot- and regional-scale models in simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes on crop development, growth and productivity2,3. One key to reducing the uncertainties is better exploitation of experimental data to eliminate crop model deficiencies and develop better algorithms that more adequately capture the impacts of extreme events, such as high temperature and drought, on crop performance4,5. In the present study, in a first step, the inter-annual variability in wheat yield and climate from 1971 to 2012 in Finland was investigated. Using statistical approaches the impacts of climate variability and extremes on wheat growth and productivity were quantified. In a second step, a plot-scale model, WOFOST6, and a regional-scale crop model, MCWLA7, were calibrated and validated, and applied to simulate wheat growth and yield variability from 1971-2012. Next, the estimated impacts of high temperature stress, cold damage, and drought stress on crop growth and productivity based on the statistical approaches, and on crop simulation models WOFOST and MCWLA were compared. Then, the impact mechanisms of climate extremes on crop growth and productivity in the WOFOST model and MCWLA model were identified, and subsequently, the various algorithm and impact functions were fitted against the long-term crop trial data. Finally, the impact mechanisms, algorithms and functions in WOFOST model and MCWLA model were improved to better simulate the impacts of climate variability and extremes, particularly high temperature stress, cold damage and drought stress for location-specific and large area climate impact assessments. Our studies provide a good example of how to improve, in parallel, the plot- and regional-scale models for simulating impacts of climate variability and extremes, as needed for

  10. Forty years of improvements in European air quality: regional policy-industry interactions with global impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Monica; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Dentener, Frank; Guizzardi, Diego; Sindelarova, Katerina; Muntean, Marilena; Van Dingenen, Rita; Granier, Claire

    2016-03-01

    The EDGARv4.3.1 (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research) global anthropogenic emissions inventory of gaseous (SO2, NOx, CO, non-methane volatile organic compounds and NH3) and particulate (PM10, PM2.5, black and organic carbon) air pollutants for the period 1970-2010 is used to develop retrospective air pollution emissions scenarios to quantify the roles and contributions of changes in energy consumption and efficiency, technology progress and end-of-pipe emission reduction measures and their resulting impact on health and crop yields at European and global scale. The reference EDGARv4.3.1 emissions include observed and reported changes in activity data, fuel consumption and air pollution abatement technologies over the past 4 decades, combined with Tier 1 and region-specific Tier 2 emission factors. Two further retrospective scenarios assess the interplay of policy and industry. The highest emission STAG_TECH scenario assesses the impact of the technology and end-of-pipe reduction measures in the European Union, by considering historical fuel consumption, along with a stagnation of technology with constant emission factors since 1970, and assuming no further abatement measures and improvement imposed by European emission standards. The lowest emission STAG_ENERGY scenario evaluates the impact of increased fuel consumption by considering unchanged energy consumption since the year 1970, but assuming the technological development, end-of-pipe reductions, fuel mix and energy efficiency of 2010. Our scenario analysis focuses on the three most important and most regulated sectors (power generation, manufacturing industry and road transport), which are subject to multi-pollutant European Union Air Quality regulations. Stagnation of technology and air pollution reduction measures at 1970 levels would have led to 129 % (or factor 2.3) higher SO2, 71 % higher NOx and 69 % higher PM2.5 emissions in Europe (EU27), demonstrating the large role that technology has

  11. Solar thermal electricity in 1998: An IEA/SolarPACES summary of status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Tyner, C.E.; Kolb, G.J.; Meinecke, W.; Trieb, F.

    1998-07-01

    Research and development activities sponsored by countries within the International Energy Agency`s solar thermal working group. SolarPACES, have helped reduce the cost of solar thermal systems to one-fifth that of the early pilot plants. Continued technological improvements are currently being proven in next-generation demonstration plants. These advances, along with cost reductions made possible by scale-up to larger production and construction of a succession of power plants, have made solar thermal systems the lowest-cost solar energy in the world and promise cost-competitiveness with fossil-fuel plants in the future. Solar thermal technologies are appropriate for a wide range of applications, including dispatchable central-station power plants where they can meet peak-load to near-base-load needs of a utility, and distributed, modular power plants for both remote and grid-connected applications. In this paper, the authors present the collective position of the SolarPACES community on solar electricity-generating technology. They discuss the current status of the technology and likely near-term improvements; the needs of target markets; and important technical and financial issues that must be resolved for success in near-term global markets.

  12. Speed, pacing strategy and aerodynamic drafting in Thoroughbred horse racing.

    PubMed

    Spence, Andrew J; Thurman, Andrew S; Maher, Michael J; Wilson, Alan M

    2012-08-23

    Choice of pacing strategy and the benefit of aerodynamic drafting are thought to be key determinants of racing performance. These effects have largely been analysed without reference to final outcome, in small datasets with low temporal resolution, and a focus on human swimming, cycling and running. Here, we determined the position and speed of 44,803 racehorses, once per second, in 3,357 races ranging in length from 1006 to 4225 m (50.9-292.9 seconds duration) using a validated radio tracking system. We find that aerodynamic drafting has a marked effect on horse performance, and hence racing outcome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that race length-dependent pacing strategies are correlated with the fastest racing times, with some horses reaching a maximum speed in excess of 19 m s(-1). The higher speeds seen with certain pacing strategies may arise due to the nature of pack racing itself, or may be a reflection of individual capabilities, that is, corresponding to horses that perform well in roles suited to their 'front-running' or 'chaser' personality traits. PMID:22399784

  13. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing.

    PubMed

    Herman, Dalibor; Prevorovská, Svetlana; Marsík, Frantisek

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed to the determination of the changes in the cardiac energetic output for three different modes of cardiac rhythm pacing. The clinical investigation of thirteen patients with the permanent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation was carried out. The patients were taken to echocardiography examination conducted by way of three pacing modes (AAI, VVI and DDD). The myocardial energetic parameters-the stroke work index (SWI) and the myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) are not directly measurable, however, their values can be determined using the numerical model of the human cardiovascular system. The 24-segment hemodynamical model (pulsating type) of the human cardiovascular system was used for the numerical simulation of the changes of myocardial workload for cardiac rhythm pacing. The model was fitted by well-measurable parameters for each patient. The calculated parameters were compared using the two-tailed Student's test. The differences of SWI and MVO2 between the modes AAI and VVI and the modes DDD and VVI are statistically significant (P<0.05). On the other hand, the hemodynamic effects for the stimulation modes DDD and AAI are almost identical, i.e. the differences are statistically insignificant (P>0.05). PMID:18080208

  14. Microbolometer Terahertz Focal Plane Array and Camera with Improved Sensitivity in the Sub-Terahertz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Kurashina, Seiji; Miyoshi, Masaru; Doi, Kohei; Ishi, Tsutomu; Sudou, Takayuki; Morimoto, Takao; Goto, Hideki; Sasaki, Tokuhito

    2015-10-01

    A pixel in an uncooled microbolometer terahertz (THz) focal plane array (FPA) has a suspended structure above read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) substrate. An optical cavity structure is formed between a thin metallic layer deposited on the suspended structure and a thick metallic layer deposited on the ROIC surface. The geometrical optical cavity length for our previous pixel structure, 3-4 μm, is extended three times, so that responsivity can be increased in the sub-THz region. This modification is carried out by depositing a thick SiN layer on the thick metallic layer. The modified pixel structure is applied to 640 × 480 and 320 × 240 THz-FPAs with 23.5 μm pixel pitch. Minimum detectable powers per pixel (MDP) are evaluated for these FPAs at 4.3, 2.5, 0.6, and 0.5 THz, and the MDP values are found to be improved by a factor of ten at 0.6 and 0.5 THz. The MDP values of the THz-FPAs developed in this work are compared with those of other THz detectors, such as uncooled antenna-coupled CMOS (complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor) THz-FPAs and cooled bolometer arrays. It is found that our THz-FPAs are more sensitive in the sub-THz region than the CMOS THz-FPAs, while they are much less sensitive than the cooled bolometer arrays. These THz-FPAs are incorporated into a 640 × 480 THz camera and 320 × 240 THz camera, and imaging equipment is developed. The equipment consists of a linearly polarized sub-THz source, a collimator lens, a beam homogenizer, two wire grids, a quarter-wave plate, and two THz cameras, and sub-THz images are demonstrated. It should be mentioned for the equipment that imaging of transmission and reflection is realized by moving only the quarter-wave plate, and the reflection image is taken along a direction normal to a sample surface so that the reflection image is hardly deformed.

  15. Temporary epicardial pacing after cardiac surgery: a practical review. Part 2: Selection of epicardial pacing modes and troubleshooting.

    PubMed

    Reade, M C

    2007-04-01

    The first part of this two-part review discussed the indications for various types of epicardial pacing systems and an overview of the routine care of a pacemaker-dependent patient. Dual chamber temporary pulse generators now feature many of the refinements developed initially for use in permanent pacemakers. Few of these are utilised in the immediate postoperative period, often solely due to lack of familiarity with all but basic functions. The second part of the review deals with the selection of pacing modes. Troubleshooting real and apparent pacemaker malfunctions, including manual adjustment of parameters such as the AV interval, post atrial refractory period and upper rate limit, to avoid over- and undersensing, cross-talk and pacemaker-mediated tachycardia will also be addressed. PMID:17381573

  16. The Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region an Overview of Network Operation, Maintenance and Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, M.; Boyce, E. S.; Bierma, R.; Walker, K.; Feaux, K.

    2011-12-01

    UNAVCO has now completed its third year of operation of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 communications relays that comprise the Alaska Region of the Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory. Working in Alaska has been challenging due to the extreme environmental conditions encountered and logistics difficulties. Despite these challenges we have been able to complete each summer field season with network operation at 95% or better. Throughout the last three years we have analyzed both our successes and failures to improve the quality of our network and better serve the scientific community. Additionally, we continue to evaluate and deploy new technologies to improve station reliability and add to the data set available from our stations. 2011 was a busy year for the Alaska engineering team and some highlights from last year's maintenance season include the following. This spring we completed testing and deployment of the first Inmarsat BGAN satellite terminal for data telemetry at AC60 Shemya Island. Shemya Island is at the far western end of the Aleutian Islands and is one of the most remote and difficult to access stations in the PBO AK network. Until the installation of the BGAN, this station was offline with no data telemetry for almost one year. Since the installation of the BGAN in early April 2011 dataflow has been uninterrupted. This year we also completed the first deployments of Stardot NetCamSC webcams in the PBO Network. Currently, these are installed and operational at six GPS stations in Alaska, with plans to install several more next season in Alaska. Images from these cameras can be found at the station homepages linked to from the UNAVCO website. In addition to the hard work put in by PBO engineers this year, it is important that we recognize the contributions of our partners. In particular the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the Alaska Earthquake Information Center and others who have provided us with valuable engineering assistance

  17. Lunar exosphere observed by MAP-PACE onboard SELENE(KAGUYA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Shoichiro; Saito, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki N.; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    The Moon has no global intrinsic magnetic field and only has a very thin atmosphere called surface-bounded exosphere. The lunar exosphere has been observed by ground-based technique on many occasions since its discovery. The alkali components such as Na or K have especially been observed to understand the generation process and the transport mechanisms. One of the loss processes of the exospheric particles is photoionization and ion-pickup process. The ionized exospheric particles are transported by the surrounding electric field. Therefore, ion measurements made from lunar orbit is another way to study the lunar exosphere as well as in-teractions between the solar wind and the planetary surface. Japanese lunar orbiter SELENE (KAGUYA), which was launched on September 14, 2007, has the in-situ plasma analyzers named MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment -Plasma energy Angle and Com-position Experiment) in order to investigate the plasma environment at 100km altitude around the Moon. PACE consists of two sensors for low energy electron measurements and two sensors for low energy ion measurements. One of the ion spectrometer, MAP-PACE IMA, which has a mass analyzer detected low-energy ions from the Moon at an altitude of 100 km. IMA has identified ion species of He+, C+, O+, Na+, K+ and Ar+. The measurements of ions from the Moon enable us to continuously monitor the lunar exosphere. The 1.5-year observation of SELENE(KAGUYA) shows that the ions from the Moon have been detected both when the Moon is exposed to the solar wind and when it is in the Earth's lobe region. The observation suggests that the solar wind is not the dominant source mechanism for the lunar exospheres. Moreover, the MAP-PACE observation shows the dependence on the solar zenith angle and the dawn-dusk asymmetry of the lunar exosphere. We report the features of the lunar exospheres obtained by the SELENE(KAGUYA) observation and discuss the source mechanism of the lunar exosphere.

  18. Operational improvement of AlGaN/GaN HEMT on SiC substrate with the amended depletion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Majid; Orouji, Ali A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a high performance AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) on SiC substrates is presented to improve the electrical operation with the amended depletion region using a multiple recessed gate (MRG-HEMT). The basic idea is to change the gate depletion region and a better distribution of the electric field in the channel and improve the device breakdown voltage. The proposed gate consists of lower and upper gate to control the channel thickness. Also, the charge of the depletion region will change due to the optimized gate. In addition, a metal between the gate and drain including the horizontal and vertical parts is used to better control the thickness of the channel. The breakdown voltage, maximum output power density, cut-off frequency, maximum oscillation frequency, minimum noise figure, maximum available gain (MAG), and maximum stable gain (MSG) are some parameters for designers which are considered and are improved in this paper.

  19. Dual chamber pacing mode in an atrial antitachycardia pacing device without a ventricular lead – A necessary evil

    PubMed Central

    Noheria, Amit; Friedman, Paul A.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.; McLeod, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a single chamber atrial pacemaker implanted for sinus node dysfunction and treatment of macroreentrant atrial tachycardias with atrial antitachycardia pacing. The patient presented with sustained atrial tachycardia above the detection rate, however, the device was unable to detect the tachycardia and did not deliver the programmed therapy. We discuss the nuances of the atrial tachyarrhythmia detection algorithms, and the programming strategies to maximize detection of atrial arrhythmias in a single chamber atrial pacemaker. PMID:26937101

  20. Data-driven methods to improve baseflow prediction of a regional groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianfang; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-12-01

    Physically-based models of groundwater flow are powerful tools for water resources assessment under varying hydrologic, climate and human development conditions. One of the most important topics of investigation is how these conditions will affect the discharge of groundwater to rivers and streams (i.e. baseflow). Groundwater flow models are based upon discretized solution of mass balance equations, and contain important hydrogeological parameters that vary in space and cannot be measured. Common practice is to use least squares regression to estimate parameters and to infer prediction and associated uncertainty. Nevertheless, the unavoidable uncertainty associated with physically-based groundwater models often results in both aleatoric and epistemic model calibration errors, thus violating a key assumption for regression-based parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification. We present a complementary data-driven modeling and uncertainty quantification (DDM-UQ) framework to improve predictive accuracy of physically-based groundwater models and to provide more robust prediction intervals. First, we develop data-driven models (DDMs) based on statistical learning techniques to correct the bias of the calibrated groundwater model. Second, we characterize the aleatoric component of groundwater model residual using both parametric and non-parametric distribution estimation methods. We test the complementary data-driven framework on a real-world case study of the Republican River Basin, where a regional groundwater flow model was developed to assess the impact of groundwater pumping for irrigation. Compared to using only the flow model, DDM-UQ provides more accurate monthly baseflow predictions. In addition, DDM-UQ yields prediction intervals with coverage probability consistent with validation data. The DDM-UQ framework is computationally efficient and is expected to be applicable to many geoscience models for which model structural error is not negligible.

  1. Improving breakdown voltage performance of SOI power device with folded drift region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Hai-Ou, Li; Ping-Jiang, Huang; Gong-Li, Xiao; Nian-Jiong, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A novel silicon-on-insulator (SOI) high breakdown voltage (BV) power device with interlaced dielectric trenches (IDT) and N/P pillars is proposed. In the studied structure, the drift region is folded by IDT embedded in the active layer, which results in an increase of length of ionization integral remarkably. The crowding phenomenon of electric field in the corner of IDT is relieved by the N/P pillars. Both traits improve two key factors of BV, the ionization integral length and electric field magnitude, and thus BV is significantly enhanced. The electric field in the dielectric layer is enhanced and a major portion of bias is borne by the oxide layer due to the accumulation of inverse charges (holes) at the corner of IDT. The average value of the lateral electric field of the proposed device reaches 60 V/μm with a 10 μm drift length, which increases by 200% in comparison to the conventional SOI LDMOS, resulting in a breakdown voltage of 607 V. Project supported by the Guangxi Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 2013GXNSFAA019335 and 2015GXNSFAA139300), Guangxi Experiment Center of Information Science of China (Grant No. YB1406), Guangxi Key Laboratory of Wireless Wideband Communication and Signal Processing of China, Key Laboratory of Cognitive Radio and Information Processing (Grant No. GXKL061505), Guangxi Key Laboratory of Automobile Components and Vehicle Technology of China (Grant No. 2014KFMS04), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61361011, 61274077, and 61464003).

  2. Probe Region Expression Estimation for RNA-Seq Data for Improved Microarray Comparability

    PubMed Central

    Uziela, Karolis; Honkela, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing public gene expression databases contain a wealth of data for building an unprecedentedly detailed picture of human biology and disease. This data comes from many diverse measurement platforms that make integrating it all difficult. Although RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is attracting the most attention, at present, the rate of new microarray studies submitted to public databases far exceeds the rate of new RNA-seq studies. There is clearly a need for methods that make it easier to combine data from different technologies. In this paper, we propose a new method for processing RNA-seq data that yields gene expression estimates that are much more similar to corresponding estimates from microarray data, hence greatly improving cross-platform comparability. The method we call PREBS is based on estimating the expression from RNA-seq reads overlapping the microarray probe regions, and processing these estimates with standard microarray summarisation algorithms. Using paired microarray and RNA-seq samples from TCGA LAML data set we show that PREBS expression estimates derived from RNA-seq are more similar to microarray-based expression estimates than those from other RNA-seq processing methods. In an experiment to retrieve paired microarray samples from a database using an RNA-seq query sample, gene signatures defined based on PREBS expression estimates were found to be much more accurate than those from other methods. PREBS also allows new ways of using RNA-seq data, such as expression estimation for microarray probe sets. An implementation of the proposed method is available in the Bioconductor package “prebs.” PMID:25966034

  3. A better GRACE solution for improving the regional Greenland mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrama, E.; Xu, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In most GRACE based researches, a variety of smoothing methods is employed to remove alternating bands of positive and negative stripes stretching in the north-south direction. Many studies have suggested to smooth the GRACE maps, on which mass variations are represented as equivalent water height (EWH). Such maps are capable of exposing the redistribution of earth surface mass over time. In Greenland the shrinking of the ice cap becomes significant in the last decade. Our present study confirms that the dominating melting trends are in the east and southeast coastal zones, however, the smoothed signals along the coastline in these areas do not represent the original but averaged measurements from GRACE satellites which means the signal strength indicating that negative mass variations are mixed with some positive signals that are very close to this area. An exact identification of the topographic edge is not possible and visually the EWH maps appear to be blurred. To improve this, we firstly used spherical harmonic coefficients of GRACE level-2 data from CSR-RL04 and produced a smoothed EWH map. Empirical Orthogonal Functions(EOF)/Principal Component Analysis(PCA) have been introduced as well, in order to extract the melting information associated with the recent warming climate. Next, the Greenland area is redefined by 16 basins and the corresponding melting zones are quantified respectively. Least Squares methods are invoked to interpolate the mass distribution function on each basin. In this way we are able to estimate more accurately regional ice melting rate and we sharpen the EWH map. After comparing our results with a hydrological model the combination SMB - D is established which contains the surface mass balance (SMB) and ice-discharge (D). A general agreement can be reached and it turns out this method is capable to enhance our understanding of the shrinking global cryosphere

  4. Improving Focal Depth Estimates: Studies of Depth Phase Detection at Regional Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A.; Reiter, D. T.; Shumway, R. H.

    2006-12-01

    networks of regional stations using a Grid-search, Multiple-Event Location method (GMEL; Rodi and Toksöz, 2000; 2001). 3. Surface-wave dispersion inversion for event depth and focal mechanism (Herrmann and Ammon, 2002). To validate our approach and provide quality control for our solutions, we applied the techniques to moderated- sized events (mb between 4.5 and 6.0) with known focal mechanisms. We illustrate the techniques using events observed at regional distances from the KSAR (Wonju, South Korea) teleseismic array and other nearby broadband three-component stations. Our results indicate that the techniques can produce excellent agreement between the various depth estimates. In addition, combining the techniques into a "unified" estimate greatly reduced location errors and improved robustness of the solution, even if results from the individual methods yielded large standard errors.

  5. Utilizing solid impurity granules for ELM pacing in NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunsford, Robert; Roquemore, L.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Maingi, R.; NSTX-U Team

    2015-11-01

    Periodic edge localized modes (ELMs) rapidly transport stored energy from the edge plasma to the divertor. These events result in abrupt heating of the plasma facing components (PFCs) which reduces their effective lifetime as well as generating a strong impurity influx. If the frequency of these ELMs can be increased through controlled triggering, also known as pacing, then the inverse relationship between the peak heat flux and the frequency of the ELMs can be utilized to prevent material damage that could result from otherwise unmitigated ELMs. At NSTX, the ability of small (300 - 1000 micron) impurity granules to trigger and pace these ELMs is being explored. In these experiments, ELMs are triggered by seeding a density perturbation within the edge-pedestal region through low speed injection and ablation of impurity granules, thus generating a localized instability. Granules are dropped from a reservoir and transit a vertical flight tube at which point a rotating impeller imparts horizontal momentum into the falling granules. This drives them into the edge of the discharge at speeds ranging from 50-150 m/s and average injection frequencies of up to 200 Hz depending upon the settings of the injector. Results from the initial laboratory injection tests of lithium, boron carbide (B4C) and vitreous carbon granules and their subsequent implementation in NSTX-U experiments will be discussed. Work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Observation of ions from the Moon by MAP-PACE IMA onboard SELENE(KAGUYA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Shoichiro; Saito, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    2010-05-01

    The Moon has no global intrinsic magnetic field and only has a very thin atmosphere. Ion measurements made from lunar orbit give us the information regarding interactions between the solar wind and the planetary surface. The ion mass spectrometry also provides the surface composition and the source and loss mechanisms of planetary tenuous atmospheres. An ion energy mass spectrometer MAP-PACE IMA onboard a lunar orbiter SELENE(KAGUYA) has detected low-energy ions from the Moon at an altitude of 100 km. IMA has identified ion species of He+, C+, O+, Na+, K+ and Ar+. The measurements of ions from the Moon enable us to continuously monitor the lunar exospheres. The 1.5-year observation of SELENE(KAGUYA) shows that the ions from the Moon have been detected both when the Moon is exposed to the solar wind and when it is in the Earth's lobe region. The observation suggests that the solar wind is not the dominant source mechanism for the lunar exospheres. Moreover, the MAP-PACE IMA shows the dependence on the solar zenith angle and the dawn-dusk asymmetry. We report the features of the lunar exospheres obtained by the SELENE(KAGUYA) observation and discuss the source mechanism of the lunar exospheres.

  7. Coronal View Ultrasound Imaging of Movement in Different Segments of the Tongue during Paced Recital: Findings from Four Normal Speakers and a Speaker with Partial Glossectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Flowers, Heather; Wong, Willy; Irish, Jonathan C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to quantitatively describe aspects of coronal tongue movement in different anatomical regions of the tongue. Four normal speakers and a speaker with partial glossectomy read four repetitions of a metronome-paced poem. Their tongue movement was recorded in four coronal planes using two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound…

  8. Biventricular stimulation to prevent cardiac desynchronization: rationale, design, and endpoints of the 'Biventricular Pacing for Atrioventricular Block to Prevent Cardiac Desynchronization (BioPace)' study.

    PubMed

    Funck, Reinhard C; Blanc, Jean-Jacques; Mueller, Hans-Helge; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Bailleul, Christophe; Maisch, Bernhard

    2006-08-01

    Despite the deleterious effects of cardiac dyssynchrony and the positive effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy, patients with high-degree atrioventricular block continue to receive desynchronizing right ventricular (RV) pacing systems. Although it is unclear whether the negative effects of RV pacing and left bundle branch block (LBBB) are comparable, and whether they depend on the presence and the degree of structural heart disease, one may hypothesize that RV pacing may have similar effects to LBBB. In the BioPace trial, the long-term effects of RV pacing vs. biventricular pacing will be prospectively compared in 1200 pacemaker patients with high likelihood of mostly paced ventricular events, regardless of whether in sinus rhythm or in atrial fibrillation (AF). After echocardiographic examination of left ventricular (LV) function, patients will be randomly assigned to the implantation of an RV vs. a biventricular pacing system and followed for up to 5 years. Primary study endpoints are survival, quality of life (QoL), and the distance covered in a 6-min hall walk (6-MHW) at 24 months after implantation. Secondary endpoints are QoL and the 6-MHW result at 12 months after implantation, hospitalization rate, LV dimensions, LV ejection fraction, and the development of chronic AF and other adverse events. PMID:16864616

  9. REGIONAL VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT (REVA) IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING THROUGH CLIENT PARTNERSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Vulnerability Assessment (ReV A) Program is an applied research program t,1at is focusing on using spatial information and model results to support environmental decision-making at regional- down to local-scales. Re VA has developed analysis and assessment methods to...

  10. Improving Teaching and Learning in a Regional University Campus through a Focus on the Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Janet; Zianian, Tahereh; Evans, Nina; Gillham, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the research process undertaken in a pilot study conducted at the University of South Australia's Centre for Regional Engagement (CRE), and reports the feedback collected in relation to this process and the project overall. Academic staff and students from CRE's two sites located in the rural and regional cities of Whyalla and…

  11. The Coalition Approach to Improved Services for Handicapped Children in the Baltimore Region. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickey, Jane M.; Hartman, Barbara L.

    Presented is the final report of a 1-year project designed to determine the possibility of coordinating services for handicapped children in the Baltimore (Maryland) region by providing technical assistance to coalitions of decision makers at the local and regional levels. Some of the findings and conclusions drawn from the project are listed such…

  12. Strategic Priorities for Improving Access to Quality Education in the Kurdistan Region--Iraq. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernez, Georges; Culbertson, Shelly; Constant, Louay

    2014-01-01

    The Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) began an ambitious reform of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq's (KRI's) kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) education system beginning in 2007 in an effort to modernize the curriculum, upgrade school facilities, and raise the quality of instruction. In 2010, RAND was asked to conduct a one-year study to assess…

  13. Regional Educational Laboratories 2002 Annual Report: Improving the Lives of Children through Education Research & Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeast and Islands Regional Educational Lab. at Brown Univ., Providence, RI.

    This report, the second annual report of the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) system's current 5-year contract, shows the progress laboratories have made in meeting regional challenges and establishing national leadership in critical areas. The report also illustrates who the labs are using research and development to gain knowledge about how…

  14. Improving Public-spending Efficiency in Czech Regions and Municipalities. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 499

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ways of ensuring Czech regions and municipalities are fully motivated to make efficiency improvements in public service provision and so help achieve countrywide fiscal sustainability. The very large number of small municipalities in the Czech Republic means that scale economies are difficult to exploit and the policy options…

  15. Integrating fuzzy logic and statistics to improve the reliable delimitation of biogeographic regions and transition zones.

    PubMed

    Olivero, Jesús; Márquez, Ana L; Real, Raimundo

    2013-01-01

    This study uses the amphibian species of the Mediterranean basin to develop a consistent procedure based on fuzzy sets with which biogeographic regions and biotic transition zones can be objectively detected and reliably mapped. Biogeographical regionalizations are abstractions of the geographical organization of life on Earth that provide frameworks for cataloguing species and ecosystems, for answering basic questions in biogeography, evolutionary biology, and systematics, and for assessing priorities for conservation. On the other hand, limits between regions may form sharply defined boundaries along some parts of their borders, whereas elsewhere they may consist of broad transition zones. The fuzzy set approach provides a heuristic way to analyse the complexity of the biota within an area; significantly different regions are detected whose mutual limits are sometimes fuzzy, sometimes clearly crisp. Most of the regionalizations described in the literature for the Mediterranean biogeographical area present a certain degree of convergence when they are compared within the context of fuzzy interpretation, as many of the differences found between regionalizations are located in transition zones, according to our case study. Compared with other classification procedures based on fuzzy sets, the novelty of our method is that both fuzzy logic and statistics are used together in a synergy in order to avoid arbitrary decisions in the definition of biogeographic regions and transition zones. PMID:22744774

  16. Ecuador steps up pace of oil development activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-23

    This paper reports that oil companies operating in Ecuador plan to quicken the pace of oil development this year. After delays in 1991, companies plan a series of projects to develop reserves discovered the past 3 years estimated at more than 600 million bbl. Oil and Gas Journal estimated Ecuador's proved crude reserves at 1.55 billion bbl as of Jan. 1, 1992. The development push is part of a larger effort needed to ensure Ecuador's status as an oil exporter into the next century. Ecuador is the smallest crude oil producer and exporter in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

  17. Controllable Snail-Paced Light in Biological Bacteriorhodopsin Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pengfei; Rao, D. V. G. L. N.

    2005-12-01

    We observe that the group velocity of light is reduced to an extremely low value of 0.091mm/s in a biological thin film of bacteriorhodopsin at room temperature. By exploiting unique features of a flexible photoisomerization process for coherent population oscillation, the velocity is all-optically controlled over an enormous span, from snail-paced to normal light speed, with no need of modifying the characteristics of the incident pulse. Because of the large quantum yield for the photoreaction in this biochemical system, the ultraslow light is observed even at low light levels of microwatts, indicating high energy efficiency.

  18. Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test: adult norms and moderator variables.

    PubMed

    Wiens, A N; Fuller, K H; Crossen, J R

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the performance of a sample of 821 healthy job applicants on the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). Subjects had previously passed basic academic skills tests and physical examinations and were deemed free of cognitive impairment and medical illness. They were also motivated to perform well on cognitive tests. Gender, ethnicity, and education were not significant moderator variables in our subjects. Age and IQ did significantly affect PASAT test results. Normative data are stratified by age and WAIS-R Full Scale IQ scores to be useful to those who administer the PASAT in clinical practice. PMID:9342683

  19. What Controls the Pacing of 100-ky Glacial Cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymo, M. E.; Kawamura, K.; Lisiecki, L.; Thompson, W. G.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    Climate variations over the last ~700,000 years are characterized by orbital periodicities of 100, 41 and 23 ky. While 23- and 41-ky components are understood as linear climatic responses to forcing by precession (modulated by eccentricity) and obliquity, respectively, the 100-ky cycle cannot be explained as a linear response to eccentricity. Rather, it has been suggested that the 100-ky cycle is caused by skipping of higher frequency beats which results in the bundling of either 4 or 5 precession cycles (Raymo, Paleoceanography, 1997), or 2 or 3 obliquity cycles (Huybers and Wunsch, Nature, 2005), each grouping resulting in an average 100 ky periodicity. However, verification of these competing hypotheses has not been possible because of the lack of accurately dated climate proxies. Here, using statistical tests of newly established chronologies of Antarctic climate (Kawamura et al., AGU 2006 fall meeting) and sea level high stands (Thompson, in preparation), we show that precession pacing is statistically more significant than obliquity pacing for the last five glacial terminations. We used the timings of Antarctic warmings at terminations from the Dome Fuji ice core for termination I to III, and from the Vostok core for termination IV. The timing of termination V was estimated by shifting the Dome C (EDC2) timescale to match the timing of peak MIS 11.3 with the Vostok record. The time of onset for the sea level high stands of the last four interglacial periods were estimated by correcting radiometric fossil coral ages with open-system age equations (Thompson et al., 2003, EPSL). Our results show that the null hypothesis for precession pacing can be rejected at the 3% significance level for the last five terminations from ice cores and for four terminations from sea level high stands, whereas the null hypothesis for obliquity pacing can be rejected only at >10% significance level. The statistical power of test for obliquity is high (>95% at the 10% significance

  20. A refined 2010-based VOC emission inventory and its improvement on modeling regional ozone in the Pearl River Delta Region, China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shasha; Zheng, Junyu; Lu, Qing; Yuan, Zibing; Huang, Zhijiong; Zhong, Liuju; Lin, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Accurate and gridded VOC emission inventories are important for improving regional air quality model performance. In this study, a four-level VOC emission source categorization system was proposed. A 2010-based gridded Pearl River Delta (PRD) regional VOC emission inventory was developed with more comprehensive source coverage, latest emission factors, and updated activity data. The total anthropogenic VOC emission was estimated to be about 117.4 × 10(4)t, in which on-road mobile source shared the largest contribution, followed by industrial solvent use and industrial processes sources. Among the industrial solvent use source, furniture manufacturing and shoemaking were major VOC emission contributors. The spatial surrogates of VOC emission were updated for major VOC sources such as industrial sectors and gas stations. Subsector-based temporal characteristics were investigated and their temporal variations were characterized. The impacts of updated VOC emission estimates and spatial surrogates were evaluated by modeling O₃ concentration in the PRD region in the July and October of 2010, respectively. The results indicated that both updated emission estimates and spatial allocations can effectively reduce model bias on O₃ simulation. Further efforts should be made on the refinement of source classification, comprehensive collection of activity data, and spatial-temporal surrogates in order to reduce uncertainty in emission inventory and improve model performance. PMID:25687669

  1. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  2. Improving accuracy in shallow-landslide susceptibility analyses at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, Giulio G. R.; Rago, Valeria; Frustaci, Francesco; Bruno, Claudia; Giordano, Stefania; Muto, Francesco; Gariano, Stefano L.; Pellegrino, Annamaria D.; Conforti, Massimo; Pascale, Stefania; Distilo, Daniela; Basile, Vincenzo; Soleri, Sergio; Terranova, Oreste G.

    2015-04-01

    Calabria (southern Italy) is particularly exposed to geo-hydrological risk. In the last decades, slope instabilities, mainly related to rainfall-induced landslides, repeatedly affected its territory. Among these, shallow landslides, characterized by abrupt onset and extremely rapid movements, are among the most destructive and dangerous phenomena for people and infrastructures. In this study, a susceptibility analysis to shallow landslides has been performed by refining a method recently applied in Costa Viola - central Calabria (Iovine et al., 2014), and only focusing on landslide source activations (regardless of their possible evolution as debris flows). A multivariate approach has been applied to estimating the presence/absence of sources, based on linear statistical relationships with a set of causal variables. The different classes of numeric causal variables have been determined by means of a data clustering method, designed to determine the best arrangement. A multi-temporal inventory map of sources, mainly obtained from interpretation of air photographs taken in 1954-1955, and in 2000, has been adopted to selecting the training and the validation sets. Due to the wide extend of the territory, the analysis has been iteratively performed by a step-by-step decreasing cell-size approach, by adopting greater spatial resolutions and thematic details (e.g. lithology, land-use, soil, morphometry, rainfall) for high-susceptible sectors. Through a sensitivity analysis, the weight of the considered factors in predisposing shallow landslides has been evaluated. The best set of variables has been identified by iteratively including one variable at a time, and comparing the results in terms of performance. Furthermore, susceptibility evaluations obtained through logistic regression have been compared to those obtained by applying neural networks. Obtained results may be useful to improve land utilization planning, and to select proper mitigation measures in shallow

  3. Paced QRS duration and myocardial scar amount: predictors of long-term outcome of right ventricular apical pacing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Cha, Myung-Jin; Cho, Youngjin; Oh, Il-Young; Choi, Eue-Keun; Oh, Seil

    2016-07-01

    Long-term right ventricular apical pacing (RVAP) is reportedly associated with heart failure (HF) development. However, the predictors of pacing-induced HF (PHF) remained unclear. We retrospectively enrolled 234 patients without structural heart disease who underwent a permanent pacemaker implantation with RVAP between 1982 and 2004. RVAP-induced HF was defined as left ventricular ejection fraction decrease >5 % with HF symptom without other HF development etiology. The QRS duration of a paced beat (pQRSd) and myocardial scar score were analyzed from each patient's 12-lead ECG. During a mean 15.6 years (range 3.3-30.0 years), 48 patients (20.5 %) patients developed RVAP-induced HF. The PHF group patients had a longer pQRSd (192.4 ± 13.5 vs. 175.7 ± 14.7 ms in non-PHF patients, p < 0.001) and a higher myocardial scar score (5.2 ± 1.9 vs. 2.7 ± 1.9, respectively p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, old age at implantation [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.62, 95 % confidential interval (CI) 1.22-2.16, p = 0.001], a longer pQRSd (HR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.15-2.05, p = 0.003), a higher myocardial scar score (HR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.03-1.49, p = 0.037), and a higher percentage of ventricular pacing (HR 1.31, 95 % CI 1.01-1.49, p = 0.010) were independent predictors of PHF. Based on the results of the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the pQRSd cutoff was 185 ms (AUC 0.79, sensitivity 66.7 %, specificity 76.3 %) and myocardial scar score cutoff value was 4 (AUC 0.81, sensitivity 81.3 %, specificity 66.1 %). The pQRSd was positively correlated with scar score (r = 0.70, p < 0.001). pQRSd ≥185 ms and/or myocardial scar score ≥4 might be independent long-term prognostic markers of PHF. PMID:26142378

  4. The pace of East African monsoon evolution during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeab, Syee; Menke, Valerie; Schmiedl, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    African monsoon precipitation experienced a dramatic change in the course of the Holocene. The pace with which the African monsoon shifted from a strong early to middle to a weak late Holocene is critical for our understanding of climate dynamics, hydroclimate-vegetation interaction, and shifts of prehistoric human settlements, yet it is controversially debated. On the basis of planktonic foraminiferal Ba/Ca time series from the eastern Mediterranean Sea, here we present a proxy record of Nile River runoff that provides a spatially integrated measure of changes in East African monsoon (EAM) precipitation. The runoff record indicates a markedly gradual middle to late Holocene EAM transition that lasted over 3500 years. The timing and pace of runoff change parallels those of insolation and vegetation changes over the Nile basin, indicating orbitally forced variation of insolation as the main EAM forcing and the absence of a nonlinear precipitation-vegetation feedback. A tight correspondence between a threshold level of Nile River runoff and the timing of occupation/abandonment of settlements suggests that along with climate changes in the eastern Sahara, the level of Nile River and intensity of summer floods were likely critical for the habitability of the Nile Valley (Egypt).

  5. Effects of spironolactone towards rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid pacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fa; Gu, Lei; Huang, Meng-Xun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Li, Hua; Zhang, Bang-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the effects of spironolactone towards the rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid atrial pacing (RAP). 30 rabbits were randomly divided into control group, RAP group and spironolactone group, with 10 rabbits in each group. RAP was performed at the speed of 800 beats/min for 8 h, atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was determined before and at the 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) of the pacing, the expressions of atrial muscular calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA were performed the RT-PCR detection, and ultrastructural changes of atrial myocytes were observed. AERP of RAP group shortened, with poor frequency adaptability; the expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA decreased 22% and 26%, respectively, when compared with the control group; ultrastructure of atrial myocytes changed significantly. AERP of spironotlactone group shortened less that RAP group, and the frequency adaptability was maintained, the decreased expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA significantly reduced. RAP could cause atrial remodeling, while spironolactone could inhibit RAP-induced atrial remodeling. PMID:26826809

  6. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verlinde, J.; Harrington, J. Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Yannuzzi, V. T.; Avramov, A.; Greenberg, S.; Johnson, N.; Zhang, G.; Poellot, M. R.; Mather, J. H.; Turner, D. D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Zak, B. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Daniel, J. S.; Kok, G. L.; Tobin, D. C.; Holz, R.; Sassen, K.; Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Tooman, T. P.; Ivey, M. D.; Richardson, S. J.; Bahramann, C. P.

    2007-01-01

    The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted September 27 through October 22, 2004 on the North Slope of Alaska. The primary objective was to collect a data set suitable to study interactions between microphysics, dynamics and radiative transfer in mixed-phase Arctic clouds. Observations taken during the 1997/1998 Surface Heat and Energy Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment revealed that Arctic clouds frequently consist of one (or more) liquid layers precipitating ice. M-PACE sought to investigate the physical processes of these clouds utilizing two aircraft (an in situ aircraft to characterize the microphysical properties of the clouds and a remote sensing aircraft to constraint the upwelling radiation) over the Department of Energy s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The measurements successfully documented the microphysical structure of Arctic mixed-phase clouds, with multiple in situ profiles collected in both single-layer and multi-layer clouds over two ground-based remote sensing sites. Liquid was found in clouds with temperatures down to -30 C, the coldest cloud top temperature below -40 C sampled by the aircraft. Remote sensing instruments suggest that ice was present in low concentrations, mostly concentrated in precipitation shafts, although there are indications of light ice precipitation present below the optically thick single-layer clouds. The prevalence of liquid down to these low temperatures could potentially be explained by the relatively low measured ice nuclei concentrations.

  7. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run

    PubMed Central

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-01-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  8. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  9. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run.

    PubMed

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-06-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  10. The use of transition region characteristics to improve the numerical simulation of heat transfer in bypass transitional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for improving the numerical prediction of bypass transition heat transfer on a flat plate in a high-disturbance environment with zero or favorable pressure gradient. The method utilizes low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence models in combination with the characteristic parameters of the transition region. The parameters representing the characteristics of the transition region used are the intermittency, transition length and turbulent spot properties. An analysis is made of the transition length in terms of turbulent spot variables. The nondimensional spot formation rate, required for the prediction of the transition length, is shown by the analysis to be a function of the spot spreading angle, the dimensionless spot velocity ratio and the dimensionless spot area ratio. The intermittency form of the k-epsilon equations were derived from conditionally averaged equations which have been shown to be an improvement over global-time-averaged equations for the numerical calculation of the transition region. The numerical predictions are in general good agreement with the experimental data and indicate the potential use of the method in accelerating flows. Turbulence models of the k-epsilon type are known to underpredict the transition length. The present work demonstrates how incorporating transition region characteristics improves the ability of two-equation turbulence models to simulate bypass transition for flat plates with potential application to turbine vanes and blades.

  11. Monte Carlo study of the transition region in the polar wind: An improved collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghouthi, I. A.; Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study the steady state flow of the polar wind protons through a background of O+ ions. The simulation region included a collision-dominated region (barosphere), a collisionless region (exosphere), and the transition layer embedded between these two regions. Special attention was given to using an accurate collision model, i.e., the Fokker-Planck expression was used to represent H+-O+ collisions. The model also included the effects of gravity, the polarization electric field, and the divergence of the geomagnetic field. For each simulation, 105 particles were monitored, and the collected data were used to calculate the H+ velocity distribution function fH+, density, drift velocity, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, and heat fluxes for parallel and perpendicular energies at different altitudes. The transition region plays a pivotal role in the behavior of the H+ flow. First, the shape of the distribution function is very close to a slowly drifting Maxwellian in the barosphere, while a ``kidney bean'' shape prevails in the exosphere. In the transition region, the shape of fH+ changes in a complicated and rapid manner from Maxwellian to kidney bean. Second, the flow changes from subsonic (in the barosphere) to supersonic (in the exosphere) within the transition region. Third, the H+ parallel and perpendicular temperatures increase with altitude in the barosphere due to frictional heating, while they decrease with altitude in the exosphere due to adiabatic cooling. Both temperatures reach their maximum values in the transition region. Fourth, the heat fluxes of the parallel and perpendicular energies are positive and increase with altitude in the barosphere, and they change rapidly from their maximum (positive) values to their minimum (negative) values within the transition region. The results of this simulation were compared with those found in previous work in which a simple (Maxwell-molecule) collision model was adopted. It

  12. A neural network based ensemble approach for improving the accuracy of meteorological fields used for regional air quality modeling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Li; Chen, Dongsheng; Li, Jianbing

    2012-12-15

    A neural network based ensemble methodology was presented in this study to improve the accuracy of meteorological input fields for regional air quality modeling. Through nonlinear integration of simulation results from two meteorological models (MM5 and WRF), the ensemble approach focused on the optimization of meteorological variable values (temperature, surface air pressure, and wind field) in the vertical layer near ground. To illustrate the proposed approach, a case study in northern China during two selected air pollution events, in 2006, was conducted. The performances of the MM5, the WRF, and the ensemble approach were assessed using different statistical measures. The results indicated that the ensemble approach had a higher simulation accuracy than the MM5 and the WRF model. Performance was improved by more than 12.9% for temperature, 18.7% for surface air pressure field, and 17.7% for wind field. The atmospheric PM(10) concentrations in the study region were also simulated by coupling the air quality model CMAQ with the MM5 model, the WRF model, and the ensemble model. It was found that the modeling accuracy of the ensemble-CMAQ model was improved by more than 7.0% and 17.8% when compared to the MM5-CMAQ and the WRF-CMAQ models, respectively. The proposed neural network based meteorological modeling approach holds great potential for improving the performance of regional air quality modeling. PMID:23000477

  13. Improving cervical region of interest by eliminating vaginal walls and cotton-swabs for automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Sankar; Li, Wenjing

    2008-03-01

    Image analysis for automated diagnosis of cervical cancer has attained high prominence in the last decade. Automated image analysis at all levels requires a basic segmentation of the region of interest (ROI) within a given image. The precision of the diagnosis is often reflected by the precision in detecting the initial region of interest, especially when some features outside the ROI mimic the ones within the same. Work described here discusses algorithms that are used to improve the cervical region of interest as a part of automated cervical image diagnosis. A vital visual aid in diagnosing cervical cancer is the aceto-whitening of the cervix after the application of acetic acid. Color and texture are used to segment acetowhite regions within the cervical ROI. Vaginal walls along with cottonswabs sometimes mimic these essential features leading to several false positives. Work presented here is focused towards detecting in-focus vaginal wall boundaries and then extrapolating them to exclude vaginal walls from the cervical ROI. In addition, discussed here is a marker-controlled watershed segmentation that is used to detect cottonswabs from the cervical ROI. A dataset comprising 50 high resolution images of the cervix acquired after 60 seconds of acetic acid application were used to test the algorithm. Out of the 50 images, 27 benefited from a new cervical ROI. Significant improvement in overall diagnosis was observed in these images as false positives caused by features outside the actual ROI mimicking acetowhite region were eliminated.

  14. Application of Slepian theory for improving the accuracy of SH-based global ionosphere models in the Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadfard, Hossein; Mashhadi Hossainali, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    Due to significant energy resources in polar regions, they have emerged as strategic parts of the world. Consequently, various researches have been funded in order to study these areas in further details. This research intends to improve the accuracy of spherical harmonic (SH)-based Global Ionospheric Models (GIMs) by reconstructing a new map of ionosphere in the Arctic region. For this purpose, the spatiospectral concentration is applied to optimize the base functions. It is carried out using the Slepian theory which was developed by Simons. Here the new base functions and the corresponding coefficients are derived from the SH models for the polar regions. Then, VTEC (vertical total electron content) is reconstructed using Slepian functions and the new coefficients. Reconstructed VTECs and the VTECs derived from SH models are compared to the estimates of this parameter, which are directly derived from dual-frequency GPS measurements. Three International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service stations located in the northern polar region have been used for this purpose. The starting and ending day of year of adopted GPS data are 69 and 83, respectively, (totally 15 successive days) of the year 2013. According to the obtained results, on average, application of Slepian theory can improve accuracy of the GIM by 1 to 2 total electron content unit (TECU) (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) in the Arctic region.

  15. Assimilation of remote sensing data into crop growth model to improve the estimation of regional winter wheat yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Gao, Wei; Liu, Pudong; Sun, Zhibin

    2014-10-01

    Accurate regional crop growth monitoring and yield prediction is very critical for the national food security assessment and sustainable development of agriculture, especially for China, which has the largest population in the world. Remote sensing data and crop growth model have been successfully used in the crop production prediction. However, both of them have inherent limitation and uncertainty. The data assimilation method which combines crop growth model and remotely sensed data has been proven to be the most effective method in regional yield estimation. The aim of this paper is to improve the estimation of regional winter wheat yield of crop growth model by using data assimilation schemes with Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) algorithm. WOrld FOod STudies (WOFOST) crop growth model was chosen as the crop growth model which was calibrated and validated by the field measured data. MODIS Leaf Area Index (LAI) values were used as remote sensing observations to adjust the LAI simulated by the WOFOST model based on EnKF. The results illustrate that the EnKF algorithm has significantly improved the regional winter wheat yield estimates over the WOFOST simulation without assimilation in both potential and water-limited modes. Although this study clearly implies that the assimilation of the remotely sensed data into crop growth model with EnKF algorithm has the potential to improve the prediction of regional crop yield and has great potential in agricultural applications, high resolution meteorological data and detailed crop field management are necessary to reach a high accuracy of regional crop yield estimation.

  16. Pacing a data transfer operation between compute nodes on a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-09-13

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for pacing a data transfer between compute nodes on a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin compute node, a chunk of an application message to a target compute node; sending, by the origin compute node, a pacing request to a target direct memory access (`DMA`) engine on the target compute node using a remote get DMA operation; determining, by the origin compute node, whether a pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine; and transferring, by the origin compute node, a next chunk of the application message if the pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine.

  17. An improved analytical model of the separation region on boattail nozzles at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, W. M., Jr.; King, R. W.; Buteau, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A practical engineering calculation was developed to model the viscous effects of a separated, reverse flow region on afterbody pressures and drag. This viscous calculation was iteratively coupled with an inviscid flow calculation by means of an aerodynamic interface. A standard boundary layer displacement thickness was used to modify the afterbody shape where the flow was attached. A discriminating streamline calculation was developed to account for displacement effects of the reverse flow in separated regions with and without a flowing jet. The viscous flow calculation was coupled with a potential flow calculation. The analysis accurately predicted afterbody pressures and drag with variations in Reynolds number, Mach number, and afterbody shape.

  18. REGIONAL SCALE EVIDENCE FOR IMPROVEMENTS IN SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY 1990 TO 2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main aim of the international UNECE monitoring program ICP Waters under the Convention of Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) is to assess, on a regional basis, the degree and geographical extent of the impact of atmospheric pollution, in particular acidification,...

  19. Characteristics of Midwest Region School Districts Identified for Improvement. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 121

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Ploeg, Arie; Wan, Yinmei; Garcia, Alicia N.; Wraight, Sara; Burke, Matthew; Norbury, Heather; Gerdeman, R. Dean

    2012-01-01

    Like other states across the country, the seven states in the Midwest Region (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin) have been striving to meet the performance targets established under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The…

  20. Learning into a Statewide System of Support: New York State's Regional Network Strategy for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Brett; Seager, Andrew; Frankel, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This report is based on a three-year study of the design of New York's Regional Network Strategy and its subsequent implementation activities, including the development of statewide professional development for members of the network involved in the state's strategy. The study is based on the idea that internal coherence--alignment and shared…

  1. Improving Technical Vocational Education and Training in the Kurdistan Region--Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constant, Louay; Culbertson, Shelly; Stasz, Cathleen; Vernez, Georges

    2014-01-01

    As Iraq's Kurdistan region develops rapidly, it is creating jobs that require a solid education and technical skills. The government has launched an ambitious reform of basic and secondary education to increase its quality and has expanded opportunities for tertiary technical and university education. But expansion of secondary vocational…

  2. Two unsung heroes of closed-chest cardiac pacing: Green and McWilliam.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1994-07-01

    In the latter half of the last century, cardiorespiratory arrest was not uncommon due to the anesthetic used (chloroform). Animal studies showed that the heart could be paced. One physician (Green) resuscitated 5 of 7 cardiac arrest patients with single stimuli applied to body surface electrodes. Another (McWilliam) issued a proposal for adoption of closed-chest pacing and provided information on the procedure. The following historical footnote describes these pioneering events in the history of cardiac pacing. PMID:7937239

  3. A comparison of two stab-on unipolar epicardial pacing leads in children.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R M; Chiu, C; Gow, R M; Williams, W G

    1997-03-01

    The Oscor MP52V and Medtronic 4951 leads have similar construction and intended application. To determine if one of these designs was more suited to pediatric pacing, we reviewed implant, 3 month, and 12 months follow-up thresholds for all 18 MP52V implants at our institution from December 1989 to April 1991 and compared them to the 4951 implants from January 1982 to October 1989. Lead survival for the MP52V implants was compared to the most recent 36 4951 implants. Patients ranged in ages from 2 days-16 years (median = 4 years) and required antibradycardia pacing for congenital or acquired heart disease. Patients were compared for weight and proportion of atrial leads in each group by t-test and Fisher exact tests respectively. Energy thresholds were assessed in microJ and compared by t-test. Lead survival was defined by abandonment or replacement for any reason. Kaplan & Meier survival curves were plotted and compared by Gehan's Wilcoxan Test. There were no significant differences between the MP52V and 4951 groups for age at implant (53 months vs 80 months) or proportion of atrial implants (5/18 vs 11/36). Lead survival was poor but did not differ significantly (70% vs 78% cumulative survival at 3 years), usually failing by exit block. Implant and follow-up thresholds did not differ significantly between leads. The MP52V did not provide significant improvement in performance over the 4951. New epicardial lead designs are needed to improve lead survival and thresholds in children. PMID:9080489

  4. Rate-related accelerating (autodecremental) atrial pacing for reversion of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Nathan, A; Hellestrand, K; Ward, D; Spurrell, R; Camm, J

    1982-01-01

    Twenty consecutive patients with paroxysmal intra A-V nodal or atrio-ventricular tachycardia had a new tachycardia reversion pacing modality evaluated during routine electrophysiological study. The pacing was controlled by a micropressor interfaced with a stimulator connected to a right atrial pacing electrode. On detection of tachycardia the first pacing cycle interval is equal to the tachycardia cycle length minus a decrement value D. Each subsequent pacing cycle is further reduced by the same value of D, thus accelerating the pacing burst until a plateau of 100 beats/min faster than tachycardia (with an absolute lower limit of 275 beats/min) is reached. Seven different values of D (2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 34, 50 msec) were assessed in combination with three different durations of pacing P (500, 5000 msec). With P:500, only 2/20 tachycardias were terminated, but with P:1000, 16/20 were terminated. With P:5000 all were terminated and the combination successful in all patients was P:5000 and D:16. No unwanted arrhythmias were induced. In contrast, competitive constant rate overdrive atrial pacing accomplished tachycardia termination in all cases, but in four instances resulted in atrial flutter or fibrillation. Autodecremental pacing, which tends to avoid stimulation in the vulnerable period, allowed safe and successful termination of all tachycardias evaluated in this study. PMID:7069321

  5. Correcting a block?: successful experience of a small British pacing centre.

    PubMed Central

    Godden, D J; MacCulloch, M S; Sandhu, P S; Kerr, F

    1987-01-01

    The establishment of a local permanent pacemaker service in a district general hospital increased the pacemaker implantation rate from 22 per million population per year to 152 per million population per year over the first 6 years of the service. Forty eight per cent of patients were referred by general practitioners and 52% by hospital specialists. Single chamber demand pacing (VVI) was used exclusively. Indications for pacing and complications were comparable to those of specialist cardiac centres. Management of symptomatic bradycardia by cardiac pacing in the United Kingdom may be facilitated by further development of small pacing centres. PMID:3676039

  6. Toward Improved Land Surface Initialization in Support of Regional WRF Forecasts at the Kenya Meteorological Service (KMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Kabuchanga, Eric; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.

    2014-01-01

    SPoRT/SERVIR/RCMRD/KMS Collaboration: Builds off strengths of each organization. SPoRT: Transition of satellite, modeling and verification capabilities; SERVIR-Africa/RCMRD: International capacity-building expertise; KMS: Operational organization with regional weather forecasting expertise in East Africa. Hypothesis: Improved land-surface initialization over Eastern Africa can lead to better temperature, moisture, and ultimately precipitation forecasts in NWP models. KMS currently initializes Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with NCEP/Global Forecast System (GFS) model 0.5-deg initial / boundary condition data. LIS will provide much higher-resolution land-surface data at a scale more representative to regional WRF configuration. Future implementation of real-time NESDIS/VIIRS vegetation fraction to further improve land surface representativeness.

  7. The Heartland Region P-Index Conservation Innovation Grant: protecting water quality through improved phosphorus management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing phosphorus loss from agricultural land is important for improvement and protection of surface water quality. Agricultural models can be used to determine management impacts on P loss and therefore serve as a guide for recommending best management practices. However, the models must be comp...

  8. Advanced Information Processing. Volume II. Instructor's Materials. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Linda

    This course curriculum is intended for use by community college insructors and administrators in implementing an advanced information processing course. It builds on the skills developed in the previous information processing course but goes one step further by requiring students to perform in a simulated office environment and improve their…

  9. SEA monitoring in Swedish regional transport infrastructure plans - Improvement opportunities identified in practical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, K.; Balfors, B.; Folkeson, L.; Nilsson, M.

    2010-11-15

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) requires monitoring in order to identify unforeseen adverse effects and to enable appropriate remedial action to be taken. Guidelines on how to monitor significant environmental impacts have been developed but experience from practice is limited. This paper presents a study of environmental monitoring in Swedish regional transport infrastructure planning. The result shows that essentially no environmental monitoring is currently performed. Monitoring of the plans merely involves checking the implementation of projects and performing an economic account. At present, a new planning period has commenced for the regional transport infrastructure plans. To obtain an iterative SEA process for the new plan with integrated SEA monitoring, the following means are suggested: reinforcement of practitioners' incentives to plan and perform monitoring; integration of monitoring in the SEA process; pre-determined impact thresholds that prompt remedial action; and more efficient use of monitoring results.

  10. On improving cold region hydrological processes in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, Arman; Sushama, Laxmi; Verseghy, Diana; Harvey, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Regional and global climate model simulated streamflows for high-latitude regions show systematic biases, particularly in the timing and magnitude of spring peak flows. Though these biases could be related to the snow water equivalent and spring temperature biases in models, a good part of these biases is due to the unaccounted effects of non-uniform infiltration capacity of the frozen ground and other related processes. In this paper, the treatment of frozen water in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which is used in the Canadian regional and global climate models, is modified to include fractional permeable area, supercooled liquid water and a new formulation for hydraulic conductivity. The impact of these modifications on the regional hydrology, particularly streamflow, is assessed by comparing three simulations performed with the original and two modified versions of CLASS, driven by atmospheric forcing data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis (ERA-Interim) for the 1990-2001 period over a northeast Canadian domain. The two modified versions of CLASS differ in the soil hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations, with one version being based on formulations from a previous study and the other one is newly proposed. Results suggest statistically significant decreases in infiltration and therefore soil moisture during the snowmelt season for the simulation with the new hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations and fractional permeable area concept compared to the original version of CLASS, which is also reflected in the increased spring surface runoff and streamflows in this simulation with modified CLASS over most of the study domain. The simulated spring peaks and their timing in this simulation are also in better agreement to those observed. This study thus demonstrates the importance of treatment of frozen water for realistic simulation of streamflows.

  11. An improved filtration procedure for measuring opiate receptors in small regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bardo, M T; Bhatnagar, R K; Gebhart, G F

    1982-12-01

    A modified filtration method for in vitro receptor binding was used to determine specific binding of [3H]naloxone to small regions of adult rat brain. Reliable determinations of ligand binding were quantified with about 50 micrograms of protein per assay tube. Large differences in [3H]naloxone binding were obtained between various brain nuclei, and these differences were consistent with prior determinations of opiate receptor densities in various rat brain nuclei using autoradiographic techniques. PMID:6292368

  12. The oil rich Niger Delta region: a framework for improved performance of the Nigerian regulatory process.

    PubMed

    Onu, N Chukemeka Hemanachi

    2003-06-01

    The adoption of this policy framework has the ability to reconcile industry, the environment and community interests, taking into account all factors that are relevant to managing developments that are both sustainable and contributory to the achievement of industrial and community stability. The management of resource development is crucial in sustaining the Niger Delta ecosystem and the human population resident in the Niger Delta region. If these separate bodies are constituted they would have the potential to reduce and discourage: i) the vulnerability of the regulatory body to influential and powerful multinational oil companies; ii) the proclivity for unaccountability to the people of the Niger Delta region, since the people of the Niger Delta would have access to the regulatory body's classified and unclassified information, and are part of the decision-making process; and iii) a reduction in conflict between the oil mining companies and the aggrieved youths of the oil rich Niger Delta region. This policy framework also has the added advantage of producing high quality decisions and more acceptable decisions than those for which the people of the Niger Delta region are excluded from the processes that concern their existence. The agency decision-making could now become a multilateral process and thus promote and enhance the accurate, impartial and rational application of legislative directives to given cases or classes of cases. Most importantly, the Minister of Petroleum Resources should be empowered by legislation to revoke any license or lease in respect of an area designated as marginal if left undeveloped for a period of 5 years and grant a lease or license for the area to a more responsible oil company. PMID:12956601

  13. Improving regional health care in West Africa using current space systems and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemison, Mae C.; Thomas, J. Segun

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved with establishing an integrated satellite health network in West Africa based on currently available technology. The system proposed makes use of a central national facility capable of transmitting and receiving voice/data and video signals from the entire country. Regional, field and local facilities provide timely epidemiologic information, sharing of medical expertise through telemedical consultations, enhance optimized resource distribution and build a framework for telecommunications for the entire country.

  14. Improving regional health care in West Africa using current space systems and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemison, Mae C.; Thomas, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved with establishing an integrated satellite health network in West Africa based on currently available technology. The system proposed makes use of a central national facility capable of transmitting and receiving voice/data and video signals from the entire country. Regional, field and local facilities provides timely epidemiologic information, sharing of medical expertise through telemedical consultations, enhances optimized resource distribution and builds a framework for telecommunications for the entire country.

  15. Improvements to Regional Explosion Identification using Attenuation Models of the Lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R

    2009-03-30

    Regional P/S amplitudes have been recognized as an effective discriminant between earthquakes and explosions. While closely spaced earthquake and explosions generally discriminate easily, the application of this technique to broad regions has been hampered by large variations in the amplitude of regional phases due to the attenuation structure of the crust and upper mantle. Making use of a recent P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the lithosphere, we have found that correcting the events using our amplitude methodology significantly reduces the scattering in the earthquake population. We demonstrate an application of this technique to station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) using broad area earthquakes and the 1998 Indian nuclear explosion recorded at the station using the Pn/Lg discriminant in the 1-2 Hz passband. We find that the explosion, which is lost in the scatter of the earthquakes in the uncorrected discriminant, clearly separates by correcting for the attenuation structure. We see a similar reduction in scatter and separation for the Pn/Sn and Pg/Lg discriminants in the same passband.

  16. Improving Modeling of the Summer Climate of Semi-Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltahir, E.; Marcella, M.

    2009-04-01

    Presented is a study on the importance of certain land surface processes in accurately simulating the summertime climate of Southwest Asia. A nearly 4 degree C bias is simulated in summertime temperatures, by standard Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3). Biases are also found in surface albedo, shortwave incident, and surface vapor pressure. Using satellite data, (Earth Radiation Budget Experiment-ERBE) modifications are introduced to match simulated surface albedo to the ERBE data. In addition, by incorporating RegCM3's dust module with sub-grid variability, surface shortwave incident biases are reduced. Lastly, representing the irrigation and marshlands of Mesopotamia reduces vapor pressure deficits in the region. All of these factors combined, along with errors in observational datasets, account for the 4 degree C warm bias in RegCM3 simulations. We conclude that accurate representations of albedo, irrigation, and dust emissions are important processes to be included for accurate summertime climate modeling in semi-arid regions around the world.

  17. Rapid ventricular pacing-induced postconditioning attenuates reperfusion injury: effects on peroxynitrite, RISK and SAFE pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pipicz, Márton; Varga, Zoltán V; Kupai, Krisztina; Gáspár, Renáta; Kocsis, Gabriella F; Csonka, Csaba; Csont, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rapid ventricular pacing (RVP) applied before an index ischaemia has anti-ischaemic effects. Here, we investigated whether RVP applied after index ischaemia attenuates reperfusion injury and whether peroxynitrite, reperfusion injury salvage kinase (RISK) and survival activating factor enhancement (SAFE) pathways as well as haem oxygenase 1 (HO1) are involved in the mechanism of RVP-induced postconditioning. Experimental Approach Langendorff perfused rat hearts were subjected to 30 min regional ischaemia and 120 min reperfusion with or without ischaemic postconditioning (6 × 10/10 s reperfusion/ischaemia; IPost) or RVP (6 × 10/10 s non-pacing/rapid pacing at 600 bpm) applied at the onset of reperfusion. Key Results Meta-analysis of our previous studies revealed an association between longer reperfusion-induced ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation with decreased infarct size. In the present experiments, we tested whether RVP is cardioprotective and found that both IPost and RVP significantly decreased infarct size; however, only RVP attenuated the incidence of reperfusion-induced ventricular tachycardia. Both postconditioning methods increased the formation of cardiac 3-nitrotyrosine and superoxide, and non-significantly enhanced Akt phosphorylation at the beginning of reperfusion without affecting ERK1/2 and STAT3, while IPost alone induced HO1. Application of brief ischaemia/reperfusion cycles or RVP without preceding index ischaemia also facilitated peroxynitrite formation; nevertheless, only brief RVP increased STAT3 phosphorylation. Conclusions and Implications Short periods of RVP at the onset of reperfusion are cardioprotective and increase peroxynitrite formation similarly to IPost and thus may serve as an alternative postconditioning method. However, downstream mechanisms of the protection elicited by IPost and RVP seem to be partially different. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Conditioning the

  18. Towards Improved MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over the US East Coast Region: Re-examining the Aerosol Model and Surface Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Holben, B. N.

    2002-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and recently the Aqua platform, produces a set of aerosol products over both ocean and land regions. Previous validation efforts have shown that from a global perspective, aerosol optical depth (AOD) is successfully retrieved from MODIS. Even over coastal regions, the over- land and over-ocean retrievals are consistent with each other, and well matched with ground-based sunphotometer measurements (such as AERONET). However, the East Coast of the United States is one region where there is consistently a discrepancy between land and ocean retrievals. Over the ocean, MODIS AODs are consistent with coastal sunphotometer measurements, but over land, AODs are consistently over- estimated. In this study we use field data from the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites experiment (CLAMS), (held during summer 2001) to determine the aerosol properties at a number of sites. Using the 6-S radiative transfer package, we compute simulated satellite radiances and compare them with observed MODIS radiances. We believe that the AOD over-estimation is not likely due to an incorrect choice of the urban/industrial aerosol models. Using 6-S to do an atmospheric correction for a very low AOD case, we show rather, that the discrepancies are likely a result of incorrect assumptions about the surface reflectance properties. Understanding and improving MODIS retrievals over the East Coast will not only improve the global quality of MODIS, but also would enable the use of MODIS as a tool for monitoring regional aerosol events.

  19. Using a Coupled Lake Model with WRF to Improve High-Resolution Regional Climate Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, M.; Bullock, R.; Nolte, C. G.; Alapaty, K.; Otte, T.; Gula, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lakes can play a significant role in regional climate by modifying air masses through fluxes of heat and moisture and by modulating inland extremes in temperature. Representing these effects becomes more important as regional climate modeling efforts employ finer grid spacing in order to simulate smaller scales. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model does not simulate lakes explicitly. Instead, lake points are treated as ocean points, with sea surface temperatures (SSTs) interpolated from the nearest neighboring ocean point in the driving coarse-scale fields. This can result in substantial errors for inland lakes such as the Great Lakes. Although prescribed lake surface temperatures (LSTs) can be used for retrospective modeling applications, this may not be desirable for applications involving downscaling future climate scenarios from a global climate model (GCM). In such downscaling simulations, lakes that impact the regional climate in the area of interest may not be resolved by the coarser global input fields. Explicitly simulating the LST would allow WRF to better represent interannual variability in regions significantly affected by lakes, and the influence of such variability on temperature and precipitation patterns. Therefore, coupling a lake model to WRF may lead to more reliable assessments of the impacts of extreme events on human health and the environment. We employ a version of WRF coupled to the Freshwater Lake model, FLake (Gula and Peltier 2012). FLake is a 1D bulk lake model which provides updated LSTs and ice coverage throughout the integration. This two-layer model uses a temperature-depth profile which includes a homogeneous mixed layer at the surface and a thermocline below. The shape of the thermocline is assumed, based on past theoretical and observational studies. Therefore, additional variables required for FLake to run are minimal, and it does not require tuning for individual lakes. These characteristics are advantageous for a

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  1. 1974 Arizona P.A.C.E. participation.

    PubMed

    Zabezensky, F

    1976-12-01

    Members of the Arizona State Society for Medical Technology were contacted to ascertain their knowledge of the P.A.C.E. program as well as to obtain release of the transcripts for those who participated during 1974. Observations regarding reported credits were noted. The Analysis of Variance test with Scheffe comparison was utilized to determine if any characteristic accounted for the difference in total continuing education hours reported. It was concluded that residence location, marital status, sex, age, degree level, length of membership in ASMT, years experience, employment extent, place of employment, and number of beds at place of employment had no significant effect on the total hours reported. A significant difference in total hours reported was noted for those individuals who reported either CEU or college credits. A significant difference was also noted in the total hours reported with respect to job description. PMID:998653

  2. Pacing and Defibrillators in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chubb, Henry; O’Neill, Mark; Rosenthal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Device therapy in the complex congenital heart disease (CHD) population is a challenging field. There is a myriad of devices available, but none designed specifically for the CHD patient group, and a scarcity of prospective studies to guide best practice. Baseline cardiac anatomy, prior surgical and interventional procedures, existing tachyarrhythmias and the requirement for future intervention all play a substantial role in decision making. For both pacing systems and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, numerous factors impact on the merits of system location (endovascular versus non-endovascular), lead positioning, device selection and device programming. For those with Fontan circulation and following the atrial switch procedure there are also very specific considerations regarding access and potential complications. This review discusses the published guidelines, device indications and the best available evidence for guidance of device implantation in the complex CHD population. PMID:27403295

  3. Coastal oceanography sets the pace of rocky intertidal community dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Menge, B. A.; Lubchenco, J.; Bracken, M. E. S.; Chan, F.; Foley, M. M.; Freidenburg, T. L.; Gaines, S. D.; Hudson, G.; Krenz, C.; Leslie, H.; Menge, D. N. L.; Russell, R.; Webster, M. S.

    2003-01-01

    The structure of ecological communities reflects a tension among forces that alter populations. Marine ecologists previously emphasized control by locally operating forces (predation, competition, and disturbance), but newer studies suggest that inputs from large-scale oceanographically modulated subsidies (nutrients, particulates, and propagules) can strongly influence community structure and dynamics. On New Zealand rocky shores, the magnitude of such subsidies differs profoundly between contrasting oceanographic regimes. Community structure, and particularly the pace of community dynamics, differ dramatically between intermittent upwelling regimes compared with relatively persistent down-welling regimes. We suggest that subsidy rates are a key determinant of the intensity of species interactions, and thus of structure in marine systems, and perhaps also nonmarine communities. PMID:14512513

  4. The Influence of Collective Behavior on Pacing in Endurance Competitions

    PubMed Central

    Renfree, Andrew; Crivoi do Carmo, Everton; Martin, Louise; Peters, Derek M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of theoretical models have been proposed in recent years to explain pacing strategies observed in individual competitive endurance events. These have typically related to the internal regulatory processes that inform the making of decisions relating to muscular work rate. Despite a substantial body of research which has investigated the influence of collective group dynamics on individual behaviors in various animal species, this issue has not been comprehensively studied in individual athletic events. This is somewhat surprising given that athletes often directly compete in close proximity to one another, and that collective behavior has also been observed in other human environments including pedestrian interactions and financial market trading. Whilst the reasons for adopting collective behavior are not fully understood, collective behavior is thought to result from individual agents following simple local rules that result in seemingly complex large systems that act to confer some biological advantage to the collective as a whole. Although such collective behaviors may generally be beneficial, competitive endurance events are complicated by the fact that increasing levels of physiological disruption as activity progresses may compromise the ability of some individuals to continue to interact with other group members. This could result in early fatigue and relative underperformance due to suboptimal utilization of physiological resources by some athletes. Alternatively, engagement with a collective behavior may benefit all due to a reduction in the complexity of decisions to be made and a subsequent reduction in cognitive loading and mental fatigue. This paper seeks evidence for collective behavior in previously published analyses of pacing behavior and proposes mechanisms through which it could potentially be either beneficial, or detrimental to individual performance. It concludes with suggestions for future research to enhance understanding of this

  5. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  6. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1–6) and at the end of a season (round 29–34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  7. Bias correction of the CCSM4 for improved regional climate modeling of the North American monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jonathan D. D.; Jin, Jiming

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates how a form of bias correction using linear regression improves the limitations of the community climate system model (CCSM) version 4 when it is dynamically downscaled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for the North American monsoon (NAM). Long-term biases in the CCSM dataset were removed using the climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) dataset as a baseline, from which a physically consistent set of bias-corrected variables were created. To quantitatively identify the effects of CCSM data on the NAM simulations, three 32-year climatologies were generated with WRF driven by (1) CFSR, (2) original CCSM, and (3) bias-corrected CCSM data. The WRF-CFSR simulations serve as a baseline for comparison. With the bias correction, onset dates simulated by WRF bias-corrected CCSM data were generally within a week of the WRF-CFSR climatology, while WRF using the original CCSM data occur up to 3-4 weeks too early over the core of the NAM. Additionally, bias-correction led to improvements in the mature phase of the NAM, reducing August root-mean-square-error values by 26 % over the core of the NAM and 36 % over the northern periphery. Comparison of the CFSR and the bias-corrected CCSM climatologies showed marked consistency in the general evolution of the NAM system. Dry biases in the NAM precipitation existed in each climatology with the original CCSM performing the poorest when compared to observations. The poor performance of the original CCSM simulations stem from biases in the thermodynamic profile supplied to the model through lateral boundary conditions. Bias-correction improved the excessive capping inversions, and mid-level mixing ratio dry biases (2-3 g kg-1) present in the CCSM simulations. Improvements in the bias-corrected CCSM data resulted in greater convective activity and a more representative seasonal distribution of precipitation.

  8. Bias correction of the CCSM4 for improved regional climate modeling of the North American monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jonathan D. D.; Jin, Jiming

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates how a form of bias correction using linear regression improves the limitations of the community climate system model (CCSM) version 4 when it is dynamically downscaled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for the North American monsoon (NAM). Long-term biases in the CCSM dataset were removed using the climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) dataset as a baseline, from which a physically consistent set of bias-corrected variables were created. To quantitatively identify the effects of CCSM data on the NAM simulations, three 32-year climatologies were generated with WRF driven by (1) CFSR, (2) original CCSM, and (3) bias-corrected CCSM data. The WRF-CFSR simulations serve as a baseline for comparison. With the bias correction, onset dates simulated by WRF bias-corrected CCSM data were generally within a week of the WRF-CFSR climatology, while WRF using the original CCSM data occur up to 3-4 weeks too early over the core of the NAM. Additionally, bias-correction led to improvements in the mature phase of the NAM, reducing August root-mean-square-error values by 26 % over the core of the NAM and 36 % over the northern periphery. Comparison of the CFSR and the bias-corrected CCSM climatologies showed marked consistency in the general evolution of the NAM system. Dry biases in the NAM precipitation existed in each climatology with the original CCSM performing the poorest when compared to observations. The poor performance of the original CCSM simulations stem from biases in the thermodynamic profile supplied to the model through lateral boundary conditions. Bias-correction improved the excessive capping inversions, and mid-level mixing ratio dry biases (2-3 g kg-1) present in the CCSM simulations. Improvements in the bias-corrected CCSM data resulted in greater convective activity and a more representative seasonal distribution of precipitation.

  9. Head-to-head running race simulation alters pacing strategy, performance, and mood state.

    PubMed

    Tomazini, Fabiano; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Damasceno, Mayara V; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos D; de Oliveira, Fernando R; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the presence and absence of competitors on pacing, overall running performance, and mood state during a self-paced 3-km run. Nine recreational runners participated in this study. They performed the following tests: a) an incremental test to exhaustion to measure the respiratory compensation point (RCP), maximal oxygen uptake, and peak treadmill speed; b) a submaximal speed constant test to measure running economy; and c) two 3-km running time trials performed collectively (COL, head-to-head competition) or individually (IND, performed alone) to establish pacing and running performance. The COL condition was formed of a group of four runners or five runners. Runners were grouped by matched performance times and to retain head-to-head characteristics.A mood state profile questionnaire was completed before and after the 3-km running time trial. The overall performance was better in the COL than in the IND (11.75 ± 0.05 min vs. 12.25 ± 0.06 min, respectively; p = 0.04). The running speeds during the first 500 m were significantly greater in COL (16.8 ± 2.16 km·h−1) than in IND (15.3 ± 2.45 km·h−1) (p = 0.03).The gain in running speed from IND to COL during the first 400 m (i.e. running speed in COL less running speed in IND) was significantly correlated with the RCP (r = 0.88; p = 0.05). The vigor score significantly decreased from pre- to post-running in COL (p=0.05), but not in IND (p=0.20). Additionally, the post running vigor was significantly higher in IND compared to COL (p = 0.03).These findings suggested that the presence of competitors induces a fast start, which results in an improved overall performance and reduced post-exercise vigor scores, compared to an individual run. PMID:26013576

  10. Baseline and target values for regional and point PV power forecasts: Toward improved solar forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri -Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Lehman, Brad; Simmons, Joseph; Campos, Edwin; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Black, Jon; Tedesco, John

    2015-11-10

    Accurate solar photovoltaic (PV) power forecasting allows utilities to reliably utilize solar resources on their systems. However, to truly measure the improvements that any new solar forecasting methods provide, it is important to develop a methodology for determining baseline and target values for the accuracy of solar forecasting at different spatial and temporal scales. This paper aims at developing a framework to derive baseline and target values for a suite of generally applicable, value-based, and custom-designed solar forecasting metrics. The work was informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models in combination with a radiative transfer model. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of PV power output. The proposed reserve-based methodology is a reasonable and practical approach that can be used to assess the economic benefits gained from improvements in accuracy of solar forecasting. Lastly, the financial baseline and targets can be translated back to forecasting accuracy metrics and requirements, which will guide research on solar forecasting improvements toward the areas that are most beneficial to power systems operations.

  11. Baseline and target values for regional and point PV power forecasts: Toward improved solar forecasting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri -Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Lehman, Brad; Simmons, Joseph; Campos, Edwin; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Black, Jon; Tedesco, John

    2015-11-10

    Accurate solar photovoltaic (PV) power forecasting allows utilities to reliably utilize solar resources on their systems. However, to truly measure the improvements that any new solar forecasting methods provide, it is important to develop a methodology for determining baseline and target values for the accuracy of solar forecasting at different spatial and temporal scales. This paper aims at developing a framework to derive baseline and target values for a suite of generally applicable, value-based, and custom-designed solar forecasting metrics. The work was informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based onmore » state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models in combination with a radiative transfer model. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of PV power output. The proposed reserve-based methodology is a reasonable and practical approach that can be used to assess the economic benefits gained from improvements in accuracy of solar forecasting. Lastly, the financial baseline and targets can be translated back to forecasting accuracy metrics and requirements, which will guide research on solar forecasting improvements toward the areas that are most beneficial to power systems operations.« less

  12. The hidden regional costs of improving irrigation efficiency: a case study from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, D. S.; Frolking, S. E.; Lammers, R. B.; Wisser, D.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Glidden, S.

    2013-12-01

    Indian agriculture depends heavily on groundwater pumping. These water withdrawals are not all consumed directly by the crops they irrigate; estimated irrigation inefficiencies indicate that two thirds of irrigation water withdrawals in India are 'lost'. Withdrawals lost through leaky canals and flood irrigation systems become runoff and re-enter the surface water system. This mechanism causes irrigation inefficiencies to re-distribute water across basins, and can significantly alter the amount of surface water available both locally and downstream. In this study we used a gridded water balance model to track the path of groundwater from its pumping location, through irrigation systems, and to its downstream consumption or discharge from river mouths. We find that nearly half of all groundwater pumped at rates higher than recharge are re-used downstream. Furthermore, increasing the efficiency of irrigation systems has the potential to decrease surface water levels downstream. We used the water balance model to simulate scenarios of increased irrigation efficiency and find that doubling efficiency does not reduce India's dependence on pumping deep groundwater by half as would be expected from standard measures of irrigation efficiency, but rather by only 38%. Increasing irrigation efficiency to 100% (i.e., no irrigation water losses) causes a decrease in modeled river discharge in both the Indus and the Ganges. The water balance model can also simulate scenarios in which groundwater pumping is limited to recharge rates. In this case, increasing irrigation efficiency to 100% results in a decrease in available surface water across large regions of eastern India, revealing the region's dependence on surface water that was originally sourced from deep groundwater pumping upstream. These results have two important implications. First, they raise questions about the strategy of increasing irrigation efficiency as a strategy for reducing water stress. Second, they show

  13. Machine learning and hurdle models for improving regional predictions of stream water acid neutralizing capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povak, Nicholas A.; Hessburg, Paul F.; Reynolds, Keith M.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Salter, R. Brion

    2013-06-01

    In many industrialized regions of the world, atmospherically deposited sulfur derived from industrial, nonpoint air pollution sources reduces stream water quality and results in acidic conditions that threaten aquatic resources. Accurate maps of predicted stream water acidity are an essential aid to managers who must identify acid-sensitive streams, potentially affected biota, and create resource protection strategies. In this study, we developed correlative models to predict the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of streams across the southern Appalachian Mountain region, USA. Models were developed using stream water chemistry data from 933 sampled locations and continuous maps of pertinent environmental and climatic predictors. Environmental predictors were averaged across the upslope contributing area for each sampled stream location and submitted to both statistical and machine-learning regression models. Predictor variables represented key aspects of the contributing geology, soils, climate, topography, and acidic deposition. To reduce model error rates, we employed hurdle modeling to screen out well-buffered sites and predict continuous ANC for the remainder of the stream network. Models predicted acid-sensitive streams in forested watersheds with small contributing areas, siliceous lithologies, cool and moist environments, low clay content soils, and moderate or higher dry sulfur deposition. Our results confirmed findings from other studies and further identified several influential climatic variables and variable interactions. Model predictions indicated that one quarter of the total stream network was sensitive to additional sulfur inputs (i.e., ANC < 100 µeq L-1), while <10% displayed much lower ANC (<50 µeq L-1). These methods may be readily adapted in other regions to assess stream water quality and potential biotic sensitivity to acidic inputs.

  14. Molecular characterization of a human matrix attachment region that improves transgene expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiu-Li; Zhao, Chun-Peng; Chen, Shao-Nan; Wang, Li; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2016-05-15

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells offer many advantages for recombinant gene expression, including proper folding and post-translational modification of the recombinant protein. However, due to positional effects resulting from the neighboring chromatin, transgenes are often expressed at low levels in these cells. While previous studies demonstrated that matrix attachment regions (MARs) can be utilized to increase transgene expression by buffering transgene silencing, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. We therefore performed a deletion analysis of the human β-globin MAR sequence to characterize the regions that are necessary to enhance transgene expression in CHO cells. Our results indicate that of the six β-globin MAR fragments tested (MAR-1-6; nucleotides 1-540, 420-1020, 900-1500, 1380-1980, 1860-2460, and 2340-2999, respectively), MAR-2, followed by MAR-3, was the most effective region for promoting stable and elevated transgene expression. Meanwhile, bioinformatic analyses demonstrated that these fragments encode a MAR-like motif and several transcription factor binding sites, including special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1), CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP), CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), and Glutathione (GSH) binding motifs, indicating that these elements may contribute to the MAR-mediated enhancement of transgene expression. In addition, we found that truncated MAR derivatives yield more stable transgene expression levels than transgenes lacking the MAR. We concluded that the MAR-mediated transcriptional activation of transgenes requires a specific AT-rich sequence, as well as specific transcription factor-binding motifs. PMID:26869318

  15. Absence of Q waves after thrombolysis predicts more rapid improvement of regional left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, E M; Siu, S C; Weyman, A E; Picard, M H

    1996-04-01

    Although the natural history of regional left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after Q-wave and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI) was well defined in the prethrombolytic era, the functional and structural implications of the absence of Q waves after thrombolysis are less clear. Echocardiography was performed within 48 hours of admission (entry) in 86 patients treated with thrombolysis for their first MI. The extent of abnormal wall motion (AWM; square centimeters) and LV endocardial surface area index (ESA; square centimeters per square meters) were quantified by using a previously validated echocardiographic endocardial surface-mapping technique. Electrocardiography (ECG) performed at 48 hours after thrombolysis was used to classify patients into groups with (Q; n=70) and without (non-Q; n=16) Q waves. All patients in the Q group had regional LV dysfunction on initial echocardiogram compared with 69 percent of those in the non-Q group (p<0.001). When the patients in the non-Q group without AWM were excluded from analysis, there was no significant difference in the extent of AWM between the Q and non-Q groups. Among those patients with AWM on entry, follow-up echocardiography at 6 to 12 weeks demonstrated a significant reduction in extent of AWM for both the Q and non-Q groups. However, the fractional change in AWM was significantly greater in the non-Q than in the Q group (-0.74 +/- 0.28 vs -0.29 +/- 0.44; p<0.02), with a trend toward less AWM at follow-up in the non-Q than in the Q group. The mean ESAi was not significantly different between the two groups at entry or at follow-up. In conclusion, failure to develop Q waves after thrombolysis predicts a lower likelihood of developing regional LV dysfunction and, when such dysfunction is present, predicts a greater degree of recovery. PMID:8721634

  16. A regional simulation center partnership: collaboration to improve staff and student competency.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, Susan; Bolton, Cathy; Bradshaw, Pamela; Close, Daria; Lee, Molly; Townley, Nancy; Watson, Michelle N

    2009-02-01

    This article describes the development of a Regional Simulation Center by a hospital, university, and community college to provide competency education and validation for students, nurses, and other allied health staff. Using high-fidelity patient simulators and scenario-based simulations, bachelor's of science in nursing-prepared laboratory mentors provide realistic opportunities for hospital staff and students to validate their clinical judgment as well as their psychomotor skills. The process of development, as well as the advantages of the partnership for the hospital and the nursing programs, is outlined. PMID:19263927

  17. Effects of personality, perceptual difficulty and pacing of a task on productivity, job satisfaction, and physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Salvendy, G; Humphreys, A P

    1979-08-01

    The relative psychological, physiological, and performance advantages and disadvantages of utilizing machine-paced and self-paced work were examined by having 12 subjects perform a marking-stapling task at 2 levels of perceptual difficulty and under 2 pacing conditions for 30 min. each. (a) 3 subjects who on the personality tests were identified as introverted, reserved, and trusting preferred to work in the machine-paced condition, while 9 subjects who were identified as extroverted, outgoing and suspicious preferred the self-paced condition, (b) the performance errors in machine-paced operation were 372% higher than for self-paced work, and (c) there were no differences between machine-paced and self-paced work on physiological variables, except for sinus arrhythmia for the task with high perceptual load, and quantity of production. PMID:503740

  18. A role for PACE4 in the proteolytic activation of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V M; Rehemtulla, A; Leppla, S H

    1997-01-01

    Several bacterial protein toxins require activation by eukaryotic proteases. Previous studies have shown that anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE), and diphtheria toxin (DT) are cleaved by furin C-terminal to the sequences RKKR, RQPR, and RVRR, respectively. Because furin-deficient cells retain some sensitivity to PA and DT, it is evident that other cellular proteases can activate these toxins. Whereas furin has been shown to require arginine residues at positions -1 and -4 for substrate recognition, another protease with an activity which could substitute for furin in toxin activation, the furin-related protease PACE4, requires basic residues in the -1, -2, and -4 positions of the substrate sequence. To examine the relative roles of furin and PACE4 in toxin activation, we used furin-deficient CHO cells (FD11 cells) transfected with either the furin (FD11/furin cells) or PACE4 (FD11/PACE4 cells) gene. Mutant PA proteins containing the cleavage sequence RAAR or KR were cytotoxic toward cells expressing only PACE4. In vitro cleavage data demonstrated that PACE4 can recognize RAAR and, to a much lesser extent, KR and RR. When extracts from PACE4-transfected cells were used as a source of proteases, PACE4 had minimal activity, indicating that it had been partially inactivated or did not remain associated with the cell membranes. Cleavage of iodinated PA containing the sequence RKKR or RAAR was detected on the surface of all cell types tested, but cleavage of a dibasic sequence was detected only intracellularly and only in cells that expressed furin or PACE4. The data provide evidence that PACE4 is present at the exterior of cells, that it plays a role in the proteolytic activation of anthrax toxin PA, and that PACE4 can activate substrates at the sequence RAAR or KR. PMID:9234799

  19. Identifying Isotropic Events Using an Improved Regional Moment Tensor Inversion Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2007-07-06

    Using a regional time-domain waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor we calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for several explosions at the Nevada Test Site as well as earthquakes, and collapses in the surrounding region of the western US. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Error in the moment tensor solutions and source parameters is also calculated. We investigate the sensitivity of the moment tensor solutions to Green's functions calculated with imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event locations, and data with a low signal-to-noise ratio. We also test the performance of the method under a range of recording conditions from excellent azimuthal coverage to cases of sparse station availability, as might be expected for smaller events. Finally, we assess the depth and frequency dependence upon event size. This analysis will be used to determine the range where well-constrained solutions can be obtained.

  20. Improved management of winter operations to limit subsurface contamination with degradable deicing chemicals in cold regions.

    PubMed

    French, Helen K; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of management considerations required for better control of deicing chemicals in the unsaturated zone at sites with winter maintenance operations in cold regions. Degradable organic deicing chemicals are the main focus. The importance of the heterogeneity of both the infiltration process, due to frozen ground and snow melt including the contact between the melting snow cover and the soil, and unsaturated flow is emphasised. In this paper, the applicability of geophysical methods for characterising soil heterogeneity is considered, aimed at modelling and monitoring changes in contamination. To deal with heterogeneity, a stochastic modelling framework may be appropriate, emphasizing the more robust spatial and temporal moments. Examples of a combination of different field techniques for measuring subsoil properties and monitoring contaminants and integration through transport modelling are provided by the SoilCAM project and previous work. Commonly, the results of flow and contaminant fate modelling are quite detailed and complex and require post-processing before communication and advising stakeholders. The managers' perspectives with respect to monitoring strategies and challenges still unresolved have been analysed with basis in experience with research collaboration with one of the case study sites, Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway. Both scientific challenges of monitoring subsoil contaminants in cold regions and the effective interaction between investigators and management are illustrated. PMID:24281673

  1. Improvement of light penetration based silkworm gender identification with confined regions of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamtongdee, Chakkrit; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Sa-ngiamsak, Chiranut

    2013-06-01

    Based on our previous work on light penetration-based silkworm gender identification, we find that unwanted optical noises scattering from the surrounding area near the silkworm pupa and the transparent support are sometimes analyzed and misinterpreted leading to incorrect silkworm gender identification. To alleviate this issue, we place a small rectangular hole on a transparent support so that it not only helps the user precisely place the silkworm pupa but also functions as a region of interest (ROI) for blocking unwanted optical noises and for roughly locating the abdomen region in the image for ease of image processing. Apart from the external ROI, we also assign a smaller ROI inside the image in order to remove strong scattering light from all edges of the external ROI and at the same time speed up our image processing operations. With only the external ROI in function, our experiment shows a measured 86% total accuracy in identifying gender of 120 silkworm pupae with a measured average processing time of 38 ms. Combining the external ROI and the image ROI together revamps the total accuracy in identifying the silkworm gender to 95% with a measured faster 18 ms processing time.

  2. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for improved regional weather prediction and monitoring of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-12-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g. the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on MetOp) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast1. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  3. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for Improved Regional Weather Prediction and Monitoring of Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g., the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Met Op) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1 km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  4. Harnessing genomics to improve health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region – an executive course in genomics policy

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Tara; Rab, Mohammed Abdur; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

    2005-01-01

    Background While innovations in medicine, science and technology have resulted in improved health and quality of life for many people, the benefits of modern medicine continue to elude millions of people in many parts of the world. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in EMR, the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics jointly organized a Genomics and Public Health Policy Executive Course, held September 20th–23rd, 2003, in Muscat, Oman. The 4-day course was sponsored by WHO-EMRO with additional support from the Canadian Program in Genomics and Global Health. The overall objective of the course was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in the region. This article presents the course findings and recommendations for genomics policy in EMR. Methods The course brought together senior representatives from academia, biotechnology companies, regulatory bodies, media, voluntary, and legal organizations to engage in discussion. Topics covered included scientific advances in genomics, followed by innovations in business models, public sector perspectives, ethics, legal issues and national innovation systems. Results A set of recommendations, summarized below, was formulated for the Regional Office, the Member States and for individuals. • Advocacy for genomics and biotechnology for political leadership; • Networking between member states to share information, expertise, training, and regional cooperation in biotechnology; coordination of national surveys for assessment of health biotechnology innovation systems, science capacity, government policies, legislation and regulations, intellectual property policies, private sector activity; • Creation in each member country of an effective National Body on genomics, biotechnology and health to: - formulate national biotechnology strategies - raise biotechnology awareness - encourage

  5. Earthquakes in western Iberia: improving the understanding of lithospheric deformation in a slowly deforming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, S.; Dias, N. A.; Carrilho, F.; Góngora, E.; Rio, I.; Marreiros, C.; Morais, I.; Alves, P.; Matias, L.

    2015-10-01

    Mainland Portugal, on the southwestern edge of the European continent, is located directly north of the boundary between the Eurasian and Nubian plates. It lies in a region of slow lithospheric deformation (<5 mm yr-1), which has generated some of the largest earthquakes in Europe, both intraplate (mainland) and interplate (offshore). Some offshore earthquakes are nucleated on old and cold lithospheric mantle, at depths down to 60 km. The seismicity of mainland Portugal and its adjacent offshore has been repeatedly classified as diffuse. In this paper, we analyse the instrumental earthquake catalogue for western Iberia, which covers the period between 1961 and 2013. Between 2010 and 2012, the catalogue was enriched with data from dense broad-band deployments. We show that although the plate boundary south of Portugal is diffuse, in that deformation is accommodated along several distributed faults rather than along one long linear plate boundary, the seismicity itself is not diffuse. Rather, when located using high-quality data, earthquakes collapse into well-defined clusters and lineations. We identify and characterize the most outstanding clusters and lineations of epicentres and correlate them with geophysical and tectonic features (historical seismicity, topography, geologically mapped faults, Moho depth, free-air gravity, magnetic anomalies and geotectonic units). Both onshore and offshore, clusters and lineations of earthquakes are aligned preferentially NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE. Cumulative seismic moment and epicentre density decrease from south to north, with increasing distance from the plate boundary. Only few earthquake lineations coincide with geologically mapped faults. Clusters and lineations that do not match geologically mapped faults may correspond to previously unmapped faults (e.g. blind faults), rheological boundaries or distributed fracturing inside blocks that are more brittle and therefore break more easily than neighbour blocks. The seismicity map

  6. Improving sub-grid scale accuracy of boundary features in regional finite-difference models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to grid refinement, the concept of a ghost node, which was developed for nested grid applications, has been extended towards improving sub-grid scale accuracy of flow to conduits, wells, rivers or other boundary features that interact with a finite-difference groundwater flow model. The formulation is presented for correcting the regular finite-difference groundwater flow equations for confined and unconfined cases, with or without Newton Raphson linearization of the nonlinearities, to include the Ghost Node Correction (GNC) for location displacement. The correction may be applied on the right-hand side vector for a symmetric finite-difference Picard implementation, or on the left-hand side matrix for an implicit but asymmetric implementation. The finite-difference matrix connectivity structure may be maintained for an implicit implementation by only selecting contributing nodes that are a part of the finite-difference connectivity. Proof of concept example problems are provided to demonstrate the improved accuracy that may be achieved through sub-grid scale corrections using the GNC schemes.

  7. Adopting narrative pedagogy to improve the student learning experience in a regional Australian university.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Margaret; John, Tracey; Gray, Michelle; Williams, Leonie; Barnes, Margaret; Allan, Janet; Rowe, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of work in the literature describes and explains narrative pedagogy within nursing and midwifery programs. This paper continues the conversation by explaining, with examples, how narrative pedagogy has been interpreted and applied within a new nursing faculty in Australia. The aims of our nursing and midwifery programs are to provide students with a clear professional identity and to prepare them for contemporary Australian nursing practice. As part of these aims, we want students to develop their imaginations and to consciously examine, and challenge, nursing and healthcare paradigms and practices such as the enduring illness model of healthcare and the emphasis on technique-oriented care. Members of our teaching team, working together and individually, have used narrative pedagogy in a variety of ways, developing novel teaching and learning activities for use in real time classroom settings as well as online to provide a regionally and globally relevant educational experience. PMID:19697986

  8. Improving microcystin monitoring relevance in recreative waters: A regional case-study (Brittany, Western France, Europe).

    PubMed

    Pitois, Frédéric; Vezie, Chantal; Thoraval, Isabelle; Baurès, Estelle

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria and their toxins are known as a health hazard in recreative and distributed waters. Monitoring data from 2004 to 2011 were collected at regional scale to characterize exposition parameters to microcystins in Brittany (Western France). The data show that cyanobacteria populations are experiencing a composition shift leading to a longer duration of cell densities higher than WHO alert levels 2 and 3. Microcystins however appear to be more frequently detected with subacute concentrations in low cell density samples than in high cell density samples or during bloom episodes. Positive relations are described between microcystin concentrations, detection frequencies and cyanobacteria biovolumes, allowing for a novel definition of alert levels and decision framework following WHO recommendations. PMID:26765088

  9. PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators—a novel tool to measure progress in cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Silvia; Brum, Lauren; Sorrow, Kathleen; Thomas, Samuel; Spence, Susan; Maulbecker-Armstrong, Catharina; Goodman, Clifford; Peake, Michael; McVie, Gordon; Geipel, Gary; Li, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about rising health care costs and the often incremental nature of improvements in health outcomes continue to fuel intense debates about ‘progress’ and ‘value’ in cancer research. In times of tightening fiscal constraints, it is increasingly important for patients and their representatives to define what constitutes ’value’ to them. It is clear that diverse stakeholders have different priorities. Harmonisation of values may be neither possible nor desirable. Stakeholders lack tools to visualise or otherwise express these differences and to track progress in cancer treatments based on variable sets of values. The Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence (PACE) Continuous Innovation Indicators are novel, scientifically rigorous progress trackers that employ a three-step process to quantify progress in cancer treatments: 1) mine the literature to determine the strength of the evidence supporting each treatment; 2) allow users to weight the analysis according to their priorities and values; and 3) calculate Evidence Scores (E-Scores), a novel measure to track progress, based on the strength of the evidence weighted by the assigned value. We herein introduce a novel, flexible value model, show how the values from the model can be used to weight the evidence from the scientific literature to obtain E-Scores, and illustrate how assigning different values to new treatments influences the E-Scores. The Indicators allow users to learn how differing values lead to differing assessments of progress in cancer research and to check whether current incentives for innovation are aligned with their value model. By comparing E-Scores generated by this tool, users are able to visualise the relative pace of innovation across areas of cancer research and how stepwise innovation can contribute to substantial progress against cancer over time. Learning from experience and mapping current unmet needs will help to support a broad audience of stakeholders in their

  10. PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators-a novel tool to measure progress in cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Silvia; Brum, Lauren; Sorrow, Kathleen; Thomas, Samuel; Spence, Susan; Maulbecker-Armstrong, Catharina; Goodman, Clifford; Peake, Michael; McVie, Gordon; Geipel, Gary; Li, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about rising health care costs and the often incremental nature of improvements in health outcomes continue to fuel intense debates about 'progress' and 'value' in cancer research. In times of tightening fiscal constraints, it is increasingly important for patients and their representatives to define what constitutes 'value' to them. It is clear that diverse stakeholders have different priorities. Harmonisation of values may be neither possible nor desirable. Stakeholders lack tools to visualise or otherwise express these differences and to track progress in cancer treatments based on variable sets of values. The Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence (PACE) Continuous Innovation Indicators are novel, scientifically rigorous progress trackers that employ a three-step process to quantify progress in cancer treatments: 1) mine the literature to determine the strength of the evidence supporting each treatment; 2) allow users to weight the analysis according to their priorities and values; and 3) calculate Evidence Scores (E-Scores), a novel measure to track progress, based on the strength of the evidence weighted by the assigned value. We herein introduce a novel, flexible value model, show how the values from the model can be used to weight the evidence from the scientific literature to obtain E-Scores, and illustrate how assigning different values to new treatments influences the E-Scores. The Indicators allow users to learn how differing values lead to differing assessments of progress in cancer research and to check whether current incentives for innovation are aligned with their value model. By comparing E-Scores generated by this tool, users are able to visualise the relative pace of innovation across areas of cancer research and how stepwise innovation can contribute to substantial progress against cancer over time. Learning from experience and mapping current unmet needs will help to support a broad audience of stakeholders in their efforts to

  11. Integrating mobile technology with routine dietetic practice: the case of myPace for weight management.

    PubMed

    Harricharan, Michelle; Gemen, Raymond; Celemín, Laura Fernández; Fletcher, David; de Looy, Anne E; Wills, Josephine; Barnett, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The field of Mobile health (mHealth), which includes mobile phone applications (apps), is growing rapidly and has the potential to transform healthcare by increasing its quality and efficiency. The present paper focuses particularly on mobile technology for body weight management, including mobile phone apps for weight loss and the available evidence on their effectiveness. Translation of behaviour change theory into weight management strategies, including integration in mobile technology is also discussed. Moreover, the paper presents and discusses the myPace platform as a case in point. There is little clinical evidence on the effectiveness of currently available mobile phone apps in enabling behaviour change and improving health-related outcomes, including sustained body weight loss. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent these apps have been developed in collaboration with health professionals, such as dietitians, and the extent to which apps draw on and operationalise behaviour change techniques has not been explored. Furthermore, presently weight management apps are not built for use as part of dietetic practice, or indeed healthcare more widely, where face-to-face engagement is fundamental for instituting the building blocks for sustained lifestyle change. myPace is an innovative mobile technology for weight management meant to be embedded into and to enhance dietetic practice. Developed out of systematic, iterative stages of engagement with dietitians and consumers, it is uniquely designed to complement and support the trusted health practitioner-patient relationship. Future mHealth technology would benefit if engagement with health professionals and/or targeted patient groups, and behaviour change theory stood as the basis for technology development. Particularly, integrating technology into routine health care practice, rather than replacing one with the other, could be the way forward. PMID:25804507

  12. An improved retrieval of tropospheric NO2 from space over polluted regions using an earthshine reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, J. S.; Monks, P. S.; Leigh, R. J.

    2014-07-01

    A novel tropospheric NO2 DOAS retrieval algorithm optimised for a nadir-viewing satellite instrument imaging polluted areas is proposed in this work. Current satellite DOAS retrievals have relied on using a solar reference spectrum to derive a total slant column, then using either model assimilation or spatial filtering to derive the tropospheric component. In the ESrs-DOAS (EarthShine reference sector DOAS) algorithm, tropospheric NO2 slant columns are derived using spectra averaged from measurements over unpolluted regions, thus removing the need for a solar reference spectrum, though some residual stratospheric signal still has to be removed. To validate the ESrs-DOAS algorithm, DOAS retrievals were performed on modelled spectra created by the radiative transfer model- SCIATRAN, as well as L1B earthshine radiance data measured by the NASA/KNMI Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). It was found that retrievals using an earthshine reference produce spatial distributions of tropospheric NO2 over eastern China during June 2005 that highly correlate with those derived using existing retrieval algorithms. Comparisons with slant columns retrieved by the operational NO2 retrieval algorithm for OMI (OMNO2A) show that the ESrs-DOAS algorithm greatly reduces the presence of artificial across-track biases (stripes) caused by calibration errors, resulting in a 27% reduction in retrieval uncertainty. The ESrs-DOAS technique also reveals absorption features over the Sahara and similar regions characteristic of sand absorption, as first discovered in analysis of GOME-2 NO2 retrievals. Potentially, future satellite instruments optimised for using the ESrs-DOAS algorithm would not need a solar reference, which would simplify their optical and mission design.

  13. LLNL Seismic Locations: Validating Improvement Through Integration of Regionalized Models and Empirical Corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, C.A.; Flanagan, M.P.; Myers, S.C.; Pasyanos, M.E.; Swenson, J.L.; Hanley, W.; Ryall, F.; Dodge, D.

    2001-07-27

    The monitoring of nuclear explosions on a global basis requires accurate event locations. As an example, a typical size used for an on-site inspection search area is 1,000 square kilometers or approximately 17 km accuracy, assuming a circular area. This level of accuracy is a significant challenge for small events that are recorded using a sparse regional network. In such cases, the travel time of seismic energy is strongly affected by crustal and upper mantle heterogeneity and large biases can result. This can lead to large systematic errors in location and, more importantly, to invalid error bounds associated with location estimates. Calibration data and methods are being developed and integrated to correct for these biases. Our research over the last few years has shown that one of the most effective approaches to generate path corrections is the hybrid technique that combine both regionalized models with three-dimensional empirical travel-time corrections. We implement a rigorous and comprehensive uncertainty framework for these hybrid approaches. Qualitative and quantitative validations are presented in the form of single component consistency checks, sensitivity analysis, robustness measures, outlier testing along with end-to-end testing of confidence measures. We focus on screening and validating both empirical and model based calibrations as well as the hybrid form that combines these two types of calibration. We demonstrate that the hybrid approach very effectively calibrates both travel-time and slowness attributes for seismic location in the Middle East North Africa, and Western Eurasia (ME/NAAVE). Furthermore, it provides highly reliable uncertainty estimates. Finally, we summarize the NNSA validated data sets that have been provided to contractors in the last year.

  14. Paeonol Protects Rat Heart by Improving Regional Blood Perfusion during No-Reflow.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Weng, Weiliang; Zhao, Le; Zheng, Yongqiu; Zhang, Jinyan; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    No-reflow phenomenon, defined as inadequate perfusion of myocardium without evident artery obstruction, occurs at a high incidence after coronary revascularization. The mechanisms underlying no-reflow is only partially understood. It is commonly caused by the swelling of endothelial cells, neutrophil accumulation, and vasoconstriction, which are all related to acute inflammation. Persistent no-reflow can lead to hospitalization and mortality. However, an effective preventive intervention has not yet been established. We have previously found that paeonol, an active extraction from the root of Paeonia suffruticosa, can benefit the heart function by inhibiting tissue damage after ischemia, reducing inflammation, and inducing vasodilatation. To further investigate the potential cardioprotective action of paeonol on no-reflow, healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham, ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury (left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated for 4 h followed by reperfusion for 8 h), and I/R injury pretreated with paeonol at two different doses. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography was used to monitor regional blood perfusion and cardiac functions. Our data indicated that paeonol treatment significantly reduces myocardial infarct area and no-reflow area (n = 8; p < 0.05). Regional myocardial perfusion (A·β) and cardiac functions such as ejection fraction, stroke volume, and fractional shortening were elevated by paeonol (n = 8; p < 0.05). Paeonol also lowered the serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, cardiac troponin T, and C-reactive protein, as indices of myocardial injury. Paeonol exerts beneficial effects on attenuating I/R-associated no-reflow injuries, and may be considered as a potential preventive treatment for cardiac diseases or post-coronary revascularization in which no-reflow often occurs. PMID:27493631

  15. Paeonol Protects Rat Heart by Improving Regional Blood Perfusion during No-Reflow

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lina; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Weng, Weiliang; Zhao, Le; Zheng, Yongqiu; Zhang, Jinyan; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    No-reflow phenomenon, defined as inadequate perfusion of myocardium without evident artery obstruction, occurs at a high incidence after coronary revascularization. The mechanisms underlying no-reflow is only partially understood. It is commonly caused by the swelling of endothelial cells, neutrophil accumulation, and vasoconstriction, which are all related to acute inflammation. Persistent no-reflow can lead to hospitalization and mortality. However, an effective preventive intervention has not yet been established. We have previously found that paeonol, an active extraction from the root of Paeonia suffruticosa, can benefit the heart function by inhibiting tissue damage after ischemia, reducing inflammation, and inducing vasodilatation. To further investigate the potential cardioprotective action of paeonol on no-reflow, healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham, ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury (left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated for 4 h followed by reperfusion for 8 h), and I/R injury pretreated with paeonol at two different doses. Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography was used to monitor regional blood perfusion and cardiac functions. Our data indicated that paeonol treatment significantly reduces myocardial infarct area and no-reflow area (n = 8; p < 0.05). Regional myocardial perfusion (A·β) and cardiac functions such as ejection fraction, stroke volume, and fractional shortening were elevated by paeonol (n = 8; p < 0.05). Paeonol also lowered the serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, cardiac troponin T, and C-reactive protein, as indices of myocardial injury. Paeonol exerts beneficial effects on attenuating I/R-associated no-reflow injuries, and may be considered as a potential preventive treatment for cardiac diseases or post-coronary revascularization in which no-reflow often occurs. PMID:27493631

  16. Using nudging to improve global-regional dynamic consistency in limited-area climate modeling: What should we nudge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, Hiba; Drobinski, Philippe; Dubos, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Regional climate modelling sometimes requires that the regional model be nudged towards the large-scale driving data to avoid the development of inconsistencies between them. These inconsistencies are known to produce large surface temperature and rainfall artefacts. Therefore, it is essential to maintain the synoptic circulation within the simulation domain consistent with the synoptic circulation at the domain boundaries. Nudging techniques, initially developed for data assimilation purposes, are increasingly used in regional climate modeling and offer a workaround to this issue. In this context, several questions on the "optimal" use of nudging are still open. In this study we focus on a specific question which is: What variable should we nudge? in order to maintain the consistencies between the regional model and the driving fields as much as possible. For that, a "Big Brother Experiment", where a reference atmospheric state is known, is conducted using the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model over the Euro-Mediterranean region. A set of 22 3-month simulations is performed with different sets of nudged variables and nudging options (no nudging, indiscriminate nudging, spectral nudging) for summer and winter. The results show that nudging clearly improves the model capacity to reproduce the reference fields. However the skill scores depend on the set of variables used to nudge the regional climate simulations. Nudging the tropospheric horizontal wind is by far the key variable to nudge to simulate correctly surface temperature and wind, and rainfall. To a lesser extent, nudging tropospheric temperature also contributes to significantly improve the simulations. Indeed, nudging tropospheric wind or temperature directly impacts the simulation of the tropospheric geopotential height and thus the synoptic scale atmospheric circulation. Nudging moisture improves the precipitation but the impact on the other fields (wind and temperature) is not significant. As

  17. Which Students Benefit from Self-Paced Mastery Instruction and Why.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinard, Thomas A.; Dolphin, Warren D.

    1981-01-01

    The determinants of achievement were compared under conventional and self-paced mastery examination schedules in an anatomy/physiology course. General scholastic ability did not interact with method, but prior preparation in science did. Students with less science preparation showed greater achievement under self-paced mastery testing than their…

  18. Web 2.0 and Social Media Connecting Learners in Self-Paced Study: Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiessen, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Distance learners determine the time and place for their studies--those engaged in self-paced study may also choose the rate at which they proceed through their courses. However, it is difficult to incorporate purposeful learner-learner interaction into self-paced study. A multiple-case study included three open universities with in-house design…

  19. Age and Self-Selected Performance Pace on a Visual Monitoring Inspection Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panek, Paul E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes various performance measures used in a study to investigate the relation of performance pace to age and information processing ability. Test results indicated no differences in performance pace but differences in performance quality between young and older individuals, with implications for hiring and training older workers. (MF)

  20. Obtaining Technical Assistance. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 4. Research & Development Series No. 240AB4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on obtaining technical assistance, the fourth in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…