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Sample records for package astm type

  1. Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (Cast Equivalent of 2507)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

  2. Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5A Super Duplex Stainless Steel ( Cast Equivalent of 2507)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

  3. Standard specification for nonoriented electrical steel, fully processed types (metric). ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-6 on Magnetic Properties and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A06.02 on Materials Specifications. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as A 677M-83. Last previous edition was A 677M-96.

  4. Standard specification for non-oriented electrical steel fully processed types. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-6 on Magnetic Properties and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A06.02 on Materials Specifications. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as A 677-73. Last previous edition A 677-96.

  5. ASTM METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASTM is a not-for-profit organization that provides a forum for producers, users, ultimate consumers, and those having a general interest (representatives of government and academia) to meet on common ground and write standards for materials, products, systems, and services. From...

  6. Type A radioactive liquid sample packaging family

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1995-11-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed two packagings that can be used to ship Type A quantities of radioactive liquids. WHC designed these packagings to take advantage of commercially available items where feasible to reduce the overall packaging cost. The Hedgehog packaging can ship up to one liter of Type A radioactive liquid with no shielding and 15 cm of distance between the liquid and the package exterior, or 30 ml of liquid with 3.8 cm of stainless steel shielding and 19 cm of distance between the liquid and the package exterior. The One Liter Shipper can ship up to one liter of Type A radioactive liquid that does not require shielding.

  7. Lessons learned during Type A Packaging testing

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.H.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    For the past 6 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Safety Analysis (EH-32) has contracted Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct compliance testing on DOE Type A packagings. The packagings are tested for compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A, general packaging, Type A requirements. The DOE has shared the Type A packaging information throughout the nuclear materials transportation community. During testing, there have been recurring areas of packaging design that resulted in testing delays and/or initial failure. The lessons learned during the testing are considered a valuable resource. DOE requested that WHC share this resource. By sharing what is and can be encountered during packaging testing, individuals will hopefully avoid past mistakes.

  8. 49 CFR 173.413 - Requirements for Type B packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.413 Requirements for Type B packages. Except as provided in § 173.416, each Type B(U) or Type B(M) package must be designed and... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for Type B packages. 173.413...

  9. Types: A data abstraction package in FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, S. )

    1990-08-01

    TYPES is a collection of Fortran programs which allow the creation and manipulation of abstract data objects'' without the need for a preprocessor. Each data object is assigned a type'' as it is created which implies participation in a set of characteristic operations. Available types include scalars, logicals, ordered sets, stacks, queues, sequences, trees, arrays, character strings, block text, histograms, virtual and allocatable memories. A data object may contain integers, reals, or other data objects in any combination. In addition to the type specific operations, a set of universal utilities allows for copying input/output to disk, naming, editing, displaying, user input, interactive creation, tests for equality of contents or structure, machine to machine translation or source code creation for and data object. TYPES is available on VAX/VMS, SUN 3, SPARC, DEC/Ultrix, Silicon Graphics 4D and Cray/Unicos machines. The capabilities of the package are discussed together with characteristic applications and experience in writing the GVerify package.

  10. TYPE B RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGE FAILURE MODES AND CONTENTS COMPLIANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R; Steve Hensel, S; Allen Smith, A

    2007-02-21

    Type B radioactive material package failures can occur due to any one of the following: inadequate design, manufacture, and maintenance of packages, load conditions beyond those anticipated in the regulations, and improper package loading and operation. The rigorous package design evaluations performed in the certification process, robust package manufacture quality assurance programs, and demanding load conditions prescribed in the regulations are all well established. This paper focuses on the operational aspects of Type B package loading with respect to an overbatch which may cause a package failure.

  11. 49 CFR 173.465 - Type A packaging tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type A packaging tests. 173.465 Section 173.465 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.465 Type A packaging tests. (a) The...

  12. 49 CFR 173.415 - Authorized Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... evaluation or comparative data showing that the construction methods, packaging design, and materials of... standards for fissile materials in 10 CFR part 71 and is used in accordance with § 173.471. (c) Any Type B(U... packaging. Each offeror of a Specification 7A package must maintain on file for at least one year after...

  13. Evaluation of various generic types of building sealants against ASTM C-920, standard specification for elastomeric joint sealants

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorillo, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    A number of sealant manufacturers suggest that although they supply primers for their sealants, in many cases the primers may not be necessary. They usually suggest running a test on the substrates the sealants are to be used with to determine if the primers are needed. This paper will discuss the results of testing several commercially available polysulfide, silicone and polyurethane sealants against ASTM C-920, Standard Specification for Elastomeric Joint Sealants. Morar, plate glass and anodized aluminum were used as the substrates. Where manufacturers supplied primers, the sealant was tested with and without their primer. Where the manufacturer did not recommend primers, testing was only doe without a primer.

  14. EARLY TESTS OF DRUM TYPE PACKAGINGS - THE LEWALLEN REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.

    2010-07-29

    The need for robust packagings for radioactive materials (RAM) was recognized from the earliest days of the nuclear industry. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant developed a packaging for shipment of Pu in the early 1960's, which became the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 6M specification package. The design concepts were employed in other early packagings. Extensive tests of these at Savannah River Laboratory (now Savannah River National Laboratory) were performed in 1969 and 1970. The results of these tests were reported in 'Drum and Board-Type Insulation Overpacks of Shipping Packages for Radioactive Materials', by E. E. Lewallen. The Lewallen Report was foundational to design of subsequent drum type RAM packaging. This paper summarizes this important early study of drum type packagings. The Lewallen Report demonstrated the ability packagings employing drum and insulation board overpacks and engineered containment vessels to meet the Type B package requirements. Because of the results of the Lewallen Report, package designers showed high concern for thermal protection of 'Celotex'. Subsequent packages addressed this by following strategies like those recommended by Lewallen and by internal metal shields and supplemental, encapsulated insulation disks, as in 9975. The guidance provide by the Lewallen Report was employed in design of a large number of drum size packagings over the following three decades. With the increased public concern over transportation of radioactive materials and recognition of the need for larger margins of safety, more sophisticated and complex packages have been developed and have replaced the simple packagings developed under the Lewallen Report paradigm.

  15. Packaging design criteria for the Type B Drum

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.; Smith, R.J.; Wells, A.H.

    1995-09-01

    The Type B Drum package is a transportation cask capable of shipping a single 55-gal (208 L) drum of transuranic (TRU) waste. The Type B Drum is smaller than existing certified packages, such as the TRUPACT-II cask, but will allow payloads with higher thermal and gas generation rates, thus providing greater operational flexibility. The Type B Drum package has double containment so that plutonium contents and other radioactive material may be transported in Type B quantities. Conceptual designs of unshielded and shielded versions of the Type B Drum were completed in Report on the Conceptual Design of the Unshielded Type B Drum Packaging and Report on the Conceptual Design of the Shielded type B Drum Packaging (WEC 1994a, WEC 1994b), which demonstrated the Type B Drum to be a viable packaging system. A Type B package containment system must withstand the normal conditions of transport and the hypothetical accident conditions, which include a 9-m (30-ft) drop onto an unyielding surface and a 1-m (3-ft) drop onto a 15-cm (6-in.) diameter pin, and a fire and immersion scenarios.

  16. Sensitization Behavior of Type 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel: Confronting DL-EPR Test and Practice W of ASTM A763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Taís Campos; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes; Sayeg, Isaac Jamil; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2014-06-01

    Stainless steels employed for manufacturing automotive exhaust systems must withstand severe thermal cycles, corrosive environment due to urea decomposition, and welding operations. AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel can be considered a low-cost alternative for this application. However, depending on the manufacturing conditions during welding cycles, this material can be sensitized due to the precipitation of chromium carbides at grain boundaries. In this work, the intergranular corrosion resistances of the AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel were evaluated after annealing at 300, 500, and 700 °C for 2, 4, and 6 h. Solution-annealed samples were also tested for comparison purposes. Two methodologies were used to assess the sensitization behavior of the 409 stainless steel samples: the first one was based on the ASTM A763 (practice W), while the second one was based on the double-loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation test. It was possible to identify that the annealing treatment performed at 500 °C was more critical to the occurrence of intergranular corrosion.

  17. THERMAL UPGRADING OF 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL (RAM) TYPE B PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

    2012-03-26

    The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

  18. TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGING FOR AIR TRANSPORT PROJECT OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Eberl, K.; Blanton, P.

    2013-10-11

    This paper presents the project status of the Model 9980, a new Type A fissile packaging for use in air transport. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed this new packaging to be a light weight (<150-lb), drum-style package and prepared a Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) for submission to the DOE/EM. The package design incorporates unique features and engineered materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight and to be in compliance with 10CFR71 requirements. Prototypes were fabricated and tested to evaluate the design when subjected to Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). An overview of the design details, results of the regulatory testing, and lessons learned from the prototype fabrication for the 9980 will be presented.

  19. Development of an Air Transport Type A Fissile Package

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Ebert, K.

    2011-07-13

    This paper presents the summary of testing by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support development of a light weight (<140 lbs) air transport qualified Type A Fissile Packaging. The package design incorporates features and materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight. The light weight package is being designed to provide confinement to the contents when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of an air transportable Type A Fissile radioactive material shipping package. The objective of these tests was to provide design input to the final design for the LORX Type A Fissile Air Transport Packaging when subjected to the performance requirements of the drop, crush and puncture probe test of 10CFR71. The post test evaluation of the prototype packages indicates that all of the tested designs would satisfactorily confine the content within the packaging. The differences in the performance of the prototypes varied significantly depending on the core materials and their relative densities. Information gathered from these tests is being used to develop the final design for the Department of Homeland Security.

  20. Documentation and verification required for type A packaging use

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.H.

    1997-07-30

    This document furnishes knowledge and methods for verifying compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) packaging requirements for shipping Type A quantities of radioactive material. The primary emphasis is on the requirements identified in 49 CFR 173.415(a), which states, ``Each offeror of a Specification 7A package must maintain on file for at least one year after the shipment, and shall provide to DOT on request, complete documentation of tests and an engineering evaluation of comparative data showing that the construction methods, packaging design, and materials of construction comply with that specification.`` This guidance document uses a checklist to show compliance.

  1. DOT-7A Type A packaging test and evaluation procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for qualifying a DOT-7A Type A packaging for use. WHC qualifies DOT-7A packaging for two purposes. The first is to provide packages for use by WHC (manufacturer-qualified). The second is to provide a contracted service in support of DOE/EM-76 (DOE-qualified). This document includes descriptions of the performance tests, the personnel involved and their qualifications, appropriate safety and quality assurance considerations, and the procedures to be followed when WHC performs the tests (either as the manufacturer, or on behalf of the DOE`s certification program).

  2. 49 CFR 173.415 - Authorized Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fissile materials in 10 CFR part 71 and is used in accordance with § 173.471. (c) Any Type B(U) or Type B... least one year after the latest shipment, and shall provide to DOT on request, complete documentation of... of a Specification 7A package must maintain on file for at least two years after the offeror's...

  3. DOT-7A Type A packaging design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide instruction for designing a U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A packaging. Another purpose for this Design Guide is to support the evaluation and testing activities that are performed on new designs by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test facility. This evaluation and testing program is called the DOT-7A Program. When an applicant has determined that a DOT-7A packaging is needed and not commercially available, a design may be created according to this document. The design should include a packaging drawing, specifications, analysis report, operating instructions, and a Packaging Qualification Checklist; all of which should be forwarded to a DOE/HQ approved test facility for evaluation and testing. This report is being submitted through the Engineering Documentation System so that it may be used for reference and information purposes.

  4. 49 CFR 178.350 - Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Packagings for Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 178.350 Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. (a) Each packaging must meet all applicable requirements of...

  5. 49 CFR 178.350 - Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Packagings for Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 178.350 Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. (a) Each packaging must meet all applicable requirements of...

  6. 49 CFR 178.350 - Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Packagings for Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 178.350 Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. (a) Each packaging must meet all applicable requirements of...

  7. ASTM A 312 -- Quality? Who bears the burden?

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, H.; Kohler, K.

    2000-05-01

    Premature failure occurred in welded type 316L stainless steel pipe ordered to ASTM A 312. This specification can result in great variability in weld-seam quality, affecting corrosion resistance. ASTM A 312 does not sufficiently protect many end users. A clarifying statement should be inserted in this specification, and a new ASTM specification for pipe produced by automated welding mills with in-line induction coil heat treatment should be developed.

  8. Determination of damage functions for the pitting of AISI type 403 blade alloy and ASTM A470/471 disk alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yancheng

    The prediction of pitting accumulation on turbine blades and disks is of particular importance to predict localized corrosion damages in low pressure (LP) steam turbines. Damage Function Analysis (DFA) and Deterministic Extreme Value Statistics (DEVS) have been employed to predict the pitting damage on AISI Type 403 stainless steel (SS) blade alloy and ASTM A470/471 disk steel in simulated LP steam turbine environments within the phase transition zone. The passivity properties of Type 403 SS and A470/471 steel in the passive regions, including defect type, defect concentration in the barrier film, barrier film thickness, and the steady-state current density, agree with the predictions of the Point Defect Model (PDM) for an n-type semiconductor. Optimization of the PDM based impedance model on the experimental electrochemical impedance data has yielded a set of parameter values that can be used to predict the barrier film growth on Type 403 SS in deaerated borate buffer solution ( pH = 8.2) at ambient temperature. Experimental relationships between the breakdown potential and chloride activity, pH, temperature, and potential scan rate have demonstrated the applicability of the PDM for describing passivity breakdown on Type 403 SS and A470/471 steel. The obtained parameter values were used to calculate the breakdown potential, induction time, and their distributions, via the PDM, which represents the first quantitative characterization of the passivity breakdown behavior on Type 403 SS. Pitting damage functions for Type 403 SS have been experimentally determined for the first time. However, low pit density on A470/471 steel led to insufficient pit numbers on the 1.27 cm2 surface for the effective determination of damage functions. DEVS has been demonstrated by predicting the average maximum pit depth for 750 hours from short-term (24 hours and 240 hours) maximum pit depth data on Type 403 SS in deaerated buffer solution with 0.10 M NaCl at an applied potential of 0

  9. 49 CFR 178.350 - Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. 178... Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. (a) Each packaging must meet all applicable requirements of subpart... of §§ 173.403, 173.410, 173.412, 173.415 and 173.465 of this subchapter for Type A packaging....

  10. Laboratory Study on Prevention of CaO-Containing ASTM "D-Type" Inclusions in Al-Deoxidized Low-Oxygen Steel Melts During Basic Slag Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Wang, Xin-Hua; Yang, Die; Lei, Shao-Long; Wang, Kun-Peng

    2015-12-01

    Present work was attempted to explore the possibility of preventing CaO-containing inclusions in Al-deoxidized low-oxygen special steel during basic slag refining, which were known as ASTM D-type inclusions. Based on the analysis on formation thermodynamics of CaO-containing inclusions, a series of laboratory experiments were designed and carried out in a vacuum induction furnace. During the experiments, slag/steel reaction equilibrium was intentionally suppressed with the aim to decrease the CaO contents in inclusions, which is different from ordinary concept that slag/steel reaction should be promoted for better control of inclusions. The obtained results showed that high cleanliness of steel was obtained in all the steel melts, with total oxygen contents varied between 0.0003 and 0.0010 pct. Simultaneously, formation of CaO-containing inclusions was successfully prohibited, and all the formed oxide inclusions were MgO-Al2O3 or/and Al2O3 in very small sizes of about 1 to 3 μm. And 90 pct to nearly 98 pct of them were wrapped by relative thicker MnS outer surface layers to produce dual-phased "(MgO-Al2O3) + MnS" or "Al2O3 + MnS" complex inclusions. Because of much better ductility of MnS, certain deformability of these complex inclusions can be expected which is helpful to improve fatigue resistance property of steel. Only very limited number of singular MnS inclusions were with sizes larger than 13 μm, which were formed during solidification because of. In the end, formation of oxide inclusions in steel was qualitatively evaluated and discussed.

  11. 77 FR 67678 - Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... COMMISSION Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages AGENCY... Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) 2012-XX, ``Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B... Plan for Transport Packages for Radioactive Material,'' for the review of content specifications...

  12. Effect of Insolation Boundary Conditions on Type B Package Internal Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hovingh, J; Shah, VL

    2002-05-30

    The prescription of the initial conditions and the final conditions for a thermal accident for Type B packages are different for differing regulations. This paper presents an analytical method for estimating the effect of the boundary conditions on post-fire peak internal package temperatures. Results are given for several boundary conditions for a Type B drum-type package.

  13. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  14. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  15. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  16. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  17. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  18. 49 CFR 173.465 - Type A packaging tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cylindrical packages, onto each of the quarters of each rim. (3) For fiberboard or wood rectangular packages... quarters of each rim from a height of 0.3 m (1 foot). (5) The target for the free drop test must be a...

  19. 49 CFR 173.465 - Type A packaging tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cylindrical packages, onto each of the quarters of each rim. (3) For fiberboard or wood rectangular packages... quarters of each rim from a height of 0.3 m (1 foot). (5) The target for the free drop test must be a...

  20. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special requirements for Type B packages containing more... TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2. A Type B package containing more than 105A2 must be designed so...

  1. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special requirements for Type B packages containing more... TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2. A Type B package containing more than 105A2 must be designed so...

  2. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special requirements for Type B packages containing more... TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2. A Type B package containing more than 105A2 must be designed so...

  3. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special requirements for Type B packages containing more... TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2. A Type B package containing more than 105A2 must be designed so...

  4. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special requirements for Type B packages containing more... TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2. A Type B package containing more than 105A2 must be designed so...

  5. FABRICATION AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE 9979 TYPE AF RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2013-10-10

    This paper summarizes the development, testing, and certification of the 9979 Type A Fissile Packaging that replaces the UN1A2 Specification Shipping Package eliminated from Department of Transportation (DOT) 49 CFR 173. The DOT Specification Package was used for many decades by the U.S. nuclear industry as a fissile waste container until its removal as an authorized container by DOT. This paper will discuss stream lining procurement of high volume radioactive material packaging manufacturing, such as the 9979, to minimize packaging production costs without sacrificing Quality Assurance. The authorized content envelope (combustible and non-combustible) as well as planned content envelope expansion will be discussed.

  6. 49 CFR 173.465 - Type A packaging tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) For packages containing fissile material, the free drop test specified in paragraph (c)(1) of this..., horizontal surface of such mass and rigidity that any increase in its resistance to displacement...

  7. 49 CFR 173.465 - Type A packaging tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... each of the quarters of each rim. (3) For fiberboard or wood rectangular packages with a mass of 50 kg... less, a separate specimen must be subjected to a free drop onto each of the quarters of each rim from...

  8. 21 CFR 610.62 - Proper name; package label; legible type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... label; legible type. (a) Position. The proper name of the product on the package label shall be placed above any trademark or trade name identifying the product and symmetrically arranged with respect to... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proper name; package label; legible type....

  9. 21 CFR 610.62 - Proper name; package label; legible type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... label; legible type. (a) Position. The proper name of the product on the package label shall be placed above any trademark or trade name identifying the product and symmetrically arranged with respect to... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Proper name; package label; legible type....

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TYPE A(F)RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    In a coordinated effort, the Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed the elimination of the Specification Packaging from 49 CFR 173.[1] In accordance with the Federal Register, issued on October 1, 2004, new fabrication of Specification Packages would no longer be authorized. In accordance with the NRC final rulemaking published January 26, 2004, Specification Packagings are mandated by law to be removed from service no later than October 1, 2008. This coordinated effort and resulting rulemaking initiated a planned phase out of Specification Type B and Type A fissile (F) material transportation packages within the Department of Energy (DOE) and its subcontractors. One of the Specification Packages affected by this regulatory change is the UN1A2 Specification Package, per DOT 49 CFR 173.417(a)(6). To maintain continuing shipments of DOE materials currently transported in UN1A2 Specification Package after the existing authorization expires, a replacement Type A(F) material packaging design is under development by the Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper presents a summary of the prototype design effort and testing of the new Type A(F) Package development for the DOE. This paper discusses the progress made in the development of a Type A Fissile Packaging to replace the expiring 49 CFR UN1A2 Specification Fissile Package. The Specification Package was mostly a single-use waste disposal container. The design requirements and authorized radioactive material contents of the UN1A2 Specification Package were defined in 49 CFR. A UN1A2 Specification Package was authorized to ship up to 350 grams of U-235 in any enrichment and in any non-pyrophoric form. The design was specified as a 55-gallon 1A2 drum overpack with a body constructed from 18 gauge steel with a 16 gauge drum lid. Drum closure was specified as a standard 12-gauge ring closure. The inner product container size was not specified but was listed as any

  11. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N

    2009-04-27

    Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

  12. Types of packaging waste from secondary sources (supermarkets)--the situation in the UK.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Hardy, Darron W; Curran, Beverley A

    2009-03-01

    Packaging waste is a contributing factor to the large quantity of waste that is sent to landfill in the UK. This research focuses on waste from the secondary packaging sector in the UK. In particular, supermarkets were investigated as they supply a large section of consumers with their grocery and other requirements and generate high quantities of packaging waste due to the high turnover within the store. In general, supermarkets use either metal cages or wooden pallets to transport products from depot to store. Investigation shows that packaging waste produced when using the wooden pallets is greater than for metal cages but the use of wooden pallets allows for greater versatility when in the store. The type of transit packaging used depends on what the products are initially packaged in and how the supermarket supply chain works. All cardboard and high-grade plastic is recycled but, depending on the facilities at the stores, the low-grade plastic can be recycled as well. This paper details types of packaging used within the supermarket secondary packaging sector and how waste can be reduced. To reduce the amount of packaging waste produced by the supermarkets, the products will have to be wrapped differently by the producers so that less packaging is needed in transit. PMID:18976897

  13. Stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata) infesting food in various types of packaging.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Volek, Vlado

    2015-02-01

    From 2008 to 2014, stored product mites have been reported from prepackaged dried food on the market in the Czech Republic. The infestation was by Carpoglyphus lactis (L.) in dried fruits and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) in dog feed. The infestation is presumably caused by poor protection of the packages. We compared various packaging methods for their resistance to mites using dried apricots and dog feed in laboratory experiments. The trial packages included nine different plastic films, monofilm, duplex and triplex, and one type of plastic cup (ten replicates per packaging type). All packaging materials are available on the Czech market for dried food products. The samples of dried food were professionally packed in a factory and packaged dried apricots were exposed to C. lactis and dog food to T. putrescentiae. After 3 months of exposure, the infestation and mite density of the prepackaged food was assessed. Mites were found to infest six types of packages. Of the packaging types with mites, 1-5 samples were infested and the maximum abundance was 1,900 mites g(-1) of dried food. Mites entered the prepackaged food by faulty sealing. Inadequate sealing is suggested to be the major cause of the emerged infestation of dried food. PMID:25420687

  14. Hypothetical accident condition thermal analysis and testing of a Type B drum package

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.J.; Alstine, M.N. Van; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    A thermophysical property model developed to analytically determine the thermal response of cane fiberboard when exposed to temperatures and heat fluxes associated with the 10 CFR 71 hypothetical accident condition (HAC) has been benchmarked against two Type B drum package fire test results. The model 9973 package was fire tested after a 30 ft. top down drop and puncture, and an undamaged model 9975 package containing a heater (21W) was fire tested to determine content heat source effects. Analysis results using a refined version of a previously developed HAC fiberboard model compared well against the test data from both the 9973 and 9975 packages.

  15. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-09-14

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

  16. Type of packaging affects the colour stability of vitamin E enriched beef.

    PubMed

    Nassu, Renata T; Uttaro, Bethany; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Zawadski, Sophie; Juárez, Manuel; Dugan, Michael E R

    2012-12-01

    Colour stability is a very important parameter for meat retail display, as appearance of the product is the deciding factor for consumers at time of purchase. This study investigated the possibility of extending appearance shelf-life through the combined use of packaging method (overwrapping - OVER, modified atmosphere - MAP, vacuum skin packaging - VSP and a combination of modified atmosphere and vacuum skin packaging - MAPVSP) and antioxidants (vitamin E enriched beef). Retail attributes (appearance, lean colour, % surface discolouration), as well as colour space analysis of images for red, green and blue parameters were measured over 18days. MAPVSP provided the most desirable retail appearance during the first 4days of retail display, while VSP-HB had the best colour stability. Overall, packaging type was more influential than α-tocopherol levels on meat colour stability, although α-tocopherol levels (>4μgg(-1) meat) had a protective effect when using high oxygen packaging methods. PMID:22953936

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HS99 AIR TRANSPORT TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2012-07-10

    An air-transport Type A Fissile radioactive shipping package for the transport of special form uranium sources has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Homeland Security. The Package model number is HS99 for Homeland Security Model 99. This paper presents the major design features of the HS99 and highlights engineered materials necessary for meeting the design requirements for this light-weight Type AF packaging. A discussion is provided demonstrating how the HS99 complies with the regulatory safety requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper summarizes the results of structural testing to specified in 10 CFR 71 for Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Conditions events. Planned and proposed future missions for this packaging are also addressed.

  18. 9977 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING - MAGNETIC FIELD COMMUNICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from proof-of-concept testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering and Visible Assets, Inc. for the DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) to determine if RuBee (IEEE 1902.1) tags and readers could be used to provide a communication link from within a drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packaging. A Model 9977 Type B Packaging was used to test the read/write capability and range performance of a RuBee tag and reader. Testing was performed with the RuBee tags placed in various locations inside the packaging including inside the drum on the outside of the lid of the containment vessel and also inside of the containment vessel. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  19. Regulatory compliance guide for DOT-7A type A packaging design

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.

    1996-06-04

    The purpose of this guide is to provide instruction for assuring that the regulatory design requirements for a DOT-7A Type A packaging are met. This guide also supports the testing and evaluation activities that are performed on new packaging designs by a DOE-approved test facility through the DOE`s DOT-7A Test Program. This Guide was updated to incorporate regulatory changes implemented by HM-169A (49 CFR, `Transportation`).

  20. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A type A packaging. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D L

    1997-08-04

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program. This document supersedes DOE Evaluation Document for DOT-7A Type A Packaging (Edling 1987), originally issued in 1987 by Monsanto Research Corporation Mound Laboratory (MLM), Miamisburg, Ohio, for the Department of Energy, Security Evaluation Program (I)P-4. Mound Laboratory issued four revisions to the document between November 1988 and December 1989. In September 1989, the program was transferred to Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) in Richland, Washington. One additional revision was issued in March 1990 by Westinghouse Hanford. This revision reflects the earlier material and incorporates a number of changes. Evaluation and testing activities on 1208 three DOT-7A Program Dockets resulted in the qualification of three new packaging configurations, which are incorporated herein and summarized. This document presents approximately 300 different packagings that have been determined to meet the requirements for a DOT-7A, type A packaging per 49 CFR 178.350.

  1. 49 CFR 173.415 - Authorized Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... standards for fissile materials in 10 CFR part 71 and is used in accordance with § 173.471. (c) Any Type B(U... latest shipment, and shall provide to DOT on request, complete documentation of tests and an...

  2. Leak testing United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission type b packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WTPP) is a one of its kind research and development facility operated by the Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office. Located in southeastern New Mexico, the WTPP is designed to demonstrate the safe, permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive nuclear waste, accumulated from 40 years of nuclear weapons production. Before the waste can be disposed of, it must first be safely transported from generator storage sites to the WIPP. To accomplish this, the TRUPACT-II was designed and fabricated. This double containment, non-vented waste packaging successfully completed a rigorous testing program, and in 1989 received a Certificate of Compliance (C of C) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Currently, the TRUPACT-II is in use at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to transport waste on site for characterization. The DOE/CAO is responsible for maintaining the TRUPACT-II C of C. The C of C requires performance of nondestructive examination (NDE), e.g., visual testing (VT), dimensional inspections, Liquid Dye Penetrant testing (PT), and Helium Leak Detection (HLD). The Waste Isolation Division (WID) uses HLD for verification of the containment integrity. The following HLD tests are performed on annual basis or when required, i.e. repairs or component replacement: (1) fabrication verification leak tests on both the outer containment vessel (OCV) and the inner containment vessel (ICV); (2) assembly verification leak tests on the OCV and ICV upper main o-rings; and (3) assembly verification leak tests on the OCV and the ICV vent port plugs. These tests are addressed in detail as part of this presentation.

  3. 9978 AND 9975 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Fogle, R.

    2012-05-07

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from a series of proof-of-concept tests performed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R and D Engineering, for the DOE Packaging Certification Program to determine if a viable radio link could be established from within the stainless steel confines of several drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packagings. Two in-hand, off-the-shelf radio systems were tested. The first system was a Wi-Fi Librestream Onsight{trademark} camera with a Fortress ES820 Access Point and the second was the On-Ramp Wireless Ultra-Link Processing{trademark} (ULP) radio system. These radio systems were tested within the Model 9975 and 9978 Type B packagings at the SRNL. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  4. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  5. Practical Thermal Evaluation Methods For HAC Fire Analysis In Type B Radiaoactive Material (RAM) Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, Glenn; Hensel, Stephen J; Gupta, Narendra K.

    2013-03-28

    Title 10 of the United States Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR Part 71.73) requires that Type B radioactive material (RAM) packages satisfy certain Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) thermal design requirements to ensure package safety during accidental fire conditions. Compliance with thermal design requirements can be met by prototype tests, analyses only or a combination of tests and analyses. Normally, it is impractical to meet all the HAC using tests only and the analytical methods are too complex due to the multi-physics non-linear nature of the fire event. Therefore, a combination of tests and thermal analyses methods using commercial heat transfer software are used to meet the necessary design requirements. The authors, along with his other colleagues at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, SC, USA, have successfully used this 'tests and analyses' approach in the design and certification of several United States' DOE/NNSA certified packages, e.g. 9975, 9977, 9978, 9979, H1700, and Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This paper will describe these methods and it is hoped that the RAM Type B package designers and analysts can use them for their applications.

  6. ASTM standards on thermocouples, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This edition has been expanded to include sixteen selected ASTM methods and practices on thermocouples. It also contains a Temperature Electromotive Force (EMF) Table for the NICROSIL-NISIL Thermocouple System.

  7. Rubber compounding materials -- ground coal. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    This classification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee on Rubber and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D11.20 on Compounding Materials and Procedures. The current edition was approved March 15, 1193 and published in May 1993.

  8. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases. 173.466 Section 173.466 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  9. 78 FR 26090 - Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... this RIS as a draft for public comment on November 13, 2012 (77 FR 67678), for a 45-day comment period... COMMISSION Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages AGENCY... Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) 2013-04, ``Content Specifications...

  10. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional design requirements for Type A packages. 173.412 Section 173.412 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS...

  11. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A Type A Packaging. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-30

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). The program is currently administered by the DOE, Office of Facility Safety Analysis, DOE/EH-32, at DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program.

  12. SHIPMENT OF TWO DOE-STD-3013 CONTAINERS IN A 9977 TYPE B PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Loftin, B.; Nathan, S.

    2011-06-06

    The 9977 is a certified Type B Packaging authorized to ship uranium and plutonium in metal and oxide forms. Historically, the standard container for these materials has been the DOE-STD-3013 which was specifically designed for the long term storage of plutonium bearing materials. The Department of Energy has used the 9975 Packaging containing a single 3013 container for the transportation and storage of these materials. In order to reduce container, shipping, and storage costs, the 9977 Packaging is being certified for transportation and storage of two 3013 containers. The challenges and risks of this content and the 9977s ability to meet the Code of Federal Regulations for the transport of these materials are presented.

  13. SHIPMENT OF NON-TRADITIONAL CONTENTS IN THE 9977 TYPE B PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.

    2011-06-06

    The 9977 is a certified Type B Packaging authorized to ship uranium and plutonium in metal and oxide forms. These materials are typically confined within metallic containers designed for ease of handling and to prevent the spread of contamination. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) uses Pu and U sources for the training of domestic and international customs agents in the identification and detection of radioactive materials (RAM). These materials are packed in polycarbonate containers which permit the trainees to view the RAM. The safety basis was made to authorize the use of these unusual containers. The inclusion of the PNNL Training Source Contents into the 9977 Packaging imposed unique conditions previously unanalyzed. The use of polycarbonate as a content container material, while different from any configuration previously considered, does not raise any safety issues with the package which continues to operate with a large safety margin for temperatures, pressures, containment, dose rates, and subcriticality.

  14. Safety evaluation for packaging 222-S laboratory cargo tank for onetime type B material shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, P.M.

    1994-08-19

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to evaluate and document the safety of the onetime shipment of bulk radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory cargo tank (222-S cargo tank). The 222-S cargo tank is a US Department of Transportation (DOT) MC-312 specification (DOT 1989) cargo tank, vehicle registration number HO-64-04275, approved for low specific activity (LSA) shipments in accordance with the DOT Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In accordance with the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1A, Chapter III (RL 1988), an equivalent degree of safety shall be provided for onsite shipments as would be afforded by the DOT shipping regulations for a radioactive material package. This document demonstrates that this packaging system meets the onsite transportation safety criteria for a onetime shipment of Type B contents.

  15. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM...

  16. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM...

  17. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM...

  18. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM...

  19. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM...

  20. A Notch-Saddle-Compensation Technique in Butterfly-Type Laser Module Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Ying-Chien; Kuang, Jao-Hwa; Sheen, Maw-Tyan; Hsu, Pu-Hsien; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2007-06-01

    A quantitative postweld shift (PWS) correction employing a notch-saddle-compensation technique (NSCT) in a laser-welded butterfly-type laser module package is presented. A predetermined notch geometry is proposed to guide the welding compensation in the specific direction and magnitude precisely. The results show that 82% to 99% of the relative coupling efficiency before welding for the laser modules is achieved by using the NSCT. The fiber shifts due to the PWS can be realigned back closer to their original optimum position after applying the NSCT, and hence, the coupling loss due to the PWS can be regained. In comparison to the published studies on PWS compensation by the mechanical adjustment using the qualitative estimation and plastic deformation, the advantages of using this novel NSCT are the quantitative and nondestructive compensations in butterfly-type laser module packages. Therefore, high-yield butterfly-type laser modules used in lightwave transmission systems are developed and fabricated.

  1. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may... for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between Roadside and Vehicle Systems—5 GHz Band... from ASTM via the Internet at http://www.astm.org....

  2. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may... for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between Roadside and Vehicle Systems—5 GHz Band... from ASTM via the Internet at http://www.astm.org....

  3. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may... for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between Roadside and Vehicle Systems—5 GHz Band... from ASTM via the Internet at http://www.astm.org....

  4. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard). 90.379 Section 90.379 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Intelligent Transportation Systems Radio Service Regulations Governing the Licensing and...

  5. Programmed packaging of multicomponent envelope-type nanoparticle system for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Daniela; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2010-05-01

    A programmed packaging strategy to develop a multicomponent envelope-type nanoparticle system (MENS) is presented. To this end, we took specific advantage of using in-house tailored liposomes that have been recently shown to exhibit intrinsic endosomal rupture properties that allow plasmid DNA to escape from endosomes and to enter the nucleus with extremely high efficiency. Transfection efficiency experiments on NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts indicate that MENS is a promising transfection candidate.

  6. ANTS2 package: simulation and experimental data processing for Anger camera type detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Martins, R.; Neves, F.; Domingos, V.; Chepel, V.

    2016-04-01

    ANTS2 is a simulation and data processing package developed for position sensitive detectors with Anger camera type readout. The simulation module of ANTS2 is based on ROOT package from CERN, which is used to store the detector geometry and to perform 3D navigation. The module is capable of simulating particle sources, performing particle tracking, generating photons of primary and secondary scintillation, tracing optical photons and generating photosensor signals. The reconstruction module features several position reconstruction methods based on the statistical reconstruction algorithms (including GPU-based implementations), artificial neural networks and k-NN searches. The module can process simulated as well as imported experimental data containing photosensor signals. A custom library for B-spline parameterization of spatial response of photosensors is implemented which can be used to calculate and parameterize the spatial response of a detector. The package includes a graphical user interface with an extensive set of configuration, visualization and analysis tools. ANTS2 is being developed with the focus on the iterative (adaptive) reconstruction of the detector response using flood field irradiation data. The package is implemented in C++ programming language and it is a multiplatform, open source project.

  7. Productivity Techniques and Quality Aspects in the Criticality Safety Evaluation of Y-12 Type-B Fissile Material Packages

    SciTech Connect

    DeClue, J. F.

    2011-06-28

    The inventory of certified Type-B fissile material packages consists of ten performance-based packages for offsite transportation purposes, serving transportation programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The containment vessels range from 5 to 19 in. in diameter and from 17 to 58 in. in height. The drum assembly external to the containment vessel ranges from 18 to 34 in. in diameter and from 26 to 71 in. in height. The weight of the packaging (drum assembly and containment vessel) ranges from 239 to 1550 lb. The older DT-nn series of Cellotex-based packages are being phased-out and replaced by a new generation of Kaolite-based ('Y-12 patented insulation') packages capable of withstanding the dynamic crush test 10 CFR 71.73(c)(2). Three replacement packages are in various stages of development; two are in use. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 6M specification package, which does not conform to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for Type-B packages, is no longer authorized for service on public roads. The ES-3100 shipping package is an example of a Kaolite-based Type-B fissile material package developed as a replacement package for the DOT 6M. With expanded utility, the ES-3100 is designed and licensed for transporting highly enriched uranium and plutonium materials on public roads. The ES-3100 provides added capability for air transport of up to 7-kg quantities of uranium material. This paper presents the productivity techniques and quality aspects in the criticality safety evaluation of Y-12 packages using the ES-3100 as an example.

  8. Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Darrell Dwaine; Noss, Philip W

    2010-09-14

    AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the

  9. Graded approach for eastablishment of QA (quality assurance) requirements for type B packaging of radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Fabian, R.R.; Woodruff, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    A study that was conducted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the US Congress to assess the effectiveness of quality assurance (QA) activities has demonstrated a need to modify and improve the application of QA requirements for the nuclear industry. As a result, the packaging community, along with the nuclear industry as a whole, has taken action to increase the efficacy of the QA function. The results of the study indicate that a graded approach for establishing QA requirements is the preferred method. The essence of the graded approach is the establishment of applicable QA requirements to an extent consistent with the importance to safety of an item, component, system, or activity. This paper presents the process that is used to develop the graded approach for QA requirements pertaining to Type B packaging.

  10. Standard specification for cadmium. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.04 on Zinc and Cadmium. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as B 440-66T. Last previous edition was B 440-76.

  11. ASTM update for stainless steels II

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, R.M.

    1999-10-01

    Specifiers and users of stainless steel (SS) should be aware that the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has revised several of its SS specifications. These changes affect grades commonly used in process and other industries. These changes are discussed.

  12. ASTM Validates Air Pollution Test Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has validated six basic methods for measuring pollutants in ambient air as the first part of its Project Threshold. Aim of the project is to establish nationwide consistency in measuring pollutants; determining precision, accuracy and reproducibility of 35 standard measuring methods. (BL)

  13. Effects of calf diet, antioxidants, packaging type and storage time on beef steak storage.

    PubMed

    Franco, Daniel; González, Laura; Bispo, Esperanza; Latorre, Alicia; Moreno, Teresa; Sineiro, Jorge; Sánchez, Marivel; Núñez, María José

    2012-04-01

    The effect of basal dietary supplemented with vegetable oils plus vitamin E (sunflower, soybean, linseed and a basal diet control), type of packaging (MAP or vacuum), addition of natural antioxidant (grape seed, rosemary) and storage time (0, 7, 14 and 21 days) on lipid oxidation, color stability, vitamin E content, and total aerobic bacterial counts in steaks of Longissimus thoracis was studied. The triple interaction diet × time × packaging affected oxidative stability, redness and yellowness of the meat. TBARS values did not increase with time in vacuum-packaged samples for all dietary treatments. However, samples from MAP and control showed the highest TBARS values after 21 days of storage (0.72 mg MDA/kg of meat, P<0.05). Both exogenous antioxidant extracts and MAP maintained low total aerobic counts in steaks until the 21st day. Calves should be fed a diet supplemented with L-VE, stored in MAP and treated with grape seed extract to extend the shelf life of their meat. PMID:22193039

  14. A COMPARISON OF TWO THERMAL INSULATION AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS FOR USE IN TYPE B PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-16

    This paper presents the summary of design features and test results of two Type B Shipping Package prototype configurations comprising different insulating materials developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy. The materials evaluated, a closed-cell polyurethane foam and a vacuformed ceramic fiber material, were selected to provide adequate structural protection to the package containment vessel during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and to provide thermal protection during the HAC fire. Polyurethane foam has been used in shipping package designs for many years because of the stiffness it provides to the structure and because of the thermal protection it provides during fire scenarios. This comparison describes how ceramic fiber material offers an alternative to the polyurethane foam in a specific overpack design. Because of the high operating temperature ({approx}2,300 F) of the ceramic material, it allows for contents with higher heat loads to be shipped than is possible with polyurethane foam. Methods of manufacturing and design considerations using the two materials will be addressed.

  15. Shelf-life of almond pastry cookies with different types of packaging and levels of temperature.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F V; De Luca, S; Piscopo, A; Santisi, V; Poiana, M

    2010-06-01

    Almond pastries are typical cookies of the south of Italy. Introduction of new packaging for this kind of cookies requires shelf-life assessments. This study, related to different types of packaging under various storage conditions of time and temperature, identifies critical parameters, as color and texture, to track during storage studies and to extend the shelf-life. The cookies were packed in three different ways and stored at two different temperatures. The pastries were separately stored: (1) in polyvinylchloride film; (2) in aluminum foil (ALL); (3) with modified atmosphere (MAP) in plastic vessels sealed into a polyamide/ polyethylene film; and (4) in vessels without any polymeric film. The storage temperatures were 20 and 30 °C. Evolution of texture, water activity, dry matter and color was assessed. Texture was evaluated by a texture analyzer with a puncturing test. Indices for hardening were the area under the curve (N × mm) up to 10 mm of distance, and the maximum force (N) corresponding to the crust fracture. The best results were obtained with ALL packaging and MAP condition, and above all, in all the trials a temperature of 30 °C reduced the crust hardness. PMID:21339139

  16. Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

    2010-10-27

    Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging

  17. 49 CFR 173.467 - Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and... Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand accident conditions in transportation. Each Type B... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  18. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... capable of withstanding the following tests: (1) Free drop test. The packaging specimen must drop onto the... lowest part of the packaging specimen to the upper surface of the target must be 9 m (30 feet) or...

  19. Measuring the Real Fracture Toughness of Ceramics: ASTM C 1421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Quinn, George; Jenkins, Michael

    ASTM C 1421 "Standard Test Methods for Determination of Fracture Toughness of Advanced Ceramics at Ambient Temperature" is a high-quality, technicallyrigorous, full-consensus standard that may have finally answered the question, "What is the 'real' fracture toughness of ceramics?" This document was eight years in the actual standardization process (although an estimated two decades of preparation work may have preceded the actual standardization process). Three different types of notch/crack geometries are employed in flexure beams: single edge precracked beam (SEPB); chevron-notched beam (CNB), and surface crack in flexure (SCF). Extensive experimental, analytical, and numerical evaluations were conducted in order to mitigate interferences that frequently lower the accuracy of fracture toughness test results. Several round robins (e.g. Versailles Advanced Materials and Standards {VAMAS}) verified and validated the choice of dimensions and test parameters included in the standard. In addition, the standard reference material NIST SRM 2100 was developed and can be used in concert with ASTM C 1421 to validate a fracture toughness test setup or test protocol.

  20. Upgrading UNLV's ASTM E477 test facility to meet the current requirements of ASTM E477

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojas, Ronn Reinier

    A by-product of Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is noise that is produced by fans, compressors, and other related equipments and the noises from the turbulence that is created by moving air. Sometimes, it is impractical to modify the sources of the noise, which requires designers to modify the path of the noise, the duct system. These modifications might include installing an in-duct silencer or acoustical lining on the inside walls of the ducts. The testing and the precise quantification of the performance of these silencers and duct linings are necessary for any designer to be able to make the correct modifications to the ventilation system. The ASTM E477 code calls for strict standardization of the testing of such noise attenuation devices. The ASTM E477 test facility used by the Center for Mechanical & Environmental Systems Technology (CMEST) at UNLV was first constructed in 1991 and required upgrades to meet the newer revisions of the ASTM code. This study includes making modifications to the facility (1) to increase sound input, (2) reduce sound leakage, and (3) to integrate the measurement systems. These upgrades will bring the facility into compliance with the current version of the ASTM E477 test standard.

  1. Comparison of attrition test methods: ASTM standard fluidized bed vs jet cup

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, R.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.; Jothimurugesan, K.; Spivey, J.J.; Gangwal, S.K.

    2000-05-01

    Attrition resistance is one of the key design parameters for catalysts used in fluidized-bed and slurry phase types of reactors. The ASTM fluidized-bed test has been one of the most commonly used attrition resistance evaluation methods; however, it requires the use of 50 g samples--a large amount for catalyst development studies. Recently a test using the jet cup requiring only 5 g samples has been proposed. In the present study, two series of spray-dried iron catalysts were evaluated using both the ASTM fluidized-bed test and a test based on the jet cup to determine this comparability. It is shown that the two tests give comparable results. This paper, by reporting a comparison of the jet-cup test with the ASTM standard, provides a basis for utilizing the more efficient jet cup with confidence in catalyst attrition studies.

  2. ASTM standardization of electrochemical noise measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, J.R.; Eden, D.A.; Yaffe, M.R.; Fahey, J.V.; Reichert, D.L.; Silverman, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    The increased utilization of electrochemical noise measurement in corrosion research and industrial process monitoring prompted the formation in 1991 of an ASTM Task Group within the G1 Corrosion of Metals Committee. The scope of the task group was to develop standards that describe instruments and methods for making and analyzing electrochemical noise measurements. Task group activities are focused exclusively on measurements to be made in the laboratory. The initial goal has been to develop consensus on: (a) terminology, (b) specifications and configurations for laboratory instrumentation, (c) laboratory apparatus, and (d) data analysis methods. A round robin was also organized to develop a body of data on different material/environment systems using a variety of instrument configurations and data analysis techniques. A guide for making valid electrochemical noise results is being prepared based on the round robin results. The status of the effort to address these and other standardization issues within the ASTM G1.11.04 Task Group on Electrochemical Noise Measurement will be presented.

  3. Specificity of neomycin analogues bound to the packaging region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA.

    PubMed

    McPike, Mark P; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2004-04-15

    The packaging region of HIV-1 RNA contains a number of structural features which are important in the life cycle of the virus, making this segment of RNA a potential target for new types of AIDS-directed drugs. We studied the binding of three neomycin analogues (neo-guanidino, neo-acridine, and neo-neo) to a 171-mer RNA molecule from the packaging region of HIV-1 using quantitative footprinting and circular dichroism. Neo-guanidino produced footprinting patterns and effects on the CD similar to those observed for neomycin and paromomycin, indicating that all three compounds bind to the same regions of the 171-mer. Neo-guanidino binds to SL 1 where it joins the large internal loop, near a bulge in the stem of SL 1, and on SL 2. Neo-acridine, which has an acridine attached to neomycin, and neo-neo, which has two neomycins linked by a flexible tether, bind bivalently, and give very different footprinting and CD results from the other compounds. The neomycin portion of neo-acridine binds to the same sites as neomycin, while the attached acridine group appears to bind to a duplex region in the main stem of the folded 171-mer. Since the footprinting data for this analogue show few enhancements, bivalent binding of neo-acridine appears to stabilize the folded structure of RNA by effectively 'stapling' parts of the structure together. Neo-neo induces significant structural changes in RNA where neomycin binds. This may be related to the inability of both neomycins of neo-neo it find optimal binding sites adjacent to one another without changing RNA structure. The intensity of a strong negative CD band in the spectrum of psi-RNA at 208 nm is sensitive to drug-induced changes in RNA structure. Neo-guanidino and neo-neo (also neomycin and paromomycin), which change RNA structure, cause an increase in intensity while neo-acridine, which induces little distortion to RNA, causes a decrease in intensity. Molecular modeling analysis shows that C-5' of ribose of neo-acridine and neo

  4. Pressure Build-Up During the Fire Test in Type B(U) Packages Containing Water - 13280

    SciTech Connect

    Feldkamp, Martin; Nehrig, Marko; Bletzer, Claus; Wille, Frank

    2013-07-01

    The safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials with content containing liquids requires special consideration. The main focus is on water as supplementary liquid content in Type B(U) packages. A typical content of a Type B(U) package is ion exchange resin, waste of a nuclear power plant, which is not dried, normally only drained. Besides the saturated ion exchange resin, a small amount of free water can be included in these contents. Compared to the safety assessment of packages with dry content, attention must be paid to some more specific issues. An overview of these issues is provided. The physical and chemical compatibility of the content itself and the content compatibility with the packages materials must be demonstrated for the assessment. Regarding the mechanical resistance the package has to withstand the forces resulting from the freezing liquid. The most interesting point, however, is the pressure build-up inside the package due to vaporization. This could for example be caused by radiolysis of the liquid and must be taken into account for the storage period. If the package is stressed by the total inner pressure, this pressure leads to mechanical loads to the package body, the lid and the lid bolts. Thus, the pressure is the driving force on the gasket system regarding the activity release and a possible loss of tightness. The total pressure in any calculation is the sum of partial pressures of different gases which can be caused by different effects. The pressure build-up inside the package caused by the regulatory thermal test (30 min at 800 deg. C), as part of the cumulative test scenario under accident conditions of transport is discussed primarily. To determine the pressure, the temperature distribution in the content must be calculated for the whole period from beginning of the thermal test until cooling-down. In this case, while calculating the temperature distribution, conduction and radiation as well as evaporation

  5. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. PMID:23434738

  6. 10 CFR 71.51 - Additional requirements for Type B packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 71.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE... substantial reduction in the effectiveness of the packaging; and (2) Section 71.73 (“Hypothetical accident..., except that for Krypton-85, an effective A2 value equal to 10 A2 may be used. (c) Compliance with...

  7. Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Part 23: Water; Atmospheric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.

    Standards for water and atmospheric analysis are compiled in this segment, Part 23, of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) annual book of standards. It contains all current formally approved ASTM standard and tentative test methods, definitions, recommended practices, proposed methods, classifications, and specifications. One…

  8. NOTE: Practical and dosimetric implications of a new type of packaging for radiographic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, S.; DeWagter, C.

    2005-04-01

    Recently, Kodak introduced new light-tight packages (vacuum packaging, aluminium layer under black polyethylene and different paper) for their oncology films (EDR-2, X-Omat V and PPL-2). In order to avoid additional uncertainty and to ensure transferability of previously published results, we assessed in this study the effect of the old and new packages on the dosimetric response of EDR-2 radiographic film. Therefore, sensitometric measurements were performed for different film assemblies (new envelope + new paper, old envelope + old paper, new envelope without paper and old envelope without paper). In addition, to assess possible effects of the package on the film depth dose response, packaged films were irradiated in parallel geometry, and central depth dose curves were retrieved. For the perpendicular geometry, on the other hand, the effect of the package was assessed at large depth for a high intensity-modulated inverse-pyramid beam. The results of the sensitometric measurements reveal no difference between the packages. However, the white colour of the paper in both the packages induces a dose-dependent increase in optical density (0 0.12) of the film. The depth dose curves show better reproducibility for the new package and the new paper improves the accuracy of film dosimetry, but despite the company's effort to evacuate the air out of the new envelope, it remains necessary to clamp the films in the phantom for the parallel irradiation geometry. At 5 cm depth, the films irradiated in parallel geometry show an under-response of 3 5% compared to films irradiated perpendicularly. Finally, even at locations of large photon scatter, no filtration effect from the aluminium layer incorporated in the new envelope has been observed for perpendicular irradiation geometry.

  9. Pyrolysis behavior of different type of materials contained in the rejects of packaging waste sorting plants

    SciTech Connect

    Adrados, A.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of materials in the pyrolysis of real plastic waste samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inorganic compounds remain unaltered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components give rise to an increase in char formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components promote the production of aqueous phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components increase CO and CO{sub 2} contents in the gases. - Abstract: In this paper rejected streams coming from a waste packaging material recovery facility have been characterized and separated into families of products of similar nature in order to determine the influence of different types of ingredients in the products obtained in the pyrolysis process. The pyrolysis experiments have been carried out in a non-stirred batch 3.5 dm{sup 3} reactor, swept with 1 L min{sup -1} N{sub 2}, at 500 Degree-Sign C for 30 min. Pyrolysis liquids are composed of an organic phase and an aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is greater as higher is the cellulosic material content in the sample. The organic phase contains valuable chemicals as styrene, ethylbenzene and toluene, and has high heating value (HHV) (33-40 MJ kg{sup -1}). Therefore they could be used as alternative fuels for heat and power generation and as a source of valuable chemicals. Pyrolysis gases are mainly composed of hydrocarbons but contain high amounts of CO and CO{sub 2}; their HHV is in the range of 18-46 MJ kg{sup -1}. The amount of CO-CO{sub 2} increases, and consequently HHV decreases as higher is the cellulosic content of the waste. Pyrolysis solids are mainly composed of inorganics and char formed in the process. The cellulosic materials lower the quality of the pyrolysis liquids and gases, and increase the production of char.

  10. ASTM standards in radiological decontamination and decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Meservey, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Subcommittee E10.03 was formed following a steering committee meeting held in April 1980. The meeting was initiated as a result of labor union concern for the safety of workers on decommissioning projects. Of particular concern at that time was the need for proper training of the workers and a means of tracking worker radiation-exposure records as they traveled to various decommissioning job sites. The steering committee concluded not only that worker protection standards were necessary for decommissioning activities but also that all phases of a decommissioning project could benefit from the appropriate guides or standards. These would provide worker protection, technical guidance, and consistency for decommissioning work. It recommended that Subcommittee E10.03 be formed and dedicated to the preparation of guides and standards that would support all phases of nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning. Subcommittee E10.03 has met regularly on a semiannual basis since that time.

  11. Effect of different types of plastic packaging films on the moisture and aflatoxin contents of pistachio nuts during storage.

    PubMed

    Shakerardekani, Ahmad; Karim, Roselina

    2013-04-01

    Pistachio nut (Pistacia vera L.) is one of the popular tree nuts in the world. Proper selection of packaging materials is necessary to prevent absorption of moisture and aflatoxin formation which will influence the overall product quality and safety. This research is undertaken to study the effect of different type of flexible packaging films on the moisture and aflatoxin contents of whole pistachio nuts during storage at ambient temperature (22-28 °C) and relative humidity of 85-100%. Five types of plastic films tested were low density polyethylene (LDPE) which serves as the control, food-grade polyvinyl chloride (PVC), nylon (LDPE/PA), polyamide/polypropylene (PA/PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The moisture content and aflatoxin content of pistachio nuts were measured using oven drying method and HPLC, respectively. Sample were analysed at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 months during the storage period. Results showed that there was an increase in moisture content with the increase in storage time of pistachio nuts. The increase in moisture content was associated with the aflatoxin level of pistachio nuts during storage time. All the packaging materials except LDPE delayed the moisture absorption and aflatoxin formation of the product. The most suitable packaging materials for maintaining the quality and safety of pistachio nuts is PET films followed by nylon, PA/PP and PVC. The shelf-life of pistachio can be extended from 2 months (Control) to 5 months when PET is used as the packaging material. PMID:24425936

  12. ASTM assessment standards garner nods, some warnings from information vendors

    SciTech Connect

    Prickett, D.S. )

    1993-08-01

    The American Society for Testing of Materials ASTM; (Philadelphia) early this year adopted standards for Phase I real estate site assessments. Many in the real estate, banking and lending communities have welcomed the standards as a partial solution to uncertainties associated with environmental due diligence requirements under CERCLA. Some, however, view the standards as minimum criteria for exercising due diligence, rather than a panacea for potential CERCLA liability problems. The author discusses the new standards with a descriptive statement prepared by ASTM, two essentially favorable views on the ASTM criteria and a cautionary statement about use of the standards in practice.

  13. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... capable of withstanding the following tests: (1) Free drop test. The packaging specimen must drop onto the target so as to suffer the maximum damage to its containment. The height of the drop measured from the... subjected to the test specified in § 173.465(e) except that the height of the drop must be 1.7 m (5.5...

  14. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... capable of withstanding the following tests: (1) Free drop test. The packaging specimen must drop onto the target so as to suffer the maximum damage to its containment. The height of the drop measured from the... subjected to the test specified in § 173.465(e) except that the height of the drop must be 1.7 m (5.5...

  15. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... capable of withstanding the following tests: (1) Free drop test. The packaging specimen must drop onto the target so as to suffer the maximum damage to its containment. The height of the drop measured from the... subjected to the test specified in § 173.465(e) except that the height of the drop must be 1.7 m (5.5...

  16. Standards activity for contamination control at ASTM and IEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jack T.

    2014-09-01

    The paper will discuss recent work at ASTM and IEST to update existing standards and introduce new standards. Committee work on standards of interest to contamination control engineers will be discussed. IEST-STD-CC1246E was released in the last year, and changes from revision D will be highlighted. A new ASTM Standard Practice for Spacecraft Hardware Thermal Vacuum Bakeout will also be emphasized.

  17. Standard radiographic examination for soundness of welds in steel by comparison to graded ASTM E 390 reference radiographs. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This radiograph is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-7 on Nondestructive Testing and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee E07.02 on Reference Radiological Images. Current edition approved May 10, 1998 and published September 1998.

  18. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  19. The requirement of the DEAD-box protein DDX24 for the packaging of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jing; Rong Liwei; Zhou Yongdong; Roy, Bibhuti Bushan; Lu, Jennifer; Abrahamyan, Levon; Mouland, Andrew J.; Pan Qinghua; Chen Liang

    2008-05-25

    RNA helicases play important roles in RNA metabolism. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) does not carry its own RNA helicase, the virus thus needs to exploit cellular RNA helicases to promote the replication of its RNA at various steps such as transcription, folding and transport. In this study, we report that knockdown of a DEAD-box protein named DDX24 inhibits the packaging of HIV-1 RNA and thus diminishes viral infectivity. The decreased viral RNA packaging as a result of DDX24-knockdown is observed only in the context of the Rev/RRE (Rev response element)-dependent but not the CTE (constitutive transport element)-mediated nuclear export of viral RNA, which is explained by the specific interaction of DDX24 with the Rev protein. We propose that DDX24 acts at the early phase of HIV-1 RNA metabolism prior to nuclear export and the consequence of this action extends to the viral RNA packaging stage during virus assembly.

  20. CAFE: A Computer Tool for Accurate Simulation of the Regulatory Pool Fire Environment for Type B Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, L.A.; Koski, J.A.; Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1999-03-16

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment computer code (CAFE) is intended to provide Type B package designers with an enhanced engulfing fire boundary condition when combined with the PATRAN/P-Thermal commercial code. Historically an engulfing fire boundary condition has been modeled as {sigma}T{sup 4} where {sigma} is the Stefan-Boltzman constant, and T is the fire temperature. The CAFE code includes the necessary chemistry, thermal radiation, and fluid mechanics to model an engulfing fire. Effects included are the local cooling of gases that form a protective boundary layer that reduces the incoming radiant heat flux to values lower than expected from a simple {sigma}T{sup 4} model. In addition, the effect of object shape on mixing that may increase the local fire temperature is included. Both high and low temperature regions that depend upon the local availability of oxygen are also calculated. Thus the competing effects that can both increase and decrease the local values of radiant heat flux are included in a reamer that is not predictable a-priori. The CAFE package consists of a group of computer subroutines that can be linked to workstation-based thermal analysis codes in order to predict package performance during regulatory and other accident fire scenarios.

  1. Vacuum decay container/closure integrity testing technology. Part 1. ASTM F2338-09 precision and bias studies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Heinz; Stauffer, Tony; Chen, Shu-Chen Y; Lee, Yoojin; Forster, Ronald; Ludzinski, Miron; Kamat, Madhav; Godorov, Phillip; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2009-01-01

    ASTM F2338-09 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Detection of Leaks in Packages by Vacuum Decay Method is applicable for leak-testing rigid and semi-rigid non-lidded trays; trays or cups sealed with porous barrier lidding materials; rigid, nonporous packages; and flexible, nonporous packages. Part 1 of this series describes the precision and bias studies performed in 2008 to expand this method's scope to include rigid, nonporous packages completely or partially filled with liquid. Round robin tests using three VeriPac 325/LV vacuum decay leak testers (Packaging Technologies & Inspection, LLC, Tuckahoe, NY) were performed at three test sites. Test packages were 1-mL glass syringes. Positive controls had laser-drilled holes in the barrel ranging from about 5 to 15 microm in nominal diameter. Two different leak tests methods were performed at each site: a "gas leak test" performed at 250 mbar (absolute) and a "liquid leak test" performed at about 1 mbar (absolute). The gas leak test was used to test empty, air-filled syringes. All defects with holes > or = 5.0 microm and all no-defect controls were correctly identified. The only false negative result was attributed to a single syringe with a < 5.0-microm hole. Tests performed using a calibrated air leak supported a 0.10-cm3 x min(-1) (ccm) sensitivity limit (99/99 lower tolerance limit). The liquid leak test was used to test both empty, air-filled syringes and water-filled syringes. Test results were 100% accurate for all empty and water-filled syringes, both without holes and with holes (5, 10, and 15 microm). Tests performed using calibrated air flow leaks of 0, 0.05, and 0.10 ccm were also 100% accurate; data supported a 0.10-ccm sensitivity limit (99/99 lower tolerance limit). Quantitative differential pressure results strongly correlated to hole size using either liquid or gas vacuum decay leak tests. The higher vacuum liquid leak test gave noticeably higher pressure readings when water was present in the

  2. Safety analysis report for packaging for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TRA Type 1 Shipping Container and TRA Type 2 Shipping Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Havlovick, B.J.

    1992-07-27

    The TRA Type I Shipping Container and TRA Type II Shipping Capsule were designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as special form containers for the transport of non-fissile radioisotopes and fissile radioisotopes in exempt quantities. The Type I container measures 0.75 in. outside diameter and 3.000 in long. The Type II capsule is 0.495 in. outside diameter 2.000 in. long. The container and capsule were tested and evaluated to determine their compliance with Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations 173, which governs packages for special form radioactive material. This report is based upon those tests and evaluations. The results of those tests and evaluations demonstrate the container and capsule are in full compliance with the special form shipping container regulations of 49 CFR 173.

  3. ASTM standards help corporate real estate executives manage environmental information

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M.J.; McCarter, B.J. )

    1993-09-01

    The American Society for Testing of Materials (ASTM; Philadelphia) new environmental due diligence standards assist executives in supporting environmental risk management procedures. ASTM standards help clarify environmental due diligence procedures for real estate transactions. These standards are being accepted by firms nationwide. The transaction screen and the Phase I environmental site assessment comprise the ASTM standards, and incorporate reviews of government environmental databases. The transaction screen, often called a pre-Phase I or Phase Zero, is an information-gathering process consisting of a questionnaire completed by a knowledgeable party, a nontechnical site inspection and a review of government environmental records. A limited historical investigation of fire insurance maps or contact with the local fire marshal, who typically maintains records of leaking USTs, is included. Emphasis on information review helps corporate real estate executives maintain organized information gathering an analysis systems.

  4. ANTS — a simulation package for secondary scintillation Anger-camera type detector in thermal neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2012-08-01

    A custom and fully interactive simulation package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations) has been developed to optimize the design and operation conditions of secondary scintillation Anger-camera type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging. The simulation code accounts for all physical processes related to the neutron capture, energy deposition pattern, drift of electrons of the primary ionization and secondary scintillation. The photons are traced considering the wavelength-resolved refraction and transmission of the output window. Photo-detection accounts for the wavelength-resolved quantum efficiency, angular response, area sensitivity, gain and single-photoelectron spectra of the photomultipliers (PMTs). The package allows for several geometrical shapes of the PMT photocathode (round, hexagonal and square) and offers a flexible PMT array configuration: up to 100 PMTs in a custom arrangement with the square or hexagonal packing. Several read-out patterns of the PMT array are implemented. Reconstruction of the neutron capture position (projection on the plane of the light emission) is performed using the center of gravity, maximum likelihood or weighted least squares algorithm. Simulation results reproduce well the preliminary results obtained with a small-scale detector prototype. ANTS executables can be downloaded from http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/.

  5. Image analysis of corrosion pit initiation on ASTM type A240 stainless steel and ASTM type A 1008 carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nine, H. M. Zulker

    The adversity of metallic corrosion is of growing concern to industrial engineers and scientists. Corrosion attacks metal surface and causes structural as well as direct and indirect economic losses. Multiple corrosion monitoring tools are available although those are time-consuming and costly. Due to the availability of image capturing devices in today's world, image based corrosion control technique is a unique innovation. By setting up stainless steel SS 304 and low carbon steel QD 1008 panels in distilled water, half-saturated sodium chloride and saturated sodium chloride solutions and subsequent RGB image analysis in Matlab, in this research, a simple and cost-effective corrosion measurement tool has identified and investigated. Additionally, the open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results have been compared with RGB analysis to gratify the corrosion. Additionally, to understand the importance of ambiguity in crisis communication, the communication process between Union Carbide and Indian Government regarding the Bhopal incident in 1984 was analyzed.

  6. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haydary, J.; Susa, D.; Dudáš, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  7. Nautilus: a bioinformatics package for the analysis of HIV type 1 targeted deep sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Kijak, Gustavo H; Pham, Phuc; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Harbolick, Elizabeth A; Eller, Leigh Anne; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-10-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing technologies is providing new insight into HIV-1 diversity and evolution, which has created the need for bioinformatics tools that could be applied to the characterization of viral quasispecies. Here we present Nautilus, a bioinformatics package for the analysis of HIV-1 targeted deep sequencing data. The DeepHaplo module determines the nucleotide base frequency and read depth at each position and computes the haplotype frequencies based on the linkage among polymorphisms in the same next generation sequence read. The Motifs module computes the frequency of the variants in the setting of their sequence context and mapping orientation, which allows for the validation of polymorphisms and haplotypes when strand bias is suspected. Both modules are accessed through a user-friendly GUI, which runs on Mac OS X (version 10.7.4 or later), and are based on Python, JAVA, and R scripts. Nautilus is available from www.hivresearch.org/research.php?ServiceID=5&SubServiceID=6 . PMID:23809062

  8. High density packaging technology ultra thin package & new tab package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Shimamoto, Haruo; Ueda, Tetsuya; Shimomura, Kou; Hata, Tsutomu; Tachikawa, Toru; Fukushima, Jiro; Banjo, Toshinobu; Yamamoto, Isamu

    1989-09-01

    As electronic devices become more highly integrated, the demand for small, high pin count packages has been increasing. We have developed two new types of IC packages in response to this demand. One is an ultra thin small outline package (TSOP) which has been reduced in size from the standard SOP and the other, which uses Tape Automated Bonding (TAB) technology, is a super thin, high pin count TAB in cap (T.I.C.) package. In this paper, we present these packages and their features along with the technologies used to improve package reliability and TAB. Thin packages are vulnerable to high humidity exposure, especially after heat shock.1 The following items were therefore investigated in order to improve humidity resistance: (1) The molding compound thermal stress, (2) Water absorption into the molding compound and its effect on package cracking during solder dipping, (3) Chip attach pad area and its affect on package cracking, (4) Adhesion between molding resin and chip attach pad and its affect on humidity resistance. With the improvements made as a result of these investigations, the reliability of the new thin packages is similar to that of the standard thicker plastic packages.

  9. Standard specification for carbon and alloy steel nuts. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-16 on Fasteners and is the responsibility of Subcommittee F16.02 on Steel Bolts, Nuts, Rivets, and Washers. Current edition approved Dec. 10, 1997. Published July 1998. Originally published as A 563-66. Last previous edition A 563-96.

  10. Standard specification for nuclear grade hafnium oxide pellets. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.03 on Neutron Absorber Materials Specifications. Current edition approved May 10, 1997. Published May 1998. Originally published as C 1076-87. Last previous edition C 1076-92.

  11. Standard specification for glass fiber felt thermal insulation. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-01-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C16.23 on Blanket and Loose Fill Insulation. Current edition approved Dec. 10, 1996. Published January 1997. Originally published as C 1086-87. Last previous edition was C 1086-90a.

  12. Standard classification of coals by rank. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This classification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-5 on Coal and Coke and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D05.18 on Classification of Coals. The current edition was approved on Sep. 10, 1998. It was published in November 1998. It was originally published as D 388-34T. The last previous edition D 388-98.

  13. Standard specification for nickel alloy forgings. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Dec. 10, 1997. Published March 1998. Originally published as B 564-72. Last previous edition B 564-97.

  14. Standard classification for rubber compounding materials -- ground coal. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    This classification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-11 Rubber and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D11.20 on Compounding Materials and Procedures. The current edition was approved on Mar. 15, 1993. It was published in May 1993. It was reapproved 1998.

  15. Standard specification for nickel-molybdenum alloy rod. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 335-58T. Last previous edition was B 335-95.

  16. Standard specification for nuclear grade zirconium oxide pellets. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.03 on Neutron Absorber Materials Specifications. Current edition approved May 10, 1997. Published May 1998. Originally published as C 1066-86. Last previous edition C 1066-92.

  17. Standard specification for UNS N08367 welded tube. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 676-80. Last previous edition was B 676-96.

  18. Standard specification for castings, nickel and nickel alloy. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1998. Published November 1998. Originally published as B 332-58T. Redesignated as A 494 in 1963. Last previous edition A 494/A 494M-94.

  19. Nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloy rod. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997. Published February 1998. Originally published as B581-73. Last previous edition B581-93.

  20. HACCP: Integrating Science and Management through ASTM Standards

    EPA Science Inventory

    From a technical perspective, hazard analysis-critical control point (HACCP) evaluation may be considered a risk management tool suited to a wide range of applications. As one outcome of a symposium convened by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) in August, 2005, th...

  1. Self-Enhanced Ultrasensitive Photoelectrochemical Biosensor Based on Nanocapsule Packaging Both Donor-Acceptor-Type Photoactive Material and Its Sensitizer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying-Ning; Liang, Wen-Bin; Xiong, Cheng-Yi; Yuan, Ya-Li; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a self-enhanced ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor was established based on a functionalized nanocapsule packaging both donor-acceptor-type photoactive material and its sensitizer. The functionalized nanocapsule with self-enhanced PEC responses was achieved first by packaging both the donor-acceptor-type photoactive material (poly{4,8-bis[5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-4,6-diyl}, PTB7-Th) and its sensitizer (nano-C60, fullerene) in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to form a nanocapsule, which significantly enhanced PEC signal and stability of the PEC biosensor. Moreover, a quadratic enzymes-assisted target recycling amplification strategy was introduced to the system for ultrasensitive determination. Compared with other established PEC biosensors, our proposed self-enhanced approach showed higher effectivity, accuracy, sensitivity, and convenience without any addition of coreactant or sensitizers into the testing electrolyte for photocurrent amplification and performed excellent analytical properties for microRNA estimation down to femtomole level with microRNA-141 as a model. Additionally, the proposed PEC biosensor was employed for estimation of microRNA in different cancer cells and pharmacodynamic evaluation in cancer cells. This self-enhanced PEC strategy has laid the foundation for fabrication of simple, effective, and ultrasensitive PEC diagnostic devices, leading to the possibility for early diagnosis, timely stage estimation, and accurate prognosis judgment of disease. PMID:27513736

  2. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition.

    PubMed

    Haydary, J; Susa, D; Dudáš, J

    2013-05-01

    Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work. PMID:23428565

  3. Effect of forage and retail packaging types on meat quality of long-term chilled lamb loins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H B; Stuart, A; Rosenvold, K; Maclennan, G

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of different forage regimes and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) systems [high oxygen (HiOx-MAP): 80% O2 and 20% CO2; and CO2-MAP: 20% CO2 and 80% N2] on color and lipid oxidation stability and sensory attributes of long-term chilled lamb loins during retail display. Lambs (n = 124) were randomly assigned to several pasture-feeding regimes for 12 wk before slaughter. Some had ryegrass (n = 18), lucerne (n = 18), chicory (n = 19), plantain (n = 16), or red clover (Clover 12; n = 17) for all 12 wk. Some were assigned a regime of red clover for 11 wk and pasture for 1 wk (Clover 11; n = 18), with others on red clover for 9 wk and pasture for 3 wk (Clover 9; n = 18). After the lambs were slaughtered, the paired loins (M. longissimus dorsi) were excised at 24 h postmortem, vacuum-packed and stored at -1.5 °C for 9 wk. Cuts were then made from each loin and randomly allocated to either HiOx-MAP or CO2-MAP, and displayed for 7 d at 4 °C under light. Chemical attributes including lipid oxidation, surface color-reversing ability, oxygen consumption, and meat quality attributes (color stability and sensory characteristics) were determined. Among the different forage types, the loins from lambs finished on ryegrass appeared to have greater color stability and less lipid oxidation than the loins from lambs finished on other forage types (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the loins from lambs finished on lucerne had the least color and lipid oxidation stabilities and least color-reversing ability (P < 0.05). The loins from lambs finished on chicory had higher aroma and flavor scores than other pasture types in general (P < 0.05). HiOx-MAP negatively influenced meat quality attributes of lamb loins during display, as substantial increases in surface discoloration and lipid oxidation were observed, along with significant decreases in aroma and flavor during retail display compared with the loins in CO2-MAP. These results

  4. The development of ASTM standards for metallographic preparation practices of thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, G.A.; Diaz, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The primary objective of metallographic examinations of thermally sprayed coatings is to reveal the constituents and structure of the coatings and substrates by means of the microscope after proper metallographic preparation is performed. Because of the diversity of coating types and the personal element, the standardization of metallographic preparation of thermally sprayed coatings is essential. An ASTM subcommittee was formed with the support of the ASM Thermal Spray Committee to provide the laboratories involved in coating characterization with guidelines that will provide consistent metallographic procedures that produce an accurate evaluation of the wide range of thermally sprayed coatings. The methods used to establish this standard will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Composition of incipient passivating layers on heat-rejecting aluminum in carboxylate- and silicate-inhibited coolants: Correlation with ASTM D 4340 weight losses

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.T.; Moylan, T.E.; Simko, S.J.; Militello, M.C.

    1999-08-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy identified compositional differences between passivating layers initially formed in carboxylated coolants, in silicated coolants, and in a mixture thereof on well-controlled 319 aluminum surfaces under heat-rejecting conditions. The layer formed in silicated coolant was primarily silica, while that in carboxylated coolant was primarily hydrated alumina. Competition between inhibitor packages when carboxylated coolant was contaminated from the start with low levels of silicated coolant produced films which were not simply patchwise mixtures of the pure-coolant film types. The surface analytical results aid the interpretation of subtle differences in weight losses under the ASTM Standard Test Method for Corrosion of Cast Aluminum Alloys in Engine Coolants Under Heat-Rejecting Conditions (D 4340) in carboxylated versus silicated coolants that became more pronounced when testing was carried out at a vehicle-like 50% coolant concentration. Results from time-resolved D4340 measurements and from a two-step cleaning procedure further contribute towards proper evaluation of D4340 weight losses in the different coolant types.

  6. An analysis of the consequences of accidents involving shipments of multiple Type A radioactive material (RAM) packages

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, N.C.; McClure, J.D.; Reardon, P.C.; Wangler, M.

    1989-01-01

    Comparing the results of the RADTRANIII calculations with a normalized set of results, both for incident-free transport and vehicular accident cases, the calculated consequences in the current analysis are lower. Even for the High-Activity Shipment, the total expected population dose from either incident-free transport or vehicular accidents is small, and smaller than that estimated in USNRC 1977. The results of the simulation in which parameters were varied randomly and independently indicate that, regardless of the input values assumed, the maximum total population dose from the High-Activity Shipment and the simultaneous occurrence of the least conservative value for each input parameter might be as high as 300 person-rem for a single shipment. The values for either of the other shipments (DOT Exemption or Common Carrier) would be significantly lower. The potential average individual radiation doses from accidents involving multiple Type A package shipments are comparable to the increase in the normal background radiation dose of 0.09 rem/person/year (90 mrem) that an individual would receive by moving from sea level to 5000 ft elevation. The maximum dose to an individual (one very near the accident scene) for the High Activity Shipment would be approximately 0.3 rem (300 mrem) in a maximum severity accident. This is within the individual dose guidelines outlined by NCRP (0.5 rem). Even at the high levels postulated for multiple package shipments under DOT controlled exemptions, the potential risks to the public in terms of expected population dose in the current analysis are below those already found to be acceptable. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 replication and packaging is entirely supported by a herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon expressing Rep and Cap.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, J E; Zolotukhin, S; Muzyczka, N; Hayward, G S; Byrne, B J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 (rAAV) vectors have recently been shown to have great utility as gene transfer agents both in vitro and in vivo. One of the problems associated with the use of rAAV vectors has been the difficulty of large-scale vector production. Low-efficiency plasmid transfection of the rAAV vector and complementing AAV type 2 (AAV-2) functions (rep and cap) followed by superinfection with adenovirus has been the standard approach to rAAV production. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the ability of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon expressing AAV-2 Rep and Cap to support replication and packaging of rAAV vectors. HSV-1 amplicon vectors were constructed which contain the AAV-2 rep and cap genes under control of their native promoters (p5, p19, and p40). An HSV-1 amplicon vector, HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27, was generated by supplying helper functions with either wild-type HSV-1 (KOS strain) or the ICP27-deleted mutant of HSV-1, d27-1, respectively. Replication of the amplicon stocks is not inhibited by the presence of AAV-2 Rep proteins, which highlights important differences between HSV-1 and adenovirus replication and the mechanism of providing helper function for productive AAV infection. Coinfection of rAAV and HSV-RC/KOS resulted in the replication and amplification of rAAV genomes. Similarly, rescue and replication of rAAV genomes occurred when rAAV vector plasmids were transfected into cells followed by HSV-RC/KOS infection and when two rAAV proviral cell lines were infected with HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27. Production of infectious rAAV by rescue from two rAAV proviral cell lines has also been achieved with HSV-RC/KOS and HSV-RC/d27. The particle titer of rAAV produced with HSV-RC/d27 is equal to that achieved by supplying rep and cap by transfection followed by adenovirus superinfection. Importantly, no detectable wild-type AAV-2 is generated with this approach. These results demonstrate

  8. Verification of the ASTM G-124 Purge Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Katherine E.; Davis, Samuel Eddie

    2009-01-01

    ASTM G-124 seeks to evaluate combustion characteristics of metals in high-purity (greater than 99%) oxygen atmospheres. ASTM G-124 provides the following equation to determine the minimum number of purges required to reach this level of purity in a test chamber: n = -4/log10(Pa/Ph), where "n" is the total number of purge cycles required, Ph is the absolute pressure used for the purge on each cycle and Pa is the atmospheric pressure or the vent pressure. The origin of this equation is not known and has been the source of frequent questions as to its accuracy and reliability. This paper shows the derivation of the G-124 purge equation, and experimentally explores the equation to determine if it accurately predicts the number of cycles required.

  9. Development of ASTM standards in support of advanced ceramics development

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Quinn, G.D.; McClung, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    The ASTM Committee C-28 on Advanced Ceramics was organized in 1986 when it became apparent that ceramics were being considered for extensive use in such applications as heat engines in the automotive and aerospace industries. It was determined that these standards should be written for the production, inspection, testing, data analysis, reliability, and probabilistic design for utilization of advanced ceramics. Advanced ceramics include both monolithic and composite materials. The ASTM Committee C-28 is organized into five subcommittees as follows: Properties and performance, design and evaluation, characterization and processing, ceramic composites, and nomenclature. A summary overview is given of work performed to date and ongoing efforts in developing standards by these various subcommittees.

  10. An Automated Safe-to-Mate (ASTM) Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Phuc; Scott, Michelle; Leung, Alan; Lin, Michael; Johnson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Safe-to-mate testing is a common hardware safety practice where impedance measurements are made on unpowered hardware to verify isolation, continuity, or impedance between pins of an interface connector. A computer-based instrumentation solution has been developed to resolve issues. The ASTM is connected to the circuit under test, and can then quickly, safely, and reliably safe-to-mate the entire connector, or even multiple connectors, at the same time.

  11. Corrosion potential for aluminum alloys measured by ASTM G 69

    SciTech Connect

    Burleigh, T.D. ); Bovard, F.S. ); Rennick, R.C.

    1993-08-01

    ASTM G 69, [open quotes]Standard Practice for Measurement of Corrosion Potentials of Aluminum Alloys[close quotes], is a useful method to discern the temper of a given aluminum alloy. Corrosion potentials (E[sub corr]) often can be used to differentiate between different alloys since copper or zinc in solid solution will cause significant differences in E[sub corr]. Measured E[sub corr] of various aluminum alloys and other non-aluminum metals were listed.

  12. Effects of vegetable type, package atmosphere and storage temperature on growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Francis, G A; O'Beirne, D

    2001-08-01

    The survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43888 and NCTC 12900) and Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 19114 and NCTC 11994) during storage (4 and 8 degrees C) on ready-to-use (RTU) packaged vegetables (lettuce, swedes (rutabaga), dry coleslaw mix, soybean sprouts) were studied. The vegetables were sealed within oriented polypropylene packaging film, and modified atmospheres developed in packs during storage due to produce respiration. Survival and growth patterns were dependent on vegetable type, package atmosphere, storage temperature and bacterial strain. Populations of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 increased (P<0.05, by 1.5 to 2.5 log cycles, depending on strain) during a 12-day storage period on shredded lettuce (8 degrees C). L. monocytogenes populations also increased (by approximately 1 log cycle) on packaged swedes, did not change significantly (P>0.05) in packages of soybean sprouts and decreased by approximately 1.5 log cycles (P<0.05) on coleslaw mix (8 degrees C). E. coli O157:H7 populations on packaged coleslaw and soybean sprouts increased (by 1.5 to 2.5 log cycles) up to day 5, but declined during subsequent storage (8 degrees C). On packaged swedes (8 degrees C), populations of E. coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43888 increased (by approximately 1 log cycle) during storage, whereas populations of strain 12900 increased between days 2 and 5, and declined during subsequent storage. Reducing the storage temperature from 8 to 4 degrees C reduced the growth of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 on packaged RTU vegetables. However, viable populations remained at the end of the storage period at 4 degrees C. PMID:11641769

  13. Standard practice for prediction of the long-term behavior of materials, including waste forms, used in engineered barrier systems (EBS) for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.13 on Repository Waste Package Materials Testing. The current edition was approved Dec. 10, 1997. It was published August 1998, and previously published as C 1174-91. The last previous edition was C 1174-91.

  14. Study on the influence of temperature, storage time and packaging type on di-n-butylphthalate and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate release into packed meals.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Teresa; Fasano, Evelina; Esposito, Francesco; Del Prete, Ernesto; Cocchieri, Renata Amodio

    2013-01-01

    Ready-to-eat meals packed in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and aluminium dishes, supplied to patients in two hospitals in the Campania region (Italy), were studied to evaluate the probable migration of di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) from the packaging into the food. The influence of temperature, storage time and type of package on the migration process was considered, analysing the meals according to three time ranges, before the packaging (T(0)) and after 60 min (T(1)) and 120 min (T(2)) from packaging during the storage in thermostatic delivery carts. At T(0) in the meals sampled before packaging in PET dishes, mean levels of DBP and DEHP were 0.023 ± 0.002 µg/g and 0.069 ± 0.041 µg/g, respectively; the DBP level increased 230% and that of DEHP increased 208% by time T(0) versus T(2). In the meals sampled before packaging (T(0)) in aluminium dishes, the mean levels of DBP and DEHP were 0.030 ± 0.001 µg/g and 0.057 ± 0.015 µg/g, respectively. The significant increase in contaminant levels over storage times for meals packed in PET dishes demonstrates that from packages made of plastic materials the migration of phthalic acid esters into foods is possible. In meals packed in PET dishes, the highest DBP and DEHP increases were observed in the T(0) to T(1) range, which represented the time interval over which meals were kept hot, and mainly in the first ones, where the highest temperatures have been recorded. PMID:23185971

  15. Packaged die heater

    SciTech Connect

    Spielberger, Richard; Ohme, Bruce Walker; Jensen, Ronald J.

    2011-06-21

    A heater for heating packaged die for burn-in and heat testing is described. The heater may be a ceramic-type heater with a metal filament. The heater may be incorporated into the integrated circuit package as an additional ceramic layer of the package, or may be an external heater placed in contact with the package to heat the die. Many different types of integrated circuit packages may be accommodated. The method provides increased energy efficiency for heating the die while reducing temperature stresses on testing equipment. The method allows the use of multiple heaters to heat die to different temperatures. Faulty die may be heated to weaken die attach material to facilitate removal of the die. The heater filament or a separate temperature thermistor located in the package may be used to accurately measure die temperature.

  16. ASTM International Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Carl G.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The “Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds” was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active “guide” documents for educational purposes, but that few standard “test methods” or “practices” have been published. Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions also highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Finally, dialogue emphasized the needs to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization and to assess the use and impact of standards in the TEMPs community. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus should now turn to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. PMID:25220952

  17. Recommendations for fluorescence instrument qualification: the new ASTM Standard Guide.

    PubMed

    DeRose, Paul C; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2010-03-01

    Aimed at improving quality assurance and quantitation for modern fluorescence techniques, ASTM International (ASTM) is about to release a Standard Guide for Fluorescence, reviewed here. The guide's main focus is on steady state fluorometry, for which available standards and instrument characterization procedures are discussed along with their purpose, suitability, and general instructions for use. These include the most relevant instrument properties needing qualification, such as linearity and spectral responsivity of the detection system, spectral irradiance reaching the sample, wavelength accuracy, sensitivity or limit of detection for an analyte, and day-to-day performance verification. With proper consideration of method-inherent requirements and limitations, many of these procedures and standards can be adapted to other fluorescence techniques. In addition, procedures for the determination of other relevant fluorometric quantities including fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes are briefly introduced. The guide is a clear and concise reference geared for users of fluorescence instrumentation at all levels of experience and is intended to aid in the ongoing standardization of fluorescence measurements. PMID:20136134

  18. Standard practice for handling densified articles of aluminum oxide reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-34 on Occupational Health and Safety and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee E34.70 on Single Crystal Ceramic Whiskers. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998. Published June 1998. Originally published as E 1435-91. Last previous edition E 1435-91. Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  19. Standard test method for vinyl chloride in workplace atmospheres (charcoal tube method). ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-22 on Sampling and Analysis of Atmospheres and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D22.04 on Workplace Atmospheres. Current edition approved May 10, 1998. Published July 1998. Originally published as D 4766-88. Last previous edition D 4766-88(1993). Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  20. Discussion on FRP design properties based on flexural tests (ASTM D-790) and tensile tests (ASTM D-638)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    Tensile and flexural test results on the same laminate can have significant difference with the reported flexural strength being up to 100% greater than the tensile strength using the standard ASTM reporting methods. Taken at face value, these results can lead to nonconservative designs. The flexural test method is much simpler and less expensive, but must be used with a clear understanding of how they were computed and with sound engineering judgment since the flexural strength is calculated with linear bending theory at failure loads that are usually in the nonlinear range. This is significant since the general accepted design practice is to use linear theory in the design of FRP equipment. Manufacturers reporting this value should thus have a clear understanding of the difference between the reported results for flexural strength and the required design strength. This paper shows how to determine the proper design value from a flexural test which results in safe designs of FRP equipment and shows that the reported flexural strength from the ASTM D-790 method should not be used in design of FRP equipment.

  1. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.; Louthan, M.; PNNL, B.

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  2. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K (HERV-K) Particles Package and Transmit HERV-K–Related Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Kaplan, Mark H.; Dube, Derek; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Chan, Susana; Meng, Fan; Dai, Manhong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Gitlin, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) make up 8% of the human genome. While the youngest of these retroviruses, HERV-K(HML-2), termed HK2, is able to code for all viral proteins and produce virus-like particles, it is not known if these virus particles package and transmit HK2-related sequences. Here, we analyzed the capacity of HK2 for packaging and transmitting HK2 sequences. We created an HK2 probe, termed Bogota, which can be packaged into HK2 viruses, and transfected it into cells that make HK2 particles. Supernatants of the transfected cells, which contained HK2 viral particles, then were added to target cells, and the transmissibility of the HK2 Bogota reporter was tracked by G418 resistance. Our studies revealed that contemporary HK2 virions produced by some teratocarcinoma and breast cancer cell lines, as well as by peripheral blood lymphocytes from lymphoma patients, can package HK2 Bogota probes, and these viruses transmitted these probes to other cells. After transmission, HK2 Bogota transcripts undergo reverse transcription, a step impaired by antiretroviral agents or by introduction of mutations into the probe sequences required for reverse transcription. HK2 viruses were more efficiently transmitted in the presence of HK2 Rec or HIV-1 Tat and Vif. Transmitted Bogota probes formed episomes but did not integrate into the cellular genome. Resistance to integration might explain the relatively low number of HK2 insertions that were acquired during the last 25 million years of evolution. Whether transient transmission of modern HK2 sequences, which encode two putative oncoproteins, can lead to disease remains to be studied. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses invaded the genome of human ancestors over the course of millions of years, yet these viruses generally have been inactivated during evolution, with only remnants of these infectious sequences remaining in the human genome. One of these viruses, termed HK2, still is capable of producing virus particles

  3. Interpreting the ASTM 'content standard for digital geospatial metadata'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nebert, Douglas D.

    1996-01-01

    ASTM and the Federal Geographic Data Committee have developed a content standard for spatial metadata to facilitate documentation, discovery, and retrieval of digital spatial data using vendor-independent terminology. Spatial metadata elements are identifiable quality and content characteristics of a data set that can be tied to a geographic location or area. Several Office of Management and Budget Circulars and initiatives have been issued that specify improved cataloguing of and accessibility to federal data holdings. An Executive Order further requires the use of the metadata content standard to document digital spatial data sets. Collection and reporting of spatial metadata for field investigations performed for the federal government is an anticipated requirement. This paper provides an overview of the draft spatial metadata content standard and a description of how the standard could be applied to investigations collecting spatially-referenced field data.

  4. Biocompatibility of metal injection molded versus wrought ASTM F562 (MP35N) and ASTM F1537 (CCM) cobalt alloys.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Sago, Alan; West, Shari; Farina, Jeff; Eckert, John; Broadley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparative analysis between biocompatibility test results of wrought and Metal Injection Molded (MIM) ASTM F562-02 UNS R30035 (MP35N) and F1537 UNS R31538 (CCM) alloy samples that have undergone the same generic orthopedic implant's mechanical, chemical surface pre-treatment, and a designed pre-testing sample preparation method. Because the biocompatibility properties resulting from this new MIM cobalt alloy process are not well understood, we conducted tests to evaluate cytotoxicity (in vitro), hemolysis (in vitro), toxicity effects (in vivo), tissue irritation level (in vivo), and pyrogenicity count (in vitro) on such samples. We show that our developed MIM MP35N and CCM materials and treatment processes are biocompatible, and that both the MIM and wrought samples, although somewhat different in microstructure and surface, do not show significant differences in biocompatibility. PMID:21537059

  5. Influence of package, type of apple juice and temperature on the production of patulin by Byssochlamys nivea and Byssochlamys fulva.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Simas, Rosineide Costa; Almeida, Carlos A A; Cabral, Elaine C; Rauber, Ricardo H; Mallmann, Carlos A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Rosenthal, Amauri; Massaguer, Pilar R

    2010-08-15

    Although the production of patulin in apple fruits is mainly by Penicillium expansum, there is no information on the ability of heat resistant moulds that may survive pasteurization to produce this mycotoxin in juice packages during storage and distribution. In this study, the production of patulin by Byssochlamys spp (Byssochlamys nivea FRR 4421, B. nivea ATCC 24008 and Byssochlamys fulva IOC 4518) in cloudy and clarified apple juices packaged in laminated paperboard packages or in polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET) and stored at both 21 degrees C and 30 degrees C, was investigated. The three Byssochlamys strains were able to produce patulin in both cloudy and clarified apple juices. Overall, the lower the storage temperature, the lower the patulin levels and mycelium dry weight in the apple juices (p<0.05). The greatest variations in pH and degrees Brix were observed in the juices from which the greatest mycelium dry weights were recovered. The maximum levels of patulin recovered from the juices were ca. 150 microg/kg at 21 degrees C and 220 microg/kg at 30 degrees C. HPLC-UV, HPCL-DAD and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the ability of B. fulva IOC 4518 to produce patulin. Due to the heat resistance of B. nivea and B. fulva and their ability to produce patulin either in PET bottles or in laminated paperboard packages, the control of contamination and the incidence of these fungi should be a matter of concern for food safety. Control measures taken by juice industries must also focus on controlling the ascospores of heat resistant moulds. PMID:20633943

  6. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be inspected at the Federal Communications Commission, 445... Roadside and Vehicle Systems—5 GHz Band Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) Medium Access Control... 19428-2959. Copies may also be obtained from ASTM via the Internet at http://www.astm.org....

  7. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be inspected at the Federal Communications Commission, 445... Roadside and Vehicle Systems—5 GHz Band Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) Medium Access Control... 19428-2959. Copies may also be obtained from ASTM via the Internet at http://www.astm.org....

  8. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be inspected at the Federal Communications Commission, 445... Roadside and Vehicle Systems—5 GHz Band Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) Medium Access Control... 19428-2959. Copies may also be obtained from ASTM via the Internet at http://www.astm.org....

  9. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. 95.1509 Section 95.1509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Dedicated Short-Range Communications Service On-Board Units (DSRCS-OBUs) § 95.1509 ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard....

  10. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be inspected at the Federal Communications Commission, 445... Roadside and Vehicle Systems—5 GHz Band Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) Medium Access Control... 19428-2959. Copies may also be obtained from ASTM via the Internet at http://www.astm.org....

  11. The effect of antioxidants, packaging type and frozen storage time on the quality of cooked turkey meatballs.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Tymoszczyk, Mirosława

    2014-04-01

    Oil-soluble rosemary extract (OR) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were added individually and in mixture (MIX) to raw turkey meatballs. After cooking and chilling, samples were air- and vacuum-packaged and frozen stored for 90 days. The synthetic antioxidant, the natural antioxidant and their mixture significantly decreased TBA values. Lipid oxidation was most effectively inhibited by a mixture of BHT and OR during storage in the air, and by BHT in vacuum-packaged samples. A lower rate of the hydrolytic process was observed in BHT samples. All additives stabilized the red colour of turkey meatballs, but samples with a mixture of natural and synthetic antioxidants showed higher a(∗) values than OR samples. Vacuum-packaged turkey meatballs were darker in colour, and the contribution of redness in these samples continued to increase until day 80. OR added alone or in combination with BHT maintained the quality of turkey meatballs during frozen storage, but samples with the synthetic antioxidant were characterized by a non-typical flavour after a longer time of storage. PMID:24262557

  12. Effect of closure and packaging type on 3-alkyl-2-methoxypyrazines and other impact odorants of Riesling and Cabernet Franc wines.

    PubMed

    Blake, Amy; Kotseridis, Yorgos; Brindle, Ian D; Inglis, Debbie; Sears, M; Pickering, Gary J

    2009-06-10

    3-Alkyl-2-methoxypyrazines (MPs) represent an important and potent class of grape- and insect-derived odor-active compounds associated with wine quality. Thirty nanograms per liter each of 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IPMP), and 3-sec-butyl-2-methoxypyrazine (SBMP) was added to Riesling and Cabernet Franc wines and monitored with headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry over 18 months to investigate the effects of various closure and packaging options on MPs. Changes in MP concentrations during bottle aging varied with closure/packaging option, with the greatest decrease evident in Tetrapak cartons. After 18 months, IBMP, IPMP, and SBMP in both Tetrapak-stored wines decreased by approximately 45, 32, and 26%, respectively. Similar changes were observed in other impact odorants to previous studies, including a greater decrease in odorant concentrations in wines closed with synthetic corks compared to natural corks and screw caps. These differences are thought to be due to the differential sorptive capacities of the various closure types. Overall, the data suggest that differences in gas permeability/contribution from the different closure and packaging options strongly associate with changes in wine composition during aging. PMID:19432423

  13. Preparation of ultrasound microbubbles crosslinked to albumin nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator gene plasmid and method of in vivo transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Ji; Shang-Yi, Ji; Xia, He; Wen-Ping, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Aims To observe the effect of constructed ultrasound microbubble crosslinked to albium nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) gene plasmid on the in vivo transfection. Methods The rabbits were chosen for all experiments. A highly expressive gene plasmid for tPA was constructed and packaged into a prepared nanoparticle with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This albium nanoparticle packaged with tPA gene plasmid was crosslinked to an ultrasound microbubble prepared with BSA and sucrose to form a nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene transfection. The transfection and effective expression of tPA in heart, liver, leg skeletal muscle and the cervical rib were detected with polyclonal antibodies to tPA using immunohistochemical method; the tPA level and D-dimer content of blood were also tested. Results The expression of tPA could be seen in the tissues mentioned above, with the increase in blood tPA level and D-dimer content from 0.20 ± 0.05 µg/L and 81.76 ± 9.84 µg/L before the operation, to the higher levels of 0.44 ± 0.05 µg/L and 669.28 ± 97.74 µg/L after transfection. Conclusion The nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene was contructed successfully. This provides a new theory and experimental method for the nano-targeted transgene.

  14. The fatigue-crack propagation behavior of ASTM A533-B steel tested in vacuo at LWR operating temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fatigue-crack propagation (FCP) behavior of ASTM A533-B-1 steel was characterized in vacuo at 288/sup 0/C. Tests were conducted at two stress ratios: R = 0.05 and R = 0.7. Results of these tests were compared with results from previous studies for the same type of steel tested in an air environment, and FCP rates in vacuo were generally lower than those in air. Stress ratio effects in vacuo were not as great as those in air, and both stress ratio effects and environmental effects are discussed from the standpoint of crack closure concepts.

  15. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SCmore » and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.« less

  16. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20168679

  17. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium. PMID:20454228

  18. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20203792

  19. Development of an ASTM Graphite Oxidation Test Method

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Burchell, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation behavior of graphite is of practical interest because of extended use of graphite materials in nuclear reactors. High temperature gas-cooled reactors are expected to become the nuclear reactors of the next generation. The most critical factor in their safe operation is an air-ingress accident, in which case the graphite materials in the moderator and reflector would come in contact with oxygen at a high temperature. Many results on graphite oxidation have been obtained from TGA measurements using commercial instruments, with sample sizes of a few hundred milligrams. They have demonstrated that graphite oxidation is in kinetic control regime at low temperatures, but becomes diffusion-limited at high temperatures. These effects are better understood from measurement results with large size samples, on which the shape and structural factors that control diffusion can be more clearly evidenced. An ASTM test for characterization of oxidation resistance of machined carbon and graphite materials is being developed with ORNL participation. The test recommends the use of large machined samples (~ 20 grams) in a dry air flow system. We will report on recent results and progress in this direction.

  20. 77 FR 10358 - Acceptance of ASTM F963-11 as a Mandatory Consumer Product Safety Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... ASTM F963-11 standard titled, Standard Consumer Safety Specifications for Toy Safety. Pursuant to... 110-314, made the provisions of ASTM F963-07, Standard Consumer Safety Specifications for Toy Safety... toy chests). The requirements of ASTM F963-08 became effective on August 16, 2009, except for...

  1. Scoring Package

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Scoring Package (PC database for purchase)   The NIST Scoring Package (Special Database 1) is a reference implementation of the draft Standard Method for Evaluating the Performance of Systems Intended to Recognize Hand-printed Characters from Image Data Scanned from Forms.

  2. Standard specification for steel, sheet, carbon, for pressure vessels. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.19 on Sheet Steel and Strip. Current edition approved Jun. 10, 1998. Published September 1998. Originally published as A 414-71. Last previous edition A 414/A 414M-97. Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  3. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20234423

  4. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20333088

  5. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SC and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.

  6. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20212622

  7. Guide to ASTM test methods for the analysis of coal and coke

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Kishore Nadkarni

    2008-07-01

    The guide includes brief descriptions of all 56 ASTM test methods that cover the physical, chemical, and spectroscopic analytical techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively identify over 40 chemical and physical properties of coal, coke, their products, and by-products.

  8. Proceedings of the ASTM 8th international symposium zirconium in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Swam, L.F.P.; Eucken, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the ASTM 8th international symposium on zirconium in the nuclear industry. Topics covered include: Behavior of pressure tubes, Corrosion, Nodular corrosion, Basic metallurgy, and Creep and growth.

  9. Guide for measurement of ionizing dose-rate burnout of semiconductor devices. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This guide is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-1 on Electronics and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F01.11 on Quality and Hardness Assurance. Current edition approved May 10, 1998 and published July 1998.

  10. Standard specification for centrifugally cast austenitic steel pipe for high-temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM. This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved Oct. 25, 1993. Published December 1993. Originally published as A 451-61T. Last previous edition was A 451-92. Reapproved 1997.

  11. Packaging Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frear, Darrel

    This chapter is a high-level overview of the materials used in an electronic package including: metals used as conductors in the package, ceramics and glasses used as dielectrics or insulators and polymers used as insulators and, in a composite form, as conductors. There is a need for new materials to meet the ever-changing requirements for high-speed digital and radio-frequency (RF) applications. There are different requirements for digital and RF packages that translate into the need for unique materials for each application. The interconnect and dielectric (insulating) requirements are presented for each application and the relevant materials properties and characteristics are discussed. The fundamental materials characteristics are: dielectric constant, dielectric loss, thermal and electric conductivity, resistivity, moisture absorption, glass-transition temperature, strength, time-dependent deformation (creep), and fracture toughness. The materials characteristics and properties are dependant on how they are processed to form the electronic package so the fundamentals of electronic packaging processes are discussed including wirebonding, solder interconnects, flip-chip interconnects, underfill for flip chip and overmolding. The relevant materials properties are given along with requirements (including environmentally friendly Pb-free packages) that require new materials to be developed to meet future electronics needs for both digital and RF applications.

  12. Safety Analysis Report for packaging (onsite) steel waste package

    SciTech Connect

    BOEHNKE, W.M.

    2000-07-13

    The steel waste package is used primarily for the shipment of remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Building to the 200 Area for interim storage. The steel waste package is authorized for shipment of transuranic isotopes. The maximum allowable radioactive material that is authorized is 500,000 Ci. This exceeds the highway route controlled quantity (3,000 A{sub 2}s) and is a type B packaging.

  13. Final evaluation report for Westinghouse Hanford Company, WRAP-1,208 liter waste drum, docket 94-35-7A, type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance test results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1 (WRAP-1) Drum. The WRAP-1 Drum was tested for DOE-HQ in August 1994, by Los Alamos National Laboratory, under docket number 94-35-7A. Additionally, comparison and evaluation of the approved, as-tested packaging configuration was performed by WHC in September 1995. The WRAP-1 Drum was evaluated against the performance of the DOT-17C, 208 1 (55-gal) steel drums tested and evaluated under dockets 89-13-7A/90-18-7A and 94-37-7A.

  14. Effect of plasticizer type and concentration on physical properties of biodegradable films based on sugar palm (arenga pinnata) starch for food packaging.

    PubMed

    Sanyang, M L; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, M; Ishak, M R; Sahari, J

    2016-01-01

    In this study, sugar palm starch (SPS) films were developed using glycerol (G), sorbitol (S) or their combination (GS) as plasticizers at the ratio of 15, 30 and 45 (wt)% using casting technique. The addition of plasticizers to SPS film-forming solutions helped to overcome the brittle and fragile nature of unplasticized SPS films. Increased plasticizer concentration resulted to an increase in film thickness, moisture content and solubility. On the contrary, density and water absorption of plasticized films decreased with increasing plasticizer concentration. Raising the plasticizer content from 15 to 45 % showed less effect on the moisture content and water absorption of S-plasticized films. Films containing glycerol and glycerol-sorbitol plasticizer (G, and GS) demonstrated higher moisture content, solubility and water absorption capacity compared to S-plasticized films. The results obtained in this study showed that plasticizer type and concentration significantly improves film properties and enhances their suitability for food packaging applications. PMID:26787952

  15. Packaging investigation of optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhike, Zhang; Yu, Liu; Jianguo, Liu; Ninghua, Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Compared with microelectronic packaging, optoelectronic packaging as a new packaging type has been developed rapidly and it will play an essential role in optical communication. In this paper, we try to summarize the development history, research status, technology issues and future prospects, and hope to provide a meaningful reference. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Nos. 2013AA014201, 2013AA014203) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61177080, 61335004, 61275031).

  16. Changes in use of types of tobacco products by pack sizes and price segments, prices paid and consumption following the introduction of plain packaging in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Scollo, Michelle; Zacher, Meghan; Coomber, Kerri; Bayly, Megan; Wakefield, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe changes among smokers in use of various types of tobacco products, reported prices paid and cigarette consumption following the standardisation of tobacco packaging in Australia. Methods National cross-sectional telephone surveys of adult smokers were conducted from April 2012 (6 months before transition to plain packaging (PP)) to March 2014 (15 months afterwards). Multivariable logistic regression assessed changes in products, brands and pack types/sizes; multivariable linear regression examined changes in inflation-adjusted prices paid and reported cigarette consumption between the pre-PP and three subsequent periods—the transition phase, PP year 1 and PP post-tax (post a 12.5% tax increase in December 2013). Results The proportion of current smokers using roll-your-own (RYO) products fluctuated over the study period. Proportions using value brands of factory-made (FM) cigarettes increased from pre-PP (21.4%) to PP year 1 (25.5%; p=0.002) and PP post-tax (27.8%; p<0.001). Inflation-adjusted prices paid increased in the PP year 1 and PP post-tax phases; the largest increases were among premium FM brands, the smallest among value brands. Consumption did not change in PP year 1 among daily, regular or current smokers or among smokers of brands in any market segment. Consumption among regular smokers declined significantly in PP post-tax (mean=14.0, SE=0.33) compared to PP year 1 (mean=14.8, SE=0.17; p=0.037). Conclusions Introduction of PP was associated with an increase in use of value brands, likely due to increased numbers available and smaller increases in prices for value relative to premium brands. Reported consumption declined following the December 2013 tax increase.

  17. Molding compound trends in a denser packaging world: Qualification tests and reliability concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Lo, R. H. Y.; Chen, A. S.; Belani, J. G.

    1993-12-01

    Molding compound development has traditionally been driven by the memory market, then subsequent applications filter down to other IC technologies such as logic, analog, and ASIC. However, this strategy has changed lately with the introduction of thin packages such as PQFP & TSOP. Rather than targeting a compound for a family of IC such as DRAM or SRAM, compound development efforts are now focused at specific classes of packages. The configurations of these thin packages impose new functional requirements that need to be revisited to provide the optimized combination of properties. The evolution of qualification tests mirrors the advances in epoxy and compounding technologies. From the first standard novolac-based epoxies of the 1970s to the latest 3(sup rd)-generation ultra-low stress materials, longer test times at increasingly harsher environments were achieved. This paper benchmarks the current reliability tests used by the electronic industry, examines those tests that affect and are affected by the molding compounds, discusses the relevance of accelerated testing, and addresses the major reliability issues facing current molding compound development efforts. Six compound-related reliability concerns were selected: moldability, package stresses, package cracking, halogen-induced intermetallic growth at bond pads, moisture-induced corrosion, and interfacial delamination. Causes of each failure type are surveyed and remedies are recommended. Accelerated tests are designed to apply to a limited quantity of devices, bias, or environmental conditions larger than usual ratings, to intensify failure mechanisms that would occur under normal operating conditions. The observed behavior is then extrapolated from the lot to the entire population. Emphasis is on compressing the time necessary to obtain reliability data. This approach has two main drawbacks. With increasingly complex devices, even accelerated tests are expensive. And with new technologies, it becomes

  18. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo; E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-09-15

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure.

  19. Final evaluation & test report for the standard waste box (docket 01-53-7A) type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D L

    2001-10-15

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A compliance test and evaluation results of the Standard Waste Box. Testing and evaluation activities documented herein are on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Safety, Health and Security (EM-5), Germantown, Maryland. Duratek Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations performed an evaluation of the changes as documented herein under Docket 01-53-7A.

  20. Chemical Energy: A Learning Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ita; Ben-Zvi, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive teaching/learning chemical energy package was developed to overcome conceptual/experimental difficulties and time required for calculation of enthalpy changes. The package consists of five types of activities occuring in repeated cycles: group activities, laboratory experiments, inquiry questionnaires, teacher-led class…

  1. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) concrete-lined waste packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.

    1997-09-25

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a package to ship Type A, non-transuranic, fissile excepted quantities of liquid or solid radioactive material and radioactive mixed waste to the Central Waste Complex for storage on the Hanford Site.

  2. Packaged Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    After studies found that many elderly persons don't eat adequately because they can't afford to, they have limited mobility, or they just don't bother, Innovated Foods, Inc. and JSC developed shelf-stable foods processed and packaged for home preparation with minimum effort. Various food-processing techniques and delivery systems are under study and freeze dried foods originally used for space flight are being marketed. (See 77N76140)

  3. AN ADA NAMELIST PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ada Namelist Package, developed for the Ada programming language, enables a calling program to read and write FORTRAN-style namelist files. A namelist file consists of any number of assignment statements in any order. Features of the Ada Namelist Package are: the handling of any combination of user-defined types; the ability to read vectors, matrices, and slices of vectors and matrices; the handling of mismatches between variables in the namelist file and those in the programmed list of namelist variables; and the ability to avoid searching the entire input file for each variable. The principle user benefits of this software are the following: the ability to write namelist-readable files, the ability to detect most file errors in the initialization phase, a package organization that reduces the number of instantiated units to a few packages rather than to many subprograms, a reduced number of restrictions, and an increased execution speed. The Ada Namelist reads data from an input file into variables declared within a user program. It then writes data from the user program to an output file, printer, or display. The input file contains a sequence of assignment statements in arbitrary order. The output is in namelist-readable form. There is a one-to-one correspondence between namelist I/O statements executed in the user program and variables read or written. Nevertheless, in the input file, mismatches are allowed between assignment statements in the file and the namelist read procedure statements in the user program. The Ada Namelist Package itself is non-generic. However, it has a group of nested generic packages following the nongeneric opening portion. The opening portion declares a variety of useraccessible constants, variables and subprograms. The subprograms are procedures for initializing namelists for reading, reading and writing strings. The subprograms are also functions for analyzing the content of the current dataset and diagnosing errors. Two nested

  4. IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    E. Thomas

    2005-07-14

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

  5. Romanian experience on packaging testing

    SciTech Connect

    Vieru, G.

    2007-07-01

    With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

  6. Effect of Electromigration on the Type of Drop Failure of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joints in PBGA Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. L.; Zhao, N.

    2015-10-01

    Board-level drop tests of plastic ball grid array (PBGA) packages were performed in accordance with the Joint Electron Devices Engineering Council standard to investigate the effect of electromigration (EM) on the drop reliability of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joints with two substrate surface finishes, organic solderability preservative (OSP) and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG). In the as-soldered state, drop failures occurred at the substrate sides only, with cracks propagating within the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) layer for OSP solder joints and along the IMC/Ni-P interface for ENEPIG solder joints. The drop lifetime of OSP solder joints was approximately twice that of ENEPIG joints. EM had an important effect on crack formation and drop lifetime of the PBGA solder joints. ENEPIG solder joints performed better in drop reliability tests after EM, that is, the drop lifetime of ENEPIG joints decreased by 43% whereas that of OSP solder joints decreased by 91%, compared with the as-soldered cases. The more serious polarity effect, i.e., excessive growth of the interfacial IMC at the anode, was responsible for the sharper decrease in drop lifetime. The different types of drop failure of PBGA solder joints before and after EM, including the position of initiation and the propagation path of cracks, are discussed on the basis of the growth behavior of interfacial IMC.

  7. Field data on testing of natural gas vehicle (NGV) containers using proposed ASTM standard test method for examination of gas-filled filament-wound pressure vessels using acoustic emission (ASTM-E070403-95/1)

    SciTech Connect

    Fultineer, R.D. Jr.; Mitchell, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    There are many composite wrapped pressure vessels in service. These containers are most widely used for gas storage in natural gas vehicles (NGV). A standard has been developed for the testing of these vessels by the subcommittee ASTM E07.04.03 Acoustic Emission (AE) applications. The AE test method is supported by both field test data and laboratory destructive testing. The test method describes a global volumetric testing technique which is offered as an alternative to the current practice of visual inspection.

  8. Neural biomarkers for assessing different types of imagery in pictorial health warning labels for cigarette packaging: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Norlund, Roger D; Thrasher, James F; Fridriksson, Johann; Brixius, William; Froeliger, Brett; Hammond, David; Cummings, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Objective Countries around the world have increasingly adopted pictorial health warning labels (HWLs) for tobacco packages to warn consumers about smoking-related risks. Research on how pictorial HWLs work has primarily analysed self-reported responses to HWLs; studies at the neural level comparing the brain's response to different types of HWLs may provide an important complement to prior studies, especially if self-reported responses are systematically biased. In this study we characterise the brain's response to three types of pictorial HWLs for which prior self-report studies indicated different levels of efficacy. Methods Current smokers rated pictorial HWLs and then observed the same HWLs during functional MRI (fMRI) scanning. Fifty 18–50-year-old current adult smokers who were free from neurological disorders were recruited from the general population and participated in the study. Demographics, smoking-related behaviours and self-reported ratings of pictorial HWL stimuli were obtained prior to scanning. Brain responses to HWLs were assessed using fMRI, focusing on a priori regions of interest. Results Pictorial HWL stimuli elicited activation in a broad network of brain areas associated with visual processing and emotion. Participants who rated the stimuli as more emotionally arousing also showed greater neural responses at these sites. Conclusions Self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs are correlated with neural responses in brain areas associated with visual and emotional processing. Study results cross-validate self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs and provide insights into how pictorial HWLs are processed. PMID:25552613

  9. Combustion Gas Properties I-ASTM Jet a Fuel and Dry Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.; Trout, A. M.; Wear, J. D.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A series of computations was made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for ASTM jet A fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0.

  10. An evaluation of efforts by nuclear power plants to use ASTM D3803-89

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    The number of nuclear power plants are now using ASTM D3803-89, {open_quotes}Standard Test Method for Nuclear-Grade Activated Carbon{close_quotes} for routine surveillance testing of adsorbents. In order to judge the impact of this change, we have gathered radioiodine removal test results from our data base on a system-by-system basis (i.e. control room, technical support center, and spent fuel pool) and compared test results obtained for the same kind of systems using the new and older test methods. Included in this comparison are systems with and without humidity control. Results are discussed from the standpoint of what to expect if a change to testing using ASTM D3803-89 is contemplated, especially regarding test results in light existing acceptance criteria. Additionally, the results are discussed from the standpoint of the sensitivity of the ASTM test method to detect when the performance of the carbon in air cleaning systems has been compromised (compared to the older methods). Finally, we offer some suggestions for how other plants might upgrade their carbon testing to incorporate testing to ASTM D3803-89.

  11. 78 FR 64248 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Section 6(b) of the Act on November 10, 2004 (69 FR 65226). The last notification was filed with the... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''),...

  12. ASTM D1076 CATEGORY 4 LATEX AND QUANTIFYING GUAYULE (NRG) AND HEVEA (NR) LATEX PROTEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guayule latex is commercially available as a low protein natural rubber latex (Yulex®) which does not contain any protein that can be detected by the ASTM D6499 antigenic protein standard developed to quantify Hevea natural rubber latex (NRL) antigenic protein. In this paper, we discuss how best to...

  13. Total chemically bound nitrogen in water by pyrolysis and chemiluminescence detection. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee on Water and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D19.06 on Methods for Analysis for Organic Substances in Water. Current edition approved Sept. 15, 1991. Published February 1992.

  14. Standard specification for nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloy plate, sheet, and strip. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 582-73. Last previous edition was B 582-92.

  15. Standard specification for castings, zirconium-base, corrosion resistant, for general application. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.05 on Castings. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 752-85. Last previous edition was B 752-91(1995).

  16. Standard specification for nuclear-grade aluminum oxide powder. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.03 on Neutron Absorber Materials Specifications. Current edition approved May 10, 1997. Published May 1998. Originally published as C 1031-84. Last previous edition C 1031-90.

  17. Standard specification for tantalum and tantalum alloy plate, sheet, and strip. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.03 on Niobium and Tantalum. Current edition approved May 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as B 708-82. Last previous edition was B 708-92.

  18. Standard specification for high-strength low-alloy structural steel. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.02 on Structural Steel for Bridges, Buildings, Rolling Stock, and Ships. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1998. Published December 1998.

  19. Standard specification for forged carbon and alloy steel flanges for low-temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.22 on Steel Forgings and Wrought Fittings for Piping Applications and Bolting Materials for Piping and Special Purpose Applications. Current edition approved Mar. 10, 1998 and published October 1998.

  20. Standard specification for nickel-molybdenum alloy plate, sheet, and strip. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1998 and published November 1998. Originally published as B 333-58T. Last previous edition was B 333-95a.

  1. Standard specification for alloy/steel bolting materials for low-temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.22 on Steel Forgings and Wrought Fittings for Piping Applications and Bolting Materials for Piping and Special Purpose Applications. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1997 and published September 1998.

  2. Standard specification for cobalt-chromium-nickel-molybdenum-tungsten alloy (UNS R31233) rod. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 815-91. Last previous edition was B 815-91.

  3. Standard specification for alloy-steel bolting materials for special applications. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.22 on Steel Forgings and Wrought Fittings for Piping Applications and Bolting Materials for Piping and Special Purpose Applications. Current edition approved Mar. 10, 1998 and published September 1998.

  4. Standard specification for thermoplastic gas pressure pipe, tubing, and fittings. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-17 on Plastic Piping Systems and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F17.60 on Gas. The current edition was approved May 10, 1998 and published October 1998. It was originally published as D 2513-66. The last previous edition was D 2513-97.

  5. Standard specification for zirconium and zirconium alloy sheet, strip, and plate for nuclear application. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.02 on Zirconium and Hafnium. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997. Published April 1998. Originally published as B 352-60T. Last previous edition B 352-92.

  6. Fracture Toughness Properties of Savannah River Site Storage Tank ASTM A285 Low Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2002-05-22

    A materials test program was developed to measure mechanical properties of ASTM A285 Grade B low carbon steel for application to structural and flaw stability analysis of storage tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). Under this plan, fracture toughness and tensile testing are being performed at conditions that are representative of storage tank

  7. Standard specification for tantalum and tantalum alloy rod and wire. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.03 on Niobium and Tantalum. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published October 1998. Originally published as B 365-61T. Last previous edition was B 365-92.

  8. Standard specification for steel strand, uncoated seven-wire for prestressed concrete. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.05 on Steel Reinforcement. Current edition approved May 10, 1998. Published December 1998. Originally published as A 416-57T. Last previous edition A 416-97.

  9. Standard specification for spray-applied rigid cellular polyurethane thermal insulation. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-11-01

    DoD adopted. This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C16.22 on Organic and Nonhomogeneous Inorganic Thermal Insulations. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1996. Published November 1996. Originally published as C 1029-85. Last previous edition was C 1029-90.

  10. Applications of ASTM Standard E 1457 - The high temperature crack growth standard

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A. )

    1993-03-01

    The ASTM Committee on Fracture Testing has developed Standard E 1457, 'Method for the Measurement of Creep Crack Growth Rates in Metals'. This Standard gives attention to the effect of elevated-temperature service life, and is pertinent to such materials as the high temperature Al alloys being contemplated for the High Speed Civil Transport and the NASP structure's intermetallics. 8 refs.

  11. Standard specification for tantalum and tantalum alloy seamless and welded tubes. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.03 on Niobium and Tantalum. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as B 521-70. Last previous edition was B 521-92.

  12. Standard specification for alloy steel forgings for nonmagnetic retaining rings for generators. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.06 on Steel Forgings and Billets. Current edition approved Nov. 10, 1997 and published August 1998. Originally published as A 289-46. Last previous edition was A 289-94.

  13. Standard specification for nickel-molybdenum alloy plate, sheet, and strip. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997. Published February 1998. Originally published as B 333-58T. Last previous edition B 333-95a.

  14. Standard descriptive nomenclature of constituents of aggregates for radiation-shielding concrete. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1992-05-01

    This nomenclature is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.41 on Concrete for Radiation Shielding. Current edition approved Mar. 15, 1992 and published May 1992. Originally published as C 638-73. Last previous edition was C 638-84(1990). It was reapproved 1997.

  15. Standard specification for anchor bolts, steel, 36, 55, and 105-ksi yield strength. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-16 on Fasteners and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F16.02 on Steel Bolts, Nuts, Rivets, and Washers. Current edition approved Dec. 10, 1997 and published July 1998. Originally published as F 1554-94. Last previous edition was F 1554-94.

  16. Standard specification for zirconium and zirconium alloy strip, sheet, and plate. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.02 on Zirconium and Hafnium. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997. Published May 1998. Originally published as B 551-71. Last previous edition B 551-92.

  17. Standard practice for conducting moist SO{sub 2} tests. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee G-1 on Corrosion of Metals and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee G01.05 on Laboratory Corrosion Tests. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published November 1998. Originally published as G 87-97. Last previous edition was G 87-97.

  18. Standard specification for general requirements for steel plates for pressure vessels. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.11 on Steel Plates for Boilers and Pressure Vessels. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1997. Published November 1998. Originally published as A 20-50T. Last previous edition A 20/A 20M-97a.

  19. Standard practice for use of scrap tires in civil engineering applications. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-34 on Biotechnology and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D34.06 on Recovery and Reuse. The current edition was approved on Jun. 10, 1998. It was published in August 1998.

  20. Standard test method for resistance of concrete to rapid freezing and thawing. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.67 on Resistance of Concrete to Its Environment. Current edition approved Jun. 10, 1997 and published June 1998. Originally published as C 666-71. Last previous edition was C 666-92.

  1. Manual sampling of coal from tops of railroad cars. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1989-08-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-5 on Coal and Coke and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D05.23 on Coal Sampling. The current edition was approved July 24, 1989 and published in August 1989.

  2. Standard specification for fibrous glass duct lining insulation (thermal and sound absorbing material). ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C16.23 on Blanket and Loose Fill Insulation. Current edition approved Jan. 10, 1998 and published June 1998. It was originally published as C 1071-86. The last previous edition was C 1071-91.

  3. PROPOSED ASTM METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ASBESTOS IN AIR BY TEM AND INFORMATION ON INTERFERING FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The draft of the ASTM Test Method for air entitled: "Airborne Asbestos Concentration in Ambient and Indoor Atmospheres as Determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy Direct Transfer (TEM)" (ASTM Z7077Z) is an adaptation of the International Standard, ISO 10312. It is currently...

  4. Reflective Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  5. The Major Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Packaging Signal Is Present on All HIV-2 RNA Species: Cotranslational RNA Encapsidation and Limitation of Gag Protein Confer Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Stephen D. C.; Allen, Jane F.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Deletion of a region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) 5′ leader RNA reduces genomic RNA encapsidation to about 5% that of wild-type virus with no defect in viral protein production but severely limits virus spread in Jurkat T cells, indicating that this region contains a major cis-acting encapsidation signal, or psi (Ψ). Being upstream of the major splice donor, it is present on all viral transcripts. We have shown that HIV-2 selects its genomic RNA for encapsidation cotranslationally, rendering wild-type HIV-2 unable to encapsidate vector RNAs in trans . Virus with Ψ deleted, however, encapsidates an HIV-2 vector, demonstrating competition for Gag protein. HIV-2 overcomes the lack of packaging signal location specificity by two novel mechanisms, cotranslational packaging and competition for limiting Gag polyprotein. PMID:11711596

  6. Tpetra Kernel Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-03-01

    A package of classes for constructing and using distributed sparse and dense matrices, vectors and graphs. Templated on the scalar and ordinal types so that any valid floating-point type, as well as any valid integer type can be used with these classes. Other non-standard types, such as 3-by-3 matrices for the scalar type and mod-based integers for ordinal types, can also be used. Tpetra is intended to provide the foundation for basic matrix and vectormore » operations for the next generation of Trilinos preconditioners and solvers, It can be considered as the follow-on to Epetra. Tpetra provides distributed memory operations via an abstract parallel machine interface, The most common implementation of this interface will be MPI.« less

  7. Quality of osmotically pre-treated and vacuum dried pineapple cubes on storage as influenced by type of solutes and packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Paul, Prodyut Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan Kumar; Singh, Dhananjay Kumar; Bhowmick, Nilesh

    2014-08-01

    The quality and stability of osmotically pre-treated and subsequently vacuum dried pineapple cubes using three different solutes and packed in three different types of packaging materials on storage was evaluated. The experiment was laid out in completely randomized block design with two factors and three replications for each treatment. Treatment combinations were considered as one factor and storage interval as another factor. Pineapple cubes stored in glass bottle showed very little percentage variation in moisture content due to its high moisture barrier properties. In all treatment combination, acidity values were invariably found to increase as the storage progressed. For all three different osmotic treatments, HDPE pouch packet always showed highest acidity followed by PVDC pouch. Again among three solutes under consideration, invert sugar recorded a rapid increase in acidity than other solutes. In pineapple cubes osmotically treated with sucrose solution, the rates of decrease of total sugar content were lower than that of invert sugar and sorbitol treated pineapple cubes. The percentage decrease of total sugar content was highest when the osmotically dehydrated pineapple cubes were packed in HDPE pouch and it was least in glass bottles. There was a gradual decrease in ascorbic acid content with the extension of storage period and this decrease was statistically significant at all storage intervals up to six-month. Lowest value of ascorbic acid content (15.210 mg per 100 g initial solid) was recorded in invert sugar treated pineapple cube packed in HDPE pouch after 6 months of storage. PMID:25114348

  8. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.

    1992-06-01

    In an effort to provide uniform packaging of hazardous material on an international level, recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods have been developed by the United Nations. These recommendations are performance oriented and contrast with a large number of packaging specifications in the US Department of Transportation's hazard materials regulations. This dual system presents problems when international shipments enter the US Department of Transportation's system. Faced with the question of continuing a dual system or aligning with the international system, the Research and Special Programs Administration of the US Department of Transportation responded with Docket HM-181. This began the transition toward the international transportation system. Following close behind is Docket HM-169A, which addressed low specific activity radioactive material packaging. This paper will discuss the differences between performance-oriented and specification packaging, the transition toward performance-oriented packaging by the US Department of Transportation, and performance-oriented testing of radioactive material packaging by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A will be discussed along with Type A (low activity) and Type B (high activity) radioactive material packaging evaluations.

  9. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.

    1992-06-01

    In an effort to provide uniform packaging of hazardous material on an international level, recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods have been developed by the United Nations. These recommendations are performance oriented and contrast with a large number of packaging specifications in the US Department of Transportation`s hazard materials regulations. This dual system presents problems when international shipments enter the US Department of Transportation`s system. Faced with the question of continuing a dual system or aligning with the international system, the Research and Special Programs Administration of the US Department of Transportation responded with Docket HM-181. This began the transition toward the international transportation system. Following close behind is Docket HM-169A, which addressed low specific activity radioactive material packaging. This paper will discuss the differences between performance-oriented and specification packaging, the transition toward performance-oriented packaging by the US Department of Transportation, and performance-oriented testing of radioactive material packaging by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A will be discussed along with Type A (low activity) and Type B (high activity) radioactive material packaging evaluations.

  10. RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

    2011-06-06

    Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.